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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

3

Fuel choice and aggregate energy demand in the commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a fuel choice and aggregate-demand model of energy use in the commercial sector of the United States. The model structure is dynamic with short-run fuel-price responses estimated to be close to those of the residential sector. Of the three fuels analyzed, electricity consumption exhibits a greater response to its own price than either natural gas or fuel oil. In addition, electricity price increases have the largest effect on end-use energy conservation in the commercial sector. An improved commercial energy-use data base is developed which removes the residential portion of electricity and natural gas use that traditional energy-consumption data sources assign to the commercial sector. In addition, household and commercial petroleum use is differentiated on a state-by-state basis.

Cohn, S.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

5

Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module is a simulation tool based upon economic and engineering relationships that models commercial sector energy demands at the nine Census Division level of detail for eleven distinct categories of commercial buildings. Commercial equipment selections are performed for the major fuels of electricity, natural gas, and distillate fuel, for the major services of space heating, space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The algorithm also models demand for the minor fuels of residual oil, liquefied petroleum gas, steam coal, motor gasoline, and kerosene, the renewable fuel sources of wood and municipal solid waste, and the minor services of office equipment. Section 2 of this report discusses the purpose of the model, detailing its objectives, primary input and output quantities, and the relationship of the Commercial Module to the other modules of the NEMS system. Section 3 of the report describes the rationale behind the model design, providing insights into further assumptions utilized in the model development process to this point. Section 3 also reviews alternative commercial sector modeling methodologies drawn from existing literature, providing a comparison to the chosen approach. Section 4 details the model structure, using graphics and text to illustrate model flows and key computations.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

7

Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1)). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

9

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

10

Propane Sector Demand Shares  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... agricultural demand does not impact regional propane markets except when unusually high and late demand for propane for crop drying combines with early cold ...

11

Propane Demand by Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

We will be watching the agricultural sector, since the Agriculture Economic Research Service has predicted a record corn crop this year. ...

12

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

13

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

14

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

15

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

16

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

17

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

18

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

commercial.gif (5196 bytes) commercial.gif (5196 bytes) The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings, however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

19

U.S. Propane Demand Sectors (1996)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The residential and commercial sector and the chemical sector are the largest end users of propane in the U.S., accounting for 34% and 41% ...

20

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

22

Residential Sector Demand Module 2000, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Residential Sector Demand Module 2004, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Residential Sector Demand Module 2001, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Residential Sector Demand Module 2002, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Residential Sector Demand Module 2005, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Residential Sector Demand Module 2003, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Residential Sector Demand Module 2008, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

29

Residential Sector Demand Module 2006, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Residential Sector Demand Module 2009, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Residential Sector Demand Module 1999, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the fifth edition of the Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector DemandModule of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It reflects changes made to themodule over the past year for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999.

John H. Cymbalsky

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Residential Sector Demand Module 2007, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Development of a commercial-sector data base and forecasting model for electricity usage and demand. Volume I. Preliminary model specification. [Description of subprograms BEHAV, DEMAND, ECON, ENER, and INGEN  

SciTech Connect

This is the first of twelve major technical reports under the Commission's contract with Hittman Associates. The contract will lead to the development of a data base on commercial space, and the development of a model to forecast electricity usage and demand. This report presents a preliminary specification of the model to be developed. The model being developed combines econometric and engineering approaches, and consists of five subprograms and an overall executing program. The first subprogram forecasts the stock of commercial space, based on employment data and other economic inputs. It also distinguishes among various types of commercial space, and breaks the commercial space into segments according to fuels for various end uses, such as heating, cooling, etc. The second subprogram uses detailed building-survey data to specify a typical, or characteristic building for each unique type of floorspace considered in the study. The third subprogram calculates monthly electricity usage for the typical buildings specified, using standard engineering techniques, and then scales up the electricity use for each building type according to the amount of space, of that type, in the entire building stock. The fourth subprogram performs a similar function, but produces hourly electricity demands, rather than monthly electricity usage. The fifth, and final subprogram adjusts the energy usage and demand values calculated to simulate the impact of certain economic conditions or policy measures. The report presents a flow chart for each subprogram, and a table of inputs and outputs required for each. The logic, structure, flow, and information transfer of each is described.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Residential sector: the demand for energy services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to project the demand for residential services, and, thereby, the demand for energy into the future. The service demands which best represent a complete breakdown of residential energy consumption is identified and estimates of the amount of energy, by fuel type, used to satisfy each service demand for an initial base year (1978) are detailed. These estimates are reported for both gross (or input) energy use and net or useful energy use, in the residential sector. The various factors which affect the consumption level for each type of energy and each identified service demand are discussed. These factors include number of households, appliance penetration, choice of fuel type, technical conversion efficiency of energy using devices, and relative energy efficiency of the building shell (extent of insulation, resistance to air infiltration, etc.). These factors are discussed relative to both the present and expected future values, for the purpose of projections. The importance of the housing stock to service demand estimation and projection and trends in housing in Illinois are discussed. How the housing stock is projected based on population and household projections is explained. The housing projections to the year 2000 are detailed. The projections of energy consumption by service demand and fuel type are contrasted with the various energy demand projections in Illinois Energy Consumption Trends: 1960 to 2000 and explains how and why the two approaches differ. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Forecasting the demand for commercial telecommunications satellites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the key elements of a forecast methodology for predicting demand for commercial satellite services and the resulting demand for satellite hardware and launches. The paper discusses the characterization of satellite services into more than a dozen applications (including emerging satellite Internet applications) used by Futron Corporation in its forecasts. The paper discusses the relationship between demand for satellite services and demand for satellite hardware

Carissa Bryce Christensen; Carie A. Mullins; Linda A. Williams

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Residential Sector Demand Module 1998, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the fourth edition of the Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector DemandModule of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It reflects changes made to themodule over the past year for the Annual Energy Outlook 1998. Since last year, severalnew end-use services were added to the module, including: Clothes washers,dishwashers, furnace fans, color televisions, and personal computers. Also, as with allNEMS modules, the forecast horizon has been extended to the year 2020.

John H. Cymbalsky

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Residential Sector Demand Module 1997, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the third edition of the Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector DemandModule of the National Energy Modeling System. It reflects changes made to the moduleover the past year for the Annual Energy Outlook 1997. Since last year, a subroutinewas added to the model which allows technology and fuel switching when space heaters,heat pump air conditioners, water heaters, stoves, and clothes dryers are retired in bothpre-1994 and post-1993 single-family homes. Also, a time-dependant function forcomputing the installed capital cost of equipment in new construction and the retail costof replacement equipment in existing housing was added.

John H. Cymbalsky

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

CO2 Monitoring for Demand Controlled Ventilation in Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Monitoring for Demand Controlled Ventilation in Commercial Buildings Title CO2 Monitoring for Demand Controlled Ventilation in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year...

39

Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Marketers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

40

Michigan Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution Companies (Percent)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Propane Demand by Sector - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In order to understand markets you also have to look at supply and demand. First, demand or who uses propane. For the most part, the major components of propane ...

42

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilitiesof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricity1: Average and Maximum Peak Electric Demand Savings during

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These tables provide estimates of commercial sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1992, 1995, 1999 and 2003 based on the Commercial ...

45

Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

46

Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

47

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Commercial Building Median Lifetimes (Years) Building Type Median (1) 66% Survival (2) 33% Survival (2) Assembly 55 40 75 Education 62 45 86 Food Sales 55 41 74 Food Service 50 35 71 Health Care 55 42 73 Large Office 65 46 92 Mercantile & Service 50 36 69 Small Office 58 41 82 Warehouse 58 41 82 Lodging 53 38 74 Other 60 44 81 Note(s): Source(s): 1) PNNL estimates the median lifetime of commercial buildings is 70-75 years. 2) Number of years after which the building survives. For example, a third of the large office buildings constructed today will survive 92 years later. EIA, Assumptions for the Annual Energy Outlook 2011, July 2011, Table 5.2, p. 40; EIA, Model Documentation Report: Commercial Sector 'Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System, May 2010, p. 30-35; and PNNL, Memorandum: New Construction in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003, Apr. 24,

48

Strategies for reducing energy demand in the materials sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research answers a key question - can the materials sector reduce its energy demand by 50% by 2050? Five primary materials of steel, cement, aluminum, paper, and plastic, contribute to 50% or more of the final energy ...

Sahni, Sahil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Major models and data sources for residential and commercial sector energy conservation analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Major models and data sources are reviewed that can be used for energy-conservation analysis in the residential and commercial sectors to provide an introduction to the information that can or is available to DOE in order to further its efforts in analyzing and quantifying their policy and program requirements. Models and data sources examined in the residential sector are: ORNL Residential Energy Model; BECOM; NEPOOL; MATH/CHRDS; NIECS; Energy Consumption Data Base: Household Sector; Patterns of Energy Use by Electrical Appliances Data Base; Annual Housing Survey; 1970 Census of Housing; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; RECS; Solar Market Development Model; and ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book. Models and data sources examined in the commercial sector are: ORNL Commercial Sector Model of Energy Demand; BECOM; NEPOOL; Energy Consumption Data Base: Commercial Sector; F.W. Dodge Data Base; NFIB Energy Report for Small Businesses; ADL Commercial Sector Energy Use Data Base; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; Nonresidential Buildings Surveys of Energy Consumption; General Electric Co: Commercial Sector Data Base; The BOMA Commercial Sector Data Base; The Tishman-Syska and Hennessy Data Base; The NEMA Commercial Sector Data Base; ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book; and Solar Market Development Model. Purpose; basis for model structure; policy variables and parameters; level of regional, sectoral, and fuels detail; outputs; input requirements; sources of data; computer accessibility and requirements; and a bibliography are provided for each model and data source.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

BUILDINGS SECTOR DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY SUMMARIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Small Commercial, Residential Author: Haider Taha VII. Solar Domestic Water Heaters........................................................................... 59 End-Use: Water Heating Sector: Residential Author: Jim Lutz VIII. Heat Pump Water Heaters ................................................................................. 63 End-Use: Water Heating Sector: Residential Author: Jim Lutz IX. Energy-Efficient Motors

51

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Title Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-3636e Year of Publication 2010 Authors Yin, Rongxin, Sila Kiliccote, Mary Ann Piette, and Kristen Parrish Conference Name 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, demand shifting (pre-cooling), DRQAT Abstract This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30% using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

52

Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings - Commercial Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Technical report User Interface: Website Website: web.anl.gov/renewables/research/building_agent_based_model.html OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Language: English References: Building Efficiency: Development of an Agent-based Model of the US Commercial Buildings Sector[1] Model the market-participants, dynamics, and constraints-help decide whether to adopt energy-efficient technologies to meet commercial building

53

Commercial Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System: Model Documentation 2012 November 2012 . Independent Statistics & Analysis . www.eia.gov

54

Commercial Sector Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Business Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimated market potential for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in the commercial sector could be about 4 billion MWh from 2001 through 2015. This market, however, is highly sensitive to impacts deregulation will have on commercial retail rates.

1996-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

55

EA-0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial 13: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration EA-0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to use several diverse approaches to purchase or acquire energy savings from commercial sector buildings region wide. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 1991 EA-0513: Final Environmental Assessment Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration September 25, 1991 EA-0513: Finding of No Significant Impact Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings,

56

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling...

57

EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities: 1992- 2003 Released Date: December 2004 Page Last Revised: August 2009 These tables provide estimates of commercial sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1992, 1995, 1999 and 2003 based on the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). They also provide estimates of energy consumption and intensities adjusted for the effect of weather on heating, cooling, and ventilation energy use. Total Site Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) Html Excel PDF bullet By Principal Building Activity (Table 1a) html Table 1a excel table 1a. pdf table 1a. Weather-Adjusted by Principal Building Activity (Table 1b) html table 1b excel table 1b pdf table 1b.

58

Sampling Methodologies for the Commercial Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing a survey sample that accurately mirrors the target population is a key step toward a much-needed understanding of the factors affecting commercial electricity use. This thorough exploration of new and familiar methodologies is based on experience with five recent, large-scale utility surveys of commercial customers.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling energy in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads during the peak periods. Savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Case studies in a number of office buildings in California has found that a simple demand limiting strategy reduced the chiller power by 20-100% (0.5-2.3W/ft2) during six

60

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Within Hawaiian Electric Company Service Territory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By reducing power usage during peak demand periods, demand response (DR) programs can help utilities manage power loads and complement energy efficiency activities while providing ratepayers an opportunity to substantially reduce their electric bills. This project assessed the costs and benefits of potential DR programs for Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) commercial and industrial (CI) customers.

2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: eco3.org/wp-content/plugins/downloads-manager/upload/Report%20on%20Dem Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-conservation-and-commercializa Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: Resource Integration Planning

62

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for CommercialScenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for CommercialThe whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive Conditioning and Increased User Satisfaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraints on Occupant Lighting choices and Satisfaction: A007 "Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsivedirectly. Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive

Agogino, Alice M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity MarketsEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response?7 3.1.Demand Response in Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contribution to Peak Demand?..5 3.potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildingsbuildings contribution to peak demand and the use of energy

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a large portion of summer peak demand. Research resultspotential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildingsbuildings contribution to peak demand and the use of energy

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Methodology for Modeling Building Energy Performance across the Commercial Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report uses EnergyPlus simulations of each building in the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to document and demonstrate bottom-up methods of modeling the entire U.S. commercial buildings sector (EIA 2006). The ability to use a whole-building simulation tool to model the entire sector is of interest because the energy models enable us to answer subsequent 'what-if' questions that involve technologies and practices related to energy. This report documents how the whole-building models were generated from the building characteristics in 2003 CBECS and compares the simulation results to the survey data for energy use.

Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Judkoff, R.; Crawley, D.; Ryan, J.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Residential Electricity Demand in India's Future - HowThe Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector instraightforward. Electricity demand per end use and region

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Braun (Purdue). 2004. Peak demand reduction from pre-coolingthe average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricityuse charges, demand ratchets, peak demand charges, and other

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

sector Renewable Energy Non renewable Energy Biomass Buildings Commercial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

user interface valueType text user interface valueType text sector valueType text abstract valueType text website valueType text openei tool keyword valueType text openei tool uri valueType text items label Calculator user interface Spreadsheet Website sector Renewable Energy Non renewable Energy Biomass Buildings Commercial Buildings Residential Economic Development Gateway Geothermal Greenhouse Gas Multi model Integration Multi sector Impact Evaluation Gateway Solar Wind energy website https www gov uk pathways analysis openei tool keyword calculator greenhouse gas emissions GHG low carbon energy planning energy data emissions data openei tool uri http calculator tool decc gov uk pathways primary energy chart uri http en openei org w index php title Calculator type Tools label AGI

71

Propane demand modeling for residential sectors- A regression analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a forecasting model for the propane consumption within the residential sector. In this research we explore the dynamic behavior of different variables (more)

Shenoy, Nitin K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Bonneville Power Administration`s Commercial Sector Conservation Market.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville has, as part of its resource plan, accepted targets for commercial conservation which are quite ambitious. To meet these targets, Bonneville will need to acquire as much cost-effective conservation as possible over the next twelve years. With this in mind, this document explores the relative importance of different commercial market segments and the types of assistance each market needs to install as many cost-effective conservation measures in as many buildings as possible. This document reviews Bonneville`s marketing environment and position, and suggests goals for commercial sector conservation marketing at Bonneville. Then it presents a broad market segmentation and series of additional demographic analyses. These analyses assess what groups of consumers Bonneville must reach to achieve most of the commercial conservation potential and what is needed to reach them. A final section reviews the success of Bonneville programs at reaching various markets. The market segmentation identifies different types of consumers and opportunities which would require distinct program approaches. Four large market segments are identified that have distinct program needs. Then four ``building life-cycle events`` are identified which provide important conservation opportunities and also require distinct program services. This creates a matrix of 16 cells which delineate distinct needs for program marketing. Each of the four key market segments manages at least 20% of the Region`s commercial floorspace.

Gordan, Frederick M. [Pacific Energy Associates, Inc. (United States)

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Factor demand linkages and the business cycle: Interpreting aggregate fluctuations as sectoral fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stylized fact that need to be addressed by any theory of the business cycle. Whether the comovement between sectors and the aggregate business cycle originates from aggregate shocks or sectoral shocks ampli?ed by sectoral interactions, or a combination... Factor demand linkages and the business cycle: interpreting aggregate ?uctuations as sectoral ?uctuations. Sean Holly Ivan Petrella Faculty of Economics and Centre for International Macroeconomics and Finance (CIMF), University of Cambridge...

Petrella, I; Holly, Sean

74

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 9 . Piette et at Automated Demand Response Strategies andDynamic Controls for Demand Response in New and ExistingFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities"

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center,...

76

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures March 2012 3.3.3 Commercial Buildings Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Total 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 148.6 37.0 17.0 202.6 148.9 37.2 17.1 203.2 145.9 36.2 16.7 198.9 147.5 36.8 16.9 201.2 143.8 35.1 16.4 195.2 145.0 35.5 16.6 197.0 141.1 34.0 16.0 191.1 142.5 34.6 16.2 193.3 136.9 32.1 15.7 184.8 139.1 33.0 15.9 188.0 133.5 31.0 15.4 179.9 135.0 31.6 15.6 182.2 131.0 29.7 15.1 175.8 131.9 30.3 15.3 177.5 128.1 28.7 14.5 171.3 130.0 29.3 15.0 174.4 129.4 29.7 15.4 174.5 127.7 29.2 13.8 170.7 134.8 29.9 14.5 179.2 134.5 28.5 16.9 180.0 141.1

77

Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Lighting in the Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Delicious

78

Water flows, energy demand, and market analysis of the informal water sector in Kisumu, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis Water flows, energy demand, and market analysis of the informal water sector in Kisumu Available online xxxx Keywords: Informal water sector Water flows Developing countries Water market analysis to cope with popu- lation growth. Informal water businesses fulfill unmet water supply needs, yet little

Elimelech, Menachem

79

Toward a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy: residential/commercial buildings market sector workbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workbook contains preliminary data and assumptions used during the preparation of inputs to a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy (NPAC). The workbook indicates the market potential, competitive position, market penetration, and technological characteristics of solar technologies for this market sector over the next twenty years. The workbook also presents projections of the mix of solar technologies by US Census Regions. In some cases, data have been aggregated to the national level. Emphasis of the workbook is on a mid-price fuel scenario, Option II, that meets about a 20% solar goal by the year 2000. The energy demand for the mid-price scenario is projected at 115 quads in the year 2000. The workbook, prepared in April 1979, represents government policies and programs anticipated at that time.

Taul, Jr., J. W.; de Jong, D. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments topower plants: Applications to commercial sector conservationprograms  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a simplified methodology to compare supply and demand-side resources. The screening curve approach supplements with load shape information the data contained in a supply curve of conserved energy. In addition, a screening curve contains information on competing supply technologies, such as annualized capital costs, variable costs, and cost per delivered kWh. The information in the screening curve allows policymakers to promptly and conveniently compare the relevant parameters affecting supply and demand-side investment decisions. While many sophisticated computer models have evolved to account for the load shape impacts of energy efficiency investments, this sophistication has, by and large, not trickled down to spreadsheet-level or 'back-of-the-envelope' analyses. Our methodology allows a simple summary of load shape characteristics based on the output of the more complicated models. It offers many advantages, principal of which is clarity in analyzing supply and demand-side investment choices. This paper first describes how supply-side screening curves have been used in the past, and develops the conceptual tools needed to apply integrated supply/demand screening curves in the least-cost utility planning process. It then presents examples of supply-side technologies and commercial sector demand-side management programs, and plots them on representative screening curves.

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Market potential for solar thermal energy supply systems in the United States industrial and commercial sectors: 1990--2030. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report revises and extends previous work sponsored by the US DOE on the potential industrial market in the United States for solar thermal energy systems and presents a new analysis of the commercial sector market potential. Current and future industrial process heat demand and commercial water heating, space heating and space cooling end-use demands are estimated. The PC Industrial Model (PCIM) and the commercial modules of the Building Energy End-Use Model (BEEM) used by the DOE`s Energy Information Administration (EIA) to support the recent National Energy Strategy (NES) analysis are used to forecast industrial and commercial end-use energy demand respectively. Energy demand is disaggregated by US Census region to account for geographic variation in solar insolation and regional variation in cost of alternative natural gas-fired energy sources. The industrial sector analysis also disaggregates demand by heat medium and temperature range to facilitate process end-use matching with appropriate solar thermal energy supply technologies. The commercial sector analysis disaggregates energy demand by three end uses: water heating, space heating, and space cooling. Generic conceptual designs are created for both industrial and commercial applications. Levelized energy costs (LEC) are calculated for industrial sector applications employing low temperature flat plate collectors for process water preheat; parabolic troughs for intermediate temperature process steam and direct heat industrial application; and parabolic dish technologies for high temperature, direct heat industrial applications. LEC are calculated for commercial sector applications employing parabolic trough technologies for low temperature water and space heating. Cost comparisons are made with natural gas-fired sources for both the industrial market and the commercial market assuming fuel price escalation consistent with NES reference case scenarios for industrial and commercial sector gas markets.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Testing of peak demand limiting using thermal mass at a small commercial building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IBPSA-USA Conference at MIT, Boston, MA. Demand ResponseDemand- Limiting Setpoint Trajectories in Commercial Buildings Using Short-Term Data Analysis, Proceedings of the 2006 IBPSA-USA

Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Braun, James E; Fredrickson, Steve; Konis, Kyle; Arens, Edward

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone Title Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3898e Year of Publication 2009 Authors Xu, Peng, Rongxin Yin, Carrie Brown, and DongEun Kim Date Published June 2009 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords demand response, demand shifting (pre-cooling), DRQAT, hot climates, market sectors, office buildings, pre-cooling, technologies, testbed tools and guides, thermal mass Abstract The potential for using building thermal mass for load shifting and peak energy demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Previous Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory research has demonstrated that the approach is very effective in cool and moderately warm climate conditions (California Climate Zones 2-4). However, this method had not been tested in hotter climate zones.This project studied the potential of pre-cooling the building early in the morning and increasing temperature setpoints during peak hours to reduce cooling-related demand in two typical office buildings in hotter California climates - one in Visalia (CEC Climate Zone 13) and the other in San Bernardino (CEC Climate Zone 10). The conclusion of the work to date is that pre-cooling in hotter climates has similar potential to that seen previously in cool and moderate climates. All other factors being equal, results to date indicate that pre-cooling increases the depth (kW) and duration (kWh) of the possible demand shed of a given building. The effectiveness of night pre-cooling in typical office building under hot weather conditions is very limited. However, night pre-cooling is helpful for office buildings with an undersized HVAC system. Further work is required to duplicate the tests in other typical buildings and in other hot climate zones and prove that pre-cooling is truly effective.

84

Commercial Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey ... space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The market segment ...

85

DSM (demand-side management) commercial customer acceptance: Volume 2, Survey and database documentation: Final report. [Demand-side management  

SciTech Connect

A survey was conducted among utility DSM (demand-side management) program managers to gather information on the characteristics of commercial sector programs. The survey data were used in part to identify the important factors that influence customer participation in such programs. Information was gathered in the following general areas of interest: (1) program characteristics (e.g., program type, objectives, status, etc.); (2) marketing characteristics (e.g., promotional mechanisms, budget, goals, etc.); (3) customer eligibility and participation (e.g., characteristics of the eligible population, participation by customer category, etc.); and (4) market research information (e.g., the data that pertain to the effectiveness of the progress). The survey obtained information on 108 DSM programs covering a broad range of options, including audits, non-audit information, financial incentive, direct load control, distributed local control, thermal energy storage, time-of-use rates, and other rate programs. Program planners can use the survey database, presented in its entirety in this report, to identify utilities that have already implemented DSM programs of interest and to learn from their experience.

George, S.S.; Kirksey, W.E.; Skelton, J.C.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning CommercialBuilding Controls  

SciTech Connect

California electric utilities have been exploring the use of dynamic critical peak pricing (CPP) and other demand response programs to help reduce peaks in customer electric loads. CPP is a new electricity tariff design to promote demand response. This paper begins with a brief review of terminology regarding energy management and demand response, followed by a discussion of DR control strategies and a preliminary overview of a forthcoming guide on DR strategies. The final section discusses experience to date with these strategies, followed by a discussion of the peak electric demand savings from the 2005 Automated CPP program. An important concept identified in the automated DR field tests is that automated DR will be most successful if the building commissioning industry improves the operational effectiveness of building controls. Critical peak pricing and even real time pricing are important trends in electricity pricing that will require new functional tests for building commissioning.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the national energy modeling system  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This reference document provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. The NEMS Residential Sector Demand Module is currently used for mid-term forecasting purposes and energy policy analysis over the forecast horizon of 1993 through 2020. The model generates forecasts of energy demand for the residential sector by service, fuel, and Census Division. Policy impacts resulting from new technologies, market incentives, and regulatory changes can be estimated using the module. 26 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

THE OCEAN TECHNOLOGY SECTOR IN ATLANTIC CANADA Volume 2: Potential Public Sector Demand Submitted to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volume 1: Profile and Impact, the companion to this volume, details the economic importance of the industry in the region and its principal markets. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The authors wish to thank the numerous government and private sector personnel who contributed their time, knowledge and support for the preparation of this 2-volume study. We would particularly like to thank the interviewees. The authors have also benefited from the generous advice and guidance received from the project Steering Committee,

Aczisc Secretariat

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Assessment of Commercial Building Automation and Energy Management Systems for Demand Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update is an overview of commercial building automation and energy management systems with a focus on their capabilities (current and future), especially in support of demand response (DR). The report includes background on commercial building automation and energy management systems; a discussion of demand response applications in commercial buildings, including building loads and control strategies; and a review of suppliers building automation and energy management systems to support d...

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

90

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

91

Energy Efficiency Report-Chapter 4: Commercial Buildings Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) The CBECS ... water heating, refrigeration, powering office equipment, and other uses.

92

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies andStrategies in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak electric demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial buildings contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. The main objectives of the study were: (1) To evaluate the size of contributions of peak demand commercial buildings in the U.S.; (2) To understand how commercial building control systems support energy efficiency and DR; and (3) To disseminate the results to the building owners, facility managers and building controls industry. In order to estimate the commercial buildings contribution to peak demand, two sources of data are used: (1) Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). These two sources indicate that commercial buildings noncoincidental peak demand is about 330GW. The project then focused on technologies and strategies that deliver energy efficiency and also target 5-10% of this peak. Based on a building operations perspective, a demand-side management framework with three main features: (1) daily energy efficiency, (2) daily peak load management and (3) dynamic, event-driven DR are outlined. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide DR potential in commercial buildings are presented. Case studies involving these technologies and strategies are described. The findings of this project are shared with building owners, building controls industry, researchers and government entities through a webcast and their input is requested. Their input is presented in the appendix section of this report.

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Sector Residential Peak Demand (MW) Commercial IndustrialTable 16. Non-coincident peak demand by sector. growth Avg.IEPR Projected non-coincident peak demand (MW) 3.1.2. Hourly

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response andEnergy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial building's contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. This paper discusses recent research results and new opportunities for advanced building control systems to provide demand response (DR) to improve electricity markets and reduce electric grid problems. The main focus of this paper is the role of new and existing control systems for HVAC and lighting in commercial buildings. A demand-side management framework from building operations perspective with three main features: daily energy efficiency, daily peak load management and event driven, dynamic demand response is presented. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide potential in commercial buildings is outlined. Case studies involving energy management and control systems and DR savings opportunities are presented. The paper also describes results from three years of research in California to automate DR in buildings. Case study results and research on advanced buildings systems in New York are also presented.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

95

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response andEnergy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial building's contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. This paper discusses recent research results and new opportunities for advanced building control systems to provide demand response (DR) to improve electricity markets and reduce electric grid problems. The main focus of this paper is the role of new and existing control systems for HVAC and lighting in commercial buildings. A demand-side management framework from building operations perspective with three main features: daily energy efficiency, daily peak load management and event driven, dynamic demand response is presented. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide potential in commercial buildings is outlined. Case studies involving energy management and control systems and DR savings opportunities are presented. The paper also describes results from three years of research in California to automate DR in buildings. Case study results and research on advanced buildings systems in New York are also presented.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

Energy Demand: Limits on the Response to Higher Energy Prices in the End-Use Sectors (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy consumption in the end-use demand sectorsresidential, commercial, industrial, and transportationgenerally shows only limited change when energy prices increase. Several factors that limit the sensitivity of end-use energy demand to price signals are common across the end-use sectors. For example, because energy generally is consumed in long-lived capital equipment, short-run consumer responses to changes in energy prices are limited to reductions in the use of energy services or, in a few cases, fuel switching; and because energy services affect such critical lifestyle areas as personal comfort, medical services, and travel, end-use consumers often are willing to absorb price increases rather than cut back on energy use, especially when they are uncertain whether price increases will be long-lasting. Manufacturers, on the other hand, often are able to pass along higher energy costs, especially in cases where energy inputs are a relatively minor component of production costs. In economic terms, short-run energy demand typically is inelastic, and long-run energy demand is less inelastic or moderately elastic at best.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

97

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

to Nine 16% Unoccupied 3% Ten or More 8% Government Owned 24% Total 100% Federal 3% State 5% Local 15% Total 100% Source(s): EIA, Commercial Building Characteristics 2003, June...

98

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6% 25% South 5% 18% 14% 37% West 3% 9% 5% 18% 100% Source(s): EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, Oct. 2006, Table A2, p. 3-4...

99

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

that are larger than 100,000 square feet. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, Oct. 2006, Table A1, p. 1-2. 2,586 948 810...

100

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

to 2003 9% Total 100% Source(s): Percent of Total Floorspace EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, Oct. 2006, Table A1, p. 1-...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Office 17% 17% 19% Mercantile 16% 14% 18% Retail 6% 9% 5% Enclosed & Strip Malls 10% 4% 13% Education 14% 8% 11% Warehouse and Storage 14% 12% 7% Lodging 7% 3% 7% Service 6% 13% 4% Public Assembly 5% 6% 5% Religious Worship 5% 8% 2% Health Care 4% 3% 8% Inpatient 3% 0% 6% Outpatient 2% 2% 2% Food Sales 2% 5% 5% Food Service 2% 6% 6% Public Order and Safety 2% 1% 2% Other 2% 2% 4% Vacant 4% 4% 1% Total 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Total Floorspace Total Buildings Primary Energy Consumption 1) For primary energy intensities by building type, see Table 3.1.13. Total CBECS 2003 commercial building floorspace is 71.7 billion SF. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table C1A

102

BetterBuildings Financing Energy Efficiency Retrofits in the Commercial Sector - Part 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Commercial Energy Efficiency Finance Programs Small Commercial Energy Efficiency Finance Programs Sponsored by State Governments SURVEY OF SURVEY OF SMALL COMMERCIAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY FINANCE PROGRAMS SPONSORED BY PROGRAMS SPONSORED BY STATE GOVERNMENTS May 3, 2011 Background of Small Commercial Finance Program Survey  Includes 20 States ( (mostly y identified from database of state incentives for renewable energy, DSIRE)  Sponsoring programs for:  small commercial (generally defined as 30,000 square feet or less and/or 150 kW or less) or   both small and large commercial sectors both small and large commercial sectors  Discussions with program managers   Creation of a table of program elements Creation of a table of program elements

103

Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

For the industrial sector, EIAs analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8 percent of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9 percent of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In AEO2006, energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50 percent of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

104

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Total Commercial Floorspace and Number of Buildings, by Year 1980 50.9 (1) N.A. 3.1 (3) 1990 64.3 N.A. 4.5 (3) 2000 (4) 68.5 N.A. 4.7 (5) 2008 78.8 15% N.A. 2010 81.1 26% N.A. 2015 84.1 34% N.A. 2020 89.2 43% N.A. 2025 93.9 52% N.A. 2030 98.2 60% N.A. 2035 103.0 68% N.A. Note(s): Source(s): EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 1994, Jan. 1994, Table A5, p. 62 for 1990 floorspace; EIA, AEO 2003, Jan. 2003, Table A5, p. 127-128 for 2000 floorspace; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A5, p. 11-12 for 2008-2035 floorspace; EIA Commercial Building Characteristics 1989, June 1991, Table A4, p. 17 for 1990 number of buildings; EIA, Commercial Building Characteristics 1999, Aug. 2002, Table 3 for 1999 number of buildings and floorspace; and EIA, Buildings and Energy in the 1980s, June 1995, Table 2.1, p. 23 for number of buildings in 1980.

105

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand.Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

106

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous California Energy previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

107

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand Robert P. Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare the industrial forecast

108

Development of an improved commercial sector energy model for national policy analysis  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory provided support to the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (CE), under the Office of Planning and Assessment, to develop improved energy and environmental analysis tools. Commercial building sector energy models from the past decade were analyzed in order to provoke comment and stimulate discussion between potential model users and developers as to the appropriate structure and capability of a commercial sector energy model supported by CE. Three specific areas were examined during this review. These areas provide (1) a look at recent suggestions and guidance as to what constitutes a minimal set of requirements and capabilities for a commercial buildings energy model for CE, (2) a review of several existing models in terms of their general structure and how they match up with the requirements listed previously, and (3) an overview of a proposed improved commercial sector energy model.

Belzer, D.B.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 2003 Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace and per Building, by Building Type ($2010) ($2010) Food Service 4.88 27.2 Mercantile 2.23 38.1 Food Sales 4.68 26.0 Education 1.43 36.6 Health Care 2.76 68.0 Service 1.39 9.1 Public Order and Safety 2.07 32.0 Warehouse and Storage 0.80 13.5 Office 2.01 29.8 Religious Worship 0.76 7.8 Public Assembly 1.73 24.6 Vacant 0.34 4.8 Lodging 1.72 61.5 Other 2.99 65.5 Note(s): Source(s): Mall buildings are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table 4; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. Per Square Foot Per Building

110

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 2003 Average Commercial Building Floorspace, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Building Type 1959 or Prior 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Education 27.5 26.9 21.7 25.6 Food Sales N.A. N.A. N.A. 5.6 Food Service 6.4 4.4 5.0 5.6 Health Care 18.5 37.1 N.A. 24.5 Inpatient N.A. 243.6 N.A. 238.1 Outpatient N.A. 11.3 11.6 10.4 Lodging 9.9 36.1 36.0 35.9 Retail (Other Than Mall) 6.2 9.3 17.5 9.7 Office 12.4 16.4 14.2 14.8 Public Assembly 13.0 13.8 17.3 14.2 Public Order and Safety N.A. N.A. N.A. 15.4 Religious Worship 8.7 9.6 15.6 10.1 Service 6.1 6.5 6.8 6.5 Warehouse and Storage 19.7 17.2 15.4 16.9 Other N.A. N.A. N.A. 22.0 Vacant N.A. N.A. N.A. 14.1 Source(s): Average Floorspace/Building (thousand SF) EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, June 2006, Table B8, p. 63-69, and Table B9, p. 70-76

111

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Energy Service Company (ESCO) Industry Activity ($Million Nominal) (1) Low High 1990 143 342 Market Segment Share 1991 218 425 MUSH (2) 69% 1992 331 544 Federal 15% 1993 505 703 Commercial & Industrial 7% 1994 722 890 Residential 6% 1995 1,105 1,159 Public Housing 3% 1996 1,294 1,396 1997 1,394 1,506 1998 1,551 1,667 2008 Revenues by Project/Technology Type 1999 1,764 1,925 2000 1,876 2,186 Market Segment Share 2001 - - Energy Efficiency 75% 2002 - - Onsite Renewables 14% 2003 - - Engine/Turbine Generators 6% 2004 2,447 2,507 Consulting/Master Planning 3% 2005 2,949 3,004 Other 2% 2006 3,579 3,627 2007 - - 2008 4,087 4,171 Note(s): Source(s): Estimated Revenue ($Million Nominal) (1) 2008 Revenue Sources 1) Estimates based on surveys of major ESCOs and input from industry experts. 2) Includes municipal and state governments, universities

112

Gas Market Transition: Buildup of Power Sector Demand: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Just how fast is natural gas demand for power generation growing in response to the many new gas-fired units being built? This simple question has a far from simple answer, due to confusing streams of data, the interplay between new efficient gas combined cycle units and existing capacity, and the surprisingly low overall levels of capacity utilization observed among the new units. This report dissects each component of gas use in the power sector and provides a novel, integrated view of near term trends...

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

113

A new approach to estimate commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the application of an end-use load shape estimation technique to develop annual energy use intensities (EUIs) and hourly end-use load shapes (LSs) for commercial buildings in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) service territory. Results will update inputs for the commercial sector energy and peak demand forecasting models used by PG&E and the California Energy Commission (CEC). EUIs were estimated for 11 building types, up to 10 end uses, 3 fuel types, 2 building vintages, and up to 5 climate regions. The integrated methodology consists of two major parts. The first part is the reconciliation of initial end-use load-shape estimates with measured whole-building load data to produce intermediate EUIs and load shapes, using LBL`s End-use Disaggregation Algorithm, EDA. EDA is a deterministic hourly algorithm that relies on the observed characteristics of the measured hourly whole-building electricity use and disaggregates it into major end-use components. The end-use EUIs developed through the EDA procedure represent a snap-shot of electricity use by building type and end-use for two regions of the PG&E service territory, for the year that disaggregation is performed. In the second part of the methodology, we adjust the EUIs for direct application to forecasting models based on factors such as climatic impacts on space-conditioning EUIs, fuel saturation effects, building and equipment vintage, and price impacts. Core data for the project are detailed on-site surveys for about 800 buildings, mail surveys ({approximately}6000), load research data for over 1000 accounts, and hourly weather data for five climate regions.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2015 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 28.4 28.4 16.3% Space Heating 14.6 2.9 1.3 0.1 4.3 0.1 4.7 23.7 13.6% Ventilation 15.1 15.1 8.6% Space Cooling 0.3 14.2 14.5 8.3% Refrigeration 9.9 9.9 5.7% Electronics 8.8 8.8 5.1% Water Heating 4.1 0.7 0.7 2.5 7.3 4.2% Computers 5.3 5.3 3.0% Cooking 1.7 0.6 2.3 1.3% Other (4) 2.9 0.3 3.7 1.4 5.4 22.8 31.1 17.8% Adjust to SEDS (5) 5.8 4.5 4.5 17.7 28.1 16.1% Total 29.3 8.4 1.3 3.7 1.5 14.9 0.1 130.0 174.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.4 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

115

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 Average Annual Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace, by Year ($2010) Year $/SF 1980 (1) 2.12 1981 2.22 (2) 1982 2.24 1983 2.21 1984 2.25 1985 2.20 1986 2.06 1987 2.00 1988 1.99 1989 2.01 1990 1.98 1991 1.92 1992 1.86 1993 1.96 1994 2.05 1995 2.12 1996 2.10 1997 2.08 1998 1.97 1999 1.88 2000 2.06 2001 2.20 2002 2.04 2003 2.13 2004 2.16 2005 2.30 2006 2.36 2007 2.35 2008 1.71 2009 2.43 2010 2.44 2011 2.44 2012 2.35 2013 2.28 2014 2.27 2015 2.29 2016 2.29 2017 2.28 2018 2.29 2019 2.29 2020 2.29 2021 2.31 2022 2.32 2023 2.32 2024 2.32 2025 2.32 2026 2.32 2027 2.33 2028 2.32 2029 2.31 2030 2.31 2031 2.32 2032 2.35 2033 2.37 2034 2.39 2035 2.42 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Data Prices and Expenditures Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A2, p. 3-5 and Table A5, p. 11-12 for consumption, Table A3, p. 6-8 for prices for 2008-2035; EIA, Annual Energy Review

116

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 35.4 35.4 19.7% Space Heating 15.0 2.9 0.9 0.1 3.9 0.1 8.5 27.5 15.3% Space Cooling 0.4 25.0 25.3 14.1% Ventilation 15.9 15.9 8.9% Refrigeration 11.6 11.6 6.5% Water Heating 4.0 0.6 0.6 2.7 7.3 4.1% Electronics 7.8 7.8 4.3% Computers 6.3 6.3 3.5% Cooking 1.6 0.7 2.3 1.3% Other (4) 2.7 0.3 3.3 1.2 4.8 20.4 28.0 15.6% Adjust to SEDS (5) 6.2 5.2 5.2 0.6 12.0 6.7% Total 29.9 9.0 0.9 3.3 1.3 14.5 0.1 134.8 179.4 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.2 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

117

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2025 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 30.1 30.1 15.2% Space Heating 17.1 2.8 1.5 0.1 4.4 0.2 4.5 26.1 13.3% Electronics 11.2 11.2 5.7% Space Cooling 0.3 14.3 14.6 7.4% Water Heating 5.2 0.8 0.8 2.5 8.5 4.3% Computers 5.5 5.5 2.8% Refrigeration 9.4 9.4 4.8% Ventilation 16.6 16.6 8.4% Cooking 2.1 0.6 2.7 1.4% Other (4) 4.8 0.3 4.3 1.7 6.3 31.2 42.3 21.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 5.9 4.9 4.9 19.2 30.0 15.2% Total 35.5 8.9 1.5 4.3 1.9 16.5 0.2 145.0 197.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.7 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2011 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

118

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2035 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 32.3 32.3 14.4% Space Heating 19.0 2.7 1.6 0.2 4.5 0.2 4.6 28.2 12.5% Water Heating 6.3 1.0 1.0 18.1 25.4 11.3% Space Cooling 0.4 15.1 15.5 6.9% Electronics 13.0 13.0 5.8% Refrigeration 10.0 10.0 4.4% Computers 6.0 6.0 2.7% Cooking 2.6 0.6 3.2 1.4% Ventilation 2.4 2.4 1.1% Other (4) 9.3 0.4 4.9 2.0 7.2 40.9 57.5 25.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 4.6 5.3 5.3 21.7 31.6 14.0% Total 42.2 9.4 1.6 4.9 2.2 18.0 0.2 164.8 225.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.2 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($2.0 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

119

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Commercial Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) Electricity Natural Gas Distillate Oil Residual Oil ($/gal) ($/gal) 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 9.39 104.50 2.79 3.78 9.35 104.74 2.81 3.81 9.47 101.25 2.73 3.69 9.40 103.22 2.76 3.75 9.54 99.28 2.67 3.60 9.51 100.49 2.70 3.64 9.52 94.53 2.66 3.52 9.55 97.45 2.64 3.55 9.46 90.92 2.61 3.46 9.48 92.13 2.63 3.49 9.49 87.65 2.54 3.41 9.47 89.48 2.58 3.42 9.58 85.91 2.41 3.28 9.54 86.36 2.49 3.34 9.57 87.02 2.07 2.97 9.52 84.58 2.26 3.14 10.09 86.14 2.34 3.55 9.76 87.22 2.37 3.57 10.27 97.87 1.49 2.03 10.14 90.95 1.66 2.86 10.04 114.33 1.51 2.47 10.56 121.16 2.01 3.34 9.59 121.45 1.24 2.07 10.13 124.31 1.39 2.32 9.44 94.94 0.93 1.23

120

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Commercial Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Average 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 (2) 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 27.39 10.47 27.48 21.15 27.10 10.45 27.73 21.01 27.56 10.32 27.04 21.10 27.52 10.45 27.28 21.18 27.86 10.05 26.41 21.06 27.74 10.12 26.73 21.07 28.00 9.75 25.85 20.90 27.96 9.93 26.16 21.01 27.78 9.21 25.46 20.46 27.90 9.45 25.69 20.67 27.76 8.95 24.95 20.23 27.72 9.09 25.24 20.32 27.96 8.64 24.34 20.11 27.81 8.77 24.80 20.14 27.91 8.46 23.15 19.90 28.07 8.59 24.07 20.11 28.61 8.72 23.94 20.36 28.05 8.70 22.00 19.99 29.73 9.10 20.28 20.99 29.57 8.61 24.24 21.03 30.95 12.12 23.75 23.21 30.09 9.79 15.83 21.13 29.70

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Electricity-use Feedback in the Commercial Sector: Examining the Potential for Building Occupant Behavior Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feedback technologies to encourage behavior change have been explored in the residential sector for the past three decades, but the savings potential of using feedback strategies in the commercial sector, which represents over one quarter of US electricity sales, has yet to be adequately explored. Although a number of building load control technologies that include some form of feedback provision have existed for some years, they generally target technical staff. The focus of this report is to understand...

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

122

Assessment of the Technical Potential for Achieving Net Zero-Energy Buildings in the Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the findings from research conducted at NREL to assess the technical potential for zero-energy building technologies and practices to reduce the impact of commercial buildings on the U.S. energy system. Commercial buildings currently account for 18% of annual U.S. energy consumption, and energy use is growing along with overall floor area. Reducing the energy use of this sector will require aggressive research goals and rapid implementation of the research results.

Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Judkoff, R.; Crawley, D.; Ryan, J.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Coal supply/demand, 1980 to 2000. Task 3. Resource applications industrialization system data base. Final review draft. [USA; forecasting 1980 to 2000; sector and regional analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of data and forecasts resulting from an analysis of the coal market and the factors influencing supply and demand. The analyses performed for the forecasts were made on an end-use-sector basis. The sectors analyzed are electric utility, industry demand for steam coal, industry demand for metallurgical coal, residential/commercial, coal demand for synfuel production, and exports. The purpose is to provide coal production and consumption forecasts that can be used to perform detailed, railroad company-specific coal transportation analyses. To make the data applicable for the subsequent transportation analyses, the forecasts have been made for each end-use sector on a regional basis. The supply regions are: Appalachia, East Interior, West Interior and Gulf, Northern Great Plains, and Mountain. The demand regions are the same as the nine Census Bureau regions. Coal production and consumption in the United States are projected to increase dramatically in the next 20 years due to increasing requirements for energy and the unavailability of other sources of energy to supply a substantial portion of this increase. Coal comprises 85 percent of the US recoverable fossil energy reserves and could be mined to supply the increasing energy demands of the US. The NTPSC study found that the additional traffic demands by 1985 may be met by the railways by the way of improved signalization, shorter block sections, centralized traffic control, and other modernization methods without providing for heavy line capacity works. But by 2000 the incremental traffic on some of the major corridors was projected to increase very significantly and is likely to call for special line capacity works involving heavy investment.

Fournier, W.M.; Hasson, V.

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

California is a leader in automating demand response (DR) to promote low-cost, consistent, and predictable electric grid management tools. Over 250 commercial and industrial facilities in California participate in fully-automated programs providing over 60 MW of peak DR savings. This paper presents a summary of Open Automated DR (OpenADR) implementation by each of the investor-owned utilities in California. It provides a summary of participation, DR strategies and incentives. Commercial buildings can reduce peak demand from 5 to 15percent with an average of 13percent. Industrial facilities shed much higher loads. For buildings with multi-year savings we evaluate their load variability and shed variability. We provide a summary of control strategies deployed, along with costs to install automation. We report on how the electric DR control strategies perform over many years of events. We benchmark the peak demand of this sample of buildings against their past baselines to understand the differences in building performance over the years. This is done with peak demand intensities and load factors. The paper also describes the importance of these data in helping to understand possible techniques to reach net zero energy using peak day dynamic control capabilities in commercial buildings. We present an example in which the electric load shape changed as a result of a lighting retrofit.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Mathieu, Johanna; Parrish, Kristen

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

125

Directory of energy efficiency information services for the residential and commercial sectors  

SciTech Connect

This directory is a compilation of organizations which disseminate a wide range of information on the efficient use of energy in the residential and commercial sectors. Each organization's services are defined by the informations' targeted audience, types of services offered, topics and sectors addressed and access terms required. The organizations included in this directory are based on the Guide to Energy Efficiency Information Services for the Residential and Commercial Sectors, June 1987. The information is presented in two formats in this directory, each focusing on different manners of data retrieval. Section One provides a matrix illustrating the information available by the type of energy-efficiency services offered and Section Two presents information on available services in an alphabetized list by the organization name.

Not Available

1988-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document that provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Comparative analysis of energy data bases for the industrial and commercial sectors  

SciTech Connect

Energy data bases for the industrial and commercial sectors were analyzed to determine how valuable this data might be for policy analysis. The approach is the same for both end-use sectors: first a descrption or overview of relevant data bases identifies the available data; the coverage and methods used to generate the data are then explained; the data are then characterized and examples are provided for the major data sets under consideration. A final step assesses the data bases under consideration and draws conclusions. There are a variety of data bases considered for each of the end-use sectors included in this report. Data bases for the industrial sector include the National Energy Accounts, process-derived data bases such as the Drexel data base and data obtained from industry trade associations. For the commercial sector, three types of data bases are analyzed: the Nonresidential Building Energy Consumption Surveys, Dodge Construction Data and the Building Owners and Manager's Association Experience Exchange Report.

Roop, J.M.; Belzer, D.B.; Bohn, A.A.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

Page, Janie; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Chiu, Albert K.; Kellow, Bashar; Koch, Ed; Lipkin, Paul

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector Sector Fred Joseck U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop (TSPI) Transportation and Stationary Power Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop (TSPI) Integration Workshop (TSPI) Phoenix, Arizona October 27, 2008 2 Why Integration? * Move away from conventional thinking...fuel and power generation/supply separate * Make dramatic change, use economies of scale,

131

Demand relief and weather sensitivity in large California commercial office buildings  

SciTech Connect

A great deal of research has examined the weather sensitivity of energy consumption in commercial buildings; however, the recent power crisis in California has given greater importance to peak demand. Several new load-shedding programs have been implemented or are under consideration. Historically, the target customers have been large industrial users who can reduce the equivalent load of several large office buildings. While the individual load reduction from an individual office building may be less significant, there is ample opportunity for load reduction in this area. The load reduction programs and incentives for industrial customers may not be suitable for commercial building owners. In particular, industrial customers are likely to have little variation in load from day to day. Thus a robust baseline accounting for weather variability is required to provide building owners with realistic targets that will encourage them to participate in load shedding programs.

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann; Gu, Lixing; Haves, Philip

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Impact of post-event avoidance behavior on commercial facilities sector venues-literature review.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 (9/11), focused a great deal of interest and concern on how individual and social perceptions of risk change behavior and subsequently affect commercial sector venues. Argonne conducted a review of the literature to identify studies that quantify the direct and indirect economic consequences of avoidance behaviors that result from terrorist attacks. Despite a growing amount of literature addressing terrorism impacts, relatively little is known about the causal relationships between risk perception, human avoidance behaviors, and the economic effects on commercial venues. Nevertheless, the technical and academic literature does provide some evidence, both directly and by inference, of the level and duration of post-event avoidance behaviors on commercial venues. Key findings are summarized in this Executive Summary. Also included as an appendix is a more detailed summary table of literature findings reproduced from the full report.

Samsa, M. E.; Baldwin, T. E.; Berry, M. S.; Guzowski, L. B.; Martinez-Moyano, I.; Nieves, A. L.; Ramarasad, A. (Decision and Information Sciences)

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

133

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010AssessmentofDemandResponseand AdvancedMetering:DevelopmentforDemandResponse Calculation?FindingsandEnergy Efficiencyand DemandResponsewithCommunicating

Page, Janie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

below. Fig. 4 Automated demand response general features Thearchitecture Automated Demand Response System ArchitectureCould Bene?t for Demand Response Programs, But Challenges

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large FacilitiesNYSERDA) and the Demand Response Research Center (LLC Working Group 2 Demand Response Program Evaluation

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project LBNL-2009a). Open Automated Demand Response Communications inand Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California.

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Program Participation Rates on Demand Response MarketTable 3-1. Methods of Estimating Demand Response PenetrationDemand Response

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive Conditioning and Increased User Satisfaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithm. The preferred demand response strategy was foundimplements the specific demand response policy chosen by theload shedding and demand response, a literature review of

Agogino, Alice M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential customers with peak demand greater than 350 kWs) Eligible Customers (peak demand) Optional hourly pricingis relatively small; the peak demand of its large, non-

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Evaluation of Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Two Large Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Building thermal mass can be used to reduce the peak cooling load. For example, in summer, the building mass can be pre-cooled during non-peak hours in order to reduce the cooling load in the peak hours. As a result, the cooling load is shifted in time and the peak demand is reduced. The building mass can be cooled most effectively during unoccupied hours because it is possible to relax the comfort constraints. While the benefits of demand shift are certain, different thermal mass discharge strategies result in different cooling load reduction and savings. The goal of an optimized discharge strategy is to maximize the thermal mass discharge and minimize the possibility of rebounds before the shed period ends. A series of filed tests were carefully planned and conducted in two commercial buildings in Northern California to investigate the effects of various precooling and demand shed strategies. Field tests demonstrated the potential of cooling load reduction in peak hours and importance of discharge strategies to avoid rebounds. EnergyPlus simulation models were constructed and calibrated to investigate different kind of recovery strategies. The results indicate the value of pre-cooling in maximizing the electrical shed in the on-peak period. The results also indicate that the dynamics of the shed need to be managed in order to avoid discharging the thermal capacity of the building too quickly, resulting in high cooling load and electric demand before the end of the shed period. An exponential trajectory for the zone set-point during the discharge period yielded good results and is recommended for practical implementation.

Xu, Peng

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all the test days and maximum demand savings for the bestin Table 4. Average Maximum Demand Demand Savings SavingsTable 4. Average and maximum demand savings results from

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

ENERGY STAR Snapshot: Measuring Progress in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Spring 2008.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Progress in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors Spring 2008 Introduction Through 2007, commercial and industrial (C&I) leaders have made unprecedented progress in their efforts to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions across their buildings and facilities. This includes: y Hundreds of organizations and individuals stepping forward to take the ENERGY STAR Challenge to improve the energy efficiency of America's buildings by 10 percent or more y Measuring the energy performance in tens of thousands of buildings y Achieving energy savings across millions of square feet y Designating more than 4,000 efficient buildings and facilities with the ENERGY STAR label ENERGY STAR partners are building tremendous momentum for energy efficiency and seeing important

143

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36E 36E Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California R. Yin, S. Kiliccote, M.A. Piette, K. Parrish Environmental Energy Technologies Division May 2010 Presented at the 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Pacific Grove, CA, August 15-20, 2010, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

144

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

340E 340E Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings M.A. Piette, G. Ghatikar, S. Kiliccote, D. Watson Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory E. Koch, D. Hennage Akuacom June 2009 Journal of Computing Science and Information Engineering, Vol. 9, Issue 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

145

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3E 3E Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings S. Kiliccote, M.A. Piette, J. Mathieu, K. Parrish Environmental Energy Technologies Division May 2010 Presented at the 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Pacific Grove, CA, August 15-20, 2010, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

146

Electricity demand analysis in different sectors: a case study of Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to estimate the main determinants of electricity demand in Iran for various subsectors (residential, industrial, agricultural and public) using (more)

Pourazarm, Elham

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Machine to machine (M2M) technology in demand responsive commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

Machine to Machine (M2M) is a term used to describe the technologies that enable computers, embedded processors, smart sensors, actuators and mobile devices to communicate with one another, take measurements and make decisions--often without human intervention. M2M technology was applied to five commercial buildings in a test. The goal was to reduce electric demand when a remote price signal rose above a predetermine price. In this system, a variable price signal was generated from a single source on the Internet and distributed using the meta-language, XML (Extensible Markup Language). Each of five commercial building sites monitored the common price signal and automatically shed site-specific electric loads when the price increased above predetermined thresholds. Other than price signal scheduling, which was set up in advance by the project researchers, the system was designed to operate without human intervention during the two-week test period. Although the buildings responded to the same price signal, the communication infrastructures used at each building were substantially different. This study provides an overview of the technologies used at each building site, the price generator/server, and each link in between. Network architecture, security, data visualization and site-specific system features are characterized. The results of the test are discussed, including: functionality at each site, measurement and verification techniques, and feedback from energy managers and building operators. Lessons learned from the test and potential implications for widespread rollout are provided.

Watson, David S.; Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Encyclopedia of Energy, Volume 1, pp 605616. Elsevier. 2004. Author nonexclusive, royalty-free copyright 1 Commercial Sector and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Encyclopedia of Energy, Volume 1, pp 605­616. Elsevier. 2004. Author nonexclusive, royalty-free copyright 1 Commercial Sector and Energy Use J. MICHAEL MACDONALD Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge of Commercial Energy Use 3. Measuring Energy Performance 4. Performance Rating Systems 5. Energy Efficiency

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

149

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period difference in maximum demand was 166 kilowatts (kW).4 p.m. ; however, the maximum demand was not reduced as muchdata indicate that the maximum demand shed always appears

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

size (average maximum demand) 84 , business type (SIC code),HECO customers average maximum demands was not available.to estimate the maximum demand (kW) of each customer.

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 Table 4. Average and Maximum Demand Savings Results fromall the test days and maximum demand savings for the best4. Table 4. Average and Maximum Demand Savings Results from

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicate minimum and maximum demand reduction. There is nopackaged units. In 2009, maximum demand for this facilityat 1.4 MW. Weekday maximum demand is 1.2 MW. Over the last

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buildings can reduce peak demand from 5 to 15% with anof events. We benchmark the peak demand of this sample ofyears. This is done with peak demand intensities and load

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Field Tests, Simulation and Audits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Braun (Purdue). 2004. Peak demand reduction from pre-coolingmass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has beenpre-cooling strategies on peak demand. In addition, a set of

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. E. Braun. 2004. Peak demand reduction from pre-coolingReducing electrical peak demand has a huge economic andmass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Where did the money go? The cost and performance of the largest commercial sector DSM program  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the total resource cost (TRC) of energy savings for 40 of the largest 1992 commercial sector DSM programs. The calculation includes the participating customer`s cost contribution to energy saving measures and all utility costs, including incentives received by customers, program administrative and overhead costs, measurement and evaluation costs, and shareholder incentives paid to the utility. All savings are based on post-program savings evaluations. We find that, on a savings-weighted basis, the programs have saved energy at a cost of 3.2 {cents}/kWh. Taken as a whole, the programs have been highly cost effective when compared to the avoided costs faced by the utilities when the programs were developed. We investigate reasons for differences in program costs and examine uncertainties in current utility practices for reporting costs and evaluating savings.

Eto, J.; Kito, S.; Shown, L.; Sonnenblick, R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Demand-side Management Strategies and the Residential Sector: Lessons from International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in producing a given level of output or activity. It is measured by the quantity of energy required to perform a particular activity (service) expressed as energy per unit of output or activity measure of service (EERE, 2010). In the residential sector...

Haney, Aoife Brophy; Jamasb, Tooraj; Platchkov, Laura M.; Pollitt, Michael G.

158

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Commercial...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. For the three major commercial sector...

159

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the US commercial buildings sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

database of energy use and peak demand savings for perimeterscope of this work. Refer to peak demand reductions given inprimary energy use or peak demand is plotted as a function

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the number of kWh saved or peak demand (kW) avoided. CCE iscalculation of the peak demand avoided from a given amountat the time of utility peak demand) is based on measured

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Web-based energy information systems for energy management and demand response in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market Energy providers Target users Program manager (energy provider), energy manager (customer) Commercialization Data Access Trendmarket Energy service providers, utilities Target users Energy manager, operator Commercialization Data Access Trend

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Herter, Karen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the national energy modeling system  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its model. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Light and Heavy Mass Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effort to understand pre-cooling thermal mass as a Demandof Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEKey words: Pre-cooling, demand response, thermal mass

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Introduction to Commercial Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response -- Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are 3 appendices listed: (A) DR strategies for HVAC systems; (B) Summary of DR strategies; and (C) Case study of advanced demand response.

Motegi, N.; Piette, M.A.; Watson, D.S.; Kiliccote, S.; Xu, P.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Web-based energy information systems for energy management and demand response in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

download EMCS download Sub-metering Real-time Connectivityof diagnostic testing, sub-metering, and performancecoincident demand at sub-metering S Compare to historical

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Herter, Karen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

response as: changes in electric usage by end-use customerselectric competition Typical rate design includes demand and/or volumetric distribution charges, with all commodity usage

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Analysis 3 LILCO--Commercial Energy Audit 4Large Commercial Audit 7 SCE--Energy Management SurveysUtilities--Energy Check 5 SMUD--Small Commercial Audit 6

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings:Field Tests, Simulation and Audits  

SciTech Connect

The principle of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads and reducing or shedding related electrical demand during the peak periods. Cost savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies (Braun 1990, Ruud et al. 1990, Conniff 1991, Andresen and Brandemuehl 1992, Mahajan et al. 1993, Morris et al. 1994, Keeney and Braun 1997, Becker and Paciuk 2002, Xu et al. 2003). This technology appears to have significant potential for demand reduction if applied within an overall demand response program. The primary goal associated with this research is to develop information and tools necessary to assess the viability of and, where appropriate, implement demand response programs involving building thermal mass in buildings throughout California. The project involves evaluating the technology readiness, overall demand reduction potential, and customer acceptance for different classes of buildings. This information can be used along with estimates of the impact of the strategies on energy use to design appropriate incentives for customers.

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

170

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped

171

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

172

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped

173

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes assessments and test results of four end-use technologies, representing products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard that was introduced to the public in 2008 and currently used in two ...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, which is an update to EPRI Report 1016082, includes assessments and test results of four end-use vendor technologies. These technologies represent products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) Communicat...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive Conditioning and Increased User Satisfaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

respect to exiting daylighting systems. Limiting peak demandrespect to existing daylighting systems, by specificallyin the tariff. A commercial daylighting system is assumed to

Agogino, Alice M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

178

Energy audits reveal significant energy savings potential in India`s commercial air-conditioned building sector  

SciTech Connect

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) began its Energy Management Consultation and Training (EMCAT) project in India. The EMCAT project began in 1991 as a six-year (1991--1997) project to improve India`s technological and management capabilities for both the supply of energy and its efficient end use. The end-use component of EMCAT aims for efficient energy utilization by industries and other sectors such as the commercial sector. A specific task under the end-use component was to conduct energy surveys/audits in high energy-use sectors, such as air-conditioned (AC) buildings in the commercial sector, and to identify investment opportunities that could improve energy utilization. This article presents results of pre-investment surveys that were conducted at four commercial air-conditioned facilities in 1995. The four facilities included two luxury hotels in New Delhi, and one luxury hotel and a private hospital in Bombay. Energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) were explored in three major energy-using systems in these buildings: air-conditioning, lighting, and steam and domestic hot water systems.

Singh, G.; Presny, D.; Fafard, C. [Resource Management Associates of Madison, Inc., WI (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEThe Role of Thermal Mass on the Cooling Load of Buildings.Keywords: Pre-cooling, demand response, thermal mass, hot

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Policy-driven distributed and collaborative demand response in multi-domain commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enabling a sophisticated Demand Response (DR) framework, whereby individual consumers adapt their electricity consumption in response to price variations, is a major objective of the emerging Smart Grid. We first point out why the current model, of EMS-based ...

Archan Misra; Henning Schulzrinne

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy commodity risk (e.g. gas markets) Attendance at training workshops Technical audits or information information and improved methods that would support more reliable demand response market assessments. Energy

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Pre-cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass inthe high thermal storage during the pre-cooling period. Forwith low thermal mass is limited, the pre-cooling period can

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF DRAFT FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Report, over the entire forecast period, primarily because both weather-adjusted peak and commercial sectors. Keywords Electricity demand, electricity consumption, demand forecast, weather normalization, annual peak demand, natural gas demand, self-generation, California Solar Initiative. #12;ii #12

184

Distributed Resources in the Commercial Sector: Customer Needs and Adoption Experiences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last five years, an increasing number of commercial customers have installed distributed resources (DR) solutions at their facilities. This study sheds light on the DR adoption experience of commercial customers, enabling EPRI members to better target attractive commercial segments and assist in customer implementation of DR solutions.

2001-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

185

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the concept for and lessons from the development and field-testing of an open, interoperable communications infrastructure to support automated demand response (auto-DR). Automating DR allows greater levels of participation, improved reliability, and repeatability of the DR in participating facilities. This paper also presents the technical and architectural issues associated with auto-DR and description of the demand response automation server (DRAS), the client/server architecture-based middle-ware used to automate the interactions between the utilities or any DR serving entity and their customers for DR programs. Use case diagrams are presented to show the role of the DRAS between utility/ISO and the clients at the facilities.

Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Watson, David; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 2003 Commercial Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type Consumption Percent of Total | Consumption Percent of Total Building Type (thousand BtuSF)...

187

Final Scientific Technical Report: INTEGRATED PREDICTIVE DEMAND RESPONSE CONTROLLER FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS  

SciTech Connect

This project provides algorithms to perform demand response using the thermal mass of a building. Using the thermal mass of the building is an attractive method for performing demand response because there is no need for capital expenditure. The algorithms rely on the thermal capacitance inherent in the building?s construction materials. A near-optimal ?day ahead? predictive approach is developed that is meant to keep the building?s electrical demand constant during the high cost periods. This type of approach is appropriate for both time-of-use and critical peak pricing utility rate structures. The approach uses the past days data in order to determine the best temperature setpoints for the building during the high price periods on the next day. A second ?model predictive approach? (MPC) uses a thermal model of the building to determine the best temperature for the next sample period. The approach uses constant feedback from the building and is capable of appropriately handling real time pricing. Both approaches are capable of using weather forecasts to improve performance.

Wenzel, Mike

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

188

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous staff members in the Demand prepared the residential sector forecast. Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Lynn

189

The Open Source Stochastic Building Simulation Tool SLBM and Its Capabilities to Capture Uncertainty of Policymaking in the U.S. Building Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA, USA applied and change the service demand. An example ofUSA Figure 9. Total US Commercial Building Sector Electricity Demand (USA For the frequently discussed carbon cap approach, the carbon emissions as well as energy demand

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the US commercial buildings sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of EC window and daylighting systems on US primary energyof EC windows and daylighting systems is 97.3 TBtu (1 TBtu =windows and daylighting systems in a prototypical commercial

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit (1) Ownership Nongovernment Owned 85.1 72% Owner-Occupied 87.3 35% Nonowner-Occupied 88.4 36%...

192

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Vintage Consumption per Year Constructed Square Foot (thousand BtuSF) Prior to 1960 84.4 23% 1960 to 1969 91.5 12% 1970...

193

The economics of photovoltaics in the commercial, institutional and industrical sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of a model which computes system break-even capital costs, array break-even capital costs and profits from photovoltaic investments in the industrial, commercial and institutional ...

Cox, Alan J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Assessing the impacts of future demand for saline groundwater on commercial deployment of CCS in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a preliminary assessment of the potential impact that future demand for groundwater might have on the commercial deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies within the United States. A number of regions within the U.S. have populations, agriculture and industries that are particularly dependent upon groundwater. Moreover, some key freshwater aquifers are already over-utilized or depleted, and others are likely to be moving toward depletion as demand grows. The need to meet future water demands may lead some parts of the nation to consider supplementing existing supplies with lower quality groundwater resources, including brackish waters that are currently not considered sources of drinking water but which could provide supplemental water via desalination. In some areas, these same deep saline-filled geologic formations also represent possible candidate carbon dioxide (CO2) storage reservoirs. The analysis presented here suggests that future constraints on CCS deployment due to potential needs to supplement conventional water supplies by desalinating deeper and more brackish waters are likely to be necessary only in limited regions across the country, particularly in areas that are already experiencing water stress.

Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

195

Engineering Methods for Estimating the Impacts of Demand-Side Management Programs: Volume 1: Fundamentals of Engineering Simulations for Residential and Commercial End Uses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook focuses on the use of building energy computer simulations for planning and evaluating demand-side management (DSM) measures. It presents techniques for estimating energy and demand savings for a list of common residential and commercial DSM technologies using widely available public-domain and EPRI computer programs.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Energy Conservation Through Demand-Side Management (DSM): A Methodology to Characterize Energy Use Among commercial Market Segments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing energy demand can be beneficial for both the energy consumer and the energy supplier. By reducing energy use, the consumer reduces operating costs and improves production efficiency and competitiveness. Similarly, the supplier may reduce the need for costly capacity expansion and wholesale power purchasing, especially if energy reductions occur during peak loading conditions. Energy reductions may also lessen global climate change and reduce many other consequences of fossil-fuel energy use. The following research highlights a methodology to characterize energy use and optimize a DSM program for different types of commercial buildings. Utilizing publicly available records, such as utility billing data and property tax records, the diverse commercial building market was characterized. The commercial building types were matched to relevant submarkets of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). These sources were combined to prioritize building type submarket energy use intensity (kWh/sf/yr), load factor and many other energy use characteristics for each market segment. From this information, lower tier performers in each NAICS submarket can be identified and appropriate DSM alternatives selected specific to each.

Grosskopf, K. R.; Oppenheim, P.; Barclay, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Energy Use in the U.S. Commercial Sector - Energy Information Administration Data, Information and Analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. As such, EIA has a wealth of energy data and analyses available for public use, including information about energy use in the buildings sectors. This paper discusses the types of EIA energy information available, how the information can be accessed, and how it may be valuable in the quest to improve existing building energy usage.

Boedecker, E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous staff members in the Demand the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare the industrial forecast. Miguel Garcia

199

Market Requirements and Opportunities for Distributred Energy Storage Systems in the Commercial Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy storage systems sited at customer locations could enable and complement utility end-use efficiency programs. As a dispatchable resource, energy storage systems can provide utility distribution planners and grid operators with more certainty in terms of peak reduction, demand response, and load shifting. This research was conducted to identify and scope ideal energy storage systems configurations and cost requirements which best leverage utility end-use energy efficiency programs.

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

200

Electricity Demand of PHEVs Operated by Private Households and Commercial Fleets: Effects of Driving and Charging Behavior  

SciTech Connect

Automotive and energy researchers have made considerable efforts to predict the impact of plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) charging on the electrical grid. This work has been done primarily through computer modeling and simulation. The US Department of Energys (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), in partnership with the University of California at Daviss Institute for Transportation Stuides, have been collecting data from a diverse fleet of PHEVs. The AVTA is conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory for DOEs Vehicle Technologies Program. This work provides the opportunity to quantify the petroleum displacement potential of early PHEV models, and also observe, rather than simulate, the charging behavior of vehicle users. This paper presents actual charging behavior and the resulting electricity demand from these PHEVs operating in undirected, real-world conditions. Charging patterns are examined for both commercial-use and personal-use vehicles. Underlying reasons for charging behavior in both groups are also presented.

John Smart; Matthew Shirk; Ken Kurani; Casey Quinn; Jamie Davies

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Countries Launch Initiative to Drive Energy Efficiency in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 20, 2010 July 20, 2010 1 FACT SHEET: THE GLOBAL SUPERIOR ENERGY PERFORMANCE PARTNERSHIP At the Clean Energy Ministerial in Washington, D.C. on July 19 th and 20 th , ministers launched a new public- private partnership to accelerate energy efficiency improvements in commercial buildings and industrial facilities, which together account for almost 60 percent of global energy use. The Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) Partnership will cut energy use, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and pollution, save money, and create

202

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 4% 28% 8% 56% | 6% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 4% 26% 7% 59% | 5% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 3% 26% 5% 61% | 5% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 5% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 4% 26% 4% 61% | 5% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 4% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 3% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 3% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 3% 25% 4% 64% | 4% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 3% 24% 4% 65% | 4% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 3% 26% 3% 65% | 4% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 2% 25% 3% 65% | 3% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 2% 25% 3% 65% | 3% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 2% 25% 2% 67% | 3% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 2% 25% 2% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 2% 26% 3% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 2% 25% 4% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 2% 25% 3% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 2% 24% 3% 67% | 3% 25%

203

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Natural Gas Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 13% 41% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 13% 42% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 14% 39% 18% 3% | 20% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 14% 39% 17% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 14% 40% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 14% 40% 18% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 14% 40% 16% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 14% 41% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 15% 42% 15% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 14% 41% 16% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 4% 19.57 1991 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 20.03 1992 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 20.71 1993 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 48% 3% 21.24 1994 14% 42% 18% 3% | 19% 48% 3% 21.75 1995 14% 42% 19% 3% | 20% 49% 3% 22.71 1996 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 23.14 1997 14% 43% 18% 3% | 20% 49% 3% 23.34 1998 13% 43% 20% 3% | 20% 50% 3% 22.86 1999 14%

204

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Commercial Water Use by Source (Million Gallons per Day) Year 1980 - - - 1985 5,710 1,230 1990 5,900 2,390 1995 6,690 2,890 2000 (3) 7,202 3,111 2005 (3) 7,102 3,068 Note(s): Source(s): 10,314 10,171 1) Public supply water use: water withdrawn by public and private water suppliers that furnish water to at least 25 people or have a minimum of 15 connections. 2) Self-supply water use: Water withdrawn from a groundwater or surface-water source by a user rather than being obtained from a public supply. 3) USGS did not estimate commercial water use in this year. Estimates are based on available data and percentage breakdown of commercial use in the 1995 survey. U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1985, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1004, 1988; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of

205

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. CommercialSector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems in developed countries over the next two decades. In the U.S., private and public expectations for this technology are heavily influenced by forecasts published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), most notably the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). EIA's forecasts are typically made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. Annual penetration is forecast by estimating the payback period for each technology, for each of a limited number of representative building types, for each of nine regions. This process results in an AEO2004 forecast deployment of about a total 3 GW of DG electrical generating capacity by 2025, which is only 0.25 percent of total forecast U.S. capacity. Analyses conducted using both the AEO2003 and AEO2004 versions of NEMS changes the baseline costs and performance characteristics of DG to reflect a world without U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research into several thermal DG technologies, which is then compared to a case with enhanced technology representative of the successful achievement of DOE research goals. The net difference in 2025 DG penetration is dramatic using the AEO2003 version of NEMS, but much smaller in the AEO2004 version. The significance and validity of these contradictory results are discussed, and possibilities for improving estimates of commercial U.S. DG potential are explored.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman,Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Countries Launch Initiative to Drive Energy Efficiency in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Updated on July 23, 2010 Updated on July 23, 2010 1 FACT SHEET: THE GLOBAL SUPERIOR ENERGY PERFORMANCE PARTNERSHIP At the Clean Energy Ministerial in Washington, D.C. on July 19 th and 20 th , ministers launched a new public- private partnership to accelerate energy efficiency improvements in commercial buildings and industrial facilities, which together account for almost 60 percent of global energy use. The Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) Partnership will cut energy use, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and pollution, save money, and create

207

Assessment of the Energy Impacts of Outside Air in the Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect

The enormous quantity of energy consumed by U.S. commercial buildings places a significant burden on the energy supply and is a potential source of economic strain. To address this, the DOE Building Technologies Program has established the goal of developing market-viable zero energy buildings by 2025. This study focuses on the effects of outside air, and considers various outside air sources, types of building construction, building subsectors, and climates. Based on the information about energy consumption attributed to outside air, it identifies topics for further research that have the greatest potential to achieve energy savings.

Benne, K.; Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Crawley, D.; Logee, T.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2003 Commercial Buildings Delivered Energy End-Use Intensities, by Building Activity (Thousand Btu per SF) (1) Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Note(s): Source(s): 43.5 45.2 164.4 20.9 1) Due to rounding, end-uses do not sum to total. EIA, 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey, Energy End-Uses, Oct. 2008, Table E.2A. 0.3 0.6 3.0 N.A. 4.9 4.8 18.9 3.1 1.7 3.5 6.0 N.A. 0.1 0.2 N.A. N.A. 4.4 13.1 34.1 1.7 0.8 N.A. N.A. N.A. 1.4 2.0 6.1 0.4 0.8 0.6 2.1 0.1 26.2 19.3 79.4 14.4 2.9 1.3 10.5 0.6 Religious

209

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Aggregate Commercial Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) Load (quads) and Percent of Total Load Component Heating Cooling Roof -0.103 12% 0.014 1% Walls (2) -0.174 21% -0.008 - Foundation -0.093 11% -0.058 - Infiltration -0.152 18% -0.041 - Ventilation -0.129 15% -0.045 - Windows (conduction) -0.188 22% -0.085 - Windows (solar gain) 0.114 - 0.386 32% Internal Gains Lights 0.196 - 0.505 42% Equipment (electrical) 0.048 - 0.207 17% Equip. (non-electrical) 0.001 - 0.006 1% People 0.038 - 0.082 7% NET Load -0.442 100% 0.963 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Loads represent the thermal energy losses/gains that, when combined, will be offset by a building's heating/cooling system to maintain a set interior temperature (which equals site energy). 2) Includes common interior walls between buildings. LBNL, Commercial Heating and Cooling Loads Component Analysis, June 1998, Table 24, p. 45 and Figure 3, p. 61

210

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Restaurants in Western United States (1) Fixture/End Use (2) Faucets Dishwashing Toilets/Urinals Ice Making Total Indoor Use (3) (4) (4) Building Size (SF) Seats: Meals: Benchmarking Values for Restaurants (6) N Gal./SF/year 90 Gal./meal 90 Gal./seat/day 90 Gal./employee/day 90 Note(s): Source(s): American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000. 25th Percentile of Users 130 - 331 6 - 9 20 - 31 86 - 122 Familiy-style dine-in establishments. Four restaurants in southern California, one in Phoenix, AZ. 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and

211

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Two California High Schools Fixture/End Use Toilet Urinal Faucet Shower Kitchen Misc. uses (2) Cooling Leaks Swimming Pool Total Use Benchmarking Values for Schools (3) N Indoor Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 142 Indoor Use, Gal./school day/student 141 Cooling Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 35 Note(s): Source(s): 8 - 20 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) One high school. 3) The study derived efficiency benchmarks by analyzing measured data and audit data. The benchmark was set at the lower 25th percentile of users. American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000.

212

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Hotels in Western United States (Gallons per Room per Year) (1) Fixture/End Use Bathtub (2) Faucets Showers Toilets Leaks Laundry Ice making (3) Other/misc. indoor Total Indoor Use Number of Rooms Logged average daily use, kgal: Peak instantaneous demand, gpm: Benchmarking Values for Hotels N Indoor Use, gal./day/occupied room 98 Cooling Use, gal./year/occupied room 97 Note(s): Source(s): 25th Percentile of Users 60 - 115 7,400 - 41,600 Based on four budget hotels and one luxury hotel. Three budget hotels in Southern California, one in Phoenix, AZ. Luxury hotel in Los Angeles, CA. 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) Based on one hotel. 3) Based on three hotels. 5) The

213

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Demand and Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Demand and Consumption Electricity Demand and Consumption Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). The sectors included are: agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial (mining, food processing, wood and paper, chemicals, basic metals, other minor sectors); commercial; and residential. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago)

214

Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide"Zero-Energy" Performance Goals in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

It is widely accepted that if the United States is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions it must aggressively address energy end use in the building sector. While there have been some notable but modest successes with mandatory and voluntary programs, there have also been puzzling failures to achieve expected savings. Collectively, these programs have not yet reached the majority of the building stock, nor have they yet routinely produced very large savings in individual buildings. Several trends that have the potential to change this are noteworthy: (1) the growing market interest in 'green buildings' and 'sustainable design', (2) the major professional societies (e.g. AIA, ASHRAE) have more aggressively adopted significant improvements in energy efficiency as strategic goals, e.g. targeting 'zero energy', carbon-neutral buildings by 2030. While this vision is widely accepted as desirable, unless there are significant changes to the way buildings are routinely designed, delivered and operated, zero energy buildings will remain a niche phenomenon rather than a sector-wide reality. Toward that end, a public/private coalition including the Alliance to Save Energy, LBNL, AIA, ASHRAE, USGBC and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) are developing an 'action plan' for moving the U.S. commercial building sector towards zero energy performance. It addresses regional action in a national framework; integrated deployment, demonstration and R&D threads; and would focus on measurable, visible performance indicators. This paper outlines this action plan, focusing on the challenge, the key themes, and the strategies and actions leading to substantial reductions in GHG emissions by 2030.

Selkowitz, Stephen; Selkowitz, Stephen; Granderson, Jessica; Haves, Philip; Mathew, Paul; Harris, Jeff

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

215

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Average Water Use of Commercial and Institutional Establishments (Gallons per Establishment per Day) Average Variation % Total % of CI % Seasonal Daily Use In Use (1) CI Use Customers Use (2) Hotels and Motels 7,113 5.41 5.8% 1.9% 23.1% Laundries/Laundromats 3,290 8.85 4.0% 1.4% 13.4% Car Washes 3,031 3.12 0.8% 0.4% 14.2% Urban Irrigation 2,596 8.73 28.5% 30.2% 86.9% Schools and Colleges 2,117 12.13 8.8% 4.8% 58.0% Hospitals/Medical Offices 1,236 78.5 3.9% 4.2% 23.2% Office Buildings 1,204 6.29 10.2% 11.7% 29.0% Restaurants 906 7.69 8.8% 11.2% 16.1% Food Stores 729 16.29 2.9% 5.2% 19.4% Auto Shops (3) 687 7.96 2.0% 6.7% 27.2% Membership Organizations (4) 629 6.42 2.0% 5.6% 46.2% Total 77.6% 83.3% Note(s): Source(s): 23,538 Estimated from 24 months of water utility billing data in five Western locations: four locations in Southern California and one in Arizona. 1)

216

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage (1) | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 Health Care 178.1 216.0 135.7 | Education 77.7 88.3 80.6 Inpatient 230.3 255.3 253.8 | Service 62.4 86.0 74.8 Outpatient 91.6 110.4 84.4 | Food Service 145.2 290.1 361.2 Food Sales 205.8 197.6 198.3 | Religious Worship 46.6 39.9 43.3 Lodging 88.2 111.5 88.1 | Public Order & Safety N.A. 101.3 110.6 Office 93.6 94.4 88.0 | Warehouse & Storage N.A. 38.9 33.3 Mercantile 80.4 91.8 94.4 | Public Assembly 61.9 107.6 119.7 Retail (Non-Malls) 74.1 63.7 86.4 | Vacant 21.4 23.1 N.A. Retail (Malls) N.A. 103.9 99.5 | Other 161.3 204.9 125.3 Note(s): Source(s): Consumption (kBtu/SF) Consumption (kBtu/SF) 1) See Table 3.1.3 for primary versus delivered energy consumption.

217

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Commercial Delivered and Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Year Percent Delivered Energy Consumption Primary Energy Consumption Floorspace Post-2000 Total Consumption per Total Consumption per (million SF) Floorspace (1) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) 1980 50.9 N.A. 5.99 117.7 10.57 207.7 1990 64.3 N.A. 6.74 104.8 13.30 207.0 2000 (2) 68.5 N.A. 8.20 119.7 17.15 250.3 2010 81.1 26% 8.74 107.7 18.22 224.6 2015 84.1 34% 8.88 105.5 18.19 216.2 2020 89.1 43% 9.02 101.2 19.15 214.9 2025 93.9 52% 9.56 101.8 20.06 213.6 2030 98.2 60% 9.96 101.5 20.92 213.1 2035 103.0 68% 10.38 100.8 21.78 211.4 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Consumption Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; DOE for 1980 floorspace; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 1994, Jan. 1994, Table A5, p. 62 for 1990 floorspace; EIA, AEO 2003, Jan. 2003, Table A5, p. 127 for 2000 floorspace; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012,

218

From comfort to kilowatts: An integrated assessment of electricity conservation in Thailand's commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

Thailand serves as a case study of the potential to conserve electricity in the fast-growing commercial sectors of the tropical developing world. We performed a field study of over 1100 Thai office workers in which a questionnaire survey and simultaneous physical measurements were taken. Both air-conditioned and non-air-conditioned buildings were included. We analyzed Thai subjective responses on the ASHRAE, McIntyre and other rating scales, relating them to Effective Temperature, demographics, and to rational indices of warmth such as PMV and TSENS. These results suggest that without sacrificing comfort, significant energy conservation opportunities exist through the relaxation of upper space temperature limits. To investigate the potential for conserving energy in a cost-effective manner, we performed a series of parametric simulations using the DOE-2.1D computer program on three commercial building prototypes based on actual buildings in Bangkok; an office, a hotel, and a shopping center. We investigated a wide range of energy conservation measures appropriate for each building type, from architectural measures to HVAC equipment and control solutions. The best measures applied in combination into high efficiency cases can generate energy savings in excess of 50%. Economic analyses performed for the high efficiency cases, resulted in costs of conserved energy of less than and internal rates of return in excess of 40%. Thermal cool storage, cogeneration, and gas cooling technology showed promise as cost-effective electric load management strategies.

Busch, J.F. Jr.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

From comfort to kilowatts: An integrated assessment of electricity conservation in Thailand's commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

Thailand serves as a case study of the potential to conserve electricity in the fast-growing commercial sectors of the tropical developing world. A field study of over 1,100 Thai office workers was performed in which a questionnaire survey and simultaneous physical measurements were taken. Both air-conditioned and non-air-conditioned buildings were included. Thai subjective responses were analyzed on the ASHRAE, McIntyre, and other rating scales, relating them to Effective Temperature, demographics, and to rational indices of warmth such as PMV and TSENSA. These results suggest that without sacrificing comfort, significant energy conservation opportunities exist through the relaxation of upper space temperature limits. To investigate the potential for conserving energy in a cost-effective manner, a series of parametric simulations were performed using the DOE-2.1D computer program for three commercial building prototypes in Bangkok: an office, a hotel, and a shopping center. A wide range of energy conservation measures appropriate for each building type was studied. Drawing on the building energy-simulation results, impacts on the Thai electric utility were evaluated under various conservation scenarios.

Busch, J.F. Jr.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2015 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.01 1.01 11.4% | 3.05 3.05 16.7% Space Heating 1.69 0.20 0.06 0.11 0.17 2.23 25.2% | 0.50 2.57 14.1% Space Cooling 0.04 0.51 0.54 6.1% | 1.52 1.56 8.6% Ventilation 0.54 0.54 6.1% | 1.62 1.62 8.9% Refrigeration 0.35 0.35 4.0% | 1.06 1.06 5.8% Electronics 0.32 0.32 3.6% | 0.95 0.95 5.2% Water Heating 0.48 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.63 7.1% | 0.27 0.81 4.5% Computers 0.19 0.19 2.1% | 0.57 0.57 3.1% Cooking 0.19 0.02 0.21 2.4% | 0.07 0.26 1.4% Other (5) 0.33 0.01 0.14 0.05 0.01 0.81 1.35 15.2% | 2.45 2.99 16.4% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.68 0.19 0.63 1.50 16.9% | 1.90 2.77 15.2% Total 3.33 0.43 0.14 0.11 0.15 4.63 8.88 100% | 13.99 18.23 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.35 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (less than 0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are

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221

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2025 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.08 1.08 11.3% | 3.27 3.27 16.3% Space Heating 1.68 0.18 0.06 0.11 0.16 2.20 23.1% | 0.49 2.53 12.6% Ventilation 0.60 0.60 6.2% | 1.80 1.80 9.0% Space Cooling 0.03 0.52 0.55 5.7% | 1.56 1.59 7.9% Electronics 0.40 0.40 4.2% | 1.22 1.22 6.1% Refrigeration 0.34 0.34 3.6% | 1.02 1.02 5.1% Water Heating 0.52 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.67 7.0% | 0.27 0.85 4.2% Computers 0.20 0.20 2.1% | 0.60 0.60 3.0% Cooking 0.21 0.02 0.23 2.4% | 0.07 0.27 1.4% Other (5) 0.48 0.01 0.15 0.05 0.01 1.12 1.82 19.1% | 3.39 4.09 20.3% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.58 0.18 0.69 1.46 15.3% | 2.09 2.85 14.2% Total 3.50 0.41 0.15 0.12 0.15 5.23 9.56 100% | 15.77 20.10 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.33 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (less than 0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are

222

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Commercial Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total Total(3) 2010-Year 1980 2.63 24.9% 1.31 12.4% 0.12 1.1% 0.02 0.2% 1.91 4.58 6.49 61.4% 1981 2.54 23.9% 1.12 10.5% 0.14 1.3% 0.02 0.2% 2.03 4.76 6.80 64.1% 1982 2.64 24.3% 1.03 9.5% 0.16 1.4% 0.02 0.2% 2.08 4.91 6.99 64.5% 1983 2.48 22.7% 1.16 10.7% 0.16 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.12 4.98 7.09 65.0% 1984 2.57 22.5% 1.22 10.7% 0.17 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.26 5.17 7.43 65.1% 1985 2.47 21.6% 1.08 9.4% 0.14 1.2% 0.02 0.2% 2.35 5.39 7.74 67.6% 1986 2.35 20.3% 1.16 10.0% 0.14 1.2% 0.03 0.2% 2.44 5.47 7.91 68.3% 1987 2.47 20.8% 1.13 9.5% 0.13 1.1% 0.03 0.2% 2.54 5.62 8.16 68.5% 1988 2.72 21.6% 1.09 8.7% 0.13 1.0% 0.03 0.3% 2.68 5.92 8.60 68.4% 1989 2.77 21.0% 1.04 7.9% 0.12 0.9% 0.10 0.8% 2.77 6.39 9.16 69.5% 1990 2.67 20.1%

223

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2035 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.15 1.15 11.1% | 3.40 3.40 15.6% Space Heating 1.65 0.18 0.06 0.11 0.16 2.16 20.8% | 0.48 2.48 11.3% Ventilation 0.65 0.65 6.2% | 1.91 1.91 8.7% Space Cooling 0.03 0.54 0.57 5.5% | 1.59 1.62 7.4% Electronics 0.46 0.46 4.5% | 1.37 1.37 6.3% Refrigeration 0.36 0.36 3.4% | 1.05 1.05 4.8% Water Heating 0.54 0.03 0.04 0.09 0.70 6.8% | 0.25 0.87 4.0% Computers 0.22 0.22 2.1% | 0.64 0.64 2.9% Cooking 0.22 0.02 0.25 2.4% | 0.06 0.29 1.3% Other (5) 0.81 0.01 0.16 0.06 0.01 1.46 2.51 24.2% | 4.30 5.35 24.5% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.40 0.18 0.77 1.36 13.1% | 2.28 2.86 13.1% Total 3.65 0.40 0.16 0.12 0.16 5.89 10.38 100% | 17.33 21.83 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.32 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are assumed

224

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.19 1.19 13.6% | 3.69 3.69 20.2% Space Heating 1.65 0.22 0.06 0.11 0.28 2.33 26.6% | 0.88 2.93 16.0% Space Cooling 0.04 0.84 0.88 10.1% | 2.60 2.64 14.5% Ventilation 0.54 0.54 6.1% | 1.66 1.66 9.1% Refrigeration 0.39 0.39 4.5% | 1.21 1.21 6.6% Water Heating 0.44 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.58 6.7% | 0.28 0.78 4.3% Electronics 0.26 0.26 3.0% | 0.81 0.81 4.4% Computers 0.21 0.21 2.4% | 0.66 0.66 3.6% Cooking 0.18 0.02 0.20 2.3% | 0.07 0.25 1.4% Other (5) 0.30 0.01 0.14 0.05 0.01 0.69 1.20 13.7% | 2.13 2.64 14.5% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.68 0.25 0.02 0.95 10.9% | 0.06 0.99 5.4% Total 3.29 0.52 0.14 0.12 0.14 4.54 8.74 100% | 14.05 18.26 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.43 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are assumed

225

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Commercial Site Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) (1) Growth Rate Wood (2) Solar Thermal (3) Solar PV (3) GHP Total 2010-Year 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 0.110 0.035 0.010 N.A. 0.155 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.154 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.007 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.148 0.6%

226

Charting a Path to Net Zero Energy: Public-Private Sector Perspectives of the Commercial Buildings Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforming the commercial buildings market to become "net-zero-energy-capable" will require dramatically lower levels of energy use sector wide. A comprehensive and concerted industry effort, partnering with utilities and government, must be sufficient in scale to influence the more than 600 billion dollar per year spent on commercial new construction, renovation, and energy bills by fundamentally reinventing today's standard "design- build-operate" building delivery process as an integrated system throughout a building's life cycle. In response to this need, in 2007 Congress called for creation of a Commercial Buildings Consortium (CBC) as a joint effort by the US Department of Energy (DOE), building owners and developers, states, utilities, and other stakeholders to develop and implement a multi-year agenda to transform the market through coordinated technology development, demonstration, and deployment. Since 2009, the CBC has attracted over 500 members, many of whom contributed actively, through 12 working groups, in developing two major reports released in early 2011. Next Generation Technologies Barriers and Industry Recommendations and an Analysis of Cost and Non-cost Barriers and Policy Solutions. This paper reviews the concept of net-zero energy (NZE) buildings and where we stand today. We discuss some of the near-term actions and longer- term strategies needed to accelerate technology innovation; make today's best practices tomorrow's business-as-usual; and deliver dramatically lower levels of energy use along with high-quality, healthy, and pleasant indoor environments that are resilient, adaptable, durable, and grid-responsive - while achieving market-accepted economics.

Harris, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy costs during the cooling season as well as the heating season. To achieve air conditioning savings, the system separates dehumidification from sensible cooling; dehumidifies by desiccant absorption, using heat from storage to dry the desiccant; and then cools at an elevated temperature improving overall system efficiency. Efficient heat for desiccant regeneration is provided by a selective-energy system coupled with thermal storage. The selective-energy system incorporates diesel cogeneration, solar energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility energy for refrigeration; 10 to 20% in refrigeration equipment; and space savings due to smaller ductwork and equipment.

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Estimating market penetration of steam, hot water and chilled water in commercial sector using a new econometric model  

SciTech Connect

For the first time in the public domain, we have estimated the energy consumption and expenditures of district steam, hot water, and chilled water. Specifically, the combined energy consumption and expenditures of steam, hot water, and chilled water in 1989 were approximately 800 trillion Btu and 7 billion dollars, respectively. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for estimating market penetration of steam, hot water, and chilled water systems in commercial buildings over the next 20 years. This research sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) used the 1989 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Surveys (CBECS) to provide information on energy consumption and expenditures and related factors in about 6000 buildings. A general linear model to estimated parameters for each of the three equations for steam, hot water, and chilled water demand in the buildings. A logarithmic transformation was made for the dependent variable and most of the explanatory variables. The model provides estimates of building steam, hot water, and chilled water consumption and expenditures between now and the year 2010. This model should be of interest to policymakers, researchers, and market participants involved with planning and implementing community-based energy-conserving and environmentally beneficial energy systems.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Karvelas, D.E.; Daniels, E.J.; Anderson, J.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Reducing Demand through Efficiency and Services: Impacts and Opportunities in Buildings Sector (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mary Ann Piette, Deputy of LBNL's Building Technologies Department and Director of the Demand Response Research Center, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Piette, Mary Ann (Director, Demand Response Research Center)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

230

Integrated estimation of commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities in the PG&E service area  

SciTech Connect

This project represents a unique research effort to address the commercial sector end-use energy forecasting data needs of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). The object of the project was to develop an updated set of commercial sector end-use energy use intensity (EUI) data that has been fully reconciled with measured data. The research was conducted in two stages. First, we developed reconciled electricity end-use EUIs and load shapes for each of the 11 building types in the inland and coastal regions of the PG&E service territory using information collected in 1986. Second, we developed procedures to translate these results into a consistent set of commercial sector forecasting model inputs recognizing the separate modeling conventions used by PG&E and CEC. EUIs have been developed for: II commercial building types; up to 10 end uses; up to 3 fuel types; 2 and 5 subservice territory forecasting regions (as specified by the PG&E and CEC forecasting models, respectively); and up to 2 distinct vintages corresponding to the period prior to and immediately following the adoption of the first generation of California building and equipment standards. For the electricity end uses, 36 sets of daily load shapes have been developed representing average weekday, average weekend, and peak weekday electricity use for each month of the year by building type for both the inland and coastal climate zones.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Energy Demand (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Growth in U.S. energy use is linked to population growth through increases in demand for housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, manufacturing, and services. This affects not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels and consumption by sector.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

232

Methodology for Analyzing the Technical Potential for Energy Performance in the U.S. Commercial Buildings Sector with Detailed Energy Modeling: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes a methodology for developing quantitative answers to the question, ''How low can energy use go within the commercial buildings sector''? The basic process is to take each building in the 1999 CBECS public use data files and create a baseline building energy model for it as if it were being built new in 2005 with code-minimum energy performance.

Griffith, B.; Crawley, D.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 16 Annual peak electricity demand by sector. Tableincludes an hourly electricity demand (i.e. power) profileof aggregating sectoral electricity demands into a statewide

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Toward a national plan for the commercialization of solar energy: price/demand scenarios and projections of solar utilization under the National Energy Act  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three macroeconomic scenarios were developed as an economic backdrop for projecting solar technology market acceptance under various government policies and commercialization programs. These scenarios assume three levels of future world oil prices - $18, $25 and $32 per barrel (1976 $) in the year 2000. This range is intended to encompass the most likely set of energy futures. The scenarios are discussed in terms of their underlying assumptions and changes in fuel and resource consumption by sector of the economy. Estimates of the future utilization of solar technologies for the mid-price scenarios are given. These estimates are based on the solar subsidies and incentive programs in the National Energy Act.

Rebibo, K. K.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide "Zero-Energy" Performance Goals in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 with Projections to 2030. Washington, DC: US Departmentcarbon-neutral buildings by 2030. While this vision isin GHG emissions by 2030. Energy Use in Commercial

Selkowitz, Stephen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial sector energy demand Commercial sector energy demand For commercial buildings, pace of decline in energy intensity depends on technology figure data Average delivered energy consumption per square foot of commercial floorspace declines at an annual rate of 0.4 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 59), while commercial floorspace grows by 1.0 percent per year. Natural gas consumption increases at about one-half the rate of delivered electricity consumption, which grows by 0.8 percent per year in the Reference case. With ongoing improvements in equipment efficiency and building shells, the growth of energy consumption declines more rapidly than commercial floorspace increases, and the average energy intensity of commercial buildings is reduced. Three alternative technology cases show the effects of efficiency

237

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial sector energy demand Commercial sector energy demand For commercial buildings, pace of decline in energy intensity depends on technology figure data Average delivered energy consumption per square foot of commercial floorspace declines at an annual rate of 0.4 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 59), while commercial floorspace grows by 1.0 percent per year. Natural gas consumption increases at about one-half the rate of delivered electricity consumption, which grows by 0.8 percent per year in the Reference case. With ongoing improvements in equipment efficiency and building shells, the growth of energy consumption declines more rapidly than commercial floorspace increases, and the average energy intensity of commercial buildings is reduced. Three alternative technology cases show the effects of efficiency

238

Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Demand Response Enabling Technologies and Approaches for Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are numerous programs sponsored by Independent System Operators (ISOs) and utility or state efficiency programs that have an objective of reducing peak demand. Most of these programs have targeted the residential and commercial sector, however, there are also huge opportunities for demand response in the industrial sector. This paper describes some of the demand response initiatives that are currently active in New York State, explaining applicability of industrial facilities. Next, we discuss demand response-enabling technologies, which can help an industrial plant effectively address demand response needs. Finally, the paper is concluded with a discussion of case study projects that illustrate application of some of these demand response enabling technologies for process operations. These case studies, illustrating some key projects from the NYSERDA Peak Load Reduction program, will describe the technologies and approaches deployed to achieve the demand reduction at the site, the quantitative impact of the project, and a discussion of the overall successes at each site.

Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.; Schmidt, C.; Seryak, J.; Smith, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

3129 Commercial Analysis 20130205 LBNL - Home - Energy ...  

Commercialization-Analysis-&Roadmap-- ... theenergycontentofthegasand ... commercialized, it must meet a market demanda demand ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

242

Barriers to the increased utilization of coal combustion/desulfurization by-products by government & commercial sectors - update 1998,7/99,3268845  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BARRIERS TO THE INCREASED UTILIZATION BARRIERS TO THE INCREASED UTILIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION/DESULFURIZATION BY-PRODUCTS BY GOVERNMENT AND COMMERCIAL SECTORS - UPDATE 1998 EERC Topical Report DE-FC21-93MC-30097--79 Submitted by: Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett Everett A. Sondreal Edward N. Steadman Kurt E. Eylands Bruce A. Dockter Energy & Environmental Research Center PO Box 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 99-EERC-07-08 July 1999 i TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii TERMINOLOGY AND DEFINITIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

243

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The23 Electricity Demandand commercial electricity demand per census division from

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

EIA projections of coal supply and demand  

SciTech Connect

Contents of this report include: EIA projections of coal supply and demand which covers forecasted coal supply and transportation, forecasted coal demand by consuming sector, and forecasted coal demand by the electric utility sector; and policy discussion.

Klein, D.E.

1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

245

Impacts of Temperature Variation on Energy Demand in Buildings (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In the residential and commercial sectors, heating and cooling account for more than 40 percent of end-use energy demand. As a result, energy consumption in those sectors can vary significantly from year to year, depending on yearly average temperatures.

Information Center

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 Peak Demand Baselinewinter morning electric peak demand in commercial buildings.California to reduce peak demand during summer afternoons,

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Analysis of residential, industrial and commercial sector responses to potential electricity supply constraints in the 1990s  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is considerable debate over the ability of electric generation capacity to meet the growing needs of the US economy in the 1990s. This study provides new perspective on that debate and examines the possibility of power outages resulting from electricity supply constraints. Previous studies have focused on electricity supply growth, demand growth, and on the linkages between electricity and economic growth. This study assumes the occurrence of electricity supply shortfalls in the 1990s and examines the steps that homeowners, businesses, manufacturers, and other electricity users might take in response to electricity outages.

Fisher, Z.J.; Fang, J.M.; Lyke, A.J.; Krudener, J.R.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Preliminary energy sector assessments of Jamaica. Volume III: renewable energy. Part I: solar energy - commercial and industrial  

SciTech Connect

This study concerns commercial and industrial solar applications, specifically solar water heating and solar air cooling. The study finds that solar domestic water heating and boiler make-up water preheating are technically feasible and, depending on the displaced energy source (electrical or various fuel types), economically justified; and that solar hot water installations could displace the equivalent of 189,842 barrels of fuel oil per year. However, solar cooling requires high performance collectors not currently manufactured in Jamaica, and feasibility studies indicate that solar cooling in the near term is not economically justified.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Key assumptions for the commercial sector in the AEO2012 integrated demand technology cases 7. Key assumptions for the commercial sector in the AEO2012 integrated demand technology cases Assumptions Integrated 2011 Deand Technology Integraged High Demand Technologya Integrated Buildings Best Available Demand Technologya End-use equipment Limited to technology menu available in 2011. Promulgated standards still take effect. Earlier availability, lower cost, and/ or higher efficiencies for advanced equipment. Purchases limited to highest available efficiency for each technology class, regardless of cost. Hurdle rates Same as Reference case distribution. All energy efficiency investments evaluated at 7-percent real interest rate. All energy efficiency investments evaluated at 7-percent real interest rate. Building shells Fixed at 2011 levels. 25 percent more improvement than in the Reference case by 2035. 50 percent more improvement than in the Reference case by 2035.

250

Demand Subsidies versus R&D: Comparing the Uncertain Impacts of Policy on a Pre-Commercial Low-Carbon Energy Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine an expert elicitation and a bottom-up manufacturing cost model to compare the effects of R&D and demand subsidies. We model their effects on the future costs of a low-carbon energy technology that is not currently commercially available, purely organic photovoltaics (PV). We find that: (1) successful R&D enables PV to achieve a cost target of 4c/kWh, (2) the cost of PV does not reach the target when only subsidies, and not R&D, are implemented, and (3) production-related effects on technological advancelearning-by-doing and economies of scaleare not as critical to the long-term potential for cost reduction in organic PV than is the investment in and success of R&D. These results are insensitive to two levels of policy intensity, the level of a carbon price, the availability of storage technology, and uncertainty in the main parameters used in the model. However, a case can still be made for subsidies: comparisons of stochastic dominance show that subsidies provide a hedge against failure in the R&D program. 1.

Gregory F. Nemet; Erin Baker

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Sector Energy Demand Commercial Sector Energy Demand On This Page End-use efficiency... Growth in electricity use... Core technologies... Improved interconnection... End-use efficiency improvements could lower energy consumption per capita The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting. figure data

252

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 22. Agricultural natural gas demand by planning area.23. Other sector natural gas demand by planning area.Projections Monthly natural gas demands are depicted in

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

254

Development of a data base and forecasting model for commercial-sector electricity usage and demand. Volume VII. Detailed survey, sampling methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed toward obtaining two sets of primary data, from which econometric and engineering parameters for the model were to be derived. The first type will be collected in a mail survey of utility-company customers determined by an analysis of customer-account data. These data have been collected from Pacific Gas and Electric, Los Angeles Div. of Water and Power, San Diego Gas and Electric, and Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and have been analyzed and the survey customers selected. The second type will consist of detailed technical data on buildings in the SMSA's of Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, and Sacramento. This report presents the final methodology for the selection of building samples, by type and location, for the detailed building data collection. Eleven tables present the results of the analysis. Within service areas and/or SMSA's, significant establishment classifications are illustrated with their energy characteristics. The allocation of the detailed survey-sample members is illustrated, according to establishment classifications and the 24 different building types. This specification is further detailed as to allocations within the SMUD service area and those to be taken from other areas. The methodology presented in this final report is being used to select sample members for the detailed survey.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Also assume that the fan, both before and after project implementa-tion, was rated at 3 thousand cubic feet per minute (MCFM). The estimation was completed as follows:

256

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

257

demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

258

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity On This Page Residential and... Coal-fired plants... Most new capacity... Annual capacity... Growth in generating... Costs and regulatory... EPACT2005 tax... Biomass and wind... Renewable capacity... State portfolio... Electricity use... Real Growth in... Improved interconn... Residential and commercial sectors dominate electricity demand growth Electricity demand growth has slowed in each decade since the 1950s. After 9.8-percent annual growth in the 1950s, demand (including retail sales and direct use) increased 2.4 percent per year in the 1990s. From 2000 to 2009 (including the 2008-2009 economic downturn) demand grew by 0.5 percent per year. In the Reference case, electricity demand growth rebounds but remains relatively slow, as growing demand for electricity services is offset by

259

Table 6.8 Natural Gas Prices by Sector, 1967-2011 (Dollars per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Commercial sector, including commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 The percentage of the sector's consumption in Table ...

260

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Title Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Results and commissioning issues from an automated demand response pilot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities"Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings", L Band Commissioning Issues from an Automated Demand Response.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, Dave; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development for Demand Response Calculation Findings andManagement and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

35% of the commercial electricity demand in CA. For thoseof displacement of electricity demand by heat-activatedApr. ) Electricity electricity demand electricity demand

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Finance Sector the Finance Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Finance, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.unepfi.org/fileadmi References Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector[1] Summary "This survey was carried out in 2008, when high and volatile oil prices, steadily rising demand for energy, and global imperatives, such as climate change, created significant renewed attention to energy efficiency - both in the policy and commercial world. UNEP Finance Initiative sought to provide an evidence base on current lending activities in the energy efficiency space, as well as views on this issue through a survey among

266

Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Savings in the Residential and Commercial Sectors with High Efficiency Electric Motors. Savings in the Residential and Commercial Sectors with High Efficiency Electric Motors. Savings in the Residential and Commercial Sectors with High Efficiency Electric Motors.

Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

268

EA-0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration EA-0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector...

269

District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution Companies (Percent) District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution...

270

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

271

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

272

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Title Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4982E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Page, Janie, Sila Kiliccote, Junqiao Han Dudley, Mary Ann Piette, Albert K. Chiu, Bashar Kellow, Edward Koch, and Paul Lipkin Date Published 07/2011 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords demand response, emerging technologies, market sectors, medium commercial business, openadr, small commercial, small commercial business, technologies Abstract Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

273

Current trends in commercial cool storage. Final report. [Use of chilled water and ice storage to reduce demand charges and electric bills; 85 projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to identify, by means of a phone-and-mail survey, recent installations of off-peak cool storage air conditioning systems in commercial buildings; to monitor new developments; and to indicate trends. This report contains descriptions of over 80 systems installed since 1981, plus findings and conclusions based on site-specific information. Analysis of the findings suggests that storage cooling systems in commercial buildings can, in many cases, offer technical and cost advantages over nonstorage systems. The detailed information should be of value to potential customers and HVAC engineers in making cooling equipment decisions that would be advantageous to customer, utility, and HVAC industry alike. 20 refs.

Hersh, H.N.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of implementation. References Architecture 2030 (2007)6.7 GtCO 2 eq/yr globally by 2030 (IPCC 2007). As advocates,commercial buildings by 2030 in the stated goals of the

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applicable Sector Commercial Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

276

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ofthesmallcommercialpeakdemand. Themajorityofthelessthan200kWofpeakdemand,makeup20?25%of peakthesmallcommercial peakdemand. Atenpercentreduction

Dudley, June Han

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Introduction Coal production in the United States in 2010 increased to a level of 1,085.3 million short tons according to preliminary data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), an increase of 1.0 percent, or 10.4 million short tons above the 2009 level of 1,074.9 million short tons (Table 1). In 2010 U.S. coal consumption increased in all sectors except commercial and institutional while total coal stocks fell slightly for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector in 2010 was higher by 4.5 percent, while coking coal consumption increased by 37.9 percent and the other industrial sector increased by 7.1 percent. The commercial and

278

Commercial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

279

Residential Sector Demand Module 1995, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This updated version of the NEMS Residential Module Documentation includes changesmade to the residential module for the production of the Annual Energy Outlook 1995.

John H. Cymbalsky

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

282

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Transportation sector energy demand Growth in transportation energy consumption flat across projection figure data The transportation sector consumes 27.1 quadrillion Btu of energy...

283

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

b Losses in CTL and biofuel production. c Energy consumption in the sectors includes electricity demand purchases from the electric power sector, ...

284

Commercialization Support for Business Program (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commercialization Support for Business Program supports product and process commercialization and business development in all sectors and all regions of the province.

285

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 2: Final residential and commercial building prototypes and DOE-2.1E developed UECs and EUIs; Part 2  

SciTech Connect

This section contains the detailed measured impact results and market segment data for each DSM case examined for this building type. A complete index of all base and measure cases defined for this building type is shown first. This index represents an expansion of the base and measure matrix presented in Table 1 (residential) or Table 2 (commercial) for the applicable sector. Following this index, a summary report sheet is provided for each DSM measure case in the order shown in the index. The summary report sheet contains a host of information and selected graphs which define and depict the measure impacts and outline the market segment data assumptions utilized for each case in the DBEDT DSM Forecasting models. The variables and figures included in the summary report sheet are described. Numerous tables and figures are included.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gasto Development of Long-Term Energy Demand Scenarios forto Development of Long-Term Energy Demand Scenarios for

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

SERI photovoltaic venture analysis: long term demand estimation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a sectoral demand analysis for photovoltaic power systems used in the residential sector (single family homes), the service, commercial, and institutional sector (schools), and in the central power sector. The results described are the output of a set of three normative modeling activities carried out by the MIT Energy Laboratory. They are based on the assumption that the sectors, i.e., the utilities, schools, and homeowners, will switch to photovoltaic power systems when they are cost-effective relative to the competition, that is, centralized power generation using conventional fuels. In each case the assumption is made that the market for photovoltaic power systems will be a new market, not a retrofit market. As a result the annual (total for utilities) sales potential at a given price is estimated for each sector assuming a specific level of new installations in that sector, i.e., new single-family homes, new schools, and additions to utility stocks. As such, the results presented are maxima for a given application. While the methodology presented does not allow for any early acceptors, it does assume that once economic all new homeowners, school-builders, and utilities will buy to a fixed level.

Tabors, R.D.; Finger, S.; Burns, A.; Carpenter, P.; Dinwoodie, T.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain  

SciTech Connect

Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S. [Univ. of Bahrain, Manama (Bahrain)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Louisville Private Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Private Sector Attendees Private Sector Attendees ENERGY STAR Kick-off Meeting December 2007 5/3rd Bank Al J Schneider Company (The Galt House East) Baptist Hospital East Brown - Forman Building Owner and Managers Association (BOMA) Louisville CB Richard Ellis Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Louisville Cushman Wakefield General Electric Company Golden Foods Greater Louisville Chapter of International Facility Management Association (IFMA) Hines Humana, Inc Institute of Real Estate Management (IREM) Kentucky Chapter Jewish Hospital & St Mary's Healthcare Kentucky Chapter, Certified Commercial Investment Managers (CCIM) Kentucky Governor's Office of Energy Policy Kentucky Society of Health Care Engineers Kindred Health Care Louisville Air Pollution Control Board

290

Commercialization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercialization Commercialization Commercialization See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. Commercialization is the process by which technologies and innovations developed in the lab make their way to market. By licensing patents or using Energy Department facilities, researchers from the private sector and academia are able to take advantage of federal investments into basic science research, while researchers are able to ensure that their discoveries have a life beyond the lab. The Energy Department also helps entrepreneurs, small business owners and

291

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the origin, structure and continuing development of a model of time varying energy consumption in the US commercial building stock. The model is based on a flexible structure that disaggregates the stock into various categories (e.g. by building type, climate, vintage and life-cycle stage) and assigns attributes to each of these (e.g. floor area and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections. In addition to supporting the interactive exploration of building stock dynamics, the model has been used to study the likely outcomes of specific policy and innovation scenarios targeting very low future energy consumption in the building stock. Model use has highlighted the scale of the challenge of meeting targets stated by various government and professional bodies, and the importance of considering both new construction and existing buildings.

Coffey, Brian; Borgeson, Sam; Selkowitz, Stephen; Apte, Josh; Mathew, Paul; Haves, Philip

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Commercial Buildings Communications protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many automation and control protocols in use in commercial building and residential sectors today. For both commercial building and residential sectors there are several thousand manufacturers throughout the world that supply end-use electrical appliances and other building fixtures that communicate using these automation and control protocols. Some of these protocols are based on open standards (for example, BACnet, DALI) while others are semi-proprietary (for example, Zigbee, LonWorks, Modbus...

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

building demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

294

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Conservation and Commercialization in...

295

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

296

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal Residential coal Residential market trends icon Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, residential energy use per capita declines by 17.0 percent from 2009 to 2035 (Figure 58). Delivered energy use stays relatively constant while population grows by 26.7 percent during the period. Growth in the number of homes and in average square footage leads to increased demand for energy services, which is offset in part by efficiency gains in space heating, water heating, and lighting equipment. Population shifts to warmer and drier climates also reduce energy demand for space heating. See more issues Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy consumption. The residential sector accounted for 57 percent of that energy

297

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial sector energy demand Industrial sector energy demand On This Page Heat and power energy... Industrial fuel mix changes... Iron and steel... Delivered energy use... Chemical industry use of fuels... Output growth for... Industrial and commercial... Heat and power energy consumption increases in manufacturing industries Despite a 54-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial energy consumption increases by only 19 percent from 2009 to 2035 in the AEO2011 Reference case. Energy consumption growth is moderated by a shift in the mix of output, as growth in energy-intensive manufacturing output (aluminum, steel, bulk chemicals, paper, and refining) slows and growth in high-value (but less energy-intensive) industries, such as computers and transportation equipment, accelerates. figure data

298

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

35% of CA commercial electricity demand. Simulating thesereflect the benefit of electricity demand displacement byApr. ) Electricity electricity demand electricity demand

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings Title Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-2340e Year of Publication 2009 Authors Piette, Mary Ann, Girish Ghatikar, Sila Kiliccote, David S. Watson, Edward Koch, and Dan Hennage Journal Journal of Computing Science and Information Engineering Volume 9 Issue 2 Keywords communication and standards, market sectors, openadr Abstract This paper describes the concept for and lessons from the development and field-testing of an open, interoperable communications infrastructure to support automated demand response (auto-DR). Automating DR allows greater levels of participation, improved reliability, and repeatability of the DR in participating facilities. This paper also presents the technical and architectural issues associated with auto-DR and description of the demand response automation server (DRAS), the client/server architecture-based middle-ware used to automate the interactions between the utilities or any DR serving entity and their customers for DR programs. Use case diagrams are presented to show the role of the DRAS between utility/ISO and the clients at the facilities.

300

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

302

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)...

303

Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

Not Available

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

304

Computers in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

has risen as well. The Annual Energy Outlook 2002 forecasts that commercial energy demand will grow at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, with the most rapid increases in...

305

Development and evaluation of fully automated demand response in large facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development for Demand Response Calculation - Findings and2003. Dividends with Demand Response. ASHRAE Journal,Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings.

Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Shockman, Christine; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Design and Implementation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities. CEC-Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Management and Demand Response in Commercial Building. ,

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. In2010. Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyImpacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyFigure 3: Commercial electricity demand with and without the

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications A Reminder for Sector 7 PIs and Users: Please report your new publications to the Sector Manager and the CAT Director. The APS requires PIs to submit new publications to its Publication Database, a link which can be found on the Publication section of the APS web site. Publication information for work done at 7ID Proper acknowledgement sentences to include in papers. Sector 7 Call for APS User Activity Reports. APS User Activity Reports by MHATT-CATers. Recent articles Recent theses Sector 7 Reports Sector 7 Recent research highlights (New) Design documents in ICMS on Sector 7 construction and operation Sector 7 related ICMS documents Library Resources available on the WWW The ANL Library system ANL electronic journal list AIM Find it! Citation Ranking by ISI (see Journal citation report)

310

Energy Perspectives: Industrial and transportation sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Since 2008, energy use in the transportation, residential, and commercial sectors stayed relatively constant or fell slightly. Industrial consumption grew in 2010 and ...

311

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Consortium Commercial Buildings Consortium Sandy Fazeli National Association of State Energy Officials sfazeli@naseo.org; 703-299-8800 ext. 17 April 2, 2013 Supporting Consortium for the U.S. Department of Energy Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Many energy savings opportunities in commercial buildings remain untapped, underserved by the conventional "invest-design-build- operate" approach * The commercial buildings sector is siloed, with limited coordination

312

sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sector sector Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 5, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption sector South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

313

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Trends in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace The addition of commercial buildings and floorspace from 1995 to 1999 continued the general trends noted since 1979 (Figures 1 and 2). The size of the commercial buildings has grown steadily over the twenty years of CBECS. Each year more buildings are added to the sector (new construction or conversion of pre-existing buildings to commercial activity) than are removed (demolition or conversion to non-commercial activity). The definition for the commercial buildings population was changed for the 1995 CBECS which resulted in a slightly smaller buildings population and accounts for the data break in both Figures 1 and 2 (see report "Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector" for complete details). Figure 1. Total Commercial Buildings, 1979 to 1999

314

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thus, the industrial electricity sector prices applied to 6%commercial/industrial sector electricity price for use inassumed that industrial sector electricity prices applied to

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fourth international symposium on distribution automation and demand side management (DA/DSM 94)  

SciTech Connect

This document is the conference proceedings from the 1994 Distribution Automation/Demand Side Management meeting in Orlando, Florida. There are 87 papers presented, and topics include: (1) improved feeder efficiency, (2) automation of older substations, (3) modeling tools for distribution, planning, and operations, (4) sensing and fault detection, (5) outage monitoring, (6) cost and benefits of distribution automation, (7) communications, (8) optimization of feeder systems operations, (9) information technology, (10) demand-side management applications in the industrial, commercial, and residential sectors, (11) pricing and regulation, and (12) applications to the natural gas industry.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Electrical Energy Conservation and Peak Demand Reduction Potential for Buildings in Texas: Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a study of electrical energy conservation and peak demand reduction potential for the building sector in Texas. Starting from 1980 building stocks and energy use characteristics, technical conservation potentials were calculated relative to frozen energy efficiency stock growth over the 1980-2000 period. The application of conservation supply methodology to Texas utilities is outlined, and then the energy use and peak demand savings, and their associated costs, are calculated using a prototypical building technique. Representative results are presented, for residential and commercial building types, as conservation supply curves for several end use categories; complete results of the study are presented in Ref. 1.

Hunn, B. D.; Baughman, M. L.; Silver, S. C.; Rosenfeld, A. H.; Akbari, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

High-performance commercial building systems  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

High-performance commercial building systems  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC and other industry partners have assisted directly in this effort

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

320

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Title Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-3643E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Kiliccote, Sila, Mary Ann Piette, Johanna L. Mathieu, and Kristen Parrish Conference Name 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords market sectors, openadr Abstract California is a leader in automating demand response (DR) to promote low-cost, consistent, and predictable electric grid management tools. Over 250 commercial and industrial facilities in California participate in fully-automated programs providing over 60 MW of peak DR savings. This paper presents a summary of Open Automated DR (OpenADR) implementation by each of the investor-owned utilities in California. It provides a summary of participation, DR strategies and incentives. Commercial buildings can reduce peak demand from 5 to 15% with an average of 13%. Industrial facilities shed much higher loads. For buildings with multi-year savings we evaluate their load variability and shed variability. We provide a summary of control strategies deployed, along with costs to install automation. We report on how the electric DR control strategies perform over many years of events. We benchmark the peak demand of this sample of buildings against their past baselines to understand the differences in building performance over the years. This is done with peak demand intensities and load factors. The paper also describes the importance of these data in helping to understand possible techniques to reach net zero energy using peak day dynamic control capabilities in commercial buildings. We present an example in which the electric load shape changed as a result of a lighting retrofit.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sector 7 : Time Resolved Research Group Sector 7 is operated by the Time Resolved Research Group, which is part of the X-ray Science Division (XSD) of the Advanced Photon Source. Our research focus is the study of Ultrafast fs-laser excitation of matter, using x-ray scattering and spectroscopy techniques. The sector developped two hard x-ray beamlines (7ID and 7BM) focused on time-resolved science. The 7BM beamline has been dedicated for time-resolved radiography of fuel sprays. Sector 7 Links: What's New Beamlines Overview User information: Getting Beamtime Current Research Programs Links to our partners, and collaborators (New) Publications Contact information Operational data (w/ current 7ID schedule) ES&H information (ESAF, EOR, TMS training, User Training)

322

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Reports > Trends in Commercial Buildings Trends: Buildings and Floorspace Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Overview: The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector Since 1978, the Energy Information Administration has collected basic statistical information from three of the major end-use sectors— residential, and industrial— periodic energy consumption surveys. Each survey is a snapshot of how energy is used in the year of the survey; the series of surveys in each sector reveals the trends in energy use for the sector. Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects data from a sample of buildings representative of the commercial buildings

323

THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Prices ..Electricity Prices ..Commercial Sector Electricity Prices, Electric Peak Load <

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Interim Data Changes in the Short-term Energy Outlook Data Systems Related to Electric Power Sector and Natural Gas Demand Data Revisions (Released in the STEO December 2002)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Beginning with the December 2002 issue of EIAs Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO),electricity generation and related fuel consumption totals will be presented on a basis that isconsistent with the definitions and aggregates used in the 2001 edition of EIAs Annual EnergyReview (AER). Particularly affected by these changes are the demand and balancing itemtotals for natural

Information Center

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Demand for gasoline is more price-inelastic than commonly thought  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy demand in the transportation sector of Mexico. and local levels in Mexico. Energy Policy 38(8): pp. 4445

Havranek, Tomas; Irsova, Zuzana; Janda, Karel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J.E. Braun. 2004. Peak Demand Reduction from Pre-contributor to summer peak demand, with large increases inin driving summer peak demands suggest that commercial

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy-Efficiency and Demand Response Programs for the Tennessee Valley Authority (2010-2030)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study to assess the achievable potential for electric energy savings and peak demand reductions for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for the years 2010-2030. The approach involved applying the methodology and technology data developed for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) National Study on the same subject, adapted to the specific market sector characteristics of the Tennessee Valley. The efficient technologies and measures considered are commercially...

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

AEP Appalachian Power - Commercial and Industrial Rebate Programs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programmable Thermostats, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment, Geothermal Heat Pumps, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

329

Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

330

Citizens Gas - Commercial Efficiency Rebates (Indiana) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Commercial Eligible Technologies Boilers, CustomOthers pending approval, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Furnaces, Programmable Thermostats, Steam-system...

331

Nicor Gas - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates (Illinois) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Commercial Eligible Technologies Boilers, CustomOthers pending approval, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Furnaces, Steam-system upgrades, Water Heaters,...

332

Saving Electrical Energy in Commercial Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the commercial and institutional building sectors using approximately 29% and 34% of all electrical energy consumption in Canada and the United States, respectively, saving (more)

Case, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand changes impact the electric power sector. Figure 2:for electricity on the electric power sector as a whole. Thedemand changes impact the electric power sector. We refer to

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Characterizing the Response of Commercial and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Pricing Signals from the Utility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Method for Heat and Electricity Demand for the Purpose ofstatistical models of electricity demand from Commercial andbuilt with historical electricity demand data. A facility

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Sector X  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X X If there is an emergency at ETTP requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at: Oak Ridge High School 127 Providence Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Take most direct route to northbound Bethel Valley Road toward Oak Ridge. Turn left onto Illinois Avenue (Highway 62). Turn right onto Oak Ridge Turnpike and turn left to Oak Ridge High School. If there is an emergency at ORNL requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at: Karns High School 2710 Byington Solway Road Knoxville, TN 37931 Take most direct route to northbound Bethel Valley Road toward Knoxville. Then take a left at Highway 62 (Oak Ridge Highway) eastbound to Knoxville. Take a right onto State Route 131 (Byington Beaver Ridge) to Karns High School. If there is an emergency at Y-12 requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at:

336

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Link to Sector 7 Users and Collaborators Link to Sector 7 Users and Collaborators This is an incomplete list of Partners from Universities and National Labs who use the facilities at Sector 7. If you wish to add a link to your institutional page, do no hesitate to contact Eric Dufresne at the APS. The APS XSD Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics group Center for Molecular Movies at Copenhagen University Roy Clarke Group at the University of Michigan Rob Crowell Group at BNL Chris Elles's group at Kansas University Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Fuel Injection and Spray Research Group Paul Evans's group web page at the University of Wisconsin Alexei Grigoriev's group at Univ. of Tulsa Eric Landahl's web page at DePaul University The SLAC Pulse Institute Ultrafast Materials Science group (D. Reis and A. Lindenberg)

337

The Commercial Energy Consumer: About Whom Are We Speaking?  

SciTech Connect

Who are commercial sector customers, and how do they make decisions about energy consumption and energy efficiency investment? The energy policy field has not done a thorough job of describing energy consumption in the commercial sector. First, the discussion of the commercial sector itself is dominated by discussion of large businesses/buildings. Second, discussion of this portion of the commercial sectors consumption behavior is driven primarily by theory, with very little field data collected on the way commercial sector decision-makers describe their own options, choices, and reasons for taking action. These limitations artificially constrain energy policy options. This paper reviews the extant literature on commercial sector energy consumption behavior and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, it argues that the primary energy policy model of commercial sector energy consumption is a top-down model that uses macro-level investment data to make conclusions about commercial behavior. Missing from the discussion is a model of consumption behavior that builds up to a theoretical framework informed by the micro-level data provided by commercial decision-makers themselves. Such a bottom-up model could enhance the effectiveness of commercial sector energy policy. In particular, translation of some behavioral models from the residential sector to the commercial sector may offer new opportunities for policies to change commercial energy consumption behavior. Utility bill consumption feedback is considered as one example of a policy option that may be applicable to both the residential and small commercial sector.

Payne, Christopher

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

338

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. energy demand U.S. energy demand In the United States, average energy use per person declines from 2010 to 2035 figure data Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use but also the mix of fuels consumed. Changes in the structure of the economy and in the efficiency of the equipment deployed throughout the economy also have an impact on energy use per capita. The shift in the industrial sector away from energy-intensive manufacturing toward services is one reason for the projected decline in industrial energy intensity (energy use per dollar of GDP), but its impact on energy consumption per capita is less direct (Figure 71). From 1990 to

339

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: News : News Sector 7 calendar of events. APS News APS Monthly meeting slides What's new at the APS Sector 7? 2013 news 2012 news 2011 news 2010 news 2009 news 2008 news 2007 news 2006 news 2005 news 2004 news 2003 news 2002 news 2001 news 2013 News from APS Sector 7 May 2013: Ruben Reininger et al. recently published an article on the optical design of the SPX Imaging and Microscopy beamline (SPXIM). The details can be found on the RSI web site here. A new web page is now available to guide 7-BM users. See the official 7-BM web page for more details. 2012 News from APS Sector 7 August 2012: Jin Wang gave a talk on August 29, 2012 entitled "The APS 7-BM is Open for Business, Officially!" at the August APS Monthly Operation Meeting. On August 1, Alan Kastengren joined the X-ray Science Division to operate the 7-BM beamline. Alan has been involved in the construction

340

Energy-economy interactions revisited within a comprehensive sectoral model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model with considerable sector and technology detail, the ``All Modular Industry Growth Assessment'' Model (AMIGA). It is argued that a detailed model is important to capture and understand the several rolls that energy plays within the economy. Fundamental consumer and industrial demands are for the services from energy; hence, energy demand is a derived demand based on the need for heating, cooling mechanical, electrical, and transportation services. Technologies that provide energy-services more efficiently (on a life cycle basis), when adopted, result in increased future output of the economy and higher paths of household consumption. The AMIGA model can examine the effects on energy use and economic output of increases in energy prices (e.g., a carbon charge) and other incentive-based policies or energy-efficiency programs. Energy sectors and sub-sector activities included in the model involve energy extraction conversion and transportation. There are business opportunities to produce energy-efficient goods (i.e., appliances, control systems, buildings, automobiles, clean electricity). These activities are represented in the model by characterizing their likely production processes (e.g., lighter weight motor vehicles). Also, multiple industrial processes can produce the same output but with different technologies and inputs. Secondary recovery, i.e., recycling processes, are examples of these multiple processes. Combined heat and power (CHP) is also represented for energy-intensive industries. Other modules represent residential and commercial building technologies to supply energy services. All sectors of the economy command real resources (capital services and labor).

Hanson, D. A.; Laitner, J. A.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS),7 Figure 3. Energy Consumption in the Agriculture Sector (13 Figure 6. Energy Consumption in the Service

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency Standards in the Residential Electricity Sector.France. USDOE (2001). Residential Energy Consumption Survey,long-term response of residential cooling energy demand to

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

McParland, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Analysis of ultimate energy consumption by sector in Islamic republic of Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total ultimate energy consumption in Iran was 1033.32 MBOE in 2006, and increased at an average annual rate of 6% in 1996-2006. Household and commercial sector has been the main consumer sector (418.47 MBOE) and the fastest-growing sector (7.2%) that ... Keywords: Iran, agricultural sector, energy audits, energy consumption, industrial sector, residential and commercial sector, transportation sector

B. Farahmandpour; I. Nasseri; H. Houri Jafari

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Commercial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6

346

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

347

"Greening" Industrial Steam Generation via On-demand Steam Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both recent economic and environmental conditions in the U.S. have converged to bring about unprecedented attention to energy efficiency and sustainability in the country's industrial sector. Historically, energy costs in the U.S. have been low in comparison to global averages in some measure do to an extended tolerance for externalized costs related to environmental degradation. Consequently, awareness, innovation & implementation of technologies focused on energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact have not kept pace with other industrialized nations. The U.S. is confronted with looming tipping points with respect to energy supply and GHG emissions that represent very tangible constraints on future economic growth and quality of life. A recent 2008 article in Forbes Magazine highlights the top ten most energy efficient economies in the world. The U.S. is conspicuously absent from the list. The U.S. economy, with an estimated energy intensity of 9,000 Btu's/$GDP, is only half as energy efficient as Japan (holding the top spot on the list with an EI of 4,500 Btu's / US$ GDP). The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated the Save Energy Now program to address this by supporting reductions in U.S. industrial energy intensity by 25% by 2020. A recent 2005 survey conducted by Energy & Environmental Analysis, Inc. (EEA) for Oak Ridge National Laboratory indicates that the current U.S. inventory of commercial/industrial boilers stands at around 163,000 units and 2.7 million MMBtu/hr. total fuel input capacity. These boilers consume nearly 8,100 Tbtu per year, representing about 40% of all energy consumed in the commercial/industrial sectors. Moreover, this same survey indicates that 47% of all commercial/industrial boilers in the U.S. are 40+ years old while as many as 76% are 30+ years old. Boilers account for nearly half of commercial / industrial energy consumption and represent some of the most energy intensive systems comprising these sectors. Given the preponderance of aged, obsolete boiler technology currently in service in the U.S., it is critical to raise awareness and examine the role of emerging new technologies to address the energy and environmental challenges inherent with steam generation. In the same way that tank-less / instantaneous water heating systems are eschewing a new era in energy efficiency in the residential sector, compact modular on-demand steam generation systems are poised to support the same kind of transformation in the commercial / industrial sector. This paper will illustrate how emerging on-demand steam generation technologies will play a part in addressing the energy and environmental challenges facing the country's commercial/ industrial sectors and in doing so help to transform the U.S. economy.

Smith, J. P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Thermal energy storage for cooling of commercial buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The storage of coolness'' has been in use in limited applications for more than a half century. Recently, because of high electricity costs during utilities' peak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a prime target for load management strategies. Systems with cool storage shift all or part of the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak hours to take advantage of reduced demand charges and/or off-peak rates. Thermal storage technology applies equally to industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. In the industrial sector, because of the lack of economic incentives and the custom design required for each application, the penetration of this technology has been limited to a few industries. The penetration rate in the residential sector has been also very limited due to the absence of economic incentives, sizing problems, and the lack of compact packaged systems. To date, the most promising applications of these systems, therefore, appear to be for commercial cooling. In this report, the current and potential use of thermal energy storage systems for cooling commercial buildings is investigated. In addition, a general overview of the technology is presented and the applicability and cost-effectiveness of this technology for developed and developing countries are discussed. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

350

Commercial Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design...

351

Commercialization and Licensing | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exclusive Patent License for ORNL Graphite Foam Technology January 28, 2010 - Light-emitting diode (LED) lamps are increasingly in demand in industrial and commercial...

352

Energy conservation opportunities in small commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

As part of a joint project between Duke Power Co. and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a study was performed to determine the energy savings potential of small commercial buildings, located in the Duke Power service territory. This relatively untouched portion of the commercial sector has the potential for reducing energy consumption by 13% - 25%, which corresponds to a reduction in average annual operating costs of $500 - $1000 per building. A database of over sixty customers was used to target five buildings with unusually high levels of energy consumption and/or peak demand. Conservation measures in these buildings were selected on the basis of cost-effectiveness and relative non-intrusiveness on the occupants. Together, ORNL and Duke Power representatives worked on data analysis, site-audits, and measure recommendations. Duke Power supplied hourly and monthly utility data, customer survey information and participated in site-audits. ORNL analyzed the data, developed targeting indices, performed site-audits and corresponding first-order energy simulations on candidate buildings, and recommended individualized conservation retrofits. For the five buildings examined, retrofits including lighting, controls, and HVAC systems accounted for a total reduction in consumption of 32%, and in peak demand of 22%. In addition, the study emphasizes the importance of continuous attention to the operating conditions of HVAC equipment and controls, in order to ensure long-term sustainability of these energy savings.

Abraham, M.M.; MacDonald, J.M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

D:\assumptions_2001\assumptions2002\currentassump\demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

354

Commercial Building Profiles | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Profiles Building Profiles Dataset Summary Description This dataset includes simulation results from a national-scale study of the commercial buildings sector. Electric load profiles contain the hour-by-hour demand for electricity for each building. Summary tables describe individual buildings and their overall annual energy performance. The study developed detailed EnergyPlus models for 4,820 different samples in 2003 CBECS. Simulation output is available for all and organized by CBECS's identification number in public use datasets. Three modeling scenarios are available: existing stock (with 2003 historical weather), stock as if rebuilt new (with typical weather), and the stock if rebuilt using maximum efficiency technology (with typical weather). The following reports describe how the dataset was developed:

355

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Agency/Company /Organization: Victoria Transport Policy Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm12.htm Cost: Free Language: English References: Victoria Transport Policy Institute[1] "The Online TDM Encyclopedia is the world's most comprehensive information resource concerning innovative transportation management strategies. It describes dozens of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies and contains information on TDM planning, evaluation and implementation. It has thousands of hyperlinks that provide instant access

356

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Programs Research Programs Sector 7's research program exploits the brilliance of the APS undulator radiation to perform material research studies with high spatial and temporal resolution. Microbeam studies are made using x-ray beam sizes on the submicron-scale, and time-resolved diffraction measurements are carried out with picosecond resolution. Sector 7's undulator line has experimental enclosures dedicated to both time-resolved and microbeam research. In one of these enclosures (7ID-D), a femtosecond laser facility is set up for ultrafast diffraction and spectroscopy studies in a pump-probe geometry. The 7ID-B hutch is a white beam capable station used for time-resolved phase-contrast imaging and beamline optics development. A third enclosure (7ID-C) is instrumented for high-resolution diffraction studies with a Huber 6-circle diffractometer. The instrument is ideal for thin-film and interface studies, including the recently developed Coherent Bragg Rod Analysis (COBRA) technique. The fs-laser has recently been delivered to 7ID-C so time-resolved laser pump-x-ray probe can be performed in 7ID-C since March 2007. An x-ray streak camera is also being commissioned in 7ID-C. 7ID-C is equipped for microdiffraction studies with a small Huber 4-cicle diffractometer used with zone-plate optics.

357

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings Title Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated...

358

Opportunities and prospects for demand-side efficiency improvements  

SciTech Connect

Substantial progress has been made over the last 20 years in improving energy efficiency in all sectors of the US economy. Although there remains a large potential for further efficiency gains, progress in improving energy efficiency has slowed recently. A combination of low energy prices, environmental challenges, and life-style changes have caused energy consumption to resume rising. Both new policies and technologies will be necessary to achieve cost-effective levels of energy efficiency. This paper describes some of the promising new demand-side technologies that are currently being implemented, nearing commercialization, or in advanced stages of development. The topics discussed include finding replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), new building equipment and envelope technologies, lessons learned about conservation program implementation, and the role of utilities in promoting the efficient use of energy.

Kuliasha, M.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Peak Demands in Commercial Buildings Center for Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET), IEA/OECD Analyses

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Survey Methodology Sampling Error, Standard Errors, and Relative Standard Errors The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of buildings that would not be considered “commercial” in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction.

362

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

363

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Information & Getting Beamtime User Information & Getting Beamtime There are three ways to request beamtime to perform an experiment on APS-7ID. One can request beam time as an APS General User, as an APS Partner User, or one can contact a staff member of Sector 7 to work collaboratively with them using a small amount of staff time to gather preliminary data. 80% of the available beamtime on 7ID is given to General and Partner Users, while 20% is reserved for staff use. Beam time is allocated and announced by email shortly before the start of an experimental run. In October 2002, beamline 7ID welcomed its first APS General Users (GU). To gain access to 7ID, General or Partner Users are required to submit a proposal to the APS GU Website by the specified deadline. Sucessful proposals will be scheduled for the next cycle following the proposal deadline. There are three proposal cycles per year with deadlines about two months before the start of a run. The deadlines and General User forms are available on the web through the APS General User Web site. Specific instructions for new General Users are available on the site. These instructions can be helpful also for new APS Users in general.

364

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview and History Overview and History Sector 7 consists of two APS beamlines: 7-ID: an insertion device beamline based on an APS Type-A Undulator 7-BM: a bend magnet beam line for time-resolved radiography (currently being commissioned) Overview of 7-ID 7-ID comprises four large experimental enclosures designated A, B, C, and D. In 2004, a laser enclosure was also added (7ID-E). Enclosure 7-ID-A is the first optics enclosure and houses a polished Be window, an empty x-ray filter unit, a pair of white beam slits, a water-cooled double crystal diamond monochromator (Kohzu HLD4), and a P4 mode shutter. The beamline vertical offset is 35 mm. Enclosure 7-ID-B is a white-, or monochromatic-beam experimental enclosure. It is equipped with two precision motorized table for alignment and positioning of experimental equipment. This station is used for white-beam imaging or microdiffraction experiments.

365

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and M.A. Piette, J. Braun Peak Demand Reduction from Pre-to reduce Electrical Peak Demands in Commercial BuildingsManagement (Daily) - TOU - Peak Demand Charges - Grid Peak -

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Capitalize on Existing Assets with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities universally struggle with escalating energy costs. EnerNOC will demonstrate how commercial, industrial, and institutional end-users can capitalize on their existing assetsat no cost and no risk. Demand response, the voluntary reduction of electric demand in response to grid instability, provides financial incentives to participating facilities that agree to conserve energy. With demand response, facilities also receive advance notice of potential blackouts and can proactively protect their equipment and machinery from sudden losses of power. A detailed case study, focusing on a sample industrial customers participation in demand response, will support the presentation.

Collins, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

368

Demand Response Spinning Reserve  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Title Demand Response Spinning Reserve Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2007 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Janine Nelson-Hoffman, Carlos...

369

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

370

Addressing Energy Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Bo Shen, Girish Ghatikar, Chun Chun Ni, and Junqiao Dudley Environmental Energy...

371

Technology data characterizing space conditioning in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0  

SciTech Connect

In the US, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of space conditioning end uses in terms of specific technologies is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and heating and cooling plants is very large. Second, the properties of the building envelope are an integral part of a building`s HVAC energy consumption characteristics. Third, the characteristics of commercial buildings vary greatly by building type. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. This report describes the process by which the authors collected space-conditioning technology data and then mapped it into the COMMEND 4.0 input format. The data are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Franconi, E.M.; Koomey, J.G.; Greenberg, S.E.; Afzal, A.; Shown, L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Montana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Retrofit Lighting: $3 - $400 per unit New Construction Lighting: $10 - $50 per unit Provider Flathead Electric Cooperative Flathead Electric Cooperative, in conjunction with Bonneville Power Administration, encourages energy efficiency in the commercial sector by providing a commercial lighting retro-fit rebate program and a new

373

El Paso Electric Company - Small Business and Commercial Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Business and Commercial Program Small Business and Commercial Program El Paso Electric Company - Small Business and Commercial Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Home Weatherization Insulation Design & Remodeling Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Large Commercial Solutions: $240/peak kW demand reduction Small Commercial Solutions: $400/kW demand reduction Provider El Paso Electric Company El Paso Electric (EPE) offers several incentive programs targeting small business owners as well as larger commercial and industrial EPE customers.

374

ERC commercialization activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ERC family of companies is anticipating market entry of their first commercial product, a 2.8-MR power plant, in the second quarter of 1999. The present Cooperative Agreement provides for: (1) Commercialization planning and organizational development, (2) Completion of the pre-commercial DFC technology development, (3) Systems and plant design, (4) Manufacturing processes` scale-up to full- sized stack components and assemblies, (5) Upgrades to ERC`s test facility for full-sized stack testing, and (6) Sub-scale testing of a DFC Stack and BOP fueled with landfill gas. This paper discusses the first item, that of preparing for commercialization. ERC`s formal commercialization program began in 1990 with the selection of the 2-MR Direct Fuel Cell power plant by the American Public Power Association (APPA) for promotion to the over 2000 municipal utilities comprising APPA`s segment of the utility sector. Since that beginning, the APPA core group expanded to become the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG) which includes representation from all markets - utilities and other power generation equipment buyers.

Maru, H.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full report (4.1 mb) Full report (4.1 mb) Heating, cooling, & water heating equipment Appendix A - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.9 mb) Appendix B - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1.3 mb) Lighting and commercial ventilation & refrigeration equipment Appendix C - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.1 mb) Appendix D - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1.1 mb) Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency Release date: August 7, 2013 Energy used in the residential and commercial sectors provides a wide range

376

A Successful Case Study of Small Business Energy Efficiency and Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a field study of 78 small commercial customers in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District service territory who volunteered for an integrated energy-efficiency/demand-response (EE-DR) program in the summer of 2008. The original objective for the pilot was to provide a better understanding of demand response issues in the small commercial sector. Early findings justified a focus on offering small businesses (1) help with the energy efficiency of their buildings in exchange for occasional load shed, and (2) a portfolio of options to meet the needs of a diverse customer sector. To meet these expressed needs, the research pilot provided on-site energy efficiency advice and offered participants several program options, including the choice of either a dynamic rate or monthly payment for air-conditioning setpoint control. Overall results show that pilot participants had energy savings of 20%, and the potential for an additional 14% to 20% load drop during a 100 F demand response event. In addition to the efficiency-related bill savings, participants on the dynamic rate saved an estimated 5% on their energy costs compared to the standard rate. About 80% of participants said that the program met or surpassed their expectations, and three-quarters said they would probably or definitely participate again without the $120 participation incentive. These results provide evidence that energy efficiency programs, dynamic rates and load control programs can be used concurrently and effectively in the small business sector, and that communicating thermostats are a reliable tool for providing air-conditioning load shed and enhancing the ability of customers on dynamic rates to respond to intermittent price events.

Herter, Karen; Wayland, Seth; Rasin, Josh

2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

377

Small Business Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats: SMUD's Summer Solutions Research Pilot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a field study of 78 small commercial customers in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District service territory who volunteered for an integrated energy-efficiency/demand-response (EE-DR) program in the summer of 2008. The original objective for the pilot was to provide a better understanding of demand response issues in the small commercial sector. Early findings justified a focus on offering small businesses (1) help with the energy efficiency of their buildings in exchange for occasional load shed, and (2) a portfolio of options to meet the needs of a diverse customer sector. To meet these expressed needs, the research pilot provided on-site energy efficiency advice and offered participants several program options, including the choice of either a dynamic rate or monthly payment for air-conditioning setpoint control. An analysis of hourly load data indicates that the offices and retail stores in our sample provided significant demand response, while the restaurants did not. Thermostat data provides further evidence that restaurants attempted to precool and reduce AC service during event hours, but were unable to because their air-conditioning units were undersized. On a 100 F reference day, load impacts of all participants during events averaged 14%, while load impacts of office and retail buildings (excluding restaurants) reached 20%. Overall, pilot participants including restaurants had 2007-2008 summer energy savings of 20% and bill savings of 30%. About 80% of participants said that the program met or surpassed their expectations, and three-quarters said they would probably or definitely participate again without the $120 participation incentive. These results provide evidence that energy efficiency programs, dynamic rates and load control programs can be used concurrently and effectively in the small business sector, and that communicating thermostats are a reliable tool for providing air-conditioning load shed and enhancing the ability of customers on dynamic rates to respond to intermittent price events.

Herter, Karen; Wayland, Seth; Rasin, Josh

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

378

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 1: Building prototype analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed description of, and the baseline assumptions and simulation results for, the building prototype simulations conducted for the building types designated in the Work Plan for Demand-side Management Assessment of Hawaii`s Demand-Side Resources (HES-4, Phase 2). This report represents the second revision to the initial building prototype description report provided to DBEDT early in the project. Modifications and revisions to the prototypes, based on further calibration efforts and on comments received from DBEDT Staff have been incorporated into this final version. These baseline prototypes form the basis upon which the DSM measure impact estimates and the DSM measure data base were developed for this project. This report presents detailed information for each of the 17 different building prototypes developed for use with the DOE-21E program (23 buildings in total, including resorts and hotels defined separately for each island) to estimate the impact of the building technologies and measures included in this project. The remainder of this section presents some nomenclature and terminology utilized in the reports, tables, and data bases developed from this project to denote building type and vintage. Section 2 contains a more detailed discussion of the data sources, the definition of the residential sector building prototypes, and results of the DOE-2 analysis. Section 3 provides a similar discussion for the commercial sector. The prototype and baseline simulation results are presented in a separate section for each building type. Where possible, comparison of the baseline simulation results with benchmark data from the ENERGY 2020 model or other demand forecasting models specific to Hawaii is included for each building. Appendix A contains a detailed listing of the commercial sector baseline indoor lighting technologies included in the existing and new prototypes by building type.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Energy End-Use Flow Maps for the Buildings Sector  

SciTech Connect

Graphical presentations of energy flows are widely used within the industrial sector to depict energy production and use. PNNL developed two energy flow maps, one each for the residential and commercial buildings sectors, in response to a need for a clear, concise, graphical depiction of the flows of energy from source to end-use in the building sector.

Belzer, David B.

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

380

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Demand Trading: Building Liquidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand trading holds substantial promise as a mechanism for efficiently integrating demand-response resources into regional power markets. However, regulatory uncertainty, the lack of proper price signals, limited progress toward standardization, problems in supply-side markets, and other factors have produced illiquidity in demand-trading markets and stalled the expansion of demand-response resources. This report shows how key obstacles to demand trading can be overcome, including how to remove the unce...

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

383

Buildings sector demand-side efficiency technology summaries  

SciTech Connect

This report provides descriptions of the following energy efficiency technologies: energy management systems; electronic fluorescent ballasts; compact fluorescent lamps; lighting controls; room air conditioners; high albedo materials, coatings and paints; solar domestic water heaters; heat pump water heaters; energy-efficient motors; adjustable-speed drives; energy-efficient refrigerators; daylight control glazing; insulating glazing; solar control glazing; switchable glazing; tree planting; and advanced insulation. For each technology, the report provides a description of performance characteristics, consumer utility, development status, technology standards, equipment cost, installation, maintenance, conservation programs, and environmental impacts.

Koomey, J.G.; Johnson, F.X.; Schuman, J. [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Power Sector Reforms in India: Demand Side and Renewable Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with EETD scientists on cooperative research? Get a job in EETD? Make my home more energy-efficient? Find a source within EETD for a news story I'm writing, shooting, or...

385

Sector 30 - useful links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Useful Links Sector 30 Sector Orientation Form HERIX experiment header for lab book MERIX experiment header for lab book Printing from your laptop at the beamline Other IXS sectors...

386

Technology data characterizing refrigeration in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of the refrigeration end use in terms of specific technologies, however, is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of refrigeration cases and systems is quite large. Also, energy use is a complex function of the refrigeration-case properties and the refrigeration-system properties. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. Expanding end-use forecasting models so that they address individual technology options requires characterization of the present floorstock in terms of service requirements, energy technologies used, and cost-efficiency attributes of the energy technologies that consumers may choose for new buildings and retrofits. This report describes the process by which we collected refrigeration technology data. The data were generated for COMMEND 4.0 but are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Southwest Gas Corporation - Large Commercial Energy-Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type Utility Rebate Program Applicable Sector Commercial Eligible Technologies Boilers, Steam Traps, Modular Burner Controls, Boiler Tune-Up, Trim Control Pad Active Incentive No...

388

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Commercial...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and...

389

CenterPoint Energy (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Rebates (Oklahoma...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rebate Program Applicable Sector Commercial, Industrial Eligible Technologies Boilers, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Furnaces, Water Heaters, Food Service Equipment,...

390

Midstate Electric Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Midstate Electric Cooperative (MEC) encourages energy efficiency in the commercial and industrial sectors by giving customers a choice of several different financial incentive programs. First, ...

391

District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per...

392

Demand Dispatch Intelligent Demand for a More Efficient Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed therein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. Demand Dispatch: Intelligent Demand for a More Efficient Grid

Keith Dodrill

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Energy demand and indoor climate of a traditional low-energy building in a hot climate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Energy demand in the built environment is quite important. China holds a large population and the energy use in the building sector is about (more)

Li, Ang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Electricity Supply Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Supply Sector Part 1 of 6 Supporting Documents Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary

395

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L ABORATORY Japans Residential Energy Demand Outlook tol i f o r n i a Japans Residential Energy Demand Outlook toParticularly in Japans residential sector, where energy

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Civilian applications and policy implications of commercial unmanned aerial vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As UAV capabilities continue to improve the technology will spill out of the military sector and into commercial and civil applications. Already, UAVs have demonstrated commercial marketability in such diverse areas as ...

Sprague, Kara Lynn, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation sector energy demand Transportation sector energy demand Growth in transportation energy consumption flat across projection figure data The transportation sector consumes 27.1 quadrillion Btu of energy in 2040, the same as the level of energy demand in 2011 (Figure 70). The projection of no growth in transportation energy demand differs markedly from the historical trend, which saw 1.1-percent average annual growth from 1975 to 2011 [126]. No growth in transportation energy demand is the result of declining energy use for LDVs, which offsets increased energy use for heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs), aircraft, marine, rail, and pipelines. Energy demand for LDVs declines from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 13.0 quadrillion Btu in 2040, in contrast to 0.9-percent average annual growth

398

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

399

Demand Impacted by Weather  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When you look at demand, its also interesting to note the weather. The weather has a big impact on the demand of heating fuels, if its cold, consumers will use ...

400

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Guidebook for Farmstead Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design  

SciTech Connect

The acceptance and growth of Demand-Side Management (DSM) continues to increase in the US. According to latest estimates, total expenditures on electric utility DSM programs now exceed $1.2 billion annually, with these investments ranging from 1 to 5 percent of a utility's gross revenues. In addition, due to increasing environmental concerns and the high cost of new capacity, these expenditure levels are expected to increase. While the vast majority of these DSM programs are directed at the more traditional residential, commercial and industrial market sectors, significant opportunities still exist. One market segment that has not been the focus of attention but a critical sector from an economic development perspective for marry utilities -- is the agricultural and farmstead market. Although the total number of farms in the United States decreased by approximately 5 percent between 1985 and 1989, the land dedicated to farming still accounts for over 995 million acres. Furthermore, the total value of farm output in the United States has been steadily increasing since 1986. The limited penetration of energy efficiency measures in farmsteads provides an excellent opportunity for utilities to expand their DSM programming efforts to capture this non-traditional'' market segment, and at the same time assist farms in increasing their efficiency and competitiveness. In marry states, and, in particular New York State, agriculture plays a major economic role. The importance of farms not only from a utility perspective but also from a state and federal perspective cannot be overstated. As such, utilities are in a unique position to facilitate farmstead DSM technology investments in an effort to benefit the farmer (and his profitability), the utility, the state and the country. This guidebook is designed to provide the framework for agricultural demand planning, including market assessment, technology assessment, market penetration analysis and program design.

Rose, M.; Camera, R.K.

1992-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

402

Demand Trading Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Download report 1006017 for FREE. The global movement toward competitive markets is paving the way for a variety of market mechanisms that promise to increase market efficiency and expand customer choice options. Demand trading offers customers, energy service providers, and other participants in power markets the opportunity to buy and sell demand-response resources, just as they now buy and sell blocks of power. EPRI's Demand Trading Toolkit (DTT) describes the principles and practice of demand trading...

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

403

Commercial Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design solutions, and develop guidelines and tools for building designers so that systems are specified and used in an optimal manner. A special emphasis is placed on the daylighting performance of glazings in commercial buildings since lighting is the single largest energy end use and daylighting can improve both visual performance and the quality of the indoor space as well as saving energy. Technical Approach: This project has two major complementary elements. The first is the exploration and assessment of glazing performance in commercial buildings leading to development of design strategies that reduce unnecessary energy use. The final step is creating design guides and tools that make this design knowledge accessible to practitioners, typically carried out in partnership with others. Although the emphasis is energy impacts, e.g. annual energy use, the performance issues addressed in the guides and tools include all that impact the final glazing selection process, e.g. appearance, glare. The second element is an exploration of daylighting strategies for commercial buildings since lighting energy use is the major energy end use in most buildings. This work develops and evaluates new daylighting devices and designs, assesses performance in commercial buildings, and demonstrates system performance using test cells, test rooms and case study buildings. All energy-related aspects of the design solutions, as well as other critical performance issues, are addressed in this work. Results of this work are integrated into the guides and tools described above. Much of this work has been co-supported by utilities and has been carried on in conjunction with participants in an International Energy Agency Daylighting Task.

404

Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial) - Sustainable Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial) - Sustainable Commercial and Industrial) - Sustainable Energy Program Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial) - Sustainable Energy Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate '''General Incentive Limits''' Commercial Industrial Lighting Retrofit: $100,000 per program year Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency: $100,000 per program year Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Industrial Lighting Retrofit Lighting Retrofit: $500/kW of peak-demand reduction

405

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

103.3 -- 112.7 -- -- -- -- not reported. aIEA data are for 2009. bLosses in CTL and biofuel production. c Energy consumption in the sectors includes electricity demand purchases...

406

How much energy is consumed in the world by each sector? - FAQ - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The electricity it produces is consumed by the end-use sectors. There are also losses in electricity generation, transmission, ... tariff, and demand charge data?

407

Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program < Back Eligibility Fed. Government Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Insulation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Bonus maximum: $100,000 All incentives: $2.50/sq. ft. (base plus bonus), $300,000, 75% of project costs, and 100% of incremental costs Program Info Funding Source Illinois Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) surcharge for Ameren,

408

Energy Efficiency Financing for Public Sector Projects (California) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Financing for Public Sector Projects (California) Energy Efficiency Financing for Public Sector Projects (California) Energy Efficiency Financing for Public Sector Projects (California) < Back Eligibility Institutional Local Government Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $3 million Program Info State California Program Type State Loan Program Provider California Energy Commission Cities, counties, public care institutions, public hospitals, public schools and colleges, and special districts in California can apply for low-interest loans from the California Energy Commission for energy

409

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Commercialization of germanium based nanocrystal memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the commercialization of germanium-based nanocrystal memories. Demand for smaller and faster electronics and embedded systems supports the development of high-density, low-power non-volatile electronic ...

Seow, Kian Chiew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Publication Type...

412

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

413

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

414

Electrical Demand Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below the previous year's level and yielded $150,000 annual savings. These measures include rescheduling of selected operations and demand limiting techniques such as fuel switching to alternate power sources during periods of high peak demand. For example, by rescheduling the startup of five heat treat annealing ovens to second shift, 950 kW of load was shifted off peak. Also, retired, non-productive steam turbine chillers and a diesel air compressor have been effectively operated to displaced 1330 kW during peak periods each day. Installed metering devices have enabled the recognition of critical demand periods. The paper concludes with a brief look at future plans and long range objectives of the Demand Management Plan.

Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Major Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 CBECS data are used to answer basic questions about the commercial buildings sector, such as: What types are there? How large are they? How old are they? and Where are they? Results from the 2003 CBECS show that: The commercial buildings sector is not dominated by a single building type. Office buildings, the most common type of commercial building, account for 17 percent of buildings, floorspace, and energy consumed. Commercial buildings range widely in size and smaller buildings are much more numerous than larger buildings. The smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) account for 53 percent of buildings, but consume only 11 percent of total energy. The largest buildings (those larger than 500,000 square feet)

416

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Demand Dispatch-Intelligent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and energy efficiency throughout the value chain resulting in the most economical price for electricity. Having adequate quantities and capacities of demand resources is a...

418

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

U.S. Propane Demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand is higher in 1999 due to higher petrochemical demand and a strong economy. We are also seeing strong demand in the first quarter of 2000; however, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xxxv Option Value of Electricity Demand Response, Osmanelasticity in aggregate electricity demand. With these newii) reduction in electricity demand during peak periods (

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Market-based airport demand management : theory, model and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ever-increasing demand for access to the world's major commercial airports combined with capacity constraints at many of these airports have led to increasing air traffic congestion. In particular, the scarcity of ...

Fan, Terence P

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

K-12 Education Sector Desk Reference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nationwide, educational institutions make up a large portion of the commercial energy market. To support utility marketing and service efforts in this important sector, this compilation collects the best information available about the electric energy needs and issues of kindergarten through 12th grade (K-12) schools.

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

424

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loads. C P P is a new electricity tariff design to promotethe structures of electricity tariffs considering the timeand tariffs provide even greater incentives to consider sophisticated building operational and control strategies that reduce electricity

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning: April 19-21, 2006Auto-DR Strategies and Commissioning One common questionConference on Building Commissioning: April 19-21, 2006

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Kyoto - End-Use Energy Demand (Residential & Commercial)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... the convenience of natural gas heating and the decline in real oil and gas prices over the past decade have led many ... (compact fluorescent ...

427

EnerNOC Inc. Commercial & Industrial Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporation Tennant Company Thomson West Toro Unisys U of M Office of IT U.S. Bank Wells Fargo Xcel Energy Tennant Company Thomson West Toro Unisys U of M Office of IT U.S. Bank Wells Fargo Xcel Energy Young Wells Fargo Xcel Energy Young America #12;2007 - 2008 Seminar Attendance Report By Company * Company

428

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

categories16 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division...

429

CO2 MONITORING FOR DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

26 Errors from energy management systems versus sensorby building energy management systems were generally verysignals to the energy management systems. Laboratory-based

Fisk, William J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Commercial Demand...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

household.gif (5637 bytes) The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and...

431

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Title Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2011 Authors Cappers, Peter, Andrew D. Mills, Charles A. Goldman, Ryan H. Wiser, and Joseph H. Eto Pagination 76 Date Published 10/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords demand response, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, renewable generation integration, smart grid Abstract The penetration of renewable generation technology (e.g., wind, solar) is expected to dramatically increase in the United States during the coming years as many states are implementing policies to expand this sector through regulation and/or legislation. It is widely understood, though, that large scale deployment of certain renewable energy sources, namely wind and solar, poses system integration challenges because of its variable and often times unpredictable production characteristics (NERC, 2009). Strategies that rely on existing thermal generation resources and improved wind and solar energy production forecasts to manage this variability are currently employed by bulk power system operators, although a host of additional options are envisioned for the near future. Demand response (DR), when properly designed, could be a viable resource for managing many of the system balancing issues associated with integrating large-scale variable generation (VG) resources (NERC, 2009). However, demand-side options would need to compete against strategies already in use or contemplated for the future to integrate larger volumes of wind and solar generation resources. Proponents of smart grid (of which Advanced Metering Infrastructure or AMI is an integral component) assert that the technologies associated with this new investment can facilitate synergies and linkages between demand-side management and bulk power system needs. For example, smart grid proponents assert that system-wide implementation of advanced metering to mass market customers (i.e., residential and small commercial customers) as part of a smart grid deployment enables a significant increase in demand response capability.1 Specifically, the implementation of AMI allows electricity consumption information to be captured, stored and utilized at a highly granular level (e.g., 15-60 minute intervals in most cases) and provides an opportunity for utilities and public policymakers to more fully engage electricity customers in better managing their own usage through time-based rates and near-real time feedback to customers on their usage patterns while also potentially improving the management of the bulk power system. At present, development of time-based rates and demand response programs and the installation of variable generation resources are moving forward largely independent of each other in state and regional regulatory and policy forums and without much regard to the complementary nature of their operational characteristics.2 By 2020, the electric power sector is expected to add ~65 million advanced meters3 (which would reach ~47% of U.S. households) as part of smart grid and AMI4 deployments (IEE, 2010) and add ~40-80 GW of wind and solar capacity (EIA, 2010). Thus, in this scoping study, we focus on a key question posed by policymakers: what role can the smart grid (and its associated enabling technology) play over the next 5-10 years in helping to integrate greater penetration of variable generation resources by providing mass market customers with greater access to demand response opportunities? There is a well-established body of research that examines variable generation integration issues as well as demand response potential, but the nexus between the two has been somewhat neglected by the industry. The studies that have been conducted are informative concerning what could be accomplished with strong broad-based support for the expansion of demand response opportunities, but typically do not discuss the many barriers that stand in the way of reaching this potential. This study examines how demand side resources could be used to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system, identifies barriers that currently limit the use of demand side strategies, and suggests several factors that should be considered in assessing alternative strategies that can be employed to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system. It is difficult to properly gauge the role that DR could play in managing VG integration issues in the near future without acknowledging and understanding the entities and institutions that govern the interactions between variable generation and mass market customers (see Figure ES-1). Retail entities, like load-serving entities (LSE) and aggregators of retail customers (ARC), harness the demand response opportunities of mass market customers through tariffs (and DR programs) that are approved by state regulatory agencies or local governing entities (in the case of public power). The changes in electricity consumption induced by DR as well as the changes in electricity production due to the variable nature of wind and solar generation technologies is jointly managed by bulk power system operators. Bulk power system operators function under tariffs approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and must operate their systems in accordance with rules set by regional reliability councils. These reliability rules are derived from enforceable standards that are set by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and approved by federal regulators. Thus, the role that DR can play in managing VG integration issues is contingent on what opportunities state and local regulators are willing to approve and how customers' response to the DR opportunities can be integrated into the bulk power system both electrically (due to reliability rules) and financially (due to market rules).

432

Demand Side Bidding. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

Spahn, Andrew

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the UScommercial buildings sector  

SciTech Connect

Switchable electrochromic (EC) windows have been projected to significantly reduce the energy use of buildings nationwide. This study quantifies the potential impact of electrochromic windows on US primary energy use in the commercial building sector and also provides a broader database of energy use and peak demand savings for perimeter zones than that given in previous LBNL simulation studies. The DOE-2.1E building simulation program was used to predict the annual energy use of a three-story prototypical commercial office building located in five US climates and 16 California climate zones. The energy performance of an electrochromic window controlled to maintain daylight illuminance at a prescribed setpoint level is compared to conventional and the best available commercial windows as well as windows defined by the ASHRAE 90.1-1999 and California Title 24-2005 Prescriptive Standards. Perimeter zone energy use and peak demand savings data by orientation, window size, and climate are given for windows with interior shading, attached shading, and horizon obstructions (to simulate an urban environment). Perimeter zone primary energy use is reduced by 10-20% in east, south, and west zones in most climates if the commercial building has a large window-to-wall area ratio of 0.60 compared to a spectrally selective low-e window with daylighting controls and no interior or exterior shading. Peak demand for the same condition is reduced by 20-30%. The emerging electrochromic window with daylighting controls is projected to save approximately 91.5-97.3 10{sup 12} Btu in the year 2030 compared to a spectrally selective low-E window with manually-controlled interior shades and no daylighting controls if it reaches a 40% market penetration level in that year.

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT PANEL INITIAL forecast, end-use demand modeling, econometric modeling, hybrid demand modeling, energyMahon, Carl Linvill 2012. Demand Forecast Expert Panel Initial Assessment. California Energy

435

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

SciTech Connect

In 2006 the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) formed an Industrial Demand Response Team to investigate opportunities and barriers to implementation of Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) systems in California industries. Auto-DR is an open, interoperable communications and technology platform designed to: Provide customers with automated, electronic price and reliability signals; Provide customers with capability to automate customized DR strategies; Automate DR, providing utilities with dispatchable operational capability similar to conventional generation resources. This research began with a review of previous Auto-DR research on the commercial sector. Implementing Auto-DR in industry presents a number of challenges, both practical and perceived. Some of these include: the variation in loads and processes across and within sectors, resource-dependent loading patterns that are driven by outside factors such as customer orders or time-critical processing (e.g. tomato canning), the perceived lack of control inherent in the term 'Auto-DR', and aversion to risk, especially unscheduled downtime. While industry has demonstrated a willingness to temporarily provide large sheds and shifts to maintain grid reliability and be a good corporate citizen, the drivers for widespread Auto-DR will likely differ. Ultimately, most industrial facilities will balance the real and perceived risks associated with Auto-DR against the potential for economic gain through favorable pricing or incentives. Auto-DR, as with any ongoing industrial activity, will need to function effectively within market structures. The goal of the industrial research is to facilitate deployment of industrial Auto-DR that is economically attractive and technologically feasible. Automation will make DR: More visible by providing greater transparency through two-way end-to-end communication of DR signals from end-use customers; More repeatable, reliable, and persistent because the automated controls strategies that are 'hardened' and pre-programmed into facility's software and hardware; More affordable because automation can help reduce labor costs associated with manual DR strategies initiated by facility staff and can be used for long-term.

McKane, Aimee T.; Piette, Mary Ann; Faulkner, David; Ghatikar, Girish; Radspieler Jr., Anthony; Adesola, Bunmi; Murtishaw, Scott; Kiliccote, Sila

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Taiwan: An energy sector study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study on the economy of Taiwan, with special reference to the energy sector, revealed the following: Taiwan's rapid export-driven economic growth in the 1970s and 1980s has earned them the rank of ''Newly Industrialized Countries.'' Coal reserves measure less than 1 billion tons, and annual output has declined to below 2 million tons per year. Marginal amounts of crude are produced. Natural gas resources have been exploited both on- and offshore, through production amounts to little more than 1 billion cubic meters per year. Domestic hydrocarbon production is forecast to decline. Taiwan prssesses an estimated 5300 mW of exploitable hydropower capacity, of which 2564 mW had been installed by 1986. Taiwan has undertaken a massive program of nuclear power construction in response to the rapid rise in oil prices during the 1970s. Energy demand has risen an average of 9.0 percent per year since 1954, while real GNP has grown 8.6 percent per year. Sine 1980, oil has provided a lower share of total energy demand. Oil demand for transport has continued to grow rapidly. Declining production of domestic natural gas has led Taiwan to initiate LNG imports from Indonesia beginning in 1990. Coal has regained some of its earlier importance in Taiwan's energy structure. With declining domestic production, imports now provide nearly 90 percent of total coal demand. Taiwan is basically self-sufficient in refining capacity. Energy demand is expected to grow 5.4 percent per year through the yeat 2000. With declining output of domestic resources, energy dependency on imports will rise from its current 90 percent level. Government policy recognizes this external dependency and has directed it efforts at diversification of suppliers. 18 refs., 11 figs., 40 tabs.

Johnson, T.; Fridley, D.; Kang, Wu

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Agricultural and Industrial Process-Heat-Market Sector workbook  

SciTech Connect

This workbook summarizes the preliminary data and assumptions of the Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat Market Sector prepared in conjunction with the development of inputs for a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy.

Shulman, M. J.; Kannan, N. P.; deJong, D. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal conditions. Maximum Demand Saving Intensity [W/ft2]automated electric demand sheds. The maximum electric shed

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

peak demand, and natural gas demand forecasts for eachnatural gas and other fossil fuels are the predominant heating fuels for Californias commercial buildings, heating electricity demandDemand. The California End Use Survey 2004 (CEUS 2004) provides statewide hourly electricity and natural gas

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Intelligent Buildings Series, Volume 1: Large Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As utilities seek the means to manage supply and demand of electricity, they increasingly look to the demand-side for opportunities. Commercial and institutional buildings represent substantial electrical loads that account for approximately 30% of all electric power consumed in the United States. Given the right circumstances, these energy consumers can act as demand-side resources by reducing their electrical demand in response to conditions on the supply-side. While demand response applications in com...

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report: DSM opportunity report  

SciTech Connect

The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. 10 figs., 55 tabs.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Assessment and Suggestions to Improve the Commercial Building Module of EIA-NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a comprehensive, computer-based, energy-economy modeling system developed and maintained by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS forecasts the national production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy out to 2015, subject to macroeconomic assumptions, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, technological developments, and behavioral and technological choice criteria. NEMS has nine program modules of which the Commercial Sector Demand (CSD) module is one. Currently the CSD module uses a matrix of Energy Use Intensities (EUls) gleaned from the 1989 CBECS database to model service demand per major fuel type for eight different geographic census divisions and eleven different building types.

O'Neal, D. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Demand Management Institute (DMI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand Management Institute (DMI) Demand Management Institute (DMI) Jump to: navigation, search Name Demand Management Institute (DMI) Address 35 Walnut Street Place Wellesley, Massachusetts Zip 02481 Sector Buildings Product Provides analysis for buildings on reducing energy use Website http://www.dmiinc.com/ Coordinates 42.3256508°, -71.2530294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3256508,"lon":-71.2530294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

444

Innovative and Progressive Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation of electric energy has been a concern of energy users in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors for several decades, and has increased in significance since the 1973 energy shortages. During this time, it has also become increasing difficult for electric utilities to install new generating capacity due to public concerns about nuclear energy and environmental issues. In many areas of the country, utilities now find themselves capacity short during their peak periods, and have concerns about providing a reliable supply of electricity. These utilities have initiated programs which encourage their customers to conserve electric energy, and shift or lower use during the utility's peak periods. In other areas of the country there are utilities which have more than adequate electric supplies. These utilities have developed programs which ensure that costs of electricity are such that existing customers are maintained. Programs which address demand issues of an energy utility are referred to as Demand-Side Management (DSM) and are extremely rigorous in scope. Electric utilities have pursued many different DSM policies and strategies during the past decade. These programs have addressed various technologies and have included rebates for efficient lighting, electric motors and packaged air conditioning systems. More recently, however, many utilities have implemented very innovative programs, which indicates an increased commitment towards demand planning, and requires a substantial financial investment in new equipment and engineering services. Some programs have addressed such areas as thermal storage and industrial processes, and others have included comprehensive facility energy studies where greater than fifty percent of the cost of energy retrofits may be covered by the utility. Progressive pricing strategies have included real-time pricing and aggressive curtailable rates for commercial and industrial buildings. Further, new standards are being established by electric utilities which promote energy efficient new construct ion. All of these programs can have considerable impacts on both the customer's and utility's energy use patterns and load shapes. This paper will discuss a number of more significant and innovative DSM programs, and will explain the potential load and energy impacts.

Epstein, G. J.; Fuller, W. H.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Abstract --Demand Response (DR) programs are not a new concept; moreover, the key technologies for their implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. III. DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS UNDER SMARTGRID PARADIGM AND MARKET INTEGRATION. The demand response as SmartGrid). While many of the DR programs under SmartGrid are directed to the distribution sector, DR

Dixon, Juan

446

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

447

Demand Response Database & Demo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Database & Demo Speaker(s): Mike Graveley William M. Smith Date: June 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Mary Ann Piette Infotility...

448

Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They...

449

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

450

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

Toward a national plan for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy. Workbook summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These workbooks contain preliminary data and assumptions used during the preparation of inputs to a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy (NPAC). The workbooks indicate the market potential, competitive position, market penetration, and technological characteristics of solar technologies over the next twenty years for five market sectors: residential buildings; commercial and institutional buildings; agricultural and industrial process heat; utility applications; and synthetic fuels and chemicals. The workbooks also present projections of the mix of solar technologies by US Census Region. In some cases, data have been aggregated to the national level. Emphasis of the workbooks is on a mid-price fuel scenario, Option II, that meets about a 20 percent solar goal by the year 2000. The energy demand for the mid-price scenario is projected at 115 quads in the year 2000.

Gerstein, R.E.; Kannan, N.P.; Miller, C.G.; Shulman, M.J.; Taul, J.W. Jr.; de Jong, D.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be 1.7 thousand TWh or 21percent of the 2030 projected base case electricity demand. Electricity savings potential ranges from a high of 38percent in India to a low of 9percent in Korea for the two sectors. Lighting, fans, and TV sets and lighting and refrigeration are the largest contributors to residential and commercial electricity savings respectively. This work presents a first estimates of the savings potential of DSM programs in APP countries. While the resulting estimates are based on detailed end-use data, it is worth keeping in mind that more work is needed to overcome limitation in data at this time of the project.

McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

453

A. G. A. six-month gas demand forecast July-December, 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of the total gas demand for 1984 (including pipeline fuel) range from 18,226 to 19,557 trillion (TBtu). The second half of the year shows a slower recovery rate as economic recovery moderates. The forecast show both actual and projected demand by month, and compares it with 1983 demand and by market sector. 6 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Sector 1 welcome  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to Sector 1 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) located at Argonne Welcome to Sector 1 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The Sector 1 beamlines are operated by the Materials Physics & Engineering Group (MPE) of the APS X-ray Science Division (XSD). Sector 1 consists of the 1-ID and 1-BM beamlines, and 80% of the available beamtime is accessible to outside users through the General User program. The main programs pursued at Sector 1 are described below. 1-ID is dedicated to providing and using brilliant, high-energy x-ray beams (50-150 keV) for the following activities: Coupled high-energy small- and wide-angle scattering (HE-SAXS/WAXS) High-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM) Sector 1 General Layout Stress/strain/texture studies Pair-distribution function (PDF) measurements

455

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-4837E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Goli, Sasank, Aimee T. McKane, and Daniel Olsen Conference Name 2011 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 08/2011 Conference Location Niagara Falls, NY Keywords market sectors, openadr, refrigerated warehouses Abstract Industrial refrigerated warehouses that implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems can be excellent candidates for Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) due to equipment synergies, and receptivity of facility managers to strategies that control energy costs without disrupting facility operations. Auto-DR utilizes OpenADR protocol for continuous and open communication signals over internet, allowing facilities to automate their Demand Response (DR). Refrigerated warehouses were selected for research because: They have significant power demand especially during utility peak periods; most processes are not sensitive to short-term (2-4 hours) lower power and DR activities are often not disruptive to facility operations; the number of processes is limited and well understood; and past experience with some DR strategies successful in commercial buildings may apply to refrigerated warehouses. This paper presents an overview of the potential for load sheds and shifts from baseline electricity use in response to DR events, along with physical configurations and operating characteristics of refrigerated warehouses. Analysis of data from two case studies and nine facilities in Pacific Gas and Electric territory, confirmed the DR abilities inherent to refrigerated warehouses but showed significant variation across facilities. Further, while load from California's refrigerated warehouses in 2008 was 360 MW with estimated DR potential of 45-90 MW, actual achieved was much less due to low participation. Efforts to overcome barriers to increased participation may include, improved marketing and recruitment of potential DR sites, better alignment and emphasis on financial benefits of participation, and use of Auto-DR to increase consistency of participation.

456

Public Sector Electric Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Sector Electric Efficiency Programs Public Sector Electric Efficiency Programs Public Sector Electric Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Fed. Government Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Other Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate $300,000 per location Total incentive may not exceed 75% of project cost (equipment + labor) or 100% of incremental measure cost Program Info Funding Source Illinois Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) surcharge for ComEd, Ameren subsidiary customers Start Date 06/01/2008 State Illinois Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Standard Incentive Program: Varies by technology

457

OpenEI - demand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

are given by a location defined by the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) for which the weather data was collected. Commercial load data is sorted by the (TMY) site as a...

458

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

California Independent System Operator demand response & proxy demand resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are designed to allow end use customers to contribute to energy load reduction individually or through a demand response provider. One form of demand response can occur when an end use customer reduces their electrical usage ...

John Goodin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time. 4 Reducing this peak demand through DR programs meansthat a 5% reduction in peak demand would have resulted insame 5% reduction in the peak demand of the US as a whole.

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand sector commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

DemandDirect | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DemandDirect DemandDirect Jump to: navigation, search Name DemandDirect Place Woodbury, Connecticut Zip 6798 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Product DemandDirect provides demand response, energy efficiency, load management, and distributed generation services to end-use electricity customers in order to reduce electricity consumption, improve grid reliability, and promote renewable energy. Coordinates 44.440496°, -72.414991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.440496,"lon":-72.414991,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

462

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand 2010 Review (entire report also available in printer-friendly format ) Previous Editions 2009 Review 2008 Review 2007 Review 2006 Review 2005 Review 2004 Review 2003 Review 2002 Review 2001 Review 2000 Review 1999 Review Data for: 2010 Released: May 2011 Next Release Date: April 2012 Table 3. Electric Power Sector Net Generation, 2009-2010 (Million Kilowatthours) New England Coal 14,378 14,244 -0.9 Hydroelectric 7,759 6,861 -11.6 Natural Gas 48,007 54,680 13.9 Nuclear 36,231 38,361 5.9 Other (1) 9,186 9,063 -1.3 Total 115,559 123,210 6.6 Middle Atlantic Coal 121,873 129,935 6.6 Hydroelectric 28,793 26,463 -8.1 Natural Gas 89,808 104,341 16.2 Nuclear 155,140 152,469 -1.7

463

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Representation Technology Type Gas Turbine Microturbine GasSystem (NEMS), gas turbine, gas engine, microturbine,System (NEMS): small (gas turbines, gas engines, and

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. Marnay. 2003. Distributed Generation Capabilities of theImpact on the Deployment of Distributed Generation. PolicyIntegration of Distributed Generation and the Development of

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. European Distributed Energy Projects, EUR 21239,Energy Sources and Distributed Energy Resources. Brussels,International Journal of Distributed Energy Resources, 1 (

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003). Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmissionelectricity and natural gas prices from the NEMS supply-side

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Module Petroleum Market Module Conversion Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission limits. The submodule receives electricity and natural gas prices from the NEMS supply-side modules are reciprocating engines fueled by natural gas. Microturbines are small (30-200 kW) turbine engines, also usually

468

Table 2.1c Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R=Revised. P=Preliminary. NA=Not available. - =No data reported. (s)=Less than 0.5 trillion Btu. 6 Conventional hydroelectricity net generation (converted to Btu ...

469

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Table C4; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Aug. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators...

470

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have waste heat driven absorption cooling capabilities. Thewith the greatest absorption cooling potential and thewaste heat driven absorption cooling capabilities into NEMS

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

versions of NEMS. Natural gas prices are higher in AEO2004.forecasted wellhead natural gas price from both versions ofhighly unstable natural gas prices, and the AEO2004 natural

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Table 2.3 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

e Conventional hydroelectric power. f Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by electric utilities and, beginning in 1996, other energy service ...

473

Demonstration of Demand Control Ventilation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand Control Ventilation (DCV) is one of the control strategies that can be used modulate the amount of ventilation air for space conditioning in commercial buildings. DCV modulates the amount of ventilation air introduced into the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system based on carbon dioxide levels sensed in the areas served. The carbon dioxide level is a proxy for the number of people within the space, from which the required quantity of ventilation air is determined. By using this ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

474

International industrial sector energy efficiency policies  

SciTech Connect

Over 40 percent of the energy consumed globally is used in the industrial sector. In China, this sector consumes an even larger proportion, reaching nearly 70 percent in 1997. A variety of energy efficiency policies and programs have been instituted in both industrialized and developing countries in an effort to improve the energy efficiency of the industrial sector. There are very few comprehensive evaluations of these industrial sector energy efficiency policies; however a number of recent workshops and conferences have included a focus on these policies. Three important meetings were the International Energy Agency's Industrial Energy Efficiency: Policies and Programs Conference in 1994, Industrial Energy Efficiency Policies: Understanding Success and Failure - A Workshop Organized by the International Network for Energy Demand Analysis in the Industrial Sector in 1998, and the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy's 1999 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Man y articles from these meetings are included as attachments to this memo. This paper provides a brief description of each of seven categories of individual industrial energy efficiency policies and programs, discuss which industrial sectors or types of equipment they apply to, and provide references for articles and reports that discuss each policy or program in more detail. We begin with mandatory-type policies and move to more voluntary-type policies. We then provide a brief description of four integrated industrial energy efficiency policies and provide references for articles and reports that describe these policies in greater detail.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

International industrial sector energy efficiency policies  

SciTech Connect

Over 40 percent of the energy consumed globally is used in the industrial sector. In China, this sector consumes an even larger proportion, reaching nearly 70 percent in 1997. A variety of energy efficiency policies and programs have been instituted in both industrialized and developing countries in an effort to improve the energy efficiency of the industrial sector. There are very few comprehensive evaluations of these industrial sector energy efficiency policies; however a number of recent workshops and conferences have included a focus on these policies. Three important meetings were the International Energy Agency's Industrial Energy Efficiency: Policies and Programs Conference in 1994, Industrial Energy Efficiency Policies: Understanding Success and Failure - A Workshop Organized by the International Network for Energy Demand Analysis in the Industrial Sector in 1998, and the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy's 1999 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Man y articles from these meetings are included as attachments to this memo. This paper provides a brief description of each of seven categories of individual industrial energy efficiency policies and programs, discuss which industrial sectors or types of equipment they apply to, and provide references for articles and reports that discuss each policy or program in more detail. We begin with mandatory-type policies and move to more voluntary-type policies. We then provide a brief description of four integrated industrial energy efficiency policies and provide references for articles and reports that describe these policies in greater detail.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining charts deal with total distillate demand. Total distillate demand includes both diesel and heating oil. These are similar products physically, and prior to the low sulfur requirements for on-road diesel fuel, were used interchangeably. But even today, low sulfur diesel can be used in the heating oil market, but low sulfur requirements keep heating oil from being used in the on-road transportation sector. The seasonal increases and decreases in stocks stem from the seasonal demand in heating oil shown as the bottom red line. Heating oil demand increases by more than 50 percent from its low point to its high

477

Alliance for Chinese Electric Vehicle Development and Commercialization |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development and Commercialization Development and Commercialization Jump to: navigation, search Name Alliance for Chinese Electric Vehicle Development and Commercialization Place China Sector Vehicles Product China-based alliance announced in January 2010 for speeding up the commercialization and achieving mass adoption of Pure Electronic Vehicles (Pure EVs) in China. References Alliance for Chinese Electric Vehicle Development and Commercialization[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Alliance for Chinese Electric Vehicle Development and Commercialization is a company located in China . References ↑ "Alliance for Chinese Electric Vehicle Development and Commercialization"

478

Commercial Building Asset Rating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 eere.energy.gov 1 eere.energy.gov Commercial Building Asset Rating Program August 23, 2011 12 p.m. ET, 9 a.m. PT Presenter: Cody Taylor PRE-DECISIONAL Information included in this document is for discussion purposes and does not constitute the final program design. FOR INFORMATION ONLY 2 eere.energy.gov Outline