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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

EIA projections of coal supply and demand  

SciTech Connect

Contents of this report include: EIA projections of coal supply and demand which covers forecasted coal supply and transportation, forecasted coal demand by consuming sector, and forecasted coal demand by the electric utility sector; and policy discussion.

Klein, D.E.

1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

2

STEO December 2012 - coal demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

coal demand seen below 1 billion tons in 2012 for fourth year in a row Coal consumption by U.S. power plants to generate electricity is expected to fall below 1 billion tons in...

3

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

4

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Preface. The U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec-

5

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0589(97) Distribution Category UC-950 U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 December 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal ...

6

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand 2010 Review (entire report also available in printer-friendly format ) Previous Editions 2009 Review 2008 Review 2007 Review 2006 Review 2005 Review 2004 Review 2003 Review 2002 Review 2001 Review 2000 Review 1999 Review Data for: 2010 Released: May 2011 Next Release Date: April 2012 Table 3. Electric Power Sector Net Generation, 2009-2010 (Million Kilowatthours) New England Coal 14,378 14,244 -0.9 Hydroelectric 7,759 6,861 -11.6 Natural Gas 48,007 54,680 13.9 Nuclear 36,231 38,361 5.9 Other (1) 9,186 9,063 -1.3 Total 115,559 123,210 6.6 Middle Atlantic Coal 121,873 129,935 6.6 Hydroelectric 28,793 26,463 -8.1 Natural Gas 89,808 104,341 16.2 Nuclear 155,140 152,469 -1.7

7

Electrical Demand Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below the previous year's level and yielded $150,000 annual savings. These measures include rescheduling of selected operations and demand limiting techniques such as fuel switching to alternate power sources during periods of high peak demand. For example, by rescheduling the startup of five heat treat annealing ovens to second shift, 950 kW of load was shifted off peak. Also, retired, non-productive steam turbine chillers and a diesel air compressor have been effectively operated to displaced 1330 kW during peak periods each day. Installed metering devices have enabled the recognition of critical demand periods. The paper concludes with a brief look at future plans and long range objectives of the Demand Management Plan.

Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review (Revised 5/6/2002) 1 by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration 1 This article has been revised, deleting 17.6 millions short tons of coal consumed by the manufacturers of synthetic coal from the consumption of coal by "other industrial plants." This change was made because the synthetic coal those plants produced was primarily consumed in the electric sector and reported as coal, resulting in an overstating of total coal consumption. Overview With the dawning of a new century came the beginning of a new era in the coal industry. Instead of the traditional prac- tice of only buying and selling produced coal in the United

9

Coal in transition 1980--2000 demand considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The usefulness of the Brookhaven model, TESOM, lies in its exploration of the demand side of the energy system. Sectors where coal may be substituted for other energy forms are identified, and attractive technologies are highlighted. The results of the runs accord well with intuitive expectations. The increasing prices of oil and natural gas usually imply that (a) coal synthetics become increasingly attractive technologies, except in the High Demand and CRUNCH Cases (b) nuclear and hydro-electric generation are preferred technologies, (c) coal steam electric, even with expensive scrubbers, becomes more attractive than oil or gas steam electric by year 1990, (d) fluidized bed combustion for electricity generation is cost effective (with relatively small environmental impacts) when compared to oil, gas and coal steam electric. FBC process steam exhibits similar behavior. In the High Demand and CRUNCH scenarios, technologies such as solar electric, which are usually not chosen on the basis of cost, enter the solution because meeting demands has become extremely difficult. As the allowed coal expansion rate becomes a limiting factor, coal synthetics manufacturing becomes an unattractive alternative. This is due both to the need for coal electric generation to meet high electricity demand levels, and to the inefficiencies in the manufacturing process. Due to preferred allocation of coal to electricity generation or synthetics, direct coal use is reduced, although this is normally a preferred option.

Kydes, A S; Cherniavsky, E A

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Volatile coal prices reflect supply, demand uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

Coal mine owners and investors say that supply and demand are now finally in balance. But coal consumers find that both spot tonnage and new contract coal come at a much higher price.

Ryan, M.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005 ..............................................................................3 Residential Forecast Comparison ..............................................................................................5 Nonresidential Forecast Comparisons

12

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historical and Hypothetical Efficiency of China's Coal-Fired Electricity Generation, 1990-2025 Gross Heat Rate (

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acknowledgments SUMMARY Electricity Demand ElectricityAdverse Impacts ELECTRICITY DEMAND . . . .Demand forElectricity Sales Electricity Demand by Major Utility

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

16

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Western Western Interior Appalachian Energy Information Administration/ U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review 1 Figure 1. Coal-Producing Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Coal Industry Annual 1996, DOE/EIA-0584(96) (Washington, DC, November 1997). U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review by B.D. Hong Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy Overview U.S. coal production totaled a record high of 1,088.6 million short tons in 1997, up by 2.3 percent over the 1996 production level, according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1). The electric power industry (utilities and independent power producers)-the dominant coal consumer-used a record 922.0 million short tons, up by 2.8 percent over 1996. The increase in coal use for

17

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

18

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand forand distribution facilities that supply electricity demand.55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand for

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statewide California Electricity Demand. [accessed June 22,fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used into added vehicle electricity demand in the BAU (no IGCC)

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Electrical Demand Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almost every building owner or manager is interested in controlling electrical costs. Since the HVAC system is a large user of electricity, this article will discuss what can be done in the HVAC system to influence parts of the utility bill.

Eppelheimer, D. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Review 3 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration Overview U.S. coal production fell for the second year in a row in 2003, declining by 24.8 million short tons to end the year at 1,069.5 million short tons according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1), down 2.3 percent from the 2002 level of 1,094.3 million short tons. (Note: All percentage change calculations are done at the short ton level.) Total U.S. coal consumption rose in 2003, with all coal-consuming sectors increasing or remaining stable for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector increased by 2.4 percent. However, there were only slight gains in consumption by the other sectors. U.S. coal exports rose in 2003 for the first time in

22

Rising Asian demand drives global coal consumption growth ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global coal demand has almost doubled since 1980, driven by increases in Asia, where demand is up over 400% from 1980-2010. In turn, Asian demand is ...

23

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. Economic demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data Rate of Electricity Demand Growth Slows, Following the Historical Trend Electricity demand fluctuates in the short term in response to business cycles, weather conditions,...

25

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEMAND . . . .Demand for Electricity and Power PeakDemand . . . . ELECTRICITY REQUIREMENTS FOR AGRICULTUREResults . . Coriclusions ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A demand-responsive decision support system for coal transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a demand-responsive decision support system is proposed by integrating the operations of coal shipment, coal stockpiles and coal railing within a whole system. A generic and flexible scheduling optimisation methodology is developed to ... Keywords: Coal shipment, Coal stockpiles, Coal train scheduling, Decision support system, Mine transportation

Erhan Kozan; Shi Qiang Liu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1995  

SciTech Connect

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternative Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management``, presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

29

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the amount of electricity demand that is settled forward.unresponsive demand side, electricity demand has to be metxed percentage of overall electricity demand. The ISO, thus,

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of deploying advanced coal power in the Chinese context,12 2.6. International coal prices and12 III. Chinese Coal

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 2.6. International coal prices and18 International coal prices and trade In parallel with thesocial stability. High coal prices and domestic shortages

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

worlds largest CBM (coal-bed methane) power plant. In orderunder the China United Coal-bed Methane Corporation (CUCBM)quandary. 3.3.4. Coal-bed and coal-mine methane Effective

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Greater fuel diversity needed to meet growing US electricity demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity demand is growing in the USA. One way to manage the uncertainty is to diversity fuel sources. Fuel sources include coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Tables show actual and planned generation projects by fuel types. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Burt, B.; Mullins, S. [Industrial Info Resources (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Residential Electricity Demand in India's Future - How2008). The Boom of Electricity Demand in the residential2005). Forecasting Electricity Demand in Developing

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

warming and electricity demand: A study of California.Extreme Heat, and Electricity Demand in California Norman L.high temperature and electricity demand for air-conditioned

Miller, N.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand side management (DSM) activities in the electric power industry. The report presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a ...

37

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Introduction Coal production in the United States in 2010 increased to a level of 1,085.3 million short tons according to preliminary data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), an increase of 1.0 percent, or 10.4 million short tons above the 2009 level of 1,074.9 million short tons (Table 1). In 2010 U.S. coal consumption increased in all sectors except commercial and institutional while total coal stocks fell slightly for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector in 2010 was higher by 4.5 percent, while coking coal consumption increased by 37.9 percent and the other industrial sector increased by 7.1 percent. The commercial and

39

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

40

Forecasting Electricity Demand by Time Series Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity demand is one of the most important variables required for estimating the amount of additional capacity required to ensure a sufficient supply of energy. Demand and technological losses forecasts can be used to control the generation and distribution of electricity more efficiently. The aim of this paper is to utilize time series model

E. Stoimenova; K. Prodanova; R. Prodanova

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity, Wiley-IEEE Press. CEC (in Major Drivers in U.S. Electricity Markets, NREL/CP-620-and fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

projected extreme heat and peak demand for electricity areadequately kept up with peak demand, and electricity supplytrend in aggregate peak demand in California is expected to

Miller, N.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

face of oil and natural gas price rises, coals share may becoal consumption declined from 1996 to 2006, but rebounded in 2006; unless residential natural gas prices

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40 Executive Summary China has been, is, and will continueMLR, cited in IEA. 2009. Cleaner Coal in China. Paris: IEA.UBS Investment Research: China Coal Sector. (17 January

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

availability, operational limits, ramp rates, and start-up costs Reliability requirements Transmission andavailability, electricity demand, and dispatches power plants based on operating costs and transmission

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Essays on exchange rates and electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines two important issues in economic development: exchange rates and electricity demand and addresses methodological issues of using time series and panel data analysis to investigate important policy ...

Li, Xiangming, 1966-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Rapid increases in electricity demand challenge both ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... on April 1 was the steepest so far this year in SPP. The rate of increase in electricity demand peaked at 12.4% between 6 a.m. and 7 a.m. ...

48

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delivered heating (district heating) (6%), and chemicalscoal growth. As district heating expands with urbanizationzone, coal use for district heating will depend on the

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Energy Efficiency Status of Power Generation Industry in China, ElectricalAnalysis of Energy Efficiency Status of Power Generation Industry in China, Electrical

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the New England ISO Demand Response Collaborative, a NYSERDACEC Staff. Selected Demand Response Pilots in California:New Principles for Demand Response Planning, Electric Power

Borenstein, Severin; Jaske, Michael; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Electricity and Power Peak Demand . . . . ELECTRICITYby Major Utility Service Area Projected Peak Demand for1977 Historical Peak Demand by Utility Service Area Weather-

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS...

54

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project Final...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project Final Report Title Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project Final Report Publication Type Report LBNL...

55

Rapid increases in electricity demand challenge both generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because supply and demand for electricity must balance in real-time, rapid changes in demand create operational challenges for the electric system and generating unit ...

56

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

57

"1. Pleasant Prairie","Coal","Wisconsin Electric Power Co",1190  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin" "1. Pleasant Prairie","Coal","Wisconsin Electric Power Co",1190 "2. South Oak Creek","Coal","Wisconsin Electric Power Co",1135 "3. Columbia","Coal","Wisconsin Power &...

58

Primary coal crushers grow to meet demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mine operators look for more throughput with less fines generation in primary crushers (defined here as single role crushers and two stage crushers). The article gives advice on crusher selection and application. Some factors dictating selection include the desired product size, capacity, Hard Grove grindability index, percentage of rock to be freed and hardness of that rock. The hardness of coal probably has greatest impact on product fineness. 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Fiscor, S.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 3: Electricity Demand Forecast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 3: Electricity Demand Forecast Summary............................................................................................................ 2 Sixth Power Plan Demand Forecast................................................................................................ 4 Demand Forecast Range

60

Coal-fired electric generators continue to dominate electric ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

More than 60% of electricity in the central region of the United States comes from coal-fired electric generators, down from 80% in the early part of ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is unable to reduce electricity prices. The unstorability ofhourly variability in electricity prices while maintainingboth forward and spot electricity prices a ect demand. Our

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Demand for Electric Vehicles in Hybrid Households: An Exploratory Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stated they wouldlikely add an electric and vehicle to theirhouseholdsand the demand electric vehicles", Transportation1983) "A Critical Reviewof Electric Vehicle MarketStudies",

Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Tom; Sperling, Daniel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Turkey opens electricity markets as demand grows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turkey's growing power market has attracted investors and project developers for over a decade, yet their plans have been dashed by unexpected political or financial crises or, worse, obstructed by a lengthy bureaucratic approval process. Now, with a more transparent retail electricity market, government regulators and investors are bullish on Turkey. Is Turkey ready to turn the power on? This report closely examine Turkey's plans to create a power infrastructure capable of providing the reliable electricity supplies necessary for sustained economic growth. It was compiled with on-the-ground research and extensive interview with key industrial and political figures. Today, hard coal and lignite account for 21% of Turkey's electricity generation and gas-fired plants account for 50%. The Alfin Elbistan-B lignite-fired plant has attracted criticism for its lack of desulfurization units and ash dam facilities that have tarnished the industry's image. A 1,100 MW hard-coal fired plant using supercritical technology is under construction. 9 figs., 1 tab.

McKeigue, J.; Da Cunha, A.; Severino, D. [Global Business Reports (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1999 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

65

Variability in electricity demand highlights potential roles for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand-response programs and technologies that tend to reduce the variability of hourly electric demand and the resulting supply requirement would reduce the need ...

66

2012 Portland General Electric. All rights reserved. Planning for Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/13/2013 1 © 2012 Portland General Electric. All rights reserved. Planning for Demand Response their usage. Demand Response ­ PGE Current Status 10 Automated Demand R

67

Does EIA publish electric utility rate, tariff, and demand charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Does EIA publish electric utility rate, tariff, and demand charge data? No, EIA does not collect or publish data on electricity rates, or tariffs, for the sale or ...

68

Demand response can lower electric power load when needed - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

February 15, 2011 Demand response can lower electric power load when needed . Consumers can play a major role in ensuring reliable electricity supply by reducing ...

69

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity...

70

Heat wave contributes to higher summer electricity demand in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

contributes to higher summer electricity demand in the Northeast In its new energy forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration expects summer retail electricity prices...

71

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State-wide, electricity demand per capita has remained essentially flat partially due to energy efficiency incentives.

Miller, N.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of coal for electricity generation in the United States....

73

Demand-side management of China`s electric power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents an analysis of China`s strategies for electricity demand-side management (DSM) by the year 2000. It discusses electricity shortages, potential for electricity conservation, and measures to cope with the problems. It concludes that the country should speed up the reform of electricity pricing, make executable laws, and invest capital in demand-side management.

Yang, M. [Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand). School of Environment, Resources and Development

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal- electric power plant Coal blending Nitrogen controlblending chemical methods resource requirements cost STEAM-ELECTRIC COAL- FIRED POWER PLANT

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oakland CA, December. PJM Demand Side Response WorkingPrice Response Program a PJM Economic Load Response ProgramLoad Response Statistics PJM Demand Response Working Group

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission or system-wide electricity failures will occur; and, · No significant gaming (manipulationCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook Ashuckian, Manager Electricity Analysis Office Terrence O'Brien, Deputy Director Systems Assessment

77

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1992. Global warming and electricity demand: A study ofValuing the Time-Varying Electricity Production of SolarCEC). 2002. 2002-2012 Electricity Outlook Report, P700- 01-

Miller, N.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

109 Figure 57. Assumed natural gas and coal prices in LEDGE-explored. Natural gas Energy price (2007$/MMBtu) Coal Figureassumed relative prices of natural gas and coal decades into

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the generation shares from coal-fired plants with high GHGof generation from coal-fired plants, marginal emissionsdemand in LADWP, where coal-fired plants may provide most of

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

109 Figure 57. Assumed natural gas and coal prices in LEDGE-Assumed natural gas and coal prices in LEDGE-CA [152]. Itin Figure 57. The coal price stays relatively constant

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

months when buildings' electricity demand is also high dueoptimize buildings' electricity demand according to hourlymonths when buildings' electricity demand is also high due

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND Jonathan Koomey* andData to Improve Electricity Demand ForecastsFinal Report.further research. Electricity demand varies constantly. At

Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyImpacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyFigure 3: Commercial electricity demand with and without the

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feature of competitive wholesale electricity markets. Ineffectively in wholesale electricity markets, we will needEfficiency in the US Electricity Futures Market, Australian

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Customers Respond to Electricity Price Variability: A Studyand lower average electricity prices paid by consumers. Inperiods with high electricity prices; (2) load displacement,

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) Most electricity customers see electricity rates that are based on average electricity costs and bear little relation to the true production costs of electricity as they vary over time. Demand response is a tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use customers in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to give

87

Does EIA publish electric utility rate, tariff, and demand charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA ... tariff, and demand charge data? No, EIA does not collect or publish data on electricity rates, or tariffs, ...

88

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

Information Center

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2006 Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article provides and overview of the year 2006 in the coal industry and covers coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, and delivered coal prices. It provides a detailed regional and State level coal production and national coal consumption along with industry developments that occurred in 2006. A brief discussion of coal-synfuel plants is included

Fred Freme

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

90

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2007 Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article provides and overview of the year 2007 in the coal industry and covers coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, and delivered coal prices. It provides a detailed regional and State level coal production and national coal consumption along with industry developments that occurred in 2007. A brief discussion of coal-synfuel plants is included

Fred Freme

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

91

1995 Demand-Side Managment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels

92

Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders U.S. Utilities, Grid Operators, Others Come Together...

93

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rates that are based on average electricity costs and bear little relation to the true production costs of electricity as they vary over time. Demand response is a tariff or...

94

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forward price curves in electricity markets, Energyenergy markets tends to increase electricity system reliability, reduce pricemarkets deregulate and energy tariffs increasingly expose customers to commodity price

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

New coal plant technologies will demand more water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population shifts, growing electricity demand, and greater competition for water resources have heightened interest in the link between energy and water. The US Energy Information Administration projects a 22% increase in US installed generating capacity by 2030. Of the 259 GE of new capacity expected to have come on-line by then, more than 192 GW will be thermoelectric and thus require some water for cooling. Our challenge will become balancing people's needs for power and for water. 1 ref., 7 figs.

Peltier, R.; Shuster, E.; McNemar, A.; Stiegel, G.J.; Murphy, J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Electricity demand patterns matter for valuing electricity supply ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Units serving baseload needs include nuclear generators; large, efficient coal-fired generators; natural gas combined-cycle generators ...

97

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Title Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5557E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, and Sila Kiliccote Date Published 06/2012 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Keywords commercial, demand response, dynamic pricing, mandatory hourly pricing, open automated demand response, openadr, pilot studies & implementation, price responsive demand Abstract In New York State, the default electricity pricing for large customers is Mandatory Hourly Pricing (MHP), which is charged based on zonal day-ahead market price for energy. With MHP, retail customers can adjust their building load to an economically optimal level according to hourly electricity prices. Yet, many customers seek alternative pricing options such as fixed rates through retail access for their electricity supply. Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) is an XML (eXtensible Markup Language) based information exchange model that communicates price and reliability information. It allows customers to evaluate hourly prices and provide demand response in an automated fashion to minimize electricity costs. This document shows how OpenADR can support MHP and facilitate price responsive demand for large commercial customers in New York City.

98

Elasticities of Electricity Demand in Urban Indian Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy demand, and in particular electricity demand in India has been growing at a very rapid rate over the last decade. Given, current trends in population growth, industrialisation, urbanisation, modernisation and income growth, electricity consumption is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades as well. Tariff reforms could play a potentially important role as a demand side management tool in India. However, the effects of any price revisions on consumption will depend on the price elasticity of demand for electricity. In the past, electricity demand studies for India published in international journals have been based on aggregate macro data at the country or sub-national / state level. In this paper, price and income elasticities of electricity demand in the residential sector of all urban areas of India are estimated for the first time using disaggregate level survey data for over thirty thousand households. Three electricity demand functions have been estimated using monthly data for the following seasons: winter, monsoon and summer. The results show electricity demand is income and price inelastic in all three seasons, and that household, demographic and geographical variables are important in determining electricity demand, something that is not possible to determine using aggregate macro models alone. Key Words Residential electricity demand, price elasticity, income elasticity Short Title Electricity demand in Indian households Acknowledgements: The authors would like to gratefully acknowledge the National Sample Survey Organisation, Department of Statistics of the Government of India, for making available to us the unit level, household survey data. We would also like to thank Prof. Daniel Spreng for his support of our research. 2 1.

Shonali Pachauri

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Electric demand growth: An uncertain future for uranium  

SciTech Connect

Broadly conceived, the demand for electricity depends upon three sets of variables: (i) the growths of the many individual demands for energy services; (ii) the competitiveness of electrically driven technologies in meeting these demands; and (iii) the energy-conversion efficiencies of installed electrical technologies. The first set of variables establishes the size of the potential market; the second, the market penetration of electrical equipment; and the third, the quantity of electricity required to operate the equipment. All forecasts of electricity consumption ultimately depend upon inferred or assumed relationships to describe the future behavior of these variables. In this paper, the authors review recent forecasts of electricity demand growth. They also examine, in a qualitative way, some of the causes for the systematic, downward revisions of these forecasts over recent years. Graphical presentations of data are extensively used in the discussions. In an important sense, forecasting, whatever the number of variables, remains a matter of ''curve fitting.''

Asbury, J.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Within Hawaiian Electric Company Service Territory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By reducing power usage during peak demand periods, demand response (DR) programs can help utilities manage power loads and complement energy efficiency activities while providing ratepayers an opportunity to substantially reduce their electric bills. This project assessed the costs and benefits of potential DR programs for Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) commercial and industrial (CI) customers.

2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Future demand for electricity in the Nassau--Suffolk region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory established a new technology for load forecasting for the Long Island Lighting Company and prepared an independent forecast of the demand for electricity in the LILCO area. The method includes: demand for electricity placed in a total energy perspective so that substitutions between electricity and other fuels can be examined; assessment of the impact of conservation, new technology, gas curtailment, and other factors upon demand for electricity; and construction of the probability distribution of the demand for electricity. A detailed analysis of changing levels of demand for electricity, and other fuels, associated with these new developments is founded upon a disaggregated end-use characterization of energy utilization, including space heat, lighting, process energy, etc., coupled to basic driving forces for future demand, namely: population, housing mix, and economic growth in the region. The range of future events covers conservation, heat pumps, solar systems, storage resistance heaters, electric vehicles, extension of electrified rail, total energy systems, and gas curtailment. Based upon cost and other elements of the competition between technologies, BNL assessed the likelihood of these future developments. An optimistic view toward conservation leads to ''low'' demand for electricity, whereas rapid development of new technologies suggests ''high'' demand. (MCW)

Carroll, T.W.; Palmedo, P.F.; Stern, R.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

serves to partially fill off-peak demand troughs. If passivehigher before or after the peak demand hour when hydro powerare highest during off-peak demand hours, and are low at

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-vehicle demand load factor Natural gas price Carbon tax89). They increase with demand (and gross natural gas-firedelectricity demand and by changing natural gas price and CO

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost. For small plants, it is quite possible that a decrease in labor could result in an increase in electric demand and cost or vice versa. In this paper two cases are presented which highlight the dependence of one on other.

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy markets. References Aniti, L. , 2002, Energy InformationEnergy Information Administration Energy Management Control Systems Electricity Market

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Duke Power d FirstEnergy Georgia Power Niagara Mohawk Pacific Gas & Electric Pennsylvania Power & Light Progress Energy

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity2006. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and2010. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The authors are solely responsible for any omissions or errors contained herein. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence More Documents & Publications Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

109

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix C: Demand Forecast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix C: Demand Forecast Energy Demand................................................................................................................................. 1 Demand Forecast Methodology.................................................................................................. 3 New Demand Forecasting Model for the Sixth Plan

110

Variability in electricity demand highlights potential roles ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These technologies convert electricity into another form of energy for storage: the potential energy in water pumped uphill to a reservoir and in compressed air, ...

111

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity customers are being exposed to real-time prices (RTP) in their default service tariff rates offered by utilities, particularly in states

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEC (2009) Statewide Electricity Rates by Utility, Class andrates if the marginal electricity rate from the LCFS isestimated marginal electricity emissions rate in California

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

114

Swarm intelligence approaches to estimate electricity energy demand in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes two new models based on artificial bee colony (ABC) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) techniques to estimate electricity energy demand in Turkey. ABC and PSO electricity energy estimation models (ABCEE and PSOEE) are developed ... Keywords: Ant colony optimization, Artificial bee colony, Electricity energy estimation, Particle swarm optimization, Swarm intelligence

Mustafa Servet K?Ran; Eren Zceylan; Mesut GNdZ; Turan Paksoy

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

116

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

117

Analysis of recent projections of electric power demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the changes and potential changes in the outlook for electric power demand since the publication of Review and Analysis of Electricity Supply Market Projections (B. Swezey, SERI/MR-360-3322, National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Forecasts of the following organizations were reviewed: DOE/Energy Information Administration, DOE/Policy Office, DRI/McGraw-Hill, North American Electric Reliability Council, and Gas Research Institute. Supply uncertainty was briefly reviewed to place the uncertainties of the demand outlook in perspective. Also discussed were opportunities for modular technologies, such as renewable energy technologies, to fill a potential gap in energy demand and supply.

Hudson, D.V. Jr.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Economics of Energy (and Electricity) Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% electrical efficiency might be able to deliver electrical heat using half the gas of gas fired boiler with 90% efficiency (p.152-153). An electric car uses around 15 kWh per 100 km, around 5 times less than the average fossil fuel car. This implies... that there is always a wide-range of observed efficiencies in the economy, with the average efficiency of the provision of an energy service being significantly less than the efficiency of the most efficient. Current new fossil fuel cars and gas boilers are 50...

Platchkov, Laura M.; Pollitt, Michael G.

119

Electricity demand patterns matter for valuing electricity supply ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PJM's hourly real-time energy prices corresponding to the week of hourly demand values are shown below. Prices also vary by hour and are much more volatile than demand.

120

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response to Electricity Real Time Prices: Short Run and LongOver-the-counter Real-time Prices Thermal Energy Storage viiare being exposed to real-time prices (RTP) in their default

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels. Data is included for energy savings, peakload reductions, and costs.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. - 1996 - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

Information Center

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Automated electricity demand response - Tech Close-Up  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated electricity demand response - Tech Close-Up Click here to view this video Date: August 27, 2013 Presenter(s): Many, including EETD's Mary Ann Piette. A Tech Close-Up news...

124

Forecasting electricity demand by hybrid machine learning model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a hybrid machine learning model for electricity demand forecasting, based on Bayesian Clustering by Dynamics (BCD) and Support Vector Machine (SVM). In the proposed model, a BCD classifier is firstly applied to cluster the input data ...

Shu Fan; Chengxiong Mao; Jiadong Zhang; Luonan Chen

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Electrical ship demand modeling for future generation warships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of future warships will require increased reliance on accurate prediction of electrical demand as the shipboard consumption continues to rise. Current US Navy policy, codified in design standards, dictates methods ...

Sievenpiper, Bartholomew J. (Bartholomew Jay)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The residential demand for electricity in New England,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The residential demand for electricity, studied on the national level for many years, is here investigated on the regional level. A survey of the literature is first presented outlining past econometric work in the field ...

Levy, Paul F.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Demand-side participation in the Australian National Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand-side participation in the Australian National Electricity Market Speaker(s): Hugh Outhred Date: March 4, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

128

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

active natural gas generators and imports will decline, inadditional system imports and natural gas-fired generation66%) Natural gas (22%) Renewable (1.4%) DSW imports 3 Coal (

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Coal gasification for the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer  

SciTech Connect

TVA is proposing to develop and commercially demonstrate the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer (urea) using integrated gasification/combined cycle (IGCC) technology. The coal-based coproduction demonstration project will show that the coproduction process can economically and environmentally enhance the production of both electric power and urea. As conceptualized, the proposed coproduction demonstration project facility would be designed for a nominal electrical capacity of about 250 megawatts (MW), Table I. During normal operation, the facility would produce about 150 MW of base-load electrical power and 1,000 tons per day of urea. Sulfur from the coal would be recovered as elemental sulfur. During peak power demand, the fertilizer capacity could be reduced or bypassed and the full 250 MW could be made available. This scheme would allow continuous operation of the gasifier at 100% of its rated capacity which would reduce the annual revenue requirements for power generation by permitting the production of fertilizer. As TVA's vision of this proposal matures (i.e., as consideration is given to alternative schemes, as TVA reviews its power demands, and as more detailed engineering estimates are developed), the nature and scope of cyclic-operation may be altered.

Kelly, D.A.; Nichols, D.E.; Faucett, H.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Coal gasification for the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer  

SciTech Connect

TVA is proposing to develop and commercially demonstrate the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer (urea) using integrated gasification/combined cycle (IGCC) technology. The coal-based coproduction demonstration project will show that the coproduction process can economically and environmentally enhance the production of both electric power and urea. As conceptualized, the proposed coproduction demonstration project facility would be designed for a nominal electrical capacity of about 250 megawatts (MW), Table I. During normal operation, the facility would produce about 150 MW of base-load electrical power and 1,000 tons per day of urea. Sulfur from the coal would be recovered as elemental sulfur. During peak power demand, the fertilizer capacity could be reduced or bypassed and the full 250 MW could be made available. This scheme would allow continuous operation of the gasifier at 100% of its rated capacity which would reduce the annual revenue requirements for power generation by permitting the production of fertilizer. As TVA`s vision of this proposal matures (i.e., as consideration is given to alternative schemes, as TVA reviews its power demands, and as more detailed engineering estimates are developed), the nature and scope of cyclic-operation may be altered.

Kelly, D.A.; Nichols, D.E.; Faucett, H.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT Forecasting Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices. With the medium natural gas price assumptions, the Council currently is seeing draft spot market for Northwest smelters. Since electricity prices are related to natural gas prices in the long-term, and high natural gas prices are associated with the high economic growth case, it may now make more sense to assume

132

Revised Draft Forecast of Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Forecasts of higher electricity and natural gas prices will fundamentally challenge energy intensive. These include the reduced growth in natural gas supplies in spite of significant drilling activity and #12;DRAFT the medium-high case, while paper and allied products has been below the medium-low. Future natural gas

133

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional PowerTransmission Area, in Electric Vehicle Symposium, Anaheim,of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2, Argonne

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on RegionalAnalysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2,of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 2: United States

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Colorado service area, system electricity requirementsColorado from the Southwest. ) The definitions of the three regions used by the Western Electricity

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Control Mechanisms for Residential Electricity Demand in SmartGrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control Mechanisms for Residential Electricity Demand in SmartGrids Shalinee Kishore Department of the emerging SmartGrid, use both prices and user preferences to control power usage across the home. We first, accounts for the potential for electricity capacity constraints. I. INTRODUCTION The emerging SmartGrid

Snyder, Larry

137

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Generation Technology Conventional Coal-Fired PowerPlants Advanced Coal-Electric Plants OperatingCharacteristics for Conventional Coal- Fired Power

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Density Forecasting for Long-Term Peak Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term electricity demand forecasting plays an important role in planning for future generation facilities and transmission augmentation. In a long-term context, planners must adopt a probabilistic view of potential peak demand levels. Therefore density forecasts (providing estimates of the full probability distributions of the possible future values of the demand) are more helpful than point forecasts, and are necessary for utilities to evaluate and hedge the financial risk accrued by demand variability and forecasting uncertainty. This paper proposes a new methodology to forecast the density of long-term peak electricity demand. Peak electricity demand in a given season is subject to a range of uncertainties, including underlying population growth, changing technology, economic conditions, prevailing weather conditions (and the timing of those conditions), as well as the general randomness inherent in individual usage. It is also subject to some known calendar effects due to the time of day, day of week, time of year, and public holidays. A comprehensive forecasting solution is described in this paper. First, semi-parametric additive models are used to estimate the relationships between demand and the driver variables, including temperatures, calendar effects and some demographic and economic variables. Then the demand distributions are forecasted by using a mixture of temperature simulation, assumed future economic scenarios, and residual bootstrapping. The temperature simulation is implemented through a new seasonal bootstrapping method with variable blocks. The proposed methodology has been used to forecast the probability distribution of annual and weekly peak electricity demand for South Australia since 2007. The performance of the methodology is evaluated by comparing the forecast results with the actual demand of the summer 20072008.

Rob J. Hyndman; Shu Fan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

US electric utility demand-side management, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in US at the national, regional, and utility levels. Objective is provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions, and costs attributable to DSM.

NONE

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1996  

SciTech Connect

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it related to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Social Welfare implications of demand response programs in competitiv e electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Customer Electricity Demand Under Fixed Tariffs vs.to re-emphasize that these electricity demands are the onesdamage from fire. of electricity demand, it is system-wide

Boisvert, Richard N.; Neenan, Bernard F.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrialchanges the time of electricity demand to off-peak hours.Load shedding curtails electricity demand during a DR event.

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hourly distribution of hydro energy does change with demand,drawn down, non-baseload hydro energy is assumed to be load-the spread of annual hydro energy has varied by more than a

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

147

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determine marginal generation sources. Although electricity16. Validation of generation by energy source in EDGE-CA (Validation of generation by energy source in EDGE-CA (TWh).

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart Grid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart Grid Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

149

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Title Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Publication Type Conference Paper Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-2322E Year of Publication 2009 Authors McNeil, Michael A., and Maithili Iyer Date Published 06/2009 Keywords Air Conditioners, Appliance Efficiency, appliance energy efficiency, energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, india, Labels, MEPS, refrigerators, Standards and labeling URL https://isswprod.lbl.gov/library/view-docs/public/output/rpt77250.PDF Refereed Designation Unknown Attachment Size

150

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

151

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Residential Electricity Demand in India's Future - HowThe Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector instraightforward. Electricity demand per end use and region

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Coal stockpiles at electric power plants were above average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Increased competition between fuels as well as a warm winter 2011-12 led to lower consumption of coal and, thus, higher coal stockpiles at electric power plants in ...

154

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles: Implications forGas Emissions from Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles: Implications forassessment of plug-in hybrid vehicles on electric utilities

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Electric shovels meet the demands for mining operations  

SciTech Connect

Rugged, intelligent shovels offer better productivity and help mine operators avoid costly downtime in a very tight market. In 2007 P & H Mining Equipment began to produce a new breed of electric mining shovels designed to help reduce operating cost in coal and other mining operations. These were designated the P & H C-Series. All have an advanced communication, command and control system called the Centurion system. Coal mining applications for this series include 4100XPCs in Australia, China and Wyoming, USA. The Centurion system provides information on shovel performance and systems health which is communicated via graphic user interface terminals to the operators cab. Bucyrus International is developing a hydraulic crowd mechanism for its electric shovels and is now field testing one for its 495 series shovel. The company has also added greater capability in the primary software in the drive system for troubleshooting and fault identification to quickly diagnose problems onboard or remotely. 4 photos.

Fiscor, S.

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Smart Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Demand Response Pilot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses a unique pilot project to evaluate electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) capable of demand response (DR) and its integration into the utility smart metering infrastructure.BackgroundThere is an immediate need to research grid interface compatibility of public charging apparatus and to develop requirements and reference design blueprints for the entire plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging infrastructurefrom the vehicle ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Electricity Markets Meet the Home through Demand Response Lazaros Gkatzikis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with increasing trends [9]. Dynamic pricing motivates home users to modify their electricity consumption behavior price timeslots leading to the same total energy consumption, but a significantly different demand in practice though, since home users require to know the price per unit of consumed energy in advance. Instead

Massoulié, Laurent

158

Potential growth of nuclear and coal electricity generation in the US  

SciTech Connect

Electricity demand should continue to grow at about the same rate as GNP, creating a need for large amounts of new generating capacity over the next fifty years. Only coal and nuclear at this time have the abundant domestic resources and assured technology to meet this need. However, large increase in both coal and nuclear usage will require solutions to many of the problems that now deter their increased usage. For coal, the problems center around the safety and environmental impacts of increased coal mining and coal combustion. For nuclear, the problems center around reactor safety, radioactive waste disposal, financial risk, and nuclear materials safeguards. This report assesses the impacts associated with a range of projected growth rates in electricity demand over the next 50 years. The resource requirements and waste generation resulting from pursuing the coal and nuclear fuel options to meet the projected growth rates are estimated. The fuel requirements and waste generation for coal plants are orders of magnitude greater than for nuclear. Improvements in technology and waste management practices must be pursued to mitigate environmental and safety concerns about electricity generation from both options. 34 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs.

Bloomster, C.H.; Merrill, E.T.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Coal supply/demand, 1980 to 2000. Task 3. Resource applications industrialization system data base. Final review draft. [USA; forecasting 1980 to 2000; sector and regional analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of data and forecasts resulting from an analysis of the coal market and the factors influencing supply and demand. The analyses performed for the forecasts were made on an end-use-sector basis. The sectors analyzed are electric utility, industry demand for steam coal, industry demand for metallurgical coal, residential/commercial, coal demand for synfuel production, and exports. The purpose is to provide coal production and consumption forecasts that can be used to perform detailed, railroad company-specific coal transportation analyses. To make the data applicable for the subsequent transportation analyses, the forecasts have been made for each end-use sector on a regional basis. The supply regions are: Appalachia, East Interior, West Interior and Gulf, Northern Great Plains, and Mountain. The demand regions are the same as the nine Census Bureau regions. Coal production and consumption in the United States are projected to increase dramatically in the next 20 years due to increasing requirements for energy and the unavailability of other sources of energy to supply a substantial portion of this increase. Coal comprises 85 percent of the US recoverable fossil energy reserves and could be mined to supply the increasing energy demands of the US. The NTPSC study found that the additional traffic demands by 1985 may be met by the railways by the way of improved signalization, shorter block sections, centralized traffic control, and other modernization methods without providing for heavy line capacity works. But by 2000 the incremental traffic on some of the major corridors was projected to increase very significantly and is likely to call for special line capacity works involving heavy investment.

Fournier, W.M.; Hasson, V.

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

160

Coal regains some electric generation market share from natural ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... a combination of higher prices for natural gas and increased demand for electricity during the summer months led electric systems across much of the country to ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

SciTech Connect

Climate projections from three atmosphere-ocean climate models with a range of low to mid-high temperature sensitivity forced by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change SRES higher, middle, and lower emission scenarios indicate that, over the 21st century, extreme heat events for major cities in heavily air-conditioned California will increase rapidly. These increases in temperature extremes are projected to exceed the rate of increase in mean temperature, along with increased variance. Extreme heat is defined here as the 90 percent exceedance probability (T90) of the local warmest summer days under the current climate. The number of extreme heat days in Los Angeles, where T90 is currently 95 F (32 C), may increase from 12 days to as many as 96 days per year by 2100, implying current-day heat wave conditions may last for the entire summer, with earlier onset. Overall, projected increases in extreme heat under the higher A1fi emission scenario by 2070-2099 tend to be 20-30 percent higher than those projected under the lower B1 emission scenario, ranging from approximately double the historical number of days for inland California cities (e.g. Sacramento and Fresno), up to four times for previously temperate coastal cities (e.g. Los Angeles, San Diego). These findings, combined with observed relationships between high temperature and electricity demand for air-conditioned regions, suggest potential shortfalls in transmission and supply during T90 peak electricity demand periods. When the projected extreme heat and peak demand for electricity are mapped onto current availability, maintaining technology and population constant only for demand side calculations, we find the potential for electricity deficits as high as 17 percent. Similar increases in extreme heat days are suggested for other locations across the U.S. southwest, as well as for developing nations with rapidly increasing electricity demands. Electricity response to recent extreme heat events, such as the July 2006 heat wave in California, suggests that peak electricity demand will challenge current supply, as well as future planned supply capacities when population and income growth are taken into account.

Miller, N.L.; Hayhoe, K.; Jin, J.; Auffhammer, M.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Demand Response: An UntappedDemand Response: An Untapped Resource for Western ElectricityResource for Western Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Administration, Form EIA-861 Database. #12;Energy Analysis Department Significant cost@lbl.gov FERC Western Energy Infrastructure Conference Denver, Colorado July 30, 2003 #12;Energy Analysis value of demand-side for electricity markets - Short-term Load Management - Dynamic Pricing - Energy

163

NREL: Energy Analysis - Coal-Fired Electricity Generation Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal-Fired Electricity Generation Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Over the last 30 years, researchers have conducted hundreds of life cycle assessments of...

164

South Korean energy outlook: Coal and electricity focus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper concisely outlines the capacity for Korea to generate electricity by using coal. Resources (native and imported) as well as facilities are reviewed.

Young, E.M. [ed.; Johnson, C.J.; Li, B.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Coal likely to remain most prevalent fuel for electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal is currently the dominant fuel for electricity generation and is likely to remain so, even if additional environmental control regulations ...

166

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1994) Demand for Electric Vehicles in Hybrid Households: A nand the Household Electric Vehicle Market: A Constraintsthe mar- ket for electric vehicles in California. Presented

Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in "Hybrid Households" Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the demand electric vehicles, TransportationResearchA,1994) ~tive NewsCalifornia Electric Vehicle ConsumerStudy.1995) Forecasting Electric Vehicle Ownership Use in the

Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charges to avoid high electricity bills. Demand Responseaffect customers' electricity bills negatively. Therefore,charges to avoid high electricity bills Under ConEd's SC-9

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Table 11.2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; 2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Sales and Net Demand Economic Total Onsite Transfers for Characteristic(a) Purchases Transfers In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 91,909 Q 1,406 194 93,319 20-49 86,795 81 2,466 282 89,060 50-99 90,115 215 2,593 1,115 91,808 100-249 124,827 347 11,375 5,225 131,324 250-499 116,631 2,402 24,079 5,595 137,516 500 and Over 225,242 6,485 91,741 20,770 302,699 Total 735,520 9,728 133,661 33,181 845,727 Employment Size Under 50

170

Table 11.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 75,652 21 5,666 347 80,993 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 16,620 0 3,494 142 19,972 311221 Wet Corn Milling 7,481 0 3,213 14 10,680 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1,264 0 1,382 109 2,537 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 9,258 0 336 66 9,528 3115 Dairy Products 9,585 2 38 22 9,602 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 20,121 15 19 0 20,155 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

171

Forecasting Electricity Demand on Short, Medium and Long Time Scales Using Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to the modelling and forecasting of electricity demand experienced by an electricity supplier. The data used in the application examples relates to the national electricity demand ... Keywords: BoxJenkins model, artificial neural networks, electrical load, electricity demand, load forecasting

J. V. Ringwood; D. Bofelli; F. T. Murray

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Innovative and Progressive Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation of electric energy has been a concern of energy users in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors for several decades, and has increased in significance since the 1973 energy shortages. During this time, it has also become increasing difficult for electric utilities to install new generating capacity due to public concerns about nuclear energy and environmental issues. In many areas of the country, utilities now find themselves capacity short during their peak periods, and have concerns about providing a reliable supply of electricity. These utilities have initiated programs which encourage their customers to conserve electric energy, and shift or lower use during the utility's peak periods. In other areas of the country there are utilities which have more than adequate electric supplies. These utilities have developed programs which ensure that costs of electricity are such that existing customers are maintained. Programs which address demand issues of an energy utility are referred to as Demand-Side Management (DSM) and are extremely rigorous in scope. Electric utilities have pursued many different DSM policies and strategies during the past decade. These programs have addressed various technologies and have included rebates for efficient lighting, electric motors and packaged air conditioning systems. More recently, however, many utilities have implemented very innovative programs, which indicates an increased commitment towards demand planning, and requires a substantial financial investment in new equipment and engineering services. Some programs have addressed such areas as thermal storage and industrial processes, and others have included comprehensive facility energy studies where greater than fifty percent of the cost of energy retrofits may be covered by the utility. Progressive pricing strategies have included real-time pricing and aggressive curtailable rates for commercial and industrial buildings. Further, new standards are being established by electric utilities which promote energy efficient new construct ion. All of these programs can have considerable impacts on both the customer's and utility's energy use patterns and load shapes. This paper will discuss a number of more significant and innovative DSM programs, and will explain the potential load and energy impacts.

Epstein, G. J.; Fuller, W. H.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Analyzing strategic behaviors in electricity markets via transmission-constrained residual demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation studies how to characterize strategic behaviors in electricity markets from a transmission-constrained residual demand perspective. This dissertation generalizes the residual demand concept, widely (more)

Xu, Lin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

175

Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?  

SciTech Connect

The time when energy-related carbon emissions come overwhelmingly from developed countries is coming to a close. China has already overtaken the United States as the world's leading emitter of greenhouse gas emissions. The economic growth that China has experienced is not expected to slow down significantly in the long term, which implies continued massive growth in energy demand. This paper draws on the extensive expertise from the China Energy Group at LBNL on forecasting energy consumption in China, but adds to it by exploring the dynamics of demand growth for electricity in the residential sector -- and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. This paper forecasts ownership growth of each product using econometric modeling, in combination with historical trends in China. The products considered (refrigerators, air conditioners, fans, washing machines, lighting, standby power, space heaters, and water heating) account for 90percent of household electricity consumption in China. Using this method, we determine the trend and dynamics of demandgrowth and its dependence on macroeconomic drivers at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, we present scenarios for reducing residential consumption through efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, thus allowing for a technologically realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities specifically in the Chinese context.

Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.; Zhou, Nan

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

176

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

177

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

178

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Conditioning, & Electric Power Machinery 29(1): 1-4 Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: DemandUSA Solutions for summer electric power shortages: Demand

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

SciTech Connect

The restructuring of regional electricity markets in the U.S. has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created significant new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators, to control and manage the load patterns of their wholesale or retail end-users. These technologies and business approaches for manipulating end-user load shapes are known as Load Management or, more recently, Demand Responsive programs. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is conducting case studies on innovative demand responsive programs and presents preliminary results for five case studies in this paper. These case studies illustrate the diversity of market participants and range of technologies and business approaches and focus on key program elements such as target markets, market segmentation and participation results; pricing scheme; dispatch and coordination; measurement, verification, and settlement; and operational results where available.

Heffner, Grayson C. Dr.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

180

Cost of New Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Coal Electricity Generation...................... 17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Future demand for electricity can be met with a range of technologies, with fuels including coal, nuclear, natural gas, biomass and other renewables, as well as with energy efficiency and demand management approaches. Choices among options will depend on factors including capital cost, fuel cost, market and regulatory uncertainty, greenhouse gas emissions, and other environmental impacts. This paper estimates the costs of new electricity generation. The approach taken here is to provide a transparent and verifiable analysis based mainly on recent data provided

Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas; Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand changes impact the electric power sector. Figure 2:for electricity on the electric power sector as a whole. Thedemand changes impact the electric power sector. We refer to

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Present coal potential of Turkey and coal usage in electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

Total coal reserve (hard coal + lignite) in the world is 984 billion tons. While hard coal constitutes 52% of the total reserve, lignite constitutes 48% of it. Turkey has only 0.1% of world hard coal reserve and 1.5% of world lignite reserves. Turkey has 9th order in lignite reserve, 8th order in lignite production, and 12th order in total coal (hard coal and lignite) consumption. While hard coal production meets only 13% of its consumption, lignite production meets lignite consumption in Turkey. Sixty-five percent of produced hard coal and 78% of produced lignite are used for electricity generation. Lignites are generally used for electricity generation due to their low quality. As of 2003, total installed capacity of Turkey was 35,587 MW, 19% (6,774 MW) of which is produced from coal-based thermal power plants. Recently, use of natural gas in electricity generation has increased. While the share of coal in electricity generation was about 50% for 1986, it is replaced by natural gas today.

Yilmaz, A.O. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A distributed renewable energy system meeting 100% of electricity demand in Humboldt County: a feasibility study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A model of electricity supply and demand in Humboldt County, California over the course of one year is presented. Wind, oceanwave, solar, and biomass electricity (more)

Ross, Darrell Adam

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The dynamics of electricity demand and supply in the low voltage distribution grid: a model study:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis a simulation study is executed that analyses how new developments of household electricity demand and decentralised electricity generation affect the low voltage (more)

Van Zoest, P.L.A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in "Hybrid Households" Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In contrast to a hybrid vehicle whichcombines multiple1994) "Demand Electric Vehicles in Hybrid for Households:or 180 mile hybrid electric vehicle. Natural gas vehicles (

Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LBNL-2124E LBNL-2124E Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence Principal Authors Peter Cappers a , Charles Goldman a , and David Kathan b a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 b Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street, NE, Washington, DC 20426, Energy Analysis Department Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90R4000 Berkeley CA 94720-8136 Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2009 http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/EMS_pubs.html Pre-print version of the article to be published in Energy, forthcoming 2009. The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S.

187

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concerns during system peak demand conditions, and failurerelative to national peak demand, was about 5.0% in 2006 [2]to a regions summer peak demand (see Fig. 2). Demand

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Demand and Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Demand and Consumption Electricity Demand and Consumption Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). The sectors included are: agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial (mining, food processing, wood and paper, chemicals, basic metals, other minor sectors); commercial; and residential. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago)

189

Electricity from coal and utilization of coal combustion by-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most electricity in the world is conventionally generated using coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear energy, or hydropower. Due to environmental concerns, there is a growing interest in alternative energy sources for heat and electricity production. The major by-products obtained from coal combustion are fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials. The solid wastes produced in coal-fired power plants create problems for both power-generating industries and environmentalists. The coal fly ash and bottom ash samples may be used as cementitious materials.

Demirbas, A. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Water effects of the use of western coal for electrical production  

SciTech Connect

Water may be a constraint on the expanded development of coal resources in the semi-arid western United States. Water allocation in the West has been determined by the appropriative rights doctrine which allows perpetual use of water sources by those who first claim it for beneficial purposes. This has had the effect of placing a dominative interest in water allocation in one economic sector: agriculture. New water sources are available to coal producers but political and economic problems must be overcome. Water is required by every phase of coal development. Mines use water for dust control and land reclamation. Coal slurry pipelines would use water as a transport medium. Steam electric power plants use water for cooling, cleaning, and in the boiler. Coal gasification plants would use water for cooling, cleaning, and as a material input. In addition to these direct uses of water by coal development, the people who build and operate the development demand water for domestic and recreational purposes. The quantity of water required for a given element of a coal development is site specific and dependent on many factors. The available literature cites a range of estimates of the amount of water required for each type of development. The width of this range seems related to the stage of development of the particular technology. Estimates of water requirements for various schemes to provide an average electrical load of 9 GWe to a load center 1000 miles from western mines are shown in Table 5.

Rogers, E.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal reports Coal reports Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector With Data through 2010 | Release Date: November 16, 2012 | Next Release Date: December 2013 | Correction Previous editions Year: 2011 2004 Go Figure 1. Deliveries from major coal basins to electric power plants by rail, 2010 Background In this latest release of Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) significantly expands upon prior versions of this report with the incorporation of new EIA survey data. Figure 1. Percent of total U.S. rail shipments represented in data figure data Previously, EIA relied solely on data from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (STB), specifically their confidential Carload Waybill Sample. While valuable, due to the statistical nature of the Waybill data,

192

Coal stockpiles at electric power plants were above average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alternative Fuels. Includes ... decline during summer and winter as power plants burn through stocks to meet peak electricity demand for heating and cooling, ...

193

Coal stockpiles at electric power plants were above average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... decline during summer and winter as power plants burn through stocks to meet peak electricity demand for heating and cooling, ... overall heating load in ...

194

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, Electricity Demography Japans population, an important factor in predicting residential energy demand as well

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001...

196

Is Real-Time Pricing Green?: The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Demand Variance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L) of demand. Oil Marginal Cost ($/MWh) Hydroelectricsince oil and gas have high marginal costs, their shares ofcost, fuel sources are gen- erally ordered hydroelectric, nuclear, coal, natural gas, and oil.

Holland, Stephen P.; Mansur, Erin T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Energy Consumption in California: Data Collection and Analysis,"analysis of electricity requirements for irrigated agri- electrical energy

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Forecasting electricity load demand: analysis of the 2001 rationing period  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEPEL e UENF. Abstract. This paper studies the electricity load demand behavior during the 2001 rationing period, which was implemented because of the Brazilian energetic crisis. The hourly data refers to a utility situated in the southeast of the country. We use the model proposed by Soares and Souza (2003), making use of generalized long memory to model the seasonal behavior of the load. The rationing period is shown to have imposed a structural break in the series, decreasing the load at about 20%. Even so, the forecast accuracy is decreased only marginally, and the forecasts rapidly readapt to the new situation. The forecast errors from this model also permit verifying the public response to pieces of information released regarding the crisis.

Leonardo Rocha Souza; Lacir Jorge Soares; Leonardo Rocha Souza; Epge Fundao; Getlio Vargas; Lacir Jorge Soares

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

SciTech Connect

Empirical evidence concerning demand response (DR) resources is needed in order to establish baseline conditions, develop standardized methods to assess DR availability and performance, and to build confidence among policymakers, utilities, system operators, and stakeholders that DR resources do offer a viable, cost-effective alternative to supply-side investments. This paper summarizes the existing contribution of DR resources in U.S. electric power markets. In 2008, customers enrolled in existing wholesale and retail DR programs were capable of providing ~;;38,000 MW of potential peak load reductions in the United States. Participants in organized wholesale market DR programs, though, have historically overestimated their likely performance during declared curtailments events, but appear to be getting better as they and their agents gain experience. In places with less developed organized wholesale market DR programs, utilities are learning how to create more flexible DR resources by adapting legacy load management programs to fit into existing wholesale market constructs. Overall, the development of open and organized wholesale markets coupled with direct policy support by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has facilitated new entry by curtailment service providers, which has likely expanded the demand response industry and led to product and service innovation.

Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Kathan, David

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Electric grid planners: demand response and energy efficiency to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: Form EIA-411, Coordinated Bulk Power Demand and Supply Report Note: All data are reported for time of summer peak, rather than overall demand.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Electricity demand changes in predictable patterns - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... winter months tend to be higher than demand levels during the fall and spring "shoulder" seasons when system demand for space conditioning (heating or cooling) ...

202

Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Large Comm. Interval metering system with monthly dataDynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering and Demand Response inE Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in

Borenstein, Severin; Jaske, Michael; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Rail Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections ‹ See all Coal Reports Rail Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector Release Date: June 16, 2011 | Next Release Date: July 2012 | full report Introduction The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is releasing a series of estimated data based on the confidential, carload waybill sample obtained from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (Carload Waybill Sample). These estimated data represent a continuation of EIA's data and analysis products related to coal rail transportation. These estimated data also address a need expressed by EIA's customers for more detailed coal transportation rate data. Having accurate coal rail transportation rate data is important to understanding the price of electricity for two main reasons. First,

204

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response in Electricity Markets." University ofRates and Tariffs /Schedule for Electricity Service, P.S.C.no. 10- Electricity/Rules 24 (Riders)/Leaf No. 177-327."

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or 180 mile hybrid electric vehicle. Natural gas vehicles (1994) Demand for Electric Vehicles in Hybrid Households: A nof Electric, Hybrid and Other Alternative Vehicles. A r t h

Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

An analysis of the potential for shifting electric power demand within daily load requirement  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the potential for shifting the electric power demand within the daily load requirements for large industrial and commercial customers of the Philadelphia Electric Company. This shifting of electric power demand would tend to flatten the daily load curve of electricity demand, benefitting both the power industry and the consumer. Data on estimated summer load curves of large commercial and industrial customers are analyzed for load flattening potential. Cost savings to the customers are determined. (GRA)

Lamb, P.G.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Table E13.1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " ",," "," ",," " ,,,,"Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "Economic",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States"

209

The Demand Component of Electric Service: Linkages to Service Reliability and Need for Transparency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper distinguishes the demand component of electric service (measured in kilowatts)distinct from the energy component (measured in kilowatthours)and emphasizes the need for power demand cost transparency. Customers' experience with electric service reliability is described in terms of continuity of electric service, availability of service, and restoration time after service interruption. The paper discusses the connection between power demand and electric service reliability, as experienced ...

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

210

A Dynamic Supply-Demand Model for Electricity Prices Manuela Buzoianu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

played a role during the crisis period. 1 Introduction The energy industry provides electrical powerA Dynamic Supply-Demand Model for Electricity Prices Manuela Buzoianu , Anthony E. Brockwell of supply and demand equilibrium. The model includes latent supply and demand curves, which may vary over

211

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

10. U.S. Electric Utility Energy Savings by North American Electric Reliability Council Region and ... design, advanced electric motors and drive systems,

212

A demand responsive bidding mechanism with price elasticity matrix in wholesale electricity pools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past several decades, many demand-side participation features have been applied in the electricity power systems. These features, such as distributed generation, on-site storage and demand response, add uncertainties ...

Wang, Jiankang, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Demand Dispatch Based on Smart Charging of Plug-in Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncontrolled charging of Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) has a negative impact on the peak load and brings potential challenges to electric utility. In this paper, we apply a statistical load model of PEVs charging demand to simulate the driving habits ... Keywords: Plug-in Electric Vehicles, Demand dispatch, Smart charging, Driving habits, Load model

Ting Wu, Gang Wu, Zhejing Bao, Wenjun Yan, Yiyan Zhang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The behavioral response to voluntary provision of an environmental public good: Evidence from residential electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity demand Grant D. Jacobsen a,n , Matthew J. Kotchen b,c , Michael P. Vandenbergh d online 25 February 2012 JEL classification: H41 Q42 G54 Keywords: Green electricity Voluntary environmental protection Carbon offset Renewable energy Moral licensing Residential electricity demand a b s t r

Kotchen, Matthew J.

215

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand (RT- Demand), Real-Time Price (RT-Price) and Day-to reduce load in real-time when a specific price point iscloser to real-time when energy market prices rose above a

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

"Table A16. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" 6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

217

Electricity demand analysis in different sectors: a case study of Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to estimate the main determinants of electricity demand in Iran for various subsectors (residential, industrial, agricultural and public) using (more)

Pourazarm, Elham

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Buildings consume more than one third of the world's total primary...

219

The Outlook for Electricity Supply and Demand to 2035: Key Drivers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov The Outlook for Electricity Supply and Demand to 2035: Key Drivers

220

An Evaluation of Demand Response in New York State's Wholesale Electricity Markets .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis identifies the conditions under which and quantifies how much society gains from integrating demand response directly into wholesale electricity markets and the level (more)

Cappers, Peter Andrew

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Electricity pricing as a demand-side management strategy: Western lessons for developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities in the Western world have increasingly realized that load commitments can be met not only by constructing new generating plants but also by influencing electricity demand. This demand-side management (DSM) process requires that electric utilities promote measures on the customer's side of the meter to directly or indirectly influence electricity consumption to meet desired load objectives. An important demand-side option to achieve these load objectives is innovative electricity pricing, both by itself and as a financial incentive for other demand-site measures. This study explores electricity pricing as a DSM strategy, addressing four questions in the process: What is the Western experience with DSM in general and electricity pricing in particular Do innovative pricing strategies alter the amount and pattern of electricity consumption Do the benefits of these pricing strategies outweigh the costs of implementation What are future directions in electricity pricing Although DSM can be used to promote increases in electricity consumption for electric utilities with excess capacity as well as to slow demand growth for capacity-short utilities, emphasis here is placed on the latter. The discussion should be especially useful for electric utilities in developing countries that are exploring alternatives to capacity expansion to meet current and future electric power demand.

Hill, L.J.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ForskEL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References EU Smart Grid Projects Map1 Overview The project developed technology for demand frequency controlled reserve (DFR) implementation, a system that automatically...

223

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difference between Strike Price & forecast wholesale priceon day-ahead forecast of demand & price Wholesale utilitiesday-of forecast, or actual hourly spot price. A quick

Heffner, Dr. Grayson C.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Consensus forecast of U. S. electricity supply and demand to the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

Recent forecasts of total electricity generating capacity and energy demand as well as for electricity produced from nuclear energy and hydroelectric power are presented in tables and graphs to the year 2000. A forecast of the distribution of type of fuel and energy source that will supply the future electricity demand is presented. Use of electricity by each major consuming sector is presented for 1975. Projected demands for electricity in the years 1985 and 2000, as allocated to consuming sectors, are derived and presented.

Lane, J.A.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The Influence of Residential Solar Water Heating on Electric Utility Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Similar sets of residences in Austin, Texas with electric water heaters and solar water heaters with electric back-up were monitored during 1982 to determine their instantaneous electric demands, the purpose being to determine the influence of residential solar water heating on electric utility demand. The electric demand of solar water hears was found to be approximately 0.39 kW lass than conventional electric water heaters during the late late afternoon, early evening period in the summer months when the Austin utility experiences its peak demand. The annual load factor would be only very slightly reduced if there were a major penetration of solar water heaters in the all electric housing sector. Thus solar water heating represents beneficial load management for utilities experiencing summer peaks.

Vliet, G. C.; Askey, J. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES TO MEET THE WORKFORCE DEMAND IN THE ELECTRIC POWER AND ENERGY PROFESSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES TO MEET THE WORKFORCE DEMAND IN THE ELECTRIC POWER AND ENERGY PROFESSION Wanda Reder, S & C Electric Company, 6601 North Ridge Blvd., Chicago, IL 60626- 3997, USA Vahid, Iowa State University ABSTRACT There is a tremendous imbalance between engineering workforce demand

227

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aspects of Converting Steam Generators Back to Coal Firing,Conditions on Steam-Electric Generator Emissions," McKnight,

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Table A19. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,1.4,1.3,1.9,0.5 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)"

229

Table A26. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Di  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,2.1,1.2,2,0.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

230

Trends in electricity demand and supply in the developing countries, 1980--1990  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of trends concerning electricity demand and supply in the developing countries in the 1980--1990 period, with special focus on 13 major countries for which we have assembled consistent data series. We describe the linkage between electricity demand and economic growth, the changing sectoral composition of electricity consumption, and changes in the mix of energy sources for electricity generation. We also cover trends in the efficiency of utility electricity supply with respect to power plant efficiency and own-use and delivery losses, and consider the trends in carbon dioxide emissions from electricity supply.

Meyers, S.; Campbell, C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Tracking new coal-fired power plants: coal's resurgence in electric power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This information package is intended to provide an overview of 'Coal's resurgence in electric power generation' by examining proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under consideration in the USA. The results contained in this package are derived from information that is available from various tracking organizations and news groups. Although comprehensive, this information is not intended to represent every possible plant under consideration but is intended to illustrate the large potential that exists for new coal-fired power plants. It should be noted that many of the proposed plants are likely not to be built. For example, out of a total portfolio (gas, coal, etc.) of 500 GW of newly planned power plant capacity announced in 2001, 91 GW have been already been scrapped or delayed. 25 refs.

NONE

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The relationship between electricity demand and the business cycle, 1969--1985  

SciTech Connect

This analysis examines the relationship between changes in electricity demand and changes in economic growth and concludes that there is no strong, consistent lead or lag pattern between these two variables. Weak evidence exists that changes in electricity use, in some cases, may have occurred prior to changes in economic activity, although this result was not discovered in all business cycles examined. Other factors including inventory behavior and capacity utilization may have little observable effect in delaying or accelerating electricity use. Based on a lack of compelling evidence, therefore, changes in electricity demand most likely are concurrent with changes in economic activity. Total electricity demand was noticeably affected only during the most recent business cycle. The drop in electricity use during that cycle (September 1981 through December 1985) was attributed largely to a decline in industrial electricity demand, the consequence of a severe drop in output from major electricity-intensive industries. Industrial electricity sales continue to be depressed because these cyclical industries have not yet experienced the recovery seen in other areas of the economy. Whether or not these industries do recover could affect the future electricity/GNP ratio and the nature of changes in electricity demand during business cycles. 11 figs., 10 tabs.

1986-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

233

Economy and Electricity Demand Growth Linked but ƒƒƒ.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economy and Electricity Demand Economy and Electricity Demand Growth Linked but ... for International Utility Conference, Demand Trends Panel March 12, 2013 | London, UK by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U. S. electricity use and economic growth, 1950-2040 Adam Sieminski, EEI Demand Trends, March 12, 2013 2 -2% 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 Percent growth, 3-year rolling average Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release History Projections 2011 Electricity Use GDP 2.4% 0.9% 2011 - 2040 average Annual energy use of a new refrigerator, 1950-2008 Adam Sieminski, EEI Demand Trends, March 12, 2013 3 Kilowatthours per year Source: DOE / EERE - Building Technologies Office 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800

234

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by end use customers from their normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to incentive payments designed to induce lower...

235

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric Energy Supply Thermal-question. Data on PG&E's hydroelectric resources and Pacific27 Table 28 Table 29 Hydroelectric Supply in California Fuel

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Electric generator dispatch depends on system demand and the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum Weekly Petroleum Status Report ... for electricity changes over the course of the ... for a future article? Send your feedback ...

237

A Bayesian Learning Model in the Agent-based Bilateral Negotiation between the Coal Producers and Electric Power Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reform of Chinas coal sector has changed the traditional relationship of the coal producers and electric power generators, and now most of the coal the coal producers sell to the generators is transacted through electric coal bilateral contracts, ... Keywords: Electric price, Agent, Bayesian Learning

Mingwen Zhang; Zhongfu Tan; Jianbao Zhao; Li Li

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Lignite Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury control technologies for Mercury control technologies for electric utilities Burning lignite coal Background In partnership with a number of key stakeholders, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE), through its National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has been carrying out a comprehensive research program since the mid-1990s focused on the development of advanced, cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for coal-fired power plants. Mercury is a poisonous metal found in coal, which can be harmful and even toxic when absorbed from the environment and concentrated in animal tissues. Mercury is present as an unwanted by-product of combustion in power plant flue gases, and is found in varying percentages in three basic chemical forms(known as speciation): particulate-bound mercury, oxidized

239

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Electricity Distribution Networks: Investment and Regulation, and Uncertain Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. At the same time, the utilities investment decisions are dependent on the regulatory framework within which they operate. Following the liberalisation of the electricity sectors around the world, the introduction of incentive regulation regimes based...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Marantes, Cristiano

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

AN ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ZAMBIAN INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY DEMAND.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis is twofold: to examine the electricity use in Zambias mining industry by focusing on own-price, cross price and index of (more)

Chama, Yoram Chama

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be implemented in 2010, 2020 and 2030. In this scenario, allEER by 2020, and 6 EER by 2030 [14]. We use the UEC providedspace to be conditioned). By 2030, we assume that electric

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

THE RESIDENTIAL DEMAND FOR ELECTRICITY BY TIME-OF-DAY .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of time-of-day (TOD) pricing as a load management tool for electric utilities has recently gained wide interest. Although utilities have successfully used TOD (more)

Ott, Deborah Ann

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption of 12kWh assuming 2.5 kg per load and 250 cycles per yearelectricity consumption annual growth rates for the three scenarios for every decade, since standards levels are applied every 10 years.

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings for the 516 large electric utilities increased to 53.7 billion kilowatthours (kWh), 3.1 billion kWh more than in 1999. These energy savings

246

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Managment 1996  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings as a Percentage of Retail Sales by U.S. Electric Utilities with DSM Energy Savings Programs and Sales to Ultimate Consumers by Class of Ownership, 1996

247

Heat wave contributes to higher summer electricity demand in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

more than a decade, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration EIA's new forecast shows household electricity use is expected to drop 1.1 percent this year and then...

248

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

249

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

250

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Berkeley, CA94720, USA Summary Demand response (DR) is anVirginia, USA in 1961, female Research Director, PIER DemandUSA Solutions for summer electric power shortages: Demand

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present methods for analyzing commercial and industrial facility 15-minute-interval electric load data. These methods allow building managers to better understand their facility's electricity consumption over time and to compare it to other buildings, helping them to ask the right questions to discover opportunities for demand response, energy efficiency, electricity waste elimination, and peak load management. We primarily focus on demand response. Methods discussed include graphical representations of electric load data, a regression-based electricity load model that uses a time-of-week indicator variable and a piecewise linear and continuous outdoor air temperature dependence, and the definition of various parameters that characterize facility electricity loads and demand response behavior. In the future, these methods could be translated into easy-to-use tools for building managers.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Price, Phillip N.; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

252

Own-price and income elasticities for household electricity demand : a survey of literature using meta-regression analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Maria Wist Langmoen Own-price and income elasticities for household electricity demand -A Literature survey using meta-regression analysis Economists have been modelling the electricity demand for (more)

Langmoen, Maria Wist

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Figure 75. U.S. electricity demand growth, 1950-2040 (percent, 3 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 75. U.S. electricity demand growth, 1950-2040 (percent, 3-year moving average) Year 3-year moving average Trendline 1950.00

254

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power measurement system in LBNL Building 90 Speaker(s): Alex McEachern Date: January 14, 2010 - 12:00pm...

255

Energy packet networks: smart electricity storage to meet surges in demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When renewable energy is used either as a primary source, or as a back-up source to meet excess demand, energy storage becomes very useful. Simple examples of energy storage units include electric car batteries and uninterruptible power supplies. More ... Keywords: energy packet networks, network control of energy flow, on-demand energy dispatching, smart grid, store and forward energy, storing renewable energy

Erol Gelenbe

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Smart Metering and Electricity Demand: Technology, Economics and International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for overall levels of advanced metering in both the electricity and gas sectors (FERC, 2006). Comparing countries and regions is a difficult task, however, because there is no single definition of what it means for a meter or a metering system...

Brophy Haney, A; Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.

257

TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relative to increases in its consumption at a higher rate than all but two states (in part because California is the lowest user of electricity per capita and per dollar of gross state product in the west). Annual WSCC consumption increased 64% from 1977 to 1998, but California's consumption grew by only 44

California at Berkeley. University of

258

International Coal Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria 45.70 52.67 64.47 81.28 87.52 92.75 96.24 122.10 120.10 Belgium 37.72 34.48 35.94 72.46 80.35 63.24 75.54 130.54 NA Canada 18.52 19.17 21.03 20.32 24.50 26.29 NA NA NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 31.29 31.43 31.18 47.75 57.70 54.68 70.17 118.49 NA Czech Republic3 8.05 8.52 C C C C C C C Denmark NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Finland 46.66 44.02 48.28 67.00 72.06 74.27 83.72 142.90 NA France 45.28 42.89 42.45 63.55 74.90 72.90 83.90 136.10 NA Germany 51.86 45.70 50.02 70.00 79.74 77.95 90.26 152.60 NA

259

Price Elasticity of Demand for Electricity: A Primer and Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of recent real-time pricing (RTP) and critical peak pricing (CPP) pilots demonstrate resoundingly that consumers can and will adjust electricity usage in response to price changes. Nonetheless, dynamic pricing plans are still novelties, in part because policy makers and pricing plan designers are equally skeptical of the impact of large-scale implementation. There is no consensus on the degree to which consumers will respond to price changes and as a result no concurrence on which pricing pla...

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

260

Managing Water Resource Requirements for Growing Electric Generation Demands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a general guide to analytical techniques used to address water resource management as related to long-term sustainability planning, and short-term regulatory requirements, including total maximum daily loads, endangered species, and relicensing of hydropower facilities. The example applications presented in the report highlight the capability of the techniques, and help electric power company and government regulatory staffs identify the best approach for a specific need.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Residential electricity demand: a suggested appliance stock equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author develops a simple appliance stock equation for estimating seasonal patterns of power demand elasticity. The equation relates an index of appliances (estimates of typical use) to marginal price per kWh, to income, to average price of alternative fuels, to climate (cooling degree days and heating degree days), to age of the household head, to family size, and to race. Price elasticity is -0.785 for the winter and 0.493 for the summer, with all estimates significant to 0.001. The appliance stock coefficient is 0.801 for the winter and 0.971 for the summer. The equation may be useful in studies that do not require elaborate disaggregation of appliance stock. 7 references, 2 tables.

Garbacz, C.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

National micro-data based model of residential electricity demand: new evidence on seasonal variation  

SciTech Connect

Building on earlier estimates of electricity demand, the author estimates elasticities by month to determine differences between heating and cooling seasons. He develops a three equation model of residential electricity demand that includes all the main components of economic theory. The model generates seasonal elasticity estimates that generally support economic theory. Based on the model using a national current household data set (monthly division), the evidence indicates there is a seasonal pattern for price elasticity of demand. While less pronounced, there also appears to be seasonal patterns for cross-price elasticity of alternative fuels, for the elasticity of appliance stock index, and for an intensity of use variable.

Garbacz, C.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of Coal to Electric Power--A Dollar and CentsR. C. Carr, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto,Clean Fuels Today," Electric Power Research Institute,

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Manipulation of Electrical Conductivity in Bituminous Coal by CNT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the conductivity of Bituminous coal samples found from Khalaspir coal mine is studied. This coal mine is located in the northern part of Bangladesh.

265

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response andits Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

SciTech Connect

Demand response (DR) is an effective tool which resolves inconsistencies between electric power supply and demand. It further provides a reliable and credible resource that ensures stable and economical operation of the power grid. This paper introduces systematic definitions for DR and demand side management, along with operational differences between these two methods. A classification is provided for DR programs, and various DR strategies are provided for application in air conditioning and refrigerating systems. The reliability of DR is demonstrated through discussion of successful overseas examples. Finally, suggestions as to the implementation of demand response in China are provided.

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

A statistical analysis of structural differences in minority household electricity demand  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the structures for electricity demand in non-Latino Black and White households are compared. Electricity demand will be analyzed within the context of a complete demand system, and statistical tests for structural differences will be systematically conducted in the hope of pinpointing the location of differences within the context of this model. Structural differences in demand are defined as statistically significant differences in a parameter or group of parameters that identify the quantitative relationship between explanatory variables and electricity consumption. Along with population taste differences, which might emanate from historical and cultural population differences, structural differences might also occur because of differences in housing and geographic patterns and as a result of differences in access to markets and information. As a consequence, energy consumption decisions will differ, and the level and composition of energy consumption are likely to vary. In practice, it is nearly impossible to untangle the causes contributing to structural differences, but it is reasonably easy to test for statistical differences. The superficial evidence indicates there is a strong likelihood that structural differences do exist in electricity demand between White and Black households. The null hypothesis, which states that there exist no differences in the structures for electricity demand for Black and White households, is tested.

Poyer, D.A.; Earl, E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

DSM strikes again. [Demand-side management of gas and electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses and explains demand-side management (DSM) of the gas and electric utility companies. It contrasts the advantages that electric utilities offering economic incentives (with any cost passed on to rate payers) to increase demand while such offerings are rarely available from the gas utilities. It then discusses the cause and cost of pollution from conventional electrical facilities compared to gas-operated equipment and facilities. The paper goes on to discuss fuel switching and other incentives to get individuals and facilities to switch to natural gas.

Katz, M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Energy Landscapes: Coal Canals, Oil Pipelines, Electricity Transmission Wires in the Mid-Atlantic, 1820-1930.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal canals, oil pipelines, and electricity transmission wires transformed the built environment of the American mid-Atlantic region between 1820 and 1930. By transporting coal, oil, (more)

Jones, Christopher F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

demand for renewable fuels increasing the fastestincluding E85 and biodiesel fuels for light-duty vehicles, biomass for co-firing at coal-fired electric power plants, and...

271

Co-Production of Pure Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal Syngas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Co-Production of Pure Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal Syngas via the Steam-Iron Process Using Promoted Iron-Based Catalysts Sub-

272

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NO x (63). ~ Control and Power Plant Thermal Efficiency.ELECTRIC COAL- FIRED POWER PLANT thermal efficiency (heatthe overall thermal efficiency of the power plant. Fuel-Gas

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

U.S. coal stockpile levels at electric power plants approach five ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total coal stockpile levels at U.S. electric power plants were 139 million tons in August 2011the lowest total level for August since 2006.

274

Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, the demand for renewable electricity has accelerated as a consequence of state and federal policies and the growth of voluntary green power purchase markets, along with the generally improving economics of renewable energy development. This paper reports on a preliminary examination of the supply and demand balance for renewable electricity in the United States, with a focus on renewable energy projects that meet the generally accepted definition of "new" for voluntary market purposes, i.e., projects installed on or after January 1, 1997. After estimating current supply and demand, this paper presents projections of the supply and demand balance out to 2010 and describe a number of key market uncertainties.

Swezey, B.; Aabakken, J.; Bird, L.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Estimating the Customer-Level Demand for Electricity Under Real-Time Market Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the customer-level demand for electricity by industrial and commercial customers purchasing electricity according to the half-hourly energy prices from the England and Wales (E&W) electricity market. These customers also face the possibility of a demand charge on its electricity consumption during the three half-hour periods that are coincident with E&W system peaks. Although energy charges are largely known by 4 PM the day prior to consumption, a fraction of the energy charge and the identity of the half-hour periods when demand charges occur are only known with certainty ex post of consumption. Four years of data from a Regional Electricity Company (REC) in the United Kingdom is used to quantify the half-hourly customer-level demands under this real-time pricing program. The econometric model developed and estimated here quantifies the extent of intertemporal substitution in electricity consumption across pricing periods within the day due to changes ...

Robert H. Patrick; Frank A. Wolak

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Assessment of factors affecting industrial electricity demand. Final report (revision version)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Chapter 2, we identify those factors affecting the industrial product mix - taste, relative output prices, and relative input prices - and isolate several determinants which have not been adequately accounted for to date in industrial electricity demand forecasts. We discuss how the lower energy prices of foreign producers affect domestic producers and how the growth in the number of substitutes for intermediate products such as steel and aluminum with plastics and composites affects the composition of production and, hence, the demand for electricity. We also investigate how the changing age structure of the population brought on by the baby boom could change the mix of outputs produced by the industrial sector. In Chapter 3, we review the history of the 1970s with regard to changes in output mix and the manufacturing demand for electricity, and with regard to changes in the use of electricity vis-a-vis the other inputs in the production process. In Chapter 4, we generate forecasts using two models which control for efficiency changes, but in different ways. In this chapter we present the sensitivity of these projections using three sets of assumptions about product mix. The last chapter summarizes our results and draw from those results implications regarding public policy and industrial electricity demand. Two appendices present ISTUM2 results from selected electricity intensive industries, describes the ISTUM and ORIM models.

None

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Influence of Air Conditioner Operation on Electricity Use and Peak Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity demand due to occupant controlled room air conditioners in a large mater-metered apartment building is analyzed. Hourly data on the electric demand of the building and of individual air conditioners are used in analyses of annual and time-of-day peaks. Effects of occupant schedules and behavior are examined. We conclude that room air conditioners cause a sharp annual peak demand because occupants have strongly varying thresholds with respect to toleration of high indoor temperatures. However, time-or-day peaking is smoothed by air conditioning in this building due to significant off-peak operation of air conditioners by some occupants. If occupants were billed directly for electricity, off-peak use would probably diminish making the peaks more pronounced and exacerbating the utility company's load management problems. Future studies of this type in individually metered apartment buildings are recommended.

McGarity, A. E.; Feuermann, D.; Kempton, W.; Norford, L. K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Long range forecast of power demands on the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company system. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the results of an econometric forecast of peak and electric power demands for the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BGandE) through the year 2003. The report describes the methodology, the results of the econometric estimations and associated summary statistics, the forecast assumptions, and the calculated forecasts of energy usage and peak demand. Separate models were estimated for summer and winter residential electricity usage in both Baltimore city and the non-city portion of the BGandE service area. Equations were also estimated for commercial energy usage, industrial usage, streetlighting, and for losses plus Company use. Non-econometric techniques were used to estimate future energy use by Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Sparrows Point plant in Baltimore County, Conrail, and the Baltimore Mass Transit Administration underground rail system. Models of peak demand for summer and winter were also estimated.

Estomin, S.L.; Kahal, M.I.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Planning India's long-term energy shipment infrastructures for electricity and coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Purdue Long-Term Electricity Trading and Capacity Expansion Planning Model simultaneously optimizes both the expansion of transmission and generation capacity. Most commercial electricity system planning software is limited to only transmission planning. An application of the model to India's national power grid, for 2008-2028, indicates substantial transmission expansion is the cost-effective means of meeting the needs of the nation's growing economy. An electricity demand growth rate of 4% over the 20-year planning horizon requires more than a 50% increase in the Government's forecasted transmission capacity expansion, and 8% demand growth requires more than a six-fold increase in the planned transmission capacity expansion. The model minimizes the long-term expansion costs (operational and capital) for the nation's five existing regional power grids and suggests the need for large increases in load-carrying capability between them. Changes in coal policy affect both the location of new thermal power plants and the optimal pattern inter-regional transmission expansions. 15 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

Brian H. Bowen; Devendra Canchi; Vishal Agarwal Lalit; Paul V. Precke; F.T. Sparrow; Marty W. Irwin [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). Energy Center at Discovery Park

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Efficiency and Environmental Impacts of Electricity Restructuring on Coal-fired Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and states in the Northeast was high electricity prices, reflecting high historical average costs from efficiency, cost of coal purchases, and utilization among coal-fired power plants using a panel data set from recent years allows us to examine longer term impacts of restructuring; (2) the focus on coal-fired power

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Coal Energy Conversion with Aquifer-Based Carbon Sequestration: An Approach to Electric Power Generation with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal Energy Conversion with Aquifer-Based Carbon Sequestration: An Approach to Electric Power an impermeable seal to prevent it from escaping the aquifer. The proposed alternative technology processes coal carbon and non-mineral coal combustion products in the process. This stream is denser than the aquifer

Nur, Amos

282

The Impact of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 on Electric Utilities and Coal Mines: Evidence from the Stock Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a. ELECTRICITY Frequency b. COAL MINING Frequency Table 1:1 Companies not integrated into coal industry Single CAR1 Companies integrated into coal industry Separate CARs for

Kahn, Shulamit; Knittel, Christopher R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Demand-side management programs change along with the electric utility industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

They heyday of demand-side management may be over as far as utilities are concerned. The future path of utility demand-side management programs is obscured in a haze of important questions, especially questions regarding potential legislation and retail wheeling. Until recently, utility after utility was announcing new DSM programs, seemingly almost daily. But, as pointed out in our November issue by Robert Smock, Electric Light & Power`s editorial director, {open_quotes}Survivors of ruthless competition will not be doing much to reduce electricity sales. They`ll be doing their best to sell more of their product.

Stein, H. [ed.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Coal investment and long-term supply and demand outlook for coal in the Asia-Pacific Region  

SciTech Connect

The theme of this symposium to look ahead almost a quarter century to 2020 gives one the freedom to speculate more than usual in projections for coal. It is important to attempt to take a long term look into the future of coal and energy, so that one can begin to prepare for major changes on the horizon. However, it would be a mistake to believe that the crystal ball for making long term projections is accurate for 2020. Hopefully it can suggest plausible changes that have long term strategic importance to Asia`s coal sector. This paper presents the medium scenario of long term projects of coal production, consumption, imports and exports in Asia. The second part of the paper examines the two major changes in Asia that could be most important to the long term role of coal. These include: (1) the impact of strict environmental legislation on energy and technology choices in Asia, and (2) the increased role of the private sector in all aspects of coal in Asia.

Johnson, C.J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Role of coal in the world and Asia  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the changing role of coal in the world and in Asia. Particular attention is given to the rapidly growing demand for coal in electricity generation, the importance of China as a producer and consumer of coal, and the growing environmental challenge to coal. Attention is given to the increasing importance of low sulfur coal and Clean Coal Technologies in reducing the environmental impacts of coal burning.

Johnson, C.J.; Li, B.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This 'electricity value chain' defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to 'demo' potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives. In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Piette, Mary Ann; Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This 'electricity value chain' defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to 'demo' potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives. In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Piette, Mary Ann; Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This ?electricity value chain? defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to"demo" potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives.1 In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; Piette, MaryAnn

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Program on Technology Innovation: Tracking the Demand for Electricity from Grid Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help address the many challenges facing the electric power industry in the next 20years, an effective process of technology research and development (R&D) planning is needed. Based on input from a broad range of stakeholders and using a proven scenario planning process, this report represents an attempt to monitor one of three key drivers, namely, the demand for electricity from grid services, which may impact the industry in the future. Collectively, these drivers form the basis of a ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

"Table A25. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

291

Solar Two is a concentrating solar power plant that can supply electric power "on demand"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Two is a concentrating solar power plant that can supply electric power "on demand time ever, a utility-scale solar power plant can supply elec- tricity when the utility needs it most achievement. The design is based on lessons learned at Solar One, this country's first power tower. Solar One

Laughlin, Robert B.

292

Structural changes between models of fossil-fuel demand by steam-electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

A consumption function for multi-fuel steam-electric power plants is used to investigate fossil-fuel demand behavior. The input consumption equations for a plant's primary and alternate fossil fuels are derived by Shepard's lemma from a generalized Cobb-Douglas cost function reflecting average variable cost minimization constrained by technology and the demand for electricity. These equations are estimated by primary and alternate fuel subsets with ordinary least squares and seemingly unrelated regression techniques for 1974, 1977, and 1980. The results of the regression analysis show the importance of consumer demand in the fossil fuel consumption decision; it has the only significant parameter in all of the estimated equations. The estimated own- and cross-price elasticities are small, when they are statistically significant. The results for the primary fuel equations are better than those for the alternate fuel equations in all of the fuel pair subsets.

Gerring, L.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

"1. Labadie","Coal","Union Electric Co",2407 "2. Iatan","Coal","Kansas City Power & Light Co",1555  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "1. Labadie","Coal","Union Electric Co",2407 "2. Iatan","Coal","Kansas City Power & Light Co",1555 "3. Rush Island","Coal","Union Electric Co",1204 "4. Callaway","Nuclear","Union Electric Co",1190 "5. New Madrid","Coal","Associated Electric Coop, Inc",1160 "6. Thomas Hill","Coal","Associated Electric Coop, Inc",1125 "7. Sioux","Coal","Union Electric Co",986 "8. Hawthorn","Coal","Kansas City Power & Light Co",979 "9. Meramec","Coal","Union Electric Co",951 "10. Aries Power Project","Gas","Dogwood Energy LLC",614

294

Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the Implementation of IECC Code in Texas: Analysis for Single-Family Residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the statewide electricity and electric demand savings achieved from the adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for single-family residences in Texas and includes the corresponding increase in construction costs over the eight-year period from 2002 through 2009. Using the Energy Systems Laboratory's International Code Compliance Calculator (IC3) simulation tool, the annual statewide electricity savings in 2009 are estimated to be $161 million. The statewide peak electric demand reductions in 2009 are estimated to be 694 MW for the summer and 766 MW for the winter periods. Since 2002, the cumulative statewide electricity and electric demand savings over the eight year period from 2002 to 2009 are $1,803 million ($776 million from electricity savings and $1,027 million from electric demand savings) while the total increased costs are estimated to be $670 million.

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Statewide Emissions Reduction, Electricity and Demand Savings from the Implementation of Building-Energy-Codes in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the estimate of electricity reduction and electric demand savings from the adoption energy codes for single-family residences in Texas, 2002-2009, corresponding increase in cnstruction costs and estimates of the statewide emissions reduction.

Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J.; Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Zilbershtein, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Design for implementation : fully integrated charging & docking infrastructure used in Mobility-on-Demand electric vehicle fleets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the technology used in electric vehicles continues to advance, there is an increased demand for urban-appropriate electric charging stations emphasizing a modern user interface, robust design, and reliable functionality. ...

Martin, Jean Mario Nations

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Impact of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs on the U.S. Electricity Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the impact of the energy efficiency (EE) and demand response (DR) programs on the grid and the consequent level of production. Changes in demand caused by EE and DR programs affect not only the dispatch of existing plants and new generation technologies, the retirements of old plants, and the finances of the market. To find the new equilibrium in the market, we use the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch Model (ORCED) developed to simulate the operations and costs of regional power markets depending on various factors including fuel prices, initial mix of generation capacity, and customer response to electricity prices. In ORCED, over 19,000 plant units in the nation are aggregated into up to 200 plant groups per region. Then, ORCED dispatches the power plant groups in each region to meet the electricity demands for a given year up to 2035. In our analysis, we show various demand, supply, and dispatch patterns affected by EE and DR programs across regions.

Baek, Young Sun [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Demand-side carbon reduction strategies in an era of electric industry competition  

SciTech Connect

With the national debate on the need for intensified research and development, supply-side mandates, and carbon taxes likely to continue for some time, the authors propose a five-point, integrated demand-side plan that is compatible with marketplace forces and can be implemented now. This paper presents a five-point, integrated demand-side plan designed to be compatible with marketplace forces in the competitive electricity era, while the nation continues to debate the need for intensified research and development, supply-side mandates, and carbon taxes.

Meyers, E.M.; Hu, G.M. [District of Columbia Public Service Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Electrical Energy Conservation and Peak Demand Reduction Potential for Buildings in Texas: Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a study of electrical energy conservation and peak demand reduction potential for the building sector in Texas. Starting from 1980 building stocks and energy use characteristics, technical conservation potentials were calculated relative to frozen energy efficiency stock growth over the 1980-2000 period. The application of conservation supply methodology to Texas utilities is outlined, and then the energy use and peak demand savings, and their associated costs, are calculated using a prototypical building technique. Representative results are presented, for residential and commercial building types, as conservation supply curves for several end use categories; complete results of the study are presented in Ref. 1.

Hunn, B. D.; Baughman, M. L.; Silver, S. C.; Rosenfeld, A. H.; Akbari, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Economic Modeling of Mid-Term Gas Demand and Electric Generation Capacity Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. power sector natural gas use over the next 10 to 20 years is a topic of significant uncertainty and debate. The industry expects the power sector to be the principal source of growth in national gas demand in the short run; and the manner in which it drives demand and affects the market over the "mid term," to 2020-2030, is an important consideration for planners in both the electric and gas industries. With abundant, relatively low-priced supplies, gas-fired generation can be a strong competito...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy utilization and environmental control technologies in the coal-electric cycle  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an overview and assessment of the currently commercial and possible future technologies in the United States that are a part of the coal-electric cycle. From coal production to residual emissions control at the power plant stack, this report includes a brief history, current status and future assessment of each technology. It also includes a discussion, helpful for policy making decisions, of the process operation, environmental emission characteristics, market constraints and detailed cost estimates for each of these technologies, with primary emphasis on coal preparation, coal-electric generation and emissions control systems.

Ferrell, G.C.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Duct Leakage Impacts on Airtightness, Infiltration, and Peak Electrical Demand in Florida Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for duct leakage was done in 155 homes. Tracer gas tests found that infiltration rates were three times greater when the air handler was operating than when it was off. Infiltration averaged 0.85 air changes per hour (ach) with the air handler (AH) operating continuously and 0.29 ach with the AH off. Return leaks were found to average 10.3% of AH total flow. House airtightness, in 90 of these homes, determined by blower door testing, averaged 12.58 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals (ACHSO). When the duct registers were sealed, ACHSO decreased to 11.04, indicating that 12.2% of the house leaks were in the duct system. Duct leaks have a dramatic impact upon peak electrical demand. Based on theoretical analysis, a fifteen percent return leak from the attic can increase cooling electrical demand by 100%. Duct repairs in a typical. electrically heated Florida home reduce winter peak demand by about 1.6 kW per house at about one-sixth the cost of building new electrical generation capacity.

Cummings, J. B.; Tooley, J. J.; Moyer, N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Specification, estimation, and forecasts of industrial demand and price of electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the specification of electricity-demand and price equations for manufacturing industries and presents empirical results based on the data for 16 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) three-digit industries from 1959 to 1976. Performances of estimated equations are evaluated by sample-period simulation tests. The estimated coefficients are then used to forecast electricity demand by industry. Results show that most of the estimated coefficients have expected signs and are statistically significant. The estimated equations perform well in terms of sample-period simulation tests, registering small mean absolute percentage errors and mean square percentage errors for most of the industries studied. Forecasted results indicate that total electricity demand by manufacturing industries would grow at an average annual rate of 3.53% according to the baseline forecast, 2.39% in the high-price scenario, and 4.76% in the low-price scenario. The forecasted growth rates vary substantially among industries. The results also indicate that the price of electricity would continue to grow at a faster rate than the general price level in the forecasted period 1977 to 1990. 19 references, 6 tables.

Chang, H.S. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville); Chern, W.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

"1. Coal Creek","Coal","Great River Energy",1133 "2. Antelope Valley","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",900  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "1. Coal Creek","Coal","Great River Energy",1133 "2. Antelope Valley","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",900 "3. Milton R Young","Coal","Minnkota Power Coop, Inc",697 "4. Leland Olds","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",670 "5. Garrison","Hydroelectric","USCE-Missouri River District",508 "6. Coyote","Coal","Otter Tail Power Co",427 "7. Stanton","Coal","Great River Energy",202 "8. Tatanka Wind Power LLC","Other Renewables","Acciona Wind Energy USA LLC",180 "9. Langdon Wind LLC","Other Renewables","FPL Energy Langdon Wind LLC",159

305

A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Preliminary Examination A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. WF6N.1015 Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

306

Integrating Coal Gasification into a Rotary Kiln Electric Furnace Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal gasification is a potential alternative to conventional coal or natural gas- fired power plants ... Fundamentals of Spark-Plasma Sintering: Net-Shaping and Size Effects ... Investigation on a Microwave High-Temperature Air Heat Exchanger.

307

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kerosene Coal INDUSTRY electricity Coal oil gas COMMERCIALkerosene Coal INDUSTRY electricity Coal oil gas COMMERCIALin the industry sector and primary electricity represents

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Demonstration Development Project: Assessment of Pressurized Oxy-Coal Technology for Steam-Electric Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of pressurized oxy-combustion technology to support steamelectric power production has been proposed by several organizations as a potential low-cost way to enable a dramatic reduction in CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The pressurized oxy-coal technology realizes most of the benefits of atmospheric pressure oxy-coal technology and offers the prospect of additional efficiency and cost benefits. The technology is, however, in the early stages of development.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Impact of Residential Air Conditioner Charging and Sizing on Peak Electrical Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric utilities have had a number of air conditioner rebate and maintenance programs for many years. The purpose of these programs was to improve the efficiency of the stock of air conditioning equipment and provide better demand-side management. This paper examines the effect of refrigerant charging (proper servicing of the equipment), system sizing, and efficiency on the steady-state, coincident peak utility demand of a residential central air conditioning system. The study is based on the results of laboratory tests of a three-ton, capillary tube expansion, split-system air conditioner, system capacity and efficiency data available from manufacturer's literature, and assumptions about relative sizing of the equipment to cooling load on a residence. A qualitative discussion is provided concerning the possible impacts of transient operation and total energy use on utility program decisions. The analysis indicates that proper sizing of the unit is the largest factor affecting energy demand of the three factors (sizing, charging, and efficiency) studied in this paper. For typical oversizing of units to cooling loads in houses, both overcharging and undercharging showed significant negative impact on peak demand. The impacts of SEER changes in utility peak demand were found to be virtually independent of oversizing. For properly sized units, there was a small peak benefit to higher efficiency air conditioners.

Neal, L.; O'Neal, D. L.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year ActualWeather Data Title A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year ActualWeather Data Publication Type Journal Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Buildings consume more than one third of the world's total primary energy. Weather plays a unique and significant role as it directly affects the thermal loads and thus energy performance of buildings. The traditional simulated energy performance using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data represents the building performance for a typical year, but not necessarily the average or typical long-term performance as buildings with different energy systems and designs respond differently to weather changes. Furthermore, the single-year TMY simulations do not provide a range of results that capture yearly variations due to changing weather, which is important for building energy management, and for performing risk assessments of energy efficiency investments. This paper employs large-scale building simulation (a total of 3162 runs) to study the weather impact on peak electricity demand and energy use with the 30-year (1980 to 2009) Actual Meteorological Year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels, across all 17 ASHRAE climate zones. The simulated results using the AMY data are compared to those from the TMY3 data to determine and analyze the differences. Besides further demonstration, as done by other studies, that actual weather has a significant impact on both the peak electricity demand and energy use of buildings, the main findings from the current study include: 1) annual weather variation has a greater impact on the peak electricity demand than it does on energy use in buildings; 2) the simulated energy use using the TMY3 weather data is not necessarily representative of the average energy use over a long period, and the TMY3 results can be significantly higher or lower than those from the AMY data; 3) the weather impact is greater for buildings in colder climates than warmer climates; 4) the weather impact on the medium-sized office building was the greatest, followed by the large office and then the small office; and 5) simulated energy savings and peak demand reduction by energy conservation measures using the TMY3 weather data can be significantly underestimated or overestimated. It is crucial to run multi-decade simulations with AMY weather data to fully assess the impact of weather on the long-term performance of buildings, and to evaluate the energy savings potential of energy conservation measures for new and existing buildings from a life cycle perspective.

311

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity Via Catalytic Coal Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Co-ProduCtion of SubStitute natural GaS / eleCtriCity via CatalytiC Coal GaSifiCation Description The United States has vast reserves of low-cost coal, estimated to be sufficient for the next 250 years. Gasification-based technology, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), is the only environmentally friendly technology that provides the flexibility to co-produce hydrogen, substitute natural gas (SNG), premium hydrocarbon liquids including transportation fuels, and electric power in desired combinations from coal and other carbonaceous feedstocks. Rising costs and limited domestic supply of crude oil and natural gas provide a strong incentive for the development of coal gasification-based co-production processes. This project addresses the co-production of SNG and electricity from coal via gasification

313

Energy and environmental advantages of cogeneration with nuclear and coal electrical utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of electrical-utility cogeneration from nuclear energy and coal is examined for improving regional energy-resource utilization efficiency and environmental performance. A case study is presented for a large and diverse hypothetical region which ... Keywords: coal, cogeneration, combined heat and power, efficiency, emissions, nuclear energy

Marc A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Coal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Coal Project Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Coal Project January 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative clean coal technology project in Texas will supply electricity to the largest municipally owned utility in the United States under a recently signed Power Purchase Agreement, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today. Under the agreement - the first U.S. purchase by a utility of low-carbon power from a commercial-scale, coal-based power plant with carbon capture - CPS Energy of San Antonio will purchase approximately 200 megawatts (MW) of power from the Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP), located just west of Midland-Odessa.

315

Market-Based Valuation of Coal Generation and Coal R&D in the U.S. Electric Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The payoff from accelerated research and development (R&D) in coal generation technology could be enormous, over $300-$1,300 billion. The prime beneficiary is the power-consuming public. This conclusion is supported by a comprehensive quantitative analysis of the U.S. electric sector. Cosponsored by LCG Consulting, this study provides a large-scale financial, technical, and operational analysis of the electric sector, applying techniques of modern business analysis at an unprecedented scale.

2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

316

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

317

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated April 28, 2004) Spot coal prices in the East rose steadily since Labor Day 2003, with rapid escalations ...

318

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 26) The average spot prices for reported coal purchases rose once again ...

319

Tight Labor Markets and the Demand for Education: Evidence from the Coal Boom and Bust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human capital theory predicts that individuals acquire less schooling when the returns to schooling are small. To test this theory, we study the effect of the coal boom in Appalachia on high school enrollments. During the 1970s, a boom in the coal industry increased the earnings of high school dropouts relative to graduates. During the 1980s, the boom subsided and the earnings of high school dropouts declined relative to graduates. We find that high school enrollment rates in Kentucky and Pennsylvania declined considerably in the 1970s and increased A simple model of human capital predicts that increases in the wages of workers with low education relative to workers with high education will reduce investments in schooling because the returns to additional years of schooling are diminished. In this paper, we exploit a particularly unique opportunity to study the effect of a decrease in the wage gap between high

Dan A. Black; Terra G. Mckinnish; Seth G. Sanders

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Electricity generation from coal and natural gas both increased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Historically, the average fuel cost of operating a combined-cycle natural gas generator exceeded that for a coal-fired generator. Until 2010, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electricity generation from coal and natural gas both increased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal generation shares declined in some regions ... the share of natural gas-fired power generation is most influenced by the availability of hydroelectric power, ...

322

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xxxv Option Value of Electricity Demand Response, Osmanelasticity in aggregate electricity demand. With these newii) reduction in electricity demand during peak periods (

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Should we transport coal, gas, or electricity: cost, efficiency, and environmental implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the life cycle costs, environmental discharges, and deaths of moving coal via rail, coal to synthetic natural gas via pipeline, and electricity via wire from the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming to Texas. Which method has least social cost depends on how much additional investment in rail line, transmission, or pipeline infrastructure is required, as well as how much and how far energy is transported. If the existing rail lines have unused capacity, coal by rail is the cheapest method (up to 200 miles of additional track could be added). If no infrastructure exists, greater distances and larger amounts of energy favor coal by rail and gasified coal by pipeline over electricity transmission. For 1,000 miles and 9 gigawatts of power, a gas pipeline is cheapest, has less environmental discharges, uses less land, and is least obtrusive. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Joule A. Bergerson; Lester B. Lave [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (US)

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory. Berkeley. Demand Response Research Center,and Automated Demand Response in Wastewater TreatmentLaboratory. Berkeley. Demand Response Research Center,

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.Berkeley National Laboratory. Demand Response ResearchCenter, Demand Response Research Center PIER Team Briefing,

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

LBNL-6280E A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

280E 280E A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30- Year Actual Weather Data Tianzhen Hong 1 , Wen-kuei Chang 2 , Hung-Wen Lin 2 1 Environmental Energy Technologies Division 2 Green Energy and Environment Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Taiwan, ROC May 2013 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center for Building Energy Efficiency, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-

328

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated August 12) According to Platts Coal Outlooks Weekly Price Survey (August 11), the ...

329

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 2) The average spot prices for coal traded last week were relatively ...

330

Integrating demand into the U.S. electric power system : technical, economic, and regulatory frameworks for responsive load  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric power system in the US developed with the assumption of exogenous, inelastic demand. The resulting evolution of the power system reinforced this assumption as nearly all controls, monitors, and feedbacks were ...

Black, Jason W. (Jason Wayne)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Electricity demand-side management for an energy efficient future in China : technology options and policy priorities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this research is to identify robust technology and policy options which achieve substantial reductions in electricity demand in China's Shandong Province. This research utilizes a scenario-based ...

Cheng, Chia-Chin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Intelligent energy management: impact of demand response and plug-in electric vehicles in a smart grid environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modernization of the power grid to meet the growing demand requires significant amount of operational, technological, and infrastructural overhaul. The Department of Energy's "Grid 2030" strategic vision outlines the action plan to alleviate the concerns ... Keywords: controlled charging, demand response, plug in hybrid electric vehicles, smart grid

Seshadri Srinivasa Raghavan; Alireza Khaligh

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Framing Scenarios of Electricity Generation and Gas Use: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a systematic appraisal of trends in electric generation and demands for gas for power generation. Gas-fired generation is the leading driver of forecasted growth in demand for natural gas in the United States, and natural gas is a leading fuel for planned new generating capacity. The report goes behind the numbers and forecasts to quantify key drivers and uncertainties.

1996-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

334

SmartCap: Flattening Peak Electricity Demand in Smart Homes Sean Barker, Aditya Mishra, David Irwin, Prashant Shenoy, and Jeannie Albrecht  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SmartCap: Flattening Peak Electricity Demand in Smart Homes Sean Barker, Aditya Mishra, David Irwin--Flattening household electricity demand reduces generation costs, since costs are disproportionately affected by peak demands. While the vast majority of household electrical loads are interactive and have little scheduling

Shenoy, Prashant

335

Using Compressed Air Efficiency Projects to Reduce Peak Industrial Electric Demands: Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"To help customers respond to the wildly fluctuating energy markets in California, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) initiated an emergency electric demand reduction program in October 2000 to cut electric use during peak periods. One component of that wide-ranging program focused on industrial compressed air systems as the target for such electric use reductions. What stands out about the compressed air effort is that customer acceptance of the program was very high (8 out of 10 customer sites implemented at least some of the efficiency projects recommended in the program's air system audits) and overall savings levels were more than 3X the original program goal (550 kW vs. 1730 kW). XENERGY, Inc. designed and carried out the program on behalf of PG&E. Key features of the program included working with compressed air system distributors to identify and qualify good customer leads and post-audit technical assistance to help customer implement recommended projects. This paper reviews the project and outlines some of the lessons learned in completing the project."

Skelton, J.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The Impact of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 on Electric Utilities and Coal Mines: Evidence from the Stock Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

companies in the electricity industry, thus controlling forhad on the entire electricity industry. However, resultswell. These two industrieselectricity generation and coal

Kahn, Shulamit; Knittel, Christopher R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Controlling Market Power and Price Spikes in Electricity Networks: Demand-side Bidding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simona Lup, Jia Jing Liu and Stephen Sosnicki for help with running the experiments and testing the software. This paper has benefited from comments from Kevin McCabe, Mark Olson, Dave Porter, and Stan Reynolds, but all errors are our own. The data are available upon request from the authors. Controlling Market Power and Price Spikes in Electricity Networks: Demand-Side Bidding In this paper we report experiments that examine how two structural features of electricity networks contribute to the exercise of market power in deregulated markets. The first feature is the distribution of ownership of a given set of generating assets. In the market power treatment, two large firms are allocated baseload and intermediate cost generators such that either firm might unilaterally withhold the capacity of its intermediate cost generators from the market to benefit from the supracompetitive prices that would result from only selling its baseload units. In the converse treatment, ownership of some of the intermediate cost generators is transferred from each of these firms to two other firms, so that no one firm could unilaterally restrict output to spawn supra-competitive prices. The second feature explores how the presence of line constraints in a radial network may segment the market and promote supra-competitive pricing in the isolated market segments. We also consider the interaction effect when both of these structural features are present. Having established a wellcontrolled data set with price spikes paralleling those observed in the naturally occurring economy, we also extend the design to include demand-side bidding. We find that demand-side bidding completely neutralizes the exercise of market power and eliminates price spikes.

Stephen J. Rassenti; Vernon L. Smith; Bart J. Wilson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Index (click to jump links) Coal Production and Prices Coal Mining Labor Productivity Coal Consumption Coal Production and Prices Emissions Caps Lead to More Use of Low-Sulfur Coal From Western Mines Continued improvements in mine productivity (which have averaged 5.9 percent per year since 1980) are projected to cause falling real minemouth prices throughout the forecast relative to historical levels. Higher electricity demand and lower prices, in turn, are projected to yield increasing coal demand, but the demand is subject to the overall sulfur emissions cap in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which encourages progressively greater reliance on the lowest sulfur coals (from Wyoming, Montana, Colorado, and Utah). Figure 106. Coal production by region, 1970-2025 (million short tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

339

Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Price-Elastic Demand in Deregulated Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The degree to which anyderegulated market functions e ciently often depends on the ability ofmarket agents to respond quickly to uctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we nd that price elasticity bothincreases the retailer's revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite e ect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the electricity forward price is ambiguous. Indeed, each retailer's response depends on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we nd that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we nd that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

Afzal S. Siddiqui; Afzal S. Siddiqui

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Is Real-Time Pricing Green?: The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Demand Variance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Hydro Nuclear Oil Notes: a) Source: EPA eGRID for 2000 (Fossil fuel sources are coal, natural gas, and oil. Non-sources are gen- erally ordered hydroelectric, nuclear, coal, natural gas, and oil.

Holland, Stephen P.; Mansur, Erin T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric Generating Facility Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric Generating Facility September 10, 2007 - 3:16pm Addthis ORLANDO, Fla. - Officials representing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company, KBR Inc. and the Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) today broke ground to begin construction of an advanced 285-megawatt integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility near Orlando, Fla. The new generating station will be among the cleanest, most efficient coal-fueled power plants in the world. Southern Company will operate the facility through its Southern Power subsidiary, which builds, owns, and manages the company's competitive generation assets. It will be located at OUC's Stanton Energy Center in

342

Is Real-Time Pricing Green?: The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Demand Variance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal Natural Gas and Oil Nuclear Quantity Supplied (MWh)natural gas, and oil. In this market, when quantity supplied

Holland, Stephen P.; Mansur, Erin T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal conditions. Maximum Demand Saving Intensity [W/ft2]automated electric demand sheds. The maximum electric shed

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Cost Analysis of Proposed National Regulation of Coal Combustion Residuals from the Electric Generating Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis quantifies the potential cost to the coal-fired electric generation industry from EPA's proposed rule on the disposal of coal combustion residuals. It includes an assessment of the incremental compliance costs of the Subtitle C proposed regulatory option. Costs for this analysis were developed at the individual generating unit and plant level and aggregated to develop a national industry cost estimate. The analytical model used to estimate the costs utilizes a Monte Carlo framework to accou...

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

345

Sampling and Analytical Plan Guidance for Water Characterization of Coal-Fired Steam Electric Utility Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US EPA recently announced its intentions to conduct a two-year study to determine whether the Steam Electric Categorical Effluent Guidelines should be revised. This report provides sampling plan guidance designed to assist the EPA in developing a sampling program and site-specific sampling plans to characterize a coal-fired facility's wastewater, to include some sampling processes used by EPRI in past coal-fired wastewater characterization studies, and to assist EPA in ensuring data quality during it...

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

346

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ForskEL (Smart Grid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ForskEL (Smart Grid ForskEL (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ForskEL Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

347

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated July 7, 2004) In the trading week ended July 2, the average spot coal prices tracked by EIA were mixed.

348

How much electricity does an American home use? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

349

A Review of Coal Mine Methane Recovery for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of methane from coal mines might be a cost-effective offset method for some utilities looking for ways to reduce or offset their greenhouse gas emissions. This report provides an evaluation of potential recovery amounts and costs for U.S. mines along with a discussion of technical and legal issues.

1997-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Historical Costs of Coal-Fired Electricity and Implications for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the costs of coal-fired electricity in the United States between 1882 and 2006 by decomposing it in terms of the price of coal, transportation costs, energy density, thermal efficiency, plant construction cost, interest rate, and capacity factor. The dominant determinants of costs at present are the price of coal and plant construction cost. The price of coal appears to fluctuate more or less randomly while the construction cost follows long-term trends, decreasing from 1902 - 1970, increasing from 1970 - 1990, and leveling off or decreasing a little since then. This leads us to forecast that even without carbon capture and storage, and even under an optimistic scenario in which construction costs resume their previously decreasing trending behavior, the cost of coal-based electricity will drop for a while but eventually be determined by the price of coal, which varies stochastically but shows no long term decreasing trends. Our analysis emphasizes the importance of using long time series and compari...

McNerney, James; Farmer, J Doyne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Is Real-Time Pricing Green?: The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Demand Variance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in regions with more hydroelectric capacity than oil-?redoil ?red rather than hydroelectric. Holland: Department ofgen- erally ordered hydroelectric, nuclear, coal, natural

Holland, Stephen P.; Mansur, Erin T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Worker noise exposures from diesel and electric surface coal mining machinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

comparative study of noise produced from diesel and electric mining machinery in an opencast coal mine was made. It was found that the diesel machines produced higher environmental noise than the electric machines. The projected and measured operator's noise dose for 8-hour also showed that the diesel machines produced higher noise than the electric machines. The recorded sound levels and the noise dose for different machines and the crusher house were compared with the regulatory limits. With electric drill machines, drilling in hard rock produced higher noise levels than drilling in soft rock. This can be used to characterize the rock for blast designs.

Roy, S.; Adhikari, G.R.

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Table 8.13 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings: Electric Utility Costs 4: ... motor drive) with less electricity. Examples include high-efficiency appliances, ... advanced electric motor drives, and

355

The Market for Coal Based Electric Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's initiative to effectively remove environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for producing electricity and transportation fuels through better technology....

356

"End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze...

357

Cloud-Active Nuclei from Coal-Fired Electric Power Plants and Their Interactions with Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the plumes from coal-fired electric power plants are generally about 2 to 5 times greater than in the ambient air unaffected by the plumes. However, if the ambient air is very clean, the ...

Peter V. Hobbs; Jeffrey L. Stith; Lawrence F. Radke

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power measurement system in LBNL Building 90 Speaker(s): Alex McEachern Date: January 14, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In the Summer of 2009, LBNL researchers installed end-use sub-metering equipment and associated Energy Information System (EIS) tools to characterize energy use and comfort in Building 90. Seven of 40 key electric loads were measured using advanced meters that make sophisticated real-time measurements of dozens of power flow parameters, power disturbances, and harmonics. The talk will review some electrical engineering fundamentals, how use and interpret data measured in building 90 in real-time. The real-time data available includes power, volt-amps, VAR's, unbalance voltage and current, voltage and current distortion,

359

Coal Combustion Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Combustion Products Coal Combustion Products Coal combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the...

360

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edison/Rates and Tariffs /Schedule for Electricity Service,Edison/Rates and Tariffs /Schedule for Electricity Service,

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Program on Technology Innovation: Tracking the Demand for Electricity From Grid-Related Services Preliminary Delphi Panel Resu lts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to develop a robust research and development portfolio under a variety of future scenarios, EPRI's research has identified three critical drivers which can substantially influence the technologies needed to provide society with clean, reliable and affordable electricity in the decades ahead. These drivers include the price of natural gas, the demand for electricity from grid services, and the potential for change in environmental and energy policy.In its scenario planning ...

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

362

Air-conditioning electricity savings and demand reductions from exterior masonry wall insulation applied to Arizona residences  

SciTech Connect

A field test involving eight single-family houses was performed during the summer of 1991 in Scottsdale, Arizona to evaluate the potential of reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption and demand by insulating their exterior masonry walls. Total per house costs to perform the installations ranged from $3610 to $4550. The average annual savings was estimated to be 491 kWh, or 9% of pre-retrofit consumption. Peak demands without and with insulation on the hottest day of an average weather year for Phoenix were estimated to be 4.26 and 3.61 kill, for a demand reduction of 0.65 kill (15%). We conclude that exterior masonry wall insulation reduces air-conditioning electricity consumption and peak demand in hot, dry climates similar to that of Phoenix. Peak demand reductions are a primary benefit, making the retrofit worthy of consideration in electric utility conservation programs. Economics can be attractive from a consumer viewpoint if considered within a renovation or home improvement program.

Ternes, M.P.; Wilkes, K.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Variable-response model of electricity demand by time of day: Results of a Wisconsin pricing experiment: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observationally alike households may differ in demand parameters and thus in economic quantities that are functions of those parameters. We have proposed a methodology for dealing with this variation. Estimation of both translog and CES versions of the model with data from the Wisconsin Electricity Pricing Experiment revealed considerable variation among households in time-of-day electricity consumption demand parameters for both summer and winter seasons and for several different definitions of the peak period. Observed household characteristics explained only a small share of total household differences, but permanent household differences dominated month-to-month variation in either expenditure shares or log consumption ratios in most cases. Permanent differences among households are important relative to total variation, including transitory month-to-month variation. We calculated various economic variables from the demand parameters, including the partial elasticity of substitution, compensated and uncompensated elasticities, and a measure of electricity expenditure under peak load pricing required to maintain the utility level under flat rate pricing relative to the flat rate expenditure. Because these are nonlinear functions of the household demand parameters, the mean parameter value over households with different demand parameters may be substantially different from the value of the function at mean values, under the representative household paradigm. For time-of-day electricity demand, variation among households is significant but small relative to mean parameter values. Therefore, controlling for the effect of household variation makes little difference in these mean calculations, but it does imply substantial variation among households in the welfare implications (and elasticities of response) of the introduction of time-of-day pricing. 25 refs., 12 tabs.

Lillard, L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Coal sector profile  

SciTech Connect

Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

1990-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

365

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain Aimee McKane,Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain Aimee McKane,grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain Aimee McKane*,Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain Aimee McKane,grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Impact of Plug-in Electrical Cars on Energy Demand, on Power System and on Environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of an electric vehicle (EV) over a gasoline vehicle (GV) is often portrayed as environment friendly or green movement ignoring how the electricity (more)

Tiwari, Sital

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Today in Energy - U.S. economy and electricity demand growth ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A country's economy and its energy use, particularly electricity use, are linked. Short-term changes in electricity use are often positively correlated with changes ...

369

U.S. economy and electricity demand growth are linked, but ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Absent a very rapid introduction of some new electricity-using deviceperhaps electric vehiclesa sharp rebound in ... less energy intensive industry. ...

370

Energy Policy Act transportation rate study: Interim report on coal transportation  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this report is to examine changes in domestic coal distribution and railroad coal transportation rates since enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90). From 1988 through 1993, the demand for low-sulfur coal increased, as a the 1995 deadline for compliance with Phase 1 of CAAA90 approached. The shift toward low-sulfur coal came sooner than had been generally expected because many electric utilities switched early from high-sulfur coal to ``compliance`` (very low-sulfur) coal. They did so to accumulate emissions allowances that could be used to meet the stricter Phase 2 requirements. Thus, the demand for compliance coal increased the most. The report describes coal distribution and sulfur content, railroad coal transportation and transportation rates, and electric utility contract coal transportation trends from 1979 to 1993 including national trends, regional comparisons, distribution patterns and regional profiles. 14 figs., 76 tabs.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Thermal energy storage for space cooling. Technology for reducing on-peak electricity demand and cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off-peak hours when electricity rates are lower. In addition, some system configurations may result in lower first costs and/or lower operating costs. Cool storage systems of one type or another could potentially be cost-effectively applied in most buildings with a space cooling system. A survey of approximately 25 manufacturers providing cool storage systems or components identified several thousand current installations, but less than 1% of these were at Federal facilities. With the Federal sector representing nearly 4% of commercial building floor space and 5% of commercial building energy use, Federal utilization would appear to be lagging. Although current applications are relatively few, the estimated potential annual savings from using cool storage in the Federal sector is $50 million. There are many different types of cool storage systems representing different combinations of storage media, charging mechanisms, and discharging mechanisms. The basic media options are water, ice, and eutectic salts. Ice systems can be further broken down into ice harvesting, ice-on-coil, ice slurry, and encapsulated ice options. Ice-on-coil systems may be internal melt or external melt and may be charged and discharged with refrigerant or a single-phase coolant (typically a water/glycol mixture). Independent of the technology choice, cool storage systems can be designed to provide full storage or partial storage, with load-leveling and demand-limiting options for partial storage. Finally, storage systems can be operated on a chiller-priority or storage priority basis whenever the cooling load is less than the design conditions. The first section describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. The next three sections define the savings potential in the Federal sector, present application advice, and describe the performance experience of specific Federal users. A step-by-step methodology illustrating how to evaluate cool storage options is presented next, followed by a case study of a GSA building using cool storage. Latter sections list manufacturers, selected Federal users, and reference materials. Finally, the appendixes give Federal life-cycle costing procedures and results for a case study.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

EIA Energy Kids - Coal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sometimes, coal-fired electric power plants are built near coal mines to lower ... industries and businesses with their own power plants use coal to generate ...

373

Impact of Reflective Roofing on Cooling Electrical Use and Peak Demand in a Florida Retail Mall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architects in hot climates have long recognized that reflective roof colors can reduce building cooling load. Experimentation spanning nearly three decades has shown that white roofing surfaces can significantly reduce surface temperatures and cooling loads (Givoni and Hoffmann, 1968; Reagan and Acklam, 1979; Griggs and Shipp, 1988; Anderson, 1989; Anderson et al., 1991 and Bansal et al., 1992). More importantly, measured cooling energy savings of white surfaces have been significant in California's climate (Akbari et al., 1991, 1992, 1997). In Florida, field research by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) since 1993 has quantified the impact of reflective roof coatings on sub-metered air conditioning (AC) consumption in tests in a dozen occupied homes (Parker et al., 1993; 1994; 1995; 1997). The coatings were applied to the roofs of each home in mid-summer after a month-long period of monitoring during which meteorological conditions, building temperatures and AC energy use were recorded. Using weather periods with similar temperatures and solar insolation, air conditioning energy use was reduced by 10% - 43% in the homes. The average drop in space cooling energy use was about 7.4 kWh/day or 19% of the pre-application air conditioning consumption. Unfortunately, until this project there has been little objective testing of the impact of roof whitening on the AC load of commercial buildings in Florida. Two demonstration sites have been monitored. The first was an elementary school in Cocoa Beach, Florida, which was monitored for a year before and after a white roof coating was applied. A final report on this project was published in the CADDET Newsletter (Parker et al., 1996a, b). The project demonstrated a 10% annual savings in chiller energy with a 30% reduction in peak cooling electrical demand. This paper summarizes the findings from the second demonstration at a commercial strip mall.

Parker, D. S.; Sonne, J. K.; Sherwin, J. R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Is Real-Time Pricing Green?: The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Demand Variance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production costs of hydroelectricity are typically low) bute?ects likely driven by hydroelectricity availability. Thus,demand for peak-shaving hydroelectricity. Finally, the four

Holland, Stephen P.; Mansur, Erin T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Analysis of PG&E`s residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts -- final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes findings from a unique project to improve the end-use electricity load shape and peak demand forecasts made by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). First, the direct incorporation of end-use metered data into electricity demand forecasting models is a new approach that has only been made possible by recent end-use metering projects. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the joint-sponsorship of this analysis has led to the development of consistent sets of forecasting model inputs. That is, the ability to use a common data base and similar data treatment conventions for some of the forecasting inputs frees forecasters to concentrate on those differences (between their competing forecasts) that stem from real differences of opinion, rather than differences that can be readily resolved with better data. The focus of the analysis is residential space cooling, which represents a large and growing demand in the PG&E service territory. Using five years of end-use metered, central air conditioner data collected by PG&E from over 300 residences, we developed consistent sets of new inputs for both PG&E`s and CEC`s end-use load shape forecasting models. We compared the performance of the new inputs both to the inputs previously used by PG&E and CEC, and to a second set of new inputs developed to take advantage of a recently added modeling option to the forecasting model. The testing criteria included ability to forecast total daily energy use, daily peak demand, and demand at 4 P.M. (the most frequent hour of PG&E`s system peak demand). We also tested the new inputs with the weather data used by PG&E and CEC in preparing their forecasts.

Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Electrical energy and demand savings from a geothermal heat pump energy savings performance contract at Ft. Polk, LA  

SciTech Connect

At Fort Polk, LA the space conditioning systems of an entire city (4,003 military family housing units) have been converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHP) under an energy savings performance contract. At the same time, other efficiency measures such as compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), low-flow hot water outlets, and attic insulation were installed. Pre- and post-retrofit data were taken at 15-minute intervals on energy flows through the electrical distribution feeders that serve the family housing areas of the post. 15-minute interval data was also taken on energy use from a sample of the residences. This paper summarizes the electrical energy and demand savings observed in this data. Analysis of feeder-level data shows that for a typical year, the project will result in a 25.6 million kWh savings in electrical energy use, or 32.4% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption in family housing. Results from analysis of building-level data compare well with this figure. Analysis of feeder-level data also shows that the project has resulted in a reduction of peak electrical demand of 6,541 kW, which is 39.6% of the pre-retrofit peak electrical demand. In addition to these electrical savings, the facility is also saving an estimated 260,000 therms per year of natural gas. It should be noted that the energy savings presented in this document are the apparent energy savings observed in the monitored data, and are not to be confused with the contracted energy savings used as the basis for payments. To determine the contracted energy savings, the apparent energy savings may require adjustments for such things as changes in indoor temperature performance criteria, additions of ceiling fans, and other factors.

Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal production capacities and coal prices. Coal Productionalso be affected by higher coal prices. II "Current Factors$/year Change in Clean Coal Price, $/ton (FOB Plant) Cost of

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

World coal outlook to the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The 1983 edition of the World Coal Outlook to the Year 2000 examines the worldwide impact of lower oil prices and lower economic activity on the demand, production, and international trade in coal. The report includes detailed regional forecasts of coal demand by end-use application. Regions include the US, Canada, Western Europe, Japan, Other Asia, Latin America, Africa, Australia/New Zealand, Communist Europe, and Communist Asia. In addition, regional coal production forecasts are provided with a detailed analysis of regional coal trade patterns. In all instances, the changes relative to Chase's previous forecasts are shown. Because of the current situation in the oil market, the report includes an analysis of the competitive position of coal relative to oil in the generation of electricity, and in industrial steam applications. The report concludes with an examination of the impact of an oil price collapse on the international markets for coal.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Carbon dioxide capture technology for the coal-powered electricity industry : a systematic prioritization of research needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal is widely relied upon as a fuel for electric power generation, and pressure is increasing to limit emissions of the CO2 produced during its combustion because of concerns over climate change. In order to continue the ...

Esber, George Salem, III

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

ZONAL PRICING AND DEMAND-SIDE BIDDING IN THE NORWEGIAN ELECTRICITY MARKET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Denmark uses coal-fired thermal plants. Figures 8 and 9 show the profile of power exchange for Norway to a large thermal power area through a transmission line. The model aims to provide insight into a plant hydroelectric plants generate roughly 113,000 GWh. Some pulp and paper factories own wood-fired thermal plants

California at Berkeley. University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

travel by electric and hybrid vehicles. SAE Technical PapersIn contrast to a hybrid vehicle which combines multipleElectric, Hybrid and Other Alternative Vehicles. A r t h u r

Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Industrial-Load-Shaping: The Practice of and Prospects for Utility/Industry Cooperation to Manage Peak Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Load-management programs designed to reduce demand for electricity during peak periods are becoming increasingly important to electric utilities. For a growing number of utilities, however, such peak-reduction programs don't go far enough in the face of new problems and challenges, and hence are proving ineffective or counterproductive. For example, many of a utility's largest customers--especially industrial customers who may be "locked into" seemingly inflexible process activities--have limited ability to respond to load-management programs that employ price signals as a central peak-reduction tool. Moreover, utilities in general are finding that vigorous efforts to reduce electric load can result in underutilization of base-load generating facilities. In these and other instances, "load-shaping," which emphasizes a shift of electric load or demand from peak to off-peak periods and provides for greater customer flexibility, may be a more effective strategy. This paper explains the need for and presents the components of a load-shaping program, and describes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PGandE) recent experience in designing and pursuing an industrial-load-shaping program. The paper also outlines important obstacles and opportunities likely to confront other utilities and industrial customers interested in working together to develop such programs.

Bules, D. J.; Rubin, D. E.; Maniates, M. F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Evaluation of electricity generation from underground coal fires and waste banks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A temperature response factors model of vertical thermal energy extraction boreholes is presented to evaluate electricity generation from underground coal fires and waste banks. Sensitivity and life-cycle cost analyses are conducted to assess the impact of system parameters on the production of 1 MW of electrical power using a theoretical binary-cycle power plant. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the average underground temperature has the greatest impact on the exiting fluid temperatures from the ground followed by fluid flow rate and ground thermal conductivity. System simulations show that a binary-cycle power plant may be economically feasible at ground temperatures as low as 190 {sup o}C.

Chiasson, A.D.; Yavuzturk, C.; Walrath, D.E. [Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR (United States)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Prospects of Renewable Energy for Meeting Growing Electricity Demand in Pakistan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pakistan is an energy deficit country. About half of the country's population has access to electricity and per capita supply is only 520 kWh. Majority of the country's population resides in rural areas and most of them are yet without electricity. Conventional electricity generation includes 66.8% thermal

Mohammad Aslam Uqaili; Khanji Harijan; Mujeebuddin Memon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Abstract-Coal and hydro will be the main sources of electric energy in Chile for the near future, given that natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- Coal and hydro will be the main sources of electric energy in Chile for the near future and the environmental dilemma faced by the country, where both coal and hydro produce some kind of impact. The role

Rudnick, Hugh

387

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

application (coal gasification, coal combustion followed byversions of advanced gasification processes show promise ofFixed-Bed Low-Btu Coal Gasification Systems for Retrofitting

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Coal News and Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Metallurgical coal markets became volatile when the thriving Chinese steel industry in late 2003 and 2004 made outsized demands for coking coal and met coke, ...

389

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricity1: Average and Maximum Peak Electric Demand Savings during

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The Growth in Electricity Demand in U - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

responsible almost for 70 percent of household emissions. ... Weather is a major cause of the variation in household electricity use for space cooling and

391

The Outlook for Electricity Supply and Demand to 2035: Key Drivers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 History . Projections2010. 18% . 16% . Electricity mix gradually shifts to lower -carbon options in the

392

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

new features of compressed natural gas, battery poweredgasoline, compressed natural gas, hybrid electric, two typesNatural gas vehicles (NGVs) were available with one or two compressed

Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Responsiveness of residential electricity demand to changes in price, information, and policy .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study analyzes consumers' behavioral responsiveness to changes in price and policy regarding residential electricity consumption, using a hybrid method of econometric analyses and energy (more)

Baek, Youngsun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Annual Coal Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Report Annual Coal Report Release Date: December 12, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report Previous Annual Coal / Coal Industry Annual Reports historical data (PDF): 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 before 2001 Industry Annual 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Go The Annual Coal Report (ACR) provides annual data on U.S. coal production, number of mines, productive capacity, recoverable reserves, employment, productivity, consumption, stocks, and prices. All data for 2012 and prior years are final. Highlights for 2012: U.S. coal production decreased 7.2 percent from 2011, driven by lower electric power sector demand, to roughly 1.02 billion short tons. Productive capacity of U.S. coal mines decreased 3.5 percent to 1.28

396

Zero emission coal: a future source of clean electric power and hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pairing of two novel technologies may permit coal energy to satisfy a dramatically increasing world energy demand for the next few hundred years. This can be done while virtually eliminating not only airborne SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, mercury and particulate emissions, but also the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The Zero Emission Coal Alliance, a collaboration of approximately 20 international industrial and government entities is investigating these concepts with the objective of completing the first pilot plant within 5 years. Paradoxically, climate change was not the overriding consideration that drove the development of these inventions. The more important consideration was that, if world carbon use continues to accelerate at rates even close to those in the last century, carbon from fossil fuels will overwhelm the natural CO{sub 2} sinks. In this view, the 'Kyoto' objectives are almost meaningless and misdirect enormous resources - both human and financial. If a world population of 10 billion reaches a standard of living comaprable, on the average, to that of the US in 2000 (with similar carbon use), then world yearly CO{sub 2} emissions will be ten times their current level. Carbon (in the form of coal) is our most important energy resource. The Challenge is to find sustainable ways of using it.

Ziock, H. J. (Hans-Joachim)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quality Coke Through Coal Blending," Yu, A. T. , Coal Age,November 1, 1975, p. 42. "Coal Blending as a Means to Meetcommunication. "Coal-Blending Seminar," EPRI Journal,

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Estimated effect of eliminating TVA electricity demand charges on the price of enriched uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An estimate of the price of enrichment services from fiscal years 1984 through 1995 are forecast assuming demand charges were eliminated and TVA power rates were set. Uranium enrichment program officials estimated the TVA power rate and TVA officials confirmed the reasonableness of that estimate.

Not Available

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

399

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Electric Demand Reduction for the U.S. Navy Public Works Center San Diego, California  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated the profitability of operating a Navy ship's generators (in San Diego) during high electricity price periods rather than the ships hooking up to the Base electrical system for power. Profitability is predicated on the trade-off between the operating and maintenance cost incurred by the Navy for operating the ship generators and the net profit associated with the sale of the electric power on the spot market. In addition, PNNL assessed the use of the ship's generators as a means to achieve predicted load curtailments, which can then be marketed to the California Independent System Operator.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Vertical Integration in Restructured Electricity Markets: Measuring Market Efficiency and Firm Conduct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal Natural Gas and Oil Nuclear Quantity Supplied (MWh)Units Oil Units Panel B: Summer of 1999 Variable QuantityQuantity demanded hourly a Price of: Electricity a Electricity (Q weighted) Natural Gas b Oil

Mansur, Erin T.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgA New Look at Residential Electricity Demand Using Household Expenditure Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate residential electricity demand for different regions of the country, assuming that consumers respond to average electricity prices. We circumvent the need for individual billing information by developing a novel generalized method of moments approach that allows us to estimate demand based on household electricity expenditure data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey, which does not have quantity and price information. We find that price elasticity estimates vary across the four census regionsthe South at 1.02 is the most price-elastic region and the Northeast at 0.82 is the leastand are essentially equivalent across income quartiles. In general, these price elasticity estimates are considerably larger in magnitude than those found in other studies using household-level data that assume that consumers respond to marginal prices. We also apply our elasticity estimates in a U.S. climate policy simulation to determine how these elasticity estimates alter consumption and price outcomes compared to the more conservative elasticity estimates commonly used in policy analysis.

Harrison Fell; Shanjun Li; Anthony Paul; Harrison Fell; Shanjun Li; Anthony Paul; Monte Carlo Analysis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Dynamic pricing and stabilization of supply and demand in modern electric power grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper proposes a mechanism for real-time pricing of electricity in smart power grids, with price stability as the primary concern. In previous publications the authors argued that relaying the real-time wholesale market ...

Roozbehani, Mardavij

406

Floating offshore wind farms : demand planning & logistical challenges of electricity generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Floating offshore wind farms are likely to become the next paradigm in electricity generation from wind energy mainly because of the near constant high wind speeds in an offshore environment as opposed to the erratic wind ...

Nnadili, Christopher Dozie, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption for the end-use in the current yearelectricity consumption for this end-use in the current yearelectricity consumption for this end-use in the current year

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Is Real-Time Pricing Green?: The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Demand Variance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atlantic region, where the PJM wholesale electricity marketoperates. Firms in PJM use a mix of fuel sources andof the fossil fuel sources in PJM. The fossil-?red units are

Holland, Stephen P.; Mansur, Erin T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Coal Combustion Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combustion Products Coal Combustion Products Coal combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the...

410

Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Director, PIER Demand Response Research CenterAssessment of Demand Response & Advanced Metering, staffPower Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The23 Electricity Demandand commercial electricity demand per census division from

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

CO sub 2 emissions from coal-fired and solar electric power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of the lifetime carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired, photovoltaic, and solar thermal electric power plants in the United States. These CO{sub 2} estimates are based on a net energy analysis derived from both operational systems and detailed design studies. It appears that energy conservation measures and shifting from fossil to renewable energy sources have significant long-term potential to reduce carbon dioxide production caused by energy generation and thus mitigate global warming. The implications of these results for a national energy policy are discussed. 40 refs., 8 figs., 23 tabs.

Keith, F.; Norton, P.; Brown, D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial (point sources) Coal Oil Other Area sourcesSource Stationary fuel combugtion Electric utilities Coal Oil

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Electricity Demand of PHEVs Operated by Private Households and Commercial Fleets: Effects of Driving and Charging Behavior  

SciTech Connect

Automotive and energy researchers have made considerable efforts to predict the impact of plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) charging on the electrical grid. This work has been done primarily through computer modeling and simulation. The US Department of Energys (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), in partnership with the University of California at Daviss Institute for Transportation Stuides, have been collecting data from a diverse fleet of PHEVs. The AVTA is conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory for DOEs Vehicle Technologies Program. This work provides the opportunity to quantify the petroleum displacement potential of early PHEV models, and also observe, rather than simulate, the charging behavior of vehicle users. This paper presents actual charging behavior and the resulting electricity demand from these PHEVs operating in undirected, real-world conditions. Charging patterns are examined for both commercial-use and personal-use vehicles. Underlying reasons for charging behavior in both groups are also presented.

John Smart; Matthew Shirk; Ken Kurani; Casey Quinn; Jamie Davies

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Subbituminous and bituminous coal dominate U.S. coal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

While almost all coal consumed in the United States is used to generate electricity (90% in 2010), coal is not entirely homogeneous. Coal is ...

417

On Coordinating Electricity Markets: Smart Power Scheduling for Demand Side Management and Economic Dispatch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-way system of communicating real-time prices and hourly de- mand between electricity producers and households a mechanism to approximate equilibrium prices and quantities for use as a real-time pricing scheme. Our goal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 3 Market Equilibrium 36 3.1 Retail Market Energy Consumption Game

Chen, Yiling

418

Coal News and Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (Energy Publishing, Coal & Energy Price Report, Bulletin, ... Although, the soaring demands of the Chinese steel industry are still with us, ...

419

Efforts to Harmonize Gas Pipeline Operations with the Demands of the Electricity Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A possible future course of action is for pipelines to continue their efforts to provide new services with FERC approval. Over time, pipelines could satisfy power generators by giving them the flexibility and services they desire and for which they are willing to pay. Another possibility is that FERC will enact new rules governing regional electricity markets that would function similarly to nationwide business practices. (author)

Costello, Ken

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Social Welfare implications of demand response programs in competitive electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

The price volatility exhibited by wholesale electricity markets has stymied the movement to restructure the industry, and may derail it altogether. Market designers argue that prices are superior to regulation for directing long-term investments to the proper location and function, and that price volatility is a natural manifestation of a robustly competitive market. However, episodes of prices that soar to previously unimaginable heights try customers' patience and cause policy makers to reconsider if the prize is worth the consequences.

Boisvert, Richard N.; Neenan, Bernard F.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.502753725,1.549729719,1.64272351,1.727259934,1.784039735,1.822135762,1.923203642,2.00781457,2.134768212,2.217425497,2.303725166,2.407715232,2.46134106,2.637086093,2.775389073,2.902293046,3.120364238,3.298013245 "AEO 1995",,1.4212343,1.462640338,1.488780998,1.545300242,1.585877053,1.619428341,1.668671498,1.7584219,1.803937198,1.890547504,1.968695652,2.048913043,2.134750403,2.205281804,2.281690821,2.375434783,2.504830918 "AEO 1996",,,1.346101641,1.350594221,1.369020126,1.391737646,1.421340737,1.458772082,1.496497523,1.561369914,1.619940033,1.674758358,1.749420803,1.800709877,1.871110564,1.924495246,2.006850327,2.048938234,2.156821499

422

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47 1.50 AEO 1996 1994 1.32 1.29 1.28 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.26 1.28

423

Perception of price when price information is costly: evidence from electricity demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic theory predicts that a well-informed consumer facing multiple prices responds to marginal price rather than to average price because he equates benefits with costs at the margin. The marginal price postulate, however, may not be true if information regarding marginal price is costly. Residential consumption of electricity is an example of a good for which it is costly to determine marginal price since the price changes with quantity purchased according to a declining-block schedule. If the cost of determining marginal price exceeds its expected benefits, the consumer will base his consumption on simpler information rather than on marginal price. The most obvious candidate is the monthly bill. Since electricity expenditures are greater than they would be if priced at marginal price, perceived price is anticipated to be higher than marginal price. The model includes a price perception variable that depends on the complexity of the rate structure as measured by the ratio of average to marginal price. Pooled annual data from 1960 to 1980 on the seven Ohio electric utilities are used for estimation. The evidence supports the hypothesis that the residential consumer responds to average price. Further, the expected increase in consumer's surplus, if marginal price were correctly perceived, is calculated at the sample mean and found to be negligible compared to any possible cost of determining marginal price.

Shin, J.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The geothermal analog of pumped storage for electrical demand load following  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 6 day cycle Load-Following Experiment, conducted in July 1995 at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test site in New Mexico, has verified that an HDR geothermal reservoir has the capability for a significant, rapid increase in thermal power output upon demand. The objective was to study the behavior of the HDR reservoir in a high-production- backpressure (2200 psi) baseload operating condition when there was superimposed a demand for significantly increased power production for a 4 hour period each day. In practice, this enhanced production, an increase of 65%, was accomplished by a programmed decrease in the production well backpressure over 4 hours, from an initial 2200 psi down to 500 psi. The rapid depressurization of the wellbore during the period of enhanced production resulted in the draining of a portion of the fluid stored in the pressure dilated joints surrounding the production well. These joints were then gradually reinflated during the following 20-hour period of high backpressure baseload operation. In essence, the HDR reservoir was acting as a fluid capacitor, being discharged for 4 hours and then slowly recharged during the subsequent 20 hours of baseload operation. In this mode, there would be no increase in the reservoir size of number of wells (the {ital in situ} capital investment) for a significant amount of peaking power production for a few hours each day. Thus, one of the advantages of geothermal load following over utility options such as pumped storage or compressed air storage is that the HDR power plant would be operated during off-peak hours in a baseline mode, with an augmented return on investment compared to these other peaking systems which would normally not be operated during off-peak periods. The surface power plant and the geofluid reinjection pumps would need to be sized for the peak rate of thermal energy production, adding somewhat to the overall HDR system capital costs when compared to a simple baseload power plant design.

Brown, D.W.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modification in coal-fired plants may still have boilerless efficient than coal-fired plants. This reflects thedata for an 800 MW coal-fired plant, with and without S02

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Coal's share of total U.S. electricity generation falls below 40% ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas combined-cycle units operate at higher efficiency than do older, coal-fired units, which increases the competitiveness of natural gas relative to coal.

427

Disaggregating regional energy supply/demand and flow data to 173 BEAs in support of export coal analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the procedures and results of a study sponsored jointly by the US Department of Transportation and the US Department of Energy. The study was conducted to provide, Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA)-level production/consumption data for energy materials for 1985 and 1990 in support of an analysis of transportation requirements for export coal. Base data for energy forecasts at the regional level were obtained from the Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration. The forecasts selected for this study are described in DOE/EIA's 1980 Annual Report to Congress, and are: 1985 Series, B, medium oil import price ($37.00/barrel); and 1990 Series B, medium oil import price ($41.00/barrel). Each forecast period is extensively described by approximately forty-three statistical tables prepared by EIA and made available to TERA for this study. This report provides sufficient information to enable the transportation analyst to appreciate the procedures employed by TERA to produce the BEA-level energy production/consumption data. The report presents the results of the procedures, abstracts of data tabulations, and various assumptions used for the preparation of the BEA-level data. The end-product of this effort was the BEA to BEA energy commodity flow data by more which serve as direct input to DOT's transportation network model being used for a detailed analysis of export coal transportation.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy costs during the cooling season as well as the heating season. To achieve air conditioning savings, the system separates dehumidification from sensible cooling; dehumidifies by desiccant absorption, using heat from storage to dry the desiccant; and then cools at an elevated temperature improving overall system efficiency. Efficient heat for desiccant regeneration is provided by a selective-energy system coupled with thermal storage. The selective-energy system incorporates diesel cogeneration, solar energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility energy for refrigeration; 10 to 20% in refrigeration equipment; and space savings due to smaller ductwork and equipment.

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Hydrogen and electricity from coal with carbon dioxide separation using chemical looping reactors  

SciTech Connect

Concern about global climate change has led to research on low CO{sub 2} emission in the process of the energy conversion of fossil fuel. One of the solutions is the conversion of fossil fuel into carbon-free energy carriers, hydrogen, and electricity with CO{sub 2} capture and storage. In this paper, the main purpose is to investigate the thermodynamics performance of converting coal to a hydrogen and electricity system with chemical-looping reactors and to explore the influences of operating parameters on the system performance. Using FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} as an oxygen carrier, we propose a carbon-free coproduction system of hydrogen and electricity with chemical-looping reactors. The performance of the new system is simulated using ASPEN PLUS software tool. The influences of the chemical-looping reactor's temperature, steam conversion rate, and O{sub 2}/coal quality ratio on the system performance, and the exergy performance are discussed. The results show that a high-purity of H{sub 2} (99.9%) is reached and that CO{sub 2} can be separated. The system efficiency is 57.85% assuming steam reactor at 815 C and the steam conversion rate 37%. The system efficiency is affected by the steam conversion rate, rising from 53.17 to 58.33% with the increase of the steam conversion rate from 28 to 41%. The exergy efficiency is 54.25% and the losses are mainly in the process of gasification and HRSG. 14 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Xiang Wenguo; Chen Yingying [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Rethinking the scale of coal-fired electric generation: technological and institutional considerations  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the economic and social implications of an electric-utility system based on medium-scale (50 to 200 MWe) coal-fired plants dispersed near load centers. The historical trend in US electric generation has been a sustained effort to capture the economies of large scale. Technical and institutional conditions within the industry, as well as the historical perception of universal electrification as a desirable social goal, have brought about this trend. Large fossil and nuclear plants, often representing joint ventures of several utilities, dominate the plans of utilities over the next 20 years. Despite these trends, this review was unable to conclude that clear advantages must inherently accrue to either small- or large-scale electrical generation. Transportation and construction do offer demonstrable economies of scale, but the other terms in the cost equation (such as reliability and transmission) are sufficiently uncertain or site-specific to prevent firm conclusions concerning the effect of scale. Biases believed to exist in the regulatory process would dilute the utilities' perception of any advantages accruing to small generators; rate-of-return regulation favors overcapitalization as embodied in the construction of large plants and extensive transmission networks. It is not clear that the current regulatory structure is capable of weighing the institutional values of accountability and local control against dollar savings generally supposed to accrue to large plants. The Midwest and East North Central states may be singularly fit for a decentralized, medium-scale system for historical, geographical, and institutional reasons, as well as for their location near the coal fields.

Gilmer, R.W.; Meunier, R.E.; Whittle, C.E.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Converting 15-Minute Interval Electricity Load Data into Reduced Demand, Energy Reduction and Cash Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole-building-electric (WBE) 15-minute interval data is an extremely low-cost, easy approach to reap an immediate reduction in energy consumption. With the advance of lower cost Internet based metering technology integrated with TCP/IP Internet communications, equipment costs and installation issues are not the issues as were in the past. The challenge is to be able to interpret the data and then implement actions to correct operational and equipment problems and anomalies. This paper will address the types of data acquisition equipment and systems available and the different components of a data. Lastly, actual graphs of data will be presented to demonstrate how to dissect and analyze a data set and then implement measures that will optimize operations and maintenance of which will effect a reduction in energy costs.

Herrin, D. G.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 16 Annual peak electricity demand by sector. Tableincludes an hourly electricity demand (i.e. power) profileof aggregating sectoral electricity demands into a statewide

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand Power UsageSetpoint (C) Peak Electric Demand Power Usage Effective-Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand Scenario

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Impact of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on power systems with demand response and wind power.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper uses a new unit commitment model which can simulate the interactions among plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), wind power, and demand response (DR). Four PHEV charging scenarios are simulated for the Illinois power system: (1) unconstrained charging, (2) 3-hour delayed constrained charging, (3) smart charging, and (4) smart charging with DR. The PHEV charging is assumed to be optimally controlled by the system operator in the latter two scenarios, along with load shifting and shaving enabled by DR programs. The simulation results show that optimally dispatching the PHEV charging load can significantly reduce the total operating cost of the system. With DR programs in place, the operating cost can be further reduced.

Wang, J.; Liu, C.; Ton, D.; Zhou, Y.; Kim, J.; Vyas, A. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( ES); (ED); (Kyungwon Univ.)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Electric power supply and demand 1979 to 1988 for the contiguous United States as projected by the Regional Electric Reliability Councils in their April 1, 1979 long-range coordinated planning reports to the Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning bulk electric power supply and demand is summarized and reviewed. Electric-utility power-supply systems are composed of power sources, transmission and distribution facilities, and users of electricity. In the United States there are three such systems of large geographic extent that together cover the entire country. Subjects covered are: energy forecasts, peak demand forecasts, generating-capacity forecasts, purchases and sales of capacity, and transmission. Extensive data are compiled in 17 tables. Information in two appendices includes a general description of the Regional Electric Reliability Councils and US generating capacity as of June 30, 1979. 3 figures, 17 tables.

Savage, N.; Graban, W.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Annual Coal Report 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0584 (2001) Annual Coal Report 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy

437

Peak-Coincident Demand Savings from Behavior-Based Programs: Evidence from PPL Electric's Behavior and Education Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Policy 38 PPL Electric. 2012. First Annual report toEvidence from PPL Electrics Behavior and Education Programon the effects of PPL Electrics behavior-based program on

Stewart, James

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required of any forecast of electricity demand and developing ways to reduce the risk of planning errors that could arise from this and other uncertainties in the planning process. Electricity demand is forecast

439

Fuel Switching on a Dime -- Boiler Capabilities of Electric Utilities and Industrial Companies: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities play an unusual and important role in the natural gas market because so much of their ongoing gas demand is price sensitive. This report, which focuses on the pattern of this demand, tracks how switching between gas and alternative fuels by major users affects the overall market. Events over the past four years and new plant-specific data have changed our understanding of this phenomenon.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

follows: EDemand t : electricity demand during day t (incost of reducing electricity demand (in $/MWh e ) HRDCost:maximum fraction of electricity demand to be met by demand

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012. Addressing Electricity Demand through Demand Response:has been driving up the electricity demand while widespreadexperiences in addressing electricity demand This section is

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prevailing marginal electricity prices, in order to give anCCE with prevailing electricity prices. In order to estimateusers. Marginal Electricity Prices and Discount Rates

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in use patterns and electricity rates between commercial andRates Residential electricity rates are much lower thanin India. Residential electricity rates are subsidized to a

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discount Rates Residential electricity rates are much lowerrates in India. Residential electricity rates are subsidizedand electricity rates between commercial and residential

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 Peak Demand Baselinewinter morning electric peak demand in commercial buildings.California to reduce peak demand during summer afternoons,

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario  

SciTech Connect

In the case of new nuclear power stations, it is necessary to pay special attention to the financial strategy that will be applied, time of construction, investment cost, and the discount and return rate. The levelized cost quantifies the unitary cost of the electricity (the kWh) generated during the lifetime of the nuclear power plant; and allows the immediate comparison with the cost of other alternative technologies. The present paper shows levelized cost for different nuclear technologies and it provides comparison among them as well as with gas and coal electricity plants. For the calculations we applied our own methodology to evaluate the levelized cost considering investment, fuel and operation and maintenance costs, making assumptions for the Mexican market, and taking into account the gas prices projections. The study also shows comparisons using different discount rates (5% and 10%), and some comparisons between our results and an OECD 1998 study. The results are i n good agreement and shows that nuclear option is cost competitive in Mexico on the basis of levelized costs.

Palacios, J.C.; Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, A.; Ortiz, J.; Longoria, L.C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

447

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process Catalytic Coal Gasification Process for the Production of Methane-Rich Syngas Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Production of Methane-Rich Syngas from Fuels Using Multi-functional Catalyst/Capture Agent." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Reducing pollution emitted by coal and waste power plants in an economically viable manner and building power plants that co-generate fuels and chemicals during times of low electricity demand are pressing goals for the energy industry. One way to achieve these goals in an economically viable manner is through the use of a catalytic gasifier that

448

Current and future use of coal in the Northeast. [60 refs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the problems of and potential for coal utilization in the Northeast region (defined as New England, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and the District of Columbia are discussed. Coal utilization in the Northeast now occurs mainly in Pennsylvania, where coal is used extensively for steel manufacturing and electricity generation. Elsewhere in the region, coal use is limited for the most part to electric power generation, and increased future reliance on coal is likely to be associated principally with this use. At present, oil supplies most of the energy used to generate electricity in the Northeast. Recent trends in national and regional coal use are reviewed, and an overview of potential options for and constraints on future coal use are presented. The outlook for future coal supplies in the region for the reference years 1985 and 2000 is discussed. Supply estimates are shown tabularly. Regional availability of low-sulfur coal will depend on interregional economic factors as well as on technical constraints and public policy. The transportation system of the Northeast coals also constrain coal use. The potential demand for coal by electric utilities in the region is considered. Three coal demand scenarios are developed for 1985. The role of coal-derived synthetic fuels in the energy future of the Northeast is discussed. For the most part, processes producing low-Btu gas, high-Btu gas, and synthetic liquids from coal will contribute to the energy supply of the Northeast indirectly by augmenting national supplies of gas, oil, and electricity. In 1985, synthetic fuels production is likely to be small; by 2000, more substantial contributions could be available if a national policy for rapid coal synthetics development was pursued.

Edelston, B.S.; Rubin, E.S.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Coal - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: December 19, 2013. The Annual Coal Distribution Report (ACDR) ... Released: September 27, 2012. Annual statistics on coal supply, demand, ...

450

Table F17: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F17: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports of Coal Coke, 2011 State Coal Coal Coke Residential a Commercial Industrial Electric ...

451

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

eliminates coal handling and pulverizing at the power plant.Plant - Without Coki ng ($1969) Component Capita 1 Cost 6,04xl0 6 $75.11xl0 6 Coal Handlingcoal and helps decrease transportation and handling costs. Moisture in coal also affects the heat rate at the power plant.

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Producing Fuel and Electricity from Coal with Low Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-carbongaseousfuel from coal. Synthesisgas from a coal gasifier is shifted to a gas mixture consistingmainly of H2 and CO2 with the coal gasifier, the shift reactor and the CO2 recovery units. CO2 recovery and storage will increase in a number of sub- processeswhich will be describedstepby step.Figures given here arevalid for a gasifier

453

Demand Dispatch-Intelligent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and energy efficiency throughout the value chain resulting in the most economical price for electricity. Having adequate quantities and capacities of demand resources is a...

454

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

SciTech Connect

The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

SciTech Connect

The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Development of a commercial-sector data base and forecasting model for electricity usage and demand. Volume I. Preliminary model specification. [Description of subprograms BEHAV, DEMAND, ECON, ENER, and INGEN  

SciTech Connect

This is the first of twelve major technical reports under the Commission's contract with Hittman Associates. The contract will lead to the development of a data base on commercial space, and the development of a model to forecast electricity usage and demand. This report presents a preliminary specification of the model to be developed. The model being developed combines econometric and engineering approaches, and consists of five subprograms and an overall executing program. The first subprogram forecasts the stock of commercial space, based on employment data and other economic inputs. It also distinguishes among various types of commercial space, and breaks the commercial space into segments according to fuels for various end uses, such as heating, cooling, etc. The second subprogram uses detailed building-survey data to specify a typical, or characteristic building for each unique type of floorspace considered in the study. The third subprogram calculates monthly electricity usage for the typical buildings specified, using standard engineering techniques, and then scales up the electricity use for each building type according to the amount of space, of that type, in the entire building stock. The fourth subprogram performs a similar function, but produces hourly electricity demands, rather than monthly electricity usage. The fifth, and final subprogram adjusts the energy usage and demand values calculated to simulate the impact of certain economic conditions or policy measures. The report presents a flow chart for each subprogram, and a table of inputs and outputs required for each. The logic, structure, flow, and information transfer of each is described.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

California Independent System Operator demand response & proxy demand resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are designed to allow end use customers to contribute to energy load reduction individually or through a demand response provider. One form of demand response can occur when an end use customer reduces their electrical usage ...

John Goodin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Table 12. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2.03 2.17 2.33 2.52 2.73 2.99 AEO 1983 1.99 2.10 2.24 2.39 2.57 2.76 4.29 AEO 1984 1.90 2.01 2.13 2.28 2.44 2.61 3.79 AEO 1985 1.68 1.76 1.86 1.95 2.05 2.19 2.32 2.49 2.66 2.83 3.03 AEO 1986 1.61 1.68 1.75 1.83 1.93 2.05 2.19 2.35 2.54 2.73 2.92 3.10 3.31 3.49 3.68 AEO 1987 1.52 1.55 1.65 1.75 1.84 1.96 2.11 2.27 2.44 3.55 AEO 1989* 1.50 1.51 1.68 1.77 1.88 2.00 2.13 2.26 2.40 2.55 2.70 2.86 3.00 AEO 1990 1.46 1.53 2.07 2.76 3.7 AEO 1991 1.51 1.58 1.66 1.77 1.88 1.96 2.06 2.16 2.28 2.41 2.57 2.70 2.85 3.04 3.26 3.46 3.65 3.87 4.08 4.33 AEO 1992 1.54 1.61 1.66 1.75 1.85 1.97 2.03 2.14 2.26 2.44 2.55 2.69 2.83 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.58 3.78 4.01 AEO 1993 1.92 1.54 1.61 1.70

460

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Economic Analysis of the Environmental Effects of the Coal-Fired Electric Generator at Boardman, Oregon. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This study is one of several commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to estimate the economic value of the environmental costs and benefits of different electricity-generating resources. In it we described and quantify the environmental costs and benefits of coal-fired generators, using the plant in Boardman, Oregon, as the basis for our estimations. The Boardman plant uses pulverized coal to produce steam for generating electricity. It is nominally rated at 550 megawatts. This study assumes a 70% load factor and an annual production of 3373 x 10/sup 6/ kWh. Cooling water comes from a 1400-acre cooling pond; coal comes from Wyoming in 100-car unit-trains every two days. The estimated service life of the plant is 40 years. We developed a socioeconomic-environmental model to assess the final physical impacts of each of the initial impacts resulting from the fuel cycle. The analysis of environmental effects comprises four steps: (1) identify all the potential environmental impacts stemming from the entire fuel cycle associated with the plant; (2) determine which effects warrant detailed economic analysis; (3) complete the economic analysis for the effects selected in step 2; and (4) estimate the extent to which the results of the case study apply to other potential plants using the coal-fuel cycle. 102 references, 5 figures, 10 tables.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

462

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibitfrom 44% in 2006. In electricity demand, its usage in plugRuns, Average Value) Electricity Demand Power/Electricity

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Clean coal technologies in Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Asia`s growing need for cleaner coal technology will likely translate into increased opportunities for independent developers and equipment suppliers. Coal is projected to play a central role in meeting Asia`s rapidly growing electric power demand. In order to minimize the negative effects of coal comsumption, the application of clean coal technologies (CCTs) will be increasingly important for the viability of coal-fired plants developed by independent power producers. The environmental impact of coal consumption has created a growing market for clean coal technologies in Asia. A study commissioned by the US DOE estimates the market for new and retrofit installation of coal facilities in Asia to be between $410 billion and $560 billion between 1993 and 2010. Actual expenditures for CCTs during the same period are likely to be much less, but still significant. Cost continues to be a factor limiting the more wide spread application of these technologies. In most cases, the application of CCTs leads to a 15 percent to 20 percent increase in capital costs and 10 to 20 percent in operating costs.

Evans, P.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Coal: Energy for the future  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared in response to a request by the US Department of energy (DOE). The principal objectives of the study were to assess the current DOE coal program vis-a-vis the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), and to recommend the emphasis and priorities that DOE should consider in updating its strategic plan for coal. A strategic plan for research, development, demonstration, and commercialization (RDD and C) activities for coal should be based on assumptions regarding the future supply and price of competing energy sources, the demand for products manufactured from these sources, technological opportunities, and the need to control the environmental impact of waste streams. These factors change with time. Accordingly, the committee generated strategic planning scenarios for three time periods: near-term, 1995--2005; mid-term, 2006--2020; and, long-term, 2021--2040. The report is divided into the following chapters: executive summary; introduction and scope of the study; overview of US DOE programs and planning; trends and issues for future coal use; the strategic planning framework; coal preparation, coal liquid mixtures, and coal bed methane recovery; clean fuels and specialty products from coal; electric power generation; technology demonstration and commercialization; advanced research programs; conclusions and recommendations; appendices; and glossary. 174 refs.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Shipping Data Generation for the Hunter Valley Coal Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand for coal is expected to double in the next decade. ... The Hunter Valley Coal Chain (HVCC) refers to the inland portion of the coal export supply chain.

466

Capitalizing on coal  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) predicts that the equivalent of 44 baseload coal fired power plants will be needed to keep pace with US electricity demand by 2025. Potential builders are looking for greater certainty on a number of energy, environmental and regulatory issues before they invest. The work of the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) in advocating solutions to create this certainty is reported in this article. It is asking Congress to put transmission assets on a par with other major assets and reduce their depreciable lives from 20 to 15 years, and calling for repeal legislation that limits investment in the regulated energy industry. EEI is advocating federal environmental legislation similar to the Clean Skies Act that would lower emissions faster, with greater certainty, and with greater cost savings. EEI is encouraging FERC to work with states to increase certainty of builders recovering their investment in coal plants. 2 photos.

McMahon, F. [Edison Electric Institute (United States). Alliance of Energy Suppliers

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

"Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze...

468

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 4 Charging Scenarios and Electricity Demand17 4.2 Electricity Demand34 Electricity Demand

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Assessment of a Novel Direct Coal Conversion - Fuel Cell Technology for Electric Utility Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Technology Road Map identified a key technical challenge is "maintaining and strengthening a robust generation portfolio". Using our abundant coal resources in the most efficient way and in a way that limits CO2 emissions is among the toughest challenges facing the power industry. There are few new options or new technologies in the R&D pipeline that address this issue. Coal options available and being considered include: combustion systems such as pulverized coal (PC) and super critical systems w...

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

470

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solidification and Storage Power Generation Cooling WaterApril, 1976 p. 440. "Power Generation - Clean Fuels Today,"1975, ORNL-4995. "Clean Power Generation from Coal," Rand D

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Most coal-fired electric capacity was built before 1980 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, ... Some older coal-fired generators were retrofitted with various environmental controls ...

472

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Draft Measuring the Capacity Impacts of Demand Response to be published in the Electricity Journal pre-print version  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand response is an increasing part of the energy policy agenda in the United States. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has undertaken major initiatives to encourage the incorporation of demand response in the wholesale markets, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (aka, the stimulus bill) has provisions

Robert Earle; Edward P. Kahn; Edo Macan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the entire forecast period, primarily because both weather-adjusted peak and electricity consumption were forecast. Keywords Electricity demand, electricity consumption, demand forecast, weather normalization, annual peak demand, natural gas demand, self-generation, conservation, California Solar Initiative. #12

476

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Provider Pacific Gas & Electric year Coal Oil Gas Other fossil Electricity Resource Mix (%) Bio- mass Hydro Nuclear Wind Solar

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The restructuring of regional and national electricity markets in the U.S. and around the world has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators to control and manage the load patterns of wholesale and retail end-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called Load Management, have re-emerged as an important element in the fine-tuning of newly restructured electricity markets. During the summers of 1999 and 2001 they played a vital role in stabilizing wholesale markets and providing a hedge against generation shortfalls throughout the U.S.A. Demand Response Programs include ''traditional'' capacity reservation and interruptible/curtailable rates programs as well as voluntary demand bidding programs offered by either Load Serving Entities (LSEs) or regional Independent System Operators (ISOs). The Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has been monitoring the development of new types of Demand Response Programs both in the U.S. and around the world. This paper provides a survey and overview of the technologies and program designs that make up these emerging and important new programs.

Heffner, Grayson C.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity consumption, the flattening of the demand curves (except Maximum demand) reflects decreasing population growth ratesresidential electricity demand are described in Table 11. For simplicity, end use-specific UEC and saturation rates

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Optimal Tariff Period Determination Cost of electricity generation is closely related to system demand. In general, the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,Pakistan,Nepal and Bangladesh) direct management is all the more Flat-rate electricity tariffs induce farmers to pump more of annual hours of pump operation,electric (flat tariff) and diesel pumpsets Water Policy Briefing 2 #12,there are strong theoretical arguments in favor of the metered electricity tariff. Farmers would learn the real

480

Abstract--Forecasting of future electricity demand is very important for decision making in power system operation and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In the 20 years prior to the Northwest Power Act, regional electrical loads were growing at 5 percent per predicted 2000 electricity loads of 23,400 average megawatts (average of medium-low and medium, and regional electricity loads in that year are estimated to have been 21,200. The third decade following

Ducatelle, Frederick

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand coal electricity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

482

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

483

Univariate Modeling and Forecasting of Monthly Energy Demand Time Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this report. #12;i ABSTRACT These electricity demand forms and instructions ask load-serving entities and Instructions for Electricity Demand Forecasts. California Energy Commission, Electricity Supply Analysis.................................................................................................................................7 Form 1 Historic and Forecast Electricity Demand

Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

484

Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discusses how electricity demands for vehicle charging cantiming of vehicle electricity demands. challenges associatedand timing of vehicle electricity demand. As the number of

Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

A portfolio approach to energy governance : state management of China's coal and electric power supply industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study addresses the extent to which China's central state devolved ownership and investment levels in its energy sector to other actors during the modern reform period (1978- 2008). The project focused on China's coal ...

Cunningham, Edward A., IV (Edward Albert)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simultaneous NOx-SO x reduction with coal derived reductfor Catalytic NO x and NOx-SO x Reduction Schemes on 800 MwRe6uctfon Process 2 NOx-SO x Reduction Sulfide Process 3 New

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

paper CO2 Regulations and Electricity Prices: Cost Estimates for Coal-Fired Power Plants. We thank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For fossil fuel power plants to be built in the future, carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for significant reductions in CO2 emissions. We examine the break-even value for CCS adoptions, that is, the critical value in the charge for CO2 emissions that would justify investment in CCS capabilities. Our analysis takes explicitly into account that the supply of electricity at the wholesale level (generation) is organized competitively in some U.S. jurisdictions, while in others a regulated utility provides integrated generation and distribution services. For either market structure, we find that emissions charges in the range of $25-$30 per tonne of CO2 would be the break-even value for adopting CCS capabilities at new coal-fired power plants. The corresponding break-even values for natural gas plants are substantially higher, near $60 per tonne. Our break-even estimates serve as a basis for projecting the change in electricity prices once carbon emissions become costly. CCS capabilities effectively put an upper bound on the rise in electricity prices. We estimate this bound to be near 30 % at the retail level for both coal and natural gas plants. In contrast to the competitive power supply scenario, however, these price increases materialize only gradually for a regulated utility. The delay in price adjustments reflects that for regulated

Stefan Reichelstein; Erica Plambeck

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Maximum demand, year 2050 electricity consumption reachesefficiency, year 2050 electricity consumption is 357 TWh,capita electricity consumption increases from 7,421 kWh/year

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Supply Related Electricity Demand in California. CEC33 percent of our electricity demand in 2020 from renewablebuildings, heating electricity demand is not included in

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Demand Response-Enabled Model Predictive HVAC Load Control in Buildings using Real-Time Electricity Pricing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A practical cost and energy efficient model predictive control (MPC) strategy is proposed for HVAC load control under dynamic real-time electricity pricing. The MPC strategy (more)

Avci, Mesut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-63806 Refrigeration, Air Conditioning, & Electric Powerand its Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigeratingand its applications in Air Conditioning and refrigerating

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Techno-economic Assessment of Wind Energy to Supply the Demand of Electricity for a Residential Community in Ethiopia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The electricity sector is a major source of carbon dioxide emission that contributes to the global climate change. Over the past decade wind energy (more)

Yebi, Adamu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Short run price elasticity of residential electricity demand within income levels and the implications for CO2 policy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the relationship between price and use of electricity in residential homes in order to understand the impact of CO2 policy. A model (more)

Green, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Heat Rates for Baseload Steam-Electric Units TypicalAnnual Heat Rates for Baseload Steam- Electric Units. * Btuare calculated for both baseload operation (65% capacity

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

496

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supplies and rising coal prices combined with relativelycontrol of power prices coupled with coal supply shortagesprice of electricity in China is capped by the government. Tight coal

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Updated Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) Emissions Estimates and Inhalation Human Health Risk Assessment for U.S. Coal-Fired Electric Generating Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the mid-1990s, there has been no comprehensive evaluation of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) emissions from U.S. coal-fired electric power plants and the risks associated with those emissions. With the exception of mercury, none of the HAPs-classified chemicals has been fundamentally reassessed for more than 15 years. The set of EPRI studies reported on here provides a fundamental reevaluation of potential HAPs emissions from coal-fired power plants based on current data concerning coals burned, co...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

498

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the costs have on the price of coal delivered by railroadsindicate that the price of coal delivered by railroads ismake up the delivered price of coal that electric plants are

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. In addition, the report

500

Illinois Coal Revival Program (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Illinois Coal Revival Program is a grants program providing partial funding to assist with the development of new, coal-fueled electric generation capacity and coal gasification or IGCC units...