Sample records for demand market trends

  1. 47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    47 Natural Gas Market Trends Chapter 5 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS INTRODUCTION Natural gas discusses current natural gas market conditions in California and the rest of North America, followed on the outlook for demand, supply, and price of natural gas for the forecasted 20-year horizon. It also addresses

  2. Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    drivingdemandsocialmedia010611.pdf More Documents & Publications Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 Social Media for Natural...

  3. Market Response ModelsMarket Response Models Demand CreationDemand Creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    Market Response ModelsMarket Response Models andand Demand CreationDemand Creation Dominique MImportance of Marketing Investments Need for a Market Response focusNeed for a Market Response focus Digital data enriched acquisition and retention costsasymmetry between acquisition and retention costs In both cases, longIn both

  4. Natural Gas Demand Markets in the Northeast

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Providing a Significant Opportunity for New and Expanding Natural Gas Demand Markets in the Northeast Prepared for: America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA) Prepared by: Bentek...

  5. Global Natural Gas Market Trends, 2. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides an overview of major trends occurring in the natural gas industry and includes a concise look at the drivers behind recent rapid growth in gas usage and the challenges faced in meeting that growth. Topics covered include: an overview of Natural Gas including its history, the current market environment, and its future market potential; an analysis of the overarching trends that are driving a need for change in the Natural Gas industry; a description of new technologies being developed to increase production of Natural Gas; an evaluation of the potential of unconventional Natural Gas sources to supply the market; a review of new transportation methods to get Natural Gas from producing to consuming countries; a description of new storage technologies to support the increasing demand for peak gas; an analysis of the coming changes in global Natural Gas flows; an evaluation of new applications for Natural Gas and their impact on market sectors; and, an overview of Natural Gas trading concepts and recent changes in financial markets.

  6. TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    PWP-085 TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN CALIFORNIA, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING** Abstract This study analyzes state and regional electricity supply and demand trends for the eleven states

  7. Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesOutlook and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesPresident, Emerging Markets Online http://www.emerginghttp://www.emerging--markets.commarkets.com Author, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market SurveyAuthor, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market Survey Columnist

  8. Marketing Demand-Side Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, M. L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand-Side Management is an organizational tool that has proven successful in various realms of the ever changing business world in the past few years. It combines the multi-faceted desires of the customers with the increasingly important...

  9. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

  10. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M T E P 06 - The Midwest ISO Transmission Expansion Plan,Demand Response in Midwest ISO Market," Presentation at MISODemand Response with Midwest ISO Wholesale Markets Ranjit

  11. Trends in demand for retail and wholesale cuts of meat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holloway, David Wayne

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRENDS IN DEMAND FOR RETAIL AND WHOLESALE CUTS OF MEAT A Thesis by DAVID WAYNE HOLLOWAY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1990 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics TRENDS IN DEMAND FOR RETAIL AND WHOLESALE CUTS OF MEAT A Thesis by DAVID WAYNE HOLLOWAY Approved as to style and content by: Donald E. Farris (Chair of Committee) Carl E. Shafer (Member) Rudo J...

  12. Two Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Two Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks Lijun Chen, Na Li, Steven H. Low and John C-- In this paper, we consider two abstract market models for designing demand response to match power supply as oligopolistic markets, and propose distributed demand response algorithms to achieve the equilibria. The models

  13. Trends in Regional Electricity Demands 1995-2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Department of Energy in EIA form 861. Council staff takes annual reported retail sales by each utility. Street lighting sales are not metered but rather estimated . 10 #12;Losses are Defined as Energy LoadsTrends in Regional Electricity Demands 1995-2012 January 29, 2014 #12;In Today's Conversation

  14. How Markets Slowly Digest Changes in Supply and Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER 2 How Markets Slowly Digest Changes in Supply and Demand Jean-Philippe Bouchaud Science-Holland, Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved. 57 #12;58 Chapter 2 · How Markets Slowly Digest Changes in Supply

  15. Modeling Structural Changes in Market Demand and Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Beom Su

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic events may cause structural changes in markets. To know the effect of the economic event we should analyze the structural changes in the market demand and supply. The purpose of this dissertation is to analyze the effect of selected...

  16. Amplified Demand for Solar Trackers to Boost Market Growth in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Amplified Demand for Solar Trackers to Boost Market Growth in Middle East and Africa Home > Groups > Solar Permitting Roadmap Development Wayne31jan's picture Submitted by...

  17. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydro facility or demand response aggregator to provide theOperator Demand Response Mass-Market Customers Aggregator ofDemand Response Resources Mass Market Customers Aggregator

  18. A Methodology for Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market PotentialEstimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market PotentialSyracuse, NY ABSTRACT Demand response (DR) is increasingly

  19. Understanding the China energy market: trends and opportunities 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbara Drazga

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report is broken up into 4 Sections: Section I - Overview of China Energy Market (historical background, market value, consumption, production, reserves, export and import, market segmentation, market forecast); Section II - Market Analysis (PEST analysis, Porter's five forces analysis, socio-economic trends, consumption trends); Section III - Market Segments (electricity, oil, natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquid petroleum gas, nuclear power, coal, renewables, photovoltaics, wind power, hydroelectric power. Each market segment details current and planned projects, and lists participants in that sector); and Section IV - Breaking Into the Market (regulatory framework, methods of market entry, foreign investment, challenges, government agencies).

  20. Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Social Marketing for Weatherization Programs Webinar Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Home Accomplishments History Better Buildings Partners Stories Interviews Videos...

  1. Identification of demand in differentiated products markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megerdichian, Aren

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1997) “Matching as an Econometric Evaluation Estimator:Treatment Effects, and Econometric Policy Evaluation. ”T. Spiller. (1996) “Econometric Market De- lineation. ”

  2. Solar Photovoltaic Installation Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Photovoltaic Installation Market Trends Home John55364's picture Submitted by John55364(95) Contributor 14 May, 2015 - 02:24 Global Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Installation...

  3. Solar Renewable Energy Certificate (SREC) Markets: Status and Trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Kreycik, C.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines experience in solar renewable energy certificate (SREC) markets in the United States. It describes how SREC markets function--key policy design provisions, eligible technologies, state and regional eligibility rules, solar alternative compliance payments, measurement and verification methods, long-term contracting provisions, and rate caps. It also examines the trends of SREC markets--trading volumes, sourcing trends, trends in the size of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems driven by these markets, and trends in price and compliance. Throughout, the paper explores key issues and challenges facing SREC markets and attempts by policymakers to address some of these market barriers. Data and information presented in this report are derived from SREC tracking systems, brokers and auctions, published reports, and information gleaned from market participants and interviews with state regulators responsible for SREC market implementation. The last section summarizes key findings.

  4. Aligning netbook microprocessor reliability to market demands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhardwaj, Anuj (Anuj Mohan)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008 Intel released a low-power and low-cost microprocessor that opened up a new market for smaller mobile computers, commonly known as netbooks. During the subsequent two years, netbooks have grown to be a substantial ...

  5. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Program Participation Rates on Demand Response MarketTable 3-1. Methods of Estimating Demand Response PenetrationDemand Response

  6. Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market Potential: Integrating Price and Customer Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market Potential:Syracuse, NY ABSTRACT Demand response (DR) is increasinglyestimated. Introduction Demand response (DR) is increasingly

  7. Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

  8. Analysis of Residential Demand Response and Double-Auction Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response and dynamic pricing programs are expected to play increasing roles in the modern Smart Grid environment. While direct load control of end-use loads has existed for decades, price driven response programs are only beginning to be explored at the distribution level. These programs utilize a price signal as a means to control demand. Active markets allow customers to respond to fluctuations in wholesale electrical costs, but may not allow the utility to control demand. Transactive markets, utilizing distributed controllers and a centralized auction can be used to create an interactive system which can limit demand at key times on a distribution system, decreasing congestion. With the current proliferation of computing and communication resources, the ability now exists to create transactive demand response programs at the residential level. With the combination of automated bidding and response strategies coupled with education programs and customer response, emerging demand response programs have the ability to reduce utility demand and congestion in a more controlled manner. This paper will explore the effects of a residential double-auction market, utilizing transactive controllers, on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

  9. Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson C. Dr.; Goldman, Charles A.

    2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The restructuring of regional electricity markets in the U.S. has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created significant new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators, to control and manage the load patterns of their wholesale or retail end-users. These technologies and business approaches for manipulating end-user load shapes are known as Load Management or, more recently, Demand Responsive programs. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is conducting case studies on innovative demand responsive programs and presents preliminary results for five case studies in this paper. These case studies illustrate the diversity of market participants and range of technologies and business approaches and focus on key program elements such as target markets, market segmentation and participation results; pricing scheme; dispatch and coordination; measurement, verification, and settlement; and operational results where available.

  10. Green Power Marketing Abroad: Recent Experience and Trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Wustenhagen, R.; Aabakken, J.

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Green power marketing--the act of differentially selling electricity generated wholly or in part from renewable sources--has emerged in more than a dozen countries around the world. This report reviews green power marketing activity abroad to gain additional perspective on consumer demand and to discern key factors or policies that affect the development of green power markets. The objective is to draw lessons from experience in other countries that could be applicable to the U.S. market.

  11. Trends and Market Effects of Wood Energy Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trends and Market Effects of Wood Energy Policies Bengt Hillring SLU SWEDEN http://www.unece.org/trade/timber/docs/tc-sessions/tc-61/presentations/10-hillring.pdf #12;Introduction · Industrial use of wood fibre has increased · Oil

  12. Alternative Fuels Market and Policy Trends (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, A. N.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Market forces and policies are increasing opportunities for alternative fuels. There is no one-size-fits-all, catch-all, silver-bullet fuel. States play a critical role in the alternative fuel market and are taking a leading role.

  13. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Kathan, David

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical evidence concerning demand response (DR) resources is needed in order to establish baseline conditions, develop standardized methods to assess DR availability and performance, and to build confidence among policymakers, utilities, system operators, and stakeholders that DR resources do offer a viable, cost-effective alternative to supply-side investments. This paper summarizes the existing contribution of DR resources in U.S. electric power markets. In 2008, customers enrolled in existing wholesale and retail DR programs were capable of providing ~;;38,000 MW of potential peak load reductions in the United States. Participants in organized wholesale market DR programs, though, have historically overestimated their likely performance during declared curtailments events, but appear to be getting better as they and their agents gain experience. In places with less developed organized wholesale market DR programs, utilities are learning how to create more flexible DR resources by adapting legacy load management programs to fit into existing wholesale market constructs. Overall, the development of open and organized wholesale markets coupled with direct policy support by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has facilitated new entry by curtailment service providers, which has likely expanded the demand response industry and led to product and service innovation.

  14. U.S. Solar Market Trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Sherwood

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid-connected photovoltaic installations grew by 40% in 2009 compared with installations in 2008. California and New Jersey have the largest markets. Growth occurred in the residential and utility markets, but non-residential customer-sited installations did not change compared with the installations in 2008. Two small solar thermal electric plants were connected to the grid in 2009 with a combined capacity of 7 MW. The future prospects for solar thermal electric plants look bright, although developers are not expected to complete any new large plants until at least 2011. Solar water heating and solar space heating annual installations grew by 40% in 2008 compared with 2007. Hawaii, California, Puerto Rico, and Florida dominate this market. Solar pool heating annual installation capacity fell by 1% in 2008 following a dramatic decline of 15% in solar pool heating capacity in 2007 compared with 2006. Florida and California are the largest markets for solar pool heating. The economic decline in the real estate markets in Florida and California likely led to the decrease in pool installations and thus the dramatic decline in capacity installed of solar pool systems in 2007.

  15. How markets slowly digest changes in supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we revisit the classic problem of tatonnement in price formation from a microstructure point of view, reviewing a recent body of theoretical and empirical work explaining how fluctuations in supply and demand are slowly incorporated into prices. Because revealed market liquidity is extremely low, large orders to buy or sell can only be traded incrementally, over periods of time as long as months. As a result order flow is a highly persistent long-memory process. Maintaining compatibility with market efficiency has profound consequences on price formation, on the dynamics of liquidity, and on the nature of impact. We review a body of theory that makes detailed quantitative predictions about the volume and time dependence of market impact, the bid-ask spread, order book dynamics, and volatility. Comparisons to data yield some encouraging successes. This framework suggests a novel interpretation of financial information, in which agents are at best only weakly informed and all have a similar and ...

  16. Efficient, Inexpensive Motors: A New Trend in The Motors Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wroblewksi, R. G.

    EFFICIENT, INEXPENSIVE MOTORS: A NEW TREND IN THE MOTORS MARKET Ronald G. Wroblewski, P.E. Trainer and Consultant ABSTRACT The Consortiwn for Energy Efficiency (CEE) has established criteria for premium-efficiency motors above the EPACf... standard. CEE has set a wrifonn efficiency benchmark that all market players (manufacturers, utilities, and end-users) can use. Some end-users however, have been reluctant to specify these motors because they think they are too expensive...

  17. Demand Response in the U.S.- Key trends and federal facility participation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—provides demand response (DR) definition, current status of DR in the United States, key DR trends, and federal participation issues.

  18. #MarketTrends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Hometcdb Home#MarketResearchReports

  19. Effects of Demand Response on Retail and Wholesale Power Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response has grown to be a part of the repertoire of resources used by utilities to manage the balance between generation and load. In recent years, advances in communications and control technology have enabled utilities to consider continuously controlling demand response to meet generation, rather than the other way around. This paper discusses the economic applications of a general method for load resource analysis that parallels the approach used to analyze generation resources and uses the method to examine the results of the US Department of Energy’s Olympic Peninsula Demonstration Testbed. A market-based closed-loop system of controllable assets is discussed with necessary and sufficient conditions on system controllability, observability and stability derived.

  20. U.S. Solar Market Trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Sherwood

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010 marked the emergence of the utility sector photovoltaic market. Utility sector photovoltaic installations quadrupled over 2009 installations. The share of utility sector installations of all U.S. grid-connected PV installations grew from virtually none in 2006 to 15 percent in 2009 and 32 percent in 2010. In addition, 2010 saw installation of a 75 MWAC concentrating solar power plant, the largest installed in the U.S. since 1991. In 2010, annual distributed grid-connected PV installations in the United States grew by 62 percent, to 606 MWDC. Photovoltaic arrays were installed at more than 50,000 sites in 2010, a 45 percent increase over the number of installations in 2009. Solar water heating installations increased by 6 percent in 2010, compared with 2009. Solar water heating has shown only two years of higher growth in the last 10 years. Solar pool heating installations increased by 13 percent in 2010, the largest growth in five years.

  1. Trends in demand for retail and wholesale cuts of meat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holloway, David Wayne

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    data from 1965 to 1985 were used. The aggregate system used beef, pork, and chicken, and then disaggregated beef into hamburger and table cuts, and chicken into parts/processed products for the second system. Additional variables in the estimation... shift in demand for beef and pork during the period, and broilers were found to be a strong substitute for beef in the second period. Implications are that there was a structural change in the meat sector during the period, and the decline...

  2. How Increased Crude Oil Demand by China and India Affects the International Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 How Increased Crude Oil Demand by China and India Affects the International Market. Abstract The global crude oil market is characterised by complex interactions between demand and supply. The question that we address in this paper is how increased demand for crude oil by China and India affects

  3. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

  4. On Coordinating Electricity Markets: Smart Power Scheduling for Demand Side Management and Economic Dispatch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    On Coordinating Electricity Markets: Smart Power Scheduling for Demand Side Management and Economic;On Coordinating Electricity Markets: Smart Power Scheduling for Demand Side Management and Economic Dispatch Abstract Information asymmetry in retail electricity markets is one of the largest sources of inef

  5. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the second half of the wholesale electric market equation.response with Midwest ISO wholesale markets, report no.DR Programs in Wholesale Markets 18

  6. Empirical Analysis of the Spot Market Implications of Price-Responsive Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Demand Response in Electricity Markets,” CSEM Working Paper CSEM-WP-105, University of California Energy Institute, Berkeley, CA, USA.USA. Siddiqui, AS (2004), “Price-Elastic Demand in Deregulated Electricity

  7. An exploration of automotive platinum demand and its impacts on the platinum market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitfield, Christopher George

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The platinum market is a material market of increasing interest, as platinum demand has grown faster than supply in recent years. As a result, the price of platinum has increased, causing end-user firms to experience ...

  8. Marketing and Driving Demand Collaborative: Social Media Tools and Strategies Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marketing and Driving Demand Collaborative: Social Media Tools and Strategies Webinar, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings program.

  9. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Sedano, Richard

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Organization of Midwest ISO States (OMS) launched the Midwest Demand Resource Initiative (MWDRI) in 2007 to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and develop policies to overcome them. The MWDRI stakeholders decided that a useful initial activity would be to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This additional detail could then be used to assess any"seams issues" affecting coordination and integration of retail DR resources with MISO's wholesale markets. Working with state regulatory agencies, we conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs, dynamic pricing tariffs, and their features in MISO states. Utilities were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g., seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. This report describes the results of this comprehensive survey and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into organized wholesale markets. Survey responses from 37 MISO members and 4 non-members provided information on 141 DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs with a peak load reduction potential of 4,727 MW of retail DR resource. Major findings of this study area:- About 72percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;18percent. Almost 90percent of the DR resources included in this survey are provided by investor-owned utilities. - Approximately, 90percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and over 1,900 MW can be dispatched on less than thirty minutes notice. These legacy DR programs are increasingly used by utilities for economic in addition to reliability purposes, with over two-thirds (68percent) of these programs callable based on market conditions. - Approximately 60percent of DLC programs and 30percent of interruptible rate programs called ten or more DR events in 2006. Despite the high frequency of DR events, customer complaints remained low. The use of economic criteria to trigger DR events and the flexibility to trigger a large number of events suggests that DR resources can help improve the efficiency of MISO wholesale markets. - Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels averaged about $5/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $6/kW-month for DLC programs. Few programs offered incentive payments that were explicitly linked to actual load reductions during events and at least 27 DR programs do not have penalties for non-performance. - Measurement and verification (M&V) protocols to estimate load impacts vary significantly across MISO states. Almost half of the DR programs have not been evaluated in recent times and thus performance data for DR events is not available. For many DLC programs, M&V protocols may need to be enhancedin order to allow participation in MISO's proposed EDR schedule. System operators and planners will need to develop more accurate estimates of the load reduced capability and actual performance.

  10. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data Collection for Demand-side Management for QualifyingPrepared by Demand-side Management Task Force of the4. Status of Demand Side Management in Midwest ISO 5.

  11. Drilling Fluids Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South, New Jersey: EnergyDrewDrilling Fluids Market Trends

  12. Pricing trends in the US market for wholesale power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geschwind, D.P.; Flucke, J.M. [Burns & McDonnell, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity markets in the United States have undergone an interesting transformation over the last several years. With the Energy Policy Act of 1992, Congress set the stage for competition in the wholesale market for electricity. No longer could one utility hold another utility hostage by denying it transmission access. Through increased choices of suppliers, purchasers of wholesale power have, in many cases, been able to lower their power costs by purchasing power on the open market, rather than purchasing power solely from an adjacent utility. Burns & McDonnell has worked with many wholesale power purchasers over recent years to evaluate the available options for lowering their power costs. In many of these evaluations, bid solicitations were conducted to identify specific wholesale power purchase options. Through these projects, Burns & McDonnell has been able to collect a substantial amount of data on the offered prices for wholesale power over the last several years. The purpose of this paper is to compare the purchase power data collected by Burns & McDonnell over the last several years in evaluating resource options for electric utilities. Reviews of this data suggest a declining pricing trend that reflects increasing levels of competition in the wholesale power market. The paper also illustrates the difficulty in constructing new generation that can produce electricity at a cost below that of the wholesale power market. Finally, the paper addresses the difference between average cost and marginal cost pricing as it relates to the cost of producing wholesale power for sale. The paper discusses the idea that some participants in the wholesale power market may actually be offering power for prices that are lower than their cost of producing electricity. The advantages and disadvantages of this pricing approach are examined.

  13. 5/2/2005 Industry Seminar -April 2005 The Housing Market and Demand for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5/2/2005 Industry Seminar - April 2005 The Housing Market and Demand for Building Materials Charlotte, NC April 27, 2005 #12;Changes that will impact demand for residential building materials ·Demographics - demand for shelter ·Housing Construction - industrialization - substitution ·Globalization - new

  14. Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2013...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2013 Data) Jenny Heeter National Renewable Energy Laboratory With contributions from: Kathy Belyeu Independent...

  15. Strategies for Marketing and Driving Demand for Commercial Financing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Using Partnerships to Drive Demand and Provide Services in Communities Financial Vehicles within an Integrated Energy...

  16. Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2012 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Nicholas, T.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voluntary green power markets are those in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs. Voluntary action provides a revenue stream for renewable energy projects and raises consumer awareness of the benefits of renewable energy. These markets continued to exhibit growth and stimulate renewable energy development in 2012. This paper reviews the voluntary market and identifies market trends.

  17. Gray Markets, A Product of Demand Uncertainty and Excess Inventory.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmadi, R.; Carr, S. M.; Dasu, S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    two-market stochastic inventory system, Management Science.M. , P. Kouvelis. 2007. Inventory, speculation, and sourcing2001. A two-location inventory model with transshipment and

  18. Illinois Home Performance: DOE REES-- Driving Demand: Successful Marketing Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents Illinois Home Performance's successful marketing strategies, from more than 100,000 direct mailings to multi-pronged online outreach, July 2012.

  19. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vs. CSP.. 24market DR program by a CSP), (3) metering and telemetryof the interval data to CSP and ISO. As new entrants, CSPs

  20. Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Demand Response in Electricity Markets." University ofRates and Tariffs /Schedule for Electricity Service, P.S.C.no. 10- Electricity/Rules 24 (Riders)/Leaf No. 177-327."

  1. Incorporating Demand Resources into ISO New England’s Forward Capacity Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Forward Capacity Market was developed by ISO New England, the six New England states, and industry stakeholders to promote investment in demand- and supply-side resources. Under the new FCM design, ISO New England will project the needs...

  2. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    bear little relation to the true production costs of electricity as they vary over time. Demand response is a tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by...

  3. Demand models for U.S. domestic air passenger markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eriksen, Steven Edward

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The airline industry in recent years has suffered from the adverse effects of top level planning decisions based upon inaccurate demand forecasts. The air carriers have recognized the immediate need to develop their ...

  4. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercialand Industrial Customers:A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response is increasingly recognized as an essentialingredient to well functioning electricity markets. This growingconsensus was formalized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), whichestablished demand response as an official policy of the U.S. government,and directed states (and their electric utilities) to considerimplementing demand response, with a particular focus on "price-based"mechanisms. The resulting deliberations, along with a variety of stateand regional demand response initiatives, are raising important policyquestions: for example, How much demand response is enough? How much isavailable? From what sources? At what cost? The purpose of this scopingstudy is to examine analytical techniques and data sources to supportdemand response market assessments that can, in turn, answer the secondand third of these questions. We focus on demand response for large(>350 kW), commercial and industrial (C&I) customers, althoughmany of the concepts could equally be applied to similar programs andtariffs for small commercial and residential customers.

  5. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Independent System Operator (MISO) and Southwest PowerTo help inform the debate at MISO and SPP concerning how tosettled using the EIS market. MISO administers a day-ahead

  6. Effects of Price-Responsive Residential Demand on Retail and Wholesale Power Market Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 Effects of Price-Responsive Residential Demand on Retail and Wholesale Power Market Operations/C) on integrated retail and wholesale power market operations. The physical operations of the A/C sys- tem at wholesale conditional on A/C load, and the retail energy prices offered to residential A/C consumers

  7. Comfort-Aware Home Energy Management Under Market-Based Demand-Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutaba, Raouf

    pricing and consumption data in South Korea. Index Terms--smart grid, demand-response, energy management I-based pricing. In peak capping, each home is allocated an energy quota. In market-based pricing, the price-term viable way of regulating energy consumptions. We work with day-ahead market pricing in this paper

  8. Electricity Markets Meet the Home through Demand Response Lazaros Gkatzikis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) programs motivate home users through dynamic pricing to shift electricity consumption from peak demand incentives to the users, usually in the form of dynamic pricing, to reduce their electricity consumption. For example, the residential sector in UK accounts for 31% of the total electricity consumption

  9. Chapter 3 Airline Economics, Markets & Demand Learning Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of traffic o Yield o Capacity/ Available Seat Miles (ASM) o Unit Cost o Load Factor = Passengers/ Capacity Average Leg Load Factor Average Network Load Factor o Rejected Demand/Spill · Basic Airline Profit / Frequency Share Model "S-curve" #12;The student will be able to perform the following analysis (i

  10. Export demand response in the Ontario electricity market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peerbocus, Nash; Melino, Angelo

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Export responses to unanticipated price shocks can be a key contributing factor to the rapid mean reversion of electricity prices. The authors use event analysis - a technique more familiar from financial applications - to demonstrate how hourly export transactions respond to negative supply shocks in the Ontario electricity market. (author)

  11. Impact of U.S. Wholesale Demand for Canned Sardines on Market Accessibility of Potential Gulf of Mexico Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of U.S. Wholesale Demand for Canned Sardines on Market Accessibility of Potential Gulf market, three product groups, which comprise the market, are analyzed at the wholesale level to detennine can to a 425 round no. 1 tall can (Lanier, 1981). In this paper we examine the U.S. wholesale demand

  12. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision|LLCInsulation IncentivesEshone EnergyEstero,Demand

  13. Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools & Strategies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECSEnergyEnergy MarketPrograms|

  14. Cost trends and government incentives in the California photovoltaics market, 2007-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang Yan, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this thesis is to analyze cost trends and government incentives in the California PV market during 2007-2008. The data show that pre-rebate system costs increased in California during this time period and that ...

  15. Assessing U.S. ESCO industry performance and market trends: Results from the NAESCO database project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborn, Julie; Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Singer, Terry

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance of the U.S. ESCO Industry: Results from theMarket Trends in the U.S. ESCO Industry: Results from theenergy service company (ESCO) industry in the United States.

  16. Trends and Market Forces Shaping Small Community Air Service in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittman, Michael D.

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Trends and Market Forces Shaping Small Community Air Service in the United States, is the first in a series of papers written under the umbrella of the MIT Small Community Air Service White Paper series. The ...

  17. 2013 Data Update: Trends and Market Forces Shaping Small Community Air Service in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittman, M.D.

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an update to MIT Small Community Air Service White Paper No. 1—Trends and Market Forces Shaping Small Community Air Service in the United States1. This report provides updated analysis and data appendices ...

  18. A Summary Report Keeping pace with changing global markets, meeting world demand for a host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    in an uncertain world. Robert Johns (CTS director), Rebecca Jasper (Council of Supply Chain ManagementA Summary Report Keeping pace with changing global markets, meeting world demand for a host, transportation infrastructure, ports, railroads, biofuels and agricultural byproducts, and transportation

  19. Lifestyle studies Market demand Usage patterns Funding: Calif. Energy Commission, BMW, Calif. ARB, ECOtality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    as much energy as it consumes. When done in 2014, the 130-acre UC Davis West Village will be home to 3Consumers Lifestyle studies · Market demand · Usage patterns Funding: Calif. Energy Commission, BMW operation · Energy savings Funding: Chrysler, US Dept of Energy Lead researcher: Kevin Nesbitt, Ph

  20. Green Marketing, Renewables, and Free Riders: Increasing Customer Demand for a Public Good

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-40632 UC-1321 Green Marketing, Renewables, and Free Riders: Increasing Customer Demand Customers that They Can "Make a Difference" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Emphasize Customer Retention errors and/or omissions are, of course, the full responsibility of the authors. The work described

  1. Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status and trends of 'compliance'--renewable energy certificate (REC) markets used to meet state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements--and 'voluntary' markets--those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Today, 29 states and the District of Columbia have an RPS, more than half of all U.S. electricity customers have an option to purchase some type of green power product directly from a retail electricity provider, and all consumers have the option to purchase RECs. This report documents REC activities and trends in the United States. The compliance REC market analysis includes analysis of REC trading, regional REC markets, REC tracking systems, types of compliance RECs, compliance REC pricing trends, and an overview of compliance with RPS polices. The voluntary REC analysis presents data and analysis on voluntary market sales and customer participation, products and premiums, green pricing marketing and administrative expenses, voluntary REC pricing, and the voluntary carbon offsets market. The report concludes with a discussion of upcoming guidance from the Federal Trade Commission on green marketing claims, the emergence of community solar programs, and the potential impact of Dodd-Frank regulations on the REC market.

  2. Empirical analysis of the spot market implications ofprice-elastic demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

    2004-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Regardless of the form of restructuring, deregulated electricity industries share one common feature: the absence of any significant, rapid demand-side response to the wholesale (or, spotmarket) price. For a variety of reasons, electricity industries continue to charge most consumers an average cost based on regulated retail tariff from the era of vertical integration, even as the retailers themselves are forced to purchase electricity at volatile wholesale prices set in open markets. This results in considerable price risk for retailers, who are sometimes forbidden by regulators from signing hedging contracts. More importantly, because end-users do not perceive real-time (or even hourly or daily) fluctuations in the wholesale price of electricity, they have no incentive to adjust their consumption in response to price signals. Consequently, demand for electricity is highly inelastic, and electricity generation resources can be stretched to the point where system stability is threatened. This, then, facilitates many other problems associated with electricity markets, such as market power and price volatility. Indeed, economic theory suggests that even modestly price-responsive demand can remove the stress on generation resources and decrease spot prices. To test this theory, we use actual generator bid data from the New York control area to construct supply stacks, and intersect them with demand curves of various slopes to approximate different levels of demand elasticity. We then estimate the potential impact of real-time pricing on the equilibrium spot price and quantity. These results indicate the immediate benefits that could be derived from a more price-elastic demand. Such analysis can provide policymakers with a measure of how effective price-elastic demand can potentially reduce prices and maintain consumption within the capability of generation resources.

  3. The Impact of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs on the U.S. Electricity Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Young Sun [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyzes the impact of the energy efficiency (EE) and demand response (DR) programs on the grid and the consequent level of production. Changes in demand caused by EE and DR programs affect not only the dispatch of existing plants and new generation technologies, the retirements of old plants, and the finances of the market. To find the new equilibrium in the market, we use the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch Model (ORCED) developed to simulate the operations and costs of regional power markets depending on various factors including fuel prices, initial mix of generation capacity, and customer response to electricity prices. In ORCED, over 19,000 plant units in the nation are aggregated into up to 200 plant groups per region. Then, ORCED dispatches the power plant groups in each region to meet the electricity demands for a given year up to 2035. In our analysis, we show various demand, supply, and dispatch patterns affected by EE and DR programs across regions.

  4. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

  5. A New Market for an Old Food: the U.S. Demand for Olive Oil , Daniel Sumner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    A New Market for an Old Food: the U.S. Demand for Olive Oil Bo Xiong , Daniel Sumner , William olive oil continues to be imported. Estimation of a demand system using monthly import data reveals that the income elasticity for virgin oils sourced from EU is above one, but demand for non-virgin oils is income

  6. Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2013 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Belyeu, K.; Kuskova-Burns, K.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voluntary green power markets are those in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs. This report surveys utilities, competitive suppliers, renewable energy certificate (REC) marketers, and, for the first time, the community choice aggregation market. This report finds that the voluntary market totaled 62 million megawatt-hours in 2013. Approximately 5.4 million customers are purchasing green power. This report presents data and analysis on voluntary market sales and customer participation, products and premiums, green pricing marketing, and administrative expenses. The report also details trends in REC tracking systems, REC pricing in voluntary and compliance markets, community and crowd-funded solar, and interest in renewable energy by the information and communication technologies sector.

  7. PV batteries and charge controllers: Technical issues, costs, and market trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, R.L.; Turpin, J.F. [Arizona State Univ. East, Mesa, AZ (United States); Corey, G.P.; Hund, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harrington, S.R. [Harrington (S.R.), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey of US system integrators, charge controller manufacturers, and battery manufacturers was conducted in 1996 to determine market and application trends. This survey was sponsored by the USDOE. Results from 21 system integrators show a 1995 PV battery sales of $4.76 million. Using the survey results, a top down market analysis was conducted with a total predicted US battery market of $34.7 million and a world wide market of US $302 million. The survey also indicated that 71% (of dollars) were spent on VRLA and 29% on flooded lead-acid batteries. Eighty percent of charge controllers were ON-OFF, vs. PWM or constant voltage.

  8. Utility Marketing Strategies and Pricing Trends (An Overview)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, S.

    utility's costs and provide a sound fiscal footing for the utility, and yet still be attractive to industry and encourage the economic development of the region. However, lower rates are simply not the only answer in a sound marketing strategy. Rather than...

  9. 11 California Petroleum Supply, Transportation, Refining and Marketing Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the world oil market as a world-scale petroleum consumer. Historically, about 50 percent of this petroleum years (as discussed in Chapter 4). These findings are based on gradual increases in oil prices. It should be noted that more abrupt increases in oil prices would cost consumers more but also stimulate

  10. The Energy Services Company (ESCO) industry: Analysis of industry and market trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dayton, D.S.; Goldman, C.A.; Pickle, S.J.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As retail competition accelerates, energy service companies (ESCOs) are confronting major structural changes in the energy services industry and a business environment in which many large customers are re-thinking their energy-related purchasing practices. This paper analyzes recent trends in the ESCO industry and looks specifically at how traditional performance contracting firms are faring during the transition to a new market structure. The authors also discuss trends in both established and emerging ESCO markets. Key findings include: (1) Independent ESCOs are declining both in number and share of the market for energy-efficiency services; (2) Utility-owned ESCOs and retail energy service companies (RESCOs) are an increasingly significant force in the energy-efficiency services market; and (3) Performance contracting, long a hallmark of the ESCO industry, is being overtaken by other forms of energy service contracts in percentage of total revenue.

  11. Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids (HGL): Recent Market Trends and Issues

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14 Dec-14Has Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids

  12. Power Rental Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation,Power Rental Market Size Home John55364'sPower

  13. Offshore Lubricants Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns JumpsourceOffshore Lubricants Market Size Home

  14. Low Voltage Cables Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) WindLow Voltage Cables Market

  15. Microturbine Systems Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole Inc JumpMicroPlanet LtdMicroturbine Systems Market

  16. Towards a Service-Oriented Energy Market: Current state and trend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiello, Marco

    Towards a Service-Oriented Energy Market: Current state and trend Giuliano Andrea Pagani and Marco, The Netherlands {g.a.pagani,m.aiello}@rug.nl Abstract. The energy sector, which has traditionally been to produce, deal and transport energy, and energy consumers are now in the position to also produce and trade

  17. Green marketing, renewables, and free riders: increasing customer demand for a public good

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Pickle, S.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retail electricity competition will allow customers to select their own power suppliers and some customers will make purchase decisions based, in part, on their concern for the environment. Green power marketing targets these customers under the assumption that they will pay a premium for ``green`` energy products such as renewable power generation. But renewable energy is not a traditional product because it supplies public goods; for example, a customer supporting renewable energy is unable to capture the environmental benefits that their investment provides to non-participating customers. As with all public goods, there is a risk that few customers will purchase ``green`` power and that many will instead ``free ride`` on others` participation. By free riding, an individual is able to enjoy the benefits of the public good while avoiding payment. This report reviews current green power marketing activities in the electric industry, introduces the extensive academic literature on public goods, free riders, and collective action problems, and explores in detail the implications of this literature for the green marketing of renewable energy. Specifically, the authors highlight the implications of the public goods literature for green power product design and marketing communications strategies. They emphasize four mechanisms that marketers can use to increase customer demand for renewable energy. Though the public goods literature can also contribute insights into the potential rationale for renewable energy policies, they leave most of these implications for future work (see Appendix A for a possible research agenda).

  18. Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids (HGL): Recent Market Trends and Issues

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past five years, rapid growth in U.S. onshore natural gas and oil production has led to increased volumes of natural gas plant liquids (NGPL) and liquefied refinery gases (LRG). The increasing economic importance of these volumes, as a result of their significant growth in production, has revealed the need for better data accuracy and transparency to improve the quality of historical data and projections for supply, demand, and prices of these liquids, co-products, and competing products. To reduce confusion in terminology and improve its presentation of data, EIA has worked with industry and federal and state governments to clarify gas liquid terminology and has developed the term Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids, or HGL.

  19. Solar Trackers Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    pressreleasesolar-trackers-market.htm The research provides detailed analysis of companies dealing in solar tracker, trend analysis and demand forecast by geography....

  20. Proceedings of the Chinese-American symposium on energy markets and the future of energy demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, S. (ed.)

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Symposium was organized by the Energy Research Institute of the State Economic Commission of China, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Johns Hopkins University from the United States. It was held at the Johns Hopkins University Nanjing Center in late June 1988. It was attended by about 15 Chinese and an equal number of US experts on various topics related to energy demand and supply. Each presenter is one of the best observers of the energy situation in their field. A Chinese and US speaker presented papers on each topic. In all, about 30 papers were presented over a period of two and one half days. Each paper was translated into English and Chinese. The Chinese papers provide an excellent overview of the emerging energy demand and supply situation in China and the obstacles the Chinese planners face in managing the expected increase in demand for energy. These are matched by papers that discuss the energy situation in the US and worldwide, and the implications of the changes in the world energy situation on both countries. The papers in Part 1 provide historical background and discuss future directions. The papers in Part 2 focus on the historical development of energy planning and policy in each country and the methodologies and tools used for projecting energy demand and supply. The papers in Part 3 examine the pattern of energy demand, the forces driving demand, and opportunities for energy conservation in each of the major sectors in China and the US. The papers in Part 4 deal with the outlook for global and Pacific region energy markets and the development of the oil and natural gas sector in China.

  1. Nonlinear Pricing in Markets with Interdependent Demand Author(s): Shmuel S. Oren, Stephen A. Smith and Robert B. Wilson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Nonlinear Pricing in Markets with Interdependent Demand Author(s): Shmuel S. Oren, Stephen A. Smith S. OREN, t STEPHEN A. SMITH, t AND ROBERT B. WILSON? This paper provides a mathematical framework Sciences #12;S. S. OREN, S. A. SMITH AND R. B. WILSON demand externalities. Nonlinear pricing, defined

  2. Photovoltaics for demand-side management utility markets: A utility/customer partnership approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, J.; Letendre, S.; Govindarajalu, C.; Wang, Y.D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Policy; Nigro, R. [Delmarva Power and Light Co., Wilmington, DE (United States); Wallace, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems located at customer sites can be used to meet utility needs for demand-side management (DSM) applications. PV-DSM can also represent a high-value intermediate market for PV in the utility sector. Maximum value for PV in DSM applications can be achieved by incorporating a dispatching capability to PV systems (through the addition of storage). This enables utilities to evaluate PV systems as a peak-shaving technology. To date, peak-shaving has been the higher value DSM application for US utilities. This analysis of the value of dispatchable PV-DSM systems indicates that small-scale, customer-sited systems are approaching competitive cost levels in several regions of the US that have favorable load matching and peak demand pricing characteristics. This paper presents the results for PV-DSM systems located within the service territories of five case study utilities.

  3. Empirical Analysis of the Spot Market Implications ofPrice-Responsive Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regardless of the form of restructuring, deregulatedelectricity industries share one common feature: the absence of anysignificant, rapid demand-side response to the wholesale (or, spotmarket) price. For a variety of reasons, most electricity consumers stillpay an average cost based regulated retail tariff held over from the eraof vertical integration, even as the retailers themselves are oftenforced to purchase electricity at volatile wholesale prices set in openmarkets. This results in considerable price risk for retailers, who aresometimes additionally forbidden by regulators from signing hedgingcontracts. More importantly, because end-users do not perceive real-time(or even hourly or daily) fluctuations in the wholesale price ofelectricity, they have no incentive to adjust their consumptionaccordingly. Consequently, demand for electricity is highly inelastic,which together with the non storability of electricity that requiresmarket clearing over very short time steps spawn many other problemsassociated with electricity markets, such as exercise of market power andprice volatility. Indeed, electricity generation resources can bestretched to the point where system adequacy is threatened. Economictheory suggests that even modest price responsiveness can relieve thestress on generation resources and decrease spot prices. To quantify thiseffect, actual generator bid data from the New York control area is usedto construct supply stacks and intersect them with demand curves ofvarious slopes to approximate the effect of different levels of demandresponse. The potential impact of real-time pricing (RTP) on theequilibrium spot price and quantity is then estimated. These resultsindicate the immediate benefits that could be derived from a moreprice-responsive demand providing policymakers with a measure of howprices can be potentially reduced and consumption maintained within thecapability of generation assets.

  4. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goldman, G. (2009) Retail demand response in Southwest PowerL. (2009) Renewable Demand Response (RDR): Financial &Northwest GridWise™ Demand Response and Variable Generation

  5. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2001. “Electricity Demand Side Management Study: Review ofEpping/North Ryde Demand Side Management Scoping Study:Energy Agency Demand Side Management (IEA DSM) Programme:

  6. Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. Price Variations of Wholesale Electricity Markets for NYC4. Price Variations of Wholesale Electricity Markets for NYCDemand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using

  7. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  8. Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and provide demand response (DR) through building controland provide demand response (DR) through building controlDemand Response Automation Server (DRAS) in a 15-minute interval. This allows the continuous monitoring of the building's

  9. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diverse set of flexible traditional generation resourcessufficient flexible demand or generation capacity exists tosufficient flexible demand or generation capacity exists to

  10. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand response options, or benchmarking, are probably not all that meaningful. The “best practices”

  11. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HVAC equipment, plug loads) and thus a more diverse set of mass marketHVAC equipment, plug loads) and thus a more diverse set of mass market

  12. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand response, participation can imply: (1) customer enrollment in voluntary programs and tariffs, or (2) the retention

  13. ESCO market and industry trends: Updated results from the NAESCO database project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, Julie G.; Goldman, Charles A.; Hopper, Nicole C.

    2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's U.S. energy efficiency services industry is one of the most successful examples of private sector energy efficiency services in the world, yet little empirical information is available on the actual market activity of this industry. LBNL, together with the National Association of Energy Services Companies (NAESCO), has compiled the most comprehensive dataset of the energy efficiency services industry: nearly 1,500 case studies of energy efficiency projects. Our analysis of these projects helps shed light on some of the conventional wisdom regarding industry performance and evolution. We report key statistics about typical projects and industry trends that will aid state, federal, and international policymakers, and other investors interested in the development of a private sector energy efficiency services industry.

  14. Linking supply and demand: increasing grower participation and customer attendance at local farmers' markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lillard, Patrick Terrell

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Farmers' markets in the United States have experienced a dramatic increase since the 1970's. In the past three decades the number of farmers' markets has increased from 340 in 1970 to 3,617 by 2006. This interest in farmers' markets has not been...

  15. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand. (energy conservation regulations). Public UtilitiesSupplemental Energy Whereas regulation reserves areDR Capacity Energy Ancillary Services Regulation Reserves

  16. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability Corporation National Institute of Standards and Technology Open Access Transmission Tariff Open Automated Demand Response Protocol Public Utility Commission Photovoltaic

  17. Using Community-Based Social Marketing to Drive Demand for Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0socialmarketing.pdf More Documents & Publications Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low- and Moderate-Income Households RePower RePower Sustainability Planning Summit...

  18. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prices and quantified how system balancing costs change with high wind energywind energy when mass market customers responded on a 15-minute basis to DR price

  19. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  20. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  1. Linking supply and demand: increasing grower participation and customer attendance at local farmers' markets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lillard, Patrick Terrell

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Farmers' markets in the United States have experienced a dramatic increase since the 1970's. In the past three decades the number of farmers' markets has increased from 340 in 1970 to 3,617 by 2006. This interest in farmers' ...

  2. Program Strategies and Results for California’s Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrhard, R.; Hamilton, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Energy Partners provides a review of California’s strategic approach to energy efficiency and demand response implementation, with a focus on the industrial sector. The official role of the state, through the California Energy Commission (CEC...

  3. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    choices in the face of real options, or surveys can beoptions may differ from their actual behavior when faced with realReal-Time Demand Response (RTDR) program offers customers two advance-notice options:

  4. A Dynamic Market Mechanism for Integration of Renewables and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knudsen, Jesper

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The most formidable challenge in assembling a Smart Grid is the integration of a high penetration of renewables. Demand Response, a largely promising concept, is increasingly discussed as a means to cope with the intermittent ...

  5. Consumer Demand under Price Uncertainty: Empirical Evidence from the Market for Cigarettes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coppejans, Mark; Gilleskie, Donna; Sieg, Holger; Strumpf, Koleman

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a demand model for goods that are subject to habit formation. We show that consumption plans of forward-looking individuals depend on preferences, current period prices, and individual beliefs about the evolution ...

  6. The Window Market in Texas: Opportunities for Energy Savings and Demand Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarnikau, J.; Campbell, L.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency features have become standard features in windows in states with building energy codes, their sales in the Texas market remain limited. This paper presents findings from a pilot energy efficiency program sponsored by American Electric Power Company...

  7. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis. Presentation given to PJM Interconnection Markete.g. , ISO-NE, NYISO, PJM, MISO, ERCOT, and CAISO). Co-also elect to participate in PJM’s day-ahead and/or real-

  8. Review of U.S. ESCO industry market trends: An empirical analysis of project data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Hopper, Nicole C.; Osborn, Julie G.; Singer, Terry E.

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article summarizes a comprehensive empirical analysis of U.S. Energy Service Company (ESCO) industry trends and performance. We employ two parallel analytical approaches: a comprehensive survey of firms to estimate total industry size and a database of {approx}1500 ESCO projects, from which we report target markets and typical project characteristics, energy savings and customer economics. We estimate that industry investment for energy-efficiency related services reached US $2 billion in 2000 following a decade of strong growth. ESCO activity is concentrated in states with high economic activity and strong policy support. Typical projects save 150-200 MJ/m2/year and are cost-effective with median benefit/cost ratios of 1.6 and 2.1 for institutional and private sector projects. The median simple payback time is 7 years among institutional customers; 3 years is typical in the private sector. Reliance on DSM incentives has decreased since 1995. Preliminary evidence suggests that state enabling policies have boosted the industry in medium-sized states. ESCOs have proven resilient in the face of restructuring and will probably shift toward selling ''energy solutions,'' with energy efficiency part of a package. We conclude that a private sector energy-efficiency services industry that targets large commercial and industrial customers is viable and self-sustaining with appropriate policy support both financial and non-financial.

  9. U.S. Energy Service Company (ESCO) Industry and Market Trends

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    market penetration of EE technologies, and customer preferences Approach - NAESCOLBNL partnership with voluntary participation from industry and government agencies -...

  10. U.S. Energy Service Company (ESCO) Industry and Market Trends

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information on the U.S. Energy Service Company and its projects, activities, and effects in the market.

  11. Estimation of a supply and demand model for the hired farm labor market in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turley, Keith Pool

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    labor in Texas increased from -0. 8 in 1951 to -2. 8 in 1975, while the long run wage elasticity of demand increased from -1. 0 to -3. 5 during the same time period. The hypothesis that Mexican immigration has had a direct influence on the supply... be expected to cause a 0. 3 per- cent short-run increase in the supply of hired farm labor in Texas, and a 0. 1 percent short-run decrease in the farm wage rate, while the long-run effect on the wage rate would be a 0. 4 percent decrease from the 1975...

  12. Market transformation lessons learned from an automated demand response test in the Summer and Fall of 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shockman, Christine; Piette, Mary Ann; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent pilot test to enable an Automatic Demand Response system in California has revealed several lessons that are important to consider for a wider application of a regional or statewide Demand Response Program. The six facilities involved in the site testing were from diverse areas of our economy. The test subjects included a major retail food marketer and one of their retail grocery stores, financial services buildings for a major bank, a postal services facility, a federal government office building, a state university site, and ancillary buildings to a pharmaceutical research company. Although these organizations are all serving diverse purposes and customers, they share some underlying common characteristics that make their simultaneous study worthwhile from a market transformation perspective. These are large organizations. Energy efficiency is neither their core business nor are the decision makers who will enable this technology powerful players in their organizations. The management of buildings is perceived to be a small issue for top management and unless something goes wrong, little attention is paid to the building manager's problems. All of these organizations contract out a major part of their technical building operating systems. Control systems and energy management systems are proprietary. Their systems do not easily interact with one another. Management is, with the exception of one site, not electronically or computer literate enough to understand the full dimensions of the technology they have purchased. Despite the research team's development of a simple, straightforward method of informing them about the features of the demand response program, they had significant difficulty enabling their systems to meet the needs of the research. The research team had to step in and work directly with their vendors and contractors at all but one location. All of the participants have volunteered to participate in the study for altruistic reasons, that is, to help find solutions to California's energy problems. They have provided support in workmen, access to sites and vendors, and money to participate. Their efforts have revealed organizational and technical system barriers to the implementation of a wide scale program. This paper examines those barriers and provides possible avenues of approach for a future launch of a regional or statewide Automatic Demand Response Program.

  13. Impacts of increased bioenergy demand on global food markets: an AgMIP economic model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Kyle, G. Page; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Havlik, Petr; van Meijl, Hans; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Popp, Alexander; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk; Wise, Marshall A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated Assessment studies have shown that meeting ambitious greenhouse gas mitigation targets will require substantial amounts of bioenergy as part of the future energy mix. In the course of the Agricultural Model Comparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), five global agro-economic models were used to analyze a future scenario with global demand for ligno-cellulosic bioenergy rising to about 100 ExaJoule in 2050. From this exercise a tentative conclusion can be drawn that ambitious climate change mitigation need not drive up global food prices much, if the extra land required for bioenergy production is accessible or if the feedstock, e.g. from forests, does not directly compete for agricultural land. Agricultural price effects across models by the year 2050 from high bioenergy demand in an RCP2.6-type scenario appear to be much smaller (+5% average across models) than from direct climate impacts on crop yields in an RCP8.5-type scenario (+25% average across models). However, potential future scarcities of water and nutrients, policy-induced restrictions on agricultural land expansion, as well as potential welfare losses have not been specifically looked at in this exercise.

  14. Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang Steven Low Computing + Math Sciences Electrical Engineering Caltech Oct 2011 #12;Outline Caltech smart grid research Optimal demand response #12;Global trends 1

  15. Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Techniques for Demand Response”, May 2007. LBNL-59975 38the Role of Automated Demand Response, 2010. Watson, D. , N.Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable Integration of

  16. Review of U.S. ESCO industry market trends: An empirical analysis of project data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles A.; Hopper, Nicole C.; Osborn, Julie G.; Singer, Terry E.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy service company (ESCO) industry in the United States.and Feldman, S. , 1999. ESCO Market Research Study. Preparedperformance of the U.S. ESCO industry: Results from the

  17. Market trends in the U.S. ESCO industry: Results from the NAESCO database project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles A.; Osborn, Julie G.; Hopper, Nicole C.; Singer, Terry E.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy service company (ESCO) industry in the United States.and Shel Feldman 1999." ESCO Market Research Study,”performance of the U.S. ESCO industry: Results from the

  18. International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  19. International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  20. The Non-alcoholic Beverage Market in the United States: Demand Interrelationships, Dynamics, Nutrition Issues and Probability Forecast Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dharmasena, Kalu Arachchillage Senarath

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    marketplace trends ................................................................ 3 1.2 Trend in per capita bottled water consumption in the United States: 1976-2007 ...................................................................... 4 1.3 Trend... in per capita consumption of milk in the United States: 1970-2007 ...................................................................... 5 1.4 Trend in per capita consumption of soft drinks in the United States: 1984...

  1. Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Market Report: New York ISO. 2010. PJM, State of theMarket Report for PJM: Ancillary Service Markets. 2010Maryland Interconnection (PJM) and Midwest ISO (MISO) all

  2. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEMAND RESPONSE .7 Wholesale Marketuse at times of high wholesale market prices or when systemenergy expenditure. In wholesale markets, spot energy prices

  3. Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson C.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The restructuring of regional and national electricity markets in the U.S. and around the world has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators to control and manage the load patterns of wholesale and retail end-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called Load Management, have re-emerged as an important element in the fine-tuning of newly restructured electricity markets. During the summers of 1999 and 2001 they played a vital role in stabilizing wholesale markets and providing a hedge against generation shortfalls throughout the U.S.A. Demand Response Programs include ''traditional'' capacity reservation and interruptible/curtailable rates programs as well as voluntary demand bidding programs offered by either Load Serving Entities (LSEs) or regional Independent System Operators (ISOs). The Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has been monitoring the development of new types of Demand Response Programs both in the U.S. and around the world. This paper provides a survey and overview of the technologies and program designs that make up these emerging and important new programs.

  4. Market Demands on Broilers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beanblossom, Floyd Z.; Miller, Marshall M.

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    if otherwise above C quality. DISJOINTED BONE: Consumers hesitate to buy broilers with disjointed bones. Likewise they lower the grade but are not as serious as if bones are broken. Deformed Backs and Breasts Deformed backs, like many other abnor... Moderately misshapen Fairly well fleshed on breast and legs Misshapen FLESHING: Well fleshed, moderately long and rounded breast Poorly fles hed FAT COVERING: Well covered--considering class and part I I appearance of flesh through I carcass...

  5. Market Demands on Broilers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beanblossom, Floyd Z.; Miller, Marshall M.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of flesh through skin ering over all parth of carcass Fat Covering : Well covered-some fat under skin over entire carcass Broilers or fryers only mod- erate covering Breast and Elsewhere Legs Pinfeat hers : Breast and Elsewhere Legs Dressed... tract None Disjointed bones Broken bones No limit Wing tips and if R-to-C wings and tail None (except 1 nonprotruding wing bone if fryer) Missing parts 1 Nonprotruding (may be in leg or wing) Wing tips Wing tips and if R-to-C 2nd wing joint...

  6. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on utility demand-side management and conservation and renewable energy programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavallo, J.D.; Germer, M.F.; Tompkins, M.M.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) requires all of its long-term firm power customers to implement programs that promote the conservation of electric energy or facilitate the use of renewable energy resources. Western has also proposed that all customers develop integrated resource plans that include cost-effective demand-side management programs. As part of the preparation of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) developed estimates of the reductions in energy demand resulting from Western`s conservation and renewable energy activities in its Salt Lake City Area Office. ANL has also estimated the energy-demand reductions from cost-effective, demand-side management programs that could be included in the integrated resource plans of the customers served by Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The results of this study have been used to adjust the expected hourly demand for Western`s major systems in the Salt Lake City Area. The expected hourly demand served as the basis for capacity expansion plans develops with ANL`s Production and Capacity Expansion (PACE) model.

  7. Market trends in the U.S. ESCO industry: Results from the NAESCO database project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Osborn, Julie G.; Hopper, Nicole C.; Singer, Terry E.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Energy Services Company (ESCO) industry is often cited as the most successful model for the private sector delivery of energy-efficiency services. This study documents actual performance of the ESCO industry in order to provide policymakers and investors with objective information and customers with a resource for benchmarking proposed projects relative to industry performance. We have assembled a database of nearly 1500 case studies of energy-efficiency projects-the most comprehensive data set of the U.S. ESCO industry available. These projects include $2.55B of work completed by 51 ESCOs and span much of the history of this industry. We estimate that the ESCO industry completed $1.8-2.1B of projects in 2000. The industry has grown rapidly over the last decade with revenues increasing at a 24% annualized rate. We summarize and compare project characteristics and costs and analyze energy savings, including the relationship between predicted and actual savings. ESCOs typically invested about $2.30/ft{sup 2} per project in various energy efficiency improvements, although there is large variation in project costs within and across market segments. We find that lighting-only projects report median electricity savings of 47% of targeted equipment consumption; the median for lighting-&-non-lighting projects is 23% of the total electric bill baseline. We examine project economics, including project net benefits, benefit/cost ratio and simple payback time. Median simple payback time is seven years for institutional sector projects and three years in the private sector. We estimate direct economic benefits of $1.62 billion for the 1080 projects in our database with both cost and savings data. The median benefit/cost ratio is 2.1 for 309 private sector projects and 1.6 for 771 institutional sector projects. We discuss the role of policies and programs adopted by state/federal legislatures and agencies that have played an important role in stimulating ESCO activity in various markets. Finally, we estimate the overall size and growth of the energy-efficiency services industry over the last ten years based on a survey of 63 ESCOs.

  8. Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    services market. Regulation energy is used to control systemfollowing and regulation, with application to wind energy,”from the campus energy manager for regulation tests at this

  9. The evolving price of household LED lamps: Recent trends and historical comparisons for the US market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Brian F.; Ngo, Allison T.; Alstone, Andrea L.; Fisseha, Kibret S.

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, household LED light bulbs (LED A lamps) have undergone a dramatic price decline. Since late 2011, we have been collecting data, on a weekly basis, for retail offerings of LED A lamps on the Internet. The resulting data set allows us to track the recent price decline in detail. LED A lamp prices declined roughly exponentially with time in 2011-2014, with decline rates of 28percent to 44percent per year depending on lumen output, and with higher-lumen lamps exhibiting more rapid price declines. By combining the Internet price data with publicly available lamp shipments indices for the US market, it is also possible to correlate LED A lamp prices against cumulative production, yielding an experience curve for LED A lamps. In 2012-2013, LED A lamp prices declined by 20-25percent for each doubling in cumulative shipments. Similar analysis of historical data for other lighting technologies reveals that LED prices have fallen significantly more rapidly with cumulative production than did their technological predecessors, which exhibited a historical decline of 14-15percent per doubling of production.

  10. Energy Conservation Through Demand-Side Management (DSM): A Methodology to Characterize Energy Use Among commercial Market Segments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosskopf, K. R.; Oppenheim, P.; Barclay, D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use intensity (kWh/sf/yr), load factor and many other energy use characteristics for each market segment. From this information, lower tier performers in each NAICS submarket can be identified and appropriate DSM alternatives selected specific to each....

  11. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    advanced metering and demand response in electricityGoldman, and D. Kathan. “Demand response in U.S. electricity29] DOE. Benefits of demand response in electricity markets

  12. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission (FERC) 2008a. “Wholesale Competition in RegionsDemand Response into Wholesale Electricity Markets,” (URL:1 2. Wholesale and Retails Electricity Markets in

  13. Expert Paper for the UNECE, Timber Committee Market Discussions, Geneva, 7-8 October 2003 1 Trends and Market Effects of Wood Energy Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    behind the increased interest for wood energy. · Bioenergy promotion policy in certain countries Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Department of Bioenergy, P.O. Box 7060, SE-750 07 and Market Effects of Wood Energy Policies By Dr. Bengt Hillring1 Department of Bioenergy Swedish University

  14. Harnessing the power of demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

  15. antimicrobial resistance trends: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2020: A GLOBAL BIODIESEL MARKET GROWTH TRENDSEU BIODIESEL MARKET GROWTH TRENDSEU BIODIESEL MARKET GROWTH TRENDS EU Biofuels Targets:EU Biofuels Targets: Target 1Target 1...

  16. California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas demands are forecast for the four natural gas utility2013 Forecast, these trends lead to declining natural gasthe 2006-2016 Forecast. Commercial natural gas demand is

  17. Demand Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

  18. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry market in 2010; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

  19. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Barbose, G.; Darghouth, N.; Hoen, B.; Mills, A.; Weaver, S.; Porter, K.; Buckley, M.; Fink, S.; Oteri, F.; Tegen, S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry market in 2012; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

  20. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry market in 2011; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

  1. LNG demand, shipping will expand through 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1998-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990s, especially the middle years, have witnessed a dramatic turnaround in the growth of liquefied-natural-gas demand which has tracked equally strong natural-gas demand growth. This trend was underscored late last year by several annual studies of world LNG demand and shipping. As 1998 began, however, economic turmoil in Asian financial markets has clouded near-term prospects for LNG in particular and all energy in general. But the extent of damage to energy markets is so far unclear. A study by US-based Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL, reveals that LNG imports worldwide have climbed nearly 8%/year since 1980 and account for 25% of all natural gas traded internationally. In the mid-1970s, the share was only 5%. In 1996, the most recent year for which complete data are available, world LNG trade rose 7.7% to a record 92 billion cu m, outpacing the overall consumption for natural gas which increased 4.7% in 1996. By 2015, says the IGT study, natural-gas use would surpass coal as the world`s second most widely used fuel, after petroleum. Much of this growth will occur in the developing countries of Asia where gas use, before the current economic crisis began, was projected to grow 8%/year through 2015. Similar trends are reflected in another study of LNG trade released at year end 1997, this from Ocean Shipping Consultants Ltd., Surrey, U.K. The study was done too early, however, to consider the effects of the financial problems roiling Asia.

  2. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  3. Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    prices or when grid reliability is jeopardized. In regions with centrally organized wholesale electricity markets, demand response can help stabilize volatile electricity prices...

  4. Market values summary/March market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is the March 1995 uranium market summary. There were 14 near-term deals is natural uranium market for a total of 5.2 Mlb. The restricted exchange value moved upward to $11.75 per pound U3O8, and the unrestricted value rose to $7.35. The UF6 market was quite active, with 8 deals and with restricted and unrestricted prices for UF6 both up ($34.75 and $22.50 per kgU as UF6 respectively). The restricted and unrestricted transaction values also rose to $10.05 and $7.25 respectively. Enrichment services followed the overall trend, with increases to $92 and $78 per SWU. Active uranium supply dropped, as did active demand.

  5. UBC STUDENT HOUSING DEMAND STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    UBC STUDENT HOUSING DEMAND STUDY Presented by Nancy Knight and Andrew Parr FEBRUARY 5, 2010 #12;PURPOSE · To determine the need/demand for future on- campus student housing · To address requests from · A survey of students, and analysis of housing markets, and preparation of a forecast · The timeline

  6. ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    changes or incentives.' (FERC) · `Changes in electric use by demand-side resources from their normalERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT Whitacre thermostats -- Other DLC Possible triggers: Real-time prices, congestion management, 4CP response paid

  7. Demand Response Programs for Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wholesale prices and looming shortages in Western power markets in 2000-01, Portland General Electric programs for large customers remain, though they are not active at current wholesale prices. Other programs demand response for the wholesale market -- by passing through real-time prices for usage above a set

  8. 2010 Solar Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 Solar Technologies Market Report details the market conditions and trends for photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. Produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the report provides a comprehensive overview of the solar electricity market and identifies successes and trends within the market from both global and national perspectives.

  9. SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market-Based Programs Technical Information Network SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility...

  10. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  11. Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CUTS//2050/energy05 as a source of energy. Global supply and demand trends will have a profound impact on the ability to use our) Transportation energy demand in the U.S. has increased because of the greater use of less fuel efficient vehicles

  12. Demand Response Programs, 6. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

  13. Emerging Trends in US Vehicle Travel Demand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwo States CARLSBAD,

  14. Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wattles, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT CATEE Conference, Galveston October 10, 2012 2 North American Bulk Power Grids CATEE Conference October 10, 2012 ? The ERCOT... adequacy ? ?Achieving more DR participation would . . . displace some generation investments, but would achieve the same level of reliability... ? ?Achieving this ideal requires widespread demand response and market structures that enable loads...

  15. Optimal Trading Strategy Supply/Demand Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrieli, John

    prices through the changes in their supply/demand.2 Thus, to study how market participants trade can have interesting implications on the observed behavior of intraday volume, volatility and prices: November 15, 2004. This Draft: April 8, 2006 Abstract The supply/demand of a security in the market

  16. The Integration of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Demand Response and Climate Change: Challenges and Opportunities for Evaluators and Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vine, Edward

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to inform projected energy and demand reductions in regionaldown to reflect energy and demand savings due to spillover (market and estimate the energy and demand savings associated

  17. Near-Optimal Execution Policies for Demand-Response Contracts in Electricity Markets Vineet Goyal1, Garud Iyengar1 and Zhen Qiu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Vineet

    -side participation including time of use pricing, real-time pricing for smart appliances and interruptible demand-AR0000235 the real-time spot price that can be significantly higher than the day-ahead price, especially contracts (if any) to offset the imbalance instead of paying the real-time spot price. Therefore

  18. Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008 #12;© 2008 EnerNOC, Inc. All Rights Reserved programs The purpose of this presentation is to offer insight into the mechanics of demand response and industrial demand response resources across North America in both regulated and restructured markets As of 6

  19. U.S. Solar Market Insight®: 2014 Year In Review (Executive Summary)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Solar Market Insight is a quarterly publication of the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA)® and GTM Research. Each quarter, they survey nearly 200 installers, manufacturers, utilities, and state agencies to collect granular data on photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar. These data provide the backbone of the Solar Market Insight report, in which they identify and analyze trends in U.S. solar demand, manufacturing, and pricing by state and market segment. This analysis also forecasts demand over the next five years. As the U.S. solar market expands, it is the hope that Solar Market Insight will provide an invaluable decision-making tool for installers, suppliers, investors, policymakers, and advocates alike.

  20. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, S.; Margolis, R.; Barbose, G.; Bartlett, J.; Cory, K.; Couture, T.; DeCesaro, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Frickel, M.; Hemmeline, C.; Mendelsohn, T.; Ong, S.; Pak, A.; Poole, L.; Peterman, C.; Schwabe, P.; Soni, A.; Speer, B.; Wiser, R.; Zuboy, J.; James, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this report is the U.S. solar electricity market, including photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. The report is organized into five chapters. Chapter 1 provides an overview of global and U.S. installation trends. Chapter 2 presents production and shipment data, material and supply chain issues, and solar industry employment trends. Chapter 3 presents cost, price, and performance trends. Chapter 4 discusses policy and market drivers such as recently passed federal legislation, state and local policies, and developments in project financing. Chapter 5 provides data on private investment trends and near-term market forecasts. Highlights of this report include: (1) The global PV industry has seen impressive growth rates in cell/module production during the past decade, with a 10-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 46% and a 5-year CAGR of 56% through 2008. (2) Thin-film PV technologies have grown faster than crystalline silicon over the past 5 years, with a 10-year CAGR of 47% and a 5-year CAGR of 87% for thin-film shipments through 2008. (3) Global installed PV capacity increased by 6.0 GW in 2008, a 152% increase over 2.4 GW installed in 2007. (4) The United States installed 0.34 GW of PV capacity in 2008, a 63% increase over 0.21 GW in 2007. (5) Global average PV module prices dropped 23% from $4.75/W in 1998 to $3.65/W in 2008. (6) Federal legislation, including the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (EESA, October 2008) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA, February 2009), is providing unprecedented levels of support for the U.S. solar industry. (7) In 2008, global private-sector investment in solar energy technology topped $16 billion, including almost $4 billion invested in the United States. (8) Solar PV market forecasts made in early 2009 anticipate global PV production and demand to increase fourfold between 2008 and 2012, reaching roughly 20 GW of production and demand by 2012. (9) Globally, about 13 GW of CSP was announced or proposed through 2015, based on forecasts made in mid-2009. Regional market shares for the 13 GW are about 51% in the United States, 33% in Spain, 8% in the Middle East and North Africa, and 8% in Australasia, Europe, and South Africa. Of the 6.5-GW project pipeline in the United States, 4.3 GW have power purchase agreements (PPAs). The PPAs comprise 41% parabolic trough, 40% power tower, and 19% dish-engine systems.

  1. Export markets gain strength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The prices for internally traded coal in the USA have reached record levels and the future market fundamentals look very good. This is mainly due to Asian demand. The article discusses recent markets for US coal and summarizes findings of a recent study by Hill & Associates entitled 'International coal trade - supply, demand and prices to 2025'. 1 ref., 2 tabs.

  2. ESCOs and information technology for new markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobker, M. [Goldman Copeland Associates (United States)

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the foreseeable future demand growth for energy will be generally higher in developing countries than in the mature markets of developed nations. Demand growth coupled with inadequate capital resources in these markets has led to projections of shortfalls in electrical capacity. As subsidies are eliminated in liberalizing economies, energy prices will rise. These trends have already created a wave of international power projects involving independent power producers, global utilities, local affiliates, financial partners, and privatizing governments. Those seeking business growth must enter and develop new markets. The new global utilities will compete for market share on the basis of service as well as price. In deregulated environments direct marketing to major end-users and market segments will be part of the game. Energy efficiency (demand-side) resources, because they can be much less expensive than new supply-side resources, offer a cost enhancement to capacity but require varied and novel techniques for their decentralized delivery. Financing and technical services may provide non-price enhancements of critical value to specific customers. Energy procurement and load management play increasingly important roles after deregulation. At the entry stage, corporate knowledge made tangible through Information Technology (IT) will help to negotiate and assemble the ``pieces on the ground`` in the form of relationships, alliances, and agreements. IT tools strengthen early performance in developing and implementing projects and new products. Energy Service Company (ESCO) learning is improved by consistency in proceeding through repeated entries. Learning the drill improves speed and reliability. But individual markets will be idiosyncratic even amidst structural parallels. Knowledge repositories provide a place where lessons learned can be shared and studied.

  3. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Arun Majumdar

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    July 29, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  4. A Simulation Study of Demand Responsive Transit System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessouky, Maged

    A Simulation Study of Demand Responsive Transit System Design Luca Quadrifoglio, Maged M. Dessouky changed the landscape for demand responsive transit systems. First, the demand for this type of transit experiencing increased usage for demand responsive transit systems. The National Transit Summaries and Trends

  5. An Experimental Test of Combinatorial Information Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledyard, John O.

    kinds of combinatorial markets, a call market and a market maker, isolated individuals who report, 1979), Oscar markets beat columnist forecasts (Pennock et al., 2001), gas demand markets beat gasAn Experimental Test of Combinatorial Information Markets John Ledyard California Institute

  6. Response to changes in demand/supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 #12;#12;111 Impacts of changes operating by some Korean paper companies for acquiring needed pulpwood as a first step for the construction

  7. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing Markets for Electricity, Wiley-IEEE Press. CEC (in Major Drivers in U.S. Electricity Markets, NREL/CP-620-and fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used

  8. Using Partnerships to Drive Demand and Provide Services in Communities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Strategies for Marketing and Driving Demand for Commercial Financing Products Information Technology Tools for Multifamily...

  9. Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services. ” Incan be used to link wholesale and retail real-time prices.11 Wholesale Electricity Market Information

  10. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

  11. Demand Side Bidding. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spahn, Andrew

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

  12. Space Cooling in North America: Market Overview and Future Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Khowailed, Gannate [Sentech, Inc.; Sikes, Karen [SRA International, Inc.; Grubbs, Tyler [SRA International, Inc.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The North American space cooling market, particularly in the United States, is experiencing shifts in regulatory regimes, population patterns, economic conditions, and consumer preferences-all catalyzed further by rapid technological innovation. Taken together these factors may result in a slight reduction in air conditioning shipments in the short term, however the longer term trends indicate a continuing increase in the number of air conditioning systems in the U.S. markets. These increases will be greatest in the warmer and more humid (e.g. higher load demand) regions. This will result in increasing pressure on the U.S. electricity supply system to meet the energy peak and consumption demands for building space cooling.

  13. 2009 Fuel Cell Market Report, November 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general.

  14. 2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report, June 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes 2010 data on fuel cells, including market penetration and industry trends. It also covers cost, price, and performance trends, along with policy and market drivers and the future outlook for fuel cells.

  15. Nordic TSOs' Action Plans in enhancing and monitoring Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE OPERATIONAL SECURITY OF THE POWER SYSTEM AND TO MAINTAIN THE NATIONAL MOMENTARY BALANCE for the Nordic market model functioning. The importance of demand re- sponse is increasing while the powerNordic TSOs' Action Plans in enhancing and monitoring Demand Response Nordel Market Committee

  16. Market review - Market values summary/October market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is the October 1995 uranium market summary. In this reporting period, there were four transactions in the natural uranium market, no activity in the spot UF6 market, no activity in the spot conversion market, and only a single activity in the enrichment services market. Spot uranium volume dropped sharply, and active uranium supply rose. The rise in demand, however, more than offset this increase. Unrestricted exchange prices rose slightly, as did the unrestricted UF6 value. All other prices remained steady.

  17. Identification of demand in differentiated products markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megerdichian, Aren

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics . . . . . . . OLS and CX Estimates, Product-2.3 Conditional Exogeneity (CX) . . . . . . . . iv Models ofAIDS CX . . . . . . . . . Simulation . . . . . . . . Merger

  18. Identification of demand in differentiated products markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megerdichian, Aren

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Finally, Quaker is owned by Pepsi Co. , another publicly17 Finally, Quaker is owned by Pepsi Co. , a publicly traded

  19. Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    broadcast your information, share relevant content from other resources as well Source: Booz Allen Hamilton document on moving early adopters, will be posted on the new...

  20. Demand Response Projects: Technical and Market Demonstrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to BPA, and mitigate critical peak periods #12;New Electric Utility Rate Design Time-of-Use Rate without participants? #12;NEW ELECTRIC UTILITY RATE DESIGN SCHEDULE Time-of-Use retail electric rate design · Rate

  1. 1986 Cogeneration Market Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, D. G.

    increases and paper production which is basically a solid fuel fired steam turbine market will increase, thus increasing the application of steam turbines. Lastly, in the refuse market probably the least effect of lower oil prices will occur. Energy.... Project developers have more to worry about with dropping oil prices. tax reform, Alcon decisions. etc. than they do with potential changes to PURPA. General Market Trends Forecasts A recent article in Energy User News said that the number...

  2. A Successful Implementation with the Smart Grid: Demand Response Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    1 A Successful Implementation with the Smart Grid: Demand Response Resources Contribution of intelligent line switching, demand response resources (DRRs), FACTS devices and PMUs is key in the smart grid events as a result of voluntary load curtailments. Index Terms--Electricity Markets, Demand Response re

  3. Optimal demand response: problem formulation and deterministic case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Optimal demand response: problem formulation and deterministic case Lijun Chen, Na Li, Libin Jiang load through real-time demand response and purchases balancing power on the spot market to meet, optimal demand response reduces to joint scheduling of the procurement and consumption decisions

  4. Demand Response Providing Ancillary A Comparison of Opportunities and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5958E Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services A Comparison of Opportunities Government or any agency thereof or The Regents of the University of California. #12;Demand Response System Reliability, Demand Response (DR), Electricity Markets, Smart Grid Abstract Interest in using

  5. Identification of Market Power in Large-Scale Electric Energy Markets Bernard C. Lesieutre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identification of Market Power in Large-Scale Electric Energy Markets Bernard C. Lesieutre Hyung and competitive operation of centrally- dispatched electricity markets. Traditional measures for market power demand and reserve requirements, a centrally-dispatched electricity market provides a transparent

  6. Performance Contracting and Energy Efficiency in the State Government Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Market Trends in the U.S. ESCO Industry: Results from the2007. “A Survey of the U.S. ESCO Industry: Market Growth andInstitutional Markets for ESCO Services: Comparing Programs,

  7. Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook was undertaken to characterize the global liquefied natural gas (LNG) market and to examine recent trends and future prospects in the LNG market.

  8. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CA Control Areas CO 2 Carbon Dioxide CHP Combined Heat and Power CPP Critical Peak Pricing DG Distributed Generation DOE Department of Energy DR Demand Response DRCC Demand...

  9. Market Power in Nonrenewable Resource Markets: An Empirical Dynamic Model1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    resources are pivotal for the development of the modern economy. From fossil fuels to various minerals to estimate an upper bound for the price elasticity of demand for those markets exhibiting market power. We find that the demand for copper, iron, lead, and zinc is relatively inelastic, while the demand for tin

  10. Base Oil Market Segment Forecasts up to 2020,Research Reports...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    base-oils-lubes-market.html This report includes the key market dynamics affecting the demand for base oil globally. As a part of our market dynamics analysis, we have analyzed...

  11. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

  12. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response:both the avoided energy costs (and demand charges) as wellCoordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response,

  13. Optimal Demand Bidding for Time-Shiftable Loads Hamed Mohsenian-Rad, Senior Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    -ahead market, real-time market, demand side management, multi-stage stochastic optimization, closed1 Optimal Demand Bidding for Time-Shiftable Loads Hamed Mohsenian-Rad, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract and enhancing demand response and peak-load shaving programs. In this paper, we seek to answer the following

  14. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arun

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  15. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arun

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  16. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  17. Demand response compensation, net Benefits and cost allocation: comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, William W.

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    FERC's Supplemental Notice of Public Rulemaking addresses the question of proper compensation for demand response in organized wholesale electricity markets. Assuming that the Commission would proceed with the proposal ''to require tariff provisions allowing demand response resources to participate in wholesale energy markets by reducing consumption of electricity from expected levels in response to price signals, to pay those demand response resources, in all hours, the market price of energy for such reductions,'' the Commission posed questions about applying a net benefits test and rules for cost allocation. This article summarizes critical points and poses implications for the issues of net benefit tests and cost allocation. (author)

  18. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefits of Demand Side Management (DSM) are insufficient toefficiency, demand side management (DSM) cost effectivenessResearch Center Demand Side Management Demand Side Resources

  19. Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

  20. Market values summary/April market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is the April 1995 uranium market summary. Overall market activity during this period was low, with five deals in the concentrates market, two deals in the long-term natural uranium market, and three deals in the spot enrichment market. There were no spot trades in the UF6 or conversion market. The restricted and unrestricted exchange values were $11.60 and $7.35 respectively. The restricted and unrestricted UF6 values were $36.00 and $25.50, and the restricted and unrestricted transaction values were $10.30 and $7.25. Active uranium supply rose, and active demand fell.

  1. MTBE demand as a oxygenated fuel additive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MTBE markets are in the state of flux. In the U.S. the demand has reached a plateau while in other parts of the world, it is increasing. The various factors why MTBE is experiencing a global shift will be examined and future volumes projected.

  2. Value of Demand Response -Introduction Klaus Skytte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of wind power. #12;Perspectives ­ The System Operator Keep the balance Demand reduction = increased as indicator. #12;Motivations We want more wind power in the system. This require more flexibility of the rest plants and better use of wind power. Public goods / Externalities not measured in the markets #12

  3. Real-Time Demand Response with Uncertain Renewable Energy in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Real-Time Demand Response with Uncertain Renewable Energy in Smart Grid Libin Jiang and Steven Low manages user load through real-time demand response and purchases balancing power on the spot market and demand response in the presence of uncertain renewable supply and time-correlated demand. The overall

  4. POWERTECH 2009, JUNE 28 -JULY 2, 2009, BUCHAREST, ROMANIA 1 Incorporation of Demand Response Resources in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    POWERTECH 2009, JUNE 28 - JULY 2, 2009, BUCHAREST, ROMANIA 1 Incorporation of Demand Response, IEEE, Abstract--The use of demand-side resources, in general, and demand response resources (DRRs concerns. Integration of demand response resources in the competitive electricity markets impacts resource

  5. Market review - market values summary/February market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is the February 1996 uranium market report. As reflected by the rising demand and decreasing supply of uranium, prices for UF6 and U3O8 increased. Separation services and conversion services prices remained constant. Data is presented for the recent trades, blocks or uranium for sale or loan, inquiries to purchase or borrow uranium, SWUs available and inquiries to purchase SWUs, and market values of U3O8 and UF6 expressed in selected currencies.

  6. Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bode, Josh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    017F.PDF KEMA, Inc. 2011. PJM Empirical Analysis of DemandMethods. Prepared for the PJM Markets Implementation~/media/markets-ops/dsr/pjm-analysis-of-dr-baseline-methods-

  7. Optimal Allocation of Inventory and Demand for Managing Supply Chain Revenues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katariya, Abhilasha

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    and liquidation de- cisions for a supplier who satisfies demand from a contractual and a spot market. The second problem extends this to investigate a supplier’s joint replenishment, allocation and pricing decisions under two markets. The third problem...

  8. Reliability implications of price responsive demand : a study of New England's power system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitaker, Andrew C. (Andrew Craig)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With restructuring of the traditional, vertically integrated electricity industry come new opportunities for electricity demand to actively participate in electricity markets. Traditional definitions of power system ...

  9. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report: January 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the U.S. solar electricity market, including photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. The report provides an overview of global and U.S. installation trends. It also presents production and shipment data, material and supply chain issues, and solar industry employment trends. It also presents cost, price, and performance trends; and discusses policy and market drivers such as recently passed federal legislation, state and local policies, and developments in project financing. The final chapter provides data on private investment trends and near-term market forecasts.

  10. OpenEI Community - #MarketTrends

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen)

  11. 2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general business strategy and market focus, as well as, financial information for select publicly-traded companies.

  12. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DECC aggregator managed portfolio automated demand responseaggregator designs their own programs, and offers demand responseaggregator is responsible for designing and implementing their own demand response

  13. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings,Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings",demand response and energy efficiency functions into the design of buildings,

  14. Petroleum 1996 - issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasingly, users of the Energy Information Administration`s petroleum data and analytical reports have expressed an interest in a recurring report that takes a broad view of the petroleum sector. What is sought is some perspective on the complex interrelationships that comprise an industry and markets accounting for 40 percent of the energy consumed in the United States and ranging from the drilling rig in the oil field to the pump at the local gasoline station. This report comprehensively examines historical trends, and selectively focuses on major issues and the events they represent. It analyzes different dimensions of the industry and related markets in terms of how they relate to a common theme, in this case, the volatility in petroleum markets.

  15. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

  16. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

  17. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006,Application to Demand Response Energy Pricing” SenSys 2003,

  18. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings”, Lawrencesystems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercial BuildingsDemand Response Test in Large Facilities13 National Conference on Building

  19. Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent electricity crisis in California and elsewhere has prompted new research to evaluate demand response strategies in large facilities. This paper describes an evaluation of fully automated demand response technologies (Auto-DR) in five large facilities. Auto-DR does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a facility through receipt of an external communications signal. This paper summarizes the measurement and evaluation of the performance of demand response technologies and strategies in five large facilities. All the sites have data trending systems such as energy management and control systems (EMCS) and/or energy information systems (EIS). Additional sub-metering was applied where necessary to evaluate the facility's demand response performance. This paper reviews the control responses during the test period, and analyzes demand savings achieved at each site. Occupant comfort issues are investigated where data are available. This paper discusses methods to estimate demand savings and results from demand response strategies at five large facilities.

  20. Trends in Gulf Coast Power Supply, Demand, and Costs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posey, L. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rate' ? Granting industrial rate increases above cost-o" service level ' ? Delays in granting rate increases. For each utility company, we examine past history a assess the regulatory climate to predict the likely effect these issues. Power...

  1. Secondary residential demand trends in contemporary Japan and North Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Michael M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research paper attempts to address the opportunity and challenges for Vacation Residential Development in North Asia, with specific geographic focus on Japan first through an analysis of national and regional consumption, ...

  2. Trends in Gulf Coast Power Supply, Demand, and Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posey, L. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 1980s, both the cost and availability of industrial electric power will become critical to corporations contemplating expansions and new sites along the Gulf Coast. Fuel costs have grown rapidly, and the shift to coal and nuclear power...

  3. Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This workDayton:|Electricity Policy

  4. Energy Demand Staff Scientist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 2007 USChina #12;Overview:Overview: Key Energy Demand DriversKey Energy Demand Drivers · 290 million new urban residents 1990-2007 · 375 million new urban residents 2007

  5. Industrial Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Boiler, Steam, and Cogeneration (BSC) Component. The BSC Component satisfies the steam demand from the PA and BLD Components. In some industries, the PA Component produces...

  6. Demand Response In California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

  7. Niche Marketing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCorkle, Dean; Anderson, David P.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Niche markets are small, specialized markets for goods or services. Agricultural producers have many opportunities for niche marketing, and this strategy can contribute to the profitability of a firm. Examples of niche markets are included...

  8. Propane Market Model documentation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Propane Market Model (PMM), describe its basic approach, and to provide details on model functions. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the general public. Documentation of the model is in accordance with EIA`s legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. The PMM performs a short-term (6- to 9-months) forecast of demand and price for consumer-grad propane in the national US market; it also calculates the end-of-month stock level during the term of the forecast. Another part of the model allows for short-term demand forecasts for certain individual Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) districts. The model is used to analyze market behavior assumptions or shocks and to determine the effect on market price, demand, and stock level.

  9. Strategic framework for real estate investment in emerging markets : the case of commercial real estate in Bogotá, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otálora Castro, José Camilo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real estate investment is becoming increasingly international. Deregulation and integration of global capital markets, growth of emerging market economies, demographic trends in developed economies, and geopolitical and ...

  10. Cost, Conflict and Climate: U.S. Challenges in the World Oil Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industry means that all oil demand pushes up the price ofearly 1980s drove down oil demand by 7% worldwide betweento suggest that the demand side of the world oil market or

  11. 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Barbose, G.; Darghouth, N.; Hoen, B.; Mills, A.; Weaver, S.; Porter, K.; Buckley, M.; Oteri, F.; Tegen, S.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report provides a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2013. This 2013 edition updates data presented in previous editions while highlighting key trends and important new developments. The report includes an overview of key installation-related trends; trends in wind power capacity growth; how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources; the amount and percentage of wind energy in individual states; the status of offshore wind power development and the quantity of proposed wind power capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States.

  12. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    37 3.8.1. Impacts of DR programs on Wholesale MarketPrice Response on Wholesale Markets.in Organized Wholesale Markets .19

  13. Market Design Test Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Sun, Junjie; Tesfatsion, Leigh

    2006-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Power industry restructuring continues to evolve at multiple levels of system operations. At the bulk electricity level, several organizations charged with regional system operation are implementing versions of a Wholesale Power Market Platform (WPMP) in response to U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission initiatives. Recently the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and several regional initiatives have been pressing the integration of demand response as a resource for system operations. These policy and regulatory pressures are driving the exploration of new market designs at the wholesale and retail levels. The complex interplay among structural conditions, market protocols, and learning behaviors in relation to short-term and longer-term market performance demand a flexible computational environment where designs can be tested and sensitivities to power system and market rule changes can be explored. This paper presents the use of agent-based computational methods in the study of electricity markets at the wholesale and retail levels, and distinctions in problem formulation between these levels.

  14. Controlling electric power demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eikenberry, J.

    1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, demand control has not been viewed as an energy conservation measure, its intent being to reduce the demand peak to lower the electric bill demand charge by deferring the use of a block of power to another demand interval. Any energy savings were essentially incidental and unintentional, resulting from curtailment of loads that could not be assumed at another time. This article considers a microprocessor-based multiplexed system linked to a minicomputer to control electric power demand in a winery. In addition to delivering an annual return on investment of 55 percent in electric bill savings, the system provides a bonus in the form of alarm and monitoring capability for critical processes.

  15. PNNL-SA-??? 1 Market Design Test Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Supply SchedulesDemand Responsive Loads Price Quantity Contract Signal Coal Gas Oil Fuel Distributors experiments. GenCo GenCo GenCo Electricity Markets Price Quantity Demand Supply LSE LSE LSE Power System price responsiv

  16. The Role of Enabling Technologies in Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a study of the technologies that are crucial to the success of demand response programs. It takes a look at the historical development of demand response programs and analyzes how new technology is needed to enable demand response to make the transition from a small scale pilot operation to a mass market means of improving grid reliability. Additionally, the report discusses the key technologies needed to enable a large scale demand response effort and evaluates current efforts to develop and integrate these technologies. Finally, the report provides profiles of leading developers of these key technologies.

  17. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (11th Edition)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Kreycik, C.; Friedman, B.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States. It presents aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States. It also provides summary data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets and green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, as well as green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of renewable energy certificates. Key market trends and issues are also discussed.

  18. Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -time prices can give these customers incentives that follow wholesale market costs very precisely every hour and transparent real-time wholesale prices for our region. Any application of real-time retail prices will need all parties' trust that the prices are fair representations of the wholesale market. The hourly prices

  19. Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2005)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report presents year-end 2005 data on utility green pricing programs, and examines trends in consumer response and program implementation over time. The data in this report, which were obtained via a questionnaire distributed to utility green pricing program managers, can be used by utilities to benchmark the success of their green power programs. It is important to note that this report covers only a portion of voluntary markets for renewable energy. It does not cover green power sold by independent marketers except for cases in which the marketers work in conjunction with utilities or default electricity suppliers.

  20. Is there life in other markets? BPA explores preschedule capacity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    can diminish the federal hydropower system's capacity to balance supply and demand for power. The process allowed BPA to explore an untested capacity market this spring to acquire...

  1. San Diego Hero Alliance: Community-Based Social Marketing Pilot...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Behavior Change Efforts Into Energy Efficiency Programs Using Community-Based Social Marketing to Drive Demand for Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Network View |...

  2. Uranium 2011 resources, production and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, questions are being raised about the future of the uranium market, including as regards the number of reactors expected to be built in the coming years, the amount of uranium required to meet forward demand, the adequacy of identified uranium resources to meet that demand and the ability of the sector to meet reactor requirements in a challenging investment climate. This 24th edition of the “Red Book”, a recognised world reference on uranium jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, provides analyses and information from 42 producing and consuming countries in order to address these and other questions. It offers a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It also provides substantive new information on established uranium production centres around the world and in countri...

  3. Market Brief: Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Armstrong, P.; Bird, L.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status and trends of U.S. 'voluntary' markets -- those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Voluntary REC markets continue to exhibit growth and spur renewable energy development. Voluntary green power markets provide an additional revenue stream for renewable energy projects and raise consumer awareness of the benefits of renewable energy. Although a full estimate of the size of the voluntary market is not available for 2011, this review uses indicative metrics to capture 2011 voluntary market trends.

  4. A Full Demand Response Model in Co-Optimized Energy and

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guodong [ORNL; Tomsovic, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been widely accepted that demand response will play an important role in reliable and economic operation of future power systems and electricity markets. Demand response can not only influence the prices in the energy market by demand shifting, but also participate in the reserve market. In this paper, we propose a full model of demand response in which demand flexibility is fully utilized by price responsive shiftable demand bids in energy market as well as spinning reserve bids in reserve market. A co-optimized day-ahead energy and spinning reserve market is proposed to minimize the expected net cost under all credible system states, i.e., expected total cost of operation minus total benefit of demand, and solved by mixed integer linear programming. Numerical simulation results on the IEEE Reliability Test System show effectiveness of this model. Compared to conventional demand shifting bids, the proposed full demand response model can further reduce committed capacity from generators, starting up and shutting down of units and the overall system operating costs.

  5. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.

  6. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.

  7. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

  8. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Exploration of Australian Petrol Demand: Unobserv- ableRelative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con- sumption Behavior.habit stock variable in a petrol demand regression, they

  9. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

  10. Increasing Global Renewable Energy Market Share

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Increasing Global Renewable Energy Market Share: Recent Trends and Perspectives Final Report Prepared for: Beijing International Renewable Energy Conference 2005 Prepared by: The Expert Group .............................................................. ix Message to the Beijing International Renewable Energy Conference from the Secretary General

  11. Killing Two Birds with One Stone: Can Real-Time Pricing SupportRetail Competition and Demand Response?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Hopper,Nicole; Neenan, Bernie

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As retail choice states reach the end of their transitional, rate-cap periods, state regulators must decide what type of default supply service to provide to customers that have not switched to a competitive retail supplier. In a growing number of states, regulators have adopted real-time pricing (RTP) as the default service for large commercial and industrial (C&I) customers. Although this trend is driven chiefly by policy objectives related to retail competition, default service RTP may have the added benefit of stimulating demand response. To evaluate the potential role of RTP as a means to both ends--retail market development and demand response--we conducted a comprehensive review of experience with default RTP in the U.S. and examined the emergence of RTP as a product offering by competitive retail suppliers. Across the ten utilities with default RTP in place in 2005, between 5% and 35% of the applicable load remained on the rate. Based on interviews with competitive retailers, we find evidence to suggest that a comparable amount of load in these states has switched to hourly pricing arrangements with competitive retailers. Many customers on default or competitive hourly pricing are paying prices indexed to the real-time spot market, and thus have no advance knowledge of prices. Because the price responsiveness of customers under these conditions has yet to be formally analyzed, and relatively few efforts have been undertaken to help these customers become price responsive, the actual demand response impacts from hourly pricing in retail choice states remains largely an open question. However, we find that policymakers and other stakeholders in retail choice states have various strategies at their disposal to capture the potential demand response benefits from hourly pricing, while simultaneously supporting retail competition.

  12. Analysis of the Chinese Market for Building Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Shi, Qing

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    China will account for about half of the new construction globally in the coming decade. Its floorspace doubled from 1996 to 2011, and Chinese rural buildings alone have as much floorspace as all of U.S. residential buildings. Building energy consumption has also grown, increasing by over 40% since 1990. To curb building energy demand, the Chinese government has launched a series of policies and programs. Combined, this growth in buildings and renovations, along with the policies to promote green buildings, are creating a large market for energy efficiency products and services. This report assesses the impact of China’s policies on building energy efficiency and on the market for energy efficiency in the future. The first chapter of this report introduces the trends in China, drawing on both historical analysis, and detailed modeling of the drivers behind changes in floorspace and building energy demand such as economic and population growth, urbanization, policy. The analysis describes the trends by region, building type and energy service. The second chapter discusses China’s policies to promote green buildings. China began developing building energy codes in the 1980s. Over time, the central government has increased the stringency of the code requirements and the extent of enforcement. The codes are mandatory in all new buildings and major renovations in China’s cities, and they have been a driving force behind the expansion of China’s markets for insulation, efficient windows, and other green building materials. China also has several other important policies to encourage efficient buildings, including the Three-Star Rating System (somewhat akin to LEED), financial incentives tied to efficiency, appliance standards, a phasing out of incandescent bulbs and promotion of efficient lighting, and several policies to encourage retrofits in existing buildings. In the third chapter, we take “deep dives” into the trends affecting key building components. This chapter examines insulation in walls and roofs; efficient windows and doors; heating, air conditioning and controls; and lighting. These markets have seen significant growth because of the strength of the construction sector but also the specific policies that require and promote efficient building components. At the same time, as requirements have become more stringent, there has been fierce competition, and quality has at time suffered, which in turn has created additional challenges. Next we examine existing buildings in chapter four. China has many Soviet-style, inefficient buildings built before stringent requirements for efficiency were more widely enforced. As a result, there are several specific market opportunities related to retrofits. These fall into two or three categories. First, China now has a code for retrofitting residential buildings in the north. Local governments have targets of the number of buildings they must retrofit each year, and they help finance the changes. The requirements focus on insulation, windows, and heat distribution. Second, the Chinese government recently decided to increase the scale of its retrofits of government and state-owned buildings. It hopes to achieve large scale changes through energy service contracts, which creates an opportunity for energy service companies. Third, there is also a small but growing trend to apply energy service contracts to large commercial and residential buildings. This report assesses the impacts of China’s policies on building energy efficiency. By examining the existing literature and interviewing stakeholders from the public, academic, and private sectors, the report seeks to offer an in-depth insights of the opportunities and barriers for major market segments related to building energy efficiency. The report also discusses trends in building energy use, policies promoting building energy efficiency, and energy performance contracting for public building retrofits.

  13. 2012 Vehicle Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Center for Transportation Analysis developed and published the first Vehicle Technologies Market Report in 2008. Three editions of the report have been published since that time. This 2012 report details the major trends in U.S. light vehicle and medium/heavy truck markets as well as the underlying trends that caused them. The opening section on Energy and Economics discusses the role of transportation energy and vehicle markets on a national scale. The following section examines light-duty vehicle use, markets, manufacture, and supply chains. The discussion of medium and heavy trucks offers information on truck sales and fuel use. The technology section offers information on alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure, and the policy section concludes with information on recent, current, and near-future Federal policies like the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards.

  14. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S. Retail Gasolinea¤ect the world crude oil market (though of course this maythe integration of the world oil market rescues the original

  15. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S. Retail Gasolines to a¤ect the world oil market. ) I use tax instruments andthe integration of the world oil market rescues the original

  16. Digital asset pricing in the textbook market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molina, Katherine (Katherine V.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. college textbook market is in the midst of a seismic shift: publishers are creating new products, students are demanding more sophisticated digital content and instructors are just beginning to experiment with ...

  17. MARKET BASED K.G. DULEEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF MODEL · Model under development for DOE-EIA is an integrated supply and demand module that forecasts survey data. #12;MODEL - USES · Current parallel work effort focuses on market based strategies to reduce

  18. Travel Demand Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Garrow, Dr. Laurie [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

  19. An analysis of US propane markets, winter 1996-1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In late summer 1996, in response to relatively low inventory levels and tight world oil markets, prices for crude oil, natural gas, and products derived from both began to increase rapidly ahead of the winter heating season. Various government and private sector forecasts indicated the potential for supply shortfalls and sharp price increases, especially in the event of unusually severe winter weather. Following a rapid runup in gasoline prices in the spring of 1996, public concerns were mounting about a possibly similar situation in heating fuels, with potentially more serious consequences. In response to these concerns, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) participated in numerous briefings and meetings with Executive Branch officials, Congressional committee members and staff, State Energy Offices, and consumers. EIA instituted a coordinated series of actions to closely monitor the situation and inform the public. This study constitutes one of those actions: an examination of propane supply, demand, and price developments and trends.

  20. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Manager Kae Lewis Acting Manager Demand Analysis Office Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director Energy Efficiency Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy

  1. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    West Interconnected System of Western Australia, run by theMarket (WEM) in Western Australia, and the NationalNew England, and the Western Australia Independent Market

  2. A Survey of the U.S. ESCO Industry: Market Growth and Development from 2008 to 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satchwell, Andrew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Market Trends in the U.S. ESCO Industry: Results from the2007. “A Survey of the U.S. ESCO Industry: Market Growth andInstitutional Markets for ESCO Services: Comparing Programs,

  3. Market values summary/December market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is the December 1993 uranium market summary. During this period, there were six deals in the restricted concentrates market and none in the unrestricted market. The restricted value dropped slightly to $9.85 per pound U3O8, while the unrestricted market rose slightly to $7.00. The UF6 market was also slow, with a slight decrease in the restricted UF6 value to $31.00 and no change in the unrestricted value ($24.00). The unrestricted transaction value was $7.15 per pound U3O8, and the restricted value was $10.25. In the enrichment services market, the unrestricted SWU value remained fixed at $68.00 per SWU, while the unrestricted value increased by a dollar to $84.00 per SWU. Active uranium supply decreased, while active demand increased.

  4. Paying for demand-side response at the wholesale level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falk, Jonathan

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent FERC Notice of Public Rulemaking regarding the payment to demand-side resources in wholesale markets has engendered a great deal of comments including FERC's obligation to ensure just and reasonable rates in the wholesale market and criteria for what FERC should do (on grounds of economic efficiency) without any real focus on what that commitment would really mean if FERC actually pursued it. (author)

  5. Energy Demand and Fuel Supply in Developing Countries Brazil, Korea and the Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980. COUNTRY REPORT BRAZIL TRENDS OF ENERGY USE I N BRAZILBRAZIL KOREA PHILIPPINES INTRODUCTION During the 1970s, energyENERGY DEMAND AND FUEL SUPPLY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES BRAZIL,

  6. ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400. Hall Deputy Director Energy Efficiency and Demand Analysis Division Scott W. Matthews Acting Executive

  7. Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity demand forecast means that the region's electricity needs would grow by 5,343 average megawattsDemand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required in electricity demand is, of course, crucial to determining the need for new electricity resources and helping

  8. Analysis of recent projections of electric power demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, D.V. Jr.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the changes and potential changes in the outlook for electric power demand since the publication of Review and Analysis of Electricity Supply Market Projections (B. Swezey, SERI/MR-360-3322, National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Forecasts of the following organizations were reviewed: DOE/Energy Information Administration, DOE/Policy Office, DRI/McGraw-Hill, North American Electric Reliability Council, and Gas Research Institute. Supply uncertainty was briefly reviewed to place the uncertainties of the demand outlook in perspective. Also discussed were opportunities for modular technologies, such as renewable energy technologies, to fill a potential gap in energy demand and supply.

  9. Markets for Ecosystem Services from Agriculture: Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Credit Trading, potential for but does not exist yet for agriculture in FL · Renewable Energy: ­ Growing from Agriculture: Policy & Market Trends · Increased federal funding in recent years dedicated Participates in ES Markets? BUYERS - Government agencies - NGOs - Private individuals - Corporations

  10. Coming Soon! 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This valuable report will be available this summer! Prepared by the Energy Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the report is a must read, providing a comprehensive overview of United States wind industry: Installation Trends, Industry Trends, Price, Cost, and Performance Trends, Policy and Market Drivers, Future Outlook.

  11. Lead -- supply/demand outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnull, T. [Noranda, Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As Japan goes--so goes the world. That was the title of a recent lead article in The Economist that soberly discussed the potential of much more severe global economic problems occurring, if rapid and coordinated efforts were not made to stabilize the economic situation in Asia in general, and in Japan in particular. During the first 6 months of last year, commodity markets reacted violently to the spreading economic problems in Asia. More recent currency and financial problems in Russia have exacerbated an already unpleasant situation. One commodity after another--including oil, many of the agricultural commodities, and each of the base metals--have dropped sharply in price. Many are now trading at multiyear lows. Until there is an overall improvement in the outlook for these regions, sentiment will likely continue to be negative, and metals prices will remain under pressure. That being said, lead has maintained its value better than many other commodities during these difficult times, finding support in relatively strong fundamentals. The author takes a closer look at those supply and demand fundamentals, beginning with consumption.

  12. Assessing Consumer Values and the Supply-Chain Market for the Integrated Water Heater/Dehumidifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashdown, BG

    2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a case study of the potential market for the dual-service residential integrated water heater/dehumidifier (WHD). Its principal purpose is to evaluate the extent to which this integrated appliance might penetrate the residential market sector, given current market trends, producer and consumer attributes, and technical parameters. The report's secondary purpose is to gather background information leading to a generic framework for conducting market analyses of technologies. This framework can be used to assess market readiness as well as factor preferred product attributes into the design to drive consumer demand for this product. This study also supports analysis for prototype design. A full market analysis for potential commercialization should be conducted after prototype development. The integrated WHD is essentially a heat-pump water heater (HPWH) with components and controls that allow dedicated dehumidification. Adequate residential humidity control is a growing issue for newly constructed residential homes, which are insulated so well that mechanical ventilation may be necessary to meet fresh air requirements. Leveraging its successful experience with the energy-efficient design improvement for the residential HPWH, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Engineering Science and Technology Division's (ESTD's) Building Equipment Group designed a water-heating appliance that combines HPWH efficiency with dedicated dehumidification. This integrated appliance could be a low-cost solution for dehumidification and efficient electric water heating. ORNL is partnering with Western Carolina University, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College, American Carolina Stamping Company, and Clemson University to develop this appliance and assess its market potential. For practical purposes, consumers are indifferent to how water is heated but are very interested in product attributes such as initial first cost, operating cost, performance, serviceability, product size, and installation costs. The principal drivers for penetrating markets are demonstrating reliability, leveraging the dehumidification attributes of the integrated WHD, and creating programs that embrace first-cost and life-cycle cost principles.

  13. Facility Automation Products--Systems--Applications--Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bynum, H. D.

    are to be commended, and should accelerate energy action plans by bringing the suppliers and demanders together for concentrated energy saving discussions. From this following view of the evolution and trends of energy control and facility management systems... of electric motor load control ???? shutting down motors when they were not required and starting them up as late as possible to perform their assigned tasks. Cycling motors off for 10 to 40 percent of the time during their duty period saved additional...

  14. Resource Adequacy in Competitive Electricity Markets George Gross and Pablo Ruiz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    of the electric system to supply the aggregate electrical demand and energy requirements of the customers at all, the existing electricity markets have not matured to the level of incorporating demand-side response. The lack of demand response is due to both the existing policies and the way electricity markets have been

  15. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortal DecisionRichlandDelegations,Demand

  16. Electricity markets in the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, E.M.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article introduces the use of rigorous econometric tools to understand the geographic scope of the market for generation services. These tools are applied to data from the current wholesale electricity market in the western United States. The behavior of the current wholesale electricity market and the methods used to assess the expanse of the geographic market in the current wholesale electricity market can go a long way toward informing the discussion of pricing behavior and performance in a restructured electricity industry. First, the current wholesale electricity market is already effectively unregulated and suffers from the same technical complexities that face a retail electricity market. Consequently, understanding the supply and demand conditions that cause the extent of the geographic market for generation services to narrow in the current wholesale electricity market can shed light on which times the geographic expanse of the market may narrow in a restructures electricity market. Second, the techniques developed in this paper to assess the extent of the current wholesale electricity market can be applied readily to a restructured electricity market. Finally, because market conditions in the electricity industry are likely to change significantly in the next few years, as the structure of the electricity sector changes dramatically, this analysis of the geographic expanse of the market can provide a useful benchmark against which to compare post-restructuring wholesale price relationships.

  17. Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wholesale Markets Presentation by Jason MacDonald Grid Integration Group, Lawrence Berkeley National;Contents · Introduction ­ Wholesale Markets and AS ­ Why DR for AS? ­ Market Clearing Price · Value/RTOs · ISO/RTOs are balancing authorities that run open wholesale markets for both energy and Ancillary

  18. Driving Demand: Lessons From Vermont

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Describes the Efficiency Vermont program and provides lessons learned in marketing and development of creative strategies.

  19. Market values summary/October market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is the October 1993 uranium market summary. In spite of the substantial quantity of material that moved through the unrestricted market during this period, the unrestricted exchange value remained constant at $6.90 per pound U3O8, and the unrestricted value dipped to $10.15. There were four deals in the concentrates market during this period. Both the restricted and the unrestricted UF6 values remained constant at $31.75 and $24.75 per kgU as UF6 respectively, as did the restricted and unrestricted SWU values ($82 and $68 respectively). Active supply increased, while active demand decreased.

  20. Demand and Usage in Scotland Update Report to March 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stage on long term supply and demand in the sector, and the likely effects on long term markets for timber from the national forest and other potential sources of woodfuel. The report is part of the work, but there has been a major increase in operational projects as a result of the success of the Scottish Biomass

  1. Wind Power Project Repowering: History, Economics, and Demand (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes a related NREL technical report and seeks to capture the current status of wind power project repowering in the U.S. and globally, analyze the economic and financial decision drivers that surround repowering, and to quantify the level and timing of demand for new turbine equipment to supply the repowering market.

  2. Ris-R-1565(EN) Analyses of Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the power system, costs of producing electricity vary considerably over short time intervals. Yet, many in Denmark and the Nordic Power Market..........................21 4.2 Prices and demand response options in Denmark Department: Systems Analysis Department Risø-R-1565(EN) October 2006 ISSN 0106-2840 ISBN 87

  3. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEST PRACTICES AND RESULTS OF DR IMPLEMENTATION . 31 Encouraging End-User Participation: The Role of Incentives 16 Demand Response

  4. Market Transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its market transformation subprogram.

  5. Providing Reliability Services through Demand Response: A Prelimnary Evaluation of the Demand Response Capabilities of Alcoa Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL; Todd, Duane [Alcoa; Caulfield, Michael [Alcoa; Helms, Brian [Alcoa

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response is the largest underutilized reliability resource in North America. Historic demand response programs have focused on reducing overall electricity consumption (increasing efficiency) and shaving peaks but have not typically been used for immediate reliability response. Many of these programs have been successful but demand response remains a limited resource. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) report, 'Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering' (FERC 2006) found that only five percent of customers are on some form of demand response program. Collectively they represent an estimated 37,000 MW of response potential. These programs reduce overall energy consumption, lower green house gas emissions by allowing fossil fuel generators to operate at increased efficiency and reduce stress on the power system during periods of peak loading. As the country continues to restructure energy markets with sophisticated marginal cost models that attempt to minimize total energy costs, the ability of demand response to create meaningful shifts in the supply and demand equations is critical to creating a sustainable and balanced economic response to energy issues. Restructured energy market prices are set by the cost of the next incremental unit of energy, so that as additional generation is brought into the market, the cost for the entire market increases. The benefit of demand response is that it reduces overall demand and shifts the entire market to a lower pricing level. This can be very effective in mitigating price volatility or scarcity pricing as the power system responds to changing demand schedules, loss of large generators, or loss of transmission. As a global producer of alumina, primary aluminum, and fabricated aluminum products, Alcoa Inc., has the capability to provide demand response services through its manufacturing facilities and uniquely through its aluminum smelting facilities. For a typical aluminum smelter, electric power accounts for 30% to 40% of the factory cost of producing primary aluminum. In the continental United States, Alcoa Inc. currently owns and/or operates ten aluminum smelters and many associated fabricating facilities with a combined average load of over 2,600 MW. This presents Alcoa Inc. with a significant opportunity to respond in areas where economic opportunities exist to help mitigate rising energy costs by supplying demand response services into the energy system. This report is organized into seven chapters. The first chapter is the introduction and discusses the intention of this report. The second chapter contains the background. In this chapter, topics include: the motivation for Alcoa to provide demand response; ancillary service definitions; the basics behind aluminum smelting; and a discussion of suggested ancillary services that would be particularly useful for Alcoa to supply. Chapter 3 is concerned with the independent system operator, the Midwest ISO. Here the discussion examines the evolving Midwest ISO market structure including specific definitions, requirements, and necessary components to provide ancillary services. This section is followed by information concerning the Midwest ISO's classifications of demand response parties. Chapter 4 investigates the available opportunities at Alcoa's Warrick facility. Chapter 5 involves an in-depth discussion of the regulation service that Alcoa's Warrick facility can provide and the current interactions with Midwest ISO. Chapter 6 reviews future plans and expectations for Alcoa providing ancillary services into the market. Last, chapter 7, details the conclusion and recommendations of this paper.

  6. Market values summary/February market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is the February 1995 uranium market summary. In the natural uranium and concentrates market, there were 10 deals, and the restricted value moved upward to $10.40. The unrestricted value remained fixed at $7.25. In the UF6 market, there were two deals in the restricted market, and the restricted value rose to $32.75 per kgU as UF6. The unrestricted value remained at $25.00. The restricted transaction value rose to $9.75, and the unrestricted value rose to $7.15. In the enrichment services market, there were three deals. The restricted SWU value rose to $90 per SWU, and the unrestricted value rose to $75 per SWU. Active uranium supply and active uranium demand dropped this reporting period.

  7. Market values summary/April market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is the April 1994 uranium market summary. The near-term market was slow, with three near-term deals for concentrates and none for UF6. This was reflected in the decline of the concentrates restricted value $9.30 per pound U3O8 and the UF6 restricted value to $29.75 per kgU as UF6. In each market, the unrestricted value remained unchanged at $7.00 and $24.50 due to the lack of trades in the unrestricted market. Transaction values in both the restricted and unrestricted market were constant at $9.45 and $7.05 per pound U3O8. The restricted SWU value rose a dollar to $88 per SWU, and the unrestricted SWU value remained steady at $67 per SWU. Active demand continued to decrease, while active supply increased.

  8. Smart finite state devices: A modeling framework for demand response technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Konstantin

    We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the ...

  9. The Impact of the Russian Tariff on Japanese Demand for Wood Products CINTRAFOR News is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    far from the main demand markets. During the post-war era, Japan went from being essentially self and it is one of the few countries in Asia that favor wood frame construction. In the early 1960's, over 80

  10. Unexpected consequences of demand response : implications for energy and capacity price level and volatility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Tal Z. (Tal Ze'ev)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, electricity consumption has been largely insensitive to short term spot market conditions, requiring the equating of supply and demand to occur almost exclusively through changes in production. Large scale ...

  11. Using Compressed Air Efficiency Projects to Reduce Peak Industrial Electric Demands: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skelton, J.

    "To help customers respond to the wildly fluctuating energy markets in California, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) initiated an emergency electric demand reduction program in October 2000 to cut electric use during peak periods. One component...

  12. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand, End-User Natural Gas Demand, and Energy Efficiency The California Energy Demand 2014-2024 Preliminary Forecast, Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand

  13. Does dynamic pricing make sense for mass market customers?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonough, Catherine; Kraus, Robert

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The added incentive to modify electric use under hourly versus monthly market-based pricing is small for most mass market customers in Upstate New York. If the ultimate policy goal of demand-response programs is to reduce peak load, then promoting conservation measures under monthly market-based pricing holds more promise. (author)

  14. Electrical Demand Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the reservoir. Util i ties have iiting for a number of years. d a rebate for reducing their When the utility needs to shed is sent to turn off one or mnre mer's electric water heater or equipment. wges have enticed more and more same strategies... an increased need for demand 1 imiting. As building zone size is reduced, total instal led tonnage increases due to inversfty. Each compressor is cycled by a space thermostat. There is no control system to limit the number of compressors running at any...

  15. Demand Response: Load Management Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs...

  16. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McParland, Charles

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

  17. Demand Response: Load Management Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs... V. Residential Discussion Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off...

  18. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

  19. Assessment of Demand Response Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

  20. Progress toward Producing Demand-Response-Ready Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Sastry, Chellury

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes several historical and ongoing efforts to make small electrical demand-side devices like home appliances more responsive to the dynamic needs of electric power grids. Whereas the utility community often reserves the word demand response for infrequent 2 to 6 hour curtailments that reduce total electrical system peak load, other beneficial responses and ancillary services that may be provided by responsive electrical demand are of interest. Historically, demand responses from the demand side have been obtained by applying external, retrofitted, controlled switches to existing electrical demand. This report is directed instead toward those manufactured products, including appliances, that are able to provide demand responses as soon as they are purchased and that require few, or no, after-market modifications to make them responsive to needs of power grids. Efforts to be summarized include Open Automated Demand Response, the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturer standard CHA 1, a simple interface being developed by the U-SNAP Alliance, various emerging autonomous responses, and the recent PinBus interface that was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  1. Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

  2. Fuel purchasing patterns and vehicle use trends from the NPD research gasoline diary data base: data display

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NPD data base has been developed from the Petroleum Marketing Index (PMI) market research survey. The source for PMI is a national diary panel of approximately 4100 households balanced against the U.S. Census according to demography and geographic location. Survey participants maintain diaries in which they record purchases of gasoline and motor oil for each household vehicle. The PMI survey was augmented to include EPA fuel economy numbers for post 1975 model year vehicles. The steps taken to prepare the data for analysis are discussed, including error correction, smoothing, and collapsing to monthly summary records. This preparation yields a manageable data base which includes monthly summary statistics on travel and fuel use. A statistical smoothing of fuel purchase data was used to reduce the uncertainty in fuel economy calculations introduced by the difference between fuel purchased and fuel consumed. Collapsing to monthly summaries also was done to standardize the observations across the data base to uniform time periods. An overview is given of available data on in-use fuel economy, vehicle miles of travel, and fuel demand, highlighting the quarterly trends in these variables. The data presented are divided into three parts: in-use fuel economy, vehicle miles of travel, and fuel demand and fuel prices.

  3. The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic retail pricing, especially real-time pricing (RTP), has been widely heralded as a panacea for providing much-needed demand response in electricity markets. However, in designing default service for competitive retail markets, demand response has been an afterthought, and in some cases not given any weight at all. But that may be changing, as states that initiated customer choice in the past 5-7 years reach an important juncture in retail market design. Most states with retail choice established an initial transitional period during which utilities were required to offer a default or standard offer generation service, often at a capped or otherwise administratively-determined rate. Many retail choice states have reached the end of their transitional period, and several have adopted or are actively considering an RTP-type default service for large commercial and industrial (C&I) customers. In most cases, the primary reason for adopting RTP as the default service has been to advance policy objectives related to the development of competitive retail markets. However, if attention is paid in its design and implementation, default RTP service can also provide a solid foundation for developing price responsive demand, creating an important link between wholesale and retail market transactions. This article, which draws from a lengthier report, describes experience to date with RTP as a default service, focusing on its role as an instrument for cultivating price responsive demand.1 As of summer 2005, default service RTP was in place or approved for future implementation in five U.S. states: New Jersey, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, and Illinois. For each of these states, we conducted a detailed review of the regulatory proceedings leading to adoption of default RTP and interviewed regulatory staff and utilities in these states, as well as eight competitive retail suppliers active in these markets.

  4. Market values summary/October market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is the October uranium market summary. During this period, volume increased to 2.2 Mlb U3O8 on the spot concentrates market. The unrestricted and restricted exchange values remained steady at $7.00 and $9.05 per pound U3O8 respectively. There were two UF6 deals during this period, and with supply more than adequate to meet the demand, the restricted UF6 price remained unchanged at $29.00 per kgU as UF6. The unrestricted value increased slightly to $24.50. The conversion value was unchanged, and the enrichment services market/prices weakened. Both active supply and demand decreased during this period.

  5. Falling MTBE demand bursts the methanol bubble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiesmann, G.; Cornitius, T.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol spot markets in Europe and the US have been hit hard by weakening demand from methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) producers. In Europe, spot prices for domestic T2 product have dropped to DM620-DM630/m.t. fob from early-January prices above DM800/m.t. and US spot prices have slipped to $1.05/gal fob from $1.35/gal. While chemical applications for methanol show sustained demand, sharp methanol hikes during 1994 have priced MTBE out of the gasoline-additive market. {open_quotes}We`ve learned an important lesson. We killed [MTBE] applications in the rest of the world,{close_quotes} says one European methanol producer. Even with methanol currently at DM620/m.t., another manufacturer points out, MTBE production costs still total $300/m.t., $30/m.t. more than MTBE spot prices. Since late 1994, Europe`s 3.3-million m.t./year MTBE production has been cut back 30%.

  6. 2008 Geothermal Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, J.; Freeman, J.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes market-wide trends for the geothermal industry throughout 2008 and the beginning of 2009. It begins with an overview of the U.S. DOE's Geothermal Technology Program's (GTP's) involvement with the geothermal industry and recent investment trends for electric generation technologies. The report next describes the current state of geothermal power generation and activity within the United States, costs associated with development, financing trends, an analysis of the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and a look at the current policy environment. The report also highlights trends regarding direct use of geothermal energy, including geothermal heat pumps (GHPs). The final sections of the report focus on international perspectives, employment and economic benefits from geothermal energy development, and potential incentives in pending national legislation.

  7. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (2009 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Sumner, J.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States. First, aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States are presented. Next, we summarize data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets; green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, as well as green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of RECs; and renewable energy sold as greenhouse gas offsets in the United States. Finally, this is followed by a discussion of key market trends and issues. The data presented in this report are based primarily on figures provided to NREL by utilities and independent renewable energy marketers.

  8. A forecasting model of tourist arrivals from major markets to Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Ching

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    important to forecast tourism demand in the region and understand the factors affecting demand. Considering the national importance of tourism, Thailand was chosen as the destination country with nine major markets as the countries of origin. A model...

  9. 5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for gasoline, diesel and other petroleum products. This chapter provides an overview of world oil trends agreements on export routes have limited development. Petroleum production in the United States, including half of petroleum supplies to the United States. OPEC petroleum production also increased in 1994

  10. The federal market for ESCO services: How does it measure up?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Birr, Dave

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Market Trends in the U.S. ESCO Industry: Results from theefficiency projects and ESCO industry activity: TatianaThe Federal Market for ESCO Services: How Does it Measure

  11. The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Chuck; Neenan, Bernie

    2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic retail electricity pricing, especially real-time pricing (RTP), has been widely heralded as a panacea for providing much-needed demand response in electricity markets. However, in designing default service for competitive retail markets, demand response often appears to be an afterthought. But that may be changing as states that initiated customer choice in the past 5-7 years reach an important juncture in retail market design. Most states with retail choice established an initial transitional period, during which utilities were required to offer a default or ''standard offer'' generation service, often at a capped or otherwise administratively-determined rate. Many retail choice states have reached, or are nearing, the end of their transitional period and several states have adopted an RTP-type default service for large commercial and industrial (C&I) customers. Are these initiatives motivated by the desire to induce greater demand response, or is RTP being called upon to serve a different role in competitive markets? Surprisingly, we found that in most cases, the primary reason for adopting RTP as the default service was not to encourage demand response, but rather to advance policy objectives related to the development of competitive retail markets. However, we also find that, if efforts are made in its design and implementation, default RTP service can also provide a solid foundation for developing price responsive demand, creating an important link between wholesale and retail market transactions. This paper, which draws from a lengthier report, describes the experience to date with default RTP in the U.S., identifying findings related to its actual and potential role as an instrument for cultivating price responsive demand [1]. For each of the five states currently with default RTP, we conducted a detailed review of the regulatory proceedings leading to its adoption. To further understand the intentions and expectations of those involved in its design and implementation, we also interviewed regulatory staff and utilities in each state, as well as eight of the most prominent competitive retail suppliers operating in these markets which, together, comprised about 60-65% of competitive C&I sales in the U.S. in 2004 [2].

  12. July 26, 2010 The Global Supply and Demand for Agricultural Land in 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    new #12;source of industrial demand in agricultural markets (Energy Information Agency 2010). To compound matters, water, a key input into agricultural production, is rapidly diminishing in availabilityJuly 26, 2010 The Global Supply and Demand for Agricultural Land in 2050: A Perfect Storm

  13. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

  14. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

    2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

  15. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ER08-___-000," December 31. MISO, 2007b, M T E P 06 - TheMidwest ISO Transmission Expansion Plan, February. MISO,2007c, "MISO Press Release," U R L : http://

  16. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MISO MP MRO MWDRI M&V NYISO PJM PUC RAP RFC RTO RTP SERC AirRTOs such as New England or PJM. In 2005 MISO became theEdison is a member of PJM). Interruptible (Total = 3398, N =

  17. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    22, 2009. Norristown, PA: PJM Interconnection, LLC, 2009.opennat.asp? fileID=11833372 PJM Interconnection, LLC.ISO New England (ISO-NE), and PJM Interconnection (PJM). The

  18. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MISO, 2006) 2: MISO Reliability "Footprint" (Source: ICF,for power. Figure 2: MISO Reliability "Footprint" (Source:resources as part of the MISO reliability planning process.

  19. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Serving Entity Midwest Independent System Operator Marketin the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and2007). The Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) called

  20. Global GPS Phones Market Size, Segmentation, Demand Forecast...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    To 2015: Radiant Insights, Inc Home > Groups > Future of Condition Monitoring for Wind Turbines Marketresearchri's picture Submitted by Marketresearchri(45) Member 30 June, 2015...

  1. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher Smith,CommercePolicyExecutiveAchieving

  2. Strategies for Marketing and Driving Demand for Commercial Financing

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Site EnvironmentalEnergySafelyVirtualStephanie PriceStrategic PlanFluctuationsProducts |

  3. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This workDayton:|Electricity PolicyAct of 2005:

  4. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchieving Them. A report to the United States

  5. Strategies for Marketing and Driving Demand for Commercial Financing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic Safety Goals Strategic Safety Goals JulyIntegrated Emission

  6. Dynamic LMP Response Under Alternative Price-Cap and Price-Sensitive Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    -source agent-based test bed developed by the authors. AMES models a restructured wholesale power market test bed, locational marginal prices, demand-bid price sensitivity, supply-offer price caps, learning to as the Wholesale Power Market Platform (WPMP). As detailed in [3], versions of the WPMP have been implemented (or

  7. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    raising transportation oil demand. Growing internationalcoal by wire could reduce oil demand by stemming coal roadEastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand

  8. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas demands are forecast for the four natural gas utilitythe 2006-2016 Forecast. Commercial natural gas demand isforecasts and demand scenarios. Electricity planning area Natural gas

  9. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

  10. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

  11. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

  12. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

  13. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McParland, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, Lawrenceand Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, LBNLCommercial and Residential Demand Response Overview of the

  14. Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.for Automated Demand Response. Technical Document to

  15. Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, Clifford

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

  16. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    District Small Business Summer Solutions: Energy and DemandSummer Solutions: Energy and Demand Impacts Monthly Energy> B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

  17. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World: Renewable Energy and Demand Response Proliferation intogether the renewable energy and demand response communityimpacts of renewable energy and demand response integration

  18. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy and environmental benefits of demand controlledindicate the energy and cost savings for demand controlled24) (California Energy Commission 2008), demand controlled

  19. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy and environmental benefits of demand controlled indicate the energy and cost savings for  demand controlled 24) (California Energy  Commission 2008), demand controlled 

  20. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integrating HECO and Hawaii Energy demand response relatedpotential. Energy efficiency and demand response efforts areBoth  energy  efficiency  and  demand  response  should  

  1. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

  2. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 2.1 Demand-Side Managementbuildings. The demand side management framework is discussedIssues 2.1 Demand-Side Management Framework Forecasting

  3. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and best practices to guide HECO demand response developmentbest practices for DR renewable integration – Technically demand responseof best practices. This is partially because demand response

  4. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings DavidStrategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Davidadjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The

  5. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on Building

  6. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In terms of demand response capability, building operatorsautomated demand response and improve building energy andand demand response features directly into building design

  7. Market Transformation

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This Fuel Cell Technologies Program fact sheet outlines current status and challenges in the market transformation of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

  8. Real-Time Electricity Markets Material from this introduction was adapted from [1].

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    ), or balancing market. #12;2 A third market, called the operating reserve market, addresses ancillary services of products: Energy: based on resource offers and demand bids Regulating reserve: for real-time balancing1 Real-Time Electricity Markets Material from this introduction was adapted from [1

  9. March market review. [Spot market prices for uranium (1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spot market price for uranium in unrestricted markets weakened further during March, and at month end, the NUEXCO Exchange Value had fallen $0.15, to $7.45 per pound U3O8. The Restricted American Market Penalty (RAMP) for concentrates increased $0.15, to $2.55 per pound U3O8. Ample UF6 supplies and limited demand led to a $0.50 decrease in the UF6 Value, to $25.00 per kgU as UF6, while the RAMP for UF6 increased $0.75, to $5.25 per kgU. Nine near-term uranium transactions were reported, totalling almost 3.3 million pounds equivalent U3O8. This is the largest monthly spot market volume since October 1992, and is double the volume reported in January and February. The March 31 Conversion Value was $4.25 per kgU as UF6. Beginning with the March 31 Value, NUEXCO now reports its Conversion Value in US dollars per kilogram of uranium (US$/kgU), reflecting current industry practice. The March loan market was inactive with no transactions reported. The Loan Rate remained unchanged at 3.0 percent per annum. Low demand and increased competition among sellers led to a one-dollar decrease in the SWU Value, to $65 per SWU, and the RAMP for SWU declined one dollar, to $9 per SWU.

  10. Market values summary/March market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is the March 1993 uranium market summary. In the natural uranium and concentrates market, there were eight transactions. Both the restricted and unrestricted values were unchanged at $9.45 and $7.00 per pound of U3O8 respectively. In the UF6 market, there were three deals. Both restricted and unrestricted values were also unchanged at $30.00 and $24.50 per kgU as UF6 respectively. The restricted transaction value dropped slightly to $9.45, and the unrestricted value dropped to $7.05. In the enrichment services market, there were six deals reported, with the restricted SWU value rising to $87.00 and the unrestricted SWU value dropping to $67.00. Active uranium demand decreased considerably, while active supply increased.

  11. Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response & Energy Efficiency International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 2 ?Less than 5... for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 5 What is Demand Response? ?The temporary reduction of electricity demanded from the grid by an end-user in response to capacity shortages, system reliability events, or high wholesale...

  12. North American Natural Gas Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  13. North American Natural Gas Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report sunnnarizes the research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  14. Evidence is growing on demand side of an oil peak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    After years of continued growth, the number of miles driven by Americans started falling in December 2007. Not only are the number of miles driven falling, but as cars become more fuel efficient, they go further on fewer gallons - further reducing demand for gasoline. This trend is expected to accelerate. Drivers include, along with higher-efficiency cars, mass transit, reversal in urban sprawl, biofuels, and plug-in hybrid vehicles.

  15. Demand Response Technology Roadmap A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    workshop agendas, presentation materials, and transcripts. For the background to the Demand Response Technology Roadmap and to make use of individual roadmaps, the reader is...

  16. ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005.................................................................................................................................3 PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC PLANNING AREA ........................................................................................9 Commercial Sector

  17. Driving Demand | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    strategies, results achieved to date, and advice for other programs. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements. This guide, developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National...

  18. Demand Response Technology Roadmap M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between May 2014 and February 2015. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Demand Response Executive Sponsor Team decided upon the scope of the project in May. Two subsequent...

  19. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Commission's final forecasts for 2012­2022 electricity consumption, peak, and natural gas demand Electricity, demand, consumption, forecast, weather normalization, peak, natural gas, self generation CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand

  20. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data Collection for Demand-side Management for QualifyingPrepared by Demand-side Management Task Force of the

  1. Econometric analysis of the historical growth and volatility trends of various metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Brittany Laurél

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post Malthusian economics, there is growing recognition of the impact technological change and advance has on market activity. By studying historical production and price trends, boundaries of feasible growth can be ...

  2. Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data) Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Technical Report NRELTP-6A20-52925 October 2011 NREL...

  3. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on key trends in the U.S. wind power market, with an emphasis on the latest year, and presents a wealth of data, some of which has not historically been mined by wind power analysts.

  4. Technical Analysis of Commodity Markets: Emphasis on Bar Charts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purcell, Wayne D.

    1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical analysis of futures markets can be complex, but this publication explains fairly simple methods of using bar charts to predict price trends. Understanding resistance and support planes, chart gaps and other signals can equip producers...

  5. Market Power in Pollution Permit Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montero, Juan Pablo

    As with other commodity markets, markets for trading pollution permits have not been immune to market power concerns. In this paper, I survey the existing literature on market power in permit trading but also contribute ...

  6. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

  7. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

  8. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  9. US rubber markets recover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, A.

    1993-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic rubber markets in North America bounced back in no uncertain terms last year, with demand climbing an impressive 9.5%, to 2.97 million m.t.; and, according to the International Institute of Synthetic Rubber Producers (IIS-RP; Houston) latest five-year forecast, producers can look forward to a 3.3% increase in demand during 1993. This growth rate outpaced out 1992 forecast and demonstrates the resilience of the synthetic rubber industry, says William E. Tessemer, managing director of IISRP. We expect demand in 1993 to surpass 1992 and level off at a 2%/year growth rate for synthetic rubber - 2.5% including thermoplastic elastomers [TPEs]-over the 1993-97 period. The improvement reflects signs of a recovery in North America, especially the pickup in the auto and tire industry. The two major tire rubbers - styrene butadiene and polybutadiene rubber - notched up double-digit gains, and other materials that have autos uses, such as nitrile rubber and many of the specialty elastomers, also advanced strongly.

  10. Shale Gas Application in Hydraulic Fracturing Market is likely...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shale Gas Application in Hydraulic Fracturing Market is likely to grow at a rate of 6.46%, owing to increased natural gas demand Home > Groups > Renewable Energy RFPs Wayne31jan's...

  11. awareness market potential: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    appliance scheduling problemComfort-Aware Home Energy Management Under Market-Based Demand-Response Jin Xiao, Jian Li, Raouf of Waterloo, Canada email: rboutaba@cs.uwaterloo....

  12. Natural gas 1995: Issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends addresses current issues affecting the natural gas industry and markets. Highlights of recent trends include: Natural gas wellhead prices generally declined throughout 1994 and for 1995 averages 22% below the year-earlier level; Seasonal patterns of natural gas production and wellhead prices have been significantly reduced during the past three year; Natural gas production rose 15% from 1985 through 1994, reaching 18.8 trillion cubic feet; Increasing amounts of natural gas have been imported; Since 1985, lower costs of producing and transporting natural gas have benefitted consumers; Consumers may see additional benefits as States examine regulatory changes aimed at increasing efficiency; and, The electric industry is being restructured in a fashion similar to the recent restructuring of the natural gas industry.

  13. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state's total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation's energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska's 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  14. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state`s total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation`s energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska`s 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  15. Multipollutant markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montero, Juan-Pablo

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I study the optimal design of marketable permit systems to regulate various pollutants (e.g. air pollution in urban areas) when the regulator lives in a real world of imperfect information and incomplete enforcement. I ...

  16. Miscellaneous: Uruguay energy supply options study assessing the market for natural gas - executive summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conzelmann, G.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Uruguay is in the midst of making critical decisions affecting the design of its future energy supply system. Momentum for change is expected to come from several directions, including recent and foreseeable upgrades and modifications to energy conversion facilities, the importation of natural gas from Argentina, the possibility for a stronger interconnection of regional electricity systems, the country's membership in MERCOSUR, and the potential for energy sector reforms by the Government of Uruguay. The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of several fuel diversification strategies on Uruguay's energy supply system. The analysis pays special attention to fuel substitution trends due to potential imports of natural gas via a gas pipeline from Argentina and increasing electricity ties with neighboring countries. The Government of Uruguay has contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to study several energy development scenarios with the support of several Uruguayan institutions. Specifically, ANL was asked to conduct a detailed energy supply and demand analysis, develop energy demand projections based on an analysis of past energy demand patterns with support from local institutions, evaluate the effects of potential natural gas imports and electricity exchanges, and determine the market penetration of natural gas under various scenarios.

  17. Abstract--Market and system operations are tightly coupled in the restructured environment. Such coupling requires a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    --electricity market economics, social welfare maximization, locational marginal price, price-responsive demand, power methodology. Through this study, we gain important insights on the role of price-responsive demand

  18. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Hernandez, John; Chiu, Albert; Sezgen, Osman; Goodin, John

    2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is conducting a pilot program to investigate the technical feasibility of bidding certain demand response (DR) resources into the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO) day-ahead market for ancillary services nonspinning reserve. Three facilities, a retail store, a local government office building, and a bakery, are recruited into the pilot program. For each facility, hourly demand, and load curtailment potential are forecasted two days ahead and submitted to the CAISO the day before the operation as an available resource. These DR resources are optimized against all other generation resources in the CAISO ancillary service. Each facility is equipped with four-second real time telemetry equipment to ensure resource accountability and visibility to CAISO operators. When CAISO requests DR resources, PG&E's OpenADR (Open Automated DR) communications infrastructure is utilized to deliver DR signals to the facilities energy management and control systems (EMCS). The pre-programmed DR strategies are triggered without a human in the loop. This paper describes the automated system architecture and the flow of information to trigger and monitor the performance of the DR events. We outline the DR strategies at each of the participating facilities. At one site a real time electric measurement feedback loop is implemented to assure the delivery of CAISO dispatched demand reductions. Finally, we present results from each of the facilities and discuss findings.

  19. 2011 Vehicle Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the major trends in U.S. light-duty vehicle and medium/heavy truck markets as well as the underlying trends that caused them. This report is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP), and, in accord with its mission, pays special attention to the progress of high-efficiency and alternative-fuel technologies. This third edition since this report was started in 2008 offers several marked improvements relative to its predecessors. Most significantly, where earlier editions of this report focused on supplying information through an examination of market drivers, new vehicle trends, and supplier data, this edition uses a different structure. After opening with a discussion of energy and economics, this report features a section each on the light-duty vehicle and heavy/medium truck markets, and concluding with a section each on technology and policy. In addition to making this sectional re-alignment, this year s edition of the report also takes a different approach to communicating information. While previous editions relied heavily on text accompanied by auxiliary figures, this third edition relies primarily on charts and graphs to communicate trends. Any accompanying text serves to introduce the trends communication by the graphic and highlight any particularly salient observations. The opening section on Energy and Economics discusses the role of transportation energy and vehicle markets on a national (and even international) scale. For example, Figures 11 through 13 discuss the connections between global oil prices and U.S. GDP, and Figures 20 and 21 show U.S. employment in the automotive sector. The following section examines Light-Duty Vehicle use, markets, manufacture, and supply chains. Figures 26 through 33 offer snapshots of major light-duty vehicle brands in the U.S. and Figures 38 through 43 examine the performance and efficiency characteristics of vehicles sold. The discussion of Medium and Heavy Trucks offers information on truck sales (Figures 58 through 61) and fuel use (Figures 64 through 66). The Technology section offers information on alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure (Figures 68 through 77), and the Policy section concludes with information on recent, current, and near-future Federal policies like the Cash for Clunkers program (Figures 87 and 88) and the Corporate Automotive Fuel Economy standard (Figures 90 through 99) and. In total, the information contained in this report is intended to communicate a fairly complete understanding of U.S. highway transportation energy through a series of easily digestible nuggets.

  20. The role of public policy in emerging green power markets: An analysis of marketer preferences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Green power marketing has been heralded by some as a means to create a private market for renewable energy that is driven by customer demand for green products. This report challenges the premise--sometimes proffered in debates over green markets--that profitable, sizable, credible markets for green products will evolve naturally without supportive public policies. Relying primarily on surveys and interviews of US green power marketers, the article examines the role of specific regulatory and legislative policies in enabling the green market, and searches for those policies that are believed by marketers to be the most conducive or detrimental to the expansion of the green market. The authors find that marketers: (1) believe that profitable green power markets will only develop if a solid foundation of supportive policies exists; (2) believe that establishing overall price competition and encouraging customer switching are the top priorities; (3) are somewhat leery of government-sponsored or mandated public information programs; and (4) oppose three specific renewable energy policies that are frequently advocated by renewable energy enthusiasts, but that may have negative impacts on the green marketers' profitability. The stated preferences of green marketers shed light on ways to foster renewables by means of the green market. Because the interests of marketers do not coincide perfectly with those of society, however, the study also recognizes other normative perspectives and highlights policy tensions at the heart of current debates related to green markets. By examining these conflicts, they identify three key policy questions that should direct future research: (1) to what extent should price competition and customer switching be encouraged at the expense of cost shifting; (2) what requirements should be imposed to ensure credibility in green products and marketing; and (3) how should the green power market and broader renewable energy policies interact?

  1. The Role of Demand Resources In Regional Transmission Expansion Planning and Reliable Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigating the role of demand resources in regional transmission planning has provided mixed results. On one hand there are only a few projects where demand response has been used as an explicit alternative to transmission enhancement. On the other hand there is a fair amount of demand response in the form of energy efficiency, peak reduction, emergency load shedding, and (recently) demand providing ancillary services. All of this demand response reduces the need for transmission enhancements. Demand response capability is typically (but not always) factored into transmission planning as a reduction in the load which must be served. In that sense demand response is utilized as an alternative to transmission expansion. Much more demand response is used (involuntarily) as load shedding under extreme conditions to prevent cascading blackouts. The amount of additional transmission and generation that would be required to provide the current level of reliability if load shedding were not available is difficult to imagine and would be impractical to build. In a very real sense demand response solutions are equitably treated in every region - when proposed, demand response projects are evaluated against existing reliability and economic criteria. The regional councils, RTOs, and ISOs identify needs. Others propose transmission, generation, or responsive load based solutions. Few demand response projects get included in transmission enhancement plans because few are proposed. But this is only part of the story. Several factors are responsible for the current very low use of demand response as a transmission enhancement alternative. First, while the generation, transmission, and load business sectors each deal with essentially the same amount of electric power, generation and transmission companies are explicitly in the electric power business but electricity is not the primary business focus of most loads. This changes the institutional focus of each sector. Second, market and reliability rules have, understandably, been written around the capabilities and limitations of generators, the historic reliability resources. Responsive load limitations and capabilities are often not accommodated in markets or reliability criteria. Third, because of the institutional structure, demand response alternatives are treated as temporary solutions that can delay but not replace transmission enhancement. Financing has to be based on a three to five year project life as opposed to the twenty to fifty year life of transmission facilities. More can be done to integrate demand response options into transmission expansion planning. Given the societal benefits it may be appropriate for independent transmission planning organizations to take a more proactive role in drawing demand response alternatives into the resource mix. Existing demand response programs provide a technical basis to build from. Regulatory and market obstacles will have to be overcome if demand response alternatives are to be routinely considered in transmission expansion planning.

  2. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005 Motegi,National Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005Demand Response and Commissioning Mary Ann Piette, David S.

  3. Community Water Demand in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Ronald C.; Chang, Chan

    Solutions to Texas water policy and planning problems will be easier to identify once the impact of price upon community water demand is better understood. Several important questions cannot be addressed in the absence of such information...

  4. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring in an Agent-Based Smart Home, Proceedings of theConference on Smart Homes and Health Telematics, September,Smart Meter Motion sensors Figure 1: Schematic of the Demand Response Electrical Appliance Manager in a Home.

  5. Overview of Demand Side Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—discusses the utility PJM's demand side response (DSR) capabilities, including emergency and economic responses.

  6. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New England 13 and the PJM Interconnection 14 . According toGW. The current size of the PJM system is approximately 165markets, most notably in the PJM Interconnection and ISO-New

  7. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

  8. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

  9. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mares, K.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

  10. After record sales and production, international met markets plummet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    After surging in 2007 and most of 2008, both the demand and the pricing for coal collapsed in 2008's final quarter. The article discusses last year's market and gives some predictions on 2009's production and prices. The National Mining Association predicts that production of coking coal will fall 11% due to plunging demand for steel. 4 photos.

  11. Mandi: A Market Exchange for Trading Utility Computing Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    . A number of companies have started building Cloud and Grid computing environments, and offering access on demand, rather than maintaining their own expensive HPC infrastructure. For such communities, it would providers. The presence of a Market Exchange (ME) infrastructure can easily fulfill their demand for compute

  12. Scaling and memory in volatility return intervals in financial markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    markets, we study the return intervals between the daily volatilities of the price changes that are above.federal- reserve.gov releases H10 hist. We choose to study daily data records because there are intraday trendsScaling and memory in volatility return intervals in financial markets Kazuko Yamasaki* , Lev

  13. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand, EndUser Natural Gas Demand, and Energy Efficiency SEPTEMBER 2013 CEC2002013004SDV1REV CALIFORNIA The California Energy Demand 2014 ­ 2024 Revised Forecast, Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand and Methods

  14. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The California Energy Demand 2014 ­ 2024 Revised Forecast, Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility Planning Area Energy Policy Report. The forecast includes three full scenarios: a high energy demand case, a low

  15. Market values summary/May market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is the May 1994 uranium market survey. In the spot concentrates market, there was only one new deal, and as a result, the restricted exchange value eased to $9.25 per pound U3O8. The unrestricted exchange value remained constant at $7.00. There were two deals in the UF6 spot market, and the restricted UF6 value decreased to $29.40 per kgU as UF6. The unrestricted UF6 value was unchanged. There were two deals in the long-term marketplace. The restricted transaction value declined to $9.40 per pound U3O8, and the unrestricted transaction value remained fixed at $7.05. There were three deals in the enrichment services market, and the restricted SWU value dropped to $87 per SWU, while the unrestricted SWU value remained constant at $67. Active uranium supply decreased this reporting period, while active demand increased. Supply continued to overwhelm demand, however.

  16. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12: Market Impacts of Price Responsive Load in PJM and ISO-44 Figure 15: PJM Synchronized Reserve Scheduled MW:particularly those in PJM’s service territory, have begun

  17. Volatility Persistence in Crude Oil Markets Amlie CHARLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , reflecting rising demand for crude oil, particularly from developing nations. Oil prices have been veryVolatility Persistence in Crude Oil Markets Amélie CHARLES Audencia Nantes, School of Management oil markets ­ Brent, West Texas Intermediate (WTI) and Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries

  18. Capacity Markets for Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing Markets for Electricity. Wiley IEEE Press. [25]in the England and Wales Electricity Market”, Power WorkingFelder (1996), “Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacity

  19. Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    human dimension of demand response technology from a caseArens, E. , et al. 2008. Demand Response Enabling TechnologyArens, E. , et al. 2006. Demand Response Enabling Technology

  20. Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Eto

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barat, and D. Watson. 2007. Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby. 2009. Demand Response Spinning ReserveFormat of 2009-2011 Demand Response Activity Applications.

  1. REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the California Energy Commission staff's revised forecasts for 2012­2022 electricity consumption, peak Electricity, demand, consumption, forecast, weather normalization, peak, natural gas, self generation REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand

  2. REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Commission staff's revised forecasts for 2012­2022 electricity consumption, peak, and natural Electricity, demand, consumption, forecast, weather normalization, peak, natural gas, self generation REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility

  3. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050 RyanCEC (2003a) California energy demand 2003-2013 forecast.CEC (2005a) California energy demand 2006-2016: Staff energy

  4. National Action Plan on Demand Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—discusses the National Assessment of Demand Response study, the National Action Plan for Demand Response, and demand response as related to the energy outlook.

  5. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.; Zhou, Nan

    2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The time when energy-related carbon emissions come overwhelmingly from developed countries is coming to a close. China has already overtaken the United States as the world's leading emitter of greenhouse gas emissions. The economic growth that China has experienced is not expected to slow down significantly in the long term, which implies continued massive growth in energy demand. This paper draws on the extensive expertise from the China Energy Group at LBNL on forecasting energy consumption in China, but adds to it by exploring the dynamics of demand growth for electricity in the residential sector -- and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. This paper forecasts ownership growth of each product using econometric modeling, in combination with historical trends in China. The products considered (refrigerators, air conditioners, fans, washing machines, lighting, standby power, space heaters, and water heating) account for 90percent of household electricity consumption in China. Using this method, we determine the trend and dynamics of demandgrowth and its dependence on macroeconomic drivers at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, we present scenarios for reducing residential consumption through efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, thus allowing for a technologically realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities specifically in the Chinese context.

  6. Dynamic Resource Allocation for Spot Markets in Cloud Computing Environments Qi Zhang, Quanyan Zhu, Raouf Boutaba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutaba, Raouf

    the demand in order to maximize total revenue while minimizing the energy cost. In this paper, we consider fluctuating resource demands, market-driven resource alloca- tion has been proposed and recently implemented for each VM type with the goal of achieving maximum revenue over time. However, as demand for each type

  7. Market-Based Incentives for Green Building Alternatives K.R. Grosskopf, Ph.D.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    be addressed. Key Words Best management practices (BMPs), demand-side management, externalities, rebates for developing market-based initiatives to stimulate demand-side conservation. This approach is founded on the principal that reducing water use and subsequent wastewater discharge through demand-side or "user

  8. Market behavior under partial price controls: the case of the retail gasoline market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camm, F.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of firm-specific controls on the price of gasoline during 1979 and 1980, at both the wholesale and the retail level, dramatically affected the retail market for gasoline. The most visible effect was a diversity of monetary prices across service stations within particular retail market areas. Price could no longer play its usual role in clearing the retail market for gasoline. Queues and other changes in quality of service at stations arose to maintain the balance of market demand and supply. This report examines the behavior of an otherwise competitive market in the presence of such regulation-induced nonprice phenomena. In such a market, consumers consider both monetary prices and costs imposed by queues in deciding where to buy gasoline and how much to buy. Using a price-theoretic model of behavior, this paper predicts how various changes in effective price regulation affect consumers. 14 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Economic analysis of wool marketing in the provinces of Buenos Aires and La Pampa (Argentina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Carlos Alfredo

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , that habit dictates marketing decisions may be admiting irrationality. Xncreased . information concerning prices and market alternatives should reduce the reliance upon habit as a market decision factor. Early sales by contract as a means of solving... available to them. Analysis of variance and the Student-newman-Keuis test were used to test the hypotheses. The factors associated with wool demand were considered and regression analysis was used to estimate the parameters oi the demand equation Xt...

  10. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

  11. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand response: ? Distribution utility ? ISO ? Aggregator (demand response less obstructive and inconvenient for the customer (particularly if DR resources are aggregated by a load aggregator).

  12. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand ResponseConference on Building Commissioning: April 22 – 24, 2008al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response

  13. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    annual per-capita electricity consumption by demand15 California electricity consumption projections by demandannual per-capita electricity consumption by demand

  14. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use of demand control ventilation systems in general officedemand controlled  ventilation systems, Dennis DiBartolomeo the demand controlled ventilation system increased the rate 

  15. Supply chain planning decisions under demand uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanfeng Anna

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sales and operational planning that incorporates unconstrained demand forecasts has been expected to improve long term corporate profitability. Companies are considering such unconstrained demand forecasts in their decisions ...

  16. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sector, the demand response potential of California buildinga demand response event prohibit a building’s participationdemand response strategies in California buildings are

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: demand response inverter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    demand response inverter ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities,...

  18. Business development trends and analysis for the data networking market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patil, Devadas V

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Internet has come a long way after the widely reported invention by Sandra Lerner and Leonard Bosack of the router, a device that can transmit data from one network to another based on certain protocols and principles. ...

  19. Green Power Marketing Abroad: Recent Experience and Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Ecotraffic (Sweden), Gero Lücking of Lichtblick (Germany), Maja Marlier of the ICHEC Business School (Belgium

  20. Fuel Cells Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, New Jersey:

  1. Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids (HGL): Recent Market Trends and Issues

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200DecadeCubic1.

  2. Circulating Fluidized Bed Boilers Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPower InternationalChuichu,Cima

  3. Solar Trackers Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingapore Jump to: navigation,PanelsLightSolarSolar Trackers

  4. OpenEI Community - Corrugated Metal Pipe Market Trends

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff the GridHome All0 en How

  5. OpenEI Community - Dimethyl Ether Market Trends

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff the GridHome All0 en

  6. OpenEI Community - Sodium hypochlorite Market Trends

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff thedriving dataHighlights

  7. Corrugated Metal Pipe Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationinConcentratingEnergyCoosa Valley

  8. Dimethyl Ether Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDaytonDestilaria detheDiebuOpenDimethyl

  9. September 4 Webinar to Explore Renewable Energy Market Trends | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of Energy Advisory10MEASUREMENTSensors,8,Opportunities |of

  10. Oilfield Equipment Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOffice of State LandsOhio: Energy ResourcesOilfield

  11. OpenEI Community - Coal Fired Power Generation Market Trends

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen)

  12. OpenEI Community - Fuel Cells Market Trends

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen)

  13. OpenEI Community - Low Voltage Cables Market Trends

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen)5/0 en Global8/0

  14. OpenEI Community - Microturbine Systems Market Trends

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen)5/0 en Global8/0

  15. OpenEI Community - Offshore Lubricants Market Trends

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen)5/0 en Global8/0

  16. OpenEI Community - Power Rental Market Trends

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen)5/0 en Global8/0

  17. Sodium hypochlorite Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteel CorporationSocovoltaic Systems JumpSodium

  18. Coal Fired Power Generation Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER esDatasetCityFundCo-benefits EvaluationCoal

  19. Unconventional Gas Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle AirshipsUnalakleet Valley Elec CoopUnconventional Gas

  20. Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    importing wood products for domestic use to become the world's leading exporter of furniture, plywood of wild lands and wildlife, while examining the impact of emerging trends in climate, technology than twice the volume of tropical logs as India, the second largest importer on the list. Japan

  1. Turkey's energy demand and supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

  2. US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Massimo www.cepe.ethz.ch #12;US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Page 1 of 25 US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

  3. International, National, and Virginia Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................................................................................1 Global Coal Production and Consumption Trends ...................................................2.S. Electricity Generation....................................................................................15 U.S. Coal Consumption

  4. Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, June Han

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HVAC Control System Advanced Telemetry No DDC Zone Control Data Trending DDC Zone Control Data Trending Detail EMCS Trends

  5. Marketing and Market Transformation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presents how going green will grow your business, as well as how programs can overcome appraisal challenges. p1-kauffman.pdf More Documents & Publications Marketing and Market...

  6. Cournot Equilibria in Two-Settlement Electricity Markets with System Contingencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is reduced substantially. Thus, forward trading is viewed as an effective way of mitigating market power market power, flow congestion, demand uncertainties and probabilistic system con- tingencies in the markets. I. INTRODUCTION The last decade has witnessed a fundamental transformation of the electric power

  7. Testing for cointegration between the New York and London futures markets for coffee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Mona Dinesh

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arbitrage between the New York and London futures markets is an active event. The price spread between the New York and London futures markets, is affected by factors concerning the supply and demand of each commodity and the world coffee market...

  8. Consumer Attitudes About Renewable Energy: Trends and Regional Differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natural Marketing Institute, Harleysville, Pennsylvania

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The data in this report are taken from Natural Marketing Institute's (NMI's) Lifestyles of Health and Sustainability Consumer Trends Database. Created in 2002, the syndicated consumer database contains responses from 2,000 to 4,000 nationally representative U.S. adults (meaning the demographics of the sample are consistent with U.S. Census findings) each year. NMI used the database to analyze consumer attitudes and behavior related to renewable energy and to update previously conducted related research. Specifically, this report will explore consumer awareness, concerns, perceived benefits, knowledge of purchase options, and usage of renewable energy as well as provide regional comparisons and trends over time.

  9. Incentives for demand-side management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, M.W.; Brown, J.B. (Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the first product of an ongoing project to monitor the efforts of states to remove regulatory barriers to, and provide financial incentives for, utility investment in demand-side management (DSM) resources. The project was commissioned by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) in response to growing interest among regulators for a comprehensive survey of developments in this area. Each state report beings with an overview of the state's progress toward removing regulatory barriers and providing incentives for DSM. Information is organized under five headings: status; IRP regulations and practice; current treatment of DSM, directions and trends; commission contact person. Where applicable, each overview is followed by one or more sections that report on specific incentive proposals or mechanisms within the state. Information on each proposal or mechanism is organized under eight headings. A notation on each page identifies the utility or other group associated with the proposal or mechanism. The eight headings are as follows: status; background; treatment of cost recovery; treatment of lost revenues/decoupling; treatment of profitability; other features; issues, and additional observations.

  10. Incentives for demand-side management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, M.W.; Brown, J.B. [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)] [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the first product of an ongoing project to monitor the efforts of states to remove regulatory barriers to, and provide financial incentives for, utility investment in demand-side management (DSM) resources. The project was commissioned by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) in response to growing interest among regulators for a comprehensive survey of developments in this area. Each state report beings with an overview of the state`s progress toward removing regulatory barriers and providing incentives for DSM. Information is organized under five headings: status; IRP regulations and practice; current treatment of DSM, directions and trends; commission contact person. Where applicable, each overview is followed by one or more sections that report on specific incentive proposals or mechanisms within the state. Information on each proposal or mechanism is organized under eight headings. A notation on each page identifies the utility or other group associated with the proposal or mechanism. The eight headings are as follows: status; background; treatment of cost recovery; treatment of lost revenues/decoupling; treatment of profitability; other features; issues, and additional observations.

  11. Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% ? 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

  12. Revelation on Demand Nicolas Anciaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is willing to reveal the aggregate response (according to his company's policy) to the customer dataRevelation on Demand Nicolas Anciaux 1 · Mehdi Benzine1,2 · Luc Bouganim1 · Philippe Pucheral1 time to support epidemiological studies. In these and many other situations, aggregate data or partial

  13. Water demand management in Kuwait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

  14. obesity demands more than just

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    #12;The World That Makes Us Fat ***** ***** ***** Overcoming obesity demands more than just. By Melinda Wenner Moyer Illustrations by A. Richard Allen 27 #12;ON ONE LEVEL, of course, obesity has a sim to pollutants. Their research suggests that to solve the problem of obesity--and, ultimately, to prevent it from

  15. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEMAND . . . .Demand for Electricity and Power PeakDemand . . • . . ELECTRICITY REQUIREMENTS FOR AGRICULTUREResults . . Coriclusions ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric

  16. Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

  17. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lisa

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

  18. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

  19. New Control Plane in 3GPP LTE/EPC Architecture for On-Demand Connectivity Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the on-demand connectivity service. The Software Defined Networking (SDN) is an emerging trend until 2017. On the other hand, a study [2] recently highlighted that network operators risk an "end such as network equipment failure, overload situations and during energy saving measures. In this paper, we focus

  20. Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    #12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

  1. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand, EndUser Natural Gas Demand, and Energy Efficiency DECEMBER 2013 CEC2002013004SFV1 CALIFORNIA and expertise of numerous California Energy Commission staff members in the Demand Analysis Office. In addition

  2. Demand Side Management in Rangan Banerjee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Rangan

    Demand Side Management in Industry Rangan Banerjee Talk at Baroda in Birla Corporate Seminar August 31,2007 #12;Demand Side Management Indian utilities ­ energy shortage and peak power shortage. Supply for Options ­ Demand Side Management (DSM) & Load Management #12;DSM Concept Demand Side Management (DSM) - co

  3. Nuclear power attitude trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nealey, S.M.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing vulnerability of nuclear power to political pressures fueled by public concerns, particularly about nuclear plant safety and radioactive waste disposal, has become obvious. Since Eisenhower's Atoms-for-Peace program, utility and government plans have centered on expansion of nuclear power generating capability. While supporters have outnumbered opponents of nuclear power expansion for many years, in the wake of the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident the margin of support has narrowed. The purpose of this paper is to report and put in perspective these long-term attitude trends.

  4. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site Map OrganizationFAQTrending:Trending:

  5. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal

  6. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print

  7. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. wind power industry experienced yet another record year in 2009, once again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, 2009 was a year of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting the wind power industry and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry toward continued aggressive expansion. The year 2010, meanwhile, is anticipated to be one of some retrenchment, with expectations for fewer wind power capacity additions than seen in 2009. The rapid pace of development and change within the industry has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace, yet the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the fourth in an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the United States wind power market, with a particular focus on 2009.

  8. Field Test Results of Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response (DR) is an emerging research field and an effective tool that improves grid reliability and prevents the price of electricity from rising, especially in deregulated markets. This paper introduces the definition of DR and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). It describes the Auto-DR technology utilized at a commercial building in the summer of 2006 and the methodologies to evaluate associated demand savings. On the basis of field tests in a large office building, Auto-DR is proven to be a reliable and credible resource that ensures a stable and economical operation of the power grid.

  9. Market Organization and Efficiency in Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Market Organization and Efficiency in Electricity Markets Erin T. Mansur and Matthew W. White October 2007 ­ Draft Abstract Electricity markets exhibit two different forms of organization costs. Our analysis points to the merits of organized market institutions for electricity, a central

  10. May market review. [Spot market prices for uranium (1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven uranium transactions totalling nearly three million pounds equivalent U3O8 were reported during May, but only two, totalling less than 200 thousand pounds equivalent U3O8, involved concentrates. As no discretionary buying occurred during the month, and as near-term supply and demand were in relative balance, prices were steady, while both buyers and sellers appeared to be awaiting some new market development to signal the direction of future spot-market prices. The May 31, 1993, Exchange Value and the Restricted American market Penalty (RAMP) for concentrates were both unchanged at $7.10, and $2.95 per pound U3O8, respectively. NUEXCO's judgement was that transactions for significant quantities of uranium concentrates that were both deliverable in and intended for consumption in the USA could have been concluded on May 31 at $10.05 per pound U3O8. Two near-term concentrate transactions were reported in which one US utility purchased less than 200 thousand pounds equivalent U3O8 from two separate sellers. These sales occurred at price levels at or near the May 31 Exchange Value plus RAMP. No long-term uranium transactions were reported during May. Consequently, the UF6 Value decreased $0.20 to $24.30 per kgU as UF6, reflecting some weakening of the UF6 market outside the USA.

  11. Introduction to energy storage with market analysis and outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, Robert [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Straße 23, 09596 Freiberg (Germany); Pillot, Christophe [AVICENNE Energy, LITWIN Building, 10 rue Jean-Jaurès, La Défense 11, Puteaux Cedex (France)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    At first, the rechargeable battery market in 2012 will be described by technology - lead acid, NiCd, NiMH, lithium ion - and application - portable electronics, power tools, e-bikes, automotive, energy storage. This will be followed by details of the lithium ion battery market value chain from the raw material to the final application. The lithium ion battery market of 2012 will be analyzed and split by applications, form factors and suppliers. There is also a focus on the cathode, anode, electrolyte and separator market included. This report will also give a forecast for the main trends and the market in 2020, 2025. To conclude, a forecast for the rechargeable battery market by application for 2025 will be presented. Since energy storage plays an important role for the growing Electric Vehicle (EV) market, this EV issue is closely considered throughout this analysis.

  12. Demand Response in the West: Lessons for States and Provinces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas C. Larson; Matt Lowry; Sharon Irwin

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 This paper is submitted in fulfillment of DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-015F22369 on the experience of western states/provinces with demand response (DR) in the electricity sector. Demand-side resources are often overlooked as a viable option for meeting load growth and addressing the challenges posed by the region's aging transmission system. Western states should work together with utilities and grid operators to facilitate the further deployment of DR programs which can provide benefits in the form of decreased grid congestion, improved system reliability, market efficiency, price stabilization, hedging against volatile fuel prices and reduced environmental impacts of energy production. This report describes the various types of DR programs; provides a survey of DR programs currently in place in the West; considers the benefits, drawbacks and barriers to DR; and presents lessons learned and recommendations for states/provinces.

  13. Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated Aggregation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging standards such as OpenADR enable Demand Response (DR) Resources to interact directly with Utilities and Independent System Operators to allow their facility automation equipment to respond to a variety of DR signals ranging from day ahead to real time ancillary services. In addition, there are Aggregators in today’s markets who are capable of bringing together collections of aggregated DR assets and selling them to the grid as a single resource. However, in most cases these aggregated resources are not automated and when they are, they typically use proprietary technologies. There is a need for a framework for dealing with aggregated resources that supports the following requirements: • Allows demand-side resources to participate in multiple DR markets ranging from wholesale ancillary services to retail tariffs without being completely committed to a single entity like an Aggregator; • Allow aggregated groups of demand-side resources to be formed in an ad hoc fashion to address specific grid-side issues and support the optimization of the collective response of an aggregated group along a number of different dimensions. This is important in order to taylor the aggregated performance envelope to the needs to of the grid; • Allow aggregated groups to be formed in a hierarchical fashion so that each group can participate in variety of markets from wholesale ancillary services to distribution level retail tariffs. This paper explores the issues of aggregated groups of DR resources as described above especially within the context of emerging smart grid standards and the role they will play in both the management and interaction of various grid-side entities with those resources.

  14. The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

  15. Solar Installation Labor Market Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, B.; Jordan, P.; Carrese, J.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential economic benefits of the growing renewable energy sector have led to increased federal, state, and local investments in solar industries, including federal grants for expanded workforce training for U.S. solar installers. However, there remain gaps in the data required to understand the size and composition of the workforce needed to meet the demand for solar power. Through primary research on the U.S. solar installation employer base, this report seeks to address that gap, improving policymakers and other solar stakeholders understanding of both the evolving needs of these employers and the economic opportunity associated with solar market development. Included are labor market data covering current U.S. employment, expected industry growth, and employer skill preferences for solar installation-related occupations. This study offers an in-depth look at the solar installation sectors. A study published by the Solar Foundation in October 2011 provides a census of labor data across the entire solar value chain.

  16. Diagnosing Market Power in California's Deregulated Wholesale Electricity Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin; Bushnell, James; Wolak, Frank

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in dereg- ulated wholesale electricity markets," RANDin California's Deregulated Wholesale Electricity MarketEffective competition in wholesale electricity markets is

  17. MTBE: Capacity boosts on hold amid demand concerns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty reigns in the methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) market. {open_quotes}We have no choice but to put our expansion plans on the back burner,{close_quotes} says one producer. {open_quotes}Because of government actions, there are no MTBE plants being built or expanded.{close_quotes} Spot MTBE prices have risen ti 82 cts- 83 cts/gal from 76 cts-78 cts/gal earlier this month as the demand for octane enhancement increases for the summer driving season. Some observers say EPA may relax different oxygen requirements for gasoline in different seasons. That would simplify production and supply for MTBE makers.

  18. Near Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under Real-time Demand-Response Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutaba, Raouf

    Near Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under Real-time Demand-Response Pricing Jin Xiao, Jae--In this paper, we present demand-side energy manage- ment under real-time demand-response pricing as a task, demand-response, energy management I. INTRODUCTION The growing awareness of global climate change has

  19. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Dudley, Junqiao

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) demonstrated and evaluated open automated demand response (OpenADR) communication infrastructure to reduce winter morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in the Seattle City Light (SCL) service territory at five sites: Seattle Municipal Tower, Seattle University, McKinstry, and two Target stores. This report describes the process and results of the demonstration. OpenADR is an information exchange model that uses a client-server architecture to automate demand-response (DR) programs. These field tests evaluated the feasibility of deploying fully automated DR during both winter and summer peak periods. DR savings were evaluated for several building systems and control strategies. This project studied DR during hot summer afternoons and cold winter mornings, both periods when electricity demand is typically high. This is the DRRC project team's first experience using automation for year-round DR resources and evaluating the flexibility of commercial buildings end-use loads to participate in DR in dual-peaking climates. The lessons learned contribute to understanding end-use loads that are suitable for dispatch at different times of the year. The project was funded by BPA and SCL. BPA is a U.S. Department of Energy agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon and serving the Pacific Northwest. BPA operates an electricity transmission system and markets wholesale electrical power at cost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energy generation facilities. Created by the citizens of Seattle in 1902, SCL is the second-largest municipal utility in America. SCL purchases approximately 40% of its electricity and the majority of its transmission from BPA through a preference contract. SCL also provides ancillary services within its own balancing authority. The relationship between BPA and SCL creates a unique opportunity to create DR programs that address both BPA's and SCL's markets simultaneously. Although simultaneously addressing both market could significantly increase the value of DR programs for BPA, SCL, and the end user, establishing program parameters that maximize this value is challenging because of complex contractual arrangements and the absence of a central Independent System Operator or Regional Transmission Organization in the northwest.

  20. Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

    2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.