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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Innovative and Progressive Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation of electric energy has been a concern of energy users in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors for several decades, and has increased in significance since the 1973 energy shortages. During this time, it has also become increasing difficult for electric utilities to install new generating capacity due to public concerns about nuclear energy and environmental issues. In many areas of the country, utilities now find themselves capacity short during their peak periods, and have concerns about providing a reliable supply of electricity. These utilities have initiated programs which encourage their customers to conserve electric energy, and shift or lower use during the utility's peak periods. In other areas of the country there are utilities which have more than adequate electric supplies. These utilities have developed programs which ensure that costs of electricity are such that existing customers are maintained. Programs which address demand issues of an energy utility are referred to as Demand-Side Management (DSM) and are extremely rigorous in scope. Electric utilities have pursued many different DSM policies and strategies during the past decade. These programs have addressed various technologies and have included rebates for efficient lighting, electric motors and packaged air conditioning systems. More recently, however, many utilities have implemented very innovative programs, which indicates an increased commitment towards demand planning, and requires a substantial financial investment in new equipment and engineering services. Some programs have addressed such areas as thermal storage and industrial processes, and others have included comprehensive facility energy studies where greater than fifty percent of the cost of energy retrofits may be covered by the utility. Progressive pricing strategies have included real-time pricing and aggressive curtailable rates for commercial and industrial buildings. Further, new standards are being established by electric utilities which promote energy efficient new construct ion. All of these programs can have considerable impacts on both the customer's and utility's energy use patterns and load shapes. This paper will discuss a number of more significant and innovative DSM programs, and will explain the potential load and energy impacts.

Epstein, G. J.; Fuller, W. H.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Electricity pricing as a demand-side management strategy: Western lessons for developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities in the Western world have increasingly realized that load commitments can be met not only by constructing new generating plants but also by influencing electricity demand. This demand-side management (DSM) process requires that electric utilities promote measures on the customer's side of the meter to directly or indirectly influence electricity consumption to meet desired load objectives. An important demand-side option to achieve these load objectives is innovative electricity pricing, both by itself and as a financial incentive for other demand-site measures. This study explores electricity pricing as a DSM strategy, addressing four questions in the process: What is the Western experience with DSM in general and electricity pricing in particular Do innovative pricing strategies alter the amount and pattern of electricity consumption Do the benefits of these pricing strategies outweigh the costs of implementation What are future directions in electricity pricing Although DSM can be used to promote increases in electricity consumption for electric utilities with excess capacity as well as to slow demand growth for capacity-short utilities, emphasis here is placed on the latter. The discussion should be especially useful for electric utilities in developing countries that are exploring alternatives to capacity expansion to meet current and future electric power demand.

Hill, L.J.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Electrical Demand Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below the previous year's level and yielded $150,000 annual savings. These measures include rescheduling of selected operations and demand limiting techniques such as fuel switching to alternate power sources during periods of high peak demand. For example, by rescheduling the startup of five heat treat annealing ovens to second shift, 950 kW of load was shifted off peak. Also, retired, non-productive steam turbine chillers and a diesel air compressor have been effectively operated to displaced 1330 kW during peak periods each day. Installed metering devices have enabled the recognition of critical demand periods. The paper concludes with a brief look at future plans and long range objectives of the Demand Management Plan.

Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the implementation of transport demand management measures. Appropriate Transport Demand Management (TDM) strategies and measures can affect travel behaviour and therefore reduce...

5

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Agency/Company /Organization: Victoria Transport Policy Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm12.htm Cost: Free Language: English References: Victoria Transport Policy Institute[1] "The Online TDM Encyclopedia is the world's most comprehensive information resource concerning innovative transportation management strategies. It describes dozens of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies and contains information on TDM planning, evaluation and implementation. It has thousands of hyperlinks that provide instant access

6

Transportation Demand Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Demand Management Plan FALL 2009 #12;T r a n s p o r t a t i o n D e m a n d M a n the transportation impacts the expanded enrollment will have. Purpose and Goal The primary goal of the TDM plan is to ensure that adequate measures are undertaken and maintained to minimize the transportation impacts

7

Hawaii Energy Strategy: Program guide. [Contains special sections on analytical energy forecasting, renewable energy resource assessment, demand-side energy management, energy vulnerability assessment, and energy strategy integration  

SciTech Connect

The Hawaii Energy Strategy program, or HES, is a set of seven projects which will produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. It will include a comprehensive energy vulnerability assessment with recommended courses of action to decrease Hawaii's energy vulnerability and to better prepare for an effective response to any energy emergency or supply disruption. The seven projects are designed to increase understanding of Hawaii's energy situation and to produce recommendations to achieve the State energy objectives of: Dependable, efficient, and economical state-wide energy systems capable of supporting the needs of the people, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The seven projects under the Hawaii Energy Strategy program include: Project 1: Develop Analytical Energy Forecasting Model for the State of Hawaii. Project 2: Fossil Energy Review and Analysis. Project 3: Renewable Energy Resource Assessment and Development Program. Project 4: Demand-Side Management Program. Project 5: Transportation Energy Strategy. Project 6: Energy Vulnerability Assessment Report and Contingency Planning. Project 7: Energy Strategy Integration and Evaluation System.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

1995 Demand-Side Managment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels

9

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies January 16, 2011 Maryanne Fuller (MF): Hi there. This is Maryanne Fuller from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory....

10

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

11

Successful demand-side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a brief summary of a series of case studies of five publicly-owned utilities that are noted for their success with demand-side management. These utilities are: (1) city of Austin, Texas, (2) Burlington Electric Department in Vermont, (3) Sacramento Municipal Utility District in California, (4) Seattle City Light, and (5) Waverly Light and Power in Iowa. From these case studies, the authors identified a number of traits associated with a successful demand-side management program. These traits are: (1) high rates, (2) economic factors, (3) environmental awareness, (4) state emphasis on integrated resource planning/demand side management, (5) local political support, (6) large-sized utilities, and (7) presence of a champion.

Hadley, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Flanigan, T. [Results Center, Aspen, CO (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Demand Response and Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several decades, power companies have deployed various types of demand response (DR), such as interruptible contracts, and there is substantial ongoing research and development on sophisticated mechanisms for triggering DR. In this white paper, EPRI discusses the increasing use of electricity DR in the power industry and how this will affect the practice of energy risk management. This paper outlines 1) characteristics of a common approach to energy risk management, 2) the variety of types of DR impl...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Demand-Side Management Glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, demand-side management (DSM) programs have grown in significance within the U.S. electric power industry. Such rapid growth has resulted in new terms, standards, and vocabulary used by DSM professionals. This report is a first attempt to provide a consistent set of definitions for the expanding DSM terminology.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

A Demand Response (DR) Event: Benefits, Strategies, Automation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Demand Response (DR) Event: Benefits, Strategies, Automation and Future of DR Title A Demand Response (DR) Event: Benefits, Strategies, Automation and Future of DR Publication...

15

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings Title Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings Publication Type Thesis Year of...

16

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning CommercialBuilding Controls  

SciTech Connect

California electric utilities have been exploring the use of dynamic critical peak pricing (CPP) and other demand response programs to help reduce peaks in customer electric loads. CPP is a new electricity tariff design to promote demand response. This paper begins with a brief review of terminology regarding energy management and demand response, followed by a discussion of DR control strategies and a preliminary overview of a forthcoming guide on DR strategies. The final section discusses experience to date with these strategies, followed by a discussion of the peak electric demand savings from the 2005 Automated CPP program. An important concept identified in the automated DR field tests is that automated DR will be most successful if the building commissioning industry improves the operational effectiveness of building controls. Critical peak pricing and even real time pricing are important trends in electricity pricing that will require new functional tests for building commissioning.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Demand-side management of China`s electric power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents an analysis of China`s strategies for electricity demand-side management (DSM) by the year 2000. It discusses electricity shortages, potential for electricity conservation, and measures to cope with the problems. It concludes that the country should speed up the reform of electricity pricing, make executable laws, and invest capital in demand-side management.

Yang, M. [Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand). School of Environment, Resources and Development

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Load Reduction, Demand Response and Energy Efficient Technologies and Strategies  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Electricity (OE) to recommend load reduction and grid integration strategies, and identify additional demand response (energy efficiency/conservation opportunities) and strategies at the Forest City Housing (FCH) redevelopment at Pearl Harbor and the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay. The goal was to provide FCH staff a path forward to manage their electricity load and thus reduce costs at these FCH family housing developments. The initial focus of the work was at the MCBH given the MCBH has a demand-ratchet tariff, relatively high demand (~18 MW) and a commensurate high blended electricity rate (26 cents/kWh). The peak demand for MCBH occurs in July-August. And, on average, family housing at MCBH contributes ~36% to the MCBH total energy consumption. Thus, a significant load reduction in family housing can have a considerable impact on the overall site load. Based on a site visit to the MCBH and meetings with MCBH installation, FCH, and Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) staff, recommended actions (including a "smart grid" recommendation) that can be undertaken by FCH to manage and reduce peak-demand in family housing are made. Recommendations are also made to reduce overall energy consumption, and thus reduce demand in FCH family housing.

Boyd, Paul A.; Parker, Graham B.; Hatley, Darrel D.

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

19

Proceedings: International Workshop on Innovative DSM [Demand Side Management] Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand-side management (DSM) is becoming more important in the utility environment characterized by increasing competition and major uncertainties in demand and supply. EPRI and CIGRE, a leading international organization for the electric power industry, cosponsored this workshop to discuss strategies for designing and implementing DSM programs.

None

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Definition: Demand Side Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Side Management Side Management Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand Side Management The term for all activities or programs undertaken by Load-Serving Entity or its customers to influence the amount or timing of electricity they use.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Energy demand management, also known as demand side management (DSM), is the modification of consumer demand for energy through various methods such as financial incentives and education. Usually, the goal of demand side management is to encourage the consumer to use less energy during peak hours, or to move the time of energy use to off-peak times such as nighttime and weekends. Peak demand management does not necessarily decrease total energy consumption, but could be expected to reduce the need

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 9 . Piette et at Automated Demand Response Strategies andDynamic Controls for Demand Response in New and ExistingFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities"

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand side management (DSM) activities in the electric power industry. The report presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a ...

24

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages:...

25

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0589(97) Distribution Category UC-950 U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 December 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal ...

26

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricity1: Average and Maximum Peak Electric Demand Savings during

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Water demand management in Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Are they equal yet. [Demand side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand-side management (DSM) is considered an important tool in meeting the load growth of many utilities. Northwest regional and utility resource plans forecast demand-side resources to meet from one-half to two-thirds of additional electrical energy needs over the next 10 years. Numerous sources have stated that barriers, both regulatory and financial, exist to utility acquisition of demand-side resources. Regulatory actions are being implemented in Oregon to make demand-side investments competitive with supply-side investments. In 1989, the Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) took two actions regarding demand-side investments. The PUC's Order 89-1700 directed utilities to capitalize demand-side investments to properly match amortization expense with the multiyear benefits provided by DSM. The PUC also began an informal investigation concerning incentives for Oregon's regulated electric utilities to acquire demand-side resources.

Irwin, K.; Phillips-Israel, K.; Busch, E.

1994-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Proceedings: Demand-Side Management Incentive Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings provide background information on proposed regulatory incentive mechanisms to encourage utilities to develop demand-side management programs. Attendees discussed and analyzed various proposals and techniques and developed lists of key attributes that incentive mechanisms should have.

None

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Micro economics for demand-side management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper aims to interpret Demand-Side Management (DSM) activity and to point out its problems, adopting microeconomics as an analytical tool. Two major findings follow. first, the cost-benefit analysis currently in use ...

Kibune, Hisao

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1999 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

33

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing -...

34

Demand Management Institute (DMI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand Management Institute (DMI) Demand Management Institute (DMI) Jump to: navigation, search Name Demand Management Institute (DMI) Address 35 Walnut Street Place Wellesley, Massachusetts Zip 02481 Sector Buildings Product Provides analysis for buildings on reducing energy use Website http://www.dmiinc.com/ Coordinates 42.3256508°, -71.2530294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3256508,"lon":-71.2530294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

35

Occupancy based demand response HVAC control strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, cooling and ventilation accounts for 30% energy usage and for 50% of the electricity usage in the United States. Currently, most modern buildings still condition rooms assuming maximum occupancy rather than actual usage. As a result, rooms are ... Keywords: HVAC, demand response, energy savings, occupancy, ventilation

Varick L. Erickson; Alberto E. Cerpa

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Proceedings: Demand-side management incentive regulation  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings document a workshop on Demand-Side Management Incentive Regulation, which was held in Denver, Colorado on August 16--17, 1989. The workshop provided a forum for discussion of current DSM programs and trends and their implications; fundamentals and rationale for incentive mechanisms; short- and long-term issues from the utility perspective; and approaches for enhancing the attractiveness of DSM incentive mechanisms. Attendees at this workshop included DSM managers, planners, and analysts.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information Speaker(s): Sebastien Houde Date: September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Christopher Payne The goal of this talk is to discuss two interrelated research projects that aim to assess the welfare effects of energy policies that rely on standards and information. The first project focuses on the Energy Star certification program. Using unique micro-data on the US refrigerator market, I first show that consumers respond to certification in different ways. Some consumers appear to rely heavily on Energy Star and pay little attention to electricity costs, others are the reverse, and still others appear to be insensitive to both electricity costs and Energy Star. I then develop a

38

Is Demand-Side Management Economically Justified?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Is Demand-Side Management Economically Justified? With billions of dollars being spent on demand-side management programs in the U.S. every year, the rationale for and performance of these programs are coming under increasing scrutiny. Three projects in the Energy Analysis Program are making significant contributions to the DSM debate. *Total Resource Cost Test Ratio = ratio of utility avoided costs (i.e., benefits) divided by total cost of program (i.e., Administrative Cost + Incentive Cost + Consumer Cost) In May, Joe Eto, Ed Vine, Leslie Shown, Chris Payne, and I released the first in a series of reports we authored from the Database on Energy Efficiency Programs (DEEP) project. The objective of DEEP is to document the measured cost and performance of utility-sponsored energy-efficiency

39

Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proposes an HVAC control strategy based on occupancy prediction and real time occupancy monitoring via simulation model. We dis- cuss the building parameters and the HVAC control strate- gies used for the energyOccupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson University of California

Cerpa, Alberto E.

40

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two California Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities o #and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities

Olsen, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

minimization Monthly peak demand management Daily time-of-Some tariff designs have peak demand charges that apply tothat may result in a peak demand that occurs in one month to

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

System Demand-Side Management: Regional results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To improve the Bonneville Power Administration's (Bonneville's) ability to analyze the value and impacts of demand-side programs, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) developed and implemented the System Demand-Side Management (SDSM) model, a microcomputer-based model of the Pacific Northwest Public Power system. This document outlines the development and application of the SDSM model, which is an hourly model. Hourly analysis makes it possible to examine the change in marginal revenues and marginal costs that accrue from the movement of energy consumption from daytime to nighttime. It also allows a more insightful analysis of programs such as water heater control in the context of hydroelectric-based generation system. 7 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

Englin, J.E.; Sands, R.D.; De Steese, J.G.; Marsh, S.J.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two California Industrial Facilities Title Examining Synergies between Energy Management and...

44

Network-Driven Demand Side Management Website | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Side Management Website Jump to: navigation, search Name Network-Driven Demand Side Management Website Abstract This task of the International Energy Agency is a broad,...

45

Memorandum regarding Definition for Demand Side Management Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEMORANDUM TO: Mary Anne Sullivan FROM: Larry Oliver SUBJECT: Definition for Demand Side Management Services In consultation with the Director of the Federal Energy Management...

46

Optimal Demand Response with Energy Storage Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider the problem of optimal demand response and energy storage management for a power consuming entity. The entity's objective is to find an optimal control policy for deciding how much load to consume, how much power to purchase from/sell to the power grid, and how to use the finite capacity energy storage device and renewable energy, to minimize his average cost, being the disutility due to load- shedding and cost for purchasing power. Due to the coupling effect of the finite size energy storage, such problems are challenging and are typically tackled using dynamic programming, which is often complex in computation and requires substantial statistical information of the system dynamics. We instead develop a low-complexity algorithm called Demand Response with Energy Storage Management (DR-ESM). DR-ESM does not require any statistical knowledge of the system dynamics, including the renewable energy and the power prices. It only requires the entity to solve a small convex optimization pr...

Huang, Longbo; Ramchandran, Kannan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies andStrategies in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak electric demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial buildings contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. The main objectives of the study were: (1) To evaluate the size of contributions of peak demand commercial buildings in the U.S.; (2) To understand how commercial building control systems support energy efficiency and DR; and (3) To disseminate the results to the building owners, facility managers and building controls industry. In order to estimate the commercial buildings contribution to peak demand, two sources of data are used: (1) Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). These two sources indicate that commercial buildings noncoincidental peak demand is about 330GW. The project then focused on technologies and strategies that deliver energy efficiency and also target 5-10% of this peak. Based on a building operations perspective, a demand-side management framework with three main features: (1) daily energy efficiency, (2) daily peak load management and (3) dynamic, event-driven DR are outlined. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide DR potential in commercial buildings are presented. Case studies involving these technologies and strategies are described. The findings of this project are shared with building owners, building controls industry, researchers and government entities through a webcast and their input is requested. Their input is presented in the appendix section of this report.

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Towards a systematic characterization of the potential of demand side management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With an increasing share of electric energy produced from non-dispatchable renewable sources both energy storage and demand side management might gain tremendously in importance. While there has been significant progress in general properties and technologies of energy storage, the systematic characterization of features particular to demand side management such as its intermittent, time-dependent potential seems to be lagging behind. As a consequence, the development of efficient and sustainable strategies for demand side management and its integration into large-scale energy system models are impeded. This work introduces a novel framework for a systematic time-resolved characterization of the potential for demand side management. It is based on the specification of individual devices both with respect to their scheduled demand and their potential of load shifting. On larger scales sector-specific profiles can straightforwardly be taken into account. The potential for demand side management is then specifie...

Kleinhans, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Assessment of Commercial Building Automation and Energy Management Systems for Demand Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update is an overview of commercial building automation and energy management systems with a focus on their capabilities (current and future), especially in support of demand response (DR). The report includes background on commercial building automation and energy management systems; a discussion of demand response applications in commercial buildings, including building loads and control strategies; and a review of suppliers’ building automation and energy management systems to support d...

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

50

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Management of Power Demand through Operations of Building Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In hot summers, the demand for electrical power is dominated by the requirements of the air-conditioning and lighting systems. Such systems account for more than 80% of the peak electrical demand in Kuwait. A study was conducted to explore the potential for managing the peak electrical demand through improved operation strategies for building systems. Two buildings with partial occupancy patterns and typical peak loads of 1 and 2.2 MW were investigated. Changes to the operation of building systems included utilizing the thermal mass to reduce cooling production and distribution during the last hour of occupancy, time-of-day control of chillers and auxiliaries, and de-lamping. The implemented operational changes led to significant reductions in building loads during the hours of national peak demand. The achieved savings reached 31% during the critical hour, and up to 47% afterwards. Daily energy savings of 13% represented an added benefit. Additional operational changes could lead to further savings in peak power when implemented.

ElSherbini, A. I.; Maheshwari, G.; Al-Naqib, D.; Al-Mulla, A.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract— Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms— Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Braun (Purdue). 2004. Peak demand reduction from pre-coolingthe average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricityuse charges, demand ratchets, peak demand charges, and other

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Preface. The U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec-

55

Berkeley Lab Transportation and Parking Demand Management Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Demand Management Committee masthead Articles Fehrs & Peers Reports FAQ FeedbackComments Contact Us Transportation Links Current Parking Impacts Due To Construction...

56

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

Information Center

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages: State-of-the-Art Report, Volume 1, Main Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages: State-of-the-Art Report, Volume 1, Main Report Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.ieadsm.org/Files/Tasks/Task%20XVII%20-%20Integration%20of%20Demand Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/integration-demand-side-management-di Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Resource Integration Planning This task of the International Energy Agency's (IEA's) Demand-Side

58

Assessment of Residential Energy Management Systems for Demand Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a description of what a residential energy management system comprises, with a focus on demand response applications. It includes findings from a survey of residential energy management system technology vendors; system pricing and availability; an overview of technology components and features; customer load monitoring and control capabilities; utility demand response control functions; communications protocols and technologies supported; and options for demand response si...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

59

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand Power UsageSetpoint (°C) Peak Electric Demand Power Usage Effective-Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand Scenario

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Introduction to Commercial Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response -- Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are 3 appendices listed: (A) DR strategies for HVAC systems; (B) Summary of DR strategies; and (C) Case study of advanced demand response.

Motegi, N.; Piette, M.A.; Watson, D.S.; Kiliccote, S.; Xu, P.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Managing plug-loads for demand response within buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed and accurate energy accounting is an important first step in improving energy efficiency within buildings. Based on this information, building managers can perform active energy management, especially during demand response situations that require ... Keywords: energy management, energy metering, plug-loads management, wireless sensor network

Thomas Weng; Bharathan Balaji; Seemanta Dutta; Rajesh Gupta; Yuvraj Agarwal

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Transportation Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Website http://www.tdm-beijing.org/ Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country China Eastern Asia References Transport Management in Beijing[1] Program Overview The project aims to improve transport demand management (TDM) in Beijing in order to manage the steadily increasing traffic density. The project provides capacity building for decision-makers and transport planners in

63

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages: State-of-the-Art Report, Volume 2, Annexes Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages: State-of-the-Art Report, Volume 2, Annexes Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.ieadsm.org/Files/Tasks/Task%20XVII%20-%20Integration%20of%20Demand Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/integration-demand-side-management-di Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Resource Integration Planning This report provides Annexes 1 through 7, which are country reports from

64

NERSC Data Management Strategy and Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Management Policies NERSC Data Management Strategy and Policies Introduction NERSC provides its users with the means to store, manage, and share their research data products....

65

Cable Reliability Management Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous collaborative research with several utilities, EPRI developed methods for forecasting the failures and cash flows associated with managing a population of underground cable. This study builds on that research and provides a method for developing least-cost repair and replacement policies for such a population. The policies specify when to replace a cable section or an entire circuit, depending on the age of the section and the number of failures the section has experienced.

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

66

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and M.A. Piette, J. Braun “Peak Demand Reduction from Pre-to reduce Electrical Peak Demands in Commercial Buildings”Management (Daily) - TOU - Peak Demand Charges - Grid Peak -

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Workflow Management Strategies at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hadoop Hadoop Data Exploration Data Analysis and Mining Software/Hardware Strategies Workflow Management Data Management Policies Science Gateways User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Operations for: Passwords & Off-Hours Status 1-800-66-NERSC, option 1 or 510-486-6821 Account Support https://nim.nersc.gov accounts@nersc.gov 1-800-66-NERSC, option 2 or 510-486-8612 Consulting http://help.nersc.gov consult@nersc.gov 1-800-66-NERSC, option 3 or 510-486-8611 Home » For Users » Data Analytics & Visualization » Workflow Management Workflow Management collage.jpg Workflow management refers to the process of connecting various software tools based on specific input and output parameters. The goal of workflow management is to automate specific sets of tasks that are repeated many

68

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels. Data is included for energy savings, peakload reductions, and costs.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Water Utility Demand Management and the Financial, Social and Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Utility Demand Management and the Financial, Social and Environmental Water Utility Demand Management and the Financial, Social and Environmental Drivers Speaker(s): Allan J. Dietemann Date: February 19, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Camilla Whitehead At Seattle Public Utilities, Al Dietemann leads a team of 11 persons with a budget of $5 million a year implementing cost-effective resource conservation measures. In 2003, the Seattle area used less water than was used in 1950 on an annual basis. Seattle's demand management programs have been successful in holding total regional water use constant in our service area, despite an annual growth in population served. During this seminar he will speak to the following issues: 1) Water utility demand management and the financial, social and environmental drivers. 2)

70

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. - 1996 - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

Information Center

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Optimized HVAC Management Service to Enhance Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimized HVAC Management Service to Enhance Demand Response Speaker(s): John Steinberg Date: August 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page...

72

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric DemandDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Scenario Supply/ ReturnDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Role of home automation in demand-side management. Topical report, May 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report explores the role of home automation (HA) in utility demand-side management (DSM) programs, in order to demonstrate the potential usefulness of a combined HA/DSM strategy in meeting the changing needs of the gas industry and providing the industry with a timely and competitive edge in the coming decade. Research was conducted using primary and secondary sources, on-line databases, and documentary research. Factors leading to the development and implementation of demand-side management and home automation were analyzed in order to best define opportunities and interests for the gas industry.

Davis, K.W.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Identifying distributed generation and demand side management investment opportunities  

SciTech Connect

Electric utilities have historically satisfied customer demand by generating electricity centrally and distributing it through an extensive transmission and distribution network. The author examines targeted demand side management programs as an alternative to system capacity investments once capacity is exceeded. The paper presents an evaluation method to determine how much a utility can afford to pay for distributed resources. 17 refs., 2 figs, 1 tab.

Hoff, T.E. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Title Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Publication Type Conference Paper Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-2322E Year of Publication 2009 Authors McNeil, Michael A., and Maithili Iyer Date Published 06/2009 Keywords Air Conditioners, Appliance Efficiency, appliance energy efficiency, energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, india, Labels, MEPS, refrigerators, Standards and labeling URL https://isswprod.lbl.gov/library/view-docs/public/output/rpt77250.PDF Refereed Designation Unknown Attachment Size

76

Evolution of the Demand Side Management in the Smart Grid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evolution of the Demand Side Management in the Smart Grid Evolution of the Demand Side Management in the Smart Grid Speaker(s): Nathan Ota Date: October 20, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Janie Page Smart grid technology has rapidly evolved over the course of the last five years. From a demand side management perspective this includes consumer-owned Home Area Networks (HAN), network-centric HAN gateways, and a leveraging of a multitier smart grid for a variety of DSM applications. In particular, smart meters enable the consumer with electricity price information and near-real time energy usage data, but they also are the devices that consumers will most often interact. The success or failure of the in-home device is therefore critical to the larger Smart Grid success. Today, distinct DSM product categories are leading to a variety of new

77

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1996  

SciTech Connect

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it related to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1995  

SciTech Connect

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternative Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management``, presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

US electric utility demand-side management, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in US at the national, regional, and utility levels. Objective is provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions, and costs attributable to DSM.

NONE

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

80

Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Transportation Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Website http://www.tdm-beijing.org/ Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country China Eastern Asia References Transport Management in Beijing[1] Program Overview The project aims to improve transport demand management (TDM) in Beijing in order to manage the steadily increasing traffic density. The project provides capacity building for decision-makers and transport planners in Beijing to enable them to calculate baselines and assess reduction

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

An efficient load model for analyzing demand side management impacts  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of implementing Demand Side Management (DSM) in power systems is to change the utility's load shape--i.e. changes in the time pattern and magnitude of utility's load. Changing the load shape as a result of demand side activities could change the peak load, base load and/or energy demand. Those three variables have to be explicitly modeled into the load curve for properly representing the effects of demand side management. The impact of DSM will be manifested as higher or lower reliability levels. This paper presents an efficient technique to model the system load such that the impact of demand side management on the power system can be easily and accurately evaluated. The proposed technique to model the load duration curve will facilitate the representation of DSM impacts on loss-of-load probability, energy not served and energy consumption. This will provide an analytical method to study the impact of DSM on capacity requirements. So far iterative methods have been applied to study these impacts. The proposed analytical method results in a faster solution with higher accuracy. It takes only 18 seconds on an 80486 PC to solve each case study involving different peak and base loads, and energy use.

Rahman, S.; Rinaldy (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Strategies for reducing energy demand in the materials sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research answers a key question - can the materials sector reduce its energy demand by 50% by 2050? Five primary materials of steel, cement, aluminum, paper, and plastic, contribute to 50% or more of the final energy ...

Sahni, Sahil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Optimized HVAC Management Service to Enhance Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimized HVAC Management Service to Enhance Demand Response Optimized HVAC Management Service to Enhance Demand Response Speaker(s): John Steinberg Date: August 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Janie Page Many utilities are investing vast sums deploying smart meters to customers, some of whom remain stubbornly opposed to those deployments, in large part because they remain unmoved by the claimed benefits. EcoFactor has developed a thermostat management service that delivers (and quantifies) significant energy savings for consumers and a number of additional benefits to other players in the energy value chain. It does so without relying on consumers to modify behavior, study energy information displays, or even pay attention to their energy use. EcoFactor also significantly boosts DR yield while it increases occupant comfort. It can identify HVAC

84

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning: April 19-21, 2006Auto-DR Strategies and Commissioning One common questionConference on Building Commissioning: April 19-21, 2006

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Title Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2012 Authors Borgeson, Merrian Keywords demand side resources: policy, electricity markets, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, self direct programs, technical assistance Full Text LBNL recently provided technical assistance funded by DOE to the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio to inform their decision-making about changes to their existing self-direct program for commercial and industrial customers. Self-direct programs are usually targeted at large industrial customers with specialized needs or strong in-house energy engineering capacity. These programs are found in at least 24 states, and there is significant variety in how these programs are structured - with important implications for the additionality and reliability of the energy savings that result. LBNL reviewed existing programs and compared key elements of self-direct program design. For additional questions about this work, please contact Merrian Borgeson.

86

Superfund Manual : Legal and Management Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

publication, Superfund Manual offers no such mechanism fornevertheless recommend Superfund Manual to anyone needing anReview: Superfund Manual: Legal and Management Strategies By

Shimpock-Vieweg, Kathy

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loads. C P P is a new electricity tariff design to promotethe structures of electricity tariffs considering the timeand tariffs provide even greater incentives to consider sophisticated building operational and control strategies that reduce electricity

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Demand-Side Management (DSM) Opportunities as Real-Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand-Side Management (DSM) Opportunities as Real-Options Demand-Side Management (DSM) Opportunities as Real-Options Speaker(s): Osman Sezgen Date: August 1, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare As some end-users of energy and aggregators are choosing to be exposed to real-time prices and energy price volatility, they are coming across new DSM opportunities that would not be feasible under typical utility rate structures. Effective evaluation of such opportunities requires a good understanding of the wholesale energy markets and the use of models based on recent financial techniques for option pricing. The speaker will give examples of such modeling approaches based on his experience in the retail-energy industry. Specific examples will include evaluation of distributed generation, load curtailment, dual-fuel cooling, and energy

89

Principles and Practice of Demand-Side Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the demand-side management (DSM) process. It is a guide for the DSM practitioner through the different steps involved in the process, and it provides an introduction to the vast and growing literature on the subject. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders may download this report at http://my.primen.com/Applications/DE/Community/index.asp .

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in communications and control technology, the strengthening of the Internet, and the growing appreciation of the urgency to reduce demand side energy use are motivating the development of improvements in both energy efficiency and demand response (DR) systems. This paper provides a framework linking continuous energy management and continuous communications for automated demand response (Auto-DR) in various times scales. We provide a set of concepts for monitoring and controls linked to standards and procedures such as Open Automation Demand Response Communication Standards (Open Auto-DR or OpenADR). Basic building energy science and control issues in this approach begin with key building components, systems, end-uses and whole building energy performance metrics. The paper presents a framework about when energy is used, levels of services by energy using systems, granularity of control, and speed of telemetry. DR, when defined as a discrete event, requires a different set of building service levels than daily operations. We provide examples of lessons from DR case studies and links to energy efficiency.

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

91

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Weather-clustering based strategy design for dynamic demand response building HVAC control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy consumption and room temperature can be simulated using EnergyPlus model, given the building model, weather information, and HVAC control strategy. For a given weather forecast, however, online simulation-based optimization of the HVAC control ... Keywords: EnergyPlus, building HVAC control strategy, clustering, dynamic demand response

Rui Liao; Geng Li; Shun Miao; Yan Lu; Jianmin Zhu; Ling Shen

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Load management strategies for electric utilities: a production cost simulation  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with the development and application of a simulation model for analyzing strategies for managing the residential loads of electric utilities. The basic components of the model are (1) a production-cost model, which simulates daily operation of an electric power system; (2) a load model, which disaggregates system loads into appliance loads and other loads; and (3) a comparison model, which compares the production costs and energy consumption needed to meet a particular load profile to the corresponding costs and energy consumption required for another load profile. The profiles in each pair define alternative ways of meeting the same demand. A method for disaggregating load profiles into appliance components is discussed and several alternative strategies for residential load management for a typical northeastern electric utility are formulated. The method is based on an analysis of the composition of electric loads for a number of classes of residential customers in the model utility system. The effect of alternative load management strategies on the entire residential loadcurve is determined by predicting the effects of these strategies on the specific appliance components of the loadcurve. The results of using the model to analyze alternative strategies for residential load management suggest that load management strategies in the residential sector, if adopted by utilities whose operating and load characteristics are similar to those of the system modeled here, must take into account a wide variety of appliances to achieve significant changes in the total load profile. Moreover, the results also suggest that it is not easy to reduce costs significantly through new strategies for managing residential loads only and that, to be worthwhile, cost-reducing strategies will have to encompass many kinds of appliances.

Blair, P.D.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Comfort-aware home energy management under market-based demand-response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To regulate energy consumption and enable Demand-Response programs, effective demand-side management at home is key and an integral part of the future Smart Grid. In essence, the home energy management is a mix between discrete appliance scheduling problem ... Keywords: demand-response, energy management, smart grid

Jin Xiao, Jian Li, Raouf Boutaba, James Won-Ki Hong

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Head & base production optimization : inventory management strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new inventory management strategy was developed for Schlumberger to reduce waste in material handling and improve the warehouse receiving efficiency. The current warehouse receiving situation was analyzed; then the ...

Guo, Yuming, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframes—incentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales —making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

None

2012-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

97

A Demand-Side Management Experience in Existing Building Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of a suite of demand-side management (DSM) program offerings, Xcel Energy provides a recommissioning program to its Colorado commercial customers. The program has a summer peak-demand savings goal of 7.8 MW to be achieved by 2005. Commenced in 2002 as a pilot, the program offers no-cost recommissioning services and incentives to participants to buy-down implementation costs to achieve a one-year simple payback. To date, four projects are complete and twenty-three more are underway. It is anticipated that approximately 65 projects will be completed through the program by 2005. This paper describes the basic program design and implementation process. The choices made in response to market barriers and program constraints are highlighted. In addition, the paper details the marketing efforts, the competitive bidding process, the standardized program elements, measurement and verification activities, and project savings to date. For each program aspect, program successes, uncertainties, and lessons learned are presented.

Franconi, E.; Selch, M.; Bradford, J.; Gruen, B.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Price-responsive demand management for a smart grid world  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Price-responsive demand is essential for the success of a smart grid. However, existing demand-response programs run the risk of causing inefficient price formation. This problem can be solved if each retail customer could establish a contract-based baseline through demand subscription before joining a demand-response program. (author)

Chao, Hung-po

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Heat Management Strategy Trade Study  

SciTech Connect

This Heat Management Trade Study was performed in 2008-2009 to expand on prior studies in continued efforts to analyze and evaluate options for cost-effectively managing SNF reprocessing wastes. The primary objective was to develop a simplified cost/benefit evaluation for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) reprocessing that combines the characteristics of the waste generated through reprocessing with the impacts of the waste on heating the repository. Under consideration were age of the SNF prior to reprocessing, plutonium and minor actinide (MA) separation from the spent fuel for recycle, fuel value of the recycled Pu and MA, age of the remaining spent fuel waste prior to emplacement in the repository, length of time that active ventilation is employed in the repository, and elemental concentration and heat limits for acceptable glass waste form durability. A secondary objective was to identify and qualitatively analyze remaining issues such as (a) impacts of aging SNF prior to reprocessing on the fuel value of the recovered fissile materials, and (b) impact of reprocessing on the dose risk as developed in the Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). Results of this study can be used to evaluate different options for managing decay heat in waste streams from spent nuclear fuel.

Nick Soelberg; Steve Priebe; Dirk Gombert; Ted Bauer

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Guidebook for Farmstead Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design  

SciTech Connect

The acceptance and growth of Demand-Side Management (DSM) continues to increase in the US. According to latest estimates, total expenditures on electric utility DSM programs now exceed $1.2 billion annually, with these investments ranging from 1 to 5 percent of a utility's gross revenues. In addition, due to increasing environmental concerns and the high cost of new capacity, these expenditure levels are expected to increase. While the vast majority of these DSM programs are directed at the more traditional residential, commercial and industrial market sectors, significant opportunities still exist. One market segment that has not been the focus of attention but a critical sector from an economic development perspective for marry utilities -- is the agricultural and farmstead market. Although the total number of farms in the United States decreased by approximately 5 percent between 1985 and 1989, the land dedicated to farming still accounts for over 995 million acres. Furthermore, the total value of farm output in the United States has been steadily increasing since 1986. The limited penetration of energy efficiency measures in farmsteads provides an excellent opportunity for utilities to expand their DSM programming efforts to capture this non-traditional'' market segment, and at the same time assist farms in increasing their efficiency and competitiveness. In marry states, and, in particular New York State, agriculture plays a major economic role. The importance of farms not only from a utility perspective but also from a state and federal perspective cannot be overstated. As such, utilities are in a unique position to facilitate farmstead DSM technology investments in an effort to benefit the farmer (and his profitability), the utility, the state and the country. This guidebook is designed to provide the framework for agricultural demand planning, including market assessment, technology assessment, market penetration analysis and program design.

Rose, M.; Camera, R.K.

1992-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DSM (demand-side management) commercial customer acceptance: Volume 2, Survey and database documentation: Final report. [Demand-side management  

SciTech Connect

A survey was conducted among utility DSM (demand-side management) program managers to gather information on the characteristics of commercial sector programs. The survey data were used in part to identify the important factors that influence customer participation in such programs. Information was gathered in the following general areas of interest: (1) program characteristics (e.g., program type, objectives, status, etc.); (2) marketing characteristics (e.g., promotional mechanisms, budget, goals, etc.); (3) customer eligibility and participation (e.g., characteristics of the eligible population, participation by customer category, etc.); and (4) market research information (e.g., the data that pertain to the effectiveness of the progress). The survey obtained information on 108 DSM programs covering a broad range of options, including audits, non-audit information, financial incentive, direct load control, distributed local control, thermal energy storage, time-of-use rates, and other rate programs. Program planners can use the survey database, presented in its entirety in this report, to identify utilities that have already implemented DSM programs of interest and to learn from their experience.

George, S.S.; Kirksey, W.E.; Skelton, J.C.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Workforce management strategies in a disaster scenario.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of the repair operations of the voice telecommunications network is used to study labor management strategies under a disaster scenario where the workforce is overwhelmed. The model incorporates overtime and fatigue functions and optimizes the deployment of the workforce based on the cost of the recovery and the time it takes to recover. The analysis shows that the current practices employed in workforce management in a disaster scenario are not optimal and more strategic deployment of that workforce is beneficial.

Kelic, Andjelka; Turk, Adam L.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Demand management : a cross-industry analysis of supply-demand planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globalization increases product variety and shortens product life cycles. These lead to an increase in demand uncertainty and variability. Outsourcing to low-cost countries increases supply lead-time and supply uncertainty ...

Tan, Peng Kuan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report: DSM opportunity report  

SciTech Connect

The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. 10 figs., 55 tabs.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

1995 Demand-Side Managment - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. Target Audience ... Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side

106

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Strategies for Fleet Managers to Conserve  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Strategies for Fleet Strategies for Fleet Managers to Conserve Fuel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Strategies for Fleet Managers to Conserve Fuel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Strategies for Fleet Managers to Conserve Fuel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Strategies for Fleet Managers to Conserve Fuel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Strategies for Fleet Managers to Conserve Fuel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Strategies for Fleet Managers to Conserve Fuel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Strategies for Fleet Managers to Conserve Fuel on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Management Strategies

107

Fuzzy financial profitability analyses of demand side management alternatives from participant perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper derives fuzzy profitability models for the financial evaluation of different demand side management (DSM) alternatives. The present value of cost (PVC) and equivalent uniform annual cost (EUAC) models are selected to determine the least-cost ... Keywords: Mellin transform, cogeneration, cooling energy storage, demand side management, fuzzy mathematics, fuzzy ranking, profitability analyses

J. N. Sheen

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Market-based airport demand management : theory, model and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ever-increasing demand for access to the world's major commercial airports combined with capacity constraints at many of these airports have led to increasing air traffic congestion. In particular, the scarcity of ...

Fan, Terence P

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level...

110

Energy Management Strategies for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarizes and compares potential energy management strategies for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, accounting for duty cycle distance.

Gonder, J.; Markel, T.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies January 16, 2011 Maryanne Fuller (MF): Hi there. This is Maryanne Fuller from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Thank you for joining this call on the marketing and driving demand collaborative. The call today is on social media. I think everyone's phone should be unmuted through this system. Is that right? No? -Can you hear me? MF: Yep, great. So everyone's phone is unmuted. But if you can please mute your own personal phone just so we don't have any background noise. But this will allow you to speak up whenever you want to so feel free to ask questions, add your two cents, et cetera as we go through the call. So, here's the agenda for today. We're going to just briefly remind you of what the collaborative is all about. We have

112

Kitchen Table Strategy: Home Inspectors Driving Demand for Home Energy Upgrades  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20/2012 20/2012 1 Benjamin Gromicko, InterNACHI "Kitchen Table" Strategy: Home Inspectors Driving Demand for Home Energy Upgrades 3/20/2012 2 Benjamin Gromicko, InterNACHI "Although the home performance industry's delivery of comprehensive energy and comfort improvements has been growing across the country, it continues to struggle in creating consumer attention and demand. Our industry's delivery timing is off. We are not yet engaging the homeowner at their sweet spot of making improvements -- right after they purchase a home! This is when they move most aggressively with all sorts of home improvement projects -- and, unfortunately, seldom with any concerns of energy use. I strongly believe the home inspection industry is in a prime position to educate new homeowners on the long-term

113

Intelligent Building Automation: A Demand Response Management Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years intelligent Building Automation Systems, based on best practice open technology, have succeeded in helping facilities reduce their infrastructure, installation and operating costs. The idea was - 'the less the human intervention and the more automated the system then the more efficient the building'. With that in mind a question may arise as to whether this philosophy has been successful in educating the consumer on the importance of energy efficiency or has it actually alienated him? Would it be more effective if the consumer were to be part of the efficiency process? What about if the energy savings could be passed on to the consumer directly depending on how efficient he was? Demand response is a mechanism by which consumers change the energy consumption in response to energy price fluctuations, demand charges, or a direct request to reduce demand when the power grid reaches critical levels. However, in order for a demand response regime to be effective the building will need to have a number of 'pre-requisites' in place.

Qazi, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A Multi-Resolution Large Population Game Framework for Smart Grid Demand Response Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Multi-Resolution Large Population Game Framework for Smart Grid Demand Response Management part of power system and market opera- tional practice. Motivated by the smart grid DR management) equation. Finally, we apply the framework to the smart grid DR management problem and illustrate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

115

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy. “Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity MarketsEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response?7 3.1.Demand Response in Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”.also provided through the Demand Response Research Center (of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contribution to Peak Demand?..5 3.potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildingsbuildings’ contribution to peak demand and the use of energy

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Grid operators' newest nightmare: managing low-demand periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As more renewable energy resources are added in many parts of the world, a new and even more daunting challenge is likely to face grid operators in the future - how to get through the minimum demand periods. This is especially a problem in systems where the difference between the daytime peak, usually in the early to late summer afternoons, and minimum load, usually in the late evening and early morning hours, is significant.

NONE

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

120

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Control and Optimization Meet the Smart Power Grid - Scheduling of Power Demands for Optimal Energy Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The smart power grid aims at harnessing information and communication technologies to enhance reliability and enforce sensible use of energy. Its realization is geared by the fundamental goal of effective management of demand load. In this work, we envision a scenario with real-time communication between the operator and consumers. The grid operator controller receives requests for power demands from consumers, with different power requirement, duration, and a deadline by which it is to be completed. The objective is to devise a power demand task scheduling policy that minimizes the grid operational cost over a time horizon. The operational cost is a convex function of instantaneous power consumption and reflects the fact that each additional unit of power needed to serve demands is more expensive as demand load increases.First, we study the off-line demand scheduling problem, where parameters are fixed and known. Next, we devise a stochastic model for the case when demands are generated continually and sched...

Koutsopoulos, Iordanis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Demand Side Management for Wind Power Integration in Microgrid Using Dynamic Potential Game Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Side Management for Wind Power Integration in Microgrid Using Dynamic Potential Game Theory the intermittency in wind power generation. Our focus is on an isolated microgrid with one wind turbine, one fast supply and demand in an isolated microgrid [2], which is an important concept for renewable energy

Huang, Jianwei

123

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

though day-ahead hourly real- time prices can be continuous,or 15-minute ahead real time price. A facility manager hasyr (though hour-ahead real-time prices can be continuous,

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Managing Water Resource Requirements for Growing Electric Generation Demands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a general guide to analytical techniques used to address water resource management as related to long-term sustainability planning, and short-term regulatory requirements, including total maximum daily loads, endangered species, and relicensing of hydropower facilities. The example applications presented in the report highlight the capability of the techniques, and help electric power company and government regulatory staffs identify the best approach for a specific need.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

125

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 Table 4. Average and Maximum Demand Savings Results fromall the test days and maximum demand savings for the best4. Table 4. Average and Maximum Demand Savings Results from

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

EIS-0269: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

69: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee EIS-0269:...

127

2012 SG Peer Review - Recovery Act: Enhanced Demand and Distribution Management Regional Demonstration - Craig Miller, NRECA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhanced Distribution and Demand Management Enhanced Distribution and Demand Management Regional Demonstration Craig Miller Cooperative Research Network National Rural Electric Cooperative Association 8 June 2012 December 2008 Project Title Objective Life-cycle Funding ($K) $68 million with match Hardware: $43 million Research: $11.6 Co-op Labor: $13.4 Technical Scope * 23 Co-ops, Distributed Nationally * 275,000 components deployed * Meters & DR * Distribution Automation * Infrastructure * In home displays and web portals * Demand response over AMI * Prepaid metering * Interactive thermal storage * Electrical storage (20x10kWh, 1MWh 0.5MWh) * Renewable energy * Smart feeder switching * Conservation voltage reduction * Advanced metering infrastructure * Meter data management * Communications infrastructure * SCADA To advance the deployment of the smart grid

128

Demand-side management programs change along with the electric utility industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

They heyday of demand-side management may be over as far as utilities are concerned. The future path of utility demand-side management programs is obscured in a haze of important questions, especially questions regarding potential legislation and retail wheeling. Until recently, utility after utility was announcing new DSM programs, seemingly almost daily. But, as pointed out in our November issue by Robert Smock, Electric Light & Power`s editorial director, {open_quotes}Survivors of ruthless competition will not be doing much to reduce electricity sales. They`ll be doing their best to sell more of their product.

Stein, H. [ed.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fourth international symposium on distribution automation and demand side management (DA/DSM 94)  

SciTech Connect

This document is the conference proceedings from the 1994 Distribution Automation/Demand Side Management meeting in Orlando, Florida. There are 87 papers presented, and topics include: (1) improved feeder efficiency, (2) automation of older substations, (3) modeling tools for distribution, planning, and operations, (4) sensing and fault detection, (5) outage monitoring, (6) cost and benefits of distribution automation, (7) communications, (8) optimization of feeder systems operations, (9) information technology, (10) demand-side management applications in the industrial, commercial, and residential sectors, (11) pricing and regulation, and (12) applications to the natural gas industry.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Driving change : evaluating strategies to control automotive energy demand growth in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the number of vehicles in China has relentlessly grown in the past decade, the energy demand, fuel demand and greenhouse gas emissions associated with these vehicles have kept pace. This thesis presents a model to project ...

Bonde Åkerlind, Ingrid Gudrun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Peak Demands in Commercial Buildings” Center for Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET), IEA/OECD Analyses

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Structuring energy supply and demand networks in a general equilibrium model to simulate global warming control strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global warming control strategies which mandate stringent caps on emissions of greenhouse forcing gases can substantially alter a country's demand, production, and imports of energy products. Although there is a large degree of uncertainty when attempting to estimate the potential impact of these strategies, insights into the problem can be acquired through computer model simulations. This paper presents one method of structuring a general equilibrium model, the ENergy and Power Evaluation Program/Global Climate Change (ENPEP/GCC), to simulate changes in a country's energy supply and demand balance in response to global warming control strategies. The equilibrium model presented in this study is based on the principle of decomposition, whereby a large complex problem is divided into a number of smaller submodules. Submodules simulate energy activities and conversion processes such as electricity production. These submodules are linked together to form an energy supply and demand network. Linkages identify energy and fuel flows among various activities. Since global warming control strategies can have wide reaching effects, a complex network was constructed. The network represents all energy production, conversion, transportation, distribution, and utilization activities. The structure of the network depicts interdependencies within and across economic sectors and was constructed such that energy prices and demand responses can be simulated. Global warming control alternatives represented in the network include: (1) conservation measures through increased efficiency; and (2) substitution of fuels that have high greenhouse gas emission rates with fuels that have lower emission rates. 6 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Hamilton, S.; Veselka, T.D.; Cirillo, R.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Simple models of district heating systems for load and demand side management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simple models of district heating systems for load and demand side management and operational Energiforskningsprogrammet EFP ENS J.nr. 1373/01-0041 December 2004 #12;Simple models of district heating systems for load 87-7475-323-1 #12;Preface The research project "Simple models of district heating systems for load

134

Proceedings: 5th National Demand-Side Management Conference, Building on Experience: Building on Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mutual benefits are driving the growth of demand-side management (DSM): customers profit from efficiency improvements and enhanced service, utilities make better use of existing resources, and society gains from positive environmental impacts. These conference papers present results of DSM programs throughout the country and offer discussions on emerging issues.

None

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group Maximizes Revenue Through Improved Demand Management and Price Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under changing market conditions for the hospitality industry, the Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group CRHG collaborated with JDA Software Group to use operations research to drive higher revenue for its hoteliers and to stay ahead of the competition. This highly ... Keywords: competitor prices, demand forecasting, hospitality, hotel, price elasticity, price optimization, revenue management

Pelin Pekgün; Ronald P. Menich; Suresh Acharya; Phillip G. Finch; Frederic Deschamps; Kathleen Mallery; Jim Van Sistine; Kyle Christianson; James Fuller

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Constrained tâtonnement for fast and incentive compatible distributed demand management in smart grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growing fuel costs, environmental awareness, government directives, an aggressive push to deploy Electric Vehicles (EVs) (a single EV consumes the equivalent of 3 to 10 homes) have led to a severe strain on a grid already on the brink. Maintaining the ... Keywords: demand management, distributed algorithms, electric vehicle, smart distributed system

Shweta Jain, Narayanaswamy Balakrishnan, Yadati Narahari, Saiful A. Hussain, Nyuk Yoong Voo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Comfort-Aware Home Energy Management Under Market-Based Demand-Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pricing and consumption data in South Korea. Index Terms--smart grid, demand-response, energy management I-based pricing. In peak capping, each home is allocated an energy quota. In market-based pricing, the price-term viable way of regulating energy consumptions. We work with day-ahead market pricing in this paper

Boutaba, Raouf

138

BRENNAN --DSM UNDER COMPETITION: 1 Demand-Side Management Programs Under Retail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BRENNAN -- DSM UNDER COMPETITION: 1 Demand-Side Management Programs Under Retail Electricity · An automotive analogy Not marketing of fuel-efficient cars Not exactly CAFE standards or EPA mileage stickers More like getting a check from oil companies if one buys a high mileage car · Conservation

California at Berkeley. University of

139

Agent-based control for decentralised demand side management in the smart grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central to the vision of the smart grid is the deployment of smart meters that will allow autonomous software agents, representing the consumers, to optimise their use of devices and heating in the smart home while interacting with the grid. However, ... Keywords: agent-based control, agents, demand-side management electricity, energy, multi-agent systems

Sarvapali D. Ramchurn; Perukrishnen Vytelingum; Alex Rogers; Nick Jennings

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Advanced Demand Side Management for the Future Smart Grid Using Mechanism Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Advanced Demand Side Management for the Future Smart Grid Using Mechanism Design Pedram Samadi.S. Wong, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--In the future smart grid, both users and power companies can meter. All smart meters are connected to not only the power grid but also a communication infrastructure

Wong, Vincent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Industrial Energy Efficiency as a Risk Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry utilizes risk management as a tool in efforts to maximize the bottom line. Industry embraced risk management strategies in the 1960s and since then it has become a key component of a comprehensive business strategy. Peter Fusaro, author of Energy Risk Management explains, “The risk management process reduces financial exposure associated with price volatility by substituting a transaction made now for one that would be made at a later date.” Risk management aids companies in minimizing operational surprises or losses. In recent decades, energy has become a greater risk to profitability due to the volatility that exists in the oil and natural gas markets. Therefore, companies now consider energy as an element of their risk management portfolio. Traditional strategies to combat against unwanted exposure in this market include hedging and long term and futures contracts. However, the following explores the topic of considering energy efficiency as a risk management tool in reducing exposure to the volatility of the energy market.

Naumoff, C.; Shipley, A. M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

DSM strikes again. [Demand-side management of gas and electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses and explains demand-side management (DSM) of the gas and electric utility companies. It contrasts the advantages that electric utilities offering economic incentives (with any cost passed on to rate payers) to increase demand while such offerings are rarely available from the gas utilities. It then discusses the cause and cost of pollution from conventional electrical facilities compared to gas-operated equipment and facilities. The paper goes on to discuss fuel switching and other incentives to get individuals and facilities to switch to natural gas.

Katz, M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand shifting are thermal energy storage systems, whichlockout, pre-cooling, thermal energy storage, cooling loadlockout • Pre-cooling • Thermal energy storage • Cooling

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Office of Legacy Management Real Property Reuse Strategy, August 2009 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Real Property Reuse Strategy, August Real Property Reuse Strategy, August 2009 Office of Legacy Management Real Property Reuse Strategy, August 2009 LM is committed to the environmentally sound disposition, and the beneficial reuse, of property. LM is currently conducting real property reuse activities at LM sites throughout the country. This strategy document addresses LM's property disposition and real property reuse priorities for the next several years. Office of Legacy Management Real Property Reuse Strategy, August 2009 More Documents & Publications Quarterly EMS Performance FY 2013 Second Quarter Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance

145

Industrial-Load-Shaping: The Practice of and Prospects for Utility/Industry Cooperation to Manage Peak Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Load-management programs designed to reduce demand for electricity during peak periods are becoming increasingly important to electric utilities. For a growing number of utilities, however, such peak-reduction programs don't go far enough in the face of new problems and challenges, and hence are proving ineffective or counterproductive. For example, many of a utility's largest customers--especially industrial customers who may be "locked into" seemingly inflexible process activities--have limited ability to respond to load-management programs that employ price signals as a central peak-reduction tool. Moreover, utilities in general are finding that vigorous efforts to reduce electric load can result in underutilization of base-load generating facilities. In these and other instances, "load-shaping," which emphasizes a shift of electric load or demand from peak to off-peak periods and provides for greater customer flexibility, may be a more effective strategy. This paper explains the need for and presents the components of a load-shaping program, and describes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PGandE) recent experience in designing and pursuing an industrial-load-shaping program. The paper also outlines important obstacles and opportunities likely to confront other utilities and industrial customers interested in working together to develop such programs.

Bules, D. J.; Rubin, D. E.; Maniates, M. F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Management Strategies for Community Acquired Pneumonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past decade has witnessed dramatic changes in the etiology, diagnosis, and management of community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Due to the wide variation in practice patterns, physicians and professional societies have taken the lead in developing practice ... Keywords: community acquired pneumonia, guidelines, history, management, protocol, treatment

Memoona Hasnain; Edward J. Clark

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Dynamic Programming Applied to Investigate Energy Management Strategies for a Plug-in HEV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper explores two basic plug-in hybrid electric vehicle energy management strategies: an electric vehicle centric control strategy and an engine-motor blended control strategy.

O'Keefe. M. P.; Markel, T.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Lessons learned from new construction utility demand side management programs and their implications for implementing building energy codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) through its Building Energy Standards Program (BESP). The purpose of this task was to identify demand-side management (DSM) strategies for new construction that utilities have adopted or developed to promote energy-efficient design and construction. PNL conducted a survey of utilities and used the information gathered to extrapolate lessons learned and to identify evolving trends in utility new-construction DSM programs. The ultimate goal of the task is to identify opportunities where states might work collaboratively with utilities to promote the adoption, implementation, and enforcement of energy-efficient building energy codes.

Wise, B.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Danko, S.L.; Gilbride, T.L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Banking channel management : global trends and strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banking channel management has become a crucial component in the drive for improved efficiency. Since the channel is the interlocutor between customers and products, banks are leveraging their knowledge of channels to ...

Catalan, Renato Teixeira

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning In situ decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a contaminated facility. At present, ISD is not recognized or addressed in the Department of Energy (DOE) and Office of Environmental Management (EM) lexicon; however, ISD is not a revolutionary concept. Since the 1970s, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has recognized the option of entombing a facility as a decommissioning option. Permanent entombment of a radioactively contaminated facility as a decommissioning option has been completed for one facility at the Idaho National Laboratory and is currently planned at a limited number of selected DOE facilities. The

151

The demand-side management program development process: A utility perspective  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an aspect of DSM that has received little attention, namely, how utilities develop DSM programs. The selection of utilities to study purposely was biased in favor of those with reputations for being experienced DSM program developers so as to optimize the chances to obtain detailed information. The DSM planning process is affected by organizational factors and external influences: (1) the location of the demand-side planning department within the utility; (2) the demand-side planning group`s functional responsibilities; (3) upper management participation in the DSM program development process; and (4) the organizational relationship between (or, separation of) supply-side and demand-side planning. Organizational factors reflect utilities` views of DSM programs and thus can affect the adoption of a technology- or customer-oriented approach. Despite repeated claims of the uniqueness of the demand- side planning process and its resistance to standardization, two general approaches to program development were discerned, namely technology- or customer-orientation. Although utilities consider customer related and technological factors in their DSM program development process, utilities can be differentiated by their emphasis on one or the other approach. 25 refs.

Wolfe, A.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yourstone, N.E. [Yourstone (Evelin), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The demand-side management program development process: A utility perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an aspect of DSM that has received little attention, namely, how utilities develop DSM programs. The selection of utilities to study purposely was biased in favor of those with reputations for being experienced DSM program developers so as to optimize the chances to obtain detailed information. The DSM planning process is affected by organizational factors and external influences: (1) the location of the demand-side planning department within the utility; (2) the demand-side planning group's functional responsibilities; (3) upper management participation in the DSM program development process; and (4) the organizational relationship between (or, separation of) supply-side and demand-side planning. Organizational factors reflect utilities' views of DSM programs and thus can affect the adoption of a technology- or customer-oriented approach. Despite repeated claims of the uniqueness of the demand- side planning process and its resistance to standardization, two general approaches to program development were discerned, namely technology- or customer-orientation. Although utilities consider customer related and technological factors in their DSM program development process, utilities can be differentiated by their emphasis on one or the other approach. 25 refs.

Wolfe, A.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Yourstone, N.E. (Yourstone (Evelin), Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Demand-side carbon reduction strategies in an era of electric industry competition  

SciTech Connect

With the national debate on the need for intensified research and development, supply-side mandates, and carbon taxes likely to continue for some time, the authors propose a five-point, integrated demand-side plan that is compatible with marketplace forces and can be implemented now. This paper presents a five-point, integrated demand-side plan designed to be compatible with marketplace forces in the competitive electricity era, while the nation continues to debate the need for intensified research and development, supply-side mandates, and carbon taxes.

Meyers, E.M.; Hu, G.M. [District of Columbia Public Service Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Abstract--Smart Grid technology appears necessary to succeed in activating the demand through demand side management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Abstract--Smart Grid technology appears necessary to succeed in activating the demand through recommendations regarding the instruments that should be implemented to maximize the benefits of smart grids by the European Union. The development of smart grids (SG) is a possible solution for achieving these goals [1

155

Game Theoretic Approach for Elastic and Inelastic Demand Management in Microgrid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart grid, which consists of many small microgrids, leads to a more stable and secure grid. In this paper, we proposed a game theoretic approach using a novel combinational pricing signal for the demand side management in a microgrid. We classified the appliance in a smart grid into appliance with elastic energy demand and appliance with inelastic appliance. We use game-theoretic approach to analyze the interaction between the microgrid operator and end users as well as among end users themself. We formulate the problem as a single leader, multiple followers Stackelberg game. An unique Stackelberg-Nash equilibrium is derived under two-fold pricing at first and then extended to case of uniform pricing scheme. 1

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NRC's NRC's Integrated Strategy for NRC s Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management Earl Easton 1 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission May 25, 2010 Road to Yucca Mountain * 20+ years of preparation for the licensing i review * DOE application received in June 2008 and accepted for review in September 2008 * President Obama pursues alternatives to Yucca Mountain * DOE motion to withdraw in March 2010 2 * DOE motion to withdraw in March 2010 * Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future 2 Growing Spent Fuel Inventory Cumulative Used Nuclear Fuel Scenarios 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 Metric Tons 3 - 50,000 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 2050 Year Reference: Crozat, March 2010 Integrated Strategy * In response to the evolving national debate on spent fuel management strategy, NRC initiated a number of actions:

157

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is an effective decommissioning practice offering a safe and environmentally-favorable alternative to completely demolishing a facility and transporting its debris elsewhere for disposal. Regulatory approval to decommission a facility through ISD is authorized primarily by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, Federal Facility Agreements and local stakeholder agreements have a direct influence on ISD approval and oversight. The ISD approach limits radiation exposure and industrial hazards to workers to a greater extent than larger scale cleanout and demolition.

158

A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies  

SciTech Connect

Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

Kastenberg, W.E. [ed.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering] [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Xcel Energy implements an alarm management strategy  

SciTech Connect

Not so long ago, Xcel Energy's Pawnee Station, a 505 MW coal-fired generating station in Brush, Colorado, USA was commonly generating 300 to 400 alarms per 8-hour shift. The article describes how the alarm system was revised and improved by tackling alarm dead-bands, and rationalising alarms for routine events. Operators are trained to understand the functions of alarm management components, their use and response, and obtain feedback. Today the power station reports about one alarm per hour. 3 photos.

Bass, J.; Abreu, G. [Xcel Energy (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Selection of a management strategy for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A consequence of the uranium enrichment process used in the United States (US) is the accumulation of a significant amount of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Currently, approximately 560,000 metric tons of the material are stored at three different sites. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently initiated a program to consider alternative strategies for the cost-effective and environmentally safe long-term management of this inventory of depleted UF{sub 6}. The program involves a technology and engineering assessment of proposed management options (use/reuse, conversion, storage, or disposal) and an analysis of the potential environmental impacts and life-cycle costs of alternative management strategies. The information obtained from the studies will be used by the DOE to select a preferred long-term management strategy. The selection and implementation of a management strategy will involve consideration of a number of important issues such as environmental, health, and safety effects; the balancing of risks versus costs in a context of reduced government spending; socioeconomic implications, including effects on the domestic and international uranium industry; the technical status of proposed uses or technologies; and public involvement in the decision making process. Because of its provisions for considering a wide range of relevant issues and involving the public, this program has become a model for future DOE materials disposition programs. This paper presents an overview of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. Technical findings of the program to date are presented, and major issues involved in selecting and implementing a management strategy are discussed.

Patton, S.E.; Hanrahan, E.J.; Bradley, C.E.

1995-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Demand-side-management: DSM must create a future as a profit center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As utilities prepare for more direct competition, demand-side management (DSM) must also become competitive to survive. DSM has traditionally been a loss leader for utilities - good public relations but expensive. In the coming years, DSM must turn that around and become a source of revenue to continue to flourish. DSm must become a profit center, contributing not only to a positive public image for the utility and appeasing government mandates, but assisting in keeping the utility on the black side of the ledger books. This article examines Central Vermont Public Service`s SmartEnergy subsidiary and it`s GreenPlugs program.

Chambers, A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

163

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

164

Program Strategies and Results for California’s Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Energy Partners provides a review of California’s strategic approach to energy efficiency and demand response implementation, with a focus on the industrial sector. The official role of the state, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), is presented along with special efforts being made in support of industrial end users. The interrelationship between the CEC and the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) with regard to advancing demand side programs is highlighted. The specific cost recovery mechanisms put in place by the CPUC is discussed, including California’s experience with revenue decoupling, public purpose funds, and avoided cost calculations. Next, the role as energy efficiency (EE) and demand response (DR) program implementer played by each of the state Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs) is outlined. Each utility is responsible for serving major end use market segments with target programs designed to provide unique value. Within the industrial sector, there is special attention paid to the needs of the various sub-markets such as oil refining, agriculture, food processing, water and wastewater, manufacturing, and others. A review is presented of how EE and DR measures are selected, how incentive values are determined, which customers are eligible for programs, and how programs are evaluated to gage effectiveness. Lastly, mechanisms used by the IOU’s to deliver industrial EE and DR incentive programs are discussed. This includes a review of “core” programs administered by the utilities as well as subcontracted programs administered by “third party” implementers and “local government partners”. Global Energy Partners will offer specific examples of program experience in the oil & gas, agriculture, and food processing sectors, and will also highlight program success within the emerging “automated” demand response market.

Ehrhard, R.; Hamilton, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Sustainable Campus Transportation through Transit Partnership and Transportation Demand Management: A Case Study from the University of Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. 2005. The impacts of transportation demand management andUnlimited access. Transportation 28 (3): 233–267. Cervero,transit. Journal of Public Transportation 3 (4):10–19. ???.

Bond, Alex; Steiner, Ruth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Demand Side Management in the Smart Grid: Information Processing for the Power Switch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we discuss the most recent developments in the area of load management, and consider possible interaction schemes of novel architectures with distributed energy resources (DER). In order to handle the challenges faced by tomorrow’s smart grid, which are caused by volatile load and generation profiles (from the large number of plug-in EVs and from renewable integration), the conventional grid operating principle of load-following needs to be changed into load-shaping or generation-following. Demand Side Management will be a most promising and powerful solution to the above challenges. However, many other issues such as load forecasting, pricing structure, market policy, renewable integration interface, and even the AC/DC implementation at the distribution side, need to be taken into the design in order to search for the most effective and applicable solution.

Alizadeh, Mahnoosh; LI, Xiao; Wang, Zhifang; Scagilone, Anna; Melton, Ronald B.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Building user commitment to implementing a knowledge management strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the IS literature, commitment is typically considered to involve organizational or managerial support for a system and not that of its users. This paper however reports on a field study involving 16 organizations that attempted to build user involvement ... Keywords: Communities of implementation, Group workshops, Knowledge management strategy, Problem structuring methods, User commitment

Duncan Shaw; John S. Edwards

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Demand Management Demonstration Project, Stage 5: development of industrial load simulation model. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to design, develop, test and document a computer simulation model of electric utility generating costs required to meet industrial power demands and the effects of utility load management on these generating costs. The results showed that the model developed is a well conceived load management testing, marginal costing tool. What if situations can be readily tested to determine their impact on system profile and short run marginal costs. The terms unshaped and shaped refer to customers or system use patterns before and after some load management technique was tested. The total flexibility of the model is only apparent after the user has studied test runs in detail. Hourly marginal costs reveal many unexpected changes as a result of shaping loads. Other unexpected changes due to varying economic dispatch schedules while shaping, illustrate the unprecedental latitude for the user to explore optimum generation and load management combinations. The general concept of the model is depicted in the flow chart on the next page.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Lessons learned in implementing a demand side management contract at the Presidio of San Francisco  

SciTech Connect

The National Park Service (NSP) recently completed the implementation phase of its Power Saving Partners (PSP) Demand Side Management (DSM) contract with the local utility, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E). Through the DSM contract, NPS will receive approximately $4.1 million over eight years in payment for saving 61 kW of electrical demand, 179,000 km of electricity per year, and 1.1 million therms of natural gas per year. These payments are for two projects: the installation of high-efficiency lighting systems at the Thoreau Center for Sustainability and the replacement of an old central boiler plant with new, distributed boilers. Although these savings and payments are substantial, the electrical savings and contract payments fall well short of the projected 1,700 kW of electrical demand, 8 million kwh of annual electricity savings, and $11 million in payments, anticipated at the project's onset. Natural gas savings exceeded the initial forecast of 800,000 therms per year. The DSM contract payments did not meet expectations for a variety of reasons which fall into two broad categories: first, many anticipated projects were not constructed, and second, some of the projects that were constructed were not included in the program because the cost of implementing the DSM program's measurement and verification (M&V) requirements outweighed anticipated payments. This paper discusses the projects implemented, and examines the decisions made to withdraw some of them from the DSM contract. It also presents the savings that were realized and documented through M&V efforts. Finally, it makes suggestions relative to M&V protocols to encourage all efficiency measures, not just those that are easy to measure.

Sartor, D.; Munn, M.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 1: Building prototype analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed description of, and the baseline assumptions and simulation results for, the building prototype simulations conducted for the building types designated in the Work Plan for Demand-side Management Assessment of Hawaii`s Demand-Side Resources (HES-4, Phase 2). This report represents the second revision to the initial building prototype description report provided to DBEDT early in the project. Modifications and revisions to the prototypes, based on further calibration efforts and on comments received from DBEDT Staff have been incorporated into this final version. These baseline prototypes form the basis upon which the DSM measure impact estimates and the DSM measure data base were developed for this project. This report presents detailed information for each of the 17 different building prototypes developed for use with the DOE-21E program (23 buildings in total, including resorts and hotels defined separately for each island) to estimate the impact of the building technologies and measures included in this project. The remainder of this section presents some nomenclature and terminology utilized in the reports, tables, and data bases developed from this project to denote building type and vintage. Section 2 contains a more detailed discussion of the data sources, the definition of the residential sector building prototypes, and results of the DOE-2 analysis. Section 3 provides a similar discussion for the commercial sector. The prototype and baseline simulation results are presented in a separate section for each building type. Where possible, comparison of the baseline simulation results with benchmark data from the ENERGY 2020 model or other demand forecasting models specific to Hawaii is included for each building. Appendix A contains a detailed listing of the commercial sector baseline indoor lighting technologies included in the existing and new prototypes by building type.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Role of Technologies in Carbon Management Strategies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

α α β β Corporate Research Energy and Global Change CHCRC.G BE/jn 1 5/31/01 Fo.-No. 137 First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington DC, May 15-17, 2001 The Role of Technologies in Carbon The Role of Technologies in Carbon Management Strategies Management Strategies Baldur Eliasson ABB Corporate Research Baden-Daettwil, Switzerland First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington DC, May 15-17, 2001 α β β Corporate Research Energy and Global Change CHCRC.G BE/jn 2 5/31/01 Fo.-No. 137 First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington DC, May 15-17, 2001 Contents Contents s Introduction s Global Warming and the Kyoto Protocol s New Energy Technologies for a New Century s Conclusions α β β Corporate Research Energy and Global Change CHCRC.G BE/jn

172

International Border Management Systems (IBMS) Program : visions and strategies.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), International Border Management Systems (IBMS) Program is working to establish a long-term border security strategy with United States Central Command (CENTCOM). Efforts are being made to synthesize border security capabilities and technologies maintained at the Laboratories, and coordinate with subject matter expertise from both the New Mexico and California offices. The vision for SNL is to provide science and technology support for international projects and engagements on border security.

McDaniel, Michael; Mohagheghi, Amir Hossein

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Including environmental concerns in management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major programs within the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) management program. The program is intended to find a long-term management strategy for the DUF{sub 6} that is currently stored in approximately 46,400 cylinders at Paducah, KY; Portsmouth, OH; and Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The program has four major components: technology assessment, engineering analysis, cost analysis, and the environmental impact statement (EIS). From the beginning of the program, the DOE has incorporated the environmental considerations into the process of strategy selection. Currently, the DOE has no preferred alternative. The results of the environmental impacts assessment from the EIS, as well as the results from the other components of the program, will be factored into the strategy selection process. In addition to the DOE`s current management plan, other alternatives continued storage, reuse, or disposal of depleted uranium, will be considered in the EIS. The EIS is expected to be completed and issued in its final form in the fall of 1997.

Goldberg, M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Avci, H.I. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bradley, C.E. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Industrial demand-side management programs: What`s happened, what works, what`s needed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to analyze experience to date with industrial demand-side management (DSM), a survey of utilities was conducted and a database of industrial DSM programs was prepared. More than eighty utilities and third-party organizations were interviewed. Data were collected via phone, fax, and/or mail from the utilities and entered into a database. In order to limit the scope of this study, the database contains incentive-based, energy-saving programs and not load management or information-only programs (including technical assistance programs). Programs in the database were divided into four categories: two ``prescriptive rebate`` categories and two ``custom rebate`` categories. The database contains 31 incentive-based, energy-saving industrial DSM programs offered by 17 utilities. The appendix to this report summarizes the results approximately 60 industrial DSM programs. Most of the programs included in the appendix, but not in the database, are either C&I programs for which commercial and industrial data were not disaggregated or new industrial DSM programs for which data are not yet available.

Jordan, J.A.; Nadel, S.M. [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effective Supply Chain Management Strategy for Food Products: An Insight to Linked Partnerships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores and extends the supply chain management strategy for food products effectively and efficiently through analysis of insights to linked partnerships within the supply chain due to the possibility of a global food crisis. The required ... Keywords: Food Crisis Resolution, Logistics Management, Strategic Partnership, Supply Chain Management Strategy, Supply Chain Strategy, Supply Chain for Agricultural Products

Witaya Krajaysri

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example  

SciTech Connect

This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Guidebook for Farmstead Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design. [Final report  

SciTech Connect

The acceptance and growth of Demand-Side Management (DSM) continues to increase in the US. According to latest estimates, total expenditures on electric utility DSM programs now exceed $1.2 billion annually, with these investments ranging from 1 to 5 percent of a utility`s gross revenues. In addition, due to increasing environmental concerns and the high cost of new capacity, these expenditure levels are expected to increase. While the vast majority of these DSM programs are directed at the more traditional residential, commercial and industrial market sectors, significant opportunities still exist. One market segment that has not been the focus of attention but a critical sector from an economic development perspective for marry utilities -- is the agricultural and farmstead market. Although the total number of farms in the United States decreased by approximately 5 percent between 1985 and 1989, the land dedicated to farming still accounts for over 995 million acres. Furthermore, the total value of farm output in the United States has been steadily increasing since 1986. The limited penetration of energy efficiency measures in farmsteads provides an excellent opportunity for utilities to expand their DSM programming efforts to capture this ``non-traditional`` market segment, and at the same time assist farms in increasing their efficiency and competitiveness. In marry states, and, in particular New York State, agriculture plays a major economic role. The importance of farms not only from a utility perspective but also from a state and federal perspective cannot be overstated. As such, utilities are in a unique position to facilitate farmstead DSM technology investments in an effort to benefit the farmer (and his profitability), the utility, the state and the country. This guidebook is designed to provide the framework for agricultural demand planning, including market assessment, technology assessment, market penetration analysis and program design.

Rose, M.; Camera, R.K.

1992-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

178

Galbraith and the Management of Specific Demand: Evidence from the tobacco industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand’, Paper presented at the Seventh International Post-Keynesian Conference, University of Missouri, Kansas City, USA,

Anderson, Stacey J; Dunn, Steve

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Web-based energy information systems for energy management and demand response in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

also known as EMS (Energy Management Systems), BMS (Buildingfacility operator or energy management systems, often wasteand Control Systems Energy Management Systems Environmental

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Herter, Karen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The past, present, and future of U.S. utility demand-side management programs  

SciTech Connect

Demand-side management or DSM refers to active efforts by electric and gas utilities to modify customers` energy use patterns. The experience in the US shows that utilities, when provided with appropriate incentives, can provide a powerful stimulus to energy efficiency in the private sector. This paper describes the range and history of DSM programs offered by US electric utilities, with a focus on the political, economic, and regulatory events that have shaped their evolution. It also describes the changes these programs are undergoing as a result of US electricity industry restructuring. DSM programs began modestly in the 1970s in response to growing concerns about dependence on foreign sources of oil and environmental consequences of electricity generation, especially nuclear power. The foundation for the unique US partnership between government and utility interests can be traced first to the private-ownership structure of the vertically integrated electricity industry and second to the monopoly franchise granted by state regulators. Electricity industry restructuring calls into question both of these basic conditions, and thus the future of utility DSM programs for the public interest. Future policies guiding ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency DSM programs will need to pay close attention to the specific market objectives of the programs and to the balance between public and private interests.

Eto, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Web-based energy information systems for energy management and demand response in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

download EMCS download Sub-metering Real-time Connectivityof diagnostic testing, sub-metering, and performancecoincident demand at sub-metering S Compare to historical

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Herter, Karen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Flexible and robust strategies for waste management in Sweden  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of solid waste continues to be on the political agenda. Waste disposal issues are often viewed from an environmental perspective, but economic and social aspects also need to be considered when deciding on waste strategies and policy instruments. The aim of this paper is to suggest flexible and robust strategies for waste management in Sweden, and to discuss different policy instruments. Emphasis is on environmental aspects, but social and economic aspects are also considered. The results show that most waste treatment methods have a role to play in a robust and flexible integrated waste management system, and that the waste hierarchy is valid as a rule of thumb from an environmental perspective. A review of social aspects shows that there is a general willingness among people to source separate wastes. A package of policy instruments can include landfill tax, an incineration tax which is differentiated with respect to the content of fossil fuels and a weight based incineration tax, as well as support to the use of biogas and recycled materials.

Finnveden, Goeran [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: goran.finnveden@infra.kth.se; Bjoerklund, Anna [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Reich, Marcus Carlsson [Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, SE-106 48 Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, Ola [Technology and Built Environment, University of Gaevle, SE-801 76 Gaevle (Sweden); Soerbom, Adrienne [Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A reservoir management strategy for multilayered reservoirs in eastern Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A reservoir management strategy has been developed for a field located in eastern Venezuela. The field contains deep, high pressure, multilayer reservoirs. A thorough formation evaluation was accomplished using the log data, core data, PVT data, geologic data, well completion data and the production data. A reservoir simulation model was built to forecast reservoir performance for a variety of exploitation and well completion strategies. Reserve forecasts have been made using the reservoir model. The methodology applied in this research consists of eight tasks: 1) build a data base with existing data, 2) analyze the log and core data, 3) analyze the pressure and production data, 4) analyze the PVT data, 5) analyze the hydraulic fracture treatments, 6) build the reservoir model, 7) determine the possible reservoir management strategies, and 8) perform economic evaluations for the management strategies. While much of the data for the field studied was supplied by PDVSA, we did not receive all of the data we requested. For example, no pressure buildup data were available. When necessary, we used correlations to determine values for reservoir data that we were not supplied. In this research four formations were studied and characterized, determining porosity and permeability values. Also, fracture treatments were analyzed and a reservoir model was developed. Runs for black oil and volatile oil were performed. The results show that the upper zones are the most prospective areas, but fracture treatments must be performed to reduce the damage on the sand face. Lower formations (Cretaceous) have a lower permeability value, but high OOIP that justify performing fracture treatments and completing this zone. Economics were developed to support this conclusion. Optimum well spacing was calculated showing that 960 acres is the optimum well spacing, but also that 640 acres can be maintained for all the reservoirs and dual completions can be performed, first hydraulic fracturing and completing the Cretaceous formation, and then, completing any upper zone. Reservoir simulation results show that up to 31% of OOIP may be incrementally recovered by hydraulic fracturing the Cretaceous formation and 10 or less from the upper zones.

Espinel Diaz, Arnaldo Leopoldo

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Lee Hall, BPA Smart Grid Program Manager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and challenging. Bonneville has previously reported to the Council on their role in the regional Smart Grid to reported to the Council on their role in the regional Smart Grid ich includes demand response in 10 to the Council on their role in the regional Smart Grid ich includes demand response in 10 participating

185

Web-based energy information systems for energy management and demand response in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market Energy providers Target users Program manager (energy provider), energy manager (customer) Commercialization Data Access Trendmarket Energy service providers, utilities Target users Energy manager, operator Commercialization Data Access Trend

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Herter, Karen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Web-based energy information systems for energy management and demand response in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of theand Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of theprogram managers and building energy managers by allowing

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Herter, Karen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Assessing the impact of knowledge management strategies announcements on the market value of firms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although there is much literature on the relationship between KM strategies and organizational performance, the benefit of KM strategies is not well understood. We addressed this issue by exploring how KM strategies influence a firm's market value using ... Keywords: Event study methodology, Knowledge management strategy, Knowledge-based view, Market value, Stock market reaction

Byounggu Choi; Ana Maria Jong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Issued on January 11, 2013, the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste is a framework for moving toward a sustainable program to deploy an integrated system capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from civilian nuclear power generation, defense, national security and other activities. Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste.pdf More Documents & Publications Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and

189

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste The Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste is a framework for moving toward a sustainable program to deploy an integrated system capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from civilian nuclear power generation, defense, national security and other activities. Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste More Documents & Publications Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste

190

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning A Strategy for Environmental Management Reducing the Footprint of the Cold War For over a decade, the Department of Energy has focused on reducing the footprint of 60 years of nuclear research and weapons testing and production. While these facilities are no longer needed, they exist with varying degrees of radiation contamination from years of operation. Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) is the process of closing down a nuclear facility and placing it in a state that reduces or eliminates risk to the pub lic and the environment. This generally includes demolition and transport of the debris to a disposal facility. Another alternative is to dispose of the facility in place (i.e., in-situ). The concept of In-Situ Decommis-

191

2012 Grid Strategy: Distribution Management System (DMS) Advanced Applications for Distributed Energy Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the management systems and the advanced applications that utilities in the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) multi-year Smart Grid Demonstration Initiative are using or plan to use to manage the distribution system and to monitor and control distributed energy resources (DER). The management systems covered in this report are the distribution management system (DMS), the distributed energy resource management system (DERMS), and the demand ...

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

192

ORIGINAL RESEARCH Strategies for and Barriers to Managing Weight When Eating at Restaurants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suggested citation for this article: Timmerman GM, Earvolino-Ramirez M. Strategies for and barriers to managing weight when eating at restaurants. Prev Chronic

Gayle M. Timmerman; Cns Marie Earvolino-ramirez; Peer Reviewed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A comparative analysis of energy management strategies for hybrid electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dissertation offers an overview of the energy management problem in hybrid electric vehicles. Several control strategies described in literature are presented and formalized in… (more)

Serrao, Lorenzo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Materials Reliability Program: Strategies for Managing Aging Effects in PWR Vessel Internals - Interim Update (MRP-99)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates the previous EPRI report on developing strategies for managing aging effects in pressurized water reactor (PWR) internals during the license renewal term.

2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

195

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Emergency management: Concepts and strategies for effective programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to define what that emergency management program should looks writes that “the best emergency managers have alreadythe protection of the public – emergency managers, public

Lucus, Valerie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Coordinated train control and energy management control strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system, in collaboration with Hughes Aircraft Company and Harmon Industries, as in the process of developing an Advanced Automatic Train Control (AATC) system to replace the current fixed-block automatic system. In the long run, the AATC system is expected to not only allow for safe short headway operation, but also to facilitate coordinated train control and energy management. This new system will employ spread spectrum radios, installed onboard trains, at wayside locations, and at control stations, to determine train locations and reliably transfer control information. Sandia National Laboratories has worked cooperatively with BART to develop a simulator of the train control and the power consumption of the AATC system. The authors are now in the process of developing enhanced train control algorithms to supplement the safety critical controller in order to smooth out train trajectories through coordinated control of multiple trains, and to reduce energy consumption and power infrastructure requirements. The control algorithms so far considered include (1) reducing peak power consumption to avoid voltage sags, especially during an outage or while clearing a backup, (2) rapid and smooth recovery from a backup, (3) avoiding oscillations due to train interference, (4) limiting needle peaks in power demand at substations to some specified level, (5) coasting, and (6) coordinating train movement, e.g., starts/stops and hills.

Gordon, S.P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Lehrer, D.G. [Bay Area Rapid Transit District, Oakland, CA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Demand-side Management Strategies and the Residential Sector: Lessons from International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in producing a given level of output or activity. It is measured by the quantity of energy required to perform a particular activity (service) expressed as energy per unit of output or activity measure of service (EERE, 2010). In the residential sector...

Haney, Aoife Brophy; Jamasb, Tooraj; Platchkov, Laura M.; Pollitt, Michael G.

199

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Impact of the Demand-Side Management (DSM) Program structure on the cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency projects  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) analyzed the cost-effective energy efficiency potential of Fort Drum, a customer of the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation (NMPC) in Watertown, New York. Significant cost-effective investments were identified, even without any demand-side management (DSM) incentives from NMPC. Three NMPC DSM programs were then examined to determine the impact of participation on the cost-effective efficiency potential at the Fort. The following three utility programs were analyzed: (1) utility rebates to be paid back through surcharges, (2) a demand reduction program offered in conjunction with an energy services company, and (3) utility financing. Ultimately, utility rebates and financing were found to be the best programs for the Fort. This paper examines the influence that specific characteristics of the DSM programs had on the decision-making process of one customer. Fort Drum represents a significant demand-side resource, whose decisions regarding energy efficiency investments are based on life-cycle cost analysis subject to stringent capital constraints. The structures of the DSM programs offered by NMPC affect the cost-effectiveness of potential efficiency investments and the ability of the Fort to obtain sufficient capital to implement the projects. This paper compares the magnitude of the cost-effective resource available under each program, and the resulting level of energy and demand savings. The results of this analysis can be used to examine how DSM program structures impact the decision-making process of federal and large commercial customers.

Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Dixon, D.R.; Elliott, D.B.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

2012 CERTS R&M Peer Review - Evaluating the Effects of Managing Controllable Demand - Tim Mount  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluating the Effects of Managing Evaluating the Effects of Managing Controllable Demand and Distributed Energy Resources Locally on System Performance and Costs Tim Mount and Ray Zimmerman Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management Cornell University Alejandro Dominguez-Garcia Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign CERTS Review, Cornell, August 7-8, 2012 An NSF I/UCRC Collaborative Research on the Smart Grid PSERC Researchers at Cornell Engineers Economists Lindsay Anderson Wooyoung Jeon* Hsiao-Dong Chiang Alberto Lamadrid* Andrew Hunter Jung Youn Mo* Bob Thomas Surin Maneevitjit* Lang Tong Tim Mount Max Zhang Dick Schuler Ray Zimmerman Bill Schulze + Hao Lu* Judy Cardell, Smith College +

202

Coordinating Inventory Control and Pricing Strategies with Random Demand and Fixed Ordering Cost: the Infinite Horizon Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze an infinite horizon, single product, periodic review model in which pricing and production/inventory decisions are made simultaneously. Demands in different periods are identically distributed random variables ...

Chen, Xin

203

Flexible system development strategies for the Chuo Shinkansen Maglev Project : dealing with uncertain demand and R&D outcomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a large-scale, long-term transportation project, the Chuo Shinkansen Maglev Project in Japan includes various uncertainties. Among them, two major uncertainties are identified in this thesis: the uncertainty of demand ...

Ishii, Masaki, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Utility Demand-Side Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies, Office of Energy Management Division of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03

205

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relating to hydroelectricity generation, irrigation water,resources to generate hydroelectricity Managing watershedsFor example, micro-hydroelectricity generation may be an

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy and Experience Strategy and Experience for In Situ Decommissioning Prepared By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Office of Engineering and Technology, EM-20 September 2009 This page is deliberately blank. DOE EM Strategy and Experience for In Situ Decommissioning i Contents Acknowledgements......................................................................................................................................iv Acronyms...................................................................................................................................................... v 1. Introduction......................................................................................................................................

207

Engineering Methods for Estimating the Impacts of Demand-Side Management Programs: Volume 1: Fundamentals of Engineering Simulations for Residential and Commercial End Uses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook focuses on the use of building energy computer simulations for planning and evaluating demand-side management (DSM) measures. It presents techniques for estimating energy and demand savings for a list of common residential and commercial DSM technologies using widely available public-domain and EPRI computer programs.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Organizational strategy development in distribution channel management using fuzzy AHP and hierarchical fuzzy TOPSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distribution channel management not only consists of choosing distribution channels. In fact, probably the most difficult phase of the distribution management starts after this choice. Determining an appropriate organization strategy for distribution ... Keywords: Distribution channel management, Distribution organization, Extent analysis method, Fuzzy analytic hierarchy process, Hierarchical fuzzy TOPSIS

Turan Paksoy; Nimet Yapici Pehlivan; Cengiz Kahraman

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Industrial Lift Truck Battery Charger Demand Response Impact Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response and load shifting are two common energy management strategies used by lift truck fleet operators to mitigate on-peak energy consumption, reduce electricity costs, and react to electric system emergency curtailment requests. When customers elect to participate in demand response programs, they are contacted and asked to reduce load during power shortage situations. Alternatively, customers may implement longer-term economic load shifting strategies by reducing power to their lift truck bat...

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

210

DEMAND SIDE ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION PROGRAM Measurement and Verification Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(average foot-candles) per room BEFORE retrofits. Retrofits are designed to provide recommended and production cost of electricity (main Campus) or City electric rates (PRC) as applicable. 5. Post&V deliverables requested here meet the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) intent for a "Post- Installation

Hofmann, Hans A.

211

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STRATEGY FOR IMPROVING CONTRACT AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STRATEGY FOR IMPROVING CONTRACT AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT Introduction In December 2010, the Deputy Secretary convened a summit to discuss strategies for improving contract and project management. The participants addressed six issues, which were identified as barriers to improved performance, including: Project and contract alignment, change control, and truing-up contracts; Program/project prioritization and funding alignment; Contract administration including surveillance, monitoring and oversight; Roles and responsibilities of contracting officers and contracting officer representatives; Accountability and aligning incentives; Adequate project and contract management staffing. As a result of the summit discussions, the Department will implement the strategies outlined in

212

Records management training: A strategy for a changing environment  

SciTech Connect

This presentation will discuss Records Management Training efforts at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Topics covered include: drivers for record management training, targeted audiences, current training efforts, and future plans for program development.

Ekkebus, S.M.

1992-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

213

Restoration And Management Strategies Of Wetlands In Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changing land use in the watershed area, pollution fromland use management, has also led to problems of pollution,

Ramachandra, T. V.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Revenue management: models and methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Revenue management is the collection of strategies and tactics firms use to scientifically manage demand for their products and services. The practice has grown from its origins in airlines to its status today as a mainstream business practice ...

Kalyan T. Talluri; Garrett J. van Ryzin; Itir Z. Karaesmen; Gustavo J. Vulcano

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Cooperative business management strategies for the U.S. integrated textile complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the American Textile (AMTEX{trademark}) Partnership is to engage the unique technical resources of the Department of Energy National Laboratories to work with the US Integrated Textile Complex (US ITC) and research universities to develop and deploy technologies that will increase the competitiveness of the US ITC. The objectives of the Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project of AMTEX are: (1) to determine strategic business structure changes for the US ITC; (2) to establish a textile industry electronic marketplace, (3) to provide methods for US ITC education ad implementation of an electronic marketplace. The Enterprise Modeling and Simulation Task of DAMA is focusing on the first DAMA goal as described in another paper of this conference. The Cooperative Business Management (CBM) Task of DAMA is developing computer-based tools that will render system-wide information accessible for improved decision making. Three CBM strategies and the associated computer tools being developed to support their implementation are described in this paper. This effort is addressing the second DAMA goal to establish a textile industry electronic marketplace in concert with the Connectivity and Infrastructure Task of DAMA. As the CBM tools mature, they will be commercialized through the DAMA Education, Outreach and Commercialization Task of DAMA to achieve the third and final DAMA goal.

Washington, K.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Information Systems Applications

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Migration strategies roles for data management in CIM  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the migration path a company goes through as it moves up the data management learning curve. This migration path is based on four distinct roles for data management in CIM. The first two sections review the justification for CIM and data management. The first section describes the changing competitive environment manufacturers face and how CIM addresses the problems this situation creates. The second section identifies the two key characteristics of a database management system and the benefits provided. The third section identifies and discusses the four roles for data management in CIM. These four roles and their variations provide snapshots of where a company is on the data management learning curve. The fourth section describes the migration path a company goes through as it moves up the learning curve. Although there are similarities, there are some significant differences between this learning curve and the one experienced by MIS as it adopted data management technology. 3 refs.

Bray, O.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

EIS-0269: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and 9: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee EIS-0269: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee Summary This EIS will evaluate the potential environmental impacts regarding management decisions on depleted UF6 by evaluating the environmental impacts of a range of reasonable alternative strategies as well as providing a means for the public to have a meaningful opportunity to be heard on this matter. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available For Download August 10, 1999 EIS-0269: Record of Decision

218

A Proactive Design Strategy For Facility Managers of Laboratory Environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Facility Manager of a laboratory environment continuously walks a fine line between safe and economical operation of that facility. The primary responsibility of the… (more)

Sandlin, Darrell R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Demand-Side and Supply-Side Load Management: Optimizing with Thermal Energy Storage (TES) for the Restructuring Energy Marketplace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current and future restructuring energy marketplace represents a number of challenges and opportunities to maximize value through the management of peak power. This is true both on the demand-side regarding peak power use and on the supply-side regarding power generation. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) can provide the flexibility essential to the economical management of power. In large industrial applications, the added value of TES has been demonstrated, not only in managing operating costs, but also in delivering a net saving in capital cost versus conventional, non-storage approaches. This capital cost saving is often realized in situations where investments in chiller plant capacity, or in on-site power generating capacity, are required. On the demand-side, TES has long been used to shift air-conditioning loads and process cooling loads from on-peak to off-peak periods. In today's and tomorrow's restructuring energy markets, price spikes are increasingly likely during periods of peak power demand. TES is performing an important role, especially when coupled with a proper understanding of modern TES technology options. The inherent advantages and limitations of the available TES technology options are briefly reviewed and discussed. Examples of existing large TES installations are presented, identifying the TES technology types they utilize. The applications include industrial facilities, as well as universities, hospitals, government, and District Cooling utility systems. The power management impact and the economic benefits of TES are illustrated through a review of several TES case studies. Combustion Turbines (CTs) are a common choice for modern on-site and utility power generation facilities. Inlet air cooling of CTs enhances their hot weather performance and has been successfully accomplished for many years, using a variety of technologies. In many instances, TES can and does provide a uniquely advantageous method of optimizing the economics of CT Inlet Cooling (CTIC) systems. TES systems can achieve low inlet air temperatures, with resulting high levels of power augmentation. The TES approach also minimizes the installed capacity (and capital cost) of cooling systems, as well as limiting the parasitic loads occurring during periods of peak power demand and peak power value. Chilled water, ice, and low temperature fluid TES systems are all applicable to CTIC. The inherent pros and cons of each TES type are discussed. Sensitivity analyses are presented to explore the impact of cooling hours per day on capital cost per kW of power enhancement. Case histories illustrate the beneficial impact of TES-based CTIC on both capital cost and operating cost of CT power plants. TES-based CTIC is advantageous as an economical, peaking power enhancement for either peaking or base-load plants. It is applied to both new and existing CTs. TES is projected to have even greater value in future restructuring energy markets.

Andrepont, J. S.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Strategies for Managing Liquid Effluents - Options, Actions, and Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenge of balancing several factors, including public perception and site management goals, faces utility managers optimizing their radioactive liquid effluent programs. This document provides a standardized methodology for decision making when setting site effluent goals, and provides the tools needed to justify equipment or policy changes to utility and public stakeholders.

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Improved Upscaling & Well Placement Strategies for Tight Gas Reservoir Simulation and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight gas reservoirs provide almost one quarter of the current U.S. domestic gas production, with significant projected increases in the next several decades in both the U.S. and abroad. These reservoirs constitute an important play type, with opportunities for improved reservoir simulation & management, such as simulation model design, well placement. Our work develops robust and efficient strategies for improved tight gas reservoir simulation and management. Reservoir simulation models are usually acquired by upscaling the detailed 3D geologic models. Earlier studies of flow simulation have developed layer-based coarse reservoir simulation models, from the more detailed 3D geologic models. However, the layer-based approach cannot capture the essential sand and flow. We introduce and utilize the diffusive time of flight to understand the pressure continuity within the fluvial sands, and develop novel adaptive reservoir simulation grids to preserve the continuity of the reservoir sands. Combined with the high resolution transmissibility based upscaling of flow properties, and well index based upscaling of the well connections, we can build accurate simulation models with at least one order magnitude simulation speed up, but the predicted recoveries are almost indistinguishable from those of the geologic models. General practice of well placement usually requires reservoir simulation to predict the dynamic reservoir response. Numerous well placement scenarios require many reservoir simulation runs, which may have significant CPU demands. We propose a novel simulation-free screening approach to generate a quality map, based on a combination of static and dynamic reservoir properties. The geologic uncertainty is taken into consideration through an uncertainty map form the spatial connectivity analysis and variograms. Combining the quality map and uncertainty map, good infill well locations and drilling sequence can be determined for improved reservoir management. We apply this workflow to design the infill well drilling sequence and explore the impact of subsurface also, for a large-scale tight gas reservoir. Also, we evaluated an improved pressure approximation method, through the comparison with the leading order high frequency term of the asymptotic solution. The proposed pressure solution can better predict the heterogeneous reservoir depletion behavior, thus provide good opportunities for tight gas reservoir management.

Zhou, Yijie

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Title Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-3636e Year of Publication 2010 Authors Yin, Rongxin, Sila Kiliccote, Mary Ann Piette, and Kristen Parrish Conference Name 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, demand shifting (pre-cooling), DRQAT Abstract This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30% using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

223

Materials Reliability Program: Aging Management Strategies for Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering PWR Internals (MRP-232)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the aging management strategy development for Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering (CE) reactor internals. This report provides the technical basis for the aging management requirements of Westinghouse and CE reactor internals in the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) internals I&E guidelines (MRP-227-Rev. 0).

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Adaptation Strategies in Policy-Driven Autonomic Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Policies have been proposed as a means to express required or desired behavior of systems and applications. Policies can be used within the autonomic management elements of the system to provide action directives to adjust application or system tuning ...

Raphael M. Bahati; Michael A. Bauer; Elvis M. Vieira

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Buildings and corporate strategy : towards a management system model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on buildings as a subject of attention and inquiry in a corporate setting. It attempts to draw implications for the design of a management system to deal with the special nature of buildings as a resource. ...

Brana, Rodrigo

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Reservoir management strategy for East Randolph Field, Randolph Township, Portage County, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Reservoir Management Field Demonstration Program is to demonstrate that multidisciplinary reservoir management teams using appropriate software and methodologies with efforts scaled to the size of the resource are a cost-effective method for: Increasing current profitability of field operations; Forestalling abandonment of the reservoir; and Improving long-term economic recovery for the company. The primary objective of the Reservoir Management Demonstration Project with Belden and Blake Corporation is to develop a comprehensive reservoir management strategy to improve the operational economics and optimize oil production from East Randolph field, Randolph Township, Portage County, Ohio. This strategy identifies the viable improved recovery process options and defines related operational and facility requirements. In addition, strategies are addressed for field operation problems, such as paraffin buildup, hydraulic fracture stimulation, pumping system optimization, and production treatment requirements, with the goal of reducing operating costs and improving oil recovery.

Safley, L.E.; Salamy, S.P.; Young, M.A.; Fowler, M.L.; Wing, J.L.; Thomas, J.B.; Mills, J.; Wood, D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Continuing Developments in PV Risk Management: Strategies, Solutions, and Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the PV industry matures, successful risk management practices will become more imperative to ensure investor confidence, control costs, and facilitate further growth. This report discusses several key aspects of risk management during the commercial- and utility-scale project life cycle, from identification of risks, to the process of mitigating and allocating those risks among project parties, to transferring those risks through insurance. The report also explores novel techniques in PV risk management, options to offload risks onto the capital markets, and innovative insurance policies (namely warranty policies) that address risks unique to the PV sector. One of the major justifications for robust risk management in the PV industry is the cost-reduction opportunities it affords. If the PV industry can demonstrate the capability to successfully manage its risks, thereby inspiring confidence in financiers, it may be able to obtain a lower cost of capital in future transactions. A lower cost of capital translates to a lower cost of energy, which will in turn enhance PV?s competitiveness at a time when it will have to rely less on subsidies to support its market penetration.

Lowder, T.; Mendelsohn, M.; Speer, B.; Hill, R.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on utility demand-side management and conservation and renewable energy programs  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) requires all of its long-term firm power customers to implement programs that promote the conservation of electric energy or facilitate the use of renewable energy resources. Western has also proposed that all customers develop integrated resource plans that include cost-effective demand-side management programs. As part of the preparation of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) developed estimates of the reductions in energy demand resulting from Western`s conservation and renewable energy activities in its Salt Lake City Area Office. ANL has also estimated the energy-demand reductions from cost-effective, demand-side management programs that could be included in the integrated resource plans of the customers served by Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The results of this study have been used to adjust the expected hourly demand for Western`s major systems in the Salt Lake City Area. The expected hourly demand served as the basis for capacity expansion plans develops with ANL`s Production and Capacity Expansion (PACE) model.

Cavallo, J.D.; Germer, M.F.; Tompkins, M.M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Implementing an Energy Management Strategy for a Houston Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intense competition and environmental regulation of industries utilizing combustion equipment have motivated many owners and operators to seek ways to reduce costs, improve performance, and minimize emissions. Energy management programs are being implemented throughout industry to improve equipment operating efficiencies, profitability, extend equipment life, prevent forced shutdowns, generate substantial fuel savings, track valuable information, and enhance compliance margins. A well designed and maintained energy management program translates to PROFIT added directly to the BOTTOM LINE. Woodward-Clyde Consultants (WCC) recently implemented and energy management program at the Lyondell-Citgo Refinery in Houston, Texas. The basis of the program is the 80/20 rule where 80% of the total potential savings are derived from optimizing the energy utilization from 20% of the combustion equipment. In this case, 11 out of 55 heaters were targeted for inclusion in the program. The fuel savings potential alone exceeded $1,250,000. In addition to the fuel savings, there were reduced costs from improved operation, as well as reduction in maintenance requirements and forced shutdowns. The remainder of this paper discusses the technical approach, the benefits, and the results of the program implemented at the Lyondell-Citgo Refinery.

Wood, S. C.; Agrawal, R. K.; Canon, D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

2012 CERTS R&M Peer Review - Summary: Evaluating the Effects of Managing Controllable Demand and Distributed Energy - Tim Mount  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Effects of Managing Controllable Demand and Distributed Energy the Effects of Managing Controllable Demand and Distributed Energy Resources Locally on System Performance and Costs Project Lead: Tim Mount, Alejandro D. Dominguez-Garcia, Ray Zimmerman 1. Project Objective The objective of this project is to use the new multi-period version of the Cornell SuperOPF to analyze the system and economic effects of having high penetrations of renewable energy on a network and to determine effective ways to mitigate the inherent variability of these sources. With the new capabilities of the SuperOPF, it will now be possible to evaluate the effects of shifting demand from peak to off-peak periods. Previous research has shown that higher penetrations of renewables are associated with higher annual costs for conventional installed generating capacity ($/MW/Year) due to

231

Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

232

Energy Conservation Through Demand-Side Management (DSM): A Methodology to Characterize Energy Use Among commercial Market Segments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing energy demand can be beneficial for both the energy consumer and the energy supplier. By reducing energy use, the consumer reduces operating costs and improves production efficiency and competitiveness. Similarly, the supplier may reduce the need for costly capacity expansion and wholesale power purchasing, especially if energy reductions occur during peak loading conditions. Energy reductions may also lessen global climate change and reduce many other consequences of fossil-fuel energy use. The following research highlights a methodology to characterize energy use and optimize a DSM program for different types of commercial buildings. Utilizing publicly available records, such as utility billing data and property tax records, the diverse commercial building market was characterized. The commercial building types were matched to relevant submarkets of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). These sources were combined to prioritize building type submarket energy use intensity (kWh/sf/yr), load factor and many other energy use characteristics for each market segment. From this information, lower tier performers in each NAICS submarket can be identified and appropriate DSM alternatives selected specific to each.

Grosskopf, K. R.; Oppenheim, P.; Barclay, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Technical strategy for the management of INEEL spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report presents evaluations, findings, and recommendations of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team. The technical strategy developed by the Task Team includes stabilization, near term storage, packaging, transport, and ultimate disposal. Key issues identified and discussed include waste characterization, criticality, packaging, waste form performance, and special fuels. Current plans focus on onsite needs, and include three central elements: (1) resolution of near-term vulnerabilities, (2) consolidation of storage locations, and (3) achieving dry storage in transportable packages. In addition to the Task Team report, appendices contain information on the INEEL spent fuel inventory; regulatory decisions and agreements; and analyses of criticality, packaging, storage, transportation, and system performance of a geological repository. 16 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The impact of organisational strategy, culture, people and technology management on organisational practice and performance: an empirical analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many believe that better people management, technology management, organisational culture, and strategies lead to better organisational practices and performance. However, there is no reliable evidence to support this assertion. This paper employs structural ...

Purnendu Mandal; Somnath Mukhopadhyay; Kallol Bagchi; Angappa Gunasekaran

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Quantifying improvements in the Engineering-Procurement-Construction (EPC) process from the implementation of information management strategies within materials management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Throughout all industries where material flow or handling is involved, employers have implemented various information management technologies with the following goals: 1) to reduce cost, time, and effort, 2) to improve productivity, 3) to streamline the process, 4) to improve product quality, and 5) to attain a competitive advantage. This study quantifies time and cost impacts on the Engineering Procurement-Construction (EPC) process due to the implementation of information management strategies within materials management related activities. The EPC process was schematically mapped and field data from both owner and contractor companies was collected to serve as the baseline condition. Twenty specific materials management related activities were modeled in detail and also loaded with associated field collected time and cost data. Process changes within these activities were analyzed through Monte Carlo simulation. These process changes were used to modify the baseline values for the EPC process and measure the overall impact. Throughout the previous five years, the activity time involved in an EPC project has decreased slightly (4% probability that a 0.584 unit change has occurred) while the greatest improvements occurred in project cost (8.7% probability that a 3.6135 unit change will occur) and schedule (7.2% probability that a 0.501 unit of change will occur). Information management strategies implemented within bulk commodities or standard engineered equipment had the greatest influence upon elapsed time (schedule), and activity time (total effort). Cost was influenced most heavily by the implementation of information management strategies within specialty engineered equipment and fabricated items. The probability that a 6,474 unit change will occur) while more gradual improvements are forecasted to occur in project cost (5.2"/o probability that 1.8395 unit change will occur) and schedule (16.9% probability that 1.7 units change will occur). Information management strategies implemented within bulk commodities will have the greatest influence upon elapsed time, while strategies implemented within fabricated items will have the greatest influence upon activity time and activity cost. Improvements within fabricated items also improve elapsed time significantly.

Toon, Jeffrey Lee

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Intelligent energy management: impact of demand response and plug-in electric vehicles in a smart grid environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modernization of the power grid to meet the growing demand requires significant amount of operational, technological, and infrastructural overhaul. The Department of Energy's "Grid 2030" strategic vision outlines the action plan to alleviate the concerns ... Keywords: controlled charging, demand response, plug in hybrid electric vehicles, smart grid

Seshadri Srinivasa Raghavan; Alireza Khaligh

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

238

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

239

Optimizing Energy Management Strategy and Degree of Hybridization for a Hydrogen Fuel Cell SUV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous work examined degree of hybridization on the fuel economy of a hybrid electric sport utility vehicle. It was observed that not only was the vehicle control strategy important, but that its definition should be coupled with the component sizing process. Both degree of hybridization and the energy management strategy have been optimized simultaneously in this study. Simple mass scaling algorithms were employed to capture the effect of component and vehicle mass variations as a function of degree of hybridization. Additionally, the benefits of regenerative braking and power buffering have been maximized using optimization methods to determine appropriate battery pack sizing. Both local and global optimization routines were applied to improve the confidence in the solution being close to the true optimum. An optimal configuration and energy management strategy that maximizes the benefit of hybridization for a hydrogen fuel cell hybrid SUV was derived. The optimal configuration was explored, and sensitivity to drive cycle in the optimization process was studied.

Keith Wipke Tony; Tony Markel; Doug Nelson

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Toward Understanding the Value of Climate Information for Multiobjective Reservoir Management under Present and Future Climate and Demand Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulation techniques and idealized reservoir management models are used to assess the utility of climate information for the effective management of a single multiobjective reservoir. Reservoir management considers meeting release and ...

Nicholas E. Graham; Konstantine P. Georgakakos

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 EMCS EPACT ERCOT FCM FERC FRCC demand side managementEnergy Regulatory Commission (FERC). EPAct began the processin wholesale markets, which FERC Order 888 furthered by

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Electricity demand-side management for an energy efficient future in China : technology options and policy priorities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this research is to identify robust technology and policy options which achieve substantial reductions in electricity demand in China's Shandong Province. This research utilizes a scenario-based ...

Cheng, Chia-Chin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Choices Among Alternative Risk Management Strategies: Evidence from the Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines risk management strategies for natural gas firms that face multiple risks (e.g., price and volume risk) and have a variety of financial and non-financial tools available to manage those risks. Natural gas firms' risk exposures to price and volume risk were changing significantly during the sample period due to a unique series of regulatory changes, including price deregulation. Natural gas firms used a combination of gas storage, cash holdings, line-ofbusiness and geographic diversification to hedge increasing volume risk and changing exposure to price risk. The firms extensively use commodity derivatives when available. Holding cash and storing gas are complementary strategies that are used by similar types of firms. While the use of derivatives and storing gas are related, firms appear to use derivatives to manage price risk and gas storage to manage volume risk. Finally, the various strategies are effective. Natural gas pipeline firms that pursue financial or operational hedging activities have smaller and less variable sensitivities to price changes than firms that do not, especially post-deregulation.

Christopher C. Géczy; Bernadette A. Minton; Catherine Schrand

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Managing Stakeholder Requirements in High Performance Computing Procurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing Stakeholder Requirements in High Performance Computing Procurement John Rooksby1 , Mark Department of Management, Lancaster University High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities are provided strategy can rigorously meet the demands of the potential users. 1 Introduction High Performance Computing

Sommerville, Ian

245

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.work was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center (load-management.php. Demand Response Research Center (2009).

Goli, Sasank

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Results and commissioning issues from an automated demand response pilot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities"Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings", L Band Commissioning Issues from an Automated Demand Response.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, Dave; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roger. 2002. Using Demand Response to Link Wholesale andfor advanced metering, demand response, and dynamic pricing.EPRI. 2001. Managing Demand-Response To Achieve Multiple

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development for Demand Response Calculation – Findings andManagement and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities. ”

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Operational concepts and implementation strategies for the design configuration management process.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes operational concepts and implementation strategies for the Design Configuration Management Process (DCMP). It presents a process-based systems engineering model for the successful configuration management of the products generated during the operation of the design organization as a business entity. The DCMP model focuses on Pro/E and associated activities and information. It can serve as the framework for interconnecting all essential aspects of the product design business. A design operation scenario offers a sense of how to do business at a time when DCMP is second nature within the design organization.

Trauth, Sharon Lee

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Report: Removal of EM Projects from the GAO High Risk List: Strategies for Improving the Effectiveness of Project and Contract Management in the Office of Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT TO THE REPORT TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD Removal of EM Projects from the GAO High Risk List: Strategies for Improving the Effectiveness of Project and Contract Management in the Office of Environmental Management Submitted by the EMAB Acquisition and Project Management Subcommittee December 5, 2011 Introduction: This report provides a comprehensive summary of the work performed by the Acquisition and Project Management Subcommittee (APMS) of the Environmental Management Advisory Board, since tasking in March 2010. In particular, this report includes the summary observations developed and recommendations previously approved by the EMAB on the Subcommittee's work and presented to the then Assistant Secretary of Environmental Management (EM). As the

251

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy Commission staff. Staff contributors to the current forecast are: Project Management and Technical Direction

252

South Korea-ANL Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Side...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Korea-ANL Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Side Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Side Management in South Korea Agency...

253

Strategy for Developing 10-Year Energy Management Plans at U.S. Army Forces Command Installations.  

SciTech Connect

In order to reach the energy reduction and sustainability goals of the Executive Order 13123, and to minimize overall energy and water costs, the U.S Army Forces Command (FORSCOM), with assistance of PNNL, has embarked on a program to develop comprehensive 10-year Energy Management Plans for each of the 11 major FORSCOM installations. These plans will identify activities and projects critical to the installation's reaching the Executive Order (E.O.) goals as well as help ensure a reliable and secure energy supply. Each FORSCOM installation will be responsible for developing a plan that is closely linked with the installation Master Plan. The Energy Management Plan will cover elements on both the demand side and the supply side, as well as energy/water security assessments and funding/financing resource requirements.

Parker, Graham B. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Gillespie, Adrian (U.S. Army Forces Command); Dixon, Douglas R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Brown, Daryl R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Reilly, Raymond W. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Warwick, William M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Choosing a sustainable demolition waste management strategy using multicriteria decision analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an application of the ELECTRE III decision-aid method in the context of choosing a sustainable demolition waste management strategy for a case study in the city of Lyon, France. This choice of waste management strategy takes into consideration the sustainable development objectives, i.e. economic aspects, environmental consequences, and social issues. Nine alternatives for demolition waste management were compared with the aid of eight criteria, taking into account energy consumption, depletion of abiotic resources, global warming, dispersion of dangerous substances in the environment, economic activity, employment, and quality of life of the local population. The case study concerned the demolition of 25 buildings of an old military camp. Each alternative was illustrated with different waste treatments, such as material recovery, recycling, landfilling, and energy recovery. The recommended solution for sustainable demolition waste management for the case study is a selective deconstruction of each building with local material recovery in road engineering of inert wastes, local energy recovery of wood wastes, and specific treatments for hazardous wastes.

Roussat, Nicolas [LGCIE, INSA-Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)], E-mail: nicolas.roussat@insa-lyon.fr; Dujet, Christiane; Mehu, Jacques [LGCIE, INSA-Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Depressurization as an accident management strategy to minimize the consequences of direct containment heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) have identified severe accidents for nuclear power plants that have the potential to cause failure of the containment through direct containment heating (DCH). Prevention of DCH or mitigation of its effects may be possible using accident management strategies that intentionally depressurize the reactor coolant system (RCS). The effectiveness of intentional depressurization during a station blackout TMLB' sequence was evaluated considering the phenomenological behavior, hardware performance, and operational performance. Phenomenological behavior was calculated using the SCDAP/RELAP5 severe accident analysis code. Two strategies to mitigate DCH by depressurization of the RCS were considered. One strategy, called early depressurization, assumed that the reactor head vent and pressurizer power-operated relief valves (PORVs) were latched open at steam generator dryout. The second strategy, called late depression, assumed that the head vent and PORVs were latched open at a core exit temperature of {approximately}922 K (1200{degree}F). Depressurization of the RCS to a low value that may mitigate DCH was predicted prior to reactor pressure vessel breach for both early and late depressurization. The strategy of late depressurization is preferred over early depressurization because there are greater opportunities to recover plant functions prior to core damage and because failure uncertainties are lessened. 22 refs., 38 figs., 6 tabs.

Hanson, D.J.; Golden, D.W.; Chambers, R.; Miller, J.D.; Hallbert, B.P.; Dobbe, C.A. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

An Integrated Modeling and Data Management Strategy for Cellulosic Biomass Production Decisions  

SciTech Connect

Emerging cellulosic bioenergy markets can provide land managers with additional options for crop production decisions. Integrating dedicated bioenergy crops such as perennial grasses and short rotation woody species within the agricultural landscape can have positive impacts on several environmental processes including increased soil organic matter in degraded soils, reduced sediment loading in watersheds, lower green house gas (GHG) fluxes, and reduced nutrient loading in watersheds. Implementing this type of diverse bioenergy production system in a way that maximizes potential environmental benefits requires a dynamic integrated modeling and data management strategy. This paper presents a strategy for designing diverse bioenergy cropping systems within the existing row crop production landscape in the midwestern United States. The integrated model developed quantifies a wide range environmental processes including soil erosion from wind and water, soil organic matter changes, and soil GHG fluxes within a geospatial data management framework. This framework assembles and formats information from multiple spatial and temporal scales. The data assembled includes yield and productivity data from harvesting equipment at the 1m scale, surface topography data from LiDAR mapping at the less than 1m scale, soil data from US soil survey databases at the 10m to 100m scale, and climate data at the county scale. These models and data tools are assembled into an integrated computational environment that is used to determine sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues for bioenergy production at the sub-field scale under a wide range of land management practices. Using this integrated model, innovative management practices including cover cropping are then introduced and evaluated for their impact on bioenergy production and important environmental processes. The impacts of introducing dedicated energy crops onto high-risk landscape positions currently being manage in row crop production are also investigated.

David J. Muth Jr.; K. Mark Bryden; Joshua B. Koch

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Demonstration in New York City Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Title Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6470E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, Sila Kiliccote, and Rongxin Yin Date Published 09/2013 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Abstract Demand response (DR) - allowing customers to respond to reliability requests and market prices by changing electricity use from their normal consumption pattern - continues to be seen as an attractive means of demand-side management and a fundamental smart-grid improvement that links supply and demand. Since October 2011, the Demand Response Research Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority have conducted a demonstration project enabling Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) in large commercial buildings located in New York City using Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) communication protocols. In particular, this project focuses on demonstrating how OpenADR can automate and simplify interactions between buildings and various stakeholders in New York State including the independent system operator, utilities, retail energy providers, and curtailment service providers. In this paper, we present methods to automate control strategies via building management systems to provide event-driven demand response, price response and demand management based on OpenADR signals. We also present cost control opportunities under day-ahead hourly pricing for large customers and Auto-DR control strategies developed for demonstration buildings. Lastly, we discuss the communication architecture and Auto-DR system designed for the demonstration project to automate price response and DR participation.

258

Update of the management strategy for Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Low-Level Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strategy for management of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) radioactively contaminated liquid waste was reviewed in 1991. The latest information available through the end of 1990 on waste characterization, regulations, US Department of Energy (DOE) budget guidance, and research and development programs was evaluated to determine how the strategy should be revised. Few changes are needed to update the strategy to reflect new waste characterization, research, and regulatory information. However, recent budget guidance from DOE indicates that minimum funding will not be sufficient to accomplish original objectives to upgrade the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) system to comply with the Federal Facilities Agreement, provide long-term LLLW treatment capability, and minimize environmental, safety, and health risks. Options are presented that might allow the ORNL LLLW system to continue operations temporarily, but they would significantly reduce its capabilities to handle emergency situations, provide treatment for new waste streams, and accommodate waste from the Environmental Restoration Program and from decontamination and decommissioning of surplus facilities. These options are also likely to increase worker radiation exposure, risk of environmental insult, and generation of solid waste for on-site and off-site disposal/storage beyond existing facility capacities. The strategy will be fully developed after receipt of additional guidance. The proposed budget limitations are too severe to allow ORNL to meet regulatory requirements or continue operations long term.

Robinson, S.M.; Abraham, T.J.; DePaoli, S.M.; Walker, A.B.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

260

Review of current Southern California edison load management programs and proposal for a new market-driven, mass-market, demand-response program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility load management programs, including direct load control and interruptible load programs, constitute a large installed base of controllable loads that are employed by utilities as system reliability resources. In response to energy supply shortfalls expected during the summer of 2001, the California Public Utilities Commission in spring 2001 authorized new utility load management programs as well as revisions to existing programs. This report provides an independent review of the designs of these new programs for a large utility (Southern California Edison) and suggests possible improvements to enhance the price responsiveness of the customer actions influenced by these programs. The report also proposes a new program to elicit a mass-market demand response to utility price signals.

Weller, G.H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Belgoprocess Strategy Relating to the Management of Materials from Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Belgium started its nuclear program quite early. The first installations were constructed in the fifties, and presently, more than 55 % of the Belgian electricity production is provided by nuclear power plants. After 30 years of nuclear experience, Belgium started decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the eighties with two main projects: the BR3-PWR plant and the Eurochemic reprocessing plant. The BR3-decommissioning project is carried out at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, while the decommissioning of the former Eurochemic reprocessing plant is managed and operated by Belgoprocess n.v., which is also operating the centralized waste treatment facilities and the interim storage for Belgian radioactive waste. Some fundamental principles have to be considered for the management of materials resulting from the decommissioning of nuclear installations, equipment and/or components, mainly based on the guidelines of the ''IAEA-Safety Fundamentals. The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management. Safety Series No. 111-F, IAEA, Vienna, 1995'' with respect to radioactive waste management. Two of the fundamental principles indicated in this document are specifically dealing with the strategy for the management of materials from decommissioning, ''Generation of radioactive waste shall be kept to the minimum practicable'' (seventh principle), and ''Radioactive waste shall be managed in such a way that it will not impose undue burdens on future generations'' (fifth principle). Based on these fundamental principles, Belgoprocess has made a straightforward choice for a strategy with minimization of the amount of materials to be managed as radioactive waste. This objective is obtained through the use of advanced decontamination techniques and the unconditional release of decontaminated materials. Unconditionally released materials are recycled, such as i.e., metal materials that are removed to conventional melting facilities, or are removed to conventional industrial disposal sites if they have no remaining value. In order to achieve these objectives, Belgoprocess uses techniques and equipment that enable the high degrees of decontamination to be obtained, while based on commercially available technology. As an example, for concrete surfaces, where the contamination has not penetrated deeply, significant improvement in operation efficiency was achieved when developing dry hand held and automated floor and wall shaving systems as an alternative for scabbling. As it was also shown that it is economically interesting to decontaminate metal components to unconditional release levels using dry abrasive blasting techniques, an industrial automated dry abrasive blasting unit was installed in the Belgoprocess central decontamination infrastructure. Moreover, a specific facility was developed and operations started for taking representative samples and monitoring concrete material in view of the final demolition and unconditional release of remaining structures of buildings after completing all dismantling and decontamination work.

Teunckens, L.; Lewandowski, P.; Walthery, R.; Ooms. B.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

263

Impact of a solar domestic hot water demand-side management program on an electric utility and its customers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology to assess the economic and environmental impacts of a large scale implementation of solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems is developed. Energy, emission and demand reductions and their respective savings are quantified. It is shown that, on average, an SDHW system provides an energy reduction of about 3200 kWH, avoided emissions of about 2 tons and a capacity contribution of 0.7 kW to a typical Wisconsin utility that installs 5000 SDHW system. The annual savings from these reductions to utility is {dollar_sign}385,000, providing a return on an investment of over 20{percent}. It is shown that, on average, a consumer will save {dollar_sign}211 annually in hot water heating bills. 8 refs., 7 figs.

Trzeniewski, J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Klein, S.A.; Beckman, W.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response andits Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

SciTech Connect

Demand response (DR) is an effective tool which resolves inconsistencies between electric power supply and demand. It further provides a reliable and credible resource that ensures stable and economical operation of the power grid. This paper introduces systematic definitions for DR and demand side management, along with operational differences between these two methods. A classification is provided for DR programs, and various DR strategies are provided for application in air conditioning and refrigerating systems. The reliability of DR is demonstrated through discussion of successful overseas examples. Finally, suggestions as to the implementation of demand response in China are provided.

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

266

Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive Conditioning and Increased User Satisfaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithm. The preferred demand response strategy was foundimplements the specific demand response policy chosen by theload shedding and demand response, a literature review of

Agogino, Alice M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

SciTech Connect

The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

SciTech Connect

The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Located in the heart of "Tornado Alley," Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company's (OG&E) electric grid faces significant challenges from severe weather, hot summers, and about 2% annual load growth. To better control costs and manage electric reliability under these conditions, OG&E is pursuing demand response strategies made possible by implementation of smart grid technologies, tools, and techniques from 2010-2012. The objective is to engage customers in lowering peak demand using smart technologies in homes and businesses and to achieve greater efficiencies on the distribution system. The immediate goal: To defer two 165 MW power plants currently planned for

270

Forecasting demand of commodities after natural disasters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand forecasting after natural disasters is especially important in emergency management. However, since the time series of commodities demand after natural disasters usually has a great deal of nonlinearity and irregularity, it has poor prediction ... Keywords: ARIMA, Demand forecasting, EMD, Emergency management, Natural disaster

Xiaoyan Xu; Yuqing Qi; Zhongsheng Hua

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Leveraging gamification in demand dispatch systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern demand-side management techniques are an integral part of the envisioned smart grid paradigm. They require an active involvement of the consumer for an optimization of the grid's efficiency and a better utilization of renewable energy sources. ... Keywords: demand response, demand side management, direct load control, gamification, smart grid, sustainability

Benjamin Gnauk; Lars Dannecker; Martin Hahmann

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

State Demand-Side Management Programs Funds are Exploding! How Industries Can Best Use These Programs to Maximize Their Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Find out from an Industrial Program Manager that runs a successful state DSM/Energy Efficiency program for the industrial sector how to best find, use and benefit from these types of programs. The amount of money that states are investing in DSM/Energy Efficiency programs is scheduled to double or triple in the next three to five years. This will result in annual program dollars of over $3 billion to invest in projects. This paper will describe how an industrial company can best capitalize on the money and programs available. It will also discuss ways that industrial companies, associations and organizations can best make the case for allocating more of these funds for the Industrial sector.

Nicol, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Perspective on the Potential Role of Geologic Options in a National Carbon Management Strategy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perspective On The Potential Role Of Geologic Options Perspective On The Potential Role Of Geologic Options In A National Carbon Management Strategy David A. Beecy (David.Beecy@hq.doe.gov; 301-903-2787) U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Systems 19901 Germantown Rd., FE-23, Building GTN Germantown, MD 20874 Vello A. Kuuskraa (vkuuskraa@adv-res.com; 703-528-8420) Advanced Resources International, Inc. 1110 N. Glebe, Suite 600 Arlington, VA 22201 Charles Schmidt (Charles.Schmidt@netl.doe.gov; 412-386-6090) U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technical Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236 Abstract. Carbon sequestration is the critical "third-option" for addressing greenhouse gas emissions, along with increased energy efficiency and expanded use of low-carbon fuels.

274

The Belgoprocess Strategy Relating to the Management of Materials from Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Belgium started its nuclear program quite early. The first installations were constructed in the fifties, and presently, more than 55 % of the Belgian electricity production is provided by nuclear power plants. After 30 years of nuclear experience, Belgium started decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the eighties with two main projects: the BR3-PWR plant and the Eurochemic reprocessing plant. The BR3-decommissioning project is carried out at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, while the decommissioning of the former Eurochemic reprocessing plant is managed and operated by Belgoprocess n.v., which is also operating the centralized waste treatment facilities and the interim storage for Belgian radioactive waste. Some fundamental principles have to be considered for the management of materials resulting from the decommissioning of nuclear installations, equipment and/or components, mainly based on the guidelines of the ''IAEA-Safety Fundamentals. The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management. Safety Series No. 111-F, IAEA, Vienna, 1995'' with respect to radioactive waste management. Two of the fundamental principles indicated in this document are specifically dealing with the strategy for the management of materials from decommissioning, ''Generation of radioactive waste shall be kept to the minimum practicable'' (seventh principle), and ''Radioactive waste shall be managed in such a way that it will not impose undue burdens on future generations'' (fifth principle). Based on these fundamental principles, Belgoprocess has made a straightforward choice for a strategy with minimization of the amount of materials to be managed as radioactive waste. This objective is obtained through the use of advanced decontamination techniques and the unconditional release of decontaminated materials. Unconditionally released materials are recycled, such as i.e., metal materials that are removed to conventional melting facilities, or are removed to conventional industrial disposal sites if they have no remaining value. In order to achieve these objectives, Belgoprocess uses techniques and equipment that enable the high degrees of decontamination to be obtained, while based on commercially available technology. As an example, for concrete surfaces, where the contamination has not penetrated deeply, significant improvement in operation efficiency was achieved when developing dry hand held and automated floor and wall shaving systems as an alternative for scabbling. As it was also shown that it is economically interesting to decontaminate metal components to unconditional release levels using dry abrasive blasting techniques, an industrial automated dry abrasive blasting unit was installed in the Belgoprocess central decontamination infrastructure. Moreover, a specific facility was developed and operations started for taking representative samples and monitoring concrete material in view of the final demolition and unconditional release of remaining structures of buildings after completing all dismantling and decontamination work.

Teunckens, L.; Lewandowski, P.; Walthery, R.; Ooms. B.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

275

A spatial agent-based model for assessing strategies of adaptation to climate and tourism demand changes in an alpine tourism destination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vast body of literature suggests that the European Alpine Region is amongst the most sensitive socio-ecosystems to climate change impacts. Our model represents the winter tourism socio-ecosystem of Auronzo di Cadore, located in the Dolomites (Italy), ... Keywords: Adaptation strategies, Alpine tourism, Climate change, Social simulation, Spatial agent-based model

Stefano Balbi, Carlo Giupponi, Pascal Perez, Marco Alberti

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A strategy for the management of energy losses in a local electricity distribution network.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation contains a strategy to minimize the non-technical electrical energy losses in an electrical distribution network. In order to develop the strategy, a model… (more)

Fourie, Johannes Wilhelmus

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Dividends with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

To assist facility managers in assessing whether and to what extent they should participate in demand response programs offered by ISOs, we introduce a systematic process by which a curtailment supply curve can be developed that integrates costs and other program provisions and features. This curtailment supply curve functions as bid curve, which allows the facility manager to incrementally offer load to the market under terms and conditions acceptable to the customer. We applied this load curtailment assessment process to a stylized example of an office building, using programs offered by NYISO to provide detail and realism.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Goldman, Charles; Sezgen, O.; Pratt, D.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Draft Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources Draft Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources Utilities in many states have been implementing energy efficiency and load management programs...

279

Power management strategy based on adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system for fuel cell-battery hybrid vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A power management strategy based on an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system is proposed to enhance the fuel economy of fuel cell-battery hybrid vehicle and increase the mileage of continuation of journey. The model of hybrid vehicle for fuel cell-battery structure is developed by electric vehicle simulation software advisor. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed strategy can satisfy the power requirement of four standard drive cycles and achieve the power distribution between fuel cell system and battery. The comprehensive comparisons with a power tracking control strategy which is widely adopted in advisor verify that the proposed strategy has better validity in terms of fuel economy in four standard drive cycles. Hence

Qi Li; Weirong Chen; Shukui Liu; Zhiyu You; Shiyong Tao; Yankun Li

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Development and evaluation of fully automated demand response in large facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development for Demand Response Calculation - Findings and2003. “Dividends with Demand Response. ” ASHRAE Journal,Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ”

Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Shockman, Christine; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Design and Implementation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities. CEC-Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Management and Demand Response in Commercial Building. ,

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Final report: mathematical method for quantifying the effectiveness of management strategies.  

SciTech Connect

Large complex teams (e.g., DOE labs) must achieve sustained productivity in critical operations (e.g., weapons and reactor development) while maintaining safety for involved personnel, the public, and physical assets, as well as security for property and information. This requires informed management decisions that depend on tradeoffs of factors such as the mode and extent of personnel protection, potential accident consequences, the extent of information and physical asset protection, and communication with and motivation of involved personnel. All of these interact (and potentially interfere) with each other and must be weighed against financial resources and implementation time. Existing risk analysis tools can successfully treat physical response, component failure, and routine human actions. However, many ''soft'' factors involving human motivation and interaction among weakly related factors have proved analytically problematic. There has been a need for an effective software tool capable of quantifying these tradeoffs and helping make rational choices. This type of tool, developed during this project, facilitates improvements in safety, security, and productivity, and enables measurement of improvements as a function of resources expended. Operational safety, security, and motivation are significantly influenced by ''latent effects'', which are pre-occurring influences. One example of these is that an atmosphere of excessive fear can suppress open and frank disclosures, which can in turn hide problems, impede correction, and prevent lessons learned. Another is that a cultural mind-set of commitment, self-responsibility, and passion for an activity is a significant contributor to the activity's success. This project pursued an innovative approach for quantitatively analyzing latent effects in order to link the above types of factors, aggregating available information into quantitative metrics that can contribute to strategic management decisions, and measuring the results. The approach also evaluates the inherent uncertainties, and allows for tracking dynamics for early response and assessing developing trends. The model development is based on how factors combine and influence other factors in real time and over extended time periods. Potential strategies for improvement can be simulated and measured. Input information can be determined by quantification of qualitative information in a structured derivation process. This has proved to be a promising new approach for research and development applied to personnel performance and risk management.

Covan, John Morgan; Sena-Henderson, Lisa; Robinett, Rush D. III (.; ); Brewer, Jeffrey D.; Roginski, Robert J.; Cooper, James Arlin

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into distributed intelligent-automated demand response (DIADR) building management systems. Project Description This project aims to develop a DIADR building management system with intelligent optimization and control algorithms for demand management, taking into account a multitude of factors affecting cost including: Comfort Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) Lighting Other building systems Climate Usage and occupancy patterns. The key challenge is to provide the demand response the ability to address more and more complex building systems that include a variety of loads,

284

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

285

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response andEnergy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial building's contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. This paper discusses recent research results and new opportunities for advanced building control systems to provide demand response (DR) to improve electricity markets and reduce electric grid problems. The main focus of this paper is the role of new and existing control systems for HVAC and lighting in commercial buildings. A demand-side management framework from building operations perspective with three main features: daily energy efficiency, daily peak load management and event driven, dynamic demand response is presented. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide potential in commercial buildings is outlined. Case studies involving energy management and control systems and DR savings opportunities are presented. The paper also describes results from three years of research in California to automate DR in buildings. Case study results and research on advanced buildings systems in New York are also presented.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

286

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response andEnergy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial building's contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. This paper discusses recent research results and new opportunities for advanced building control systems to provide demand response (DR) to improve electricity markets and reduce electric grid problems. The main focus of this paper is the role of new and existing control systems for HVAC and lighting in commercial buildings. A demand-side management framework from building operations perspective with three main features: daily energy efficiency, daily peak load management and event driven, dynamic demand response is presented. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide potential in commercial buildings is outlined. Case studies involving energy management and control systems and DR savings opportunities are presented. The paper also describes results from three years of research in California to automate DR in buildings. Case study results and research on advanced buildings systems in New York are also presented.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

287

INFORMATION: Management Alert on Environmental Management's Select Strategy for Disposition of Savannah River Site Depleted Uranium Oxides  

SciTech Connect

The Administration and the Congress, through policy statements and passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), have signaled that they hope that proactive actions by agency Inspectors General will help ensure that Federal Recovery Act activities are transparent, effective and efficient. In that context, the purpose of this management alert is to share with you concerns that have been raised to the Office of Inspector General regarding the planned disposition of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) inventory of Depleted Uranium (DU) oxides. This inventory, generated as a by-product of the nuclear weapons production process and amounting to approximately 15,600 drums of DU oxides, has been stored at SRS for decades. A Department source we deem reliable and credible recently came to the Office of Inspector General expressing concern that imminent actions are planned that may not provide for the most cost effective disposition of these materials. During April 2009, the Department chose to use funds provided under the Recovery Act to accelerate final disposition of the SRS inventory of DU oxides. After coordination with State of Utah regulators, elected officials and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Department initiated a campaign to ship the material to a facility operated by EnergySolutions in Clive, Utah. Although one shipment of a portion of the material has already been sent to the EnergySolutions facility, the majority of the product remains at SRS. As had been planned, both for the shipment already made and those planned in the near term, the EnergySolutions facility was to have been the final disposal location for the material. Recently, a member of Congress and various Utah State officials raised questions regarding the radioactive and other constituents present in the DU oxides to be disposed of at the Clive, Utah, facility. These concerns revolved around the characterization of the material and its acceptability under existing licensing criteria. As a consequence, the Governor of Utah met with Department officials to voice concerns regarding further shipments of the material and to seek return of the initial shipment of DU oxides to SRS. Utah's objections and the Department's agreement to accede to the State's demands effectively prohibit the transfer of the remaining material from South Carolina to Utah. In response, the Department evaluated its options and issued a draft decision paper on March 1, 2010, which outlined an alternative for temporary storage until the final disposition issue could be resolved. Under the terms of the proposed option, the remaining shipments from SRS are to be sent on an interim basis to a facility owned by Waste Control Specialists (WCS) in Andrews, Texas. Clearly, this choice carries with it a number of significant logistical burdens, including substantial additional costs for, among several items, repackaging at SRS, transportation to Texas, storage at the interim site, and, repackaging and transportation to the yet-to-be-determined final disposition point. The Department source expressed the concern that the proposal to store the material on an interim basis in Texas was inefficient and unnecessary, asserting: (1) that the materials could remain at SRS until a final disposition path is identified, and that this could be done safely, securely and cost effectively; and, (2) that the nature of the material was not subject to existing compliance agreements with the State of South Carolina, suggesting the viability of keeping the material in storage at SRS until a permanent disposal site is definitively established. We noted that, while the Department's decision paper referred to 'numerous project and programmatic factors that make it impractical to retain the remaining inventory at Savannah River,' it did not outline the specific issues involved nor did it provide any substantive economic or environmental analysis supporting the need for the planned interim storage action. The only apparent driver in this case was a Recovery Act-related goal esta

None

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Ups and downs of demand limiting  

SciTech Connect

Electric power load management by limiting power demand can be used for energy conservation. Methods for affecting demand limiting, reducing peak usage in buildings, particularly usage for heating and ventilating systems, and power pricing to encourage demand limiting are discussed. (LCL)

Pannkoke, T.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Demand-side management in office buildings in Kuwait through an ice-storage assisted HVAC system with model predictive control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Examining methods for controlling the electricity demand in Kuwait was the main objective and motivation of this researchp roject. The extensiveu se of air-conditioning for… (more)

Al-Hadban, Yehya

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Analysis of Severe Accident Management Strategy for a BWR-4 Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Chinshan nuclear power plant (NPP) is a Mark-I boiling water reactor (BWR) NPP located in northern Taiwan. The Chinshan NPP severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs) were developed based on the BWR Owners Group Emergency Procedure Guidelines/Severe Accident Guidelines and were developed at the end of 2003. The MAAP4 code has been used as a tool to validate the SAMG strategies. The development process and characteristics of the Chinshan SAMGs are described. The T{sub 5}U{sub t}X{sub C} sequence, the highest core damage frequency in the probabilistic risk assessment insight of the Chinshan NPP, is cited as a reference case for SAMG validation. Not all safety injection systems are operated in the T{sub 5}U{sub t}X{sub C} sequence. The severe accident progression is simulated, and the entry condition of the SAMGs is described. Then, the T{sub 5}U{sub t}X{sub C} sequence is simulated with reactor pressure vessel (RPV) depressurization. Mitigation actions based on the Chinshan NPP SAMGs are then applied to demonstrate the effectiveness of the SAMGs. Sensitivity studies on RPV depressurization with the reactor water level and minimum RPV injection flow rate are also investigated in this study. Based on MAAP4 calculation and the default values of the parameters calculating the severe accident phenomena, the result shows that RPV depressurization before the reactor water level reaches one-fourth of the core water level can prevent the core from damage in the T{sub 5}U{sub t}X{sub C} sequence. The flow rate of two control rod drive pumps is enough to maintain the reactor water level above the top of active fuel and cool down the core in the T{sub 5}U{sub t}X{sub C} sequence without operator action.

Wang, T.-C.; Wang, S.-J.; Teng, J.-T

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Respiration-Correlated Image Guidance Is the Most Important Radiotherapy Motion Management Strategy for Most Lung Cancer Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), 4D image guidance (4D-IG), and beam gating on calculated treatment field margins in a lung cancer patient population. Materials and Methods: Images were acquired from 46 lung cancer patients participating in four separate protocols at three institutions in Europe and the United States. Seven patients were imaged using fluoroscopy, and 39 patients were imaged using 4DCT. The magnitude of respiratory tumor motion was measured. The required treatment field margins were calculated using a statistical recipe (van Herk M, et al. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2000;474:1121-1135), with magnitudes of all uncertainties, except respiratory peak-to-peak displacement, the same for all patients, taken from literature. Required margins for respiratory motion management were calculated using the residual respiratory tumor motion for each patient for various motion management strategies. Margin reductions for respiration management were calculated using 4DCT, 4D-IG, and gated beam delivery. Results: The median tumor motion magnitude was 4.4 mm for the 46 patients (range 0-29.3 mm). This value corresponded to required treatment field margins of 13.7 to 36.3 mm (median 14.4 mm). The use of 4DCT, 4D-IG, and beam gating required margins that were reduced by 0 to 13.9 mm (median 0.5 mm), 3 to 5.2 mm (median 5.1 mm), and 0 to 7 mm (median 0.2 mm), respectively, to a total of 8.5 to 12.4 mm (median 8.6 mm). Conclusion: A respiratory management strategy for lung cancer radiotherapy including planning on 4DCT scans and daily image guidance provides a potential reduction of 37% to 47% in treatment field margins. The 4D image guidance strategy was the most effective strategy for >85% of the patients.

Korreman, Stine, E-mail: korreman@ruc.dk [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark); Department of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison (United States); Persson, Gitte; Nygaard, Ditte [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brink, Carsten [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Juhler-Nottrup, Trine [Department of Oncology, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

FY12 annual Report: PHEV Engine Control and Energy Management Strategy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives are: (1) Investigate novel engine control strategies targeted at rapid engine/catalyst warming for the purpose of mitigating tailpipe emissions from plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) exposed to multiple engine cold start events; (2) Optimize integration of engine control strategies with hybrid supervisory control strategies in order to reduce cold start emissions and fuel consumption of PHEVs; and (3) Ensure that development of new vehicle technologies complies with existing emission standards.

Chambon, Paul H [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elsevier. Dowds, J. Anaerobic Digestion: A Farm Methaneto the adoption of anaerobic digestion on US livestock2006) “Strategies for the anaerobic digestion of the organic

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Multimodal Traffic at Isolated Signalized Intersections: New Management Strategies to Increase Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of bicycles on capacity of signalized intersections.can produce significant capacity gains in complicated, real-Strategies to Increase Capacity Yiguang Xuan, Vikash Gayah,

Xuan, Yiguang; Gayah, Vikash; Daganzo, Carlos; Cassidy, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities Title Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-58178 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Piette, Mary Ann, David S. Watson, Naoya Motegi, and Norman Bourassa Date Published 10/18/2005 Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract This report describes the results of the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of time dependant activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage electricity costs, and provide systems that encourage load shifting or shedding during times when the electric grid is near its capacity or electric prices are high. Demand Response is a subset of demand side management, which also includes energy efficiency and conservation. The overall goal of this research project was to support increased penetration of DR in large facilities through the use of automation and better understanding of DR technologies and strategies in large facilities. To achieve this goal, a set of field tests were designed and conducted. These tests examined the performance of Auto-DR systems that covered a diverse set of building systems, ownership and management structures, climate zones, weather patterns, and control and communication configurations.

297

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Title Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5319E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Aimee T. McKane, Sasank Goli, Peter L. Therkelsen, and Daniel Olsen Date Published 01/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords automated dr, controls and automation, demand response, dynamic pricing, industrial controls, market sectors, openadr Abstract California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with good control capabilities are needed to dispel perceived barriers to participation and to investigate industrial subsectors suggested of having inherent Demand Response potential.

298

Inventory management strategy for the supply chain of a medical device company  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the medical device industry, many companies rely on a high inventory strategy in order to meet their customers' urgent requirements, sometimes leading to excessive inventory. This problem is compounded when it involves ...

Tjhin, Poi Chung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

System strategies in the management of transit systems towards the end of their life cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores and evaluates essential strategies needed for the transit authority/operator to deal with end of life cycle challenges of Rapid Transit Systems (RTS) systems. RTS systems are elaborate systems consisting ...

Kairon, Ajmer Singh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Electric Transmission Line Right-of-Way Post-Blackout Vegetation Management Strategies: 2008 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of the federal government in regulating vegetation management on power line corridors changed significantly after the August 2003 blackout that affected more than 50 million people in the eastern United States and Canada. In 2004, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) released a series of reports on vegetation management associated with the blackout, with a respondent sequence of draft standards for vegetation management released from 2005-2006. These standards are being promulgated an...

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ethnic and Geographic Distribution of Natural Resource Management Strategies in the Tchabal Mbabo Region, Cameroon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Conservation and development projects in Africa are now attempting to implement participatory approaches to protected area management. These approaches remedy many past sources of conflict… (more)

Green, Arthur Gerrish

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Development of a Fuel Containing Material Removal and Waste Management Strategy for the Chernobyl Unit 4 Shelter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was performed to develop a strategy for the removal of fuel-containing material (FCM) from the Chernobyl Unit 4 Shelter and for the related waste management. This study was performed during Phase 1 of the Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP) and was funded by the Chernobyl Shelter Fund. The main objective for Phase 2 of the SIP is to stabilize the Shelter and to construct a New Confinement (NC) by the year 2007. In addition, the SIP includes studies on the strategy and on the conceptual design implications of the removal of FCM from the Shelter. This is considered essential for the ultimate goal, the transformation of the Shelter into an environmentally safe system.

Tokarevsky, V. V.; Shibetsky, Y. A.; Leister, P.; Davison, W. R.; Follin, J. F.; McNair, J.; Lins, W.; Edler, G.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

303

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

304

Demand Response Spinning Reserve  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Title Demand Response Spinning Reserve Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2007 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Janine Nelson-Hoffman, Carlos...

305

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

306

Addressing Energy Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Bo Shen, Girish Ghatikar, Chun Chun Ni, and Junqiao Dudley Environmental Energy...

307

Propane Sector Demand Shares  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... agricultural demand does not impact regional propane markets except when unusually high and late demand for propane for crop drying combines with early cold ...

308

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Title Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2011 Authors Cappers, Peter, Andrew D. Mills, Charles A. Goldman, Ryan H. Wiser, and Joseph H. Eto Pagination 76 Date Published 10/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords demand response, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, renewable generation integration, smart grid Abstract The penetration of renewable generation technology (e.g., wind, solar) is expected to dramatically increase in the United States during the coming years as many states are implementing policies to expand this sector through regulation and/or legislation. It is widely understood, though, that large scale deployment of certain renewable energy sources, namely wind and solar, poses system integration challenges because of its variable and often times unpredictable production characteristics (NERC, 2009). Strategies that rely on existing thermal generation resources and improved wind and solar energy production forecasts to manage this variability are currently employed by bulk power system operators, although a host of additional options are envisioned for the near future. Demand response (DR), when properly designed, could be a viable resource for managing many of the system balancing issues associated with integrating large-scale variable generation (VG) resources (NERC, 2009). However, demand-side options would need to compete against strategies already in use or contemplated for the future to integrate larger volumes of wind and solar generation resources. Proponents of smart grid (of which Advanced Metering Infrastructure or AMI is an integral component) assert that the technologies associated with this new investment can facilitate synergies and linkages between demand-side management and bulk power system needs. For example, smart grid proponents assert that system-wide implementation of advanced metering to mass market customers (i.e., residential and small commercial customers) as part of a smart grid deployment enables a significant increase in demand response capability.1 Specifically, the implementation of AMI allows electricity consumption information to be captured, stored and utilized at a highly granular level (e.g., 15-60 minute intervals in most cases) and provides an opportunity for utilities and public policymakers to more fully engage electricity customers in better managing their own usage through time-based rates and near-real time feedback to customers on their usage patterns while also potentially improving the management of the bulk power system. At present, development of time-based rates and demand response programs and the installation of variable generation resources are moving forward largely independent of each other in state and regional regulatory and policy forums and without much regard to the complementary nature of their operational characteristics.2 By 2020, the electric power sector is expected to add ~65 million advanced meters3 (which would reach ~47% of U.S. households) as part of smart grid and AMI4 deployments (IEE, 2010) and add ~40-80 GW of wind and solar capacity (EIA, 2010). Thus, in this scoping study, we focus on a key question posed by policymakers: what role can the smart grid (and its associated enabling technology) play over the next 5-10 years in helping to integrate greater penetration of variable generation resources by providing mass market customers with greater access to demand response opportunities? There is a well-established body of research that examines variable generation integration issues as well as demand response potential, but the nexus between the two has been somewhat neglected by the industry. The studies that have been conducted are informative concerning what could be accomplished with strong broad-based support for the expansion of demand response opportunities, but typically do not discuss the many barriers that stand in the way of reaching this potential. This study examines how demand side resources could be used to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system, identifies barriers that currently limit the use of demand side strategies, and suggests several factors that should be considered in assessing alternative strategies that can be employed to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system. It is difficult to properly gauge the role that DR could play in managing VG integration issues in the near future without acknowledging and understanding the entities and institutions that govern the interactions between variable generation and mass market customers (see Figure ES-1). Retail entities, like load-serving entities (LSE) and aggregators of retail customers (ARC), harness the demand response opportunities of mass market customers through tariffs (and DR programs) that are approved by state regulatory agencies or local governing entities (in the case of public power). The changes in electricity consumption induced by DR as well as the changes in electricity production due to the variable nature of wind and solar generation technologies is jointly managed by bulk power system operators. Bulk power system operators function under tariffs approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and must operate their systems in accordance with rules set by regional reliability councils. These reliability rules are derived from enforceable standards that are set by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and approved by federal regulators. Thus, the role that DR can play in managing VG integration issues is contingent on what opportunities state and local regulators are willing to approve and how customers' response to the DR opportunities can be integrated into the bulk power system both electrically (due to reliability rules) and financially (due to market rules).

309

Management Employment-Relations Strategies: Perspectives from Studies of European (and American) Airlines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss deregulation (liberalisation) and some of the international institutions that influence the management of people in airlines. As a point of departure, we summarise contrasting models from successful ‘new entrant’ ...

Bamber, Greg J.

310

The Role of Distributed Resources in Business Strategies for Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes how electric retailers and power marketers may be able to use gas-fueled distributed resources (DR) for either risk management or gas-electric arbitrage.

2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

311

Globalization at NTT DoCoMo : implementing global business management strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global business management has become one of the most important issues facing companies today, and global economic dynamics provide companies with both tremendous opportunities and formidable challenges. Countries are ...

Takagi, Katsuyuki, 1964-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Risk management with residential real estate derivatives : strategies for home builders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines why and how publicly-traded home builders might use index-based residential property derivatives to manage risk. After describing a number of alternative reasons for hedging, I argue for a paradigm for ...

Eddins, Quinn W. (Quinn William)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Quality Assurance Strategy for Existing Homes: Final Quality Management Primer for High Performing Homes  

SciTech Connect

This guide is designed to help Building America (BA) Teams understand quality management and its role in transitioning from conventional to high performance home building and remodeling. It explains what quality means, the value of quality management systems, the unique need for QMS when building high performing homes, and the first steps to a implementing a comprehensive QMS. This document provides a framework and context for BA teams when they encounter builders and remodelers.

Del Bianco, M.; Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wood, A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Management Strategies for Treatment and Disposal of Utility-Generated Low-Level Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some states or regional compacts may be unable to establish LLRW disposal facilities by the January 1, 1993, deadline. The possible strategies described in this report should help nuclear utilities prepare for this possibility by identifying safe and cost-effective waste disposal options.

1989-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

315

FY11 annual Report: PHEV Engine Control and Energy Management Strategy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objectives are to: (1) Investigate novel engine control strategies targeted at rapid engine/catalyst warming for the purpose of mitigating tailpipe emissions from plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) exposed to multiple engine cold start events; and (2) Validate and optimize hybrid supervisory control techniques developed during previous and on-going research projects by integrating them into the vehicle level control system and complementing them with the modified engine control strategies in order to further reduce emissions during both cold start and engine re-starts. Approach used are: (1) Perform a literature search of engine control strategies used in conventional powertrains to reduce cold start emissions; (2) Develop an open source engine controller providing full access to engine control strategies in order to implement new engine/catalyst warm-up behaviors; (3) Modify engine cold start control algorithms and characterize impact on cold start behavior; and (4) Develop an experimental Engine-In-the-Loop test stand in order to validate control methodologies and verify transient thermal behavior and emissions of the real engine when combined with a virtual hybrid powertrain. Some major accomplishments are: (1) Commissioned a prototype engine controller on a GM Ecotec 2.4l direct injected gasoline engine on an engine test cell at the University of Tennessee. (2) Obtained from Bosch (with GM's approval) an open calibration engine controller for a GM Ecotec LNF 2.0l Gasoline Turbocharged Direct Injection engine. Bosch will support the bypass of cold start strategies if calibration access proves insufficient. The LNF engine and its open controller were commissioned on an engine test cell at ORNL. (3) Completed a literature search to identify key engine cold start control parameters and characterized their impact on the real engine using the Bosch engine controller to calibrate them. (4) Ported virtual hybrid vehicle model from offline simulation environment to real-time Hardware-In-the-Loop platform.

Chambon, Paul H [ORNL

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers...

317

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Demand Trading: Building Liquidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand trading holds substantial promise as a mechanism for efficiently integrating demand-response resources into regional power markets. However, regulatory uncertainty, the lack of proper price signals, limited progress toward standardization, problems in supply-side markets, and other factors have produced illiquidity in demand-trading markets and stalled the expansion of demand-response resources. This report shows how key obstacles to demand trading can be overcome, including how to remove the unce...

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

Review of current Southern California edison load management programs and proposal for a new market-driven, mass-market, demand-response program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Southern California Edison company. Table of Contentsfor Southern California Edison. LBNL-52408. Appendix A.Current Southern California Edison Load Management Programs

Weller, G.H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Development and Demonstration of Energy Management Control Strategies for Automated Real-Time Pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric loads in commercial buildings can be automatically shifted or shed in response to variable energy prices, resulting in big cost savings for building owners and substantial load-reduction benefits for the energy company supplying the building. This project demonstrated the magnitude of savings possible with such an energy management system.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

SciTech Connect

This study examines data center characteristics, loads, control systems, and technologies to identify demand response (DR) and automated DR (Open Auto-DR) opportunities and challenges. The study was performed in collaboration with technology experts, industrial partners, and data center facility managers and existing research on commercial and industrial DR was collected and analyzed. The results suggest that data centers, with significant and rapidly growing energy use, have significant DR potential. Because data centers are highly automated, they are excellent candidates for Open Auto-DR. 'Non-mission-critical' data centers are the most likely candidates for early adoption of DR. Data center site infrastructure DR strategies have been well studied for other commercial buildings; however, DR strategies for information technology (IT) infrastructure have not been studied extensively. The largest opportunity for DR or load reduction in data centers is in the use of virtualization to reduce IT equipment energy use, which correspondingly reduces facility cooling loads. DR strategies could also be deployed for data center lighting, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Additional studies and demonstrations are needed to quantify benefits to data centers of participating in DR and to address concerns about DR's possible impact on data center performance or quality of service and equipment life span.

Ghatikar, Girish; Piette, Mary Ann; Fujita, Sydny; McKane, Aimee; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Radspieler, Anthony; Mares, K.C.; Shroyer, Dave

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Field Tests, Simulation and Audits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Braun (Purdue). 2004. Peak demand reduction from pre-coolingmass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has beenpre-cooling strategies on peak demand. In addition, a set of

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The development of a methodology to quantify the impacts of information management strategies on EPC projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research develops and demonstrates a methodology to quantify time and cost impacts on Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) projects resulting from information management driven process changes in design related activities. Many companies have implemented information technologies expecting to save time and effort, gain competitive advantage, improve productivity, better align objectives, and improve product quality. The premise of this research is that these benefits can be quantified in terms of time and cost project performance measures. While previous efforts to quantify benefits have been function-or technology-specific, and have provided sub-optimal results, the methodology presented allows quantification at a total project level. A schematic representation of the EPC Process was developed and field data from both owner and contractor companies was collected to serve as a baseline condition. Fifteen specific design related activities were modeled in detail and also loaded with associated field collected time and cost data. Potential process changes from increasing levels of information management were investigated. Monte Carlo simulation was used as the means by which time and cost impacts of the process changes were observed and measured. The impacts found in the specific design activities were used to adjust the baseline condition of the EPC process. Resimulation of the total process enabled quantification of impacts at a project level. The results of the research demonstrated that potential impacts from information management can be quantified. The results also showed that very aggressive levels of information management improvements may potentially improve total project activity time and labor cost by 7% and 8%, respectively. More conservative changes showed impacts to the same parameters at approximately 3% and 1%. The research also provided an indication of the relative impact various level of information management may have on project elapsed time. Finally, the research illustrated the importance of measuring the impacts at a total project-level. That is, the magnitude of impacts at the project-level were much lower than those observed at the activity or task level, thus providing a more realistic approximation of information management impacts.

Moreau, Karen Anne

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Frequently Asked Questions About Southwesterns Vegetation Management Strategy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OK 74103-3502 OK 74103-3502 918-595-6600 www.swpa.gov Vegetation Management Program - Frequently Asked Questions Question. Why does Southwestern have to keep its transmission corridor clear of trees? Answer. Southwestern's vegetation management goals are to promote safety, provide for main- tenance access, and ensure electric system reliability. Trees or other vegetation near a trans- mission line can conduct electricity and increase the chance of unintentional contact with people and pets. If electricity flows through a tree to the ground, that tree essentially becomes "electrified," and anyone touching that tree could sustain serious injury, even death, as electricity seeks a path to ground. Additionally, as the operator of nearly 1,400 miles

325

Carbon emissions reduction strategies in Africa from improved waste management: A review  

SciTech Connect

The paper summarises a literature review into waste management practices across Africa as part of a study to assess methods to reduce carbon emissions. Research shows that the average organic content for urban Municipal Solid Waste in Africa is around 56% and its degradation is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. The paper concludes that the most practical and economic way to manage waste in the majority of urban communities in Africa and therefore reduce carbon emissions is to separate waste at collection points to remove dry recyclables by door to door collection, compost the remaining biogenic carbon waste in windrows, using the maturated compost as a substitute fertilizer and dispose the remaining fossil carbon waste in controlled landfills.

Couth, R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.z [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Municipal solid waste management in Africa: Strategies and livelihoods in Yaounde, Cameroon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the state of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in the capital of Cameroon, Yaounde, and suggests some possible solutions for its improvement. The institutional, financial, and physical aspects of MSW management, as well as the livelihoods of the population, were analyzed. Our study revealed that distances and lack of infrastructure have a major impact on waste collection. Garbage bins are systematically mentioned as the primary infrastructure needed by the population in all quarters, whether it be a high or low standard community. The construction of transfer stations and the installation of garbage bins are suggested as a solution to reduce distances between households and garbage bins, thus improving waste collection vehicle accessibility. Transfer stations and garbage bins would enable the official waste collection company to expand its range of services and significantly improve waste collection rates. Several transfer stations have already been set up by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and community-based organizations (CBOs), but they require technical, institutional and funding support. Research is needed on the quality and safety of community-made compost, as well as on soil fertility in urban and peri-urban areas. Most of the stakeholders, municipalities, the official waste collection company and households acknowledge the need for better monitoring and regulation of MSW management. The urban community of Yaounde also needs to maintain its support of MSW management and promote the sustainability of NGOs and CBOs operating in underserved areas not yet covered by adequate infrastructures. A major opportunity for implementation of such waste policy is the heavily indebted poor countries (HIPC) program dedicated to urban planning and good governance.

Parrot, Laurent [Centre de Cooperation Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Developpement (CIRAD), Montpellier 34398 Cedex 5 (France)], E-mail: laurent.parrot@cirad.fr; Sotamenou, Joel; Dia, Bernadette Kamgnia [University of Yaounde II - Soa, Faculty of Economics and Management, P.O. Box 1365, Yaounde (Cameroon)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Demand Response Quick Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Demand response quick assessment tool image The opportunities for demand reduction and cost savings with building demand responsive controls vary tremendously with building type and location. This assessment tool will predict the energy and demand savings, the economic savings, and the thermal comfort impact for various demand responsive strategies. Users of the tool will be asked to enter the basic building information such as types, square footage, building envelope, orientation, utility schedule, etc. The assessment tool will then use the prototypical simulation models to calculate the energy and demand reduction potential under certain demand responsive strategies, such as precooling, zonal temperature set up, and chilled water loop and air loop set points

328

Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances  

SciTech Connect

With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Demand Impacted by Weather  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When you look at demand, it’s also interesting to note the weather. The weather has a big impact on the demand of heating fuels, if it’s cold, consumers will use ...

330

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

331

Demand Trading Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Download report 1006017 for FREE. The global movement toward competitive markets is paving the way for a variety of market mechanisms that promise to increase market efficiency and expand customer choice options. Demand trading offers customers, energy service providers, and other participants in power markets the opportunity to buy and sell demand-response resources, just as they now buy and sell blocks of power. EPRI's Demand Trading Toolkit (DTT) describes the principles and practice of demand trading...

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Title Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-3643E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Kiliccote, Sila, Mary Ann Piette, Johanna L. Mathieu, and Kristen Parrish Conference Name 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords market sectors, openadr Abstract California is a leader in automating demand response (DR) to promote low-cost, consistent, and predictable electric grid management tools. Over 250 commercial and industrial facilities in California participate in fully-automated programs providing over 60 MW of peak DR savings. This paper presents a summary of Open Automated DR (OpenADR) implementation by each of the investor-owned utilities in California. It provides a summary of participation, DR strategies and incentives. Commercial buildings can reduce peak demand from 5 to 15% with an average of 13%. Industrial facilities shed much higher loads. For buildings with multi-year savings we evaluate their load variability and shed variability. We provide a summary of control strategies deployed, along with costs to install automation. We report on how the electric DR control strategies perform over many years of events. We benchmark the peak demand of this sample of buildings against their past baselines to understand the differences in building performance over the years. This is done with peak demand intensities and load factors. The paper also describes the importance of these data in helping to understand possible techniques to reach net zero energy using peak day dynamic control capabilities in commercial buildings. We present an example in which the electric load shape changed as a result of a lighting retrofit.

333

Energy management action plan: Developing a strategy for overcoming institutional barriers to municipal energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

Energy offices working to improve efficiency of local government facilities face not only technical tasks, but institutional barriers, such as budget structures that do not reward efficiency, a low awareness of energy issues, and purchasing procedures based only on minimizing initial cost. The bureau, in working to remove such barriers in San Francisco, has identified 37 institutional barriers in areas such as operations & maintenance, purchasing, and facility design; these barriers were then reorganized into three groupings-- policy & attitudes, budget & incentives, and awareness & information-- and mapped. This map shows that the barriers mutually reinforce each other, and that a holistic approach is required for permanent change. The city`s recreation & parks department was used as a model department, and information about facility energy use was compiled into a departmental energy review. Staff interviews showed how barriers affect conservation. The bureau then generated ideas for projects to remove specific barriers and rated them according to potential impact and the resources required to implement them. Four of the six projects selected focused on maintenance staff: a cost- sharing lighting retrofit program, a boiler efficiency program, a departmental energy tracking system, and a budgetary incentive program for conservation. The other two projects are city-wide: promotion of a new term contract supplying energy-efficient light materials, and publication/distribution of ENERGY NEWS newsletter. A general methodology, the EMAP Strategy Guide, has been created to assist other energy offices in developing EMAPs.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

An Externally Replicated Experiment for Evaluating the Learning Effectiveness of Using Simulations in Software Project Management Education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing demand for software project managers in industry requires strategies for the development of the management-related knowledge and skills of the current and future software workforce. Although several approaches help teach the required skills ... Keywords: COCOMO, learning effectiveness, replicated experiment, software project management education, system dynamics simulation

Dietmar Pfahl; Oliver Laitenberger; Jörg Dorsch; Günther Ruhe

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Chapter 3 Demand-Side Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

these resources result from one of two methods of reducing load: energy efficiency or demand response load management. The energy efficiency method designs and deploys...

336

Model Documentation Report: Residential Demand Module of the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

rebates used in demand-side management programs), can be modified at the equipment level. Housing ... Residential retired equipment efficiencies of 2005 stock

337

Integrated Forecasting and Inventory Control for Seasonal Demand ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a data-driven forecasting technique with integrated inventory ... ponents of inventory management: the random demand is first estimated using ...

338

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Publication Type...

339

Soft systems analysis of the unification of test and evaluation and program management: A study of a Federal Aviation Administration's strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strategic objective of a test and evaluation (T&E) organization is to detect defects, which must be fixed prior to system deployment in order to meet the operational needs and achieve customer satisfaction. Numerous process improvement models have ... Keywords: program management, program strategy, soft systems methodology, test and evaluation

Arekhandia Patrick Eigbe; Brian J. Sauser; John Boardman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

California is a leader in automating demand response (DR) to promote low-cost, consistent, and predictable electric grid management tools. Over 250 commercial and industrial facilities in California participate in fully-automated programs providing over 60 MW of peak DR savings. This paper presents a summary of Open Automated DR (OpenADR) implementation by each of the investor-owned utilities in California. It provides a summary of participation, DR strategies and incentives. Commercial buildings can reduce peak demand from 5 to 15percent with an average of 13percent. Industrial facilities shed much higher loads. For buildings with multi-year savings we evaluate their load variability and shed variability. We provide a summary of control strategies deployed, along with costs to install automation. We report on how the electric DR control strategies perform over many years of events. We benchmark the peak demand of this sample of buildings against their past baselines to understand the differences in building performance over the years. This is done with peak demand intensities and load factors. The paper also describes the importance of these data in helping to understand possible techniques to reach net zero energy using peak day dynamic control capabilities in commercial buildings. We present an example in which the electric load shape changed as a result of a lighting retrofit.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Mathieu, Johanna; Parrish, Kristen

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CARBON MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR U.S. ELECTRICITY GENERATION CAPACITY: A VINTAGE-BASED APPROACH  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the stock of fossil-fired power generation capacity in the United States within the context of climate change. At present, there are over 1,337 fossil-fired power generating units of at least 100 MW in capacity, that began operating between the early 1940s and today. Together these units provide some 453 GW of electric power. Launching a national program to accelerate the early retirement of this stock or tearing them down and undertaking near-term brownfield redevelopment with advanced power cycle technologies as a means of addressing their greenhouse gas emissions will not be a sensible option for all of these units. Considering a conservative 40-year operating life, there are over 667 existing fossil-fired power plants, representing a capacity of over 291 GW, that have at least a decades worth of productive life remaining. This paper draws upon specialized tools developed by Battelle to analyze the characteristics of this subset of U.S. power generation assets and explore the relationships between plant type, location, emissions, and vintage. It examines the use of retrofit carbon capture technologies, considering criteria such as the proximity of these power plants to geologic reservoirs, to assess the potential that geologic sequestration of CO2 offers these plants for managing their emissions. The average costs for retrofitting these plants and sequestering their CO2 into nearby geologic reservoirs are presented. A discussion of a set of planned U.S. fossil-fired power projects within this context is also included.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Demand Dispatch-Intelligent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and energy efficiency throughout the value chain resulting in the most economical price for electricity. Having adequate quantities and capacities of demand resources is a...

343

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

U.S. Propane Demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand is higher in 1999 due to higher petrochemical demand and a strong economy. We are also seeing strong demand in the first quarter of 2000; however, ...

346

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xxxv Option Value of Electricity Demand Response, Osmanelasticity in aggregate electricity demand. With these newii) reduction in electricity demand during peak periods (

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT PANEL INITIAL forecast, end-use demand modeling, econometric modeling, hybrid demand modeling, energyMahon, Carl Linvill 2012. Demand Forecast Expert Panel Initial Assessment. California Energy

348

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal conditions. Maximum Demand Saving Intensity [W/ft2]automated electric demand sheds. The maximum electric shed

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Integrated Building Management System (IBMS) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Management System Building Management System (IBMS) Integrated Building Management System (IBMS) The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into an integrated building management system (IBMS). Project Description This project seeks to develop an open integration framework that allows multivendor systems to interoperate seamlessly using internet protocols. The applicant will create an integrated control platform for implementing new integrated control strategies and to enable additional enterprise control applications, such as demand response. The project team seeks to develop several strategies that take advantage of the sensors and functionality of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC); security; and information and communication technologies (ICT) subsystems;

350

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries  

SciTech Connect

California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This,study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with good control capabilities are needed to dispel perceived barriers to participation and to investigate industrial subsectors suggested of having inherent Demand Response potential.

Ghatikar, Girish; McKane, Aimee; Goli, Sasank; Therkelsen, Peter; Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

351

Warehousing and inventory management: integrating simulation modeling and equipment condition diagnostics for predictive maintenance strategies -a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results from a case study in predictive maintenance at a distribution warehouse. A simulation model was built with ARENATM 5.0 for integrating predictive maintenance strategies with production planning strategies, ...

Luis Rene Contreras; Chirag Modi; Arunkumar Pennathur

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

353

Evaluation of Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Two Large Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Building thermal mass can be used to reduce the peak cooling load. For example, in summer, the building mass can be pre-cooled during non-peak hours in order to reduce the cooling load in the peak hours. As a result, the cooling load is shifted in time and the peak demand is reduced. The building mass can be cooled most effectively during unoccupied hours because it is possible to relax the comfort constraints. While the benefits of demand shift are certain, different thermal mass discharge strategies result in different cooling load reduction and savings. The goal of an optimized discharge strategy is to maximize the thermal mass discharge and minimize the possibility of rebounds before the shed period ends. A series of filed tests were carefully planned and conducted in two commercial buildings in Northern California to investigate the effects of various precooling and demand shed strategies. Field tests demonstrated the potential of cooling load reduction in peak hours and importance of discharge strategies to avoid rebounds. EnergyPlus simulation models were constructed and calibrated to investigate different kind of recovery strategies. The results indicate the value of pre-cooling in maximizing the electrical shed in the on-peak period. The results also indicate that the dynamics of the shed need to be managed in order to avoid discharging the thermal capacity of the building too quickly, resulting in high cooling load and electric demand before the end of the shed period. An exponential trajectory for the zone set-point during the discharge period yielded good results and is recommended for practical implementation.

Xu, Peng

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Hawaii Energy Strategy: Program guide  

SciTech Connect

The Hawaii Energy Strategy program, or HES, is a set of seven projects which will produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. It will include a comprehensive energy vulnerability assessment with recommended courses of action to decrease Hawaii`s energy vulnerability and to better prepare for an effective response to any energy emergency or supply disruption. The seven projects are designed to increase understanding of Hawaii`s energy situation and to produce recommendations to achieve the State energy objectives of: Dependable, efficient, and economical state-wide energy systems capable of supporting the needs of the people, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The seven projects under the Hawaii Energy Strategy program include: Project 1: Develop Analytical Energy Forecasting Model for the State of Hawaii. Project 2: Fossil Energy Review and Analysis. Project 3: Renewable Energy Resource Assessment and Development Program. Project 4: Demand-Side Management Program. Project 5: Transportation Energy Strategy. Project 6: Energy Vulnerability Assessment Report and Contingency Planning. Project 7: Energy Strategy Integration and Evaluation System.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Forecasting Uncertain Hotel Room Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic systems are characterized by increasing uncertainty in their dynamics. This increasing uncertainty is likely to incur bad decisions that can be costly in financial terms. This makes forecasting of uncertain economic variables an instrumental activity in any organization. This paper takes the hotel industry as a practical application of forecasting using the Holt-Winters method. The problem here is to forecast the uncertain demand for rooms at a hotel for each arrival day. Forecasting is part of hotel revenue management system whose objective is to maximize the revenue by making decisions regarding when to make rooms available for customers and at what price. The forecast approach discussed in this paper is based on quantitative models and does not incorporate management expertise. Even though, forecast results are found to be satisfactory for certain days, this is not the case for other arrival days. It is believed that human judgment is important when dealing with ...

Mihir Rajopadhye Mounir; Mounir Ben Ghaliay; Paul P. Wang; Timothy Baker; Craig V. Eister

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Advanced Controls Technologies and Strategies Linking Energy Efficiency and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Controls Technologies and Strategies Linking Energy Efficiency and Advanced Controls Technologies and Strategies Linking Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Speaker(s): Sila Kiliccote Date: October 6, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Reliable supply of affordable electricity has been in the spotlight since the blackouts in California, the grid shutdown events in New England and the terrorist threats nationwide. While the array of generation technologies and transmission safety issues have been widely discussed, capacity requirements and demand side management issues have also been revisited. This presentation will concentrate on a preliminary framework to describe how advanced controls can support multiple modes of operations including both energy efficiency and demand response (DR). A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide status will be outlined.

357

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

358

demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

359

Demand Response Database & Demo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Database & Demo Speaker(s): Mike Graveley William M. Smith Date: June 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Mary Ann Piette Infotility...

360

Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

365

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

366

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 4, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. The Demand Response Quick Assessment Tools developed at LBNL will be demonstrated. The tool is built on EnergyPlus simulation and is able to evaluate and compare different DR strategies, such as global temperature reset, chiller cycling, supply air temperature reset, etc. A separate EnergyPlus plotting tool will also be demonstrated during this seminar. Users can use the tool to test EnergyPlus models, conduct parametric analysis, or compare multiple EnergyPlus simulation

367

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes assessments and test results of four end-use technologies, representing products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard that was introduced to the public in 2008 and currently used in two ...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, which is an update to EPRI Report 1016082, includes assessments and test results of four end-use vendor technologies. These technologies represent products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) Communicat...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial refrigerated warehouses that implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems can be excellent candidates for Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) due to equipment synergies, and receptivity of facility managers to strategies that control energy costs without disrupting facility operations. Auto-DR utilizes OpenADR protocol for continuous and open communication signals over internet, allowing facilities to automate their Demand Response (DR). Refrigerated warehouses were selected for research because: They have significant power demand especially during utility peak periods; most processes are not sensitive to short-term (2-4 hours) lower power and DR activities are often not disruptive to facility operations; the number of processes is limited and well understood; and past experience with some DR strategies successful in commercial buildings may apply to refrigerated warehouses. This paper presents an overview of the potential for load sheds and shifts from baseline electricity use in response to DR events, along with physical configurations and operating characteristics of refrigerated warehouses. Analysis of data from two case studies and nine facilities in Pacific Gas and Electric territory, confirmed the DR abilities inherent to refrigerated warehouses but showed significant variation across facilities. Further, while load from California's refrigerated warehouses in 2008 was 360 MW with estimated DR potential of 45-90 MW, actual achieved was much less due to low participation. Efforts to overcome barriers to increased participation may include, improved marketing and recruitment of potential DR sites, better alignment and emphasis on financial benefits of participation, and use of Auto-DR to increase consistency of participation.

Goli, Sasank; McKane, Aimee; Olsen, Daniel

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

370

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This 'electricity value chain' defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to 'demo' potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives. In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Piette, Mary Ann; Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This 'electricity value chain' defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to 'demo' potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives. In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Piette, Mary Ann; Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This ?electricity value chain? defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to"demo" potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives.1 In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; Piette, MaryAnn

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

IT Modernization Strategy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This white paper frames a Department of Energy (DOE) strategy for modernizing our Federal information technology (IT) as one of the foundations for management and operational excellence.  It...

374

Incorporating Offset Projects into Corporate Greenhouse Gas Strategies: Risk Management Under Conditions of Policy and Market Uncert ainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information for electric sector companies considering the development of project-based strategies to offset or reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, as well as insights to help them assess what kinds of projects and strategies are appropriate to their own situations. Effective project-based strategies link investments in specific activities with the emissions reductions they generate, resulting in the creation of mitigation credits with economic value in the emerging GHG marketplace...

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

California Independent System Operator demand response & proxy demand resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are designed to allow end use customers to contribute to energy load reduction individually or through a demand response provider. One form of demand response can occur when an end use customer reduces their electrical usage ...

John Goodin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time. 4 Reducing this peak demand through DR programs meansthat a 5% reduction in peak demand would have resulted insame 5% reduction in the peak demand of the US as a whole.

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

379

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

380

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Demand Side Bidding. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

Spahn, Andrew

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

384

Automated Demand Response Today  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) has progressed over recent years beyond manual and semi-automated DR to include growing implementation and experience with fully automated demand response (AutoDR). AutoDR has been shown to be of great value over manual and semi-automated DR because it reduces the need for human interactions and decisions, and it increases the speed and reliability of the response. AutoDR, in turn, has evolved into the specification known as OpenADR v1.0 (California Energy Commission, PIER Program, C...

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

385

Travel Demand Modeling  

SciTech Connect

This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Garrow, Dr. Laurie [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

United States lubricant demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines United States Lubricant Demand for Automotive and Industrial Lubricants by year from 1978 to 1992 and 1997. Projected total United States Lubricant Demand for 1988 is 2,725 million (or MM) gallons. Automotive oils are expected to account for 1,469MM gallons or (53.9%), greases 59MM gallons (or 2.2%), and Industrial oils will account for the remaining 1,197MM gallons (or 43.9%) in 1988. This proportional relationship between Automotive and Industrial is projected to remain relatively constant until 1992 and out to 1997. Projections for individual years between 1978 to 1992 and 1997 are summarized.

Solomon, L.K.; Pruitt, P.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(at 97 deg. F) #12;Cool Keeper Unit Installation #12;Cool Keeper Test Shed Load Profile 3350 3400 3450 operating according to their 'Natural Duty Cycle' 93 o F Expected load profile w/o Cool Keeper intervention, Demand Side Management #12;Current Programs/Tariffs ­ Load Control Programs Cool Keeper, Utah (currently

389

Developing a holistic strategy for integrated waste management within municipal planning: Challenges, policies, solutions and perspectives for Hellenic municipalities in the zero-waste, low-cost direction  

SciTech Connect

The present position paper addresses contemporary waste management options, weaknesses and opportunities faced by Hellenic local authorities. It focuses on state-of-the-art, tested as well as innovative, environmental management tools on a municipal scale and identifies a range of different collaboration schemes between local authorities and related service providers. Currently, a policy implementation gap is still experienced among Hellenic local authorities; it appears that administration at the local level is inadequate to manage and implement many of the general policies proposed; identify, collect, monitor and assess relevant data; and safeguard efficient and effective implementation of MSWM practices in the framework of integrated environmental management as well. This shortfall is partly due to the decentralisation of waste management issues to local authorities without a parallel substantial budgetary and capacity support, thus resulting in local activity remaining often disoriented and isolated from national strategies, therefore yielding significant planning and implementation problems and delays against pressing issues at hand as well as loss or poor use of available funds. This paper develops a systemic approach for MSWM at both the household and the non-household level, summarizes state-of-the-art available tools and compiles a set of guidelines for developing waste management master plans at the municipal level. It aims to provide a framework in the MSWM field for municipalities in Greece as well as other countries facing similar problems under often comparable socioeconomic settings.

Zotos, G. [Division of Business Studies, Dept. of Economics, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Zampetoglou, S. [Municipal Development Company of Kalamaria, GR-55132 (Greece); Malamakis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: amalama@aix.meng.auth.gr; Antonopoulos, I.-S.; Kontogianni, S. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Tchobanoglous, G. [Department of civil and environmental Engineering, University of California, Davis (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Residential Energy Demand Reduction Analysis and Monitoring Platform - REDRAMP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dramatic Peak Residential Dramatic Peak Residential Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest Yahia Baghzouz Center for Energy Research University of Nevada, Las Vegas Golden, CO Overview * Project description * Subdivision energy efficiency features * Home energy monitoring * Demand side management * Feeder loading * Battery Energy Storage System * Future Work Team Members Project Objective and Methodology * The main objective is to reduce peak power demand of a housing subdivision by 65% (compared to housing development that is built to conventional code). * This objective will be achieved by - Energy efficient home construction with roof- integrated PV system - Demand Side Management - Battery Energy Storage System Project schematic Diagram Project Physical Location: Las Vegas, NV Red Rock Hotel/Casino

391

On Demand Guarantees in Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??On Demand Guarantees in Iran This thesis examines on demand guarantees in Iran concentrating on bid bonds and performance guarantees. The main guarantee types and… (more)

Ahvenainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Demand Side Management in Rangan Banerjee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressed Air ­ reduce pressure, air leakages FRP fans ­ Cooling towers, energy efficient fans Waste heat Cooling Tower Additional Chiller pump Under ground Chilled water Storage tank Space to be conditioned, cooling, motive power...) #12;Utility Load Shape Objectives Peak Clipping Valley Filling Load Shifting

Banerjee, Rangan

395

Discount rates and demand-side management  

SciTech Connect

The standard economic analysis of of implied discount rates for energy-efficiency investment is wrong. First, consumers are not profit maximizing or economic optimizing agents with respect to energy. To the extent consumers make tradeoffs on some criteria other than energy costs, implied discount rates measure that other tradeoff, not the energy cost tradeoff. Second, to the extent that product pricing does not reflect tradeoffs between first cost and energy cost, there is no meaning to implied market discount rates based on these factors. Related to this misinterpretation of consumer and market discount rates is the issue of consumer and utility self-interest. To the extent that utilities can capitalize on the energy-inefficient investment behavior of individuals through DSM programs, it is in their interest and the ratepayer's interest to do so. Considerable evidence suggests that implied discount rates convey extremely misleading information about the level of this underinvestment. Drawing inferences about the value of DSM programs from this information is similarly misleading. An economic explanation of consumer and marker behavior suggests that such underinvestment is both rational and common and that large gains may be achieved through DSM. Societal welfare would be improved if utilities aggressively capitalized on the widespread consumer underinvestment in energy efficiency by incorporating DSM in their resource planning processes.

Chernoff, H.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Demand side management in district heating systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a multiagent system that has made the voyage from research project to commercialised product. The purpose for the multiagent system is to dynamically control a system so that the load of the system is below certain threshold values ... Keywords: agent-based deployed applications

Fredrik Wernstedt; Paul Davidsson; Christian Johansson

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

are country reports from Task XVII participants, including Austria, Finland, Italy, Korea, the Netherlands, Spain and the United States. Annex 8 provides a list of software...

398

The Alignment of Partnering Strategy, Governance and Management in R&D Projects: The Role of Contract Choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Firms increasingly look outside their organizational boundaries to identify partners that can improve the effectiveness of R&D projects. The strategy for using partners, however, varies significantly across projects. In ...

MacCormack, Alan

399

A Strategy and Case Study Example for Designing and Implementing Environmental Long-Term Monitoring at Legacy Management Sites  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring objectives of site owners, regulators, consultants, and scientists typically share the common elements of (1) cost management, (2) risk management, and (3) information management (Figure 1). Many site owners focus on minimizing monitoring costs while regulators typically focus on risk and regulatory compliance. Scientists and consultants typically provide information management in the form of spreadsheets with extracted information provided in reports to other users. This common piecemeal approach upon individual focus on elements of the monitoring objectives, rather than the common objective of minimizing cost and risk using site information, results in missed opportunities for cost savings, environmental protection, and improved understanding of site performance.

Earl D. Mattson; Roelof J. Versteeg; Mark Ankeny; Gail Heath; Alex Richardson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Demand Controlled Filtration in an Industrial Cleanroom  

SciTech Connect

In an industrial cleanroom, significant energy savings were realized by implementing two types of demand controlled filtration (DCF) strategies, one based on particle counts and one on occupancy. With each strategy the speed of the recirculation fan filter units was reduced to save energy. When the control was based on particle counts, the energy use was 60% of the baseline configuration of continuous fan operation. With simple occupancy sensors, the energy usage was 63% of the baseline configuration. During the testing of DCF, no complaints were registered by the operator of the cleanroom concerning processes and products being affected by the DCF implementation.

Faulkner, David; DiBartolomeo, Dennis; Wang, Duo

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A Methodology for Optimizing Boiler Operating Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among the many ways by which an energy manager can conserve energy is the establishment of a strategy for operation of fired boilers. In particular, he can effect total fuel consumption by his decision on how much on-line boiler surplus is required. There is a need to be able to balance the cost advantages of operating with less boiler surplus against the potential economic losses that might result from the increased risk of not meeting demand. A methodology for doing this along with an example calculation, is presented in this paper.

Jones, K. C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Short Communication: Monitoring strategies and scale-appropriate hydrologic and biogeochemical modelling for natural resource management: Conclusions and recommendations from a session held at the iEMSs 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This short communication paper presents recommendations for developing scale-appropriate monitoring and modelling strategies to assist decision making in natural resource management (NRM). These ideas presented here were discussed in the session (S5) ... Keywords: Monitoring strategies, Nutrients, Uncertainty, Water quality, Water resources

Ulrike Bende-Michl; Martin Volk; Daren Harmel; Lachlan Newham; Tommy Dalgaard

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400 .......................................................................................................................................1-1 ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING AT THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION: AN OVERVIEW

404

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required of any forecast of electricity demand and developing ways to reduce the risk of planning errors that could arise from this and other uncertainties in the planning process. Electricity demand is forecast

405

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

406

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

407

On Demand Paging Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The power consumption of the network interface plays a major role in determining the total operating lifetime of wireless handheld devices. On demand paging has been proposed earlier to reduce power consumption in cellular networks. In this scheme, a low power secondary radio is used to wake up the higher power radio, allowing the latter to sleep or remain off for longer periods of time. In this paper we present use of Bluetooth radios to serve as a paging channel for the 802.11 wireless LAN. We have implemented an on-demand paging scheme on a WLAN consisting of iPAQ PDAs equipped with Bluetooth radios and Cisco Aironet wireless networking cards. Our results show power saving ranging from 19% to 46% over the present 802.11b standard operating modes with negligible impact on performance.

Bluetooth Radios On; Yuvraj Agarwal; Rajesh K. Gupta

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Demonstration of Demand Control Ventilation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand Control Ventilation (DCV) is one of the control strategies that can be used modulate the amount of ventilation air for space conditioning in commercial buildings. DCV modulates the amount of ventilation air introduced into the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system based on carbon dioxide levels sensed in the areas served. The carbon dioxide level is a proxy for the number of people within the space, from which the required quantity of ventilation air is determined. By using this ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

Net Demand3 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract Number: DE-FE0004002 (Subcontract: S013-JTH-PPM4002 MOD 00) Summary The US DOE has identified a number of materials that are both used by clean energy technologies and are at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Several of these materials, especially the rare earth elements (REEs) yttrium, cerium, and lanthanum were identified by DOE as critical (USDOE 2010) and are crucial to the function and performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) 1. In addition, US DOE has issued a second Request For Information regarding uses of and markets for these critical materials (RFI;(USDOE 2011)). This report examines how critical materials demand for SOFC applications could impact markets for these materials and vice versa, addressing categories 1,2,5, and 6 in the RFI. Category 1 – REE Content of SOFC Yttria (yttrium oxide) is the only critical material (as defined for the timeframe of interest for SOFC) used in SOFC 2. Yttrium is used as a dopant in the SOFC’s core ceramic cells.. In addition, continuing developments in SOFC technology will likely further reduce REE demand for SOFC, providing credible scope for at least an additional 50 % reduction in REE use if desirable. Category 2 – Supply Chain and Market Demand SOFC developers expect to purchase

J. Thijssen Llc

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

G&T adds versatile load management system  

SciTech Connect

Wolverine`s load management system was designed in response to the need to reduce peak demand. The Energy Management System (EMS) prepares short term (seven day) load forecasts, based on a daily peak demand forecst, augmented by a similar day profile based on weather conditions. The software combines the similar day profile with the daily peak demand forecast to yield an hourly load forecast for an entire week. The software uses the accepted load forecast case in many application functions, including interchange scheduling, unit commitment, and transaction evaluation. In real time, the computer updates the accepted forecast hourly, based in actual changes in the weather and load. The load management program executes hourly. The program uses impact curves to calculate a load management strategy that reduces the load forecast below a desired load threshold.

Nickel, J.R.; Baker, E.D.; Holt, J.W.; Chan, M.L.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-4837E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Goli, Sasank, Aimee T. McKane, and Daniel Olsen Conference Name 2011 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 08/2011 Conference Location Niagara Falls, NY Keywords market sectors, openadr, refrigerated warehouses Abstract Industrial refrigerated warehouses that implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems can be excellent candidates for Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) due to equipment synergies, and receptivity of facility managers to strategies that control energy costs without disrupting facility operations. Auto-DR utilizes OpenADR protocol for continuous and open communication signals over internet, allowing facilities to automate their Demand Response (DR). Refrigerated warehouses were selected for research because: They have significant power demand especially during utility peak periods; most processes are not sensitive to short-term (2-4 hours) lower power and DR activities are often not disruptive to facility operations; the number of processes is limited and well understood; and past experience with some DR strategies successful in commercial buildings may apply to refrigerated warehouses. This paper presents an overview of the potential for load sheds and shifts from baseline electricity use in response to DR events, along with physical configurations and operating characteristics of refrigerated warehouses. Analysis of data from two case studies and nine facilities in Pacific Gas and Electric territory, confirmed the DR abilities inherent to refrigerated warehouses but showed significant variation across facilities. Further, while load from California's refrigerated warehouses in 2008 was 360 MW with estimated DR potential of 45-90 MW, actual achieved was much less due to low participation. Efforts to overcome barriers to increased participation may include, improved marketing and recruitment of potential DR sites, better alignment and emphasis on financial benefits of participation, and use of Auto-DR to increase consistency of participation.

412

Data center demand response: Avoiding the coincident peak via workload shifting and local generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response is a crucial aspect of the future smart grid. It has the potential to provide significant peak demand reduction and to ease the incorporation of renewable energy into the grid. Data centers' participation in demand response is becoming ... Keywords: Data center, Demand response, Online algorithm, Prediction error, Renewable penetration, Workload management

Zhenhua Liu, Adam Wierman, Yuan Chen, Benjamin Razon, Niangjun Chen

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Advanced Controls Technologies and Strategies Linking Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Controls Technologies and Strategies Linking Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Speaker(s): Sila Kiliccote Date: October 6, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Reliable...

414

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Demands..xi Annual natural gas demand for each alternativeused in natural gas demand projections. 34

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum demand and Maximum demand incorporate assumptionslevels, or very minor Maximum demand household size, growthvehicles in Increasing Maximum demand 23 mpg truck share

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Within Hawaiian Electric Company Service Territory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By reducing power usage during peak demand periods, demand response (DR) programs can help utilities manage power loads and complement energy efficiency activities while providing ratepayers an opportunity to substantially reduce their electric bills. This project assessed the costs and benefits of potential DR programs for Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) commercial and industrial (CI) customers.

2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

417

Annual Review of Demand-Side Planning Research: 1985 Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's demand-side planning research spans a wide range of utility activities: planning and evaluating demand-side management programs, investigating end-use forecasting techniques, and analyzing the effect of innovative rates. Reflecting efforts to develop utility applications of EPRI research products in 1985, this report focuses on computer models such as REEPS, COMMEND, HELM, and INDEPTH.

None

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Role of context-awareness for demand response mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently due to major changes in the structure of electricity industry and the rising costs of power generation, many countries have realized the potential and benefits of smart metering systems and demand response programs in balancing between the supply ... Keywords: context-awareness, demand response, smart energy management

Pari Delir Haghighi; Shonali Krishnaswamy

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Tritium production analysis and management strategies for a Fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature test reactor (FHTR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fluoride-salt-cooled High-temperature Test Reactor (FHTR) is a test reactor concept that aims to demonstrate the neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, materials, tritium management, and to address other reactor operational ...

Rodriguez, Judy N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission or system-wide electricity failures will occur; and, · No significant gaming (manipulationCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook Ashuckian, Manager Electricity Analysis Office Terrence O'Brien, Deputy Director Systems Assessment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation By Tansa Musa zones and do not respect size limits in their quest for maximum financial returns. "I lack words economy. China's demand for hardwood drives illegal logging says "Both illegal and authorized

422

Estimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Properties of the AIDS Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator 24 #12;Estimating a Demand SystemEstimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand Amos Golan* Jeffrey with nonnegativity constraints is presented. This approach, called generalized maximum entropy (GME), is more

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

423

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling energy in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads during the peak periods. Savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Case studies in a number of office buildings in California has found that a simple demand limiting strategy reduced the chiller power by 20-100% (0.5-2.3W/ft2) during six

424

Management Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Plan (SSMP) to be submitted to Congress after the April 2010 release of the Nuclear Posture Review Report. It is aligned with the President's National Security Strategy...

425

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

426

DemandDirect | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DemandDirect DemandDirect Jump to: navigation, search Name DemandDirect Place Woodbury, Connecticut Zip 6798 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Product DemandDirect provides demand response, energy efficiency, load management, and distributed generation services to end-use electricity customers in order to reduce electricity consumption, improve grid reliability, and promote renewable energy. Coordinates 44.440496°, -72.414991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.440496,"lon":-72.414991,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

427

Electrical Demand Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almost every building owner or manager is interested in controlling electrical costs. Since the HVAC system is a large user of electricity, this article will discuss what can be done in the HVAC system to influence parts of the utility bill.

Eppelheimer, D. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005 ..............................................................................3 Residential Forecast Comparison ..............................................................................................5 Nonresidential Forecast Comparisons

430

Overview of Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 PJM 08 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Overview of Demand Response PJM ©2008 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Growth, Statistics, and Current Footprint AEP, Dayton, ComEd, & DUQ Dominion Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Current PJM RTO Statistics Current PJM RTO Statistics PJM Mid-Atlantic Integrations completed as of May 1 st , 2005 ©2008 PJM

431

Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced metering Title Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced metering Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-55673 Year of Publication 2004 Authors Levy, Roger, Karen Herter, and John Wilson Conference Name 2004 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 06/2004 Publisher ACEEE Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Call Number California Energy Commission Keywords demand response, demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, energy efficiency demand response advanced metering, rate programs & tariffs Abstract Reliance on the standard cumulative kilowatt-hour meter substantially compromises energy efficiency and demand response programs. Without advanced metering, utilities cannot support time-differentiated rates or collect the detailed customer usage information necessary to (1) educate the customer to the economic value of efficiency and demand response options, or (2) distribute load management incentives proportional to customer contribution. These deficiencies prevent the customer feedback mechanisms that would otherwise encourage economically sound demand-side investments and behaviors. Thus, the inability to collect or properly price electricity usage handicaps the success of almost all efficiency and demand response options.

432

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Title Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-50626 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Herter, Karen, Roger Levy, John Wilson, and Arthur H. Rosenfeld Conference Name 2002 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response, demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, rate programs & tariffs Abstract Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operator controlled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customer controlled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Any demand response program based on this system could consist of either or both of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled, providing automatic load management through customer-programmed price response, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability in California. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers to implementation of such a program in California.

433

Simulation of forage management strategies considering farm-level land diversity: Example of dairy farms in the Auvergne  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land diversity is a characteristic of low-input farming systems. Land diversity can refer to between-field diversity of grassland vegetation types that are a result of management practices (fertilisation, grazing, cutting), and environmental factors ... Keywords: Farmland diversity, Forage practices, Livestock dairy farm, Simulation model

Nadine Andrieu; Christophe Poix; Etienne Josien; Michel Duru

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) performed a technology demonstration and evaluation for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in Seattle City Light's (SCL) service territory. This report summarizes the process and results of deploying open automated demand response (OpenADR) in Seattle area with winter morning peaking commercial buildings. The field tests were designed to evaluate the feasibility of deploying fully automated demand response (DR) in four to six sites in the winter and the savings from various building systems. The project started in November of 2008 and lasted 6 months. The methodology for the study included site recruitment, control strategy development, automation system deployment and enhancements, and evaluation of sites participation in DR test events. LBNL subcontracted McKinstry and Akuacom for this project. McKinstry assisted with recruitment, site survey collection, strategy development and overall participant and control vendor management. Akuacom established a new server and enhanced its operations to allow for scheduling winter morning day-of and day-ahead events. Each site signed a Memorandum of Agreement with SCL. SCL offered each site $3,000 for agreeing to participate in the study and an additional $1,000 for each event they participated. Each facility and their control vendor worked with LBNL and McKinstry to select and implement control strategies for DR and developed their automation based on the existing Internet connectivity and building control system. Once the DR strategies were programmed, McKinstry commissioned them before actual test events. McKinstry worked with LBNL to identify control points that can be archived at each facility. For each site LBNL collected meter data and trend logs from the energy management and control system. The communication system allowed the sites to receive day-ahead as well as day-of DR test event signals. Measurement of DR was conducted using three different baseline models for estimation peak load reductions. One was three-in-ten baseline, which is based on the site electricity consumption from 7 am to 10 am for the three days with the highest consumption of the previous ten business days. The second model, the LBNL outside air temperature (OAT) regression baseline model, is based on OAT data and site electricity consumption from the previous ten days, adjusted using weather regressions from the fifteen-minute electric load data during each DR test event for each site. A third baseline that simply averages the available load data was used for sites less with less than 10 days of historical meter data. The evaluation also included surveying sites regarding any problems or issues that arose during the DR test events. Question covered occupant comfort, control issues and other potential problems.

Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

436

Application of axiomatic design and TOPSIS methodologies under fuzzy environment for proposing competitive strategies on Turkish container ports in maritime transportation network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strategic positions and geographical advantages of the Turkish container ports in the world transportation network create an excessive demand which seek urgent development strategies for managing ongoing problems in operational and administrative ... Keywords: FAD, Fuzzy TOPSIS, Multiple criteria evaluation, Port competitiveness, Quantified SWOT, Turkish container ports

Metin Celik; Selcuk Cebi; Cengiz Kahraman; I.Deha Er

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

title Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers in New York City using OpenADR booktitle International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ICEBO year month address Montreal Quebec abstract p class p1 Open Automated Demand Response OpenADR an XML based information exchange model is used to facilitate continuous price responsive operation and demand response participation for large commercial buildings in New York who are subject to the default day ahead hourly pricing We summarize the existing demand response programs in New York and discuss OpenADR communication prioritization of demand response signals and control methods Building energy simulation models are developed and field tests are conducted to evaluate continuous energy management

438

2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis and Transition Strategies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2025 Scenario Analysis Sig Gronich Technology Validation Manager Manager- Transition Strategies DOE Hydrogen Program DOE Hydrogen Program The President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative...

439

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

440

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Teuchos C++ memory management classes, idioms, and related topics, the complete reference : a comprehensive strategy for safe and efficient memory management in C++ for high performance computing.  

SciTech Connect

The ubiquitous use of raw pointers in higher-level code is the primary cause of all memory usage problems and memory leaks in C++ programs. This paper describes what might be considered a radical approach to the problem which is to encapsulate the use of all raw pointers and all raw calls to new and delete in higher-level C++ code. Instead, a set of cooperating template classes developed in the Trilinos package Teuchos are used to encapsulate every use of raw C++ pointers in every use case where it appears in high-level code. Included in the set of memory management classes is the typical reference-counted smart pointer class similar to boost::shared ptr (and therefore C++0x std::shared ptr). However, what is missing in boost and the new standard library are non-reference counted classes for remaining use cases where raw C++ pointers would need to be used. These classes have a debug build mode where nearly all programmer errors are caught and gracefully reported at runtime. The default optimized build mode strips all runtime checks and allows the code to perform as efficiently as raw C++ pointers with reasonable usage. Also included is a novel approach for dealing with the circular references problem that imparts little extra overhead and is almost completely invisible to most of the code (unlike the boost and therefore C++0x approach). Rather than being a radical approach, encapsulating all raw C++ pointers is simply the logical progression of a trend in the C++ development and standards community that started with std::auto ptr and is continued (but not finished) with std::shared ptr in C++0x. Using the Teuchos reference-counted memory management classes allows one to remove unnecessary constraints in the use of objects by removing arbitrary lifetime ordering constraints which are a type of unnecessary coupling [23]. The code one writes with these classes will be more likely to be correct on first writing, will be less likely to contain silent (but deadly) memory usage errors, and will be much more robust to later refactoring and maintenance. The level of debug-mode runtime checking provided by the Teuchos memory management classes is stronger in many respects than what is provided by memory checking tools like Valgrind and Purify while being much less expensive. However, tools like Valgrind and Purify perform a number of types of checks (like usage of uninitialized memory) that makes these tools very valuable and therefore complement the Teuchos memory management debug-mode runtime checking. The Teuchos memory management classes and idioms largely address the technical issues in resolving the fragile built-in C++ memory management model (with the exception of circular references which has no easy solution but can be managed as discussed). All that remains is to teach these classes and idioms and expand their usage in C++ codes. The long-term viability of C++ as a usable and productive language depends on it. Otherwise, if C++ is no safer than C, then is the greater complexity of C++ worth what one gets as extra features? Given that C is smaller and easier to learn than C++ and since most programmers don't know object-orientation (or templates or X, Y, and Z features of C++) all that well anyway, then what really are most programmers getting extra out of C++ that would outweigh the extra complexity of C++ over C? C++ zealots will argue this point but the reality is that C++ popularity has peaked and is becoming less popular while the popularity of C has remained fairly stable over the last decade22. Idioms like are advocated in this paper can help to avert this trend but it will require wide community buy-in and a change in the way C++ is taught in order to have the greatest impact. To make these programs more secure, compiler vendors or static analysis tools (e.g. klocwork23) could implement a preprocessor-like language similar to OpenMP24 that would allow the programmer to declare (in comments) that certain blocks of code should be ''pointer-free'' or allow smaller blocks to be 'pointers allowed'. This would signific

Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Deployment Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Deployment Project Summary Full Title: Geographically-Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Deployment Scenario Analysis Project ID: 189 Principal Investigator: Margo Melendez Keywords: Hydrogen fueling; infrastructure; fuel cell vehicles (FCV) Purpose This analysis estimates the spatial distribution of hydrogen fueling stations necessary to support the 5 million fuel cell vehicle scenario, based on demographic demand patterns for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and strategy of focusing development on specific regions of the U.S. that may have high hydrogen demand. Performer Principal Investigator: Margo Melendez Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3393 Telephone: 303-275-4479

444

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

445

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

446

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Commissioning Title Automated Demand Response and Commissioning Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-57384 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Piette, Mary...

447

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lvi Southern California Edison filed its SmartConnectinfrastructure (e.g. , Edison Electric Institute, DemandSouthern California Edison Standard Practice Manual

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Demand Uncertainty and Price Dispersion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Demand uncertainty has been recognized as one factor that may cause price dispersion in perfectly competitive markets with costly and perishable capacity. With the persistence… (more)

Li, Suxi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.energy efficiency and demand response program and tariffenergy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT) The opportunities for demand reduction and cost saving with building demand responsive control vary tremendously with building type...

451

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderatefor each day type for the demand response study - moderate

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. “Economic” demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due toaddressed in this report. Maximum Demand Savings Intensity (Echelon Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due to

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Building Energy Management Systems (BEMS) to begin pre-a facility using Energy Management Control Systems (EMCS) orAct of 2007 energy management control systems The Energy

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and compared with alternative cooling systems using air-sidealternative economizer design, known as a water-side economizer, employs cooling

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE, 2005), the economizer design was less efficient than the baseline design in most of the California climate zones

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand management strategies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cities, with electricity generation in some regions more reliant on fossil fuels while hydro- or nuclear-

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

different California climate zones. The modeling results andin different climate zones. 4.2. Methods 4.2.1. Data centerweather data for California climate zones (CEC, 2005). (heat

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 1. Figure 3-3 presents the design fan curve for one of 16be relatively minor. Building design fan curves indicate ato the building fan curves the design brake horsepower (BHP)

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Evaluating demand planning strategy in the retail channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2007 Dell began selling through the retail channel. Five years later, the retail channel is still in the early stages relative to competitors and is growing rapidly. Short product lifecycles, long lead times and a high ...

Zehavi, Limor (Limor Hadas)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electricifier DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Scenario Supply/ifier DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Provider Pacific Gas & Electric year Coal Oil Gas Other fossil Electricity Resource Mix (%) Bio- mass Hydro Nuclear Wind Solar

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

side economizer, employs cooling towers that use ambient airair cold water warm water cooling tower AHU condensing wateris piped from the cooling towers, which cools the water

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lower RH upper RH UPS Waste Heat Humid- ifier DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electriclower RH upper RH UPS Waste Heat Humid- ifier DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Harnessing the power of demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

ANN-based residential water end-use demand forecasting model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bottom-up urban water demand forecasting based on empirical data for individual water end uses or micro-components (e.g., toilet, shower, etc.) for different households of varying characteristics is undoubtedly superior to top-down estimates originating ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Residential water demand forecasting, Water demand management, Water end use, Water micro-component