Sample records for demand distributed generation

  1. Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    integration of energy efficiency, distributed generation, renewable energy resources and energy storage technologies, both locally and globally, to maximize the value of the...

  2. Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    generation, smart grid and energy storage. Annex 9 is a list of pilot programs and case studies, with links to those resources. References Retrieved from "http:...

  3. Distributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    is to perform demand side management (DSM) [1], which aims at matching the consum- ers' electricity demand between electricity consumption and generation. On the consumption side, electric demand ramps upDistributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost Siyu Yue

  4. Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframes—incentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales —making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

  5. Distributed generation and demand side management : applications to transmission system operation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Barry Patrick

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity networks are undergoing a period of rapid change and transformation, with increased penetration levels of renewable-based distributed generation, and new influences on electricity end-use patterns from ...

  6. DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Director EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLES & DEMAND ANALYSIS DIVISION B.B. Blevins Executive Director DISCLAIMER capacity targets. KEYWORDS Distributed generation, cogeneration, photovoltaics, wind, biomass, combined

  7. Distributed Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers SubfoldersU.S. RefiningDistributed EnergyUntapped

  8. Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Peer Exchange...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Peer Exchange Call Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Peer Exchange Call March 12, 2015 3:00PM to 4:3...

  9. TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    PWP-085 TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN CALIFORNIA, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING** Abstract This study analyzes state and regional electricity supply and demand trends for the eleven states

  10. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response underof Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response underof Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under

  11. CONSULTANT REPORT DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an independent cost analysis to interconnect and integrate increased penetration levels of renewable distributed costs. The Energy Commission considers this study a first step toward the 2012 Integrated Energy Policy Generation Integration Cost Study: Analytical Framework. California Energy Commission. CEC2002013007. i

  12. Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Policies & Programs Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs Distributed generation...

  13. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diverse set of flexible traditional generation resourcessufficient flexible demand or generation capacity exists tosufficient flexible demand or generation capacity exists to

  14. GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

  15. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goldman, G. (2009) Retail demand response in Southwest PowerL. (2009) Renewable Demand Response (RDR): Financial &Northwest GridWise™ Demand Response and Variable Generation

  16. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand ResponseControl of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Responseinstalled distribution energy resources (DER) in the form of

  17. Electricity Distribution Networks: Investment and Regulation, and Uncertain Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamasb, Tooraj; Marantes, Cristiano

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    " and describes a network investment assessment model developed as a tool to identify and assess the investment requirements of distribution networks. A broadening of the scope of network investments to include demand-related measures that can reduce the need...

  18. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CA Control Areas CO 2 Carbon Dioxide CHP Combined Heat and Power CPP Critical Peak Pricing DG Distributed Generation DOE Department of Energy DR Demand Response DRCC Demand...

  19. Distributed Algorithms for Control of Demand Response and Distributed Energy Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    (DRRs), sign a contract with an aggregating entity--the demand response provider--so as their load canDistributed Algorithms for Control of Demand Response and Distributed Energy Resources Alejandro D networks. These algorithms are relevant for load curtailment control in demand response programs, and also

  20. Distributed Generation Operational Reliability, Executive Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2004 This report summarizes the results of the project, "Distributed Generation Market Transformation Tools: Distributed Generation Reliability and Availability Database,"...

  1. Distributed Demand Response and User Adaptation in Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Zhong

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a distributed framework for demand response and user adaptation in smart grid networks. In particular, we borrow the concept of congestion pricing in Internet traffic control and show that pricing information is very useful to regulate user demand and hence balance network load. User preference is modeled as a willingness to pay parameter which can be seen as an indicator of differential quality of service. Both analysis and simulation results are presented to demonstrate the dynamics and convergence behavior of the algorithm.

  2. Integrated, Automated Distributed Generation Technologies Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Kevin

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the NETL Project was to develop a diverse combination of distributed renewable generation technologies and controls and demonstrate how the renewable generation could help manage substation peak demand at the ATK Promontory plant site. The Promontory plant site is located in the northwestern Utah desert approximately 25 miles west of Brigham City, Utah. The plant encompasses 20,000 acres and has over 500 buildings. The ATK Promontory plant primarily manufactures solid propellant rocket motors for both commercial and government launch systems. The original project objectives focused on distributed generation; a 100 kW (kilowatt) wind turbine, a 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit, a 500 kW energy storage system, and an intelligent system-wide automation system to monitor and control the renewable energy devices then release the stored energy during the peak demand time. The original goal was to reduce peak demand from the electrical utility company, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), by 3.4%. For a period of time we also sought to integrate our energy storage requirements with a flywheel storage system (500 kW) proposed for the Promontory/RMP Substation. Ultimately the flywheel storage system could not meet our project timetable, so the storage requirement was switched to a battery storage system (300 kW.) A secondary objective was to design/install a bi-directional customer/utility gateway application for real-time visibility and communications between RMP, and ATK. This objective was not achieved because of technical issues with RMP, ATK Information Technology Department’s stringent requirements based on being a rocket motor manufacturing facility, and budget constraints. Of the original objectives, the following were achieved: • Installation of a 100 kW wind turbine. • Installation of a 300 kW battery storage system. • Integrated control system installed to offset electrical demand by releasing stored energy from renewable sources during peak hours of the day. Control system also monitors the wind turbine and battery storage system health, power output, and issues critical alarms. Of the original objectives, the following were not achieved: • 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit. • Bi-directional customer/utility gateway for real time visibility and communications between RMP and ATK. • 3.4% reduction in peak demand. 1.7% reduction in peak demand was realized instead.

  3. Agent-Based Simulation of Distribution Systems with High Penetration of Photovoltaic Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    of strategic trading in restructured wholesale power markets with congestion managed by locational marginal when coupled with increased price-sensitivity of demand as realized through demand response, demand dispatch, and/or price-sensitive demand bidding. Index Terms--Distributed power generation, multiagent sys

  4. A DISTRIBUTED INTELLIGENT AUTOMATED DEMAND RESPONSE BUILDING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auslander, David; Culler, David; Wright, Paul; Lu, Yan; Piette, Mary

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the 2.5 year Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) project was to reduce peak electricity load of Sutardja Dai Hall at UC Berkeley by 30% while maintaining a healthy, comfortable, and productive environment for the occupants. We sought to bring together both central and distributed control to provide “deep” demand response1 at the appliance level of the building as well as typical lighting and HVAC applications. This project brought together Siemens Corporate Research and Siemens Building Technology (the building has a Siemens Apogee Building Automation System (BAS)), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (leveraging their Open Automated Demand Response (openADR), Auto-­Demand Response, and building modeling expertise), and UC Berkeley (related demand response research including distributed wireless control, and grid-­to-­building gateway development). Sutardja Dai Hall houses the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS), which fosters collaboration among industry and faculty and students of four UC campuses (Berkeley, Davis, Merced, and Santa Cruz). The 141,000 square foot building, occupied in 2009, includes typical office spaces and a nanofabrication laboratory. Heating is provided by a district heating system (steam from campus as a byproduct of the campus cogeneration plant); cooling is provided by one of two chillers: a more typical electric centrifugal compressor chiller designed for the cool months (Nov-­ March) and a steam absorption chiller for use in the warm months (April-­October). Lighting in the open office areas is provided by direct-­indirect luminaries with Building Management System-­based scheduling for open areas, and occupancy sensors for private office areas. For the purposes of this project, we focused on the office portion of the building. Annual energy consumption is approximately 8053 MWh; the office portion is estimated as 1924 MWh. The maximum peak load during the study period was 1175 kW. Several new tools facilitated this work, such as the Smart Energy Box, the distributed load controller or Energy Information Gateway, the web-­based DR controller (dubbed the Central Load-­Shed Coordinator or CLSC), and the Demand Response Capacity Assessment & Operation Assistance Tool (DRCAOT). In addition, an innovative data aggregator called sMAP (simple Measurement and Actuation Profile) allowed data from different sources collected in a compact form and facilitated detailed analysis of the building systems operation. A smart phone application (RAP or Rapid Audit Protocol) facilitated an inventory of the building’s plug loads. Carbon dioxide sensors located in conference rooms and classrooms allowed demand controlled ventilation. The extensive submetering and nimble access to this data provided great insight into the details of the building operation as well as quick diagnostics and analyses of tests. For example, students discovered a short-­cycling chiller, a stuck damper, and a leaking cooling coil in the first field tests. For our final field tests, we were able to see how each zone was affected by the DR strategies (e.g., the offices on the 7th floor grew very warm quickly) and fine-­tune the strategies accordingly.

  5. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Only Load Electricity Generation By Fuel in the U.S.electricity generation from most sources, except oil, is growing to meet the growing demand and that fossil fuels

  6. Avoiding Distribution System Upgrade Costs Using Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; DeSteese, John G.; Speer, Gregory A.

    2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    PNNL, in cooperation with three utilities, developed a database and methodology to analyze and characterize the avoided costs of Distributed Generation (DG) deployment as an alternative to traditional distribution system investment. After applying a number of screening criteria to the initial set of 307 cases, eighteen were selected for detailed analysis. Alternative DG investment scenarios were developed for these cases to permit capital, operation, maintenance, and fuel costs to be identified and incorporated into the analysis. The “customer-owned” backup power generator option was also investigated. The results of the analysis of the 18 cases show that none yielded cost savings under the alternative DG scenarios. However, the DG alternative systems were configured using very restrictive assumptions concerning reliability, peak rating, engine types and acceptable fuel. In particular it was assumed that the DG alternative in each case must meet the reliability required of conventional distribution systems (99.91% reliability). The analysis was further constrained by a requirement that each substation meet the demands placed upon it by a one in three weather occurrence. To determine if, by relaxing these requirements, the DG alternative might be more viable, one project was re-examined. The 99.91% reliability factor was still assumed for normal operating conditions but redundancy required to maintain reliability was relaxed for the relatively few hours every three years where extreme weather caused load to exceed present substation capacity. This resulted in the deferment of capital investment until later years and reduced the number of engines required for the project. The cost of both the conventional and DG alternative also dropped because the centralized power generation, variable O&M, and DG fuels costs were calculated based on present load requirements in combination with long-term forecasts of load growth, as opposed to load requirements plus a buffer based on predictions of extraordinary weather conditions. Application of the relaxed set of assumptions reduced the total cost of the DG alternative by roughly 57 percent from $7.0 million to $3.0 million. The reduction, however, did not change the overall result of the analysis, as the cost of the conventional distribution system upgrade alternative remained lower at $1.7 million. This paper also explores the feasibility of using a system of backup generators to defer investment in distribution system infrastructure. Rather than expanding substation capacity at substations experiencing slow load growth rates, PNNL considered a scenario where diesel generators were installed on location at customers participating in a program designed to offer additional power security and reliability to the customer and connection to the grid. The backup generators, in turn, could be used to meet peak demand for a limited number of hours each year, thus deferring distribution system investment. Data from an existing program at one of the three participating utilities was used to quantify the costs associated with the backup generator scenario. The results of the “customer owned” backup power generator analysis showed that in all cases the nominal cost of the DG scenario is more than the nominal cost of the base-case conventional distribution system upgrade scenario. However, in two of the cases the total present value costs of the alternative backup generator scenarios were between 15 and 22% less than those for the conventional scenarios. Overall, the results of the study offer considerable encouragement that the use of DG systems can defer conventional distribution system upgrades under the right conditions and when the DG configurations are intelligently designed. Using existing customer-owned DG to defer distribution system upgrades appears to be an immediate commercially-viable opportunity.

  7. Electrical ship demand modeling for future generation warships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sievenpiper, Bartholomew J. (Bartholomew Jay)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of future warships will require increased reliance on accurate prediction of electrical demand as the shipboard consumption continues to rise. Current US Navy policy, codified in design standards, dictates methods ...

  8. NREL: Technology Deployment - Distributed Generation Interconnection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative Become a Member DGIC members are included in quarterly informational meetings and discussions related to distributed PV...

  9. Central power generation versus distributed generation e An air quality assessment in the South Coast Air Basin of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Keywords: Distributed generation Central generation Air quality modeling Reactivity a b s t r a c by the widespread installation of many stationary power generators close to the point of electricity use within from which electricity must be transmitted to end users. However, increasing electricity demand

  10. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We take the perspective of a microgrid that has installed distribution energy resources (DER) in the form of distributed generation with combined heat and power applications. Given uncertain electricity and fuel prices, the microgrid minimizes its expected annual energy bill for various capacity sizes. In almost all cases, there is an economic and environmental advantage to using DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected annualized energy bill is reduced by 9percent while CO2 emissions decline by 25percent. Furthermore, the microgrid's risk is diminished as DER may be deployed depending on prevailing market conditions and local demand. In order to test a policy measure that would place a weight on CO2 emissions, we use a multi-criteria objective function that minimizes a weighted average of expected costs and emissions. We find that greater emphasis on CO2 emissions has a beneficial environmental impact only if DR is available and enough reserve generation capacity exists. Finally, greater uncertainty results in higher expected costs and risk exposure, the effects of which may be mitigated by selecting a larger capacity.

  11. Abstract--Implementation of Distribution Automation (DA) and Demand Side Management (DSM) intended to serve both

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Abstract--Implementation of Distribution Automation (DA) and Demand Side Management (DSM) intended with differentiate QoS in a multitasking environment. I. INTRODUCTION ODERN society demands a reliable and high by the distribution utility for the security. REMPLI (Remote Energy Management over Power Lines and Internet) system

  12. Distributed Generation Operational Reliability and Availability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reliability and Availability Database, Final Report, January 2004 Distributed Generation Operational Reliability and Availability Database, Final Report, January 2004 This final...

  13. A reliability assessment methodology for distribution systems with distributed generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duttagupta, Suchismita Sujaya

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability assessment is of primary importance in designing and planning distribution systems that operate in an economic manner with minimal interruption of customer loads. With the advances in renewable energy sources, Distributed Generation (DG...

  14. Worst Case Scenario for Large Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Worst Case Scenario for Large Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation M. A. Mahmud) in distri- bution network has significant effects on voltage profile for both customers and distribution on variation of the voltage and the amount of DG that can be connected to the distribution networks. This paper

  15. Cascade Failures from Distributed Generation in Power Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scala, Antonio; Scoglio, Caterina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power grids are nowadays experiencing a transformation due to the introduction of Distributed Generation based on Renewable Sources. At difference with classical Distributed Generation, where local power sources mitigate anomalous user consumption peaks, Renewable Sources introduce in the grid intrinsically erratic power inputs. By introducing a simple schematic (but realistic) model for power grids with stochastic distributed generation, we study the effects of erratic sources on the robustness of several IEEE power grid test networks with up to 2000 buses. We find that increasing the penetration of erratic sources causes the grid to fail with a sharp transition. We compare such results with the case of failures caused by the natural increasing power demand.

  16. Power Flow Analysis Algorithm for Islanded LV Microgrids Including Distributed Generator Units with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Sanjay

    Power Flow Analysis Algorithm for Islanded LV Microgrids Including Distributed Generator Units With larger portion of growing electricity demand which is being fed through distributed generation (DG power system. Being able to operate in both grid-connected and islanded mode, a microgrid manages

  17. Microgrids: distributed on-site generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    : · Diversity of the load profile as a function of microgrid size; · Feasibility of accurate control of bothMicrogrids: distributed on-site generation Suleiman Abu-Sharkh, Rachel Li, Tom Markvart, Neil Ross for Climate Change Research Technical Report 22 #12;1 Microgrids: distributed on-site generation Tyndall

  18. Report on Distributed Generation Penetration Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.; Ye, Z.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents part of a multiyear research program dedicated to the development of requirements to support the definition, design, and demonstration of a distributed generation-electric power system interconnection interface concept. The report focuses on the dynamic behavior of power systems when a significant portion of the total energy resource is distributed generation. It also focuses on the near-term reality that the majority of new DG relies on rotating synchronous generators for energy conversion.

  19. Nonlinear DSTATCOM controller design for distribution network with distributed generation to enhance voltage stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Nonlinear DSTATCOM controller design for distribution network with distributed generation Accepted 19 June 2013 Keywords: Distributed generation Distribution network DSATACOM Partial feedback connected to a distribution network with distributed generation (DG) to regulate the line voltage

  20. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-54447. Distributed Generation Dispatch OptimizationA Business Case for On-Site Generation: The BD Biosciencesrelated work. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization

  1. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    option on natural gas generation, which increases in valueL ABORATORY Distributed Generation Investment by a MicrogridORMMES’06 Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid

  2. Power-Demand Routing in massive geo-distributed systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qureshi, Asfandyar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing trend toward massive, geographically distributed systems. The largest Internet companies operate hundreds of thousands of servers in multiple geographic locations, and are growing at a fast clip. A ...

  3. Abatement of Air Pollution: Distributed Generators (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purpose of these regulations, a distributed generator is defined as any equipment that converts primary fuel, including fossil fuel and renewable fuel, into electricity or electricity and...

  4. Distributed generation - the fuel processing example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Victor, R.A. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States); Farris, P.J.; Maston, V. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The increased costs of transportation and distribution are leading many commercial and industrial firms to consider the on-site generation for energy and other commodities used in their facilities. This trend has been accelerated by the development of compact, efficient processes for converting basic raw materials into finished services at the distributed sites. Distributed generation with the PC25{trademark} fuel cell power plant is providing a new cost effective technology to meet building electric and thermal needs. Small compact on-site separator systems are providing nitrogen and oxygen to many industrial users of these gases. The adaptation of the fuel processing section of the PC25 power plant for on-site hydrogen generation at industrial sites extends distributed generation benefits to the users of industrial hydrogen.

  5. Voltage Management of Networks with Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, James

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At present there is much debate about the impacts and benefits of increasing the amount of generation connected to the low voltage areas of the electricity distribution network. The UK government is under political ...

  6. Operation of Distributed Generation Under Stochastic Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We model the operating decisions of a commercial enterprisethatneeds to satisfy its periodic electricity demand with either on-sitedistributed generation (DG) or purchases from the wholesale market. Whilethe former option involves electricity generation at relatively high andpossibly stochastic costs from a set of capacity-constrained DGtechnologies, the latter implies unlimited open-market transactions atstochastic prices. A stochastic dynamic programme (SDP) is used to solvethe resulting optimisation problem. By solving the SDP with and withoutthe availability of DG units, the implied option values of the DG unitsare obtained.

  7. Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWPIndiantown,Innoferm GmbHCaltechOpensystems,Energy

  8. Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWPIndiantown,Innoferm

  9. Abstract --Due to the potentially large number of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) demand response, distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    to accurately estimate the transients caused by demand response is especially important to analyze the stability of the system under different demand response strategies, where dynamics on time scales of seconds to minutes demand response. The aggregated model efficiently includes statistical information of the population

  10. The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related Issues That May Impede Its Expansion The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related...

  11. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility experience with RTP tariffs is described in 3. Distributed GenerationUtilities Commission, Division of Ratepayer Advocates have also provided support on related work. Distributed Generation

  12. The Value of Distributed Generation and CHP Resources in Wholesale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Value of Distributed Generation and CHP Resources in Wholesale Power Markets, September 2005 The Value of Distributed Generation and CHP Resources in Wholesale Power Markets,...

  13. SMALL TURBOGENERATOR TECHNOLOGY FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sy Ali; Bob Moritz

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is produced in under Contract DE-FC26-00NT40914, awarded in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy solicitation DE-PS26-00FT40759, ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Fossil Energy-Wide Coal, Natural Gas and Oil R&D Programs'', area of interest 7, ''Advanced Turbines and Engines.'' As a result of ten years of collaborative fuel cell systems studies with U.S. fuel cell manufacturers, initiated to evaluate the gas turbine opportunities likely to result from this technology, Rolls-Royce in Indianapolis has established a clear need for the creation of a turbogenerator to a specification that cannot be met by available units. Many of the required qualities are approached, but not fully met, by microturbines, which tend to be too small and low in pressure ratio. Market evaluation suggests a 1 MW fuel cell hybrid, incorporating a turbogenerator of about 250 kW, is a good market entry product (large enough to spread the costs of a relatively complex plant, but small enough to be acceptable to early adopters). The fuel cell stack occupies the position of a combustor in the turbogenerator, but delivers relatively low turbine entry temperature (1600 F [870 C]). If fitted with a conventional combustor and run stand-alone at full uncooled turbine temperature (1800 F [980 C]), the turbogenerator will develop more power. The power can be further enhanced if the turbogenerator is designed to have flow margin in its fuel cell role (by running faster). This margin can be realized by running at full speed and it is found that power can be increased to the 0.7 to 1.0 MW range, depending on initial fuel cell stack flow demand. The fuel cell hybrid applications require increased pressure ratio (at least 6 rather than the 3-4 of microturbines) and very long life for a small machine. The outcome is a turbogenerator that is very attractive for stand-alone operation and has been the subject of unsolicited enthusiasm from potential users who see an application in grid support. The machine is consistent with 21st century power generation objectives. It will be more efficient than a microturbine and also more cost effective because it does not require an expensive recuperator. It will produce ultra-low emissions because it has a low combustor delivery temperature. It will also avoid producing hazardous waste because it requires no lube system. These qualities are obtained by combining, and in some instances extending, the best of available technologies rather than breaking wholly new ground. Limited ''barrier technology'' rig tests of bearing systems and alternator configuration are proposed to support the extension of technology. Low combustion temperature also has merit in handling alternative fuels with minimum emissions and minimum materials degradation. Program continuation is proposed that will simultaneously provide technology support to a SECA fuel cell hybrid system and a distributed generation turbogenerator. This technology program will be led by a Rolls-Royce team based in Indianapolis with access to extensive small turbogenerator experience gathered in DOE (and other) programs by Allison Mobile Power Systems. It is intended that subsequent production will be in the U.S., but the products may have substantial export potential.

  14. On-demand generation of aqueous two-phase microdroplets with reversible phase transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Mruetusatorn, Prachya [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous two-phase systems contained entirely within microdroplets enable a bottom-up approach to mimicking the dynamic microcompartmentation of biomaterial that naturally occurs within the cytoplasm of cells. Here, we demonstrate the on-demand generation of femtolitre aqueous two-phase droplets within a microfluidic oil channel. Gated pressure pulses were used to generate individual, stationary two-phase microdroplets with a well-defined time zero for carrying out controlled and sequential phase transformations over time. Reversible phase transitions between single-phase, two-phase, and core-shell microgel states were obtained via evaporation-induced dehydration and on-demand water rehydration. In contrast to other microfluidic aqueous two-phase droplets, which require continuous flows and high-frequency droplet formation, our system enables the controlled isolation and reversible transformation of a single microdroplet and is expected to be useful for future studies in dynamic microcompartmentation and affinity partitioning.

  15. Influence of Climate Change Mitigation Technology on Global Demands of Water for Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Dooley, James J.; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Globally, electricity generation accounts for a large and potentially growing water demand, and as such is an important component to assessments of global and regional water scarcity. However, the current suite—as well as potential future suites—of thermoelectric generation technologies has a very wide range of water demand intensities, spanning two orders of magnitude. As such, the evolution of the generation mix is important for the future water demands of the sector. This study uses GCAM, an integrated assessment model, to analyze the global electric sector’s water demands in three futures of climate change mitigation policy and two technology strategies. We find that despite five- to seven-fold expansion of the electric sector as a whole from 2005 to 2095, global electric sector water withdrawals remain relatively stable, due to the retirement of existing power plants with water-intensive once-through flow cooling systems. In the scenarios examined here, climate policies lead to the large-scale deployment of advanced, low-emissions technologies such as carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), concentrating solar power, and engineered geothermal systems. In particular, we find that the large-scale deployment of CCS technologies does not increase long-term water consumption from hydrocarbon-fueled power generation as compared with a no-policy scenario without CCS. Moreover, in sensitivity scenarios where low-emissions electricity technologies are required to use dry cooling systems, we find that the consequent additional costs and efficiency reductions do not limit the utility of these technologies in achieving cost-effective whole-system emissions mitigation.

  16. On-Demand Generation of Monodisperse Femtoliter Droplets by Shape-Induced Shear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, Pat [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Jung, Seung-Yong [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a method for creating discrete femtoliter-scale water-in-oil droplets on demand, based solely on a geometrically induced reduction in oil/water interfacial area at microfabricated junction orifices. This on-demand generation method is driven by self-shear of droplets due to interfacial tension induced forces resulting from a localized transition in microchannel height. The magnitudes of shear stresses involved appear to be significantly less than the shearing instabilities used to split off daughter droplets from aqueous mother plugs at microfabricated junctions in continuous water-in-oil segmented flows, which implies that this method may be better suited for studying biochemical reactions and reaction kinetics in droplets of decreased volume without loss of chemical reactivity due to redistribution of surfactant density used to passivate the oil/water interface. Predictable droplet generation rates under constant pressure conditions or the gated formation of one, two or more droplets at a time with fixed pressure pulses have been demonstrated in a similar manner to active on-demand droplet generation strategies, but with a simpler system not needing actuation and sensing equipment beyond a pressure regulator.

  17. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

  18. Towards Building an Optimal Demand Response Framework for DC Distribution Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    . There- fore, in this paper, the first steps are taken towards designing de- mand response programs, such as photovoltaic (PV) systems, batteries, and fuel cells, that are natively DC sources. H. MohsenianTowards Building an Optimal Demand Response Framework for DC Distribution Networks Hamed Mohsenian

  19. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    time of use United States Postal Service v Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs

  20. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility electricity and natural gas purchases, amortized capital and maintenance costs for distributed generation (

  1. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydro facility or demand response aggregator to provide theOperator Demand Response Mass-Market Customers Aggregator ofDemand Response Resources Mass Market Customers Aggregator

  2. A Distributed Generation Control Architecture for Islanded AC Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez-Garcia, Alejandro

    1 A Distributed Generation Control Architecture for Islanded AC Microgrids Stanton T. Cady, Student architecture for generation control in islanded microgrids, and illustrate the performance Member, IEEE Abstract In this paper, we propose a distributed architecture for generation control

  3. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  4. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  5. Physical Effects of Distributed PV Generation on California's Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Michael A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deployment of high-penetration photovoltaic (PV) power is expected to have a range of effects -- both positive and negative -- on the distribution grid. The magnitude of these effects may vary greatly depending upon feeder topology, climate, PV penetration level, and other factors. In this paper we present a simulation study of eight representative distribution feeders in three California climates at PV penetration levels up to 100\\%, supported by a unique database of distributed PV generation data that enables us to capture the impact of PV variability on feeder voltage and voltage regulating equipment. When comparing the influence of feeder location (i.e. climate) versus feeder type on outcomes, we find that location more strongly influences the incidence of reverse power flow, reductions in peak loading and the presence of voltage excursions. On the other hand, we find that feeder characteristics more strongly influence the magnitude of loss reduction and changes in voltage regulator operations. We find th...

  6. Assessment of Distributed Generation Potential in JapaneseBuildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida,Masaru

    2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet growing energy demands, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and on-site generation coupled with effective utilization of exhaust heat will all be required. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems (or microgrids). This research investigates a method of choosing economically optimal DER, expanding on prior studies at the Berkeley Lab using the DER design optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM finds the optimal combination of installed equipment from available DER technologies, given prevailing utility tariffs, site electrical and thermal loads, and a menu of available equipment. It provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the site energy loads can be served at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, and cooling. Five prototype Japanese commercial buildings are examined and DER-CAM applied to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Based on the optimization results, energy and emission reductions are evaluated. Furthermore, a Japan-U.S. comparison study of policy, technology, and utility tariffs relevant to DER installation is presented. Significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the DER-CAM results. Savings were most noticeable in the sports facility (a very favourable CHP site), followed by the hospital, hotel, and office building.

  7. The Value of Distributed Generation under Different TariffStructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Ryan; Magnus Maribu, Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed generation (DG) may play a key role in a modern energy system because it can improve energy efficiency. Reductions in the energy bill, and therefore DG attractiveness, depend on the electricity tariff structure; a system created before widespread adoption of distributed generation. Tariffs have been designed to recover costs equitably amongst customers with similar consumption patterns. Recently, electric utilities began to question the equity of this electricity pricing structure for standby service. In particular, the utilities do not feel that DG customers are paying their fair share of transmission and distribution costs - traditionally recovered through a volumetric($/kWh) mechanism - under existing tariff structures. In response, new tariff structures with higher fixed costs for DG have been implemented in New York and in California. This work analyzes the effects of different electricity tariff structures on DG adoption. First, the effects of the new standby tariffs in New York are analyzed in different regions. Next generalized tariffs are constructed, and the sensitivity to varying levels of the volumetric and the demand ($/kW, i.e. maximum rate) charge component are analyzed on New York's standard and standby tariff as well as California's standby tariff. As expected, DG profitability is reduced with standby tariffs, but often marginally. The new standby structures tend to promote smaller base load systems. The amount of time-of-day variability of volumetric pricing seems to have little effect on DG economics.

  8. INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    . It may also be implemented by means of customer-sited emergency power generation (e.g., diesel generators the case that distributed PV generation deserves a substantial portion of the credit allotted to demand response programs. This is because PV generation acts as a catalyst to demand response, markedly enhancing

  9. Emissions Benefits of Distributed Generation in the Texas Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    One potential benefit of distributed generation (DG) is a net reduction in air emissions. While DG will produce emissions, most notably carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, the power it displaces might have produced more. This study used a system dispatch model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate the 2012 Texas power market with and without DG. This study compares the reduction in system emissions to the emissions from the DG to determine the net savings. Some of the major findings are that 85% of the electricity displaced by DG during peak hours will be simple cycle natural gas, either steam or combustion turbine. Even with DG running as baseload, 57% of electricity displaced will be simple cycle natural gas. Despite the retirement of some gas-fired steam units and the construction of many new gas turbine and combined cycle units, the marginal emissions from the system remain quite high (1.4 lb NO{sub x}/MWh on peak and 1.1 lb NO{sub x}/MWh baseload) compared to projected DG emissions. Consequently, additions of DG capacity will reduce emissions in Texas from power generation in 2012. Using the DG exhaust heat for combined heat and power provides an even greater benefit, since it eliminates further boiler emissions while adding none over what would be produced while generating electricity. Further studies are warranted concerning the robustness of the result with changes in fuel prices, demands, and mixes of power generating technology.

  10. New modeling and control solutions for integrated microgrid system with respect to thermodynamics properties of generation and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Fang-Yu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates microgrid control stability with respect to thermodynamics behaviors of generation and demand. First, a new integrated microgrid model is introduced. This model consists of a combined cycle power ...

  11. Distributed Generation: Challenges and Opportunities, 7. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report is a comprehensive study of the Distributed Generation (DG) industry. The report takes a wide-ranging look at the current and future state of DG and both individually and collectively addresses the technologies of Microturbines, Reciprocating Engines, Stirling Engines, Fuel Cells, Photovoltaics, Concentrating Solar, Wind, and Microgrids. Topics covered include: the key technologies being used or planned for DG; the uses of DG from utility, energy service provider, and customer viewpoints; the economics of DG; the benefits of DG from multiple perspectives; the barriers that exist to implementing DG; the government programs supporting the DG industry; and, an analysis of DG interconnection and net metering rules.

  12. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty AfzalEnergy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty ?DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected

  13. Centralized and Distributed Generated Power Systems -A Comparison Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White Paper Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future ElectricCentralized and Distributed Generated Power Systems - A Comparison Approach Future Grid Initiative Energy System #12;Centralized and Distributed Generated Power Systems - A Comparison Approach Prepared

  14. City of San Marcos- Distributed Generation Rebate Program (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of San Marcos offers a Distributed Generation Rebate Program for the installation of grid-tied renewable energy systems. The Distributed Generation Rebate Program is offered on a first...

  15. Distributed multicast tree generation with dynamic group membership Frank Adelsteina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard III, Golden G.

    Distributed multicast tree generation with dynamic group membership Frank Adelsteina , Golden G. Another distinguishing character- istic for tree generation algorithms is centralized versus distributed, efficient network utilization becomes a growing concern. Multicast transmission may use network bandwidth

  16. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity generated by distributed energy resources (DER) located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumer requirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid. Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associated with transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricity delivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities to purchase energy when attractive. On-site thermal power generation is typically less efficient than central station generation, but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and utilizing combined heat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scale on-site generation to displace fuel purchases, then DER can become attractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts, the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressed using a mixed-integer linear programme, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, and information (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies, DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selecting the units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. In this paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion of the option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep an inventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lower costs even further by reducing off-peak generation and relying on storage. This and other effects of storages are demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in San Francisco, California, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacity of heat storage is calculated.

  17. Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility tari?s, the electricity price may be revised only Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation

  18. Automatically Generating Symbolic Prefetches for Distributed Transactional Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Automatically Generating Symbolic Prefetches for Distributed Transactional Memories Alokika Dash and Brian Demsky University of California, Irvine Abstract. Developing efficient distributed applications for distributed applications. We propose a new approach to prefetching, symbolic prefetching, that can prefetch

  19. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    selection of on-site power generation with combined heat andTotal Electricity Generation Figure 13. Small MercantileWeekday Total Electricity Generation (No Storage Adoption

  20. An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

  1. SOFC combined cycle systems for distributed generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, R.A.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The final phase of the tubular SOFC development program will focus on the development and demonstration of pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC)/gas turbine (GT) combined cycle power systems for distributed power applications. The commercial PSOFC/GT product line will cover the power range 200 kWe to 50 MWe, and the electrical efficiency for these systems will range from 60 to 75% (net AC/LHV CH4), the highest of any known fossil fueled power generation technology. The first demonstration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine combined cycle will be a proof-of-concept 250 kWe PSOFC/MTG power system consisting of a single 200 kWe PSOFC module and a 50 kWe microturbine generator (MTG). The second demonstration of this combined cycle will be 1.3 MWe fully packaged, commercial prototype PSOFC/GT power system consisting of two 500 kWe PSOFC modules and a 300 kWe gas turbine.

  2. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity produced by distributed energy resources (DER)located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumerrequirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid.Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associatedwith transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricitydelivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities topurchase energy when attractive. On-site, single-cycle thermal powergeneration is typically less efficient than central station generation,but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and by utilizing combinedheat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scaleon-site thermal generation to displace fuel purchases, DER can becomeattractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts,the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressedusing a mixed-integer linear program, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, andinformation (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies,DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selectingthe units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. Inthis paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion ofthe option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep aninventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lowercosts even further by reducing lucrative peak-shaving generation whilerelying on storage to meet heat loads. This and other effects of storageare demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in SanFrancisco, California, USA, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacityof heat storage is calculated.

  3. The Effect of Distributed Energy Resource Competition with Central Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed Energy Resource (DER) has been touted as a clean and efficient way to generate electricity at end-use sites, potentially allowing the exhaust heat to be put to good use as well. However, despite its environmental acceptability compared to many other types of generation, it has faced some disapproval because it may displace other, cleaner generation technologies. The end result could be more pollution than if the DER were not deployed. On the other hand, the DER may be competing against older power plants. If the DER is built then these other plants may be retired sooner, reducing their emissions. Or it may be that DER does not directly compete against either new or old plant capacity at the decision-maker level, and increased DER simply reduces the amount of time various plants operate. The key factor is what gets displaced if DER is added. For every kWh made by DER a kWh (or more with losses) of other production is not made. If enough DER is created, some power plants will get retired or not get built so not only their production but their capacity is displaced. Various characteristics of the power system in a region will influence how DER impacts the operation of the grid. The growth in demand in the region may influence whether new plants are postponed or old plants retired. The generation mix, including the fuel types, efficiencies, and emission characteristics of the plants in the region will factor into the overall competition. And public policies such as ease of new construction, emissions regulations, and fuel availability will also come into consideration.

  4. Developing and Implementing the Foundation for a Renewable Energy-Based "Distribution Generation Micro-grid": A California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Co-Funded Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilly, P.; Sebold, F. D.; Carpenter, M.; Kitto, W.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The California Energy Commission has been implementing its Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) and Renewable Energy Programs since early 1998. In the last two years, the demand for renewable distributed generation systems has increased rapidly...

  5. June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Documents for Power Generation And Distribution Science Subject Feed Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook NETL (2004) 118 > Electric power high-voltage transmission lines:...

  6. A Valuation-Based Framework for Considering Distributed Generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tools to inform further discussions. Keywords-tariff design, ratemaking, distributed generation, photovoltaic, solar valuation, value of solar, cost-benefit analysis I....

  7. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L, editor. 11 th Annual Real Options Conference, Berkeley,from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find aDistributed Generation; Real Options; Optimal Investment;

  8. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility. Using the real options approach, we find naturalDistributed Generation; Real Options; Optimal Investment. 1.based microgrid via the real options approach to determine

  9. Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Distributed Generation Small-Scale, Gas-Fired CHP AgencyCompany Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http:...

  10. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand. (energy conservation regulations). Public UtilitiesSupplemental Energy Whereas regulation reserves areDR Capacity Energy Ancillary Services Regulation Reserves

  11. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability Corporation National Institute of Standards and Technology Open Access Transmission Tariff Open Automated Demand Response Protocol Public Utility Commission Photovoltaic

  12. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pricing on the Usage of Wind Generation. Power Systems, IEEE2008) Analysis of Wind Generation Impact on ERCOT Anclillaryto higher or lower wind generation than scheduled. To manage

  13. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. (2008). Coupling wind generators with deferrable loads.tariff. For example, a wind generator could partner with acharge for or prevent a wind generator from submitting hour-

  14. Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    decision as the opportunity cost of exercising the investment option increases as well. In this paper, weInvestment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty Afzal Siddiqui Karl Maribu 13 for microgrids to use small-scale distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) applications via

  15. Distributed Generation in Buildings (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, distributed generation provides a very small share of residential and commercial electricity requirements in the United States. The Annual Energy Outlook 2005 reference case projects a significant increase in electricity generation in the buildings sector, but distributed generation is expected to remain a small contributor to the sectors energy needs. Although the advent of higher energy prices or more rapid improvement in technology could increase the use of distributed generation relative to the reference case projection, the vast majority of electricity used in buildings is projected to continue to be purchased from the grid.

  16. Distributed Medium Access Control for Next Generation CDMA Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Weihua

    Distributed Medium Access Control for Next Generation CDMA Wireless Networks Hai Jiang, Princeton wireless networks are expected to have a simple infrastructure with distributed control. In this article, we consider a generic distributed network model for future wireless multi- media communications

  17. A reliability assessment methodology for distribution systems with distributed generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duttagupta, Suchismita Sujaya

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability assessment is of primary importance in designing and planning distribution systems that operate in an economic manner with minimal interruption of customer loads. With the advances in renewable energy sources, ...

  18. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smart Grid, and specifically AMI, can play in mitigating variable generation integrationSmart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integrationSmart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration

  19. Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design de...

  20. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    purchase abs. cooling offset electric supply (kW) hourTariffs electric supply (kW) abs. cooling offset purchasecooling offset Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs electric supply (

  1. Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ment of uncertainty via real options increases the value of2007) and the 2007 Real Options Conference in Berkeley, CA,distributed generation, real options JEL Codes: D81, Q40

  2. Advanced Distributed Generation LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara,Addington,Admire,CA 94105Advanced Distributed

  3. Distributed Generation Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open Energy Information At1986)Distributed

  4. Local Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Konstantin S; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the re...

  5. Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sulc, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

  6. Generating generalized distributions from dynamical simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Eric J.; Laird, Brian Bostian; Leimkuhler, Benedict J.

    2003-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    virtual momentum related to the actual momentum of the system by p˜5sp.3 The equations of motion generated by the Nose´ Hamiltonian @Eq. ~1!# are dq dt 5M 21p˜/s2, ~2! dp˜ dt 52„V~q!, ~3! ds dt 5 p Q , ~4! dp dt 5 p˜TM21p˜ s3 2gkBT/s . ~5! The Nose´ method... regulates the temperature of the sys- tem through a dynamical time transformation given by dt/dt5s , where t is the Nose´ ~virtual! time and t is real time. The remarkable property of Nose´ dynamics is that mi- crocanonical sampling of the extended phase...

  7. Insertion of Distributed Generation into Rural Feeders , R. MORENO+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    -generating technologies with new technologies that pollute less. Therefore, the use of renewable energies in the worldwide of renewable energy distributed generators (DG) to radial feeders is assessed. Often, the long distance between, however, are not usually designed to receive energy at the consumer end. This problem intensifies

  8. Introduction to Network Analysis 21 Generating Functions and Degree Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safro, Ilya

    Introduction to Network Analysis 21 Generating Functions and Degree Distributions we add zero term because of infinity #12;Introduction to Network Analysis 22 Number of second neighbors of a vertex Probability of having k second neighbors given m first neighbors degree distribution Prob excess degrees of m

  9. Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation A. Der Minassians, K. H. Aschenbach discuss the technical and economic feasibility of a low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power technologies should be judged by output power per dollar rather than by efficiency or other technical merits

  10. Voltage Control of Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation using Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Voltage Control of Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation using Reactive Power to control voltage of distribution networks with DG using reactive power compensation approach. In this paper profile within the specified limits, it is essential to regulate the reactive power of the compensators

  11. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Optimal Control of Distributed EnergyRio de Janeiro, Brazil Optimal Control of Distributed EnergyRio de Janeiro, Brazil Optimal Control of Distributed Energy

  12. Efficiency and Air Quality Implications of Distributed Generation and Combined Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficiency and Air Quality Implications of Distributed Generation and Combined Heat and Power potentially increase exposure to air pollutants. When distributed generation is efficiently deployed to determine accurately the efficiencies and emissions of various applications of distributed generation

  13. Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Sulc; Konstantin Turitsyn; Scott Backhaus; Michael Chertkov

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design decision that weighs on the speed and quality of communication required is whether the control should be centralized or distributed (i.e. local). In general, we find that local control schemes are capable for maintaining voltage within acceptable bounds. We consider the benefits of choosing different local variables on which to control and how the control system can be continuously tuned between robust voltage control, suitable for daytime operation when circuit conditions can change rapidly, and loss minimization better suited for nighttime operation.

  14. The Photovoltaic Crisis and the Demand-side Generation in Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir-Artigues, Pere

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RES-E promotion policy in Spain gave priority to the photovoltaic (henceforth, PV) ground-mounted installations. For years, the coupling of customer-side generation coupled with excess energy exports was never specifically considered. However...

  15. Floating offshore wind farms : demand planning & logistical challenges of electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nnadili, Christopher Dozie, 1978-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Floating offshore wind farms are likely to become the next paradigm in electricity generation from wind energy mainly because of the near constant high wind speeds in an offshore environment as opposed to the erratic wind ...

  16. A planning scheme for penetrating embedded generation in power distribution grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiankang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Penetrating Embedded Generation, or Distributed Generation (DG), in power distribution grids presents great benefits and substantial positive social impacts to utilities, system operators and electricity consumers. Existing ...

  17. New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forowicz, T.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents an interactive on-line package for calculation of energy and cost demands for residential infiltration and ventilation, with input and output data entry through a web browser. This is a unique tool. It represents a new kind of approach to developing software employing user (client) and server (package provider) computers. The main program, servicing {open_quotes}intelligent{close_quotes} CGI (Common Gateway Interface) calls, resides on the server and dynamically handles the whole package performance and the procedure of calculations. The {open_quotes}computing engine{close_quotes} consists of two parts: RESVENT - the previously existing program for ventilation calculations and ECONOMICS - for heating and cooling system energy and cost calculations. The user interface is designed in such a way, that it allows simultaneous access by many users from all over the world.

  18. Ris Energy Report 4 Distributed generation 1 What is distributed generation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    generation (DG) refers to an emerging evolu- tion of the electric power generation systems, in which all of the Euro- pean Union (CEU) as an essential part of the develop- ment of the European power system the use of modelling in these contexts, including: · strategic planning and policymaking · detailed system

  19. Generate Uniform Transverse Distributed Electron Beam along a Beam Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been reported that transverse distribution shaping can help to further enhance the energy extraction efficiency in a terawatt, tapered X-ray free-electron laser. Thus, methods of creating and keeping almost uniform transverse distributed (UTD) beam within undulators are required. This study shows that a UTD electron beam can be generated within evenly distributed drift sections where undulators can be placed, by means of octupoles and particular optics. A concrete design is presented, and numerical simulations are done to verify the proposed method.

  20. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recover and store waste heat in the process. Consequently,expansion. Indeed, the waste heat from on-site generation

  1. A new wholesale bidding mechanism for enhanced demand response in smart grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiankang

    Calls to improve customer participation as a key element of smart grids have reinvigorated interest in demand-side features such as distributed generation, on-site storage and demand response. In the context of deregulated ...

  2. A demand responsive bidding mechanism with price elasticity matrix in wholesale electricity pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiankang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past several decades, many demand-side participation features have been applied in the electricity power systems. These features, such as distributed generation, on-site storage and demand response, add uncertainties ...

  3. Introduction to Network Analysis 15 Generating Functions and Degree Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Introduction to Network Analysis 15 Generating Functions and Degree Distributions #12;Introduction to Network Analysis 16 Polylogarithm drawn values add to a specific sum #12;Introduction to Network Analysis-loops, multi-edges #12;Introduction to Network Analysis 18 Configuration Model Conclusion: expected number

  4. Parton distributions and event generators Stefano Carrazza, Stefano Forte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Parton distributions and event generators Stefano Carrazza, Stefano Forte Dipartimento di Fisica ingredient in achieving all of these goals is the integration of parton distri- butions within Monte Carlo, and data collected in an experimental fiducial region. Whereas next-to-leading (NLO) order Monte Carlo

  5. Energy Storage and Distributed Energy Generation Project, Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwank, Johannes; Mader, Jerry; Chen, Xiaoyin; Mi, Chris; Linic, Suljo; Sastry, Ann Marie; Stefanopoulou, Anna; Thompson, Levi; Varde, Keshav

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report serves as a Final Report under the “Energy Storage and Distribution Energy Generation Project” carried out by the Transportation Energy Center (TEC) at the University of Michigan (UM). An interdisciplinary research team has been working on fundamental and applied research on: -distributed power generation and microgrids, -power electronics, and -advanced energy storage. The long-term objective of the project was to provide a framework for identifying fundamental research solutions to technology challenges of transmission and distribution, with special emphasis on distributed power generation, energy storage, control methodologies, and power electronics for microgrids, and to develop enabling technologies for novel energy storage and harvesting concepts that can be simulated, tested, and scaled up to provide relief for both underserved and overstressed portions of the Nation’s grid. TEC’s research is closely associated with Sections 5.0 and 6.0 of the DOE "Five-year Program Plan for FY2008 to FY2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs, August 2006.”

  6. Design of a Norm-Bounded LQG Controller for Power Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    . Therefore, control of modern electric power systems becomes more and more challenging as the present trends control is essential. Moreover, induction motor loads account for a large portion of domestic loadsDesign of a Norm-Bounded LQG Controller for Power Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation

  7. RANDOM VARIATE GENERATION FOR THE DIGAMMA AND TRIGAMMA DISTRIBUTIONS Luc Devroye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devroye, Luc

    RANDOM VARIATE GENERATION FOR THE DIGAMMA AND TRIGAMMA DISTRIBUTIONS Luc Devroye School of Computer these distributions and selected generalized hypergeometric distributions. The generators can also be used for the discrete stable distribution, the Yule distribution, Mizutani's distribution and the Waring distribution

  8. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuel electricity demands, and generation from these plantplants .. 47 Additional generation .. 48 Electricityelectricity demand increases generation from NGCC power plants.

  9. Modeling and Verification of Distributed Generation and Voltage Regulation Equipment for Unbalanced Distribution Power Systems; Annual Subcontract Report, June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M. W.; Broadwater, R.; Hambrick, J.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the development of models for distributed generation and distribution circuit voltage regulation equipment for unbalanced power systems and their verification through actual field measurements.

  10. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generation and purchase of natural gas for heating, they mayuncertain electricity and natural gas prices • Section 5F P t : wholesale natural gas price during day t (in $/

  11. Laboratories for the 21st Century Best Practices: Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guide describes general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments.

  12. Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rastler, D. M.

    Wires Manage Wires defer capital Optimize Energy Services Not Utility Business Not Utility Business New Business Opportunities DISTRIBUTED GENERATION Distributed generation includes small gas turbines, micro-turbines, fuel cells, storage...UTILITYIINDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS INVOLVING DISTRIBUTED GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EVOLVING ELECTRICITY MARKETS Daniel M. Rastler Manager, Fuel Cells and Distributed Generation Electric Power Research Institute Palo Alto, California ABSTRACT...

  13. The increasing world energy demand, depletion and unequal distribution of fossil resources, and the dangers caused by climate change are the driving forces for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Brink, Jeroen

    Summary Summary The increasing world energy demand, depletion and unequal distribution of fossil demand, many nations have established new regimes on renewable energy. For instance, the European of alternative energy sources. In view of the GHG emission reduction target agreed upon in the Kyoto protocol

  14. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid UnderUncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines a California-based microgrid s decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit that operates on natural gas. While the long-term natural gas generation cost is stochastic, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity at a fixed retail rate from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find natural gas generating cost thresholds that trigger DG investment. Furthermore, the consideration of operational flexibility by the microgrid accelerates DG investment, while the option to disconnect entirely from the utility is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an investment threshold boundary and find that high electricity price volatility relative to that of natural gas generating cost delays investment while simultaneously increasing the value of the investment. We conclude by using this result to find the implicit option value of the DG unit.

  15. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines a California-based microgrid?s decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit fuelled by natural gas. While the long-term natural gas generation cost is stochastic, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity at a fixed retail rate from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find a natural gas generation cost threshold that triggers DG investment. Furthermore, the consideration of operational flexibility by the microgrid increases DG investment, while the option to disconnect from the utility is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an investment threshold boundary and find that high electricity price volatility relative to that of natural gas generation cost delays investment while simultaneously increasing the value of the investment. We conclude by using this result to find the implicit option value of the DG unit when two sources of uncertainty exist.

  16. ANALYSIS OF DISTRIBUTION FEEDER LOSSES DUE TO ADDITION OF DISTRIBUTED PHOTOVOLTAIC GENERATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Singh, Ruchi

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed generators (DG) are small scale power supplying sources owned by customers or utilities and scattered throughout the power system distribution network. Distributed generation can be both renewable and non-renewable. Addition of distributed generation is primarily to increase feeder capacity and to provide peak load reduction. However, this addition comes with several impacts on the distribution feeder. Several studies have shown that addition of DG leads to reduction of feeder loss. However, most of these studies have considered lumped load and distributed load models to analyze the effects on system losses, where the dynamic variation of load due to seasonal changes is ignored. It is very important for utilities to minimize the losses under all scenarios to decrease revenue losses, promote efficient asset utilization, and therefore, increase feeder capacity. This paper will investigate an IEEE 13-node feeder populated with photovoltaic generators on detailed residential houses with water heater, Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning (HVAC) units, lights, and other plug and convenience loads. An analysis of losses for different power system components, such as transformers, underground and overhead lines, and triplex lines, will be performed. The analysis will utilize different seasons and different solar penetration levels (15%, 30%).

  17. New product demand forecasting and distribution optimization : a case study at Zara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garro, Andres

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of optimally distributing new products is common to many companies and industries. This thesis describes how this challenge was addressed at Zara, a leading retailer in the "fast fashion" industry. The thesis ...

  18. Reliability Improvement Programs in Steam Distribution and Power Generation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petto, S.

    RELIABILITY IIIPROVEfWlT PROGRAMS IN STEAM DISTRIBUTION AND POVER GENERATION SYSTEItS Steve Petto Tech/Serv Corporation Blue Bell, PA Abstract This paper will present alternatives to costly corrective maintenance of the steam trap... In the reliability and efficiency of the system. Recent studies have shownt hat more than 40% of all In stalled steam traps and 20% of certain types of valves need some form of corrective action. The majority of all high backpressure problems In condensate return...

  19. A Bio-Based Fuel Cell for Distributed Energy Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony Terrinoni; Sean Gifford

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology we propose consists primarily of an improved design for increasing the energy density of a certain class of bio-fuel cell (BFC). The BFCs we consider are those which harvest electrons produced by microorganisms during their metabolism of organic substrates (e.g. glucose, acetate). We estimate that our technology will significantly enhance power production (per unit volume) of these BFCs, to the point where they could be employed as stand-alone systems for distributed energy generation.

  20. Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

  1. Optimal Solar PV Arrays Integration for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Li, Xueping [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems hold great potential for distributed energy generation by installing PV panels on rooftops of residential and commercial buildings. Yet challenges arise along with the variability and non-dispatchability of the PV systems that affect the stability of the grid and the economics of the PV system. This paper investigates the integration of PV arrays for distributed generation applications by identifying a combination of buildings that will maximize solar energy output and minimize system variability. Particularly, we propose mean-variance optimization models to choose suitable rooftops for PV integration based on Markowitz mean-variance portfolio selection model. We further introduce quantity and cardinality constraints to result in a mixed integer quadratic programming problem. Case studies based on real data are presented. An efficient frontier is obtained for sample data that allows decision makers to choose a desired solar energy generation level with a comfortable variability tolerance level. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to show the tradeoffs between solar PV energy generation potential and variability.

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 2, MARCH 2014 861 An Optimal and Distributed Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehorai, Arye

    hour load to off-peak hours. Traditionally it is achieved by setting a time of use (TOU) price scheme and renewable distributed generators. A price scheme considering fluctuation cost is developed. We con- sider at time t. Fluctuation cost coefficient. Base price at time . Fluctuation price at time . Coefficient

  3. Integrating Renewable Energy into the Transmission and Distribution...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    generation DOE U.S. Department of Energy DPR Dynamic Power Resource DS distributed storage DSM demand side management D-SMES distributed superconducting magnetic energy...

  4. Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories, Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide provides general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments. Specific technology applications, general performance information, and cost data are provided to educate and encourage laboratory energy managers to consider onsite power generation or combined heat and power (CHP) systems for their facilities. After conducting an initial screening, energy managers are encouraged to conduct a detailed feasibility study with actual cost and performance data for technologies that look promising. Onsite distributed generation systems are small, modular, decentralized, grid-connected, or off-grid energy systems. These systems are located at or near the place where the energy is used. These systems are also known as distributed energy or distributed power systems. DG technologies are generally considered those that produce less than 20 megawatts (MW) of power. A number of technologies can be applied as effective onsite DG systems, including: (1) Diesel, natural gas, and dual-fuel reciprocating engines; (2) Combustion turbines and steam turbines; (3) Fuel cells; (4) Biomass heating; (5) Biomass combined heat and power; (6) Photovoltaics; and (7) Wind turbines. These systems can provide a number of potential benefits to an individual laboratory facility or campus, including: (1) High-quality, reliable, and potentially dispatchable power; (2) Low-cost energy and long-term utility cost assurance, especially where electricity and/or fuel costs are high; (3) Significantly reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Typical CHP plants reduce onsite GHG by 40 to 60 percent; (4) Peak demand shaving where demand costs are high; (5) CHP where thermal energy can be used in addition to electricity; (6) The ability to meet standby power needs, especially where utility-supplied power is interrupted frequently or for long periods and where standby power is required for safety or emergencies; and (7) Use for standalone or off-grid systems where extending the grid is too expensive or impractical. Because they are installed close to the load, DG systems avoid some of the disadvantages of large, central power plants, such as transmission and distribution losses over long electric lines.

  5. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  6. 1 Control Challenges of Fuel Cell-Driven Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valery Knyazkin; Lennart Söder; Claudio Canizares

    Abstract — This paper discusses the load following capability of fuel cell-driven power plants. A linear model of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power plant is obtained and utilized for the design of robust controllers which enhance tracking response of the plant and reject disturbances originating from the distribution grid. Two robust controllers are synthesized applying the H? mixed-sensitivity optimization and their performance is validated by means of nonlinear time-domain simulations. The obtained results indicate that the disturbances can be successfully attenuated; however, the tracking response cannot be significantly improved without a modification of the design of the fuel cell power plant. The paper is concluded by a brief discussion on the physical limitations on the fuel cell output power ramp and possible solutions are outlined. Index Terms — Distributed generation, Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, robust control, H ? controller design, disturbance rejection.

  7. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Deangelis; Rich Depuy; Debashis Dey; Georgia Karvountzi; Nguyen Minh; Max Peter; Faress Rahman; Pavel Sokolov; Deliang Yang

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the April to October 2004 reporting period in Task 2.3 (SOFC Scaleup for Hybrid and Fuel Cell Systems) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems for central power generation application based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by natural gas. The main objective of this task is to develop credible scale up strategies for large solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems. System concepts that integrate a SOFC with a gas turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 20 MW. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

  8. Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling Farm < Distributed Generation Study

  9. Distributed Generation Study/Floyd Bennett | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling Farm < Distributed Generation

  10. Municipal solid waste management: Identification and analysis of engineering indexes representing demand and costs generated in virtuous Italian communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamberini, R., E-mail: rita.gamberini@unimore.it; Del Buono, D.; Lolli, F.; Rimini, B.

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Collection and analysis of real life data in the field of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) generation and costs for management. • Study of 92 virtuous Italian communities. • Elaboration of trends of engineering indexes useful during design and evaluation of MSWM systems. - Abstract: The definition and utilisation of engineering indexes in the field of Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) is an issue of interest for technicians and scientists, which is widely discussed in literature. Specifically, the availability of consolidated engineering indexes is useful when new waste collection services are designed, along with when their performance is evaluated after a warm-up period. However, most published works in the field of MSWM complete their study with an analysis of isolated case studies. Conversely, decision makers require tools for information collection and exchange in order to trace the trends of these engineering indexes in large experiments. In this paper, common engineering indexes are presented and their values analysed in virtuous Italian communities, with the aim of contributing to the creation of a useful database whose data could be used during experiments, by indicating examples of MSWM demand profiles and the costs required to manage them.

  11. Time series power flow analysis for distribution connected PV generation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broderick, Robert Joseph; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Ellis, Abraham; Reno, Matthew J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA; Smith, Jeff [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN; Dugan, Roger [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed photovoltaic (PV) projects must go through an interconnection study process before connecting to the distribution grid. These studies are intended to identify the likely impacts and mitigation alternatives. In the majority of the cases, system impacts can be ruled out or mitigation can be identified without an involved study, through a screening process or a simple supplemental review study. For some proposed projects, expensive and time-consuming interconnection studies are required. The challenges to performing the studies are twofold. First, every study scenario is potentially unique, as the studies are often highly specific to the amount of PV generation capacity that varies greatly from feeder to feeder and is often unevenly distributed along the same feeder. This can cause location-specific impacts and mitigations. The second challenge is the inherent variability in PV power output which can interact with feeder operation in complex ways, by affecting the operation of voltage regulation and protection devices. The typical simulation tools and methods in use today for distribution system planning are often not adequate to accurately assess these potential impacts. This report demonstrates how quasi-static time series (QSTS) simulation and high time-resolution data can be used to assess the potential impacts in a more comprehensive manner. The QSTS simulations are applied to a set of sample feeders with high PV deployment to illustrate the usefulness of the approach. The report describes methods that can help determine how PV affects distribution system operations. The simulation results are focused on enhancing the understanding of the underlying technical issues. The examples also highlight the steps needed to perform QSTS simulation and describe the data needed to drive the simulations. The goal of this report is to make the methodology of time series power flow analysis readily accessible to utilities and others responsible for evaluating potential PV impacts.

  12. Integrated Simulation Development and Decision Support Tool-Set for Utility Market and Distributed Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daye, Tony [Green Power Labs

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will enable utilities to develop long-term strategic plans that integrate high levels of renewable energy generation, and to better plan power system operations under high renewable penetration. The program developed forecast data streams for decision support and effective integration of centralized and distributed solar power generation in utility operations. This toolset focused on real time simulation of distributed power generation within utility grids with the emphasis on potential applications in day ahead (market) and real time (reliability) utility operations. The project team developed and demonstrated methodologies for quantifying the impact of distributed solar generation on core utility operations, identified protocols for internal data communication requirements, and worked with utility personnel to adapt the new distributed generation (DG) forecasts seamlessly within existing Load and Generation procedures through a sophisticated DMS. This project supported the objectives of the SunShot Initiative and SUNRISE by enabling core utility operations to enhance their simulation capability to analyze and prepare for the impacts of high penetrations of solar on the power grid. The impact of high penetration solar PV on utility operations is not only limited to control centers, but across many core operations. Benefits of an enhanced DMS using state-of-the-art solar forecast data were demonstrated within this project and have had an immediate direct operational cost savings for Energy Marketing for Day Ahead generation commitments, Real Time Operations, Load Forecasting (at an aggregate system level for Day Ahead), Demand Response, Long term Planning (asset management), Distribution Operations, and core ancillary services as required for balancing and reliability. This provided power system operators with the necessary tools and processes to operate the grid in a reliable manner under high renewable penetration.

  13. IMPACT OF FUEL CELL BASED HYBRID DISTRIBUTED GENERATION IN AN ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Recent developments in distributed generation technologies have enabled new options for supplying electrical energy in remote and off-grid areas. The importance of fuel cells has increased during the past decade due to the extensive use of fossil fuels for electrical power has resulted in many negative consequences. Fuel cells are now closer to commercialization than past and they have the ability to fulfill all of the global power needs while meeting the economic and environmental expectations..The objective of this paper is to study the economic performance and operation of a fuel cell distributed generation and to provide an assessment of the economic issues associated in electrical network. In this study, with HOMER (Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewables) software, NREL’s micro power optimization model performed a range of equipment options over varying constraints and sensitivities to optimize small power distribution systems. Its flexibility makes it useful in the evaluation of design issues in the planning and early decision-making phase of rural electrification projects. This study concludes that fuel cell systems appear competitive today if is connected with proposed hybrid DG in an AC distribution grid. The overall energy management strategy for coordinating the power flows among the different energy sources is presented with cost-effective approach.

  14. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt Montgomery; Nguyen Minh

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the October 2001 to December 2001 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. The conceptual and demonstration system designs were proposed and analyzed, and these systems have been modeled in Aspen Plus. Work has also started on the assembly of dynamic component models and the development of the top-level controls requirements for the system. SOFC stacks have been fabricated and performance mapping initiated.

  15. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen Minh

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the January 2002 to March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. For this reporting period the following activities have been carried out: {lg_bullet} Conceptual system design trade studies were performed {lg_bullet} System-level performance model was created {lg_bullet} Dynamic control models are being developed {lg_bullet} Mechanical properties of candidate heat exchanger materials were investigated {lg_bullet} SOFC performance mapping as a function of flow rate and pressure was completed

  16. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the July 2001 to September 2001 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. An internal program kickoff was held at Honeywell in Torrance, CA. The program structure was outlined and the overall technical approach for the program was presented to the team members. Detail program schedules were developed and detailed objectives were defined. Initial work has begun on the system design and pressurized SOFC operation.

  17. Distributed generation capabilities of the national energy modeling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Berkeley Lab's exploration of how the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models distributed generation (DG) and presents possible approaches for improving how DG is modeled. The on-site electric generation capability has been available since the AEO2000 version of NEMS. Berkeley Lab has previously completed research on distributed energy resources (DER) adoption at individual sites and has developed a DER Customer Adoption Model called DER-CAM. Given interest in this area, Berkeley Lab set out to understand how NEMS models small-scale on-site generation to assess how adequately DG is treated in NEMS, and to propose improvements or alternatives. The goal is to determine how well NEMS models the factors influencing DG adoption and to consider alternatives to the current approach. Most small-scale DG adoption takes place in the residential and commercial modules of NEMS. Investment in DG ultimately offsets purchases of electricity, which also eliminates the losses associated with transmission and distribution (T&D). If the DG technology that is chosen is photovoltaics (PV), NEMS assumes renewable energy consumption replaces the energy input to electric generators. If the DG technology is fuel consuming, consumption of fuel in the electric utility sector is replaced by residential or commercial fuel consumption. The waste heat generated from thermal technologies can be used to offset the water heating and space heating energy uses, but there is no thermally activated cooling capability. This study consists of a review of model documentation and a paper by EIA staff, a series of sensitivity runs performed by Berkeley Lab that exercise selected DG parameters in the AEO2002 version of NEMS, and a scoping effort of possible enhancements and alternatives to NEMS current DG capabilities. In general, the treatment of DG in NEMS is rudimentary. The penetration of DG is determined by an economic cash-flow analysis that determines adoption based on the n umber of years to a positive cash flow. Some important technologies, e.g. thermally activated cooling, are absent, and ceilings on DG adoption are determined by some what arbitrary caps on the number of buildings that can adopt DG. These caps are particularly severe for existing buildings, where the maximum penetration for any one technology is 0.25 percent. On the other hand, competition among technologies is not fully considered, and this may result in double-counting for certain applications. A series of sensitivity runs show greater penetration with net metering enhancements and aggressive tax credits and a more limited response to lowered DG technology costs. Discussion of alternatives to the current code is presented in Section 4. Alternatives or improvements to how DG is modeled in NEMS cover three basic areas: expanding on the existing total market for DG both by changing existing parameters in NEMS and by adding new capabilities, such as for missing technologies; enhancing the cash flow analysis but incorporating aspects of DG economics that are not currently represented, e.g. complex tariffs; and using an external geographic information system (GIS) driven analysis that can better and more intuitively identify niche markets.

  18. Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Maribu, Karl

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The ongoing deregulation of electricity industries worldwide is providing incentives for microgrids to use small-scale distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) applications via heat exchangers (HXs) to meet local energy loads. Although the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that of central-station production, relatively high tariff rates and the potential for CHP applications increase the attraction of on-site generation. Nevertheless, a microgrid contemplatingthe installation of gas-fired DG has to be aware of the uncertainty in the natural gas price. Treatment of uncertainty via real options increases the value of the investment opportunity, which then delays the adoption decision as the opportunity cost of exercising the investment option increases as well. In this paper, we take the perspective of a microgrid that can proceed in a sequential manner with DG capacity and HX investment in order to reduce its exposure to risk from natural gas price volatility. In particular, with the availability of the HX, the microgrid faces a tradeoff between reducing its exposure to the natural gas price and maximising its cost savings. By varying the volatility parameter, we find that the microgrid prefers a direct investment strategy for low levels of volatility and a sequential one for higher levels of volatility.

  19. A Model of U.S. Commercial Distributed Generation Adoption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Ryan Firestone; Zhou, Nan; Maribu,Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems over the next two decades. Forecasts of DG adoption published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) are made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. NEMS is also used for estimating the future benefits of Department of Energy research and development used in support of budget requests and management decisionmaking. The NEMS approach to modeling DG has some limitations, including constraints on the amount of DG allowed for retrofits to existing buildings and a small number of possible sizes for each DG technology. An alternative approach called Commercial Sector Model (ComSeM) is developed to improve the way in which DG adoption is modeled. The approach incorporates load shapes for specific end uses in specific building types in specific regions, e.g., cooling in hospitals in Atlanta or space heating in Chicago offices. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) uses these load profiles together with input cost and performance DG technology assumptions to model the potential DG adoption for four selected cities and two sizes of five building types in selected forecast years to 2022. The Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model (DER-MaDiM) is then used to then tailor the DER-CAM results to adoption projections for the entire U.S. commercial sector for all forecast years from 2007-2025. This process is conducted such that the structure of results are consistent with the structure of NEMS, and can be re-injected into NEMS that can then be used to integrate adoption results into a full forecast.

  20. Dynamic load Variation and Stability Analysis in Distribution Networks with Distributed Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    to the electric energy consumers. Demand for electricity is growing with great rapidity as for nations modernize and economies develop. Due to this development, there is an increased demand in electricity. The increased demand for electricity has outstripped that for other forms of energy. Renewable energy which comes from

  1. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Commission's final forecasts for 2012­2022 electricity consumption, peak, and natural gas demand Electricity, demand, consumption, forecast, weather normalization, peak, natural gas, self generation CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand

  2. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost of Natural Gas Generation, p Figure 6. Normalised NetCost of Natural Gas Generation, p Figure 7. Wait InvestCost of Natural Gas Generation (US$/kWh e ), C Figure 8.

  3. Air Quality Impact of Distributed Generation of Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jing, Qiguo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the near source air quality impact of distributedDabdub, D. , 2003. Urban Air quality impacts of distributedDabdub, D. , 2004. Urban Air quality impacts of distributed

  4. Method and apparatus for anti-islanding protection of distributed generations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ye, Zhihong; John, Vinod; Wang, Changyong; Garces, Luis Jose; Zhou, Rui; Li, Lei; Walling, Reigh Allen; Premerlani, William James; Sanza, Peter Claudius; Liu, Yan; Dame, Mark Edward

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for anti-islanding protection of a distributed generation with respect to a feeder connected to an electrical grid is disclosed. The apparatus includes a sensor adapted to generate a voltage signal representative of an output voltage and/or a current signal representative of an output current at the distributed generation, and a controller responsive to the signals from the sensor. The controller is productive of a control signal directed to the distributed generation to drive an operating characteristic of the distributed generation out of a nominal range in response to the electrical grid being disconnected from the feeder.

  5. HYBRID CONTROL OF DISTRIBUTED GENERATORS CONNECTED TO WEAK RURAL NETWORKS TO MITIGATE VOLTAGE VARIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth

    thermal power plants will increase the total and proportion of capacity of Distributed Generation (DG@iee.org; Robin.Wallace@ed.ac.uk ABSTRACT Distributed generators are normally operated in automatic power factor-constrained bi- directional power flow may cause unacceptable voltage fluctuations that would cause generator

  6. Automated di/dt Stressmark Generation for Microprocessor Power Distribution Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    Automated di/dt Stressmark Generation for Microprocessor Power Distribution Networks Youngtaek Kim for automated di/dt stressmark generation to test maximum voltage droop in a microprocessor power distribution and typical benchmarks in experiments covering three micro-processor architectures and five power distribution

  7. Demand Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

  8. Fuel cell power plants in a distributed generator application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.J. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ONSI`s (a subsidiary of International Fuel Cells Corporation) world wide fleet of 200-kW PC25{trademark} phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants which began operation early in 1992 has shown excellent performance and reliability in over 1 million hours of operation. This experience has verified the clean, quiet, reliable operation of the PC25 and confirmed its application as a distributed generator. Continuing product development efforts have resulted in a one third reduction of weight and volume as well as improved installation and operating characteristics for the PC25 C model. Delivery of this unit began in 1995. International Fuel Cells (IFC) continues its efforts to improve product design and manufacturing processes. This progress has been sustained at a compounded rate of 10 percent per year since the late 1980`s. These improvements will permit further reductions in the initial cost of the power plant and place increased emphasis on market development as the pacing item in achieving business benefits from the PC25 fuel cell. Derivative product opportunities are evolving with maturation of the technologies in a commercial environment. The recent announcement of Praxair, Inc., and IFC introducing a non-cryogenic hydrogen supply system utilizing IFC`s steam reformer is an example. 11 figs.

  9. Abstract--This paper proposes a distributed generator (DG) placement methodology based on newly defined term reactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    . Index Terms--Distributed generator (DG), reactive power loadability, solar, voltage regulation, wind generator. I. INTRODUCTION istributed generation based on renewable energy sources offers a promising

  10. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

  11. Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

  12. Micro-grid operation of inverter based distributed generation with voltage and frequency dependent loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeineldin, H. H.

    Distribution systems are experiencing increasing penetration of distributed generation (DG). One attractive option is to use the available DG capacity during utility outages by forming planned micro-grids. Load sharing ...

  13. Dynamic equivalencing of distribution network with embedded generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Xiaodan Selina

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy generation will play an important role in solving the climate change problem. With renewable electricity generation increasing, there will be some significant changes in electric power systems, ...

  14. Impact of Renewable Distributed Generation on Power Systems M. Begovi, A. Pregelj, A. Rohatgi D. Novosel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , improve the voltage profile across the feeder, may reduce the loading level of branches and substation the effect of DG penetration on the actual load demand and voltage profile of the distribution feeder. However, DG systems inherently provide some benefits to the utility. They may level the load curve

  15. Smoothing the Eects of Renewable Generation on the Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naud, Paul S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Grid by Paul Naud Renewable electrical power sourcessystem based on various renewable energy resources. InCRUZ Smoothing the Effects of Renewable Generation on the

  16. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electricity markets , PhD thesis, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA,USA, 1994. Joskow PL, Productivity growth and technical change in the generation of electricity,

  17. Future of Distributed Generation and IEEE 1547 (Presentation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    new boundary issues and requirements, islanding issues, and how it impacts distributed wind. times redirected to final destination ShortURL Code Published Current state Most...

  18. Future of Distributed Generation and IEEE 1547 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the background on IEEE 1547, including its purpose, changes, new boundary issues and requirements, islanding issues, and how it impacts distributed wind.

  19. Control and Analysis of Droop and Reverse Droop Controllers for Distributed Generations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    Control and Analysis of Droop and Reverse Droop Controllers for Distributed Generations Dan Wu1 University, P. R. China ftang_nego@126.com Abstract--This paper addresses control and analysis of droop and reverse droop control for distributed generations (DG). The droop control is well known applied

  20. Self-triggered Communication Enabled Control of Distributed Generation in Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Sudip K.

    1 Self-triggered Communication Enabled Control of Distributed Generation in Microgrids Muhammad. I. INTRODUCTION Effective integration of multiple distributed generation (DG) units in microgrids. Conventionally the secondary control in a microgrid is based on a centralized control structure using periodic

  1. 1170 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 28, NO. 2, MAY 2013 Independent Distributed Generation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    -scale electric generation facilities to participate in distributed generation (DG) with few requirements on power-purchase1170 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 28, NO. 2, MAY 2013 Independent Distributed is maximized via procuring power from DGs and the market at a minimum expense. On the other hand, each DG unit

  2. Reactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    -loadability Reactive power margin Wind turbine a b s t r a c t This paper proposes static and dynamic VAR planningReactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage February 2013 Available online Keywords: Composite load Distributed generation D-STATCOM Q

  3. OPTIMAL DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION UNDER NETWORK LOAD CONSTRAINTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Jason

    of novel components for decentral power generation (solar panels, small wind turbines and heat pumps). This gives rise to the question how many units of each type (solar panel, small wind turbine or central-producers. Decentralized Power Generation (DPG) refers to an electric power source such as solar, wind or combined heat

  4. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand response: ? Distribution utility ? ISO ? Aggregator (demand response less obstructive and inconvenient for the customer (particularly if DR resources are aggregated by a load aggregator).

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: demand response inverter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    demand response inverter ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities,...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: How a Grid Manager Meets Demand...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demand (Load) How a Grid Manager Meets Demand (Load) In the "historical" electric grid, power-generating plants fell into three categories: No daily electrical demand data plot...

  7. Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2: L A City, DWP Valley Generating 1: Hunters Point 2: PG &E Co, Hunters Point Power 1: SDG & E Co/Kearny Mesa GT 2:Angeles ST(4) BF(2) Hunters Point San Francisco NG, Diesel

  8. March 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Methods for Power Distribution Systems: Final Report Tom McDermott (2010) 67 Frequency Control Concerns in the North American Electric Power System Kirby, B.J. (2003) 64 A...

  9. Smoothing the Eects of Renewable Generation on the Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naud, Paul S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fortunately, inverter data from a customer with a PV systemsystem, in series with a PV array and ahead of the inverter,PV is fed into an inverter to feed energy into the distribution system.

  10. Random Boolean networks with number of parents generated by certain probability distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matache, Dora

    Random Boolean networks with number of parents generated by certain probability distributions Ray A following a Power Law distribution. Others have examined how highly connected networks use a Popularity network where the number of parents are obtained using a Power Law distribution and are connected based

  11. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the dispatch of flexible loads and generation resources bothof controllable generation and flexible demand. In the casecontrollable generation resources and flexible loads in the

  12. REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the California Energy Commission staff's revised forecasts for 2012­2022 electricity consumption, peak Electricity, demand, consumption, forecast, weather normalization, peak, natural gas, self generation REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand

  13. REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Commission staff's revised forecasts for 2012­2022 electricity consumption, peak, and natural Electricity, demand, consumption, forecast, weather normalization, peak, natural gas, self generation REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility

  14. Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Kirkham, Harold

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity, and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.

  15. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under VariousElectricity Tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The on-site generation of electricity can offer buildingowners and occupiers financial benefits as well as social benefits suchas reduced grid congestion, improved energy efficiency, and reducedgreenhouse gas emissions. Combined heat and power (CHP), or cogeneration,systems make use of the waste heat from the generator for site heatingneeds. Real-time optimal dispatch of CHP systems is difficult todetermine because of complicated electricity tariffs and uncertainty inCHP equipment availability, energy prices, and system loads. Typically,CHP systems use simple heuristic control strategies. This paper describesa method of determining optimal control in real-time and applies it to alight industrial site in San Diego, California, to examine: 1) the addedbenefit of optimal over heuristic controls, 2) the price elasticity ofthe system, and 3) the site-attributable greenhouse gas emissions, allunder three different tariff structures. Results suggest that heuristiccontrols are adequate under the current tariff structure and relativelyhigh electricity prices, capturing 97 percent of the value of thedistributed generation system. Even more value could be captured bysimply not running the CHP system during times of unusually high naturalgas prices. Under hypothetical real-time pricing of electricity,heuristic controls would capture only 70 percent of the value ofdistributed generation.

  16. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty++++ Afzal Siddiqui

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    , CA 94720-8163, USA, c_marnay@lbl.gov ABSTRACT. This paper examines a California-based microgrid-term natural gas generation cost is stochastic, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an investment threshold

  17. Optimal distributed power generation under network load constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    wind turbines and heat pumps). This gives rise to the question how many units of each type (solar panel, mainly because of the development of novel components for decentral power generation (solar panels, small (DPG) refers to an electric power source such as solar, wind or combined heat power (CHP) connected

  18. Distributed Power Generation: Requirements and Recommendations for an ICT Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appelrath, Hans-Jürgen

    . In the future of energy markets, the distributed energy production through wind and hydroelectric power plants. Some of these are sustainable (wind and hydroelectric power plants, solar cells), some are controllable, one has to distinguish between two in principle different products: consumption power and balance

  19. Study and Development of Anti-Islanding Control for Synchronous Machine-Based Distributed Generators: November 2001--March 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Z.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the study and development of new active anti-islanding control schemes for synchronous machine-based distributed generators, including engine generators and gas turbines.

  20. The Value of Distributed Solar Electric Generation to San Antonio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Nic [Solar San Antonio, TX (United States); Norris, Ben [Clean Power Research, Napa, CA (United States); Meyer, Lisa [City of San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an analysis of value provided by grid-connected, distributed PV in San Antonio from a utility perspective. The study quantified six value components, summarized in Table ES- 1. These components represent the benefits that accrue to the utility, CPS Energy, in accepting solar onto the grid. This analysis does not treat the compensation of value, policy objectives, or cost-effectiveness from the retail consumer perspective.

  1. Quantum feedback by discrete quantum non-demolition measurements: towards on-demand generation of photon-number states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Dotsenko; M. Mirrahimi; M. Brune; S. Haroche; J. -M. Raimond; P. Rouchon

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a quantum feedback scheme for the preparation and protection of photon number states of light trapped in a high-Q microwave cavity. A quantum non-demolition measurement of the cavity field provides information on the photon number distribution. The feedback loop is closed by injecting into the cavity a coherent pulse adjusted to increase the probability of the target photon number. The efficiency and reliability of the closed-loop state stabilization is assessed by quantum Monte-Carlo simulations. We show that, in realistic experimental conditions, Fock states are efficiently produced and protected against decoherence.

  2. Investigation of anti-islanding schemes for utility interconnection of distributed fuel cell powered generations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeraputra, Chuttchaval

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid emergence of distributed fuel cell powered generations (DFPGs) operating in parallel with utility has brought a number of technical concerns as more DFPGs are connected to utility grid. One of the most challenging ...

  3. Applying epoch-era analysis for homeowner selection of distributed generation power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piña, Alexander L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current shift from centralized energy generation to a more distributed model has opened a number of choices for homeowners to provide their own power. While there are a number of systems to purchase, there are no tools ...

  4. Dynamic Control of Electricity Cost with Power Demand Smoothing and Peak Shaving for Distributed Internet Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, A.K.M. Ashikur

    and efficiently manage the electricity cost of distributed IDCs based on the Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP on the electricity price in- formation of the regions where IDCs are located. Based on this observation various of all, due to electricity-price based biased work- load distribution, the IDCs located at relatively

  5. High Penetration Solar Distributed Generation Study on Oahu | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy CompletingPresentedGeneration FY13

  6. Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy : bDistributed

  7. Distributed Generation Study/Harbec Plastics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling Farm < Distributed

  8. Distributed Generation Study/Hudson Valley Community College | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling Farm < DistributedInformation

  9. Velocity distribution measurements in atomic beams generated using laser induced back-ablation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denning, A; Lee, S; Ammonson, M; Bergeson, S D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of calcium atoms in an atomic beam generated using a dual-stage laser back-ablation apparatus. Distributions are measured using a velocity selective Doppler time-of-flight technique. They are Boltzmann-like with rms velocities corresponding to temperatures above the melting point for calcium. Contrary to a recent report in the literature, this method does not generate a sub-thermal atomic beam.

  10. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Ruchi; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of addition of renewable resources- solar and wind in the distribution system as deployed in the SGIG projects.

  11. Fault Current Issues for Market Driven Power Systems with Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are required for the selection of interruption devices, protective relays, and their coordination. Systems must Terms--Distributed / dispersed generation, power distri- bution, power system protection, fault in siting conventional generation ­ but, for whatever reason, protection engineers as well as transmission

  12. A forward microphysical model to predict the size-distribution parameters of laboratory generated (mimic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    A forward microphysical model to predict the size- distribution parameters of laboratory generated Interactions ­ Condensational Growth and Coagulation, Submitted for Indian Aerosol Science and Technology Microphysical Model for the UTLS (FAMMUS) is applied to predict the size-distribution parameters of laboratory

  13. A New Approach to Mitigate the Impact of Distributed Generation on the Overcurrent Protection Scheme of Radial Distribution Feeders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Funmilayo, Hamed

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................5 2.3. Overcurrent Protection Coordination Rules ....................................................10 2.4. Distributed Generation (DG) in Radial Feeders ..............................................15 2.5. Radial Feeder with DG.............................................................................29 3.3. System Protection............................................................................................31 3.4. Interconnection Protection...............................................................................35 3.5. DG Unit...

  14. Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rastler, D. M.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wires Manage Wires defer capital Optimize Energy Services Not Utility Business Not Utility Business New Business Opportunities DISTRIBUTED GENERATION Distributed generation includes small gas turbines, micro-turbines, fuel cells, storage... Residential Single Family Multi Family 1-10 kW 15- 50 kW Ultra micro-turbines Stirling Engines Fuel Cells PEMFC SOFC PV BatterylUPS Remote Loads 5 kW - 1,000 kW IC engines Off Grid Diesel Engine Micro turbine Stirling Engines Distribution...

  15. Onsite Backup Generation and Interruption Insurance for Electricity Distribution Author(s): Joseph A. Doucet and Shmuel S. Oren

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Onsite Backup Generation and Interruption Insurance for Electricity Distribution Author(s): Joseph customerownedonsitebackupdecisionswillpre-emptthe utility'splan to mitigatecompensationpaymentsbyprovidingonsitebackup generation access to The Energy Journal. http://www.jstor.org #12;Onsite Backup Generation and Interruption

  16. Key factors affecting voltage oscillations of distribution networks with distributed generation and induction motor loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    of distributed energy sources such as, combined heat and power (CHP), wind, solar, and fuel cells, are expected and IT, The University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia b Future Grid Research Centre, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia c Griffith School of Engineering, Griffith University

  17. Distributional and Efficiency Impacts of Clean and Renewable Energy Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supply and demand, including renewable energy resources and generating technologies, while representingDistributional and Efficiency Impacts of Clean and Renewable Energy Standards for Electricity on recycled paper #12;Distributional and Efficiency Impacts of Clean and Renewable Energy Standards

  18. Distributed Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at customer sites to address peak load. 2 Using these resources could reduce required installed capacity and would increase the operating reserve margins for the network,...

  19. Demand Side Bidding. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spahn, Andrew

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

  20. Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study Zhi Zhou1 Fangming Liu of fuel cell energy in cloud computing, yet it is unclear what and how much benefit it may bring. This paper, for the first time, attempts to quantitatively examine the benefits brought by fuel cell

  1. Published in IET Generation, Transmission & Distribution Received on 8th July 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Yong

    , in a practical power system, the transmission topology can change as a result of maintenance and network network topology in an electric power system. The modelling is accomplished in a coordinatedPublished in IET Generation, Transmission & Distribution Received on 8th July 2013 Revised on 31st

  2. Published in IET Generation, Transmission & Distribution Received on 5th October 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Zhihua

    , and the system reliability is improved. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed secondary networks reduce the system reliability. More reliable and sparse communication networks can be accommodated of multiple photovoltaic generators in a power distribution system [16]. Networked multi-agent systems have

  3. Operation and Control of Distribution Systems with high level integration of Renewable Generation units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    models Probabilistic methodologies are being applied to power system analysis since 70' [9] becauseOperation and Control of Distribution Systems with high level integration of Renewable Generation. Diagonal 649 Pavelló A, 08028 Barcelona, Spain Summary Traditional power systems have a hierarchical

  4. Abstract--Distributed generation (DG) has brought great attention from the power community, especially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    generation and DFACTS (distribution network Flexible AC Transmission System). In these researches, especially when it is associated with renewable energy sources, as a sustainable energy alternative. Some DG applications, especially on high penetration levels, may have adverse impact on the transmission

  5. Competitive Bidding Process for Electric Distribution Companies’ Procurement of Default and Back-up Electric Generation Services (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electric distribution companies shall utilize a competitive bidding process for electric generation services. The Department of Public Utility Control will be responsible for setting the criteria...

  6. Flexible Demand Management under Time-Varying Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Yong

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management   System Flexible   Appliances   Distributed  Flexible Demand Management under Time-Varying Prices by YongYing-Ju Chen Spring 2013 Flexible Demand Management under

  7. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

  8. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  9. Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand, Conflict and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fesharaki, Fereidun; Banaszak, Sarah; WU, Kang; Valencia, Mark J.; Dorian, James P.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    favorable economically, energy demand, and particularly oil3 Energy Policies and Energy Demand in Northeastissue of whether rising energy demand generates new security

  10. Abstract--Recently, there is an increasing interest in using distributed generators (DGs) not only to inject power into the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    1 1 Abstract--Recently, there is an increasing interest in using distributed generators (DGs, it is well-known that the Distributed Generators (DGs) often consist of a prime mover connected through-frame control method for voltage unbalance compensation in an islanded microgrid is proposed. This method

  11. Soil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM10 Nicholaus M. Madden a,*, Randal J. Southard a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM10 Nicholaus M. Madden a Soil particle size distribution Soil water content a b s t r a c t Management of soils to reduce earlier work of predicting tillage-generated dust emissions based on soil properties. We focus

  12. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of capacity factors of wind generation from a Vestas V112-demand is higher, while wind generation peaks at night andvalues of Tehachapi wind generation, Palm Springs solar

  13. Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

    2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

  14. Design of a 2.5kW Low Temperature Stirling Engine for Distributed Solar Thermal Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    Design of a 2.5kW Low Temperature Stirling Engine for Distributed Solar Thermal Generation Mike He on the design of a Stirling engine for distributed solar thermal ap- plications. In particular, we design for experimentation. Stirling engines can have broad significance and technological advantages for distributed

  15. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  16. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua, Ph.D., C.H.P.; Hillol Guha, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 {micro}m) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 {micro}m, arising from condensation of vaporized material and subsequent rapid formation of aggregates. Particles of larger size, resulting from ejection of melted material or fragments from the cutting zone, were also observed. This study presents data regarding the metal cutting rate, particle size distribution, and their generation rate, while using different cutting tools and metals. The study shows that respirable particles constitute only a small fraction of the released kerf.

  17. Making the Economic Case for Small-Scale Distributed Wind -- A Screening for Distributed Generation Wind Opportunities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Brown, E.; Dominick, J.; Jurotich, T.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was an offshoot of a previous assessment, which examined the potential for large-scale, greater than 50 MW, wind development on occupied federal agency lands. The study did not find significant commercial wind development opportunities, primarily because of poor wind resource on available and appropriately sized land areas or land use or aesthetic concerns. The few sites that could accommodate a large wind farm failed to have transmission lines in optimum locations required to generate power at competitive wholesale prices. The study did identify a promising but less common distributed generation (DG) development option. This follow-up study documents the NREL/Global Energy Concepts team efforts to identify economic DG wind projects at a select group of occupied federal sites. It employs a screening strategy based on project economics that go beyond quantity of windy land to include state and utility incentives as well as the value of avoided power purchases. It attempts to account for the extra costs and difficulties associated with small projects through the use of project scenarios that are more compatible with federal facilities and existing land uses. These benefits and barriers of DG are discussed, and the screening methodology and results are included. The report concludes with generalizations about the screening method and recommendations for improvement and other potential applications for this methodology.

  18. GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

  19. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsakiris, N.; Gill-Comeau, M.; Lewis, L. J. [Département de Physique et Regroupement Québécois sur les Matériaux de Pointe (RQMP), Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Anoop, K. K.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S., E-mail: amoruso@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II and CNR-SPIN, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ?50 fs, 800?nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (?90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (?10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.

  20. Optimizing Geographic Allotment of Photovoltaic Capacity in a Distributed Generation Setting: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urquhart, B.; Sengupta, M.; Keller, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-objective optimization was performed to allocate 2MW of PV among four candidate sites on the island of Lanai such that energy was maximized and variability in the form of ramp rates was minimized. This resulted in an optimal solution set which provides a range of geographic allotment alternatives for the fixed PV capacity. Within the optimal set, a tradeoff between energy produced and variability experienced was found, whereby a decrease in variability always necessitates a simultaneous decrease in energy. A design point within the optimal set was selected for study which decreased extreme ramp rates by over 50% while only decreasing annual energy generation by 3% over the maximum generation allocation. To quantify the allotment mix selected, a metric was developed, called the ramp ratio, which compares ramping magnitude when all capacity is allotted to a single location to the aggregate ramping magnitude in a distributed scenario. The ramp ratio quantifies simultaneously how much smoothing a distributed scenario would experience over single site allotment and how much a single site is being under-utilized for its ability to reduce aggregate variability. This paper creates a framework for use by cities and municipal utilities to reduce variability impacts while planning for high penetration of PV on the distribution grid.

  1. Decoding the `Nature Encoded' Messages for Distributed Energy Generation Control in Microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Shuping; Lai, Lifeng; Qiu, Robert C

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The communication for the control of distributed energy generation (DEG) in microgrid is discussed. Due to the requirement of realtime transmission, weak or no explicit channel coding is used for the message of system state. To protect the reliability of the uncoded or weakly encoded messages, the system dynamics are considered as a `nature encoding' similar to convolution code, due to its redundancy in time. For systems with or without explicit channel coding, two decoding procedures based on Kalman filtering and Pearl's Belief Propagation, in a similar manner to Turbo processing in traditional data communication systems, are proposed. Numerical simulations have demonstrated the validity of the schemes, using a linear model of electric generator dynamic system.

  2. Reliable, Low-Cost Distributed Generator/Utility System Interconnect: Final Subcontract Report, November 2001-March 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.; Li, L.; Zhou, R.; Garces, L.; Dame, M.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the detailed study and development of new GE anti-islanding controls for two classes of distributed generation. One is inverter-interfaced, while the other is synchronous machine interfaced.

  3. Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2014738 Published: J. M. Pearce, "Expanding Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation from Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic + Combined Heat.08.012 Expanding Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation from Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic and power (CHP) systems has provided the opportunity for inhouse power backup of residentialscale

  4. Generating the local oscillator "locally" in continuous-variable quantum key distribution based on coherent detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bing Qi; Pavel Lougovski; Raphael Pooser; Warren Grice; Miljko Bobrek

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) protocols based on coherent detection have been studied extensively in both theory and experiment. In all the existing implementations of CV-QKD, both the quantum signal and the local oscillator (LO) are generated from the same laser and propagate through the insecure quantum channel. This arrangement may open security loopholes and also limit the potential applications of CV-QKD. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a pilot-aided feedforward data recovery scheme which enables reliable coherent detection using a "locally" generated LO. Using two independent commercial laser sources and a spool of 25 km optical fiber, we construct a coherent communication system. The variance of the phase noise introduced by the proposed scheme is measured to be 0.04 (rad^2), which is small enough to enable secure key distribution. This technology also opens the door for other quantum communication protocols, such as the recently proposed measurement-device-independent (MDI) CV-QKD where independent light sources are employed by different users.

  5. Viability of Small Wind Distributed Generation for Farmers Who Irrigate (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meadows, B.; Forsyth, T.; Johnson, S.; Healow, D.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 14% of U.S. farms are irrigated, representing 55 million acres of irrigated land. Irrigation on these farms is a major energy user in the United States, accounting for one-third of water withdrawals and 137 billion gallons per day. More than half of the Irrigation systems use electric energy. Wind energy can be a good choice for meeting irrigation energy needs. Nine of the top 10 irrigation states (California, Texas, Idaho, Arkansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Arizona, Kansas, Washington, and Oregon) have good to excellent wind resources. Many rural areas have sufficient wind speeds to make wind an attractive alternative, and farms and ranches can often install a wind energy system without impacting their ability to plant crops and graze livestock. Additionally, the rising and uncertain future costs of diesel, natural gas, and even electricity increase the potential effectiveness for wind energy and its predictable and competitive cost. In general, wind-powered electric generation systems generate more energy in the winter months than in the summer months when most crops need the water. Therefore, those states that have a supportive net metering policy can dramatically impact the viability of an onsite wind turbine. This poster presentation highlights case studies that show favorable and unfavorable policies that impact the growth of small wind in this important sector and demonstrate how net metering policies affect the viability of distributed wind generation for farmers who irrigate.

  6. Abstract--This paper presents the consequences and operating limitations of installing distributed generation (DG) to electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are required for the selection of interruption devices, protective relays, and their coordination. Systems must Terms--Distributed / dispersed generation, power distri- bution, power system protection, fault in siting conventional generation ­ but, for whatever reason, protection engineers as well as transmission

  7. Evaluating shortfalls in mixed-integer programming approaches for the optimal design and dispatch of distributed generation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    heat and power Fuel cells Building energy a b s t r a c t The distributed generation (DG) of combined Wisconsin, retrofitted with solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and a hot water storage tank. The simpler model of renewable or non- renewable sources of power generation (e.g., photovoltaic (PV) cells, fuel cells

  8. Abstract--The capacity of distributed generation (DG) is set to increase significantly with much of the plant connecting to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth

    limiting network capability in absorbing new DG. Finally, it demonstrates the use of optimal power flow market. Index Terms-- distributed generation, optimal power flow, power distribution. I. INTRODUCTION O in England and Wales (18% in Scotland) is derived from renewable resources. With existing large hydro

  9. Panel on Microgrids Systems International Conference on System of Systems Engineering, April 16-18, 2007 San Antonio Abstract--Application of individual distributed generators can

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are included. Keywords: CHP, UPS, distributed generation, intentional islanding, inverters, microgrid, power vs-18, 2007 San Antonio Abstract--Application of individual distributed generators can cause as many problems as it may solve. A better way to realize the emerging potential of distributed generation is to take

  10. The distribution of Voronoi cells generated by Southern California earthquake epicenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic P; Barr, Christopher; Jungju Seo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous Univariate Distributions. 2nd ed. Wiley, Newfor the tapered Pareto distribution. Journal of AppliedWoods, J. (2003) On the distribution of wild?re sizes. Envi-

  11. Study of the longitudinal distribution of power generated in a random distributed feedback Raman fibre laser with unidirectional pumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churkin, D V; El-Taher, A E; Vatnik, I D; Babin, Sergei A

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The longitudinal distribution of the Stokes-component power in a Raman fibre laser with a random distributed feedback and unidirectional pumping is measured. The fibre parameters (linear loss and Rayleigh backscattering coefficient) are calculated based on the distributions obtained. A numerical model is developed to describe the lasing power distribution. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  12. Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, D.; Gota, H.; Hayashi, R.; Kiyashko, V.; Morehouse, M.; Primavera, S. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Bolte, N. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Marsili, P. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Roche, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Wessel, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

  13. Commercialization of a 2.5kW Utility Interactive Inverter for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torrey, David A.

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Through this project, Advanced Energy Conversion (AEC) has developed, tested, refined and is preparing to commercialize a 2.5kW utility-interactive inverter system for distributed generation. The inverter technology embodies zero-voltage switching technology that will ultimately yield a system that is smaller, less expensive and more efficient than existing commercial technologies. This program has focused on commercial success through careful synthesis of technology, market-focus and business development. AEC was the primary participant. AEC is utilizing contract manufacturers in the early stages of production, allowing its technical staff to focus on quality control issues and product enhancements. The objective of this project was to bring the AEC inverter technology from its current pre-production state to a commercial product. Federal funds have been used to build and test production-intent inverters, support the implementation of the commercialization plan and bring the product to the point of UL certification.

  14. The Influence of Air-Conditioning Efficiency in the Peak Load Demand for Kuwait 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, A. A.; Maheshwari, G. P.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) The annual savings realized in peak load demand and cost of electric power generation and distribution network ( ) due to this revision are: nPRSAV PL ,, n,PR SAV nPRACACnPRAC PLPLPL ,,,, ?=? (4) 400*000,1* ,,, nPRACnPR PLSAV...

  15. PV Ramping in a Distributed Generation Environment: A Study Using Solar Measurements; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Keller, J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variability in Photovoltaic (PV) generation resulting from variability in the solar radiation over the PV arrays is a topic of continuing concern for those involved with integrating renewables onto existing electrical grids. The island of Lanai, Hawaii is an extreme example of the challenges that integrators will face due to the fact that it is a small standalone grid. One way to study this problem is to take high-resolution solar measurements in multiple locations and model simultaneous PV production for various sizes at those locations. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected high-resolution solar data at four locations on the island where proposed PV plants will be deployed in the near future. This data set provides unique insight into how the solar radiation may vary between points that are proximal in distance, but diverse in weather, due to the formation of orographic clouds in the center of the island. Using information about each proposed PV plant size, power output was created at high resolution. The team analyzed this output to understand power production ramps at individual locations and the effects of aggregating the production from all four locations. Hawaii is a unique environment, with extremely variable events occurring on a daily basis. This study provided an excellent opportunity for understanding potential worst-case scenarios for PV ramping. This paper provides an introduction to the datasets that NREL collected over a year and a comprehensive analysis of PV variability in a distributed generation scenario.

  16. Diagnostic probes for particle and molecule distributions in laser-generated plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbrell, S.M.

    1990-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser microprobe analysis (LMA) offers good spatial and depth resolution for solid sampling of virtually any material. Coupled with numerous optical spectroscopic and mass spectrometric detection methods, LMA is a powerful analytical tool. Yet, fundamental understanding of the interaction between the laser and the sample surface leading to the formation of the high temperature plasma (plume) is far from complete. To better understand the process of plume formation, an imaging method based on acousto-optic laser beam deflection has been coupled with light scattering methods and absorption methods to record temporal and spatial maps of the particle and molecule distributions in the plume with good resolution. Because particles can make up a major fraction of the vaporized material under certain operating conditions, they can reflect a large loss of atomic signal for elemental analysis, even when using auxiliary excitation to further vaporized the particles. Characterization of the particle size distributions in plumes should provide insight into the vaporization process and information necessary for studies of efficient particle transfer. Light scattering methods for particle size analysis based on the Mie Theory are used to determine the size of particles in single laser-generated plumes. The methods used, polarization ratio method and dissymmetry ratio method, provide good estimates of particle size with good spatial and temporal resolution for this highly transient system. Large particles, on the order of 0.02-0.2{mu}m in radius, were observed arising directly from the sample surface and from condensation.

  17. Generation of potential/surface density pairs in flat disks Power law distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -M. Hure; D. Pelat; A. Pierens

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a simple method to generate potential/surface density pairs in flat axially symmetric finite size disks. Potential/surface density pairs consist of a ``homogeneous'' pair (a closed form expression) corresponding to a uniform disk, and a ``residual'' pair. This residual component is converted into an infinite series of integrals over the radial extent of the disk. For a certain class of surface density distributions (like power laws of the radius), this series is fully analytical. The extraction of the homogeneous pair is equivalent to a convergence acceleration technique, in a matematical sense. In the case of power law distributions, the convergence rate of the residual series is shown to be cubic inside the source. As a consequence, very accurate potential values are obtained by low order truncation of the series. At zero order, relative errors on potential values do not exceed a few percent typically, and scale with the order N of truncation as 1/N**3. This method is superior to the classical multipole expansion whose very slow convergence is often critical for most practical applications.

  18. Distributed Dynamic State Estimator, Generator Parameter Estimation and Stability Monitoring Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meliopoulos, Sakis; Cokkinides, George; Fardanesh, Bruce; Hedrington, Clinton

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for this project that was performed in the period: October1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. In this project, a fully distributed high-fidelity dynamic state estimator (DSE) that continuously tracks the real time dynamic model of a wide area system with update rates better than 60 times per second is achieved. The proposed technology is based on GPS-synchronized measurements but also utilizes data from all available Intelligent Electronic Devices in the system (numerical relays, digital fault recorders, digital meters, etc.). The distributed state estimator provides the real time model of the system not only the voltage phasors. The proposed system provides the infrastructure for a variety of applications and two very important applications (a) a high fidelity generating unit parameters estimation and (b) an energy function based transient stability monitoring of a wide area electric power system with predictive capability. Also the dynamic distributed state estimation results are stored (the storage scheme includes data and coincidental model) enabling an automatic reconstruction and “play back” of a system wide disturbance. This approach enables complete play back capability with fidelity equal to that of real time with the advantage of “playing back” at a user selected speed. The proposed technologies were developed and tested in the lab during the first 18 months of the project and then demonstrated on two actual systems, the USVI Water and Power Administration system and the New York Power Authority’s Blenheim-Gilboa pumped hydro plant in the last 18 months of the project. The four main thrusts of this project, mentioned above, are extremely important to the industry. The DSE with the achieved update rates (more than 60 times per second) provides a superior solution to the “grid visibility” question. The generator parameter identification method fills an important and practical need of the industry. The “energy function” based transient stability monitoring opens up new ways to protect the power grid, better manage disturbances, confine their impact and in general improve the reliability and security of the system. Finally, as a by-product of the proposed research project, the developed system is able to “play back” disturbances by a click of a mouse. The importance of this by-product is evident by considering the tremendous effort exerted after the August 2003 blackout to piece together all the disturbance recordings, align them and recreate the sequence of events. This project has moved the state of art from fault recording by individual devices to system wide disturbance recording with “play back” capability.

  19. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

  20. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response:both the avoided energy costs (and demand charges) as wellCoordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response,

  1. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McParland, Charles

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

  2. Index for the Evaluation of Distributed Generation Impacts on Distribution System Luis F. Ochoa (1,2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth

    decisions that lead to the best management of the system, regarding both technical and economical aspects. Various studies have demonstrated that integration of DG in distribution networks may create technical in voltage control processes, diminish or increase losses, etc. In fact, all our knowledge about distribution

  3. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  4. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefits of Demand Side Management (DSM) are insufficient toefficiency, demand side management (DSM) cost effectivenessResearch Center Demand Side Management Demand Side Resources

  5. Economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The final report provides a summary of results of the Cost of Ownership Model and the circumstances under which a distributed fuel cell is economically viable. The analysis is based on a series of micro computer models estimate the capital and operations cost of a fuel cell central utility plant configuration. Using a survey of thermal and electrical demand profiles, the study defines a series of energy user classes. The energy user class demand requirements are entered into the central utility plant model to define the required size the fuel cell capacity and all supporting equipment. The central plant model includes provisions that enables the analyst to select optional plant features that are most appropriate to a fuel cell application, and that are cost effective. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. Other applications are also practical; however, such applications have a higher relative demand for thermal energy, a characteristic that is well-suited to a fuel cell application with its free source of hot water or steam. The analysis combines the capital and operation from the preceding models into a Cost of Ownership Model to compute the plant capital and operating costs as a function of capacity and principal features and compares these estimates to the estimated operating cost of the same central plant configuration without a fuel cell.

  6. Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. CommercialSector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman,Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems in developed countries over the next two decades. In the U.S., private and public expectations for this technology are heavily influenced by forecasts published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), most notably the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). EIA's forecasts are typically made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. Annual penetration is forecast by estimating the payback period for each technology, for each of a limited number of representative building types, for each of nine regions. This process results in an AEO2004 forecast deployment of about a total 3 GW of DG electrical generating capacity by 2025, which is only 0.25 percent of total forecast U.S. capacity. Analyses conducted using both the AEO2003 and AEO2004 versions of NEMS changes the baseline costs and performance characteristics of DG to reflect a world without U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research into several thermal DG technologies, which is then compared to a case with enhanced technology representative of the successful achievement of DOE research goals. The net difference in 2025 DG penetration is dramatic using the AEO2003 version of NEMS, but much smaller in the AEO2004 version. The significance and validity of these contradictory results are discussed, and possibilities for improving estimates of commercial U.S. DG potential are explored.

  7. A Multi-State Model for the Reliability Assessment of a Distributed Generation System via Universal Generating Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Milan, Italy, Dipartimento di Energia Enrico.zio@polimi.it Abstract The current and future developments renewable technology (e.g. wind or solar, etc.) whose behavior is described by a binary state, working assessment, multi-state modeling, universal generating function #12;2 Notations Solar irradiance Total number

  8. FEMTOSECOND TIMING DISTRIBUTION AND CONTROL FOR NEXT GENERATION ACCELERATORS AND LIGHT SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Li-Jin [Idesta Quantum Electronics, LLC

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Femtosecond Timing Distribution At LCLS Free-electron-lasers (FEL) have the capability of producing high photon flux from the IR to the hard x-ray wavelength range and to emit femtosecond and eventually even at-tosecond pulses. This makes them an ideal tool for fundamental as well as applied re-search. Timing precision at the Stanford Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) between the x-ray FEL (XFEL) and ultrafast optical lasers is currently no better than 100 fs RMS. Ideally this precision should be much better and could be limited only by the x-ray pulse duration, which can be as short as a few femtoseconds. An increasing variety of science problems involving electron and nuclear dynamics in chemical and material systems will become accessible as the timing improves to a few femtoseconds. Advanced methods of electron beam conditioning or pulse injection could allow the FEL to achieve pulse durations less than one femtosecond. The objec-tive of the work described in this proposal is to set up an optical timing distribution sys-tem based on modelocked Erbium doped fiber lasers at LCLS facility to improve the timing precision in the facility and allow time stamping with a 10 fs precision. The primary commercial applications for optical timing distributions systems are seen in the worldwide accelerator facilities and next generation light sources community. It is reasonable to expect that at least three major XFELs will be built in the next decade. In addition there will be up to 10 smaller machines, such as FERMI in Italy and Maxlab in Sweden, plus the market for upgrading already existing facilities like Jefferson Lab. The total market is estimated to be on the order of a 100 Million US Dollars. The company owns the exclusive rights to the IP covering the technology enabling sub-10 fs synchronization systems. Testing this technology, which has set records in a lab environment, at LCLS, hence in a real world scenario, is an important corner stone of bringing the technology to market.

  9. Synthesised Constraint Models for Distributed Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Wolfgang

    generation [1], demand-side manage- ment, or building control software. In a producer-based view, supplySynthesised Constraint Models for Distributed Energy Management Alexander Schiendorfer, Jan frequently encountered in energy management systems such as the coordination of power generators in a virtual

  10. Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wattles, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT CATEE Conference, Galveston October 10, 2012 2 North American Bulk Power Grids CATEE Conference October 10, 2012 ? The ERCOT... adequacy ? ?Achieving more DR participation would . . . displace some generation investments, but would achieve the same level of reliability... ? ?Achieving this ideal requires widespread demand response and market structures that enable loads...

  11. Retrospective modeling of the merit-order effect on wholesale electricity prices from distributed photovoltaic generation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Retrospective modeling of the merit-order effect on wholesale electricity prices from distributed, the depression in wholesale prices has significant value. c 5 GW of solar generation would have saved $1.8 billion in the market over two years. c The depression of wholesale prices offsets the cost of support

  12. PhotoVoltaic distributed generation for Lanai power grid real-time simulation and control integration scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinett, Rush D., III; Kukolich, Keith (Opal RT Technologies, Montreal, Quebec, Canada); Wilson, David Gerald; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the modeling, analysis, and testing in a real-time simulation environment of the Lanai power grid system for the integration and control of PhotoVoltaic (PV) distributed generation. The Lanai Island in Hawaii is part of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) to transition to 30% renewable green energy penetration by 2030. In Lanai the primary loads come from two Castle and Cook Resorts, in addition to residential needs. The total peak load profile is 12470 V, 5.5 MW. Currently there are several diesel generators that meet these loading requirements. As part of the HCEI, Lanai has initially installed 1.2 MW of PV generation. The goal of this study has been to evaluate the impact of the PV with respect to the conventional carbon-based diesel generation in real time simulation. For intermittent PV distributed generation, the overall stability and transient responses are investigated. A simple Lanai 'like' model has been developed in the Matlab/Simulink environment (see Fig. 1) and to accommodate real-time simulation of the hybrid power grid system the Opal-RT Technologies RT-Lab environment is used. The diesel generators have been modelled using the SimPowerSystems toolbox swing equations and a custom Simulink module has been developed for the High level PV generation. All of the loads have been characterized primarily as distribution lines with series resistive load banks with one VAR load bank. Three-phase faults are implemented for each bus. Both conventional and advanced control architectures will be used to evaluate the integration of the PV onto the current power grid system. The baseline numerical results include the stable performance of the power grid during varying cloud cover (PV generation ramping up/down) scenarios. The importance of assessing the real-time scenario is included.

  13. A residential energy demand system for Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labandeira Villot, Xavier

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sharp price fluctuations and increasing environmental and distributional concerns, among other issues, have led to a renewed academic interest in energy demand. In this paper we estimate, for the first time in Spain, an ...

  14. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and maintenance of six 380 V 50 Hz diesel generators for the LEP electrical distribution system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and maintenance of six 380 V 50 Hz diesel generators for the LEP electrical distribution system

  15. Modeling and Generating Daily Changes in Market Variables Using A Multivariate Mixture of Normal Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jin

    Distributions Jin Wang Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Valdosta State University Valdosta, GA 31698-0040 January 28, 2000 Abstract The mixture of normal distributions provides a useful extension of the normal distribution for modeling of daily changes in market variables with fatter-than-normal tails

  16. Rate of convergence of the short cycle distribution in random regular graphs generated by pegging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wormald, Nick

    of the random network (degree distribution, connectivity, diameter, etc.) vary when p is assigned different values. However, the Erdos-R´enyi model cannot produce scale-free networks [2], whose degree distribution, the stationary distribution is uniform. Thus, for this simplified version of the SWAN network, the limiting

  17. THE GALACTIC SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF OB ASSOCIATIONS AND THEIR SURROUNDING SUPERNOVA-GENERATED SUPERBUBBLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higdon, J. C. [W. M. Keck Science Center, Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711-5916 (United States); Lingenfelter, R. E., E-mail: jhigdon@kecksci.claremont.edu, E-mail: rlingenfelter@ucsd.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Galactic spatial distribution of OB associations and their surrounding superbubbles (SBs) reflect the distribution of a wide range of important processes in our Galaxy. In particular, it can provide a three-dimensional measure not only of the major source distribution of Galactic cosmic rays, but also the Galactic star formation distribution, the Lyman continuum ionizing radiation distribution, the core-collapse supernova distribution, the neutron star and stellar black hole production distribution, and the principal source distribution of freshly synthesized elements. Thus, we construct a three-dimensional spatial model of the massive-star distribution based primarily on the emission of the H II envelopes that surround the giant SBs and are maintained by the ionizing radiation of the embedded O stars. The Galactic longitudinal distribution of the 205 ?m N II radiation, emitted by these H II envelopes, is used to infer the spatial distribution of SBs. We find that the Galactic SB distribution is dominated by the contribution of massive-star clusters residing in the spiral arms.

  18. Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

    2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract— Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms— Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

  19. Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

  20. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DECC aggregator managed portfolio automated demand responseaggregator designs their own programs, and offers demand responseaggregator is responsible for designing and implementing their own demand response

  1. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings,Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings",demand response and energy efficiency functions into the design of buildings,

  2. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations. This study begins with an examination of existing DER research. Building energy loads were then generated through simulation (DOE-2) and scaled to match available load data in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S. were then compared: electricity prices did not differ significantly, while commercial gas prices in Japan are much higher than in the U.S. For smaller DER systems, the installation costs in Japan are more than twice those in the U.S., but this difference becomes smaller with larger systems. In Japan, DER systems are eligible for a 1/3 rebate of installation costs, while subsidies in the U.S. vary significantly by region and application. For 10,000 m{sup 2} buildings, significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the economically optimal results. This was most noticeable in the sports facility, followed the hospital and hotel. This research demonstrates that office buildings can benefit from CHP, in contrast to popular opinion. For hospitals and sports facilities, the use of waste heat is particularly effective for water and space heating. For the other building types, waste heat is most effectively use

  3. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

  4. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

  5. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006,Application to Demand Response Energy Pricing” SenSys 2003,

  6. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings”, Lawrencesystems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercial BuildingsDemand Response Test in Large Facilities13 National Conference on Building

  7. CALIFORNIA'S NEXT GENERATION OF LOAD MANAGEMENT STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    upon privately owned rights. This report has not been approved or disapproved by the California Energy the need for new peaking generation capacity and associated transmission and distribution capacity's "load management" authority as a way to achieve higher levels of costeffective demand response

  8. Robust Unit Commitment Problem with Demand Response and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long Zhao

    2010-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 31, 2010 ... Abstract: To improve the efficiency in power generation and to reduce the greenhouse gas emission, both Demand Response (DR) strategy ...

  9. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    49 Table 13. Vehicle and fuel efficiency and electricity14. Timing profiles and vehicle and fuel pathways includedand generation, Table 18. Vehicle demand and system load

  10. Energy Demand Staff Scientist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 2007 USChina #12;Overview:Overview: Key Energy Demand DriversKey Energy Demand Drivers · 290 million new urban residents 1990-2007 · 375 million new urban residents 2007

  11. Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% ? 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

  12. Industrial Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Boiler, Steam, and Cogeneration (BSC) Component. The BSC Component satisfies the steam demand from the PA and BLD Components. In some industries, the PA Component produces...

  13. Demand Response In California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

  14. Modeling Framework and Validation of a Smart Grid and Demand Response System for Wind Power Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broeer, Torsten; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, David P.; Djilali, Ned

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity generation from wind power and other renewable energy sources is increasing, and their variability introduces new challenges to the power system. The emergence of smart grid technologies in recent years has seen a paradigm shift in redefining the electrical system of the future, in which controlled response of the demand side is used to balance fluctuations and intermittencies from the generation side. This paper presents a modeling framework for an integrated electricity system where loads become an additional resource. The agent-based model represents a smart grid power system integrating generators, transmission, distribution, loads and market. The model incorporates generator and load controllers, allowing suppliers and demanders to bid into a Real-Time Pricing (RTP) electricity market. The modeling framework is applied to represent a physical demonstration project conducted on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA, and validation simulations are performed using actual dynamic data. Wind power is then introduced into the power generation mix illustrating the potential of demand response to mitigate the impact of wind power variability, primarily through thermostatically controlled loads. The results also indicate that effective implementation of Demand Response (DR) to assist integration of variable renewable energy resources requires a diversity of loads to ensure functionality of the overall system.

  15. Distributed Generation versus Centralised Supply: a Social Cost-Benefit Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulli, Francesco

    2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation versus Centralised Supply: a Social Cost-Benefit Analysis Francesco Gullì* Istituto di Economia e Politica dell’Energia e dell’Ambiente (Iefe). Università Bocconi, Milano July 2003 1. Introduction #1; The restructuring and privatisation...

  16. Two Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Two Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks Lijun Chen, Na Li, Steven H. Low and John C-- In this paper, we consider two abstract market models for designing demand response to match power supply as oligopolistic markets, and propose distributed demand response algorithms to achieve the equilibria. The models

  17. Response to changes in demand/supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , distribution channels, differentiation of quality, price, specification, etc., of the products. Primary wood with the mill consuming 450 000 m3 , amounting to 30% of total plywood log demand in 1995. The composites board;112 distribution channels, differentiation of quality, price, specification, etc., of the products. Primary wood

  18. Using Utility Load Data to Estimate Demand for Space Cooling and Potential for Shiftable Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Ong, S.; Booten, C.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a simple method to estimate hourly cooling demand from historical utility load data. It compares total hourly demand to demand on cool days and compares these estimates of total cooling demand to previous regional and national estimates. Load profiles generated from this method may be used to estimate the potential for aggregated demand response or load shifting via cold storage.

  19. Controlling electric power demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eikenberry, J.

    1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, demand control has not been viewed as an energy conservation measure, its intent being to reduce the demand peak to lower the electric bill demand charge by deferring the use of a block of power to another demand interval. Any energy savings were essentially incidental and unintentional, resulting from curtailment of loads that could not be assumed at another time. This article considers a microprocessor-based multiplexed system linked to a minicomputer to control electric power demand in a winery. In addition to delivering an annual return on investment of 55 percent in electric bill savings, the system provides a bonus in the form of alarm and monitoring capability for critical processes.

  20. Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

    2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

  1. Utilizing Electric Vehicles to Assist Integration of Large Penetrations of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Gowri, Krishnan

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary Introduction and Motivation This analysis provides the first insights into the leveraging potential of distributed photovoltaic (PV) technologies on rooftop and electric vehicle (EV) charging. Either of the two technologies by themselves - at some high penetrations – may cause some voltage control challenges or overloading problems, respectively. But when combined, there – at least intuitively – could be synergistic effects, whereby one technology mitigates the negative impacts of the other. High penetration of EV charging may overload existing distribution system components, most prominently the secondary transformer. If PV technology is installed at residential premises or anywhere downstream of the secondary transformer, it will provide another electricity source thus, relieving the loading on the transformers. Another synergetic or mitigating effect could be envisioned when high PV penetration reverts the power flow upward in the distribution system (from the homes upstream into the distribution system). Protection schemes may then no longer work and voltage violation (exceeding the voltage upper limited of the ANSI voltage range) may occur. In this particular situation, EV charging could absorb the electricity from the PV, such that the reversal of power flow can be reduced or alleviated. Given these potential mutual synergistic behaviors of PV and EV technologies, this project attempted to quantify the benefits of combining the two technologies. Furthermore, of interest was how advanced EV control strategies may influence the outcome of the synergy between EV charging and distributed PV installations. Particularly, Californian utility companies with high penetration of the distributed PV technology, who have experienced voltage control problems, are interested how intelligent EV charging could support or affect the voltage control

  2. Investigation of anti-islanding schemes for utility interconnection of distributed fuel cell powered generations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeraputra, Chuttchaval

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    perspectives, some of the apparent advantages include distribution and transmission capacity relief, load peak shaving, deferral of high cost transmission and distribution (T&D) system upgrades, etc. Utility customers also gain benefits from efficient use... power variation ? P and load real power PLoad (see (1.5)) as, 1 LoadP PV ?? (1.8) From (1.8), the real power variation ? P must be set at least ? 0.20 (per-unit) so that a change in the voltage at inverter (DFPG) terminal is out of the threshold (0...

  3. A Study of Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Protective Load Control Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhe

    different type of WTs are integrated into a DGS, the DGS presents different properties. Therefore Turbines (WT) have attracted significant attentions. A DGS with renewable sources such as WTs and solar panels is distinct from a conventional power system. The renewable generation units make a DGS

  4. Practical stability assessment of distributed synchronous generators under variations in the system equilibrium conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    synchro- nous generators driven by steam turbines have been connected to the system using a byproduct of Brazil, this sector of the national industry had already considerable experience in the usage of steam turbines, which have been extensively employed within its internal production [1­3]. As a result, several

  5. Subsystem Interaction Analysis in Power Distribution Systems of Next Generation Airlifters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindner, Douglas K.

    . Quan Keenan of Lockheed Martin Control Systems, Johnson City, New York, in providing the models control actuator systems. The aircraft power distribution system plays a central role in the development tolerant, autonomously controlled electrical power system to deliver high quality power from the sources

  6. Unnatural landscapes in ecology: Generating the spatial distribution of brine spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Sublette, K. [University of Tulsa; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative tools are needed to evaluate the ecological effects of increasing petroleum production. In this article, we describe two stochastic models for simulating the spatial distribution of brine spills on a landscape. One model uses general assumptions about the spatial arrangement of spills and their sizes; the second model distributes spills by siting rectangular well complexes and conditioning spill probabilities on the configuration of pipes. We present maps of landscapes with spills produced by the two methods and compare the ability of the models to reproduce a specified spill area. A strength of the models presented here is their ability to extrapolate from the existing landscape to simulate landscapes with a higher (or lower) density of oil wells.

  7. Advanced Inverter Technology for High Penetration Levels of PV Generation in Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schauder, C.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This subcontract report was completed under the auspices of the NREL/SCE High-Penetration Photovoltaic (PV) Integration Project, which is co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the California Solar Initiative (CSI) Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD&D) program funded by the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and managed by Itron. This project is focused on modeling, quantifying, and mitigating the impacts of large utility-scale PV systems (generally 1-5 MW in size) that are interconnected to the distribution system. This report discusses the concerns utilities have when interconnecting large PV systems that interconnect using PV inverters (a specific application of frequency converters). Additionally, a number of capabilities of PV inverters are described that could be implemented to mitigate the distribution system-level impacts of high-penetration PV integration. Finally, the main issues that need to be addressed to ease the interconnection of large PV systems to the distribution system are presented.

  8. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.

  9. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.

  10. Abstract-Distributed energy resources (DER) are quickly making their way to industry primarily as backup generation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    generation includes microturbine generators, internal combustion engines (ICEs), and fuel cells. Frequently

  11. Microgrid Dispatch for Macrogrid Peak-Demand Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicholas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distributed generation and storage technologies provide SRJ with microgrid functionality, allowing it to operate in island

  12. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Exploration of Australian Petrol Demand: Unobserv- ableRelative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con- sumption Behavior.habit stock variable in a petrol demand regression, they

  13. Distributed Automated Demand Response - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers SubfoldersU.S. Refining

  14. Magnetic field distribution in the plasma flow generated by a plasma focus discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrofan@triniti.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovaiton and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Krauz, V. I., E-mail: krauz_vi@nrcki.ru; Myalton, V. V.; Velikhov, E. P.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Vinogradova, Yu. V. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic field in the plasma jet propagating from the plasma pinch region along the axis of the chamber in a megajoule PF-3 plasma focus facility is studied. The dynamics of plasma with a trapped magnetic flow is analyzed. The spatial sizes of the plasma jet region in which the magnetic field concentrates are determined in the radial and axial directions. The magnetic field configuration in the plasma jet is investigated: the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field inside the jet is determined. It is shown that the magnetic induction vector at a given point in space can change its direction during the plasma flight. Conclusions regarding the symmetry of the plasma flow propagation relative to the chamber axis are drawn.

  15. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

  16. Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang Steven Low Computing + Math Sciences Electrical Engineering Caltech Oct 2011 #12;Outline Caltech smart grid research Optimal demand response #12;Global trends 1

  17. Travel Demand Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Garrow, Dr. Laurie [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

  18. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Manager Kae Lewis Acting Manager Demand Analysis Office Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director Energy Efficiency Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy

  19. Development and Testing of a 6-Cylinder HCCI Engine for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, D L; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Killingsworth, N; Aceves, S M; Dibble, R; Kristic, M; Bining, A

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the technical approach for converting a Caterpillar 3406 natural gas spark ignited engine into HCCI mode. The paper describes all stages of the process, starting with a preliminary analysis that determined that the engine can be operated by preheating the intake air with a heat exchanger that recovers energy from the exhaust gases. This heat exchanger plays a dual role, since it is also used for starting the engine. For start-up, the heat exchanger is preheated with a natural gas burner. The engine is therefore started in HCCI mode, avoiding the need to handle the potentially difficult transition from SI or diesel mode to HCCI. The fueling system was modified by replacing the natural gas carburetor with a liquid petroleum gas (LPG) carburetor. This modification sets an upper limit for the equivalence ratio at {phi} {approx} 0.4, which is ideal for HCCI operation and guarantees that the engine will not fail due to knock. Equivalence ratio can be reduced below 0.4 for low load operation with an electronic control valve. Intake boosting has been a challenge, as commercially available turbochargers are not a good match for the engine, due to the low HCCI exhaust temperature. Commercial introduction of HCCI engines for stationary power will therefore require the development of turbochargers designed specifically for this mode of operation. Considering that no appropriate off-the-shelf turbocharger for HCCI engines exists at this time, we are investigating mechanical supercharging options, which will deliver the required boost pressure (3 bar absolute intake) at the expense of some reduction in the output power and efficiency. An appropriate turbocharger can later be installed for improved performance when it becomes available or when a custom turbocharger is developed. The engine is now running in HCCI mode and producing power in an essentially naturally aspirated mode. Current work focuses on developing an automatic controller for obtaining consistent combustion in the 6 cylinders. The engine will then be tested for 1000 hours to demonstrate durability. This paper presents intermediate progress towards development of an HCCI engine for stationary power generation and next steps towards achieving the project goals.

  20. DISTRIBUTION COEFICIENTS (KD) GENERATED FROM A CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Core samples originating from Vault 4, Cell E of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) were collected in September of 2008 (Hansen and Crawford 2009, Smith 2008) and sent to SRNL to measure chemical and physical properties of the material including visual uniformity, mineralogy, microstructure, density, porosity, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), and chemical composition. Some data from these experiments have been reported (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). In this study, leaching experiments were conducted with a single core sample under conditions that are representative of saltstone performance. In separate experiments, reducing and oxidizing environments were targeted to obtain solubility and Kd values from the measurable species identified in the solid and aqueous leachate. This study was designed to provide insight into how readily species immobilized in saltstone will leach from the saltstone under oxidizing conditions simulating the edge of a saltstone monolith and under reducing conditions, targeting conditions within the saltstone monolith. Core samples were taken from saltstone poured in December of 2007 giving a cure time of nine months in the cell and a total of thirty months before leaching experiments began in June 2010. The saltstone from Vault 4, Cell E is comprised of blast furnace slag, class F fly ash, portland cement, and Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) Batch 2 salt solution. The salt solution was previously analyzed from a sample of Tank 50 salt solution and characterized in the 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) report (Zeigler and Bibler 2009). Subsequent to Tank 50 analysis, additional solution was added to the tank solution from the Effluent Treatment Project as well as from inleakage from Tank 50 pump bearings (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). Core samples were taken from three locations and at three depths at each location using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit (1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; 3-1, 3-2, 3-3) (Hansen and Crawford 2009). Leaching experiments were conducted with a section of core sample 3-2. All cores from location 3 were drilled without using water. Core sample 3-2 was drilled from approximately six inches to a depth of approximately 13 inches. Approximately six inches of the core was removed but it broke into two pieces during removal from the bit. At the time of drilling, core material appeared olive green in color (Smith 2008). The fact that the samples were cored as olive green and were received after storage with a gray outer layer is indicative that some oxidation had occurred prior to leaching studies.

  1. Global Climate Change and Demand for Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    -CARES) Washington University in St. Louis #12;9 Jun ­ Jul ­ Aug Temperature Anomaly Distribution Frequency of air and water temperatures Losses of ice from Greenland and Antarctica Sea-level rise Energy demands 169 390 327 90 16 H2O, CO2, O3 Earth receives visible light from hot Sun and Earth radiates to space

  2. ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400. Hall Deputy Director Energy Efficiency and Demand Analysis Division Scott W. Matthews Acting Executive

  3. Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity demand forecast means that the region's electricity needs would grow by 5,343 average megawattsDemand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required in electricity demand is, of course, crucial to determining the need for new electricity resources and helping

  4. The strategic use of renewables to achieve demand-side management impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, N.; Hauser, S.; Potter, T.; Westby, R.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to both the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Edison Electric Institute (EEI), utilities in the United States are now spending about $2 billion per year on demand-side management (DSM) activities. By the year 2000, EPRI and EEI predict that utilities will be spending $10 to $15 billion per year on DSM. If this expenditure is matched by consumers, total expenditures -- $30 billion a year -- will equal what the nation spent on power plant construction during the peak 1970s power plant building era. Historically, DSM programs at utilities utilize technologies that reduce the demand for electricity and energy used by their customers. This is accomplished primarily by increasing the efficacy of lighting, improving the conversion efficiency of heating, cooling, and process equipment, and reducing thermal losses through the building envelope. A broader definition of DSM -- one that incorporates renewable energy resources -- will greatly enhance the opportunity to impact customer loads. Renewable energy technologies use resources that are not depleted, such as heat and light from the sun, the force of winds, falling water, biomass, and geothermal heat from the earth. As related to utility systems, renewable technologies can contribute in three main ways: (1) the more traditional ``supply-side`` role as central generating plants or independent power producers, (2) as distributed generation (supply-side variation), and (3) as demand-side options. Distributed generation is being seriously studied by several utilities as a means of serving remote loads and reducing transmission and distribution costs, but is not discussed further in this paper. Demand-side renewable technologies (DSR) are technologies that utilize renewable energy to reduce the end-use load of a customer. In this paper we will describe specific DSR options, characterize their potential load impact, and recommend a method for effectively integrating them into current DSM programs.

  5. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortal DecisionRichlandDelegations,Demand

  6. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

  7. Distributed Generation Standard Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: The second enrollment period for standard contracts in 2013 closed June 28. The third is scheduled to begin in September.'''''

  8. Modeling of GE Appliances in GridLAB-D: Peak Demand Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Leistritz, Sean M.; Parker, Graham B.

    2012-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread adoption of demand response enabled appliances and thermostats can result in significant reduction to peak electrical demand and provide potential grid stabilization benefits. GE has developed a line of appliances that will have the capability of offering several levels of demand reduction actions based on information from the utility grid, often in the form of price. However due to a number of factors, including the number of demand response enabled appliances available at any given time, the reduction of diversity factor due to the synchronizing control signal, and the percentage of consumers who may override the utility signal, it can be difficult to predict the aggregate response of a large number of residences. The effects of these behaviors can be modeled and simulated in open-source software, GridLAB-D, including evaluation of appliance controls, improvement to current algorithms, and development of aggregate control methodologies. This report is the first in a series of three reports describing the potential of GE's demand response enabled appliances to provide benefits to the utility grid. The first report will describe the modeling methodology used to represent the GE appliances in the GridLAB-D simulation environment and the estimated potential for peak demand reduction at various deployment levels. The second and third reports will explore the potential of aggregated group actions to positively impact grid stability, including frequency and voltage regulation and spinning reserves, and the impacts on distribution feeder voltage regulation, including mitigation of fluctuations caused by high penetration of photovoltaic distributed generation and the effects on volt-var control schemes.

  9. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEST PRACTICES AND RESULTS OF DR IMPLEMENTATION . 31 Encouraging End-User Participation: The Role of Incentives 16 Demand Response

  10. Commercial Demand Module

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    heaters. The use of wind energy is projected based on an estimate of existing distributed wind turbines and the potential endogenous penetration of wind turbines in the commercial...

  11. Uranium 2014 resources, production and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. It presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Long-term projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major changes in the industry.

  12. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  13. Uranium 2007 resources, production and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on official information received from 40 countries, Uranium 2007 provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1st January 2007, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2030 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. It finds that with rising demand and declining inventories, uranium prices have increased dramatically in recent years. As a result, the uranium industry is undergoing a significant revival, bringing to an end a period of over 20 years of underinvestment.

  14. Uranium 2005 resources, production and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. This 21st edition presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand as of 1st January 2005 and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2025 are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major c...

  15. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand, End-User Natural Gas Demand, and Energy Efficiency The California Energy Demand 2014-2024 Preliminary Forecast, Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand

  16. Electrical Demand Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the reservoir. Util i ties have iiting for a number of years. d a rebate for reducing their When the utility needs to shed is sent to turn off one or mnre mer's electric water heater or equipment. wges have enticed more and more same strategies... an increased need for demand 1 imiting. As building zone size is reduced, total instal led tonnage increases due to inversfty. Each compressor is cycled by a space thermostat. There is no control system to limit the number of compressors running at any...

  17. Demand Response: Load Management Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs...

  18. Demand Response: Load Management Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs... V. Residential Discussion Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off...

  19. Assessment of Demand Response Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

  20. Distributed Control of Residential Energy Systems using a Market Maker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    , in particular reverse power flow during daytime periods of peak generation coupled with low residential load distribution networks and shave peak demand without large-scale capital costs for feeder replacement.weller}@newcastle.edu.au) Abstract: The recent rapid uptake of residential solar photovoltaic (PV) installations provides many

  1. Comparison of two types of 60 GHz photonic millimeter-wave generation and distribution of a 3 Gb/s OFDM signal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    converts the optical signal into an electrical one. After, the signal is sent into a low noise amplifier a new generation of optoelec- tronic components designed for 60 GHz applications. I. RADIO OVER FIBRE and distribution of a 3 Gb/s OFDM signal. The first one uses low cost well known components and the second one

  2. The Impact of Distributed Generation on Power Transmission Grid Dynamics D. E. Newman B. A. Carreras M. Kirchner I. Dobson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Ian

    on the robustness of the power transmission grid using a dynamic model of the power transmission system (OPA renewable, power sources, coupled with a drive for decentralization, the fraction of electric power and the engineering responses to failure. In this model, the power demand is increased at a constant rate and is also

  3. Analysis of Residential Demand Response and Double-Auction Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response and dynamic pricing programs are expected to play increasing roles in the modern Smart Grid environment. While direct load control of end-use loads has existed for decades, price driven response programs are only beginning to be explored at the distribution level. These programs utilize a price signal as a means to control demand. Active markets allow customers to respond to fluctuations in wholesale electrical costs, but may not allow the utility to control demand. Transactive markets, utilizing distributed controllers and a centralized auction can be used to create an interactive system which can limit demand at key times on a distribution system, decreasing congestion. With the current proliferation of computing and communication resources, the ability now exists to create transactive demand response programs at the residential level. With the combination of automated bidding and response strategies coupled with education programs and customer response, emerging demand response programs have the ability to reduce utility demand and congestion in a more controlled manner. This paper will explore the effects of a residential double-auction market, utilizing transactive controllers, on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

  4. Abstract--Application of individual distributed generators can cause as many problems as it may solve. A better way to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , microturbines, photovoltaic, fuel cells and wind- power. Most emerging technologies such as micro-turbines, photovoltaic, fuel cells and gas internal combustion engines with permanent magnet generator require generation technologies permits generators to be placed optimally in relation to heat loads allowing for use

  5. Demand Side Management in the Smart Grid: Information Processing for the Power Switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alizadeh, Mahnoosh; LI, Xiao; Wang, Zhifang; Scagilone, Anna; Melton, Ronald B.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we discuss the most recent developments in the area of load management, and consider possible interaction schemes of novel architectures with distributed energy resources (DER). In order to handle the challenges faced by tomorrow’s smart grid, which are caused by volatile load and generation profiles (from the large number of plug-in EVs and from renewable integration), the conventional grid operating principle of load-following needs to be changed into load-shaping or generation-following. Demand Side Management will be a most promising and powerful solution to the above challenges. However, many other issues such as load forecasting, pricing structure, market policy, renewable integration interface, and even the AC/DC implementation at the distribution side, need to be taken into the design in order to search for the most effective and applicable solution.

  6. A hybrid inventory management system respondingto regular demand and surge demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammad S. Roni; Mingzhou Jin; Sandra D. Eksioglu

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a hybrid policy for a stochastic inventory system facing regular demand and surge demand. The combination of two different demand patterns can be observed in many areas, such as healthcare inventory and humanitarian supply chain management. The surge demand has a lower arrival rate but higher demand volume per arrival. The solution approach proposed in this paper incorporates the level crossing method and mixed integer programming technique to optimize the hybrid inventory policy with both regular orders and emergency orders. The level crossing method is applied to obtain the equilibrium distributions of inventory levels under a given policy. The model is further transformed into a mixed integer program to identify an optimal hybrid policy. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to investigate the impact of parameters on the optimal inventory policy and minimum cost. Numerical results clearly show the benefit of using the proposed hybrid inventory model. The model and solution approach could help healthcare providers or humanitarian logistics providers in managing their emergency supplies in responding to surge demands.

  7. Demand Response Programs, 6. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

  8. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    raising transportation oil demand. Growing internationalcoal by wire could reduce oil demand by stemming coal roadEastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand

  9. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas demands are forecast for the four natural gas utilitythe 2006-2016 Forecast. Commercial natural gas demand isforecasts and demand scenarios. Electricity planning area Natural gas

  10. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

  11. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

  12. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

  13. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

  14. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McParland, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, Lawrenceand Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, LBNLCommercial and Residential Demand Response Overview of the

  15. Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.for Automated Demand Response. Technical Document to

  16. Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, Clifford

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

  17. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    District Small Business Summer Solutions: Energy and DemandSummer Solutions: Energy and Demand Impacts Monthly Energy> B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

  18. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World: Renewable Energy and Demand Response Proliferation intogether the renewable energy and demand response communityimpacts of renewable energy and demand response integration

  19. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy and environmental benefits of demand controlledindicate the energy and cost savings for demand controlled24) (California Energy Commission 2008), demand controlled

  20. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy and environmental benefits of demand controlled indicate the energy and cost savings for  demand controlled 24) (California Energy  Commission 2008), demand controlled 

  1. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integrating HECO and Hawaii Energy demand response relatedpotential. Energy efficiency and demand response efforts areBoth  energy  efficiency  and  demand  response  should  

  2. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

  3. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 2.1 Demand-Side Managementbuildings. The demand side management framework is discussedIssues 2.1 Demand-Side Management Framework Forecasting

  4. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and best practices to guide HECO demand response developmentbest practices for DR renewable integration – Technically demand responseof best practices. This is partially because demand response

  5. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings DavidStrategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Davidadjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The

  6. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on Building

  7. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In terms of demand response capability, building operatorsautomated demand response and improve building energy andand demand response features directly into building design

  8. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEMAND RESPONSE .7 Wholesale Marketuse at times of high wholesale market prices or when systemenergy expenditure. In wholesale markets, spot energy prices

  9. Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response & Energy Efficiency International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 2 ?Less than 5... for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 5 What is Demand Response? ?The temporary reduction of electricity demanded from the grid by an end-user in response to capacity shortages, system reliability events, or high wholesale...

  10. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  11. Demand Response Technology Roadmap A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    workshop agendas, presentation materials, and transcripts. For the background to the Demand Response Technology Roadmap and to make use of individual roadmaps, the reader is...

  12. ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005.................................................................................................................................3 PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC PLANNING AREA ........................................................................................9 Commercial Sector

  13. Driving Demand | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    strategies, results achieved to date, and advice for other programs. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements. This guide, developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National...

  14. Demand Response Technology Roadmap M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between May 2014 and February 2015. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Demand Response Executive Sponsor Team decided upon the scope of the project in May. Two subsequent...

  15. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

  16. Brussels, Belgium, November 19-22, 2012 Energy Demand Prediction in a Charge Station: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    EEVC Brussels, Belgium, November 19-22, 2012 Energy Demand Prediction in a Charge Station over a real database which can be associated with the energy demand generated by electric vehicles simplifying assumptions about the EV drivers' energy demand. To improve the accuracy of the modelling

  17. Energy-Agile Laptops: Demand Response of Mobile Plug Loads Using Sensor/Actuator Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culler, David E.

    Energy-Agile Laptops: Demand Response of Mobile Plug Loads Using Sensor/Actuator Networks Nathan@me.berkeley.edu Abstract--This paper explores demand response techniques for managing mobile, distributed loads with on observed. Our first simulation study explores a classic demand response scenario in which a large number

  18. Autonomous Demand Side Management Based on Game-Theoretic Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    Autonomous Demand Side Management Based on Game-Theoretic Energy Consumption Scheduling distributed demand side energy management strategy requires each user to simply apply its best response-average ratio of the total energy demand, the total energy costs, as well as each user's individual daily

  19. Managing Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Managing Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services by Simon Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services by Simon Christopher Parkinson B highly-distributed sustainable demand- side infrastructure, in the form of heat pumps, electric vehicles

  20. Cautious Risk-Takers: Investor Preferences and Demand for Active Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Cautious Risk-Takers: Investor Preferences and Demand for Active Management Valery Polkovnichenko and Demand for Active Management Abstract Actively managed mutual funds have distinct return distributions from the equally important side of investor demand. We take funds returns as given and use them

  1. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data Collection for Demand-side Management for QualifyingPrepared by Demand-side Management Task Force of the

  2. UBC STUDENT HOUSING DEMAND STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    UBC STUDENT HOUSING DEMAND STUDY Presented by Nancy Knight and Andrew Parr FEBRUARY 5, 2010 #12;PURPOSE · To determine the need/demand for future on- campus student housing · To address requests from · A survey of students, and analysis of housing markets, and preparation of a forecast · The timeline

  3. Harnessing the power of demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

  4. ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    changes or incentives.' (FERC) · `Changes in electric use by demand-side resources from their normalERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT Whitacre thermostats -- Other DLC Possible triggers: Real-time prices, congestion management, 4CP response paid

  5. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

  6. Space-based solar power generation using a distributed network of satellites and methods for efficient space power transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLinko, Ryan M.

    Space-based solar power (SSP) generation is being touted as a solution to our ever-increasing energy consumption and dependence on fossil fuels. Satellites in Earth's orbit can capture solar energy through photovoltaic ...

  7. In situ diagnostic of the size distribution of nanoparticles generated by ultrashort pulsed laser ablation in vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourquard, Florent; Loir, Anne-Sophie; Donnet, Christophe; Garrelie, Florence, E-mail: florence.garrelie@univ-st-etienne.fr [Université de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5516, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, Saint-Étienne (France)] [Université de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5516, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, Saint-Étienne (France)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We aim to characterize the size distribution of nanoparticles located in the ablation plume produced by femtosecond laser interaction. The proposed method relies on the use of white-light extinction spectroscopy setup assisted by ultrafast intensified temporal gating. This method allows measurement of optical absorbance of a nickel nanoparticles cloud. Simulation of the extinction section of nickel nanoparticles size distributions has been developed in order to compare the measured optical absorbance to the optical extinction by theoretical and experimental nanoparticles size distributions (measured by scanning electron microscopy). A good agreement has been found between the in situ measured optical absorbance and the optical extinction cross section calculated from ex situ nanoparticles size distribution measurements.

  8. Real-time Pricing Demand Response in Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Marinovici, Maria C.; Berliner, Teri; Graves, Alan

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—Dynamic pricing schemes have been implemented in commercial and industrial application settings, and recently they are getting attention for application to residential customers. Time-of-use and critical-peak-pricing rates are in place in various regions and are being piloted in many more. These programs are proving themselves useful for balancing energy during peak periods; however, real-time (5 minute) pricing signals combined with automation in end-use systems have the potential to deliver even more benefits to operators and consumers. Besides system peak shaving, a real-time pricing system can contribute demand response based on the locational marginal price of electricity, reduce load in response to a generator outage, and respond to local distribution system capacity limiting situations. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is teaming with a mid-west electricity service provider to run a distribution feeder-based retail electricity market that negotiates with residential automation equipment and clears every 5 minutes, thus providing a signal for lowering or raising electric consumption based on operational objectives of economic efficiency and reliability. This paper outlines the capability of the real-time pricing system and the operational scenarios being tested as the system is rolled-out starting in the first half of 2012.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distribution Grid Integration ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety,...

  10. Net Metering Policy Development and Distributed Solar Generation in Minnesota: Overview of Trends in Nationwide Policy Development and Implications of Increasing the Eligible System Size Cap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Busche, S.; Hockett, S.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Minnesota net metering policy is to give the maximum possible encouragement to distributed generation assets, especially solar electric systems (MN 2008). However, according to a published set of best practices (NNEC 2008) that prioritize the maximum development of solar markets within states, the Minnesota policy does not incorporate many of the important best practices that may help other states transform their solar energy markets and increase the amount of grid-connected distributed solar generation assets. Reasons cited include the low system size limit of 40kW (the best practices document recommends a 2 MW limit) and a lack of language protecting generators from additional utility fees. This study was conducted to compare Minnesota's policies to national best practices. It provides an overview of the current Minnesota policy in the context of these best practices and other jurisdictions' net metering policies, as well as a qualitative assessment of the impacts of raising the system size cap within the policy based on the experiences of other states.

  11. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005 Motegi,National Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005Demand Response and Commissioning Mary Ann Piette, David S.

  12. Marketing Demand-Side Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, M. L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand-Side Management is an organizational tool that has proven successful in various realms of the ever changing business world in the past few years. It combines the multi-faceted desires of the customers with the increasingly important...

  13. Community Water Demand in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Ronald C.; Chang, Chan

    Solutions to Texas water policy and planning problems will be easier to identify once the impact of price upon community water demand is better understood. Several important questions cannot be addressed in the absence of such information...

  14. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring in an Agent-Based Smart Home, Proceedings of theConference on Smart Homes and Health Telematics, September,Smart Meter Motion sensors Figure 1: Schematic of the Demand Response Electrical Appliance Manager in a Home.

  15. Overview of Demand Side Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—discusses the utility PJM's demand side response (DSR) capabilities, including emergency and economic responses.

  16. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

  17. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of coal and LNG-fired power generation efficiency (to a drop in coal thermal power generation, and improvementsDemand for steaming coal for power generation is expected to

  18. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

  19. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mares, K.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

  20. Smart Finite State Devices: A Modeling Framework for Demand Response Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Konstantin; Ananyev, Maxim; Chertkov, Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the following four types: (a) optional loads that can be shed, e.g. light dimming; (b) deferrable loads that can be delayed, e.g. dishwashers; (c) controllable loads with inertia, e.g. thermostatically-controlled loads, whose task is to maintain an auxiliary characteristic (temperature) within pre-defined margins; and (d) storage devices that can alternate between charging and generating. Our analysis of the devices seeks to find their optimal price-taking control strategy under a given stochastic model of the distribution market.

  1. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand, EndUser Natural Gas Demand, and Energy Efficiency SEPTEMBER 2013 CEC2002013004SDV1REV CALIFORNIA The California Energy Demand 2014 ­ 2024 Revised Forecast, Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand and Methods

  2. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The California Energy Demand 2014 ­ 2024 Revised Forecast, Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility Planning Area Energy Policy Report. The forecast includes three full scenarios: a high energy demand case, a low

  3. Evaluation on double-wall-tube residual stress distribution of sodium-heated steam generator by neutron diffraction and numerical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisohara, N. [Advanced Nuclear System Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Suzuki, H.; Akita, K. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Kasahara, N. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A double-wall-tube is nominated for the steam generator heat transfer tube of future sodium fast reactors (SFRs) in Japan, to decrease the possibility of sodium/water reaction. The double-wall-tube consists of an inner tube and an outer tube, and they are mechanically contacted to keep the heat transfer of the interface between the inner and outer tubes by their residual stress. During long term SG operation, the contact stress at the interface gradually falls down due to stress relaxation. This phenomenon might increase the thermal resistance of the interface and degrade the tube heat transfer performance. The contact stress relaxation can be predicted by numerical analysis, and the analysis requires the data of the initial residual stress distributions in the tubes. However, unclear initial residual stress distributions prevent precious relaxation evaluation. In order to resolve this issue, a neutron diffraction method was employed to reveal the tri-axial (radius, hoop and longitudinal) initial residual stress distributions in the double-wall-tube. Strain gauges also were used to evaluate the contact stress. The measurement results were analyzed using a JAEA's structural computer code to determine the initial residual stress distributions. Based on the stress distributions, the structural computer code has predicted the transition of the relaxation and the decrease of the contact stress. The radial and longitudinal temperature distributions in the tubes were input to the structural analysis model. Since the radial thermal expansion difference between the inner (colder) and outer (hotter) tube reduces the contact stress and the tube inside steam pressure contributes to increasing it, the analytical model also took these effects into consideration. It has been conduced that the inner and outer tubes are contacted with sufficient stresses during the plant life time, and that effective heat transfer degradation dose not occur in the double-wall-tube SG. (authors)

  4. Distributed and Decentralized Control of Residential Energy Systems Incorporating Battery Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    is increasingly being considered by utilities seeking to reinforce distribution networks and shave peak demand consists of solar PV generation, battery storage and an inelastic energy load. Each RES is connected--The recent rapid uptake of residential solar photo- voltaic (PV) installations provides many challenges

  5. Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

  6. PJM©2012 Minimum Generation Alert PJM Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluate Schedules (including; Prior Light; Load Period

    – To provide alert that system conditions may require the use of emergency procedures as a result of generation exceeding demand. • Trigger – When expected generation levels approach 2,500 MW of normal generation limits.

  7. Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reliability of the electricity system; reducing costs associated with generation, transmission and distribution;

  8. Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reliability of the electricity system; Reducing costs associated with generation, transmission and distribution;

  9. Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    human dimension of demand response technology from a caseArens, E. , et al. 2008. Demand Response Enabling TechnologyArens, E. , et al. 2006. Demand Response Enabling Technology

  10. Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Eto

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barat, and D. Watson. 2007. Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby. 2009. Demand Response Spinning ReserveFormat of 2009-2011 Demand Response Activity Applications.

  11. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050 RyanCEC (2003a) California energy demand 2003-2013 forecast.CEC (2005a) California energy demand 2006-2016: Staff energy

  12. National Action Plan on Demand Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—discusses the National Assessment of Demand Response study, the National Action Plan for Demand Response, and demand response as related to the energy outlook.

  13. Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Ma, Ookie [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

  14. Comfort-constrained distributed heat pump management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkinson, Simon; Crawford, Curran; Djilali, Ned

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces the design of a demand response network control strategy aimed at thermostatically controlled electric heating and cooling systems in buildings. The method relies on the use of programmable communicating thermostats, which are able to provide important component-level state variables to a system-level central controller. This information can be used to build power density distribution functions for the aggregate heat pump load. These functions lay out the fundamental basis for the methodology by allowing for consideration of customer-level constraints within the system-level decision making process. The proposed strategy is then implemented in a computational model to simulate a distribution of buildings, where the aggregate heat pump load is managed to provide the regulation services needed to successfully integrate wind power generators. Increased exploitation of wind resources will place similarly themed ancillary services in high-demand, traditionally provided by dispatchable energy ...

  15. A dynamic model of industrial energy demand in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haji, S.H.H. [Gothenburg Univ. (Sweden)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyses the effects of input price movements, technology changes, capacity utilization and dynamic mechanisms on energy demand structures in the Kenyan industry. This is done with the help of a variant of the second generation dynamic factor demand (econometric) model. This interrelated disequilibrium dynamic input demand econometric model is based on a long-term cost function representing production function possibilities and takes into account the asymmetry between variable inputs (electricity, other-fuels and Tabour) and quasi-fixed input (capital) by imposing restrictions on the adjustment process. Variations in capacity utilization and slow substitution process invoked by the relative input price movement justifies the nature of input demand disequilibrium. The model is estimated on two ISIS digit Kenyan industry time series data (1961 - 1988) using the Iterative Zellner generalized least square method. 31 refs., 8 tabs.

  16. Power spectrum estimates of high frequency noise generated by high impedance arcing faults on distribution systems / by Thomas James Talley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Thomas James

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    faults, and to search for possible solutions, Pennsylvania Power and Light Company (PP&L) gathered data on instances of downed conductors. [ 4 ] In a breakdown of 390 cases of downed conductors on 12 KV overhead distribution lines in 1974...-75, they found that over- current protective devices did not operate for 23%%d of the cases where the feeder had bare wire conductors, and 727. of the cases where the feeder had XLP covered conductors. These figures indicate the severity of the problem...

  17. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

  18. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand ResponseConference on Building Commissioning: April 22 – 24, 2008al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response

  19. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    annual per-capita electricity consumption by demand15 California electricity consumption projections by demandannual per-capita electricity consumption by demand

  20. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use of demand control ventilation systems in general officedemand controlled  ventilation systems, Dennis DiBartolomeo the demand controlled ventilation system increased the rate 

  1. Supply chain planning decisions under demand uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanfeng Anna

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sales and operational planning that incorporates unconstrained demand forecasts has been expected to improve long term corporate profitability. Companies are considering such unconstrained demand forecasts in their decisions ...

  2. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sector, the demand response potential of California buildinga demand response event prohibit a building’s participationdemand response strategies in California buildings are

  3. Analysis of Voltage Rise Effect on Distribution Network with Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Analysis of Voltage Rise Effect on Distribution Network with Distributed Generation M. A. Mahmud.hossain@adfa.edu.au, and H.Pota@adfa.edu.au). Abstract: Connections of distributed generation (DG) in distribution networks are increasing. These connections of distributed generation cause voltage rise in the distribution network

  4. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  5. Turkey's energy demand and supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

  6. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  7. US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Massimo www.cepe.ethz.ch #12;US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Page 1 of 25 US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

  8. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sjstems (ITS) Electricity Sector Promoting nuclear useindustrial and electricity generation sectors (Table 4-2).In the industrial sector, electricity demand will increase,

  9. Estimation and specification tests of count data recreation demand functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Irma Adriana

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is ultimately used to compute consumer surplus for natural resource policy analysis. Data from population-wide surveys, although not collected quite as frequently as user survey data, are also useful for estimating recreation demand functions. However, data... of distributions. They specify the mean and variance of the Katz distribution under the alternative to be p. ; and (lt; + u p. ; ), 2-k respectively. In this case, the Poisson estimator is obtain when u = 0. This suggest that a test for the null against...

  10. Greater fuel diversity needed to meet growing US electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, B.; Mullins, S. [Industrial Info Resources (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity demand is growing in the USA. One way to manage the uncertainty is to diversity fuel sources. Fuel sources include coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Tables show actual and planned generation projects by fuel types. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Almeida, A.T. [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dep. Eng. Electrotecnica; Fisk, W.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

  12. Demand Response Programs for Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wholesale prices and looming shortages in Western power markets in 2000-01, Portland General Electric programs for large customers remain, though they are not active at current wholesale prices. Other programs demand response for the wholesale market -- by passing through real-time prices for usage above a set

  13. Revelation on Demand Nicolas Anciaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is willing to reveal the aggregate response (according to his company's policy) to the customer dataRevelation on Demand Nicolas Anciaux 1 · Mehdi Benzine1,2 · Luc Bouganim1 · Philippe Pucheral1 time to support epidemiological studies. In these and many other situations, aggregate data or partial

  14. Water demand management in Kuwait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

  15. obesity demands more than just

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    #12;The World That Makes Us Fat ***** ***** ***** Overcoming obesity demands more than just. By Melinda Wenner Moyer Illustrations by A. Richard Allen 27 #12;ON ONE LEVEL, of course, obesity has a sim to pollutants. Their research suggests that to solve the problem of obesity--and, ultimately, to prevent it from

  16. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEMAND . . . .Demand for Electricity and Power PeakDemand . . • . . ELECTRICITY REQUIREMENTS FOR AGRICULTUREResults . . Coriclusions ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric

  17. Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

  18. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lisa

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

  19. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

  20. Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Palmintier, B.; Barrows, C.; Ibanez, E.; Bird, L.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the methods, data, and tools that could be used at different levels of sophistication and effort to estimate the benefits and costs of DGPV. In so doing, we identify the gaps in current benefit-cost-analysis methods, which we hope will inform the ongoing research agenda in this area. The focus of this report is primarily on benefits and costs from the utility or electricity generation system perspective. It is intended to provide useful background information to utility and regulatory decision makers and their staff, who are often being asked to use or evaluate estimates of the benefits and cost of DGPV in regulatory proceedings. Understanding the technical rigor of the range of methods and how they might need to evolve as DGPV becomes a more significant contributor of energy to the electricity system will help them be better consumers of this type of information. This report is also intended to provide information to utilities, policy makers, PV technology developers, and other stakeholders, which might help them maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of integrating DGPV into a changing electricity system.

  1. Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    #12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

  2. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand, EndUser Natural Gas Demand, and Energy Efficiency DECEMBER 2013 CEC2002013004SFV1 CALIFORNIA and expertise of numerous California Energy Commission staff members in the Demand Analysis Office. In addition

  3. Demand Side Management in Rangan Banerjee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Rangan

    Demand Side Management in Industry Rangan Banerjee Talk at Baroda in Birla Corporate Seminar August 31,2007 #12;Demand Side Management Indian utilities ­ energy shortage and peak power shortage. Supply for Options ­ Demand Side Management (DSM) & Load Management #12;DSM Concept Demand Side Management (DSM) - co

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 4, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2013 2089 Scalable and Robust Demand Response With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannakis, Georgios

    Response With Mixed-Integer Constraints Seung-Jun Kim and Georgios B. Giannakis Abstract--A demand response--Lagrange relaxation, mixed-integer programs, parallel and distributed algorithms, real-time demand response, robust of piecewise linear convex . I. INTRODUCTION DEMAND response (DR) is a key component of the smart grid, which

  5. Deep Demand Response: The Case Study of the CITRIS Building at the University of California-Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culler, David E.

    Deep Demand Response: The Case Study of the CITRIS Building at the University of California quality. We have made progress towards achieving deep demand response of 30% reduction of peak loads modeling expertise), and UC Berkeley (related demand response research including distributed wireless

  6. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE BATTERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LANDI, J.T.; PLIVELICH, R.F.

    2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electro Energy, Inc. conducted a research project to develop an energy efficient and environmentally friendly bipolar Ni-MH battery for distributed energy storage applications. Rechargeable batteries with long life and low cost potentially play a significant role by reducing electricity cost and pollution. A rechargeable battery functions as a reservoir for storage for electrical energy, carries energy for portable applications, or can provide peaking energy when a demand for electrical power exceeds primary generating capabilities.

  7. The Integration of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Demand Response and Climate Change: Challenges and Opportunities for Evaluators and Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vine, Edward

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distributed generation facilities that have received ratepayer incentives toward the utility’distributed generation system owners to retain 100% of their renewable energy credits (RECs), and that utilities

  8. Exploring Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Souhern California Edison Service Territory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Kingston, Tim [Gas Technology Institute

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed energy (DE) technologies have received much attention for the energy savings and electric power reliability assurances that may be achieved by their widespread adoption. Fueling the attention have been the desires to globally reduce greenhouse gas emissions and concern about easing power transmission and distribution system capacity limitations and congestion. However, these benefits may come at a cost to the electric utility companies in terms of lost revenue and concerns with interconnection on the distribution system. This study assesses the costs and benefits of DE to both consumers and distribution utilities and expands upon a precursory study done with Detroit Edison (DTE)1, by evaluating the combined impact of DE, energy-efficiency, photovoltaics (a use of solar energy), and demand response that will shape the grid of the future. This study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Gas Research Institute (GRI), American Electric Power (AEP), and Gas Technology Institute's (GTI) Distributed Energy Collaborative Program (DECP). It focuses on two real Southern California Edison (SCE) circuits, a 13 MW suburban circuit fictitiously named Justice on the Lincoln substation, and an 8 MW rural circuit fictitiously named Prosper on the Washington Substation. The primary objectives of the study were threefold: (1) Evaluate the potential for using advanced energy technologies, including DE, energy-efficiency (EE), demand response, electricity storage, and photovoltaics (PV), to reshape electric load curves by reducing peak demand, for real circuits. (2) Investigate the potential impact on guiding technology deployment and managing operation in a way that benefits both utilities and their customers by: (a) Improving grid load factor for utilities; (b) Reducing energy costs for customers; and (c) Optimizing electric demand growth. (3) Demonstrate benefits by reporting on a recently installed advanced energy system at a utility customer site. This study showed that advanced energy technologies are economical for many customers on the two SCE circuits analyzed, providing certain customers with considerable energy cost savings. Using reasonable assumptions about market penetration, the study showed that adding distributed generation would reduce peak demand on the two circuits enough to defer the need to upgrade circuit capacity. If the DE is optimally targeted, the deferral could economically benefit SCE, with cost savings that outweigh the lost revenues due to lower sales of electricity. To a lesser extent, economically justifiable energy-efficiency, photovoltaic technologies, and demand response could also help defer circuit capacity upgrades by reducing demand.

  9. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditioning circuitry which converted the AC signal from the generator to usable DC signal, and RFID Battery-

  10. The Role of Demand Resources In Regional Transmission Expansion Planning and Reliable Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigating the role of demand resources in regional transmission planning has provided mixed results. On one hand there are only a few projects where demand response has been used as an explicit alternative to transmission enhancement. On the other hand there is a fair amount of demand response in the form of energy efficiency, peak reduction, emergency load shedding, and (recently) demand providing ancillary services. All of this demand response reduces the need for transmission enhancements. Demand response capability is typically (but not always) factored into transmission planning as a reduction in the load which must be served. In that sense demand response is utilized as an alternative to transmission expansion. Much more demand response is used (involuntarily) as load shedding under extreme conditions to prevent cascading blackouts. The amount of additional transmission and generation that would be required to provide the current level of reliability if load shedding were not available is difficult to imagine and would be impractical to build. In a very real sense demand response solutions are equitably treated in every region - when proposed, demand response projects are evaluated against existing reliability and economic criteria. The regional councils, RTOs, and ISOs identify needs. Others propose transmission, generation, or responsive load based solutions. Few demand response projects get included in transmission enhancement plans because few are proposed. But this is only part of the story. Several factors are responsible for the current very low use of demand response as a transmission enhancement alternative. First, while the generation, transmission, and load business sectors each deal with essentially the same amount of electric power, generation and transmission companies are explicitly in the electric power business but electricity is not the primary business focus of most loads. This changes the institutional focus of each sector. Second, market and reliability rules have, understandably, been written around the capabilities and limitations of generators, the historic reliability resources. Responsive load limitations and capabilities are often not accommodated in markets or reliability criteria. Third, because of the institutional structure, demand response alternatives are treated as temporary solutions that can delay but not replace transmission enhancement. Financing has to be based on a three to five year project life as opposed to the twenty to fifty year life of transmission facilities. More can be done to integrate demand response options into transmission expansion planning. Given the societal benefits it may be appropriate for independent transmission planning organizations to take a more proactive role in drawing demand response alternatives into the resource mix. Existing demand response programs provide a technical basis to build from. Regulatory and market obstacles will have to be overcome if demand response alternatives are to be routinely considered in transmission expansion planning.

  11. Control and Optimization Meet the Smart Power Grid - Scheduling of Power Demands for Optimal Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutsopoulos, Iordanis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The smart power grid aims at harnessing information and communication technologies to enhance reliability and enforce sensible use of energy. Its realization is geared by the fundamental goal of effective management of demand load. In this work, we envision a scenario with real-time communication between the operator and consumers. The grid operator controller receives requests for power demands from consumers, with different power requirement, duration, and a deadline by which it is to be completed. The objective is to devise a power demand task scheduling policy that minimizes the grid operational cost over a time horizon. The operational cost is a convex function of instantaneous power consumption and reflects the fact that each additional unit of power needed to serve demands is more expensive as demand load increases.First, we study the off-line demand scheduling problem, where parameters are fixed and known. Next, we devise a stochastic model for the case when demands are generated continually and sched...

  12. "Greening" Industrial Steam Generation via On-demand Steam Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, J. P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both recent economic and environmental conditions in the U.S. have converged to bring about unprecedented attention to energy efficiency and sustainability in the country's industrial sector. Historically, energy costs in ...

  13. "Greening" Industrial Steam Generation via On-demand Steam Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, J. P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impact have not kept pace with other industrialized nations. The U.S. is confronted with looming tipping points with respect to energy supply and GHG emissions that represent very tangible constraints on future economic growth and quality of life. A...

  14. Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Peer Exchange Call |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02 TUE 08:59 FAXFact SheetConditionsOwners |UsingOAK

  15. Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13,StatementFinancing SolutionsFossilCommunitiesGTOGENDERGenerating

  16. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Hernandez, John; Chiu, Albert; Sezgen, Osman; Goodin, John

    2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is conducting a pilot program to investigate the technical feasibility of bidding certain demand response (DR) resources into the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO) day-ahead market for ancillary services nonspinning reserve. Three facilities, a retail store, a local government office building, and a bakery, are recruited into the pilot program. For each facility, hourly demand, and load curtailment potential are forecasted two days ahead and submitted to the CAISO the day before the operation as an available resource. These DR resources are optimized against all other generation resources in the CAISO ancillary service. Each facility is equipped with four-second real time telemetry equipment to ensure resource accountability and visibility to CAISO operators. When CAISO requests DR resources, PG&E's OpenADR (Open Automated DR) communications infrastructure is utilized to deliver DR signals to the facilities energy management and control systems (EMCS). The pre-programmed DR strategies are triggered without a human in the loop. This paper describes the automated system architecture and the flow of information to trigger and monitor the performance of the DR events. We outline the DR strategies at each of the participating facilities. At one site a real time electric measurement feedback loop is implemented to assure the delivery of CAISO dispatched demand reductions. Finally, we present results from each of the facilities and discuss findings.

  17. Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

  18. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

  19. Effects of Demand Response on Retail and Wholesale Power Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response has grown to be a part of the repertoire of resources used by utilities to manage the balance between generation and load. In recent years, advances in communications and control technology have enabled utilities to consider continuously controlling demand response to meet generation, rather than the other way around. This paper discusses the economic applications of a general method for load resource analysis that parallels the approach used to analyze generation resources and uses the method to examine the results of the US Department of Energy’s Olympic Peninsula Demonstration Testbed. A market-based closed-loop system of controllable assets is discussed with necessary and sufficient conditions on system controllability, observability and stability derived.

  20. Near Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under Real-time Demand-Response Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutaba, Raouf

    Near Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under Real-time Demand-Response Pricing Jin Xiao, Jae--In this paper, we present demand-side energy manage- ment under real-time demand-response pricing as a task, demand-response, energy management I. INTRODUCTION The growing awareness of global climate change has

  1. Scalable Distributed Automation System: Scalable Real-time Decentralized Volt/VAR Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GENI Project: Caltech is developing a distributed automation system that allows distributed generators—solar panels, wind farms, thermal co-generation systems—to effectively manage their own power. To date, the main stumbling block for distributed automation systems has been the inability to develop software that can handle more than 100,000 distributed generators and be implemented in real time. Caltech’s software could allow millions of generators to self-manage through local sensing, computation, and communication. Taken together, localized algorithms can support certain global objectives, such as maintaining the balance of energy supply and demand, regulating voltage and frequency, and minimizing cost. An automated, grid-wide power control system would ease the integration of renewable energy sources like solar power into the grid by quickly transmitting power when it is created, eliminating the energy loss associated with the lack of renewable energy storage capacity of the grid.

  2. A Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhunia, Swarup

    energy generation and consumption parameters. The system uses economics inspired supply-demand modelA Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy Utilization Western Reserve University, *Cleveland State University, +Rockwell Automation, Cleveland, OR, USA Email

  3. Providing Reliability Services through Demand Response: A Prelimnary Evaluation of the Demand Response Capabilities of Alcoa Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL; Todd, Duane [Alcoa; Caulfield, Michael [Alcoa; Helms, Brian [Alcoa

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response is the largest underutilized reliability resource in North America. Historic demand response programs have focused on reducing overall electricity consumption (increasing efficiency) and shaving peaks but have not typically been used for immediate reliability response. Many of these programs have been successful but demand response remains a limited resource. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) report, 'Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering' (FERC 2006) found that only five percent of customers are on some form of demand response program. Collectively they represent an estimated 37,000 MW of response potential. These programs reduce overall energy consumption, lower green house gas emissions by allowing fossil fuel generators to operate at increased efficiency and reduce stress on the power system during periods of peak loading. As the country continues to restructure energy markets with sophisticated marginal cost models that attempt to minimize total energy costs, the ability of demand response to create meaningful shifts in the supply and demand equations is critical to creating a sustainable and balanced economic response to energy issues. Restructured energy market prices are set by the cost of the next incremental unit of energy, so that as additional generation is brought into the market, the cost for the entire market increases. The benefit of demand response is that it reduces overall demand and shifts the entire market to a lower pricing level. This can be very effective in mitigating price volatility or scarcity pricing as the power system responds to changing demand schedules, loss of large generators, or loss of transmission. As a global producer of alumina, primary aluminum, and fabricated aluminum products, Alcoa Inc., has the capability to provide demand response services through its manufacturing facilities and uniquely through its aluminum smelting facilities. For a typical aluminum smelter, electric power accounts for 30% to 40% of the factory cost of producing primary aluminum. In the continental United States, Alcoa Inc. currently owns and/or operates ten aluminum smelters and many associated fabricating facilities with a combined average load of over 2,600 MW. This presents Alcoa Inc. with a significant opportunity to respond in areas where economic opportunities exist to help mitigate rising energy costs by supplying demand response services into the energy system. This report is organized into seven chapters. The first chapter is the introduction and discusses the intention of this report. The second chapter contains the background. In this chapter, topics include: the motivation for Alcoa to provide demand response; ancillary service definitions; the basics behind aluminum smelting; and a discussion of suggested ancillary services that would be particularly useful for Alcoa to supply. Chapter 3 is concerned with the independent system operator, the Midwest ISO. Here the discussion examines the evolving Midwest ISO market structure including specific definitions, requirements, and necessary components to provide ancillary services. This section is followed by information concerning the Midwest ISO's classifications of demand response parties. Chapter 4 investigates the available opportunities at Alcoa's Warrick facility. Chapter 5 involves an in-depth discussion of the regulation service that Alcoa's Warrick facility can provide and the current interactions with Midwest ISO. Chapter 6 reviews future plans and expectations for Alcoa providing ancillary services into the market. Last, chapter 7, details the conclusion and recommendations of this paper.

  4. Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

  5. Smart finite state devices: A modeling framework for demand response technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Konstantin

    We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the ...

  6. A Multi Agent-Based Framework for Simulating Household PHEV Distribution and Electric Distribution Network Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL] [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Hoe Kyoung [ORNL] [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL] [ORNL; Tuttle, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The variation of household attributes such as income, travel distance, age, household member, and education for different residential areas may generate different market penetration rates for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV). Residential areas with higher PHEV ownership could increase peak electric demand locally and require utilities to upgrade the electric distribution infrastructure even though the capacity of the regional power grid is under-utilized. Estimating the future PHEV ownership distribution at the residential household level can help us understand the impact of PHEV fleet on power line congestion, transformer overload and other unforeseen problems at the local residential distribution network level. It can also help utilities manage the timing of recharging demand to maximize load factors and utilization of existing distribution resources. This paper presents a multi agent-based simulation framework for 1) modeling spatial distribution of PHEV ownership at local residential household level, 2) discovering PHEV hot zones where PHEV ownership may quickly increase in the near future, and 3) estimating the impacts of the increasing PHEV ownership on the local electric distribution network with different charging strategies. In this paper, we use Knox County, TN as a case study to show the simulation results of the agent-based model (ABM) framework. However, the framework can be easily applied to other local areas in the US.

  7. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services Silain Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services Silasuccessfully in the wholesale non- spinning ancillary

  8. Physically-based demand modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calloway, Terry Marshall

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. AC-19, December 1974, pp. 887-893. L3] |4] LS] [6] [7] LB] C. W. Brice and S. K. Jones, MPhysically-Based Demand Modeling, d EC-77-5-01-5057, RF 3673, Electric Power Institute, Texas A&M University, October 1978.... C. W. Br ice and 5, K, Jones, MStochastically-Based Physical Load Models Topical Report, " EC-77-5-01-5057, RF 3673, Electric Power Institute, Texas A&M University, May 1979. S. K. Jones and C. W. Brice, "Point Process Models for Power System...

  9. Justice and the demands of realism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munro, Daniel K., 1972-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissertation examines how concerns about the demands of realism should be addressed in political theories of justice. It asks whether the demands of realism should affect the construction of principles of justice and, ...

  10. Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were near 100...

  11. Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    drivingdemandsocialmedia010611.pdf More Documents & Publications Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 Social Media for Natural...

  12. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    renewable integration capability. Coordinating and integrating HECO and Hawaii Energy demand response related activities has the potential

  13. Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, Clifford

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature-based demand response in buildings that havedemand response advantages of global zone temperature setup in buildings

  14. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand-side management (DSM) framework presented in Table x provides three major areas for changing electric loads in buildings:

  15. EIA - Distributed Generation in Buildings

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2YonthlyEnergy Markets 9,Analysis

  16. THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response (DR) can.S. and internationally and lay out ideas that could help move California forward. KEY WORDS demand response, peak

  17. THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response can help reduce the threat of planned rotational outages. Demand response is also widely regarded as having

  18. Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest Chuck Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cagoldman@lbl.gov Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Portland OR May 2, 2007 #12;Overview · Typology Annual Reports ­ Journal articles/Technical reports #12;Demand Response Resources · Incentive

  19. Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-2294E Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response F. Rubinstein, G. Ghatikar, J Ann Piette of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC and Environment's (CIEE) Demand Response Emerging Technologies Development (DRETD) Program, under Work for Others

  20. Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008 #12;© 2008 EnerNOC, Inc. All Rights Reserved programs The purpose of this presentation is to offer insight into the mechanics of demand response and industrial demand response resources across North America in both regulated and restructured markets As of 6

  1. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study F. Rubinstein, S. Kiliccote Energy Environmental Technologies Division January 2007 #12;LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy

  2. Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers G. Di Bella, L. Giarr`e, M. Ippolito, A. Jean-Marie, G. Neglia and I. Tinnirello § January 2, 2014 Abstract Energy demand aggregators are new actors in the energy scenario: they gather a group of energy consumers and implement a demand

  3. Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CUTS//2050/energy05 as a source of energy. Global supply and demand trends will have a profound impact on the ability to use our) Transportation energy demand in the U.S. has increased because of the greater use of less fuel efficient vehicles

  4. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

  5. Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand, more flexible thermal generation, and lower costof VG technologies), more flexible thermal generation, pricedemand, more flexible thermal generation, and low-cost bulk-

  6. Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs Solar Photovoltaic and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyra, K.; Hanel, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs Solar Photovoltaic and Demand Response October 10, 2012 ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS OVERVIEW ?Program rules and guidelines established by Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) ?All Texas investor... to be administered by transmission-distribution utilities ?Programs are implemented by Energy Efficiency Services Providers and Retail Electric Providers 1 WHY DOES ONCOR DO SOLAR PV? ?Helps meet our energy efficiency goals ?Helps customers reduce...

  7. Coordinated Aggregation of Distributed Demand-Side Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -5706 Phone: 480-965-1643 Fax: 480-965-0745 Notice Concerning Copyright Material PSERC members are given is given to this document as the source material. This report is available for downloading from the PSERC website. 2014 Cornell University. All rights reserved #12;Acknowledgements This is the final report

  8. Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes. Developing novel schemes for demand response in smart electric gird is an increasingly active research area/SCADA for demand response in smart infrastructures face the following dilemma: On one hand, in order to increase

  9. Patterns of crude demand: Future patterns of demand for crude oil as a func-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    #12;2 #12;Patterns of crude demand: Future patterns of demand for crude oil as a func- tion schemes, and/or change quality of the feedstock (crude). Demand for crude oil is growing, especially perspective. This thesis aims pre- cisely at understanding the quality of oil from a demand side perspective

  10. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

  11. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    single cycle, oil or diesel generation, which would lead toTurbine/Diesel, and the other generation type include PumpedDiesel Nuclear Power Pumped Storage Fuel Cells Renewable Sources Distributed Generation

  12. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

  13. Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Techniques for Demand Response. May 2007. LBNL-59975.to facilitate automating  demand response actions at the Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,

  14. Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated Aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) StandardsControl for Automated Demand Response, Grid Interop, 2009. [C. McParland, Open Automated Demand Response Communications

  15. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reliability signals for demand response GTA HTTPS HVAC IT kWand Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems. ”and Techniques for Demand Response. California Energy

  16. Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Ed

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.

  17. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

  18. Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goli, Sasank

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.work was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center (load-management.php. Demand Response Research Center (2009).

  19. Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goodin. 2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services. ” InOpen Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project. LBNL-

  20. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    advanced metering and demand response in electricityGoldman, and D. Kathan. “Demand response in U.S. electricity29] DOE. Benefits of demand response in electricity markets