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Sample records for demand china india

  1. How Increased Crude Oil Demand by China and India Affects the International Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 How Increased Crude Oil Demand by China and India Affects the International Market. Abstract The global crude oil market is characterised by complex interactions between demand and supply. The question that we address in this paper is how increased demand for crude oil by China and India affects

  2. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh Ben Crow andIndia, tensions over water with Pakistan and Bangladesh mayso that both India and Pakistan could use the water, within

  3. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    2007). Coping with Residential Electricity Demand in India'sResidential Electricity Demand in China –Can EfficiencyBoom of Electricity Demand in the residential sector in the

  4. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    N ATIONAL L ABORATORY India Energy Outlook: End Use DemandTables Figures Figure 1. India Primary Energy Supply by fuel33 Table 15. India Industry Energy Intensities (GJ/

  5. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2010-01-01

    international energy supply/demand in 2050, China, India andStorage (CCS) J energy including China and India, growing ""

  6. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2010-01-01

    The household energy transition in India and China. ? EnergyThe household energy transition in India and China. ? Energy

  7. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    2006. “All India Electricity Statistics, General Review2005, “Industrial Statistics of India: Status and Issues”,is reported in India’s national statistics for this sector,

  8. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    with Residential Electricity Demand in India's Future - How2008). The Boom of Electricity Demand in the residential2005). Forecasting Electricity Demand in Developing

  9. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Petroleum pricing in India: balancing efficiency andand Tables Figures Figure 1. India Primary Energy Supply by28 Table 13. India, US and France Farm Machinery

  10. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Past Trend and Future Outlook",LBNL forthcoming. de la Rue2006. “Building up India: Outlook for India’s real estate”,2006a. “World Energy Outlook”, IEA/OECD, Paris, France.

  11. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    pumps in India”, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews,Renewable Energy (MNES), 2008. “Annual Report 2007-08”. Government of India.

  12. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

    2009-07-01

    This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

  13. China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing -...

  14. China, India and the Commodity Boom: Economic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coxhead, Ian

    China, India and the Commodity Boom: Economic and Environmental Implications for Low of Life Sciences and 2 La Trobe University 1. INTRODUCTION THE emergence of China and India as major and regional economic integration (Tongzon, 2005; Haddad, 2007; Athukorala, 2009). India's rapid growth

  15. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    2005a. “Statistics of the Indian Paper Industry: Directoryof Indian Paper Industry”. Volume II. Saharanpur, India. de2005. “The Indian Paper Industry: Towards Sustainability”,

  16. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Tables Figures Figure 1. India Primary Energy Supply by fuel7 Figure 2. Final and Primary Energy (including biomass) by19 Figure 10. Final and Primary Energy Consumption in the

  17. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    mines in China lowers the coal recovery rate and increasesthat China’s average coal recovery rate is 30% nationallyimproved aggregate coal recovery rates and local- scale

  18. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    Power generation ..Efficiency Status of Power Generation Industry in China,”Efficiency Status of Power Generation Industry in China,”

  19. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-30

    Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

  20. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    s ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. Ifgrowth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustiondependence. 4.4.1. Carbon dioxide emissions Coal is China’s

  1. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    raising transportation oil demand. Growing internationalcoal by wire could reduce oil demand by stemming coal roadEastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand

  2. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    China Primary Energy Consumption, 1980-2007 Primary Energy Consumption (mtce) hydro & nuclear coal natural gas

  3. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    Roles and prospect of nuclear power in China’s energy supply70% load factor 48 GW of nuclear power capacity @ 90% loadnear LNG import terminals. Nuclear power IEA, World Energy

  4. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    coal type mining. Production by coal type Since 1980, China maximizedthe production shares of coal types, the shares of different

  5. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    and Reserves Circular. Beijing: MLR, cited in IEA. 2009.Cleaner Coal in China. Paris: IEA. Ghee Peh, Wei Ouyang. (London: WEC Press. IEA. (2007) World Energy Outlook 2007.

  6. India and China: A Comparative Analysis of Mobile Phones in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonthu, Prashanthi

    2014-05-31

    In 2010, China and India were named the first and second largest mobile phone markets in the world based on their number of subscribers. India and China have focused on extending their telecommunication services into rural areas for socio...

  7. Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    trends in China, India, Eastern Europe and other developing areas. China oil demand +104% by 2030, India 2000 2020 2040 2060 Supply demand Energy UWM-CUTS 14 U.S. DOE viewpoint, source:http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/FTPROOT/features/longterm.pdf#search='oilTransportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CUTS//2050/energy05

  8. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    unit water requirement of coal-fired electricity generationin electricity demand. Coal-fired power generation accounted12, the absolute amount of coal-fired capacity grew at an

  9. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.; Zhou, Nan

    2009-05-18

    The time when energy-related carbon emissions come overwhelmingly from developed countries is coming to a close. China has already overtaken the United States as the world's leading emitter of greenhouse gas emissions. The economic growth that China has experienced is not expected to slow down significantly in the long term, which implies continued massive growth in energy demand. This paper draws on the extensive expertise from the China Energy Group at LBNL on forecasting energy consumption in China, but adds to it by exploring the dynamics of demand growth for electricity in the residential sector -- and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. This paper forecasts ownership growth of each product using econometric modeling, in combination with historical trends in China. The products considered (refrigerators, air conditioners, fans, washing machines, lighting, standby power, space heaters, and water heating) account for 90percent of household electricity consumption in China. Using this method, we determine the trend and dynamics of demandgrowth and its dependence on macroeconomic drivers at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, we present scenarios for reducing residential consumption through efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, thus allowing for a technologically realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities specifically in the Chinese context.

  10. Developing Financial Intermediation Mechanisms for Energy Efficiency Investments in Brazil, China and India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Developing Financial Intermediation Mechanisms for Energy Efficiency Investments in Brazil, China and India Brazil-China-India Workshop on Energy Efficiency Financing Cross country exchange, outreach and dissemination Juan Zak URC Brazil, May 2004 #12;2 What is URC ? · URC is the UNEP Risoe Centre on Energy

  11. Fact Sheet: U.S. and China Actions Matter for Global Energy Demand...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    next two decades. The U.S. continues working with China to increase energy efficiency and renewable energy use. The actions of the U.S. and China matter for global energy demand,...

  12. Driving change : evaluating strategies to control automotive energy demand growth in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonde Åkerlind, Ingrid Gudrun

    2013-01-01

    As the number of vehicles in China has relentlessly grown in the past decade, the energy demand, fuel demand and greenhouse gas emissions associated with these vehicles have kept pace. This thesis presents a model to project ...

  13. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    IEEJ (2007), China and India’s Energy Status and EnergyIEA. IEEJ (2007), China and India’s Energy Status and Energy2007), World Energy Outlook 2007: China and India Insight,

  14. Environmental and Resource Economics Household Energy Demand in Urban China: Accounting for regional prices and rapid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    growth, China's energy consumption is rising at one of the fastest rates in the world, almost 8% per year, in particular, household electricity use rose by 12.6% per year, and natural gas by 19.5% in the last decade1Environmental and Resource Economics Household Energy Demand in Urban China: Accounting

  15. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    for 90% of household electricity consumption in China. Usinggives an annual electricity consumption of 12kWh assumingto look at is electricity consumption at the household

  16. An overview of energy supply and demand in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, F.; Davis, W.B.; Levine, M.D.

    1992-05-01

    Although China is a poor country, with much of its population still farming for basic subsistence in rural villages, China is rich in energy resources. With the world`s largest hydropower potential, and ranking third behind the US and USSR in coal reserves, China is in a better position than many other developing countries when planning for its future energy development and self-sufficiency. China is now the third largest producer and consumer of commercial energy, but its huge populace dilutes this impressive aggregate performance into a per capita figure which is an order of magnitude below the rich industrialized nations. Despite this fact, it is still important to recognize that China`s energy system is still one of the largest in the world. A system this size allows risk taking and can capture economies of scale. The Chinese have maintained rapid growth in energy production for several decades. In order to continue and fully utilize its abundant resources however, China must successfully confront development challenges in many areas. For example, the geographic distribution of consumption centers poorly matches the distribution of resources, which makes transportation a vital but often weak link in the energy system. Another example -- capital -- is scarce relative to labor, causing obsolete and inefficiently installed technology to be operated well beyond what would be considered its useful life in the West. Major improvements in industrial processes, buildings, and other energy-using equipment and practices are necessary if China`s energy efficiency is to continue to improve. Chinese energy planners have been reluctant to invest in environmental quality at the expense of more tangible production quotas.

  17. The Elasticity of Demand for Gasoline in China1 C.-Y. Cynthia Lin, Jieyin (Jean) Zeng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    The Elasticity of Demand for Gasoline in China1 C.-Y. Cynthia Lin, Jieyin (Jean) Zeng Department the price and income elasticities of demand for gasoline in China. Our estimates of the intermediate-run price elasticity of gasoline demand range between -0.497 and -0.196, and our estimates

  18. Modeling Climate Feedbacks to Energy Demand: The Case of China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asadoorian, Malcolm O.

    This paper is an empirical investigation of the effects of climate on the use of electricity by consumers and producers in urban and rural areas within China. It takes advantage of an unusual combination of temporal and ...

  19. An overview of energy supply and demand in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, F.; Davis, W.B.; Levine, M.D.

    1992-05-01

    Although China is a poor country, with much of its population still farming for basic subsistence in rural villages, China is rich in energy resources. With the world's largest hydropower potential, and ranking third behind the US and USSR in coal reserves, China is in a better position than many other developing countries when planning for its future energy development and self-sufficiency. China is now the third largest producer and consumer of commercial energy, but its huge populace dilutes this impressive aggregate performance into a per capita figure which is an order of magnitude below the rich industrialized nations. Despite this fact, it is still important to recognize that China's energy system is still one of the largest in the world. A system this size allows risk taking and can capture economies of scale. The Chinese have maintained rapid growth in energy production for several decades. In order to continue and fully utilize its abundant resources however, China must successfully confront development challenges in many areas. For example, the geographic distribution of consumption centers poorly matches the distribution of resources, which makes transportation a vital but often weak link in the energy system. Another example -- capital -- is scarce relative to labor, causing obsolete and inefficiently installed technology to be operated well beyond what would be considered its useful life in the West. Major improvements in industrial processes, buildings, and other energy-using equipment and practices are necessary if China's energy efficiency is to continue to improve. Chinese energy planners have been reluctant to invest in environmental quality at the expense of more tangible production quotas.

  20. Corporate Clean Energy Investment Trends in Brazil, China, India...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    India and South Africa AgencyCompany Organization Carbon Disclosure Project Partner Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Sector Energy Focus Area Energy...

  1. Demand for Environmentally-Friendly Durables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Leslie Aimee

    2012-01-01

    productivity growth in india’s energy intensive industries.below India’s levels. India’s energy intensity of outputsectors in India and China Source: IEA 2005: Average energy

  2. China's Building Energy Demand: Long-Term Implications from a Detailed Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

    2012-10-01

    We present here a detailed, service-based model of China’s building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China’s building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China’s building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China’s building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

  3. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    Hydroelectricity ..long term demand. 5. Hydroelectricity China’s hydroelectricSummary of China’s Hydroelectricity Reserves”, Sate Power

  4. Projections of highway vehicle population, energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions in India through 2040.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, S.; Vyas, A.; Johnson, L.; Energy Systems

    2011-02-22

    This paper presents projections of motor vehicles, oil demand, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions for India through the year 2040. The populations of highway vehicles and two-wheelers are projected under three different scenarios on the basis of economic growth and average household size in India. The results show that by 2040, the number of highway vehicles in India would be 206-309 million. The oil demand projections for the Indian transportation sector are based on a set of nine scenarios arising out of three vehicle-growth and three fuel-economy scenarios. The combined effects of vehicle-growth and fuel-economy scenarios, together with the change in annual vehicle usage, result in a projected demand in 2040 by the transportation sector in India of 404-719 million metric tons (8.5-15.1 million barrels per day). The corresponding annual CO{sub 2} emissions are projected to be 1.2-2.2 billion metric tons.

  5. Electricity demand-side management for an energy efficient future in China : technology options and policy priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Chia-Chin

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to identify robust technology and policy options which achieve substantial reductions in electricity demand in China's Shandong Province. This research utilizes a scenario-based ...

  6. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel T.; Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David G.

    2009-07-01

    Urbanization has re-shaped China's economy, society, and energy system. Between 1990 and 2007 China added 290 million new urban residents, bringing the total urbanization rate to 45%. This population adjustment spurred energy demand for construction of new buildings and infrastructure, as well as additional residential use as rural biomass was replaced with urban commercial energy services. Primary energy demand grew at an average annual rate of 10% between 2000 and 2007. Urbanization's effect on energy demand was compounded by the boom in domestic infrastructure investment, and in the export trade following World Trade Organization (WTO) accession in 2001. Industry energy consumption was most directly affected by this acceleration. Whereas industry comprised 32% of 2007 U.S. energy use, it accounted for 75% of China's 2007 energy consumption. Five sub-sectors accounted for 78% of China's industry energy use in 2007: iron and steel, energy extraction and processing, chemicals, cement, and non-ferrous metals. Ferrous metals alone accounted for 25% of industry and 18% of total primary energy use. The rapid growth of heavy industry has led China to become by far the world's largest producer of steel, cement, aluminum, and other energy-intensive commodities. However, the energy efficiency of heavy industrial production continues to lag world best practice levels. This study uses scenario analysis to quantify the impact of urbanization and trade on industrial and residential energy consumption from 2000 to 2025. The BAU scenario assumed 67% urbanization, frozen export amounts of heavy industrial products, and achievement of world best practices by 2025. The China Lightens Up (CLU) scenario assumed 55% urbanization, zero net exports of heavy industrial products, and more aggressive efficiency improvements by 2025. The five dominant industry sub-sectors were modeled in both scenarios using a LEAP energy end-use accounting model. The results of this study show that a CLU-style development path would avoid 430 million tonnes coal-equivalent energy use by 2025. More than 60% of these energy savings would come from reduced activity and production levels. In carbon terms, this would amount to more than a billion-tonne reduction of energy-related carbon emissions compared with the BAU scenario in 2025, though the absolute level of emissions rises in both scenarios. Aside from the energy and carbon savings related to CLU scenario development, this study showed impending saturation effects in commercial construction, urban appliance ownership, and fertilizer application. The implication of these findings is that urbanization will have a direct impact on future energy use and emissions - policies to guide urban growth can play a central role in China's efforts to mitigate emissions growth.

  7. SICSA is able to provide bursaries for researchers in Informatics and Computing Sciences at SICSA institutions to take part in researcher visits to Europe, North America, China and India.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    institutions to take part in researcher visits to Europe, North America, China and India. The main purpose: Europe = £300 North America = £600 China & India = £1000 Accommodation is limited to £75 per night (for America, China or India only · Visit must be for a minimum of one month. This can be applied as one

  8. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

  9. Electricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options and Policy Priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Neufville Professor of Engineering Systems Chair, ESD Education Committee #12;2 #12;3 Electricity DemandElectricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options: ______________________________________________________________ : Stephen R. Connors Director, Analysis Group for Regional Electricity Alternatives Thesis Supervisor

  10. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    refer to IEA (2007), World Energy Outlook 2007: China andIEA (2007), World Energy Outlook 2007: China and India

  11. Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

    2009-05-30

    The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

  12. What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    2012. Addressing Electricity Demand through Demand Response:has been driving up the electricity demand while widespreadexperiences in addressing electricity demand This section is

  13. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2010-01-01

    66: China CO 2 Emissions in Global Context WEO '08 globalmt CO2 WEO '08 China CLU Source: IEA, 2008 World Energy

  14. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    in this volume; India — Tata Energy Research Institute,of China 1994; India — LDC Energy Database, InternationalReview, 1994; India —LDC Energy Database, International

  15. What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    K.C. Mares, D. Shroyer. , 2010. Demand Response andOpen Automated Demand Response Opportunities for DataProcessing Industry Demand Response Participation: A Scoping

  16. Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Study of Coal in India's Future Energy Scope. Tata EnergyLabeling and Energy Efficiency Standards in India. Indianproducts: The case of India." Energy Policy 36(9): CLASP .

  17. Global Carbon Emissions in the Coming Decades: The Case of China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    2007. World Energy Outlook 2007: China and India Insights.2007. World Energy Outlook 2007: China and India Insights.

  18. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01

    and Sathaye, 2008. “India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand inand Sathaye, 2008. “India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand inand Sathaye, 2008. “India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in

  19. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2010-01-01

    growth and of energy-intensive exports to 2025. Withinlevels and export activity, total energy use dips slightlydemand for energy-intensive Chinese exports as China‘s WTO

  20. What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    the ongoing pilot demand-side management (DSM) programs ina comprehensive demand-side management (DSM) pilot program,a directive on demand-side management (DSM) in late 2010.

  1. What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    of preferred resources, placing energy efficiency and demandPromoting Energy Efficiency as a Cost-Effective Resource infor energy efficiency and demand response resources. Peak

  2. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    by climate change and glacial melting. Several of theseassumptions have changed. Glacial melting and climate changeof these changes. Glacial melting and climate change The

  3. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    relating to hydroelectricity generation, irrigation water,resources to generate hydroelectricity Managing watershedsFor example, micro-hydroelectricity generation may be an

  4. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    hydro. International Hydro Power and Dam Construction.suggested) Supply of hydro-electric power * Supply of waterrights ? Supply of hydro-electric power ? Supply of water

  5. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    Ganges-Brahmaputra Region: Bangladesh Perspective. ” NaturalBrahmaputra-Barak Basins, Bangladesh Unnayan Parishad,Development Studies; Dhaka: Bangladesh Unnayan Parishad.

  6. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    2009 T ABLE 1: L ARGER HYDROELECTRIC AND DIVERSION PROJECTSin the promotion of hydroelectric power is not known. Bothwas primarily focused on hydroelectric power coming from the

  7. The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    in the promotion of hydroelectric power is not known. Bothwas primarily focused on hydroelectric power coming from theirrigation and hydroelectric power generation schemes better

  8. What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    increases in electricity consumption. To meet the surgingthe efficiency of electricity consumption in industrial2008 had lowered electricity consumption in China, a massive

  9. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2010-01-01

    CO2 emissions per capita Urban Rural Commercial Only Source:Emissions in Global Context WEO '08 global mt CO2 WEO '08 China CLU Source:

  10. What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    and Hebei. Regulation on load management To tackle China’sparticularly governing load management. The regulation,It further requires that load management take the following

  11. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    2007). Coping with Residential Electricity Demand in India'stowards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of2007. “Coping with Residential Electricity Demand in India’s

  12. China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Ed., David

    2008-01-01

    China India Japan USA Russia Electricity Heat Gas LiquidChina India Japan USA Russia Electricity China India HeatRussia India Japan Electricity Russia USA Heat Russia USA

  13. Modeling regional transportation demand in China and the impacts of a national carbon constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kishimoto, Paul

    2015-01-30

    Climate and energy policy in China will have important and uneven impacts on the country’s regionally heterogeneous transport system. In order to simulate these impacts, transport sector detail is added to a multi-sector, ...

  14. Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    in use patterns and electricity rates between commercial andRates Residential electricity rates are much lower thanin India. Residential electricity rates are subsidized to a

  15. China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Ed., David

    2008-01-01

    China India Japan USA Russia Gas China India Non-hydroChina India Japan USA Russia Gas China Russia USA Russia USAIndia Japan USA Russia Electricity Heat Gas Liquid Coal Non-

  16. Carbon Offsetting: An Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions or to Avoid Reducing Emissions? An Investigation and Analysis of Offsetting Design and Practice in India and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haya, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    52 India’s energybackground information on India’s energy and sugar sectors,2. BACKGROUND 2.1. India’s energy sector The potential

  17. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    current pace of growth in oil demand as staying consistentthis point, China’s demand Oil Demand vs. Domestic Supply inand predictions of oil supply and demand affected foreign

  18. Scenarios of Building Energy Demand for China with a Detailed Regional Representation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Eom, Jiyong; Zhou, Yuyu; Evans, Meredydd; Clarke, Leon E.

    2014-02-07

    Building energy consumption currently accounts for 28% of China’s total energy use and is expected to continue to grow induced by floorspace expansion, income growth, and population change. Fuel sources and building services are also evolving over time as well as across regions and building types. To understand sectoral and regional difference in building energy use and how socioeconomic, physical, and technological development influence the evolution of the Chinese building sector, this study developed a building energy use model for China downscaled into four climate regions under an integrated assessment framework. Three building types (rural residential, urban residential, and commercial) were modeled specifically in each climate region. Our study finds that the Cold and Hot Summer Cold Winter regions lead in total building energy use. The impact of climate change on heating energy use is more significant than that of cooling energy use in most climate regions. Both rural and urban households will experience fuel switch from fossil fuel to cleaner fuels. Commercial buildings will experience rapid growth in electrification and energy intensity. Improved understanding of Chinese buildings with climate change highlighted in this study will help policy makers develop targeted policies and prioritize building energy efficiency measures.

  19. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    by Source, 1992 I.Mtce Country Coal Liquid Gas China India*Japan USA FSUf Country Coal Liquid Gas China India* JapanElectricity t V Coal & Cokef Liquids U Natural Gas Delivered

  20. Energy Demand Staff Scientist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    #12;Sources: China National Bureau of Statistics; U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook. Overview:Overview: Energy Use in China and the U.S.Energy Use in China and the U.S. 5 0Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused

  1. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    India i Japan Electricity Q i USA G a s China EnergyIndia Japan USA FSUf 3S4.8 Liquid Gas Electricity Heat fiIndia Japan USA FSU World f H Hydro- electricity Uranium §

  2. China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Ed., David

    2008-01-01

    Comparisons Japan India China Energy Databook 7.0 TableJapan USA Russia China India China Energy Databook 7.0 JapanAssociation, 1994; India and FSU — LDC Energy Database,

  3. China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Ed., David

    2008-01-01

    Non-Hydro Renewable Energy, Mtoe Country China India JapanNon-hydro Renewable Energy, Shares Country China India JapanNon-Hydro Renewable Energy, Mtoe Country China India Japan

  4. Radiative forcing due to major aerosol emitting sectors in China and India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sectors in China have near-zero net global forcings. Coal-fired power plants in both countries exert, but they extend as far as North America, Europe, and the Arctic. Citation: Streets, D. G., D. T. Shindell, Z. Lu and Faluvegi [2010] focused on the net climate forcing of emissions from coal- fired power plants, emphasizing

  5. Carbon Offsetting: An Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions or to Avoid Reducing Emissions? An Investigation and Analysis of Offsetting Design and Practice in India and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haya, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    2008), of which wind and small hydro dominate (Ministry oflarge & small) Wind in India Biomass in India Hydro in India

  6. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich James

    2011-01-01

    in residential electricity demand. Physical residential70% of China’s net electricity demand (Figure 25). Heavycharacteristic of electricity demand in China. From 1980 to

  7. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    Singapore Russia Korea, South Imports Exports Source: Chinaand Russia, while leading target markets for exports areShare of exports Unit: (%) India Japan USA FSU/ Russia China

  8. Environmental Challenges of Climate-Nuclear Fusion: A Case Study of India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badrinarayan, Deepa

    2011-01-01

    example. Recognizing India's energy demands and the climatecountries such as India, nuclear energy is shaping climateat GOVERNMENT OF INDIA, ATOMIC ENERGY REGULATORY BOARD,

  9. The Political Economy of Wind Power in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Ryan Landon

    2011-01-01

    Outlook for China’s Electricity Demand (2010) [?????? ???and rapidly growing electricity demand. By extension, thisare assured high electricity demand and grid companies need

  10. Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Phillippines and Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2008-01-01

    potential for carbon sequestration and emission reductionForestry Options on Carbon Sequestration in India, Workinggas emissions and carbon sequestration in the forest sector

  11. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    India. Prayas. (2005). Demand-Side Management (DSM) in theEnergy Efficiency and Demand Side Management (DSM). PlanningDemand Growth Demand Side Management Delhi Transco Limited

  12. Carbon Offsetting: An Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions or to Avoid Reducing Emissions? An Investigation and Analysis of Offsetting Design and Practice in India and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haya, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    effectively promote renewable energy in India. I analyzedCDM and renewable energy professionals in India is that manyof CDM and renewable energy professionals in India together

  13. Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    reported in IEA India transportation energy data. DifferentKeywords: India, transport, energy demand, decomposition,balance for India, transport energy consumption represents

  14. Is The Financial Crisis Playing Against China In Africa?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOLA NOUCK, Lucien

    2009-01-01

    University. His main area of research is China-Africa andIndia-Africa relations.Playing Against China In Africa? Introduction Since they

  15. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01

    239 Mt World's Oil Consumption (2010) US China Japan IndiaKorea Canada Other Total World Oil Consumption: 4,028 MtTotal China Oil Consumption: 445 Mt Natural Gas Production

  16. Gauging Improvements in Urban Building Energy Policy in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    J. Sathaye. 2009. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand ineetools.in/. New Delhi, India: Bureau of Energy Efficiency.Report on Building Energy Codes in India. Richland, Wash. :

  17. The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    first China and now India to emerging as ‘energy giants’, afluorescent lamps (CFLs) in India." Energy Policy 31 : 259-India Market consideration (semi automatic machines versus horizontal axis) Fans (kWh/year) Water (USDOE 2005) (Sakulin and Energy

  18. SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yijun

    turbines, jet engines, nuclear power plants and space crafts, have placed severe demands on highSCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences © Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  19. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01

    61 4.3.2 Crude Oil Demand and Tradeor no impact on China’s crude oil import demand. Rather,for reductions in crude oil imports and coal demand in its

  20. Gender, Sanitation, and Political Leadership in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yu Jung

    2015-01-01

    India . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in India . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 India’s Sanitation

  1. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-28

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

  2. Analysis of International Policies In The Solar Electricity Sector: Lessons for India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Ranjit

    2011-01-01

    market outlook for photovoltaics until 2015”. 39 Solaroutlook for photovoltaics until 2015”. Figure 7: China’s annual solarsolar promotion policies in seven countries - Germany, Spain, the United States, Japan, China, Taiwan, and India – in terms of their outlook,

  3. Global Carbon Emissions in the Coming Decades: The Case of China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Agency. 2007. World Energy Outlook 2007: China and IndiaAgency. 2007. World Energy Outlook 2007: China and IndiaInf. Adm. 2007. Annual Energy Outlook 2007. DOE/EIA-0484(

  4. China Energy Primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2009-11-16

    Based on extensive analysis of the 'China Energy Databook Version 7' (October 2008) this Primer for China's Energy Industry draws a broad picture of China's energy industry with the two goals of helping users read and interpret the data presented in the 'China Energy Databook' and understand the historical evolution of China's energy inustry. Primer provides comprehensive historical reviews of China's energy industry including its supply and demand, exports and imports, investments, environment, and most importantly, its complicated pricing system, a key element in the analysis of China's energy sector.

  5. Carbon Offsetting: An Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions or to Avoid Reducing Emissions? An Investigation and Analysis of Offsetting Design and Practice in India and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haya, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    for wind, biomass and hydropower projects in India, Iat wind power, biomass energy and hydropower projects inassumptions 43 Hydropower projects: inappropriate

  6. Carbon Offsetting: An Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions or to Avoid Reducing Emissions? An Investigation and Analysis of Offsetting Design and Practice in India and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haya, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    2001. Commercial scale cogeneration of bagasse energy inS. C. Bagasse based cogeneration, India marching ahead .1998. Promotion of biomass cogeneration with power export in

  7. Stumbling Toward Capitalism: The State, Global Production Networks, and the Unexpected Emergence of China's Independent Auto Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Crystal Whai-ku

    2011-01-01

    and trends of China‘s Oil Demand. ? Congress Papers, WorldMotor Vehicle Growth, Oil Demand, and CO2 Emissions throughin China: Trends in Oil Demand and Imports/;, International

  8. A Surgeon in Wartime China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Lyle Stephenson

    1946-01-01

    the Hooghly and then the Brahmaputra River to this area. From here they were flown over the Hump, or the Himalaya Mountains, by our American Air Corps and A.T.C. pilots. The Japanese had of course cut off the only other en trance into China, the Burma... Effort in Ckina THE X, Y, AND Z FORCES T THE TIME of my arrival in China, January, 1944, the war effort in China, Burma, and India was com- JL JL.bined into one theater, known as the C.B.I. (China, Burma, India) under the command of General Joseph W...

  9. Demand Reduction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

  10. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    of growth in residential energy demand in China will requirein Table 1. Residential energy demand is shaped by a varietydrivers of energy and demand in residential buildings are

  11. China's Pathways to Energy Security 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Steven; Caruana, Craig; Coats, Charles; Haguewood, Robert; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Morgan, Broderick; Murray, Joshua; Riedell, Michael

    2010-01-01

    43, 2009) 220,000 bpd of Kazakhstan’s total oil exports of 1.0 million bpd goes to China Kazakhstan is a major oil nation, with more oil reserves (30 bil. Barrels est) than the US and half that of Russia Kazakhstan the only Cen. Asian nation... increasingly concerned about China’s economic clout China’s economy still export driven - Attempting to create a larger domestic market China’s demand increase between 2006 - 2020 Coal: 7,400% Copper: 600% Iron Ore: 380% Wood: 330% Soy: 80% Manganese: 30...

  12. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    assumption of four distinct motivations in pursuing international oilassumption that China has a unified strategy for international oiloil demand as staying consistent into the future, but this is perhaps an unreasonable assumption;

  13. Implications of maximizing China's technical potential for residential end-use energy efficiency: A 2030 outlook from the bottom-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khanna, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Levine. 2012. “China's Energy and Emissions Outlook to 2050:on China’s Future Energy and Emissions Outlook. LBNL-4032E.Energy Demand Outlook

  14. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    rural, k=Kerosene m=rural, k=biogas m =urban, k=LPG m=urban,k=LPG k=wood k=kerosene k=biogas k=electricity k=electricity

  15. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    of oil use for the need of LPG and kerosene for cooking andSector PJ Fuel Oil Diesel Oil LPG Electricity Source: CEA,PJ) PJ fuel oil diesel LPG electricity Energy consumption is

  16. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Efficiency in Electricity Consumption", HWWA Discussionelectricity includes electricity consumption plus thedistribution. Total electricity consumption represents 1,654

  17. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Crises & Climate Challenges - 30 Years of Energy Use in IEACountries”, IEA/OECD, Paris, France. International Energy2006a. “World Energy Outlook”, IEA/OECD, Paris, France.

  18. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Technology for Indian Pulp and Paper Industry” Newsletter ofwith 13% and the pulp and paper industry with 9%. Similarly,and Paper The Indian pulp and paper industry is the sixth

  19. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    for cooking and lighting. Biomass energy consumption willused in an economy, biomass energy consumption is certainlyby a large share of biomass energy use representing 50% of

  20. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    7 Figure 3. Energy Consumption in the Agriculture Sector (13 Figure 6. Energy Consumption in the ServiceFinal and Primary Energy Consumption in the Industry Sector,

  1. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Statistics and Programme Implementation published a condensed version of statics related to energy production and consumption (

  2. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    2002, “TEDDY: TERI’s energy data directory and yearbook2006. “TEDDY: TERI’s energy data directory and yearbookU.S. DOE, 2006, “Buildings Energy Data Book 2006”, September

  3. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    same activities that require energy today will continue toaccounting of how energy is consumed today. For each sector,

  4. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    and 6 million diesel irrigation pump sets in operation (rural areas, pump sets are installed to provide irrigation

  5. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    5% of its reserve is coking coal used by the steel industry.imports around 70% of coking coal annually. More recently,

  6. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Diesel, 18% Primary Electricity Diesel, 49% Electricty,51% Electricty Data Adjustment Electricity consumption from

  7. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    gas oil nuclear hydro Energy output Own Uses Transmissiongas oil nuclear hydro Energy output Own Uses Transmissionenergy equivalence of electricity generated from hydro or

  8. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    photovoltaic water pumping systems since 1993- 94. About 7,000 pump set were installed with a capacity

  9. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    of 43% of total oil consumption. The residential sectorrepresenting 63% and oil consumption representing the rest.the diesel and fuel oil consumption are included, the total

  10. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    first electricity distribution and transmission (T&D)Own Uses Transmission and distribution losses ElectricityOwn Uses Transmission and distribution loses Electricity

  11. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    N. Zhou, 2009. Residential Electricity Demand in China –Cangas emissions, demand from residential and commercialgas emissions, demand from residential and commercial

  12. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

  13. A comparative study of maritime operations in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukundan, Harish

    2007-01-01

    This thesis studies the maritime sector of India, specifically using China as a basis for comparison. Chinese economic impact is studied under the two major headings: the effective use of non-living and living resources. ...

  14. A Model for India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Patricia Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Foundation Program in India WHO, World Health OrganizationA Model for IndiaDescription India is a conservative country. Talking about

  15. Building Energy Efficiency in India: Compliance Evaluation of Energy Conservation Building Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Delgado, Alison

    2014-03-26

    India is experiencing unprecedented construction boom. The country doubled its floorspace between 2001 and 2005 and is expected to add 35 billion m2 of new buildings by 2050. Buildings account for 35% of total final energy consumption in India today, and building energy use is growing at 8% annually. Studies have shown that carbon policies will have little effect on reducing building energy demand. Chaturvedi et al. predicted that, if there is no specific sectoral policies to curb building energy use, final energy demand of the Indian building sector will grow over five times by the end of this century, driven by rapid income and population growth. The growing energy demand in buildings is accompanied by a transition from traditional biomass to commercial fuels, particularly an increase in electricity use. This also leads to a rapid increase in carbon emissions and aggravates power shortage in India. Growth in building energy use poses challenges to the Indian government. To curb energy consumption in buildings, the Indian government issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which applies to commercial buildings with a connected load of 100 kW or 120kVA. It is predicted that the implementation of ECBC can help save 25-40% of energy, compared to reference buildings without energy-efficiency measures. However, the impact of ECBC depends on the effectiveness of its enforcement and compliance. Currently, the majority of buildings in India are not ECBC-compliant. The United Nations Development Programme projected that code compliance in India would reach 35% by 2015 and 64% by 2017. Whether the projected targets can be achieved depends on how the code enforcement system is designed and implemented. Although the development of ECBC lies in the hands of the national government – the Bureau of Energy Efficiency under the Ministry of Power, the adoption and implementation of ECBC largely relies on state and local governments. Six years after ECBC’s enactment, only two states and one territory out of 35 Indian states and union territories formally adopted ECBC and six additional states are in the legislative process of approving ECBC. There are several barriers that slow down the process. First, stakeholders, such as architects, developers, and state and local governments, lack awareness of building energy efficiency, and do not have enough capacity and resources to implement ECBC. Second, institution for implementing ECBC is not set up yet; ECBC is not included in local building by-laws or incorporated into the building permit process. Third, there is not a systematic approach to measuring and verifying compliance and energy savings, and thus the market does not have enough confidence in ECBC. Energy codes achieve energy savings only when projects comply with codes, yet only few countries measure compliance consistently and periodic checks often indicate poor compliance in many jurisdictions. China and the U.S. appear to be two countries with comprehensive systems in code enforcement and compliance The United States recently developed methodologies measuring compliance with building energy codes at the state level. China has an annual survey investigating code compliance rate at the design and construction stages in major cities. Like many developing countries, India has only recently begun implementing an energy code and would benefit from international experience on code compliance. In this paper, we examine lessons learned from the U.S. and China on compliance assessment and how India can apply these lessons to develop its own compliance evaluation approach. This paper also provides policy suggestions to national, state, and local governments to improve compliance and speed up ECBC implementation.

  16. InDemandInDemandInDemand Energize Your Career

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    InDemandInDemandInDemand Energize Your Career You can join the next generation of workers who in Energy #12;#12;In Demand | 1 No, this isn't a quiz...but if you answered yes to any or all and Training Administration wants you to have this publication, In Demand: Careers in Energy. It will let you

  17. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Shui, Bin; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2009-04-07

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America. This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in India, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes in India, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial buildings in India.

  18. Nuclear programs in India and Pakistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mian, Zia

    2014-05-09

    India and Pakistan launched their respective nuclear programs in the 1940s and 1950s with considerable foreign technical support, especially from the United States Atoms for Peace Program. The technology and training that was acquired served as the platform for later nuclear weapon development efforts that included nuclear weapon testing in 1974 and in 1998 by India, and also in 1998 by Pakistan - which had illicitly acquired uranium enrichment technology especially from Europe and received assistance from China. As of 2013, both India and Pakistan were continuing to produce fissile material for weapons, in the case of India also for nuclear naval fuel, and were developing a diverse array of ballistic and cruise missiles. International efforts to restrain the South Asian nuclear build-up have been largely set aside over the past decade as Pakistani support became central for the U.S. war in Afghanistan and as U.S. geopolitical and economic interests in supporting the rise of India, in part as a counter to China, led to India being exempted both from U.S non-proliferation laws and international nuclear trade guidelines. In the absence of determined international action and with Pakistan blocking the start of talks on a fissile material cutoff treaty, nuclear weapon programs in South Asia are likely to keep growing for the foreseeable future.

  19. VideoonDemandVideoonDemandVideoonDemand Video on Demand Testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleftheriadis, Alexandros

    VideoonDemandVideoonDemandVideoonDemand Columbia's Video on Demand Testbed and Interoperability Experiment Columbia's Video on Demand Testbed and Interoperability Experiment S.-F. Chang and A Columbia UniversityColumbia University www.www.ctrctr..columbiacolumbia..eduedu/advent/advent #12;VideoonDemandVideoonDemandVideoonDemand

  20. VideoonDemandVideoonDemandVideoonDemand Video on Demand Testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleftheriadis, Alexandros

    #12;VideoonDemandVideoonDemandVideoonDemand Columbia's Video on Demand Testbed and Interoperability Experiment Columbia's Video on Demand Testbed and Interoperability Experiment H.H. KalvaKalva, A.www.eeee..columbiacolumbia..eduedu/advent/advent #12;VideoonDemandVideoonDemandVideoonDemand VoD Testbed ArchitectureVoD Testbed Architecture Video

  1. China Brief, Volume 7, Issue 1 SAFETY CHALLENGES IN CHINA'S COAL MINING INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) of coal produced in China was 2.73 in 2005, it was a mere 0.04 in the United States [2]. Even India,995 deaths annually in the last decade, though independent experts state that China's actual death toll technologies and strict regulations. Therefore, while the official fatality rate per million tonnes (mt

  2. India's Worsening Uranium Shortage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2007-01-15

    As a result of NSG restrictions, India cannot import the natural uranium required to fuel its Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs); consequently, it is forced to rely on the expediency of domestic uranium production. However, domestic production from mines and byproduct sources has not kept pace with demand from commercial reactors. This shortage has been officially confirmed by the Indian Planning Commission’s Mid-Term Appraisal of the country’s current Five Year Plan. The report stresses that as a result of the uranium shortage, Indian PHWR load factors have been continually decreasing. The Uranium Corporation of India Ltd (UCIL) operates a number of underground mines in the Singhbhum Shear Zone of Jharkhand, and it is all processed at a single mill in Jaduguda. UCIL is attempting to aggrandize operations by establishing new mines and mills in other states, but the requisite permit-gathering and development time will defer production until at least 2009. A significant portion of India’s uranium comes from byproduct sources, but a number of these are derived from accumulated stores that are nearing exhaustion. A current maximum estimate of indigenous uranium production is 430t/yr (230t from mines and 200t from byproduct sources); whereas, the current uranium requirement for Indian PHWRs is 455t/yr (depending on plant capacity factor). This deficit is exacerbated by the additional requirements of the Indian weapons program. Present power generation capacity of Indian nuclear plants is 4350 MWe. The power generation target set by the Indian Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is 20,000 MWe by the year 2020. It is expected that around half of this total will be provided by PHWRs using indigenously supplied uranium with the bulk of the remainder provided by breeder reactors or pressurized water reactors using imported low-enriched uranium.

  3. India to participate in fusion PTI[ FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2004 03:44:29 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    India to participate in fusion PTI[ FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2004 03:44:29 PM ] NEW DELHI : India as the future technology to meet growing energy demands of the world, officials said on Friday. The issue was discussed here on Thursday at an Indo-UK Science and Technology Joint Committee meeting. India has expressed

  4. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    and J. Sathaye (2009). India Energy Outlook: End Use Demandand Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trends and Futureenergy demand, forecasting, end use, bottom-up, China, India,

  5. Compost marketing guidelines for solid municipal waste management in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ellen, M. Eng. (Ellen C.). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    India has a waste problem. With the world's second largest population at 1.252 billion individuals, a population density of 382 persons per square kilometer and consumer behavior demanding a higher standard of life and ...

  6. Environmental and economic tradeoffs in building materials production in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuchman, Nina Shayne

    2014-01-01

    The current and projected growth of India's economy and population will continue to lead to increased demand for buildings and infrastructure, and there is a real need to consider what this increase means in terms of natural ...

  7. Conservation Potential of Compact Fluorescent Lamps in India and Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Residential Energy Demand in Brazil and Income Classes:in Brazil: Potential and Pro- gress", ENERGY, vol. 13, no.decreasing energy services in India and Brazil. The initial

  8. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

  9. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    of China’s Renewable Energy Policy Framework: China’sof China’s Renewable Energy Policy Framework: China’spromote renewable energy through governmental policies have

  10. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    ??????? ??????????????"); IEA, WEO 2007; IEA Greenhouse Gastonnes exceeded the IEA’s WEO 2000 forecast for 2020 coalCoal Consumption, 1980-2025 WEO 2008 IEO 2008 IEO 2000 NDRC

  11. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    of deploying advanced coal power in the Chinese context,”12 2.6. International coal prices and12 III. Chinese Coal

  12. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    CO2 control technology effects on IGCC plant performance and cost,”CO2 control technology effects on IGCC plant performance and cost,”

  13. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    delivered heating (district heating) (6%), and chemicalscoal growth. As district heating expands with urbanizationzone, coal use for district heating will depend on the

  14. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    Press. IEA. (2007) World Energy Outlook 2007. Pan Kexi. (IEA 2008, various years. World Energy Outlook. Paris: OECD/s total IEA. (2007) World Energy Outlook 2007. World Energy

  15. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    an expanded power generation quota trading program wherebypower plants and raise cash to manage shutdowns. Quota trading

  16. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    materials (6%), delivered heating (district heating) (6%),coal growth. As district heating expands with urbanizationzone, coal use for district heating will depend on the

  17. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007capacity displayed above hydropower in this figure. 3.3.1.load factor 86 GW of hydropower capacity @ 50% load factor

  18. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    Natural Gas Coal 233 billion tonnes coal equivalent 97% total fossil fuel reserve base Reserves by location, quality,

  19. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    US emission data are from the IEA World Energy Outlook,world conventional fossil fuel reserves were coal by energy content; 19% were oil, and 19% natural gas. Data

  20. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    19 3.4. Coking coal for iron & steels FOB export value for coking coal was relatively stables FOB export value for coking coal significantly increased

  1. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    Central government support for nuclear and renewable energyCentral government support for nuclear and renewable energy

  2. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    IEA. (2007) World Energy Outlook 2007. Pan Kexi. (2005) “TheIEA 2008, various years. World Energy Outlook. Paris: OECD/2006). International Energy Outlook 2006. Washington DC:

  3. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    pollution. With coal and liquid transport fuel deficits in26 3.6. Coal-to-liquids and coal-to-70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60

  4. Public participation in shantytown transformation in China : a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Luxi

    2015-01-01

    Public participation is not a familiar concept in China but there is a growing demand from urban planners and policymakers in China to understand and utilize public participation tools. This research seeks to answer: How ...

  5. Extreme Energy in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, Nina; Fridley, David; Cai, Lixue

    2013-06-01

    Over the last decade, China has focused its policies simultaneously on moderating the rapid energy demand growth that has been driven by three decades of rapid economic growth and industrialization and on increasing its energy supply. In spite of these concerted efforts, however, China continues to face growing energy supply challenges, particularly with accelerating demand for oil and natural gas, both of which are now heavily dependent on imports. On the supply side, the recent 11th and 12th Five-Year Plans have emphasized accelerating conventional and nonconventional oil and gas exploration and development through pricing reforms, pipeline infrastructure expansions and 2015 production targets for shale gas and coal seam methane. This study will analyze China’s new and nonconventional oil and gas resources base, possible development paths and outlook, and the potential role for these nonconventional resources in meeting oil and gas demand. The nonconventional resources currently being considered by China and included in this study include: shale gas, coal seam methane (coal mine methane and coal bed methane), tight gas, in-situ coal gasification, tight oil and oil shale, and gas hydrates.

  6. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  7. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  8. The Political Economy of Wind Power in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Ryan Landon

    2011-01-01

    Renewable power for China: Past, present, and future,? Frontiers of Energyfuture energy demand. Wind power must be complemented with other renewable

  9. China energy databook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, J.E.; Levine, M.D.; Feng Liu; Davis, W.B.; Jiang Zhenping; Zhuang Xing; Jiang Kejun; Zhou Dadi

    1992-12-31

    The Energy Analysis Program (EAP) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) first became involved in Chinese energy issues through a joint China-US symposium on markets and demand for energy held in Nanjing in November of 1988. Discovering common interests, EAP began to collaborate on projects with the Energy Research Institute (ERI) of China`s State Planning Commission. In the course of this work it became clear that a major issue in the furtherance of our research was the acquisition of reliable data. In addition to other, more focused activities-evaluating programs of energy conservation undertaken in China and the prospects for making Chinese industrics morc energy-efficient, preparing historical reviews of cncrgy supply and demand in the People`s Republic of China, sponsoring researchers from China to work with experts at LBL on such topics as energy efficiency standards for buildings, adaptation of US energy analysis software to Chinese conditions, and transportation issues-we decided to compile, assess, and organize Chinese energy data. Preparing this volume confronted us with a number of difficult issues. The most frustrating usually involved the different approaches to sectoral divisions taken in China and the US. For instance, fuel used by motor vehicles belonging to industrial enterprises is counted as industrial consumption in China; only fuel use by vehicles belonging to enterprises engaged primarily in transportation is countcd as transportation use. The estimated adjustment to count all fuel use by vehicles as transportation energy use is quite large, since a large fraction of motor vehicles belong to industrial enterprises. Similarly, Chinese industrial investment figures are skewed compared to those collected in the US because a large portion of enterprises` investment funds is directed towards providing housing and social services for workers and their families.

  10. China energy databook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, J.E.; Levine, M.D.; Feng Liu; Davis, W.B. ); Jiang Zhenping; Zhuang Xing; Jiang Kejun; Zhou Dadi )

    1992-11-01

    The Energy Analysis Program (EAP) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) first becamc involved in Chinese energy issues through a joint China-US symposium on markets and demand for energy held in Nanjing in November of 1988. Discovering common interests, EAP began to collaborate on projects with the Energy Research Institute (ERI) of China's State Planning Commission. In the course of this work it became clear that a major issue in the furtherance of our research was the acquisition of reliable data. In addition to other, more focused activities-evaluating programs of energy conservation undertaken in China and the prospects for making Chinese industries more energy-efficient, preparing historical reviews of energy supply and demand in the People's Republic of China, sponsoring researchers from China to work with experts at LBL on such topics as energy efficiency standards for buildings, adaptation of US energy analysis software to Chinese conditions, and transportation issues-we decided to compile, assess, and organize Chinese energy data. We are hopeful that this volume will not only help us in our work, but help build a broader community of Chinese energy policy studies within the US.

  11. China energy databook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, J.E.; Levine, M.D.; Feng Liu; Davis, W.B. ); Jiang Zhenping; Zhuang Xing; Jiang Kejun; Zhou Dadi )

    1992-01-01

    The Energy Analysis Program (EAP) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) first became involved in Chinese energy issues through a joint China-US symposium on markets and demand for energy held in Nanjing in November of 1988. Discovering common interests, EAP began to collaborate on projects with the Energy Research Institute (ERI) of China's State Planning Commission. In the course of this work it became clear that a major issue in the furtherance of our research was the acquisition of reliable data. In addition to other, more focused activities-evaluating programs of energy conservation undertaken in China and the prospects for making Chinese industrics morc energy-efficient, preparing historical reviews of cncrgy supply and demand in the People's Republic of China, sponsoring researchers from China to work with experts at LBL on such topics as energy efficiency standards for buildings, adaptation of US energy analysis software to Chinese conditions, and transportation issues-we decided to compile, assess, and organize Chinese energy data. Preparing this volume confronted us with a number of difficult issues. The most frustrating usually involved the different approaches to sectoral divisions taken in China and the US. For instance, fuel used by motor vehicles belonging to industrial enterprises is counted as industrial consumption in China; only fuel use by vehicles belonging to enterprises engaged primarily in transportation is countcd as transportation use. The estimated adjustment to count all fuel use by vehicles as transportation energy use is quite large, since a large fraction of motor vehicles belong to industrial enterprises. Similarly, Chinese industrial investment figures are skewed compared to those collected in the US because a large portion of enterprises' investment funds is directed towards providing housing and social services for workers and their families.

  12. India’s Grand Strategy: Some Preliminary Thoughts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOYT, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    or series of shocks might push India into a similar trajec-of threats that might force India to reconsider its currentPOLICY BRIEF 5, JANUARY 2012 India’s Grand Strategy: Some

  13. Demand for Environmentally-Friendly Durables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Leslie Aimee

    2012-01-01

    presents fuel use statistics for India’s largest industries.inputs. Summary statistics describing India’s policy reformscase of india. The Review of Economics and Statistics, 93(

  14. Microfinance regulation in China and India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gowrie-Smith, Lachlan Ian

    2010-01-01

    The regulatory responses of Governments in different countries to emerging microfinance sectors have varied dramatically and as a result so have the outcomes for these sectors. As two of the fastest growing developing ...

  15. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

  16. Africa N. of visitors Asia N. of visitors Latin America N. of visitors Algeria 109 India 348 Brazil 131

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    India 348 Brazil 131 Nigeria 86 Iran 150 Argentina 78 Egypt 66 China 137 Colombia 71 South Africa 63 - CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS (CMSP) ! 2 - MATHEMATICS (Math)! 1 - High Energy Physics (HECAP) ! 1 - Physics

  17. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01

    benefits of Demand Side Management (DSM) are insufficient toefficiency, demand side management (DSM) cost effectivenessResearch Center Demand Side Management Demand Side Resources

  18. Residential Demand Sector Data, Commercial Demand Sector Data, Industrial Demand Sector Data - Annual Energy Outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Tables describing consumption and prices by sector and census division for 2006 - includes residential demand, commercial demand, and industrial demand

  19. Does Management Matter? Evidence from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloom, Nicholas; Eifert, Benn; Mahajan, Aprajit; McKenzie, David; Roberts, John

    2012-01-01

    MATTER? EVIDENCE FROM INDIA Nicholas Bloom a , Benn Eifertorganization, productivity and India. Acknowledgements:textile industry? Despite India’s recent rapid growth, total

  20. ICTs and Rural Development in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2006-01-01

    USA World Bank (2003), India: Sustaining Reform, ReducingReferences iii ICTs and India’s Development – Nirvikarare many efforts underway in India and other developing

  1. The community-based partnership approach for affordable housing development : a case in Shenzhen, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Feifei

    2009-01-01

    Affordable housing has been a crucial urban issue in China. Given its fast-paced urbanization process, China is experiencing a dramatic increase in the demand for affordable housing. At the same time, the affordable housing ...

  2. Analyzing the Regional Impact of a Fossil Energy Cap in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, D.

    Decoupling fossil energy demand from economic growth is crucial to China’s sustainable development. In addition to energy and carbon intensity targets enacted under the Twelfth Five-Year Plan (2011–2015), a coal or fossil ...

  3. China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Ed., David

    2008-01-01

    Gas Heat Non-hydro Electricity renewables Total Coal LiquidGas Coal Liquid Coal Heat 2. Shares Country China IndiaUSA Russian Federation Coal Liquid Gas Heat Coal Liquid Gas

  4. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Chinese Transportation Fuel Demand

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s, China has experienced tremendous growth in its transportation sector. By the end of 2010, China's road infrastructure had emerged as the second-largest transportation system in the world after the United States. Passenger vehicle sales are dramatically increasing from a little more than half a million in 2000, to 3.7 million in 2005, to 13.8 million in 2010. This represents a twenty-fold increase from 2000 to 2010. The unprecedented motorization development in China led to a significant increase in oil demand, which requires China to import progressively more petroleum from other countries, with its share of petroleum imports exceeding 50% of total petroleum demand since 2009. In response to growing oil import dependency, the Chinese government is adopting a broad range of policies, including promotion of fuel-efficient vehicles, fuel conservation, increasing investments in oil resources around the world, and many others.

  5. China energy databook. 1992 Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, J.E.; Levine, M.D.; Feng Liu; Davis, W.B.; Jiang Zhenping; Zhuang Xing; Jiang Kejun; Zhou Dadi

    1992-11-01

    The Energy Analysis Program (EAP) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) first becamc involved in Chinese energy issues through a joint China-US symposium on markets and demand for energy held in Nanjing in November of 1988. Discovering common interests, EAP began to collaborate on projects with the Energy Research Institute (ERI) of China`s State Planning Commission. In the course of this work it became clear that a major issue in the furtherance of our research was the acquisition of reliable data. In addition to other, more focused activities-evaluating programs of energy conservation undertaken in China and the prospects for making Chinese industries more energy-efficient, preparing historical reviews of energy supply and demand in the People`s Republic of China, sponsoring researchers from China to work with experts at LBL on such topics as energy efficiency standards for buildings, adaptation of US energy analysis software to Chinese conditions, and transportation issues-we decided to compile, assess, and organize Chinese energy data. We are hopeful that this volume will not only help us in our work, but help build a broader community of Chinese energy policy studies within the US.

  6. DEMAND INTERPROCEDURAL PROGRAM ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reps, Thomas W.

    1 DEMAND INTERPROCEDURAL PROGRAM ANALYSIS USING LOGIC DATABASES Thomas W. Reps Computer Sciences@cs.wisc.edu ABSTRACT This paper describes how algorithms for demand versions of inerprocedural program­ analysis for all elements of the program. This paper concerns the solution of demand versions of interprocedural

  7. Capacity Demand Power (GW)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Capacity Demand Power (GW) Hour of the Day The "Dip" Electricity Demand in Electricity Demand Every weekday, Japan's electricity use dips about 6 GW at 12 but it also shows that: · Behavior affects naHonal electricity use in unexpected ways

  8. Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION This appendix provides more detail on some of the topics raised in Chapter 4, "Demand Response" of the body of the Plan. These topics include 1. The features, advantages and disadvantages of the main options for stimulating demand response (price mechanisms

  9. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    DECC aggregator managed portfolio automated demand responseaggregator designs their own programs, and offers demand responseaggregator is responsible for designing and implementing their own demand response

  10. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01

    Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

  11. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

  12. Demand Response Programs for Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Programs for Oregon Utilities Public Utility Commission May 2003 Public Utility ....................................................................................................................... 1 Types of Demand Response Programs............................................................................ 3 Demand Response Programs in Oregon

  13. China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Ed., David

    2008-01-01

    Source: World Energy Council, 2001. China data on uraniumdata from International Energy Studies Group, EAP, LBNL; India, Russian Federation and WorldWorld Bank, online database Chapter 9, International Comparisons China Energy Databook 7.0 Table 9B.26. Demographic Data

  14. Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2013-01-01

    energy efficiency measures in heavy industry in China, India, Brazil,and energy (including electricity) in 2003-2004 were about 0.65 t CO 2 /t of cement in Brazil,Brazil, 78% in Italy, 80% in Spain, 74% in China, and 91% in the United This article was originally published in “Energy

  15. Exponential Demand Simulation Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Derek D.

    2015-05-15

    Operant behavioral economics investigates the relation between environmental constraint and reinforcer consumption. The standard approach to quantifying this relation is through the use of behavioral economic demand curves. ...

  16. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing Increased Charging Demand Carrie Giles ICF International, Supporting the Workplace Charging Challenge Workplace Charging Challenge Do you already own an EV? Are you...

  17. China's energy-water nexus – assessment of the energy sector's compliance with the “3 Red Lines” industrial water policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Ying; Curmi, Elizabeth; Kopec, Grant M.; Allwood, Julian M.; Richards, Keith S.

    2015-04-02

    Increasing population and economic growth continue to drive China's demand for energy and water resources. The interaction of these resources is particularly important in China, where water resources are unevenly distributed, with limited...

  18. Structure and geochronological constraints on the ductile deformation observed along the Gaoligong Shan and Chong Shan Shear Zones, Yunnan (China)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akciz, Sinan Osman, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism by which the Cenozoic post-collisional northward motion of India relative to Eurasia and South China was accommodated along its eastern boundary is still a poorly understood aspect of the tectonic evolution ...

  19. Energy Usage Attitudes of Urban India IBM Research India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Energy Usage Attitudes of Urban India Mohit Jain IBM Research India mohitjain@in.ibm.com Deepika@cs.cmu.edu Amarjeet Singh IIIT Delhi, India amarjeet@iiitd.ac.in Abstract-- Though rapid increase in energy factors affecting energy consumption in urban India. However, the small numbers of participants in those

  20. Electrical Demand Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below...

  1. Farmland Reforestation in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Peter Alfred

    2010-01-01

    suitability evaluation in desertification-affected northwind erosion and desertification plague much of China’swind erosion and desertification plague much of China’s

  2. The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

    2008-05-13

    With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

  3. Gender, Sanitation, and Political Leadership in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yu Jung

    2015-01-01

    India and UP, 2001-2011 Descriptive Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .India’s National Sample Survey Organisation, which is under the Ministry of Statistics

  4. Fiscal Federalism and Decentralization in India?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2007-01-01

    Provision of Public Goods in India,” Asian Survey, Vol. 44,State Transfers in India”, processed, Indian Statistical1988), Municipal Finance in India: Based on Orissa, New

  5. Essays on India in a Global Context    

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2014-01-01

    India’s geography and infrastructure. In renewable energy,renewable energy sources, as a way of cutting down on problematic fossil fuels, is an area where India

  6. Lurching towards markets for power: China's electricity policy 19852007 Xiaoli Zhao a,c,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyon, Thomas P.

    responsive to electricity demand and price signals to some extend. However, it cannot be proved a consistent balance between energy supply and demand [1]. A growing shortage of electricity in China forcedLurching towards markets for power: China's electricity policy 1985­2007 Xiaoli Zhao a,c, , Thomas

  7. Energy use and CO2 emissions of China’s industrial sector from a global perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Sheng; Kyle, G. Page; Yu, Sha; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Luckow, Patrick W.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Zhang, Xiliang; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-07-10

    The industrial sector has accounted for more than 50% of China’s final energy consumption in the past 30 years. Understanding the future emissions and emissions mitigation opportunities depends on proper characterization of the present-day industrial energy use, as well as industrial demand drivers and technological opportunities in the future. Traditionally, however, integrated assessment research has handled the industrial sector of China in a highly aggregate form. In this study, we develop a technologically detailed, service-oriented representation of 11 industrial subsectors in China, and analyze a suite of scenarios of future industrial demand growth. We find that, due to anticipated saturation of China’s per-capita demands of basic industrial goods, industrial energy demand and CO2 emissions approach a plateau between 2030 and 2040, then decrease gradually. Still, without emissions mitigation policies, the industrial sector remains heavily reliant on coal, and therefore emissions-intensive. With carbon prices, we observe some degree of industrial sector electrification, deployment of CCS at large industrial point sources of CO2 emissions at low carbon prices, an increase in the share of CHP systems at industrial facilities. These technological responses amount to reductions of industrial emissions (including indirect emission from electricity) are of 24% in 2050 and 66% in 2095.

  8. "Are Distributed Energy Systems Optimal In India?" Narayanan Komerath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .9% 22.5% Petroleum 1,410,000 GWh 34.4% 39.7% Natural Gas 267,000 GWh 6.5% 23.2% Hydroelectric 258 THE PROBLEM The US Department of Energy[2] projects that year 2010 Indian energy consumption will be 13 to 15 Quadrillion BTUs. This compares with 97 for the US, 40 for China and 23 for Japan. India is far from President

  9. WTERT-India Observations from India's Crisis Ranjith Annepu Observations from India's Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) ­ India, 89-B, NEERI Mumbai Zonal Lab, Worli, Mumbai, MH 400018, India In 2012, for the first time in the history of India, the country has seen to Energy in India" organized in Mumbai ­ August 23-24, 2012 can be found here. More information about

  10. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd; Lin, H.; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing; Song, Bo; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2009-04-15

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in China, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope and HVAC) for commercial and residential buildings in China.

  11. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as wind, solar, and electric vehicles as well as dispatchable loads and microgrids. Many of these resources will be "behind-the-meter" (i.e., demand resources) and...

  12. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    2-1). In addition to attaining oil resources, China’s energyWith limited domestic oil resources, China’s major oilgrowth, limited crude oil resources and the late development

  13. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    International Energy Agency (IEA), China’s Worldwide QuestSecurity, (Paris: OCED/IEA, 2000), 74. Thomas Woodrow, “TheInternational Energy Agency (IEA), China’s Worldwide Quest

  14. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.

  15. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.

  16. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    H. , and James M. Gri¢ n. 1983. Gasoline demand in the OECDof dynamic demand for gasoline. Journal of Econometrics 77(An empirical analysis of gasoline demand in Denmark using

  17. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

  18. California's Futures: Accommodating Growth in An Era of Climate Change and Rising Fuel Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    especially China and India. Oil demand is a growing concerncoal, oil, and natural gas. Two-thirds of the new demand

  19. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Sterner. 1991. Analysing gasoline demand elasticities: A2011. Measuring global gasoline and diesel price and incomeMutairi. 1995. Demand for gasoline in Kuwait: An empirical

  20. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01

    No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

  1. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Expansion .Challenges to China’s Nuclear Expansion China’s nuclearto China’s rapid nuclear expansion will be nuclear waste

  2. Hythane project by Hydrogen China Ltd and China Railway Construction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hythane project by Hydrogen China Ltd and China Railway Construction Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hythane project by Hydrogen China Ltd and China Railway...

  3. Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang Steven Low Computing + Math Sciences Electrical Engineering Caltech Oct 2011 #12;Outline Caltech smart grid research Optimal demand response #12;Global trends 1

  4. ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................1-16 Energy Consumption Data...............................................1-15 Data Sources for Energy Demand Forecasting ModelsCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report

  5. THE HUNDRED BILLION DOLLAR BONUS: Global Energy Efficiency Lessons from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Seema

    2012-01-01

    could: Eliminate India’s energy deficit by 2014 Addyears, supporters of India’s energy efficiency efforts hoperole in addressing India’s growing energy challenge while

  6. Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.

    1998-05-01

    First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

  7. India’s Grand Strategy: Some Preliminary Thoughts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOYT, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    security relationship with Pakistan. As China’s reliance onmilitary crises with Pakistan and avoided a majorlikely source is, sadly, Pakistan, which maintains a robust

  8. Estimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlini, David

    Estimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand Amos Golan* Jeffrey an almost ideal demand system for five types of meat using cross-sectional data from Mexico, where most households did not buy at least one type of meat during the survey week. The system of demands is shown

  9. Peer-Assisted On-Demand Streaming: Characterizing Demands and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Peer-Assisted On-Demand Streaming: Characterizing Demands and Optimizing Supplies Fangming Liu Abstract--Nowadays, there has been significant deployment of peer-assisted on-demand streaming services over the Internet. Two of the most unique and salient features in a peer-assisted on-demand streaming

  10. Women’s Pathways to Mental Health in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sood, Anubha

    2008-01-01

    Pathways to Mental Health in India: Comparing Psychiatry andindeed, doubts concerning India’s commitment to developmentwere popular and thriving in India was a matter of shame for

  11. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    fraction of residential and commercial demands, leading16 Residential electricity demand endspecific residential electricity demands into electricity

  12. Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required in electricity demand is, of course, crucial to determining the need for new electricity resources and helping of any forecast of electricity demand and developing ways to reduce the risk of planning errors

  13. Fact #669: April 4, 2011 GM Sells More Vehicles in China than in the U.S.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the first time ever, General Motors (GM) sold more cars and trucks in China than in the United States. The demand in China grew by 29% from 2009 to 2010, while demand in the U.S. grew 6%. These...

  14. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    Urban Households Clothes Washer Color TV Refrigerator AC Fans per 100 households per 100 households Unit Energy Consumption Baseline and Efficiency

  15. Energy Demand in China (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn

    2011-06-08

    Lynn Price, LBNL scientist, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  16. China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd Jump to:ChangingCNE Jump to:NewCooperation

  17. International Transportation Energy Demand Determinants (ITEDD): Prototype Results for China

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full2% of domestic oilInterimJim

  18. Opportunities and Challenges for Solar Minigrid Development in Rural India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thirumurthy, N.; Harrington, L.; Martin, D.; Thomas, L.; Takpa, J.; Gergan, R.

    2012-09-01

    The goal of this report is to inform investors about the potential of solar minigrid technologies to serve India's rural market. Under the US-India Energy Dialogue, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is supporting the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE)'s Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission (JNNSM) in performing a business-case and policy-oriented analysis on the deployment of solar minigrids in India. The JNNSM scheme targets the development of 2GW of off-grid solar power by 2022 and provides large subsidies to meet this target. NREL worked with electricity capacity and demand data supplied by the Ladakh Renewable Energy Development Agency (LREDA) from Leh District, to develop a technical approach for solar minigrid development. Based on the NREL-developed, simulated solar insolation data for the city of Leh, a 250-kW solar photovoltaic (PV) system can produce 427,737 kWh over a 12-month period. The business case analysis, based on several different scenarios and JNNSM incentives shows the cost of power ranges from Rs. 6.3/kWh (US$0.126) to Rs. 9/kWh (US$0.18). At these rates, solar power is a cheaper alternative to diesel. An assessment of the macro-environment elements--including political, economic, environmental, social, and technological--was also performed to identify factors that may impact India?s energy development initiatives.

  19. Resource demand growth and sustainability due to increased world consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balatsky, Alexander V.; Balatsky, Galina I.; Borysov, Stanislav S.

    2015-03-20

    The paper aims at continuing the discussion on sustainability and attempts to forecast the impossibility of the expanding consumption worldwide due to the planet’s limited resources. As the population of China, India and other developing countries continue to increase, they would also require more natural and financial resources to sustain their growth. We coarsely estimate the volumes of these resources (energy, food, freshwater) and the gross domestic product (GDP) that would need to be achieved to bring the population of India and China to the current levels of consumption in the United States. We also provide estimations for potentially needed immediate growth of the world resource consumption to meet this equality requirement. Given the tight historical correlation between GDP and energy consumption, the needed increase of GDP per capita in the developing world to the levels of the U.S. would deplete explored fossil fuel reserves in less than two decades. These estimates predict that the world economy would need to find a development model where growth would be achieved without heavy dependence on fossil fuels.

  20. Resource demand growth and sustainability due to increased world consumption

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balatsky, Alexander V.; Balatsky, Galina I.; Borysov, Stanislav S.

    2015-03-20

    The paper aims at continuing the discussion on sustainability and attempts to forecast the impossibility of the expanding consumption worldwide due to the planet’s limited resources. As the population of China, India and other developing countries continue to increase, they would also require more natural and financial resources to sustain their growth. We coarsely estimate the volumes of these resources (energy, food, freshwater) and the gross domestic product (GDP) that would need to be achieved to bring the population of India and China to the current levels of consumption in the United States. We also provide estimations for potentially neededmore »immediate growth of the world resource consumption to meet this equality requirement. Given the tight historical correlation between GDP and energy consumption, the needed increase of GDP per capita in the developing world to the levels of the U.S. would deplete explored fossil fuel reserves in less than two decades. These estimates predict that the world economy would need to find a development model where growth would be achieved without heavy dependence on fossil fuels.« less

  1. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    retail regulatory authority prohibit such activity. Demand response integration into US wholesale power marketsretail or wholesale level. 17 While demand response began participating at scale in wholesale power markets

  2. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    unfettered access to oil resources including the possibleChina’s search for oil resources around the world. However,a survey of China’s oil resources, while others focus

  3. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    crude oil and natural gas, Russia has become China’s crucialprovinces 19 . Although a Russia-China gas pipeline projectnatural gas supply • Geopolitics such as Russia vs. Central

  4. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developApril 21, “China and Venezuela sign oil agreements. ” Chinaaccessed April 21, “Venezuela and China sign oil deal. ” BBC

  5. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    China made an Iranian oil investment valued at $70 billion.across Iran, China’s oil investment may exceed $100 billionthese involving investment in oil and gas, really undermine

  6. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    China and the Middle East: Energy First,” Middle EastChina and the Middle East: Energy First,” Middle EastChina and the Middle East: Energy First,” Middle East

  7. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    development in East China Sea • Energy Efficiency • EnergyAfrica Middl East Source: China Energy Databook, V.7.0. ,SouthCentral East 800 Mtce Source: China Energy Databook,

  8. An Anatomy of China's Energy Insecurity and Its Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Bo

    2005-12-06

    China’s energy insecurity largely originates from its constrained availability, questionable reliability, and uncertain affordability of its oil supplies. The country’s fast industrialization and urbanization, together with demand for infrastructure and increasing popularity of automobiles, requires a lot of energy, but it consumes energy both intensively and inefficiently, threatening the environmental well-being of China and its neighbors. China’s risk aversion and poor energy policy making system further magnifies its perceptions of the low availability, reliability and affordability of oil imports, which further compounds its sense of energy insecurity. Distrustful of the market, and suspicious of other major energy players in the international market, the Chinese leadership relies on the state-centered approach, or economic nationalism, rather than a market approach to enhance its energy security. However, the country lacks not only an energy policy making system that can make and implement sound energy policies but also an energy market that relies on market prices to allocate energy resources efficiently. As a result of this domestic failure, China has pushed its national flagship companies to undertake a global scavenger hunt for energy while muddling along a messy road of energy reform at home. Setbacks in acquiring new sources of oil have validated the Chinese leadership’s belief that the international oil market is not free and China’s access to international oil is not guaranteed through the market. China’s problems in the international energy market are also perceived as evidence of attempts to prevent China from exerting international influence. China’s leadership is convinced that China should focus on areas where western capital is not heavily concentrated or where western influences are weak. With the recent revaluation of Chinese currency and growing economy, China has both the wherewithal and appetite to acquire more oil assets abroad. Both China and the United States stand at a critical juncture of history where China’s rise depends on reliable energy supplies which it increasingly imports from abroad and where the growing wealth of the United States is increasingly dependent upon China’s success. If China does not have energy security it’s 1.3 billion fuel-starved people will prevent the rest of the world from achieving energy security.

  9. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2DepartmentDelta Dental Claim Form PDF iconDemand

  10. Revelation on Demand Nicolas Anciaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revelation on Demand Nicolas Anciaux 1 · Mehdi Benzine1,2 · Luc Bouganim1 · Philippe Pucheral1 "revelation on demand". Keywords: Confidentiality and privacy, Secure device, Data warehousing, Indexing model

  11. by popular demand: Addiction II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niv, Yael

    by popular demand: Addiction II PSY/NEU338:Animal learning and decision making: Psychological, size of other non-drug rewards, and cost (but ultimately the demand is inelastic, or at least

  12. Demand Response: Load Management Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01

    Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs V. Residential Discussion... Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off-peak period or from high-price periods...

  13. China energy databook. Revision 2, 1992 edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, J.E.; Levine, M.D.; Liu, Feng; Davis, W.B.; Jiang Zhenping; Zhuang Xing; Jiang Kejun; Zhou Dadi

    1993-06-01

    The Energy Analysis Program at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) first became involved in Chinese energy issues through a joint China-US symposium on markets and demand for energy held in Nanjing in November of 1988. Discovering common interests, EAP began to collaborate on projects with the Energy Research Institute of China`s State Planning Commission. In the course of this work it became clear that a major issue in the furtherance of our research was the acquisition of reliable data. In addition to other, more focused activities-evaluating programs of energy conservation undertaken in China and the prospects for making Chinese industries more energy-efficient, preparing historical reviews of energy supply and demand in the People`s Republic of China, sponsoring researchers from China to work with experts at LBL on such topics as energy efficiency standards for buildings, adaptation of US energy analysis software to Chinese conditions, and transportation issues, we decided to compile, assess, and organize Chinese energy data. We are hopeful that this volume will not only help us in our work, but help build a broader community of Chinese energy policy studies within the US. In order to select appropriate data from what was available we established several criteria. Our primary interest was to use the data to help understand the historical evolution and likely future of the Chinese energy system. A primary criterion was thus that the data relate to the structure of energy supply and demand in the past and indicate probable developments (e.g., as indicated by patterns of investment). Other standards were accuracy, consistency with other information, and completeness of coverage. This is not to say that all the data presented herein are accurate, consistent, and complete, but where discrepancies and omissions do occur we have tried to note them.

  14. Chord on Demand Alberto Montresor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelasity, Márk

    Chord on Demand Alberto Montresor University of Bologna, Italy montresor@cs.unibo.it M´ark Jelasity to solve a specific task on demand. We introduce T- CHORD, that can build a Chord network efficiently to solve a specific task on demand. Existing join protocols are not designed to handle the massive

  15. Supply Chain Supernetworks Random Demands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chain Supernetworks with Random Demands June Dong and Ding Zhang Department of Marketing of three tiers of decision-makers: the manufacturers, the distributors, and the retailers, with the demands equilibrium model with electronic commerce and with random demands for which modeling, qualitative analysis

  16. Chord on Demand Alberto Montresor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chord on Demand Alberto Montresor University of Bologna, Italy montresor@cs.unibo.it Mark Jelasity to solve a specific task on demand. We introduce T- CHORD, that can build a Chord network efficiently on demand. Existing join protocols are not designed to handle the massive concurrency involved in a jump

  17. ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT Whitacre;Definitions of Demand Response · `The short-term adjustment of energy use by consumers in response to price to market or reliability conditions.' (NAESB) #12;Definitions of Demand Response · The common threads

  18. Assessment of Demand Response Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

  19. The Dynamics of Reform of India’s Federal System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2007-01-01

    Conflict and Economic Reform in the Developing World, Newconstraints to economic reforms that provide aggregateExpenditures and Economic Reform in India,” Journal of

  20. China's Energy Management System Program for Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, B.; Yu, Y.; Friedman, Z.; Taylor, R.

    2014-01-01

    Use: 1995 – 2010 Source: NBS, 2011b 9 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 1995 2000 2005 2010 P r i m a r y E n e r g y * ( M t c e ) Wood and wood products Transport equipment Non-specified industry Paper, pulp and printing Food... Poland China India Food and tobacco Textile and leather Wood and wood products Paper, pulp and printing Petrochemicals Chemicals and chemical products Non-metallic minerals Metals Machinery Transport equipment Total ESL-IE-14...

  1. Development and utilization of new and renewable energy with Stirling engine system for electricity in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, W.; Abenavoli, R.I.; Carlini, M.

    1996-12-31

    China is the largest developing country in the world. Self-supporting and self-sustaining energy supply is the only solution for development. Recently, fast economic development exposed gradually increasing pressure of energy demand and environment concern. In order to increase the production of electricity of China, the Stirling engine system should be developed. This paper provides an investigation of energy production and consumption in China. The main features of the energy consumption and the development objectives of China`s electric power industry are also described. The necessity and possibility of development of Stirling engine system is discussed.

  2. Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuters June 10, 2007 NGAMBE-TIKAR, Cameroon (Reuters) - From outside, Cameroon's Ngambe-Tikar forest the raw materials for Chinese exports to the West. China needs 5 million cubic meters more of tropical

  3. RS India Wind Energy Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETEREFU Elektronik GmbH JumpChinaRMRS India Wind

  4. Employee Spotlight: Dances of India

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jobs Career Stories Employee Spotlight Alina Deshpande Alina Deshpande-Dances of India Lab scientist Alina Deshpande teaches classical Indian dance and writes, produces,...

  5. ESCO Industry in China

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information about the development, achievements, and functions of the China Energy Conservation project and ESCO.

  6. The Minorities of China.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwyer, Arienne M.

    2005-01-01

    Citation: Dwyer, Arienne. (As “Areienne [sic] Dwyer”). 2005. The Minorities of China. In Carl Skutsch, ed. The Encyclopedia of the World’s Minorities. NY: Routledge: 286–294. Preprint. 286 THE MINORITIES OF CHINA Arienne M. Dwyer 1.... Introduction Though minorities constitute only 8.4% of the current population of the People’s Republic of China, they played an important role in China’s emergence as a nation-state. As they also occupy 60% of China’s landmass in strategic peripheral...

  7. Passenger transport in China under climate constraints : general equilibrium analysis, uncertainty, and policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kishimoto, Paul N

    2012-01-01

    Vehicle sales and road travel volume in China have grown rapidly in recent years, and with them energy demand, greenhouse gas emissions and local air pollution. Aviation and rail travel have also grown, while ceding a large ...

  8. China Energy Databook - Rev. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinton Editor, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Advertising Co. China Automotive Industry Corporation andQiche Gongye Nianjian (China Automotive Industry Yearbook).Board of the China Automotive Industry Yearbook. Editorial

  9. Demand Response Programs, 6. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-10-15

    The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

  10. Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Generating Demand for...

  11. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

  12. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01

    3 2.1 Demand-Side Managementbuildings. The demand side management framework is discussedIssues 2.1 Demand-Side Management Framework Forecasting

  13. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McParland, Charles

    2010-01-01

    LBNL Commercial and Residential Demand Response Overview ofmarket [5]. Residential demand reduction programs have beenin the domain of residential demand response. There are a

  14. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01

    their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

  15. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderatefor each day type for the demand response study - deep

  16. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01

    Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

  17. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01

    2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

  18. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

  19. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Like HECO actual utility demand response implementations canindustry-wide utility demand response applications tend toobjective. Figure 4. Demand Response Objectives 17  

  20. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01

    23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

  1. Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence 2009 Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool (January...

  2. Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Eto

    2014-01-01

    Barat, and D. Watson. 2007. Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby. 2009. Demand Response Spinning Reserveand B. Kirby. 2012. The Demand Response Spinning Reserve

  3. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    duty fuel demand in alternate scenarios. ..for light-duty fuel demand in alternate scenarios. Minimum52 Heavy-duty vehicle fuel demand for each alternate

  4. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    2006-2016: Staff energy demand forecast (Revised SeptemberCEC (2005b) Energy demand forecast methods report.California energy demand 2003-2013 forecast. California

  5. China's industrial sector in an international context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Lehman, Bryan; Sinton, Jonathan

    2000-05-01

    The industrial sector accounts for 40% of global energy use. In 1995, developing countries used an estimated 48 EJ for industrial production, over one-third of world total industrial primary energy use (Price et al., 1998). Industrial output and energy use in developing countries is dominated by China, India, and Brazil. China alone accounts for about 30 EJ (National Bureau of Statistics, 1999), or about 23% of world industrial energy use. China's industrial sector is extremely energy-intensive and accounted for almost 75% of the country's total energy use in 1997. Industrial energy use in China grew an average of 6.6% per year, from 14 EJ in 1985 to 30 EJ in 1997 (Sinton et al., 1996; National Bureau of Statistics, 1999). This growth is more than three times faster than the average growth that took place in the world during the past two decades. The industrial sector can be divided into light and heavy industry, reflecting the relative energy-intensity of the manufacturing processes. In China, about 80% of the energy used in the industrial sector is consumed by heavy industry. Of this, the largest energy-consuming industries are chemicals, ferrous metals, and building materials (Sinton et al., 1996). This paper presents the results of international comparisons of production levels and energy use in six energy-intensive subsectors: iron and steel, aluminum, cement, petroleum refining, ammonia, and ethylene. The sectoral analysis results indicate that energy requirements to produce a unit of raw material in China are often higher than industrialized countries for most of the products analyzed in this paper, reflecting a significant potential to continue to improve energy efficiency in heavy industry.

  6. Avoiding 100 New Power Plants by Increasing Efficiency of Room Air Conditioners in India: Opportunities and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Abhyankar, Nikit; Shah, Nihar

    2014-06-19

    Electricity demand for room ACs is growing very rapidly in emerging economies such as India. We estimate the electricity demand from room ACs in 2030 in India considering factors such as weather and income growth using market data on penetration of ACs in different income classes and climatic regions. We discuss the status of the current standards, labels, and incentive programs to improve the efficiency of room ACs in these markets and assess the potential for further large improvements in efficiency and find that efficiency can be improved by over 40percent cost effectively. The total potential energy savings from Room AC efficiency improvement in India using the best available technology will reach over 118 TWh in 2030; potential peak demand saving is found to be 60 GW by 2030. This is equivalent to avoiding 120 new coal fired power plants of 500 MW each. We discuss policy options to complement, expand and improve the ongoing programs to capture this large potential.

  7. Avoiding 100 new power plants by increasing efficiency of room air conditioners in India: opportunities and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Abhyankar, Nikit; Shah, Nihar

    2013-10-15

    Electricity demand for room ACs is growing very rapidly in emerging economies such as India. We estimate the electricity demand from room ACs in 2030 in India considering factors such as weather and income growth using market data on penetration of ACs in different income classes and climatic regions. We discuss the status of the current standards, labels, and incentive programs to improve the efficiency of room ACs in these markets and assess the potential for further large improvements in efficiency and find that efficiency can be improved by over 40% cost effectively. The total potential energy savings from Room AC efficiency improvement in India using the best available technology will reach over 118 TWh in 2030; potential peak demand saving is found to be 60 GW by 2030. This is equivalent to avoiding 120 new coal fired power plants of 500 MW each. We discuss policy options to complement, expand and improve the ongoing programs to capture this large potential.

  8. Why did China's Energy Intensity Increase during 1998-2006: Decomposition and Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    takes up about 70 percent of the total energy consumption. Per capita oil, natural gas and coal deposits consumption; Industrial policy; Energy price policy JEL: Q43; Q48 1. Introduction China's energy demand has. China's industrial energy consumption reached 1751.4 million ton of coal equivalent (mtce) in 2006

  9. Demand Response Technology Roadmap A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meetings and workshops convened to develop content for the Demand Response Technology Roadmap. The project team has developed this companion document in the interest of providing...

  10. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David

    2011-06-15

    In addition to promoting energy efficiency, China has actively pursued alternative energy development as a strategy to reduce its energy demand and carbon emissions. One area of particular focus has been to raise the share of alternative energy in China’s rapidly growing electricity generation with a 2020 target of 15% share of total primary energy. Over the last ten years, China has established several major renewable energy regulations along with programs and subsidies to encourage the growth of non-fossil alternative energy including solar, wind, nuclear, hydro, geothermal and biomass power as well as biofuels and coal alternatives. This study thus seeks to examine China’s alternative energy in terms of what has and will continue to drive alternative energy development in China as well as analyze in depth the growth potential and challenges facing each specific technology. This study found that despite recent policies enabling extraordinary capacity and investment growth, alternative energy technologies face constraints and barriers to growth. For relatively new technologies that have not achieved commercialization such as concentrated solar thermal, geothermal and biomass power, China faces technological limitations to expanding the scale of installed capacity. While some alternative technologies such as hydropower and coal alternatives have been slowed by uneven and often changing market and policy support, others such as wind and solar PV have encountered physical and institutional barriers to grid integration. Lastly, all alternative energy technologies face constraints in human resources and raw material resources including land and water, with some facing supply limitations in critical elements such as uranium for nuclear, neodymium for wind and rare earth metals for advanced solar PV. In light of China’s potential for and barriers to growth, the resource and energy requirement for alternative energy technologies were modeled and scenario analysis used to evaluate the energy and emission impact of two pathways of alternative energy development. The results show that China can only meets its 2015 and 2020 targets for non-fossil penetration if it successfully achieves all of its capacity targets for 2020 with continued expansion through 2030. To achieve this level of alternative generation, significant amounts of raw materials including 235 Mt of concrete, 54 Mt of steel, 5 Mt of copper along with 3 billion tons of water and 64 thousand square kilometers of land are needed. China’s alternative energy supply will likely have relatively high average energy output to fossil fuel input ratio of 42 declining to 26 over time, but this ratio is largely skewed by nuclear and hydropower capacity. With successful alternative energy development, 32% of China’s electricity and 21% of its total primary energy will be supplied by alternative energy by 2030. Compared to the counterfactual baseline in which alternative energy development stumbles and China does not meet its capacity targets until 2030, alternative energy development can displace 175 Mtce of coal inputs per year and 2080 Mtce cumulatively from power generation by 2030. In carbon terms, this translates into 5520 Mt of displaced CO{sub 2} emissions over the twenty year period, with more than half coming from expanded nuclear and wind power generation. These results illustrate the critical role that alternative energy development can play alongside energy efficiency in reducing China’s energy-related carbon emissions.

  11. Supply Chain Supernetworks With Random Demands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chain Supernetworks With Random Demands June Dong Ding Zhang School of Business State Field Warehouses: stocking points Customers, demand centers sinks Production/ purchase costs Inventory Customer Demand Customer Demand Retailer OrdersRetailer Orders Distributor OrdersDistributor Orders

  12. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    2013-9 January 2013 China’s Nuclear Industry After FukushimaMarch 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident has had a significanton the future of China’s nuclear power. First, it highlights

  13. China Energy Group - Sustainable Growth Through EnergyEfficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, Mark; Fridley, David; Lin, Jiang; Sinton, Jonathan; Zhou,Nan; Aden, Nathaniel; Huang, Joe; Price, Lynn; McKane, Aimee T.

    2006-03-20

    China is fueling its phenomenal economic growth with huge quantities of coal. The environmental consequences reach far beyond its borders--China is second only to the United States in greenhouse gas emissions. Expanding its supply of other energy sources, like nuclear power and imported oil, raises trade and security issues. Soaring electricity demand necessitates the construction of 40-70 GW of new capacity per year, creating sustained financing challenges. While daunting, the challenge of meeting China's energy needs presents a wealth of opportunities, particularly in meeting demand through improved energy efficiency and other clean energy technologies. The China Energy Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is committed to understanding these opportunities, and to exploring their implications for policy and business. We work collaboratively with energy researchers, suppliers, regulators, and consumers in China and elsewhere to: better understand the dynamics of energy use in China. Our Research Focus Encompasses Three Major Areas: Buildings, Industry, and Cross-Cutting Activities. Buildings--working to promote energy-efficient buildings and energy-efficient equipment used in buildings. Current work includes promoting the design and use of minimum energy efficiency standards and energy labeling for appliances, and assisting in the development and implementation of building codes for energy-efficient residential and commercial/public buildings. Past work has included a China Residential Energy Consumption Survey and a study of the health impacts of rural household energy use. Industry--understanding China's industrial sector, responsible for the majority of energy consumption in China. Current work includes benchmarking China's major energy-consuming industries to world best practice, examining energy efficiency trends in China's steel and cement industries, implementing voluntary energy efficiency agreements in various industries, and developing a multi-year program for standards and for optimizing the industrial motor systems in China. Past work has included a comprehensive study of China's oil refining sector. Cross-Cutting--analysis and research focused on multisector, policy, and long-term development issues. Current cross-cutting policy and analysis research includes work on government procurement programs; energy service companies; a national energy policy assessment including the National Energy Strategy released by the government in early 2005; energy efficiency policy; an analysis of past trends in energy consumption in China as well as of future scenarios; and our China Energy Databook accompanied by chapter summaries and analysis of recent trends.

  14. Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools & Strategies Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools & Strategies Presentation slides from the Better...

  15. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01

    Data Collection for Demand-side Management for QualifyingPrepared by Demand-side Management Task Force of the

  16. Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility,...

  17. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01

    Acknowledgments SUMMARY Electricity Demand ElectricityAdverse Impacts ELECTRICITY DEMAND . . . .Demand forElectricity Sales Electricity Demand by Major Utility

  18. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    continue to pursue nuclear expansion as part of an energythe rapid expansion of China’s nuclear industry requires a

  19. China and India Industrial Efficiency NREL Partnership | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd Jump to:ChangingCNE Jump to:New Energy Development

  20. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Unleashing the Potential of Renewable Energy in India.of Potential for Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (of Potential for Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (

  1. Medical tourism? A case study of African patients in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Allyson M

    2013-01-01

    resistance  mechanism  in  India,  Pakistan,  and  the  infectious   diseases  in  India."   The  Lancet,  2011.  Sequence  Type  14  from  India."   Antimicrobial  Agents  

  2. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  3. GOVERNMENT RESPONSE TO SELF-DETERMINATION MOVEMENTS: A CASE STUDY COMPARISON IN INDIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hariharan, Pritha

    2014-12-31

    Bangladesh in 1971. The years after Independence through the 1950s were full of turmoil with protests and strikes in different parts of the country. Using the combination of an iron hand and the States Reorganization Act of 1956, the leaders of newly... international attention, other movements that are associated with multiple fatalities and human rights abuses are largely ignored. In the northeast, India shares borders with China to the north, Myanmar (Burma) to the east, Bangladesh to the southwest...

  4. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Levine, Mark

    2011-02-15

    As a result of soaring energy demand from a staggering pace of economic expansion and the related growth of energy-intensive industry, China overtook the United States to become the world's largest contributor to CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007. At the same time, China has taken serious actions to reduce its energy and carbon intensity by setting both a short-term energy intensity reduction goal for 2006 to 2010 as well as a long-term carbon intensity reduction goal for 2020. This study presents a China Energy Outlook through 2050 that assesses the role of energy efficiency policies in transitioning China to a lower emission trajectory and meeting its intensity reduction goals. Over the past few years, LBNL has established and significantly enhanced its China End-Use Energy Model which is based on the diffusion of end-use technologies and other physical drivers of energy demand. This model presents an important new approach for helping understand China's complex and dynamic drivers of energy consumption and implications of energy efficiency policies through scenario analysis. A baseline ('Continued Improvement Scenario') and an alternative energy efficiency scenario ('Accelerated Improvement Scenario') have been developed to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and potential actions, and to evaluate the potential for China to control energy demand growth and mitigate emissions. In addition, this analysis also evaluated China's long-term domestic energy supply in order to gauge the potential challenge China may face in meeting long-term demand for energy. It is a common belief that China's CO{sub 2} emissions will continue to grow throughout this century and will dominate global emissions. The findings from this research suggest that this will not necessarily be the case because saturation in ownership of appliances, construction of residential and commercial floor area, roadways, railways, fertilizer use, and urbanization will peak around 2030 with slowing population growth. The baseline and alternative scenarios also demonstrate that China's 2020 goals can be met and underscore the significant role that policy-driven energy efficiency improvements will play in carbon mitigation along with a decarbonized power supply through greater renewable and non-fossil fuel generation.

  5. Nuclear fuel cycle assessment of India: a technical study for U.S.-India cooperation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woddi, Taraknath Venkat Krishna

    2009-05-15

    The recent civil nuclear cooperation proposed by the Bush Administration and the Government of India has heightened the necessity of assessing India’s nuclear fuel cycle inclusive of nuclear materials and facilities. This agreement proposes...

  6. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    42 Figure 2-11 Crude Oil Production by Oilfield (1980-for 44.8% of China’s total oil production in 2006, a drop ofgas, a by-product of oil production, has been used primarily

  7. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    42 Figure 2-11 Crude Oil Production by Oilfield (1980-Stabilize the increase in crude oil production and implementSinopec CNOOC China’s crude oil production increased from

  8. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    Figure 5-10 Natural Gas (LNG) Price in Selected Countries (Figure 5-10 Natural Gas (LNG) Price in Selected CountriesPrices With China’s increasing dependency on the international natural gas (LNG)

  9. Shakespeare Studies in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Hui

    2012-05-31

    , the characteristic of Shakespeare studies in China is closely associated with the political and cultural situation of the time. This thesis chronicles and analyzes noteworthy scholarship of Shakespeare studies in China, especially since the 1990s, in terms...

  10. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    Michael T. Klare, Blood and Oil: The Dangers of America’sDowns and Jeffrey A. Bader, “Oil-Hungry China Belongs at BigChina, Africa, and Oil,” (Council on Foreign Relations,

  11. Plague From China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Boyd, David

    2011-02-09

    Broadcast Transcript: Those of you who have been paying attention to Postcards these past three years are already aware that China takes credit for many of the world's firsts, including pasta, gunpowder and golf. Well, China can add another first...

  12. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    7 Table 1-3 China’s Exploitable HydropowerGW of technically exploitable hydropower reserves capable ofTable 1-3). The major hydropower resources are in Southwest

  13. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    Efficiency • Energy related advanced equipment and high technology, such as nuclearEnergy Efficiency Target for Power Industry (2006-2010) . 22 Table 2-8 China’s Development Plan for Nuclear

  14. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    Industry and Gas to Power Generation, IEEJ. Ni, Chun Chun (Chun (2008), China’s Wind-Power Generation Policy and MarketInstalled Capacity and Power Generation (2006) . 60

  15. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    Potential in China’s Coal-fired Power Sector, IEEJ. Ni, ChunProjects for Existing Coal-fired Power Plants by CapacityConversion Plan for Existing Coal-fired Power Plants Table

  16. Research Outlook: China Focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with China's key national research agencies and institutions. With the signing of China Australia Free Trade and facilitate the safeguarding of bilateral trade and investment into the future. This publication provides

  17. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    5 ENERGY PRICES Figure 5-1 Major Coal Price Reforms (1980-117 Figure 5-2 Ex-Factory Coal Price Index (1980-Figure 6-14 Comparison of Coal Prices in China’s Domestic

  18. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

  19. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

  20. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    electricity. In this manner, demand side management is directly integrated into the wholesale capacity marketcapacity market U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Florida Reliability Coordinating Council incremental auctions independent electricity

  1. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    global gasoline and diesel price and income elasticities.shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.Habits and Uncertain Relative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con-

  2. California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    demands. Residential and commercial demand has a significantDemand by Sector Residential Peak Demand (MW) Commercialwe convert residential electricity demand based upon climate

  3. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and implement a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of demand response resources and to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to assess economic value of the realizable potential of demand response for ancillary services.

  4. Physically-based demand modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calloway, Terry Marshall

    1980-01-01

    nts on the demand. Of course the demand of a real a1r cond1t1oner has lower and upper bounds equal to 0 and 0 , respec- u tively. A constra1ned system can be simulated numerically, but there 1s no explicit system response formula s1m11ar... sect1on. It may now be instruct1ve to relate this model to that of Jones and Bri ce [5] . The average demand pred1 cted by their model is the expected value of the product of a load response factor 0 and a U sw1tching process H(t), which depends...

  5. A Global Review of Incentive Programs to Accelerate Energy-Efficient Appliances and Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    implemented energy-saving obligation schemes. This is theCertificates Energy saving obligation scheme Denmark DemandEU China India Energy saving obligation scheme Since 1995

  6. Washington State University Wins 2014 Hydrogen Student Design...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    low demand. Contest participants included 14 teams of students from the United States, Egypt, India, Japan, Taiwan, South Africa, and China. Representatives from the National...

  7. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    natural gas consumption, consumption in the North, East, and Southern ChinaConsumption Unit: (Mtce) Heat Natural Gas Total Petroleum Electricity Coke Total Coal Source: ChinaConsumption (Shares) Coal Crude Oil Natural Gas Electricity Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Electricity Source: China

  8. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (2011), doi:10.1016/j.Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (2011), doi:10.1016/j.most studies on India’s energy future have predicted only a

  9. Proceedings of the Chinese-American symposium on energy markets and the future of energy demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, S. (ed.)

    1988-11-01

    The Symposium was organized by the Energy Research Institute of the State Economic Commission of China, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Johns Hopkins University from the United States. It was held at the Johns Hopkins University Nanjing Center in late June 1988. It was attended by about 15 Chinese and an equal number of US experts on various topics related to energy demand and supply. Each presenter is one of the best observers of the energy situation in their field. A Chinese and US speaker presented papers on each topic. In all, about 30 papers were presented over a period of two and one half days. Each paper was translated into English and Chinese. The Chinese papers provide an excellent overview of the emerging energy demand and supply situation in China and the obstacles the Chinese planners face in managing the expected increase in demand for energy. These are matched by papers that discuss the energy situation in the US and worldwide, and the implications of the changes in the world energy situation on both countries. The papers in Part 1 provide historical background and discuss future directions. The papers in Part 2 focus on the historical development of energy planning and policy in each country and the methodologies and tools used for projecting energy demand and supply. The papers in Part 3 examine the pattern of energy demand, the forces driving demand, and opportunities for energy conservation in each of the major sectors in China and the US. The papers in Part 4 deal with the outlook for global and Pacific region energy markets and the development of the oil and natural gas sector in China.

  10. Seasonality in air transportation demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichard Megwinoff, H?tor Nicolas

    1988-01-01

    This thesis investigates the seasonality of demand in air transportation. It presents three methods for computing seasonal indices. One of these methods, the Periodic Average Method, is selected as the most appropriate for ...

  11. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring in an Agent-Based Smart Home, Proceedings of theConference on Smart Homes and Health Telematics, September,Smart Meter Motion sensors Figure 1: Schematic of the Demand Response Electrical Appliance Manager in a Home.

  12. Full Rank Rational Demand Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaFrance, Jeffrey T; Pope, Rulon D.

    2006-01-01

    Dover Publications 1972. Barnett, W.A. and Y.W. Lee. “TheEconometrica 53 (1985): 1421- Barnett, W.A. , Lee, Y.W. ,Laurent demand systems (Barnett and Lee 1985; Barnett, Lee,

  13. Residential Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

  14. Marketing Demand-Side Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    Demand-Side Management is an organizational tool that has proven successful in various realms of the ever changing business world in the past few years. It combines the multi-faceted desires of the customers with the increasingly important...

  15. Cambridge's "Our relationship with India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    Geotechnical centrifuge development Nanoscience and nanotech Thorium as uranium replacement P U N E Drug A N G A L O R E Conservation studies B A N G A L O R E Advanced materials EU­India grid

  16. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

    2007-05-01

    The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

  17. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01

    A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

  18. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mares, K.C.

    2010-01-01

    Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

  19. Optimal Demand Response and Power Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willett, Rebecca

    Optimal Demand Response and Power Flow Steven Low Computing + Math Sciences Electrical Engineering #12;Outline Optimal demand response n With L. Chen, L. Jiang, N. Li Optimal power flow n With S. Bose;Optimal demand response Model Results n Uncorrelated demand: distributed alg n Correlated demand

  20. Neighborhood design and the energy efficiency of urban lifestyle in China : treating residence and mobility as lifestyle bundle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning

    2012-01-01

    China and the rest of the world are facing the challenge of meeting energy demand sustainably. Household-level energy consumption is a large ultimate driving force of a nation's energy use. Realizing a sustainable energy ...

  1. REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    relatively high economic/demographic growth, relatively low electricity and natural gas rates REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand Bill Junker Manager DEMAND ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS

  2. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    high economic/demographic growth, relatively low electricity and natural gas rates, and relatively low CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand Manager DEMAND ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION

  3. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    relatively high economic/demographic growth, relatively low electricity and natural gas rates CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand Gough Office Manager DEMAND ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS

  4. Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Eto

    2014-01-01

    Barat, and D. Watson. 2007. Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby. 2009. Demand Response Spinning ReserveFormat of 2009-2011 Demand Response Activity Applications.

  5. Greater India Basin hypothesis and a two-stage Cenozoic collision between India and Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    Greater India Basin hypothesis and a two-stage Cenozoic collision between India and Asia Douwe J. J and where India­Asia convergence was accommodated after collision at or be- fore 52 Ma remains a long and 25 Ma. Paleomagnetic data show that this extended continental and oceanic "Greater India" promontory

  6. Published in India Today magazine, August 20, 2007 What Unites India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suri, Manil

    Published in India Today magazine, August 20, 2007 What Unites India Manil Suri Some years ago, I, customs, culture, language ­ they even look the same. What unites Finland? Everything does. India by India. According to this philosophy, the danger of fragmentation for a highly diverse society is so

  7. IEDC/GEDC ( INDIA CHAPTER )IEDC/GEDC ( INDIA CHAPTER ) Status Reportp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xun

    IEDC/GEDC ( INDIA CHAPTER )IEDC/GEDC ( INDIA CHAPTER ) Status Reportp Prof. N.R. Shettyy President, Indian Society for Technical Education Chairman, IEDC/GEDC(India Chapter) 21 October 2011, GEDCHighlights · Presence of 110+ deans ; 35+ from India · Acceptance of the objectives by the Deans

  8. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01

    Alternative Fuel/Vehicle for China’s Future Road Transport: Energyalternative fuel/vehicle for China’s future road transport: Life-cycle energyAlternative Fuel/Vehicle for china’s Future Road Transport: Energy

  9. Exponential Communication Ine ciency of Demand Queries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandholm, Tuomas W.

    FORECAST COMBINATION IN REVENUE MANAGEMENT DEMAND FORECASTING SILVIA RIEDEL A thesissubmitted Combination in RevenueManagement Demand Forecasting Abstract The domain of multi level forecastcombination

  10. Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Generating...

  11. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    demand response: ? Distribution utility ? ISO ? Aggregator (demand response less obstructive and inconvenient for the customer (particularly if DR resources are aggregated by a load aggregator).

  12. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    annual per-capita electricity consumption by demand15 California electricity consumption projections by demandannual per-capita electricity consumption by demand

  13. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

  14. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Energy Efficiency, Demand Response, and Peak Load Managementdemand response, and load management programs in the Ebefore they undertake load management and demand response

  15. Supply chain planning decisions under demand uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanfeng Anna

    2008-01-01

    Sales and operational planning that incorporates unconstrained demand forecasts has been expected to improve long term corporate profitability. Companies are considering such unconstrained demand forecasts in their decisions ...

  16. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    > B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Responseand integration is: Energy efficiency, energy conservation,

  17. Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades May 14, 2015 12:30PM to 2:00PM EDT Learn more...

  18. Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission January 6, 2005 Mike Koszalka Director;Demand Response Results, 2004 Load Control ­ Cool Keeper ­ ID Irrigation Load Control Price Responsive

  19. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01

    hydraulic head to control hydroelectricity generation, andlarge scale of China’s hydroelectricity generation needs,

  20. The political life of information: "Information" and the practice of governance in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Janaki

    2011-01-01

    Research Foundation, India at Pondicherry (22 nd , 27-29and Governmentality in India. Cambridge: Cambridgeand Survival. ” Tehelka - India’s Independent Weekly News

  1. THE HUNDRED BILLION DOLLAR BONUS: Global Energy Efficiency Lessons from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Efficiency Lessons from India Seema Paul Shakti SustainableEnergy Efficiency Lessons from India. ClimateWorks NetworkKnowledge Series. March. Contents INDIA’S ELECTRICITY SUPPLY

  2. The Country and the City in Mid-20th Century Ethnographies of Village India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frazier, Camille Anne

    2013-01-01

    a Mysore Village. ” In Village India: Studies in the LittlePress. Cohn, Bernard. 1971. India: The Social AnthropologyPress. -------- 1963. India’s Changing Villages: Human

  3. Turkey's energy demand and supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

  4. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  5. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  6. Demand Response and Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IC-09-11-05.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 14615 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IC-09-11-05.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Demand Response... 4 An Innovative Solution to Get the Ball Rolling ? Demand Response (DR) ? Monitoring Based Commissioning (MBCx) EnerNOC has a solution involving two complementary offerings. ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference...

  7. China’s Defense Electronics Industry: Innovation, Adaptation, and Espionage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulvenon, James; Luce, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    2010 China’s Defense Electronics Industry: Innovation,of the Chinese defense electronics sector can be attributedAdvanced defense electronics components and systems play a

  8. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01

    billion m 3 Total China Natural Gas Consumption: 126 billionTotal China Oil Consumption: 445 Mt Natural Gas ProductionNatural Gas Consumption (2010) United States Russia Iran China

  9. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    on the future of China’s nuclear power. First, it highlightsas China builds more nuclear power plants. The challengesto manage, run, and inspect nuclear power plants across the

  10. UF in India NGOs and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    UF in India NGOs and Development Summer B: July 5 - Aug 9, 2015 Obtain a First-hand View in Chennai, South India and continue in New Delhi, Jaipur, and Pondicherry for field visits with 15 NGOs) and their rural fringes, each a unique and colorful representative of the diverse cultures of India, a nation

  11. FEATURE ARTICLE 2 Midwifery in colonial India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    FEATURE ARTICLE 2 Midwifery in colonial India WORK IN PROGRESS 4 Religion, medicine and gender- century German medical text detailing the examination of wine. Midwifery in colonial India The role of traditional birth attendants in colonial India. In 1902, the first Midwives Act was passed in England

  12. Higher Education and China’s Defense Science and Technology Establishment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALDERMAN, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    7 January 2015 Higher Education and China’s Defense Sciencetalented personnel. The education of China’s defense scienceits institutes of higher education are not better preparing

  13. Quenching China's Thirst for Renewable Power: Water Implications of China's Renewable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2014-01-01

    forthcoming). “China’s Alternative Energy Development. ”barriers to China’s alternative energy development, theand energy inputs to alternative energy technologies (AET)

  14. Quenching China's Thirst for Renewable Power: Water Implications of China's Renewable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2014-01-01

    forthcoming). “China’s Alternative Energy Development. ”Sector Renewable and alternative energy development hasbarriers to China’s alternative energy development, the

  15. Revelation on Demand Nicolas Anciaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is willing to reveal the aggregate response (according to his company's policy) to the customer dataRevelation on Demand Nicolas Anciaux 1 · Mehdi Benzine1,2 · Luc Bouganim1 · Philippe Pucheral1 time to support epidemiological studies. In these and many other situations, aggregate data or partial

  16. Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services: A Comparison of Opportunities and Challenges in US to operate (likely price takers) ­ Statistical reliability (property of large aggregations of small resources size based on Mid-Atlantic Reserve Zone #12;Market Rules: Resource Size Min. Size (MW) Aggregation

  17. Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% ? 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

  18. Water demand management in Kuwait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

  19. On-demand data broadcasting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kothandaraman, Kannan

    1998-01-01

    related to on-demand data broadcasting. We look at the problem of data broadcasting in an environment where clients make explicit requests to the server. The server broadcasts requested data items to all the clients, including those who have not requested...

  20. Promising Technology: Demand Control Ventilation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demand control ventilation (DCV) measures carbon dioxide concentrations in return air or other strategies to measure occupancy, and accurately matches the ventilation requirement. This system reduces ventilation when spaces are vacant or at lower than peak occupancy. When ventilation is reduced, energy savings are accrued because it is not necessary to heat, cool, or dehumidify as much outside air.

  1. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    Energy June 2009, British Petroleum. 5 Assessment Report ofEconomics Japan. British Petroleum (2009), StatisticalSouth-East Asian Nations British Petroleum China Compulsory

  2. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    the Renewable Energy Law 25 Table 2-11enacted the Renewable Energy Law in February 2005 (the Lawthe China Renewable Energy Law, which went into effect in

  3. Key China Energy Statistics 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Growth of China's Total Primary Energy Production (TPE)by Fuel (Mtce) Primary Energy Production (Mtce) AAGR CoalGrowth of China's Total Primary Energy Production (Mtce)

  4. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Exports : 19 Mt China's Coal Imports (2010) Indonesia Australia Vietnam Mongolia RussiaExports: 3 Mt China's Crude Oil Imports (2010) Saudi Arabia Angola Iran Oman Russia

  5. China's Space Robotic Arms Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLLPETER, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    2013 China’s Space Robotic Arm Programs Kevin POLLPETERdebris observation and space robotic arm technologies. Thelikely equipped with a robotic arm, grappling the target

  6. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01

    DEMAND . . . .Demand for Electricity and Power PeakDemand . . • . . ELECTRICITY REQUIREMENTS FOR AGRICULTUREResults . . Coriclusions ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric

  7. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

  8. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01

    Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

  9. Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee T.

    2009-01-01

    and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

  10. Incorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection Transmission Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satchwell, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Aggregator Programs. Demand Response Measurement andIncorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection13 Demand Response Dispatch

  11. Upply Chain Supernetworks with Random Demands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Upply Chain Supernetworks with Random Demands June Dong & Ding Zhang School of Business State Warehouses: stocking points Field Warehouses: stocking points Customers, demand centers sinks Production Commerce and Value Chain Management, 1998 Customer Demand Customer Demand Retailer OrdersRetailer Orders

  12. Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    #12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

  13. China's Approaches to Financing Sustainable Development: Policies, Practices, and Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    composition of China’s green energy investment portfolio.financing mechanisms for green energy development in China.Composition of China’s green energy investment portfolio •

  14. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01

    application of additive manufacturing in China’s aviationAnalysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats,of China’s additive manufacturing industry is presented,

  15. The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rochlin, Cliff

    2009-11-15

    Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

  16. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response. International Experiences and Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo; Ghatikar, Girish; Ni, Chun Chun; Dudley, Junqiao; Martin, Phil; Wikler, Greg

    2012-06-01

    Demand response (DR) is a load management tool which provides a cost-effective alternative to traditional supply-side solutions to address the growing demand during times of peak electrical load. According to the US Department of Energy (DOE), demand response reflects “changes in electric usage by end-use customers from their normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to incentive payments designed to induce lower electricity use at times of high wholesale market prices or when system reliability is jeopardized.” 1 The California Energy Commission (CEC) defines DR as “a reduction in customers’ electricity consumption over a given time interval relative to what would otherwise occur in response to a price signal, other financial incentives, or a reliability signal.” 2 This latter definition is perhaps most reflective of how DR is understood and implemented today in countries such as the US, Canada, and Australia where DR is primarily a dispatchable resource responding to signals from utilities, grid operators, and/or load aggregators (or DR providers).

  17. China`s first true IPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, K.

    1997-06-01

    No guarantees - that`s what the Chinese government has been telling potential infrastructure investors lately. One recent power plant financing may show the way to financing without guarantees from the Chinese government, export credit agencies or multilateral lenders. {open_quotes}Financing without government guarantees is less of a financing strategy but rather the reality in China,{close_quotes} says Jack Su, assistant vice president and counsel for Sithe China Holdings Ltd. Sithe China is 39 percent owned by Sithe Energies of New York, 30.5 percent by AIG Asian Infrastructure Fund and 30.5 percent by the Government of Singapore Investment Corp. Sithe`s 2 X 50 MW coal-fired cogeneration plant in Tangshan Municipality, Hebei province, was the first independent power project to proceed in the country without government, multilateral lender or credit agency guarantees. The deal, which was signed in Beijing last October, could lead project financing in China to a level where project risks can be borne internally, without recourse to either sovereign guarantors or export credit agencies. Project backers believe that it is more than just a one-off, but rather a first for truly independent power production in China.

  18. SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences © Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg HU HongChang, TIAN FuQiang* & HU HePing Department of Hydraulic Engineering, State Key Laboratory as a key soil physical parameter and has been widely used to predict soil hydraulic and other related

  19. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; T. Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-07-01

    After rapid growth in economic development and energy demand over the last three decades, China has undertaken energy efficiency improvement efforts to reduce its energy intensity under the 11th Five Year Plan (FYP). Since becoming the world's largest annual CO{sub 2} emitter in 2007, China has set reduction targets for energy and carbon intensities and committed to meeting 15% of its total 2020 energy demand with non-fossil fuel. Despite having achieved important savings in 11th FYP efficiency programs, rising per capita income and the continued economic importance of trade will drive demand for transport activity and fuel use. At the same time, an increasingly 'electrified' economy will drive rapid power demand growth. Greater analysis is therefore needed to understand the underlying drivers, possible trajectories and mitigation potential in the growing industrial, transport and power sectors. This study uses scenario analysis to understand the likely trajectory of China's energy and carbon emissions to 2030 in light of the current and planned portfolio of programs, policies and technology development and ongoing urbanization and demographic trends. It evaluates the potential impacts of alternative transportation and power sector development using two key scenarios, Continued Improvement Scenario (CIS) and Accelerated Improvement Scenario (AIS). CIS represents the most likely path of growth based on continuation of current policies and meeting announced targets and goals, including meeting planned appliance efficiency standard revisions, fuel economy standards, and industrial targets and moderate phase-out of subcritical coal-fired generation with additional non-fossil generation. AIS represents a more aggressive trajectory of accelerated improvement in energy intensity and decarbonized power and transport sectors. A range of sensitivity analysis and power technology scenarios are tested to evaluate the impact of additional actions such as carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and integrated mine-mouth generation. The CIS and AIS results are also contextualized and compared to model scenarios in other published studies. The results of this study show that China's energy and CO{sub 2} emissions will not likely peak before 2030, although growth is expected to slow after 2020. Moreover, China will be able to meet its 2020 carbon intensity reduction target of 40 to 45% under both CIS and AIS, but only meet its 15% non-fossil fuel target by 2020 under AIS. Under both scenarios, efficiency remains a key resource and has the same, if not greater, mitigation potential as new technologies in transport and power sectors. In the transport sector, electrification will be closely linked the degree of decarbonization in the power sector and EV deployment has little or no impact on China's crude oil import demand. Rather, power generation improvements have the largest sector potential for overall emission mitigation while mine-mouth power generation and CCS have limited mitigation potential compared to fuel switching and efficiency improvements. Comparisons of this study's results with other published studies reveal that CIS and AIS are within the range of other national energy projections but alternative studies rely much more heavily on CCS for carbon reduction. The McKinsey study, in particular, has more optimistic assumptions for reductions in crude oil imports and coal demand in its abatement scenario and has much higher gasoline reduction potential for the same level of EV deployment. Despite these differences, this study's scenario analysis of both transport and power sectors illustrate the necessity for continued efficiency improvements and aggressive power sector decarbonization in flattening China's CO{sub 2} emissions.

  20. Stochastic Dynamic Demand Inventory Models with Explicit Transportation Costs and Decisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Liqing

    2011-07-01

    Peters August 2011 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering iii ABSTRACT Stochastic Dynamic Demand Inventory Models with Explicit Transportation Costs and Decisions. (August 2011) Liqing Zhang, B.S.; M.S., Tsinghua University, P.R. China Chair... An Illustration of (Q,~s, ~S) Policy ( m = ? s1n?Qn C ? + 1 ) . . . . . . . . 52 5 Optimal Policies for Special Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 6 Influence of Parameter K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 7 Influence...

  1. Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Gupta, Arjun

    2010-04-30

    Electricity demand has consistently exceeded available supply in India. While the electricity deficit varies across states, nationally it was estimated to be of the order of 12percent on peak and 11percent for electricity during 2008-09. This paper explores a demand-side focused potential for energy efficiency improvement to eliminate the electricity deficit compared to a business as usual (BAU) supply-side focused scenario. The limited availability of finance and other legal and administrative barriers have constrained the construction of new power plant capacity in India. As a result, under the BAU scenario, India continues to face an electricity deficit beyond the end of the Twelfth Five Year Plan. The demand-side cost-effective potential achieved through replacement of new electricity-using products, however, is large enough to eliminate the deficit as early as 2013 and subsequently reduce the future construction of power plants and thus reduce air pollutant emissions. Moreover, energy efficiency improvements cost a fraction of the cost for new supply and can lead to a substantial increase in India's economic output or gross domestic product (GDP). Eliminating the deficit permits businesses that have experienced electricity cutbacks to restore production. We estimate the size of the cumulative production increase in terms of the contribution to GDP at a $505 billion between 2009 and 2017, the end of India's Twelfth Five Year Plan, which may be compared with India's 2007-08 GDP of $911 billion. The economic output is influenced by the size of the electricity savings and rate of penetration of energy efficient technologies, and that of self-generation equipment and inverters used by businesses faced with electricity cuts. Generation and inverters are estimated to service 23percent of these customers in 2009, which increase to 48percent by 2020. The reduction in the construction and operation of new power plants reduces the cumulative CO2 emissions by 65 Mt, and those of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides by 0.4 Mt each, while also reducing India's imports of coal and natural gas. By 2020, the cumulative GDP benefit increases to $608 billion, the CO2 savings expand to 333 Mt and SO2 and NOx to 2.1 Mt.

  2. Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-01-01

    Economic Survey of India (ESI) and statistics provided by2006). All India Electricity Statistics - General Review

  3. HIV Transmission Potential Among Local and Migrant Factory Workers in Kolkata, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deb, Alok Kumar; Deb, Manjari; Saha, Malay Kumar; Chakraborty, Shantanu; Bhattacharya, Sujit Kumar; Detels, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Statistics & Pro- gramme Implementation, Government of India,Statistics & Programme Implementation, Govern- ment of India,

  4. English Heart, Hindi Heartland: The Political Life of Literature in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadana, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    nuclear households. Also see Robin Jeffrey’s India’s Newspaper Revolution: Capitalism, Politics, and

  5. Going Green? Urban vs. Rural Residency and Pro-Environmental Attitudes in China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    are from pollution, the less likely they are to believe the environment is in need of protection. Therefore, since rural respondents live farther from cities like Guangzhou or Beijing where the air pollution is visible, they are unexposed... to natural resources, distance from pollution, and materialistic demands. 16 CHAPTER II METHODS Aside from personal observations in China?s major and minor cities in the summer to spring of 2008, this research design analyzes social value surveys...

  6. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01

    31. China's Electricity Generation Output by Fuel under33. China's Electricity Generation Output by Fuel under31. China's Electricity Generation Output by Fuel under

  7. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01

    and Runqing Hu, 2005, “Solar thermal in China: Overview andperspectives of the Chinese solar thermal market. ” RefocusProspectives for China’s solar thermal power technology

  8. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01

    32 Table 13. Total Resource Requirements for Hydropower23 Figure 12. China's Hydropower Installed Capacity, 1980-and costs of China’s hydropower: Development or slowdown? ”

  9. Reimagining Federalism in India: Exploring the Frontiers of Collaborative Federal Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Chanchal Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Economic freedom of the States of India. New Delhi: Academicwww.cato.org/economic-freedom-india/ EconomicFreedomIndia-E. (2003). Political economy of India’s fiscal and financial

  10. Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-01-01

    and Sathaye, J. (2009). India Energy Outlook: End Use Demandwould help improve India’s energy security position. 5.2utility companies. India’s energy security position would

  11. Outsourcing Development: The State, Entrepreneurship, and Information Technologies in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    Outsourcing Development: The State, Entrepreneurship, and Information Technologies in India, Entrepreneurship, and Information Technologies in India Copyright 2008 By Renee Kuriyan #12;1 Abstract Outsourcing Development: The State, Entrepreneurship, and Information Technologies in India By Renee Kuriyan Doctor

  12. Gauging Improvements in Urban Building Energy Policy in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    2009. Doing Business in India 2009: Comparing Regulations inon Building Energy Codes in India. Richland, Wash. : PacificM. McNeil, & J. Sathaye. 2009. India Energy Outlook: End Use

  13. The epidemiologic features of acute encephalitis syndrome in central India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Rajnish

    2009-01-01

    of leptospirosis in India. Arch Dis Child 88: 1033. PhuongSurveillance Program: India. New Delhi: WHO. Lombardo J,in the slums of Kolkata, India: data from a prospective

  14. Internet Kiosks in Rural India: What Influences Success?#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kendall, Jake; Singh, Nirvikar

    2007-01-01

    subject to learning effects. Internet Kiosks in Rural India:Science, 46, 4, 548-62. Internet Kiosks in Rural India: Whataccessed September 27, 2004. Internet Kiosks in Rural India:

  15. Energy Savings Potential for Street Lighting in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Alissa K.

    2014-01-01

    for public lighting in India; how much energy is used, whichof India) and Ministry of Power, “National awards on energy2. Public lighting energy use in India: current and 2020

  16. Conservation Potential of Compact Fluorescent Lamps in India and Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Ministry of Energy, Government of India, Annual Report 1087-of the Solar Energy Society of India, SESI-J, Vol. 1,without decreasing energy services in India and Brazil. The

  17. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    the Potential of Renewable Energy in India. Energy SectorWind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (2011), doi:10.1016/j.Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (2011), doi:10.1016/j.

  18. STEO December 2012 - coal demand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The2/01/12 Page 1NEWSSupportcoal demand seen below

  19. Scaling Microblogging Services with Divergent Traffic Demands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Xiaoming

    Scaling Microblogging Services with Divergent Traffic Demands Tianyin Xu, Yang Chen, Lei Jiao, Ben-server architecture has not scaled with user demands, lead- ing to server overload and significant impairment

  20. Michel Meulpolder Managing Supply and Demand of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Meulpolder Managing Supply and Demand of Bandwidth in Peer-to-Peer Communities #12;#12;Managing Supply and Demand of Bandwidth in Peer-to-Peer Communities Proefschrift ter verkrijging van de

  1. REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    relatively high economic/demographic growth, relatively low electricity and natural gas rates REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility OFFICE Sylvia Bender Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION Robert P

  2. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /demographic growth, relatively low electricity and natural gas rates, and relatively low efficiency program CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Manager Bill Junker Manager DEMAND ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY

  3. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    incorporates relatively high economic/demographic growth, relatively low electricity and natural gas rates CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand Sylvia Bender Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION Robert P. Oglesby Executive

  4. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    incorporates relatively high economic/demographic growth, relatively low electricity and natural gas rates CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand OFFICE Sylvia Bender Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION Robert P

  5. Solar in Demand | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar in Demand Solar in Demand June 15, 2012 - 10:23am Addthis Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin...

  6. Demand Effects in Productivity and Efficiency Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chia-Yen

    2012-07-16

    Demand fluctuations will bias the measurement of productivity and efficiency. This dissertation described three ways to characterize the effect of demand fluctuations. First, a two-dimensional efficiency decomposition (2DED) of profitability...

  7. Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    1998-01-01

    Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air ...

  8. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-01-01

    Summarizes existing research and discusses current practices, opportunities, and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response programs.

  9. Decentralized demand management for water distribution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabolio, Dow Joseph

    1989-01-01

    OF THE DEMAND CURVE 30 31 35 39 Model Development Results 39 45 VI CONTROLLER DESIGN AND COSTS 49 Description of Controller Production and Installation Costs 49 50 VII SYSTEM EVALUATION AND ECONOMICS 53 System Response and Degree of Control... Patterns 9 Typical Winter Diurnal Patterns 10 Trace of Marginal Pump Efficiency and Hourly Demand 11 Original Demand Distribution and Possible Redistributions 33 34 40 41 43 46 12 Typical Nodal Responses to Demand Change 54 ix LIST OF TABLES...

  10. Peak CO2? China's Emissions Trajectories to 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David G.; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Levine, Mark

    2011-05-01

    As a result of soaring energy demand from a staggering pace of economic growth and the related growth of energy-intensive industry, China overtook the United States to become the world's largest contributor to CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007. At the same time, China has taken serious actions to reduce its energy and carbon intensity by setting both short-term energy intensity reduction goal for 2006 to 2010 as well as long-term carbon intensity reduction goal for 2020. This study focuses on a China Energy Outlook through 2050 that assesses the role of energy efficiency policies in transitioning China to a lower emission trajectory and meeting its intensity reduction goals. In the past years, LBNL has established and significantly enhanced the China End-Use Energy Model based on the diffusion of end-use technologies and other physical drivers of energy demand. This model presents an important new approach for helping understand China's complex and dynamic drivers of energy consumption and implications of energy efficiency policies through scenario analysis. A baseline ('Continued Improvement Scenario') and an alternative energy efficiency scenario ('Accelerated Improvement Scenario') have been developed to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and potential actions, and to evaluate the potential for China to control energy demand growth and mitigate emissions. It is a common belief that China's CO{sub 2} emissions will continue to grow throughout this century and will dominate global emissions. The findings from this research suggest that this will not likely be the case because of saturation effects in appliances, residential and commercial floor area, roadways, railways, fertilizer use, and urbanization will peak around 2030 with slowing population growth. The baseline and alternative scenarios also demonstrate that the 2020 goals can be met and underscore the significant role that policy-driven energy efficiency improvements will play in carbon mitigation along with a decarbonized power supply through greater renewable and non-fossil fuel generation.

  11. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson

    2009-02-01

    While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

  12. Demand Queries with Preprocessing Uriel Feige

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Queries with Preprocessing Uriel Feige and Shlomo Jozeph May 1, 2014 )>IJH=?J Given a set of items and a submodular set-function f that determines the value of every subset of items, a demand query, the value of S minus its price. The use of demand queries is well motivated in the context of com

  13. DemandDriven Pointer Analysis Nevin Heintze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tardieu, Olivier

    Demand­Driven Pointer Analysis Nevin Heintze Research, Agere Systems (formerly Lucent Technologies analysis of a pro­ gram or program component. In this paper we introduce a demand­driven approach for pointer analysis. Specifically, we describe a demand­driven flow­insensitive, subset­based, context

  14. APPLICATION-FORM DEMANDED'ADMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opportunities and Challenges for Data Center Demand Response Adam Wierman Zhenhua Liu Iris Liu of renewable energy into the grid as well as electric power peak-load shaving: data center demand response. Data center demand response sits at the intersection of two growing fields: energy efficient data

  15. Airline Pilot Demand Projections What this is-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    60 Mobile applications constantly demand additional memory, and traditional designs increase but also e-mail, Internet access, digital camera features, and video on demand. With feature expansion demanding additional storage and memory in all com- puting devices, DRAM and flash memory densities

  16. Algorithms Demands and Bounds Applications of Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabanets, Valentine

    2/28/2014 1 Algorithms ­ Demands and Bounds Applications of Flow Networks Design and Analysis of Algorithms Andrei Bulatov Algorithms ­ Demands and Bounds 12-2 Lower Bounds The problem can be generalized) capacities (ii) demands (iii) lower bounds A circulation f is feasible if (Capacity condition) For each e E

  17. Adapton: Composable, Demand-Driven Incremental Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Michael

    Adapton: Composable, Demand-Driven Incremental Computation CS-TR-5027 -- July 12, 2013 Matthew A demands on the program output; that is, if a program input changes, all depen- dencies will be recomputed. To address these problems, we present cdd ic , a core calculus that applies a demand-driven seman- tics

  18. Pricing Cloud Bandwidth Reservations under Demand Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Heap Assumptions on Demand Andreas Podelski1 , Andrey Rybalchenko2 , and Thomas Wies1 1 University analysis produces heap assumptions on demand to eliminate counterexamples, i.e., non-terminating abstract of a non-terminating abstract computation, i.e., it applies shape analysis on demand. The shape analysis

  19. Demand And Response Transportation Rider's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Demand And Response Transportation Rider's Guide http://www.virginia.edu/parking/disabilities/dart Version 14.5 (8/13/14) Welcome DART Rider: The Demand and Response Transportation (DART) Service rides: #12;Demand And Response Transportation Rider's Guide http

  20. Scaling Microblogging Services with Divergent Traffic Demands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almeroth, Kevin C.

    Scaling Microblogging Services with Divergent Traffic Demands Tianyin Xu1 , Yang Chen1 , Lei Jiao1 client-server architecture has not scaled with user demands, leading to server overload and significant #12;Scaling Microblogging Services with Divergent Traffic Demands 21 producing effective predictions

  1. Demande de diplmes NOM,Prnom : ......................................................................................................................

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chamroukhi, Faicel

    Optimal demand response: problem formulation and deterministic case Lijun Chen, Na Li, Libin Jiang load through real-time demand response and purchases balancing power on the spot market to meet the aggregate demand. Hence optimal supply procurement by the LSE and the consumption decisions by the users

  2. Precision On Demand: An Improvement in Probabilistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Precision On Demand: An Improvement in Probabilistic Hashing Igor Melatti, Robert Palmer approach Precision on Demand or POD). #12;This paper provides a scientific evaluation of the pros and cons time likely to increase by a factor of 1.8 or less. #12;Precision On Demand: An Improvement

  3. ADAPTON: Composable, Demand-Driven Incremental Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Michael

    ADAPTON: Composable, Demand- Driven Incremental Computation Abstract Many researchers have proposed important drawbacks. First, recomputation is oblivious to specific demands on the program output; that is ic , a core calculus that applies a demand-driven semantics to incremental computa- tion, tracking

  4. Constructing Speculative Demand Functions in Equilibrium Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Convergence of Statistical Techniques for Inferring Network Traffic Demands Alberto Medina1 of traffic demands in a communication net- work enables or enhances a variety of traffic engineering and net set of these demands is prohibitively expensive because of the huge amounts of data that must

  5. Heap Assumptions on Demand Andreas Podelski1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wies, Thomas

    Heap Assumptions on Demand Andreas Podelski1 , Andrey Rybalchenko2 , and Thomas Wies1 1 University checker and shape analysis. The shape analysis pro- duces heap assumptions on demand to eliminate.e., it applies shape analysis on demand. The shape analysis produces a heap assumption, which is an assertion

  6. Appeld'offrespublic Demanded'approvisionnement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montréal, Université de

    ATM for Video and Audio on Demand David Greaves. University of Cambridge and ATM Ltd. email: djg fast, particularly for video- on-demand. These digital streams require constant-rate digi- tal channels of the Cambridge Digital Interactive Television Trial, where Video and Audio on demand are transported to the Home

  7. Precision On Demand: An Improvement in Probabilistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Precision On Demand: An Improvement in Probabilistic Hashing Igor Melatti, Robert Palmer approach Precision on Demand or POD). #12; This paper provides a scientific evaluation of the pros and cons time likely to increase by a factor of 1.8 or less. #12; Precision On Demand: An Improvement

  8. FORECAST COMBINATION IN REVENUE MANAGEMENT DEMAND FORECASTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Demandness in Rewriting and Narrowing Sergio Antoy1 and Salvador Lucas2 1 Computer Science by a strategy to compute a step. The notion of demandness provides a suitable framework for pre- senting that the notion of demandness is both atomic and fundamental to the study of strategies. 1 Introduction Modern

  9. Resolution on Demand Bianka BuschbeckWolf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyle, Uwe

    Resolution on Demand Bianka Buschbeck­Wolf Universit¨at Stuttgart Report 196 May 1997 #12; May 1997¨ur den Inhalt dieser Arbeit liegt bei der Autorin. #12; Resolution on Demand Abstract Following the strategy of resolution on demand, the transfer component triggers inference processes in analysis

  10. Heap Assumptions on Demand Andreas Podelski1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wies, Thomas

    PROTOTYPE IMPLEMENTATION OF A DEMAND DRIVEN NETWORK MONITORING ARCHITECTURE Augusto Ciuffoletti for demand driven monitoring, named gd2, that can be potentially integrated in the gLite framework. We capable of managing the scalability challenge offered by a Grid environment: i) demand driven

  11. Pricing Cloud Bandwidth Reservations under Demand Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Pricing Cloud Bandwidth Reservations under Demand Uncertainty Di Niu, Chen Feng, Baochun Li's utility depends not only on its bandwidth usage, but more importantly on the portion of its demand that can be made by all tenants and the cloud provider, even with the presence of demand uncertainty

  12. Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers G. Di Bella, L. Giarr`e, M. Ippolito, A. Jean-Marie, G. Neglia and I. Tinnirello § January 2, 2014 Abstract Energy demand aggregators- response paradigm. When the energy provider needs to reduce the current energy demand on the grid, it can

  13. INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS Prepared by Richard Perez et al. NREL subcontract the case that distributed PV generation deserves a substantial portion of the credit allotted to demand response programs. This is because PV generation acts as a catalyst to demand response, markedly enhancing

  14. Demand Response for Computing Jerey S. Chase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chase, Jeffrey S.

    Chapter 1 Demand Response for Computing Centers Jerey S. Chase Duke University 1.1 Introduction ............................................................... 3 1.2 Demand Response in the Emerging Smart Grid .......................... 5 1.2.1 Importance of Demand Response for Energy E ciency .......... 6 1.2.2 The Role of Renewable Energy

  15. Response to changes in demand/supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 http with the mill consuming 450 000 m3 , amounting to 30% of total plywood log demand in 1995. The composites board, statistics of demand and supply of wood, costs and competitiveness were analysed. The reactions

  16. Response to changes in demand/supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 #12;#12;111 Impacts of changes log demand in 1995. The composites board mills operating in Korea took advantage of flexibility environment changes on the production mix, some economic indications, statistics of demand and supply of wood

  17. Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008 #12;© 2008 EnerNOC, Inc. All Rights Reserved programs The purpose of this presentation is to offer insight into the mechanics of demand response and industrial demand response resources across North America in both regulated and restructured markets As of 6

  18. THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response (DR) can.S. and internationally and lay out ideas that could help move California forward. KEY WORDS demand response, peak

  19. Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest Chuck Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cagoldman@lbl.gov Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Portland OR May 2, 2007 #12;Overview · Typology Annual Reports ­ Journal articles/Technical reports #12;Demand Response Resources · Incentive

  20. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study F. Rubinstein, S. Kiliccote Energy Environmental Technologies Division January 2007 #12;LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy

  1. Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-2294E Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response F. Rubinstein, G. Ghatikar, J Ann Piette of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC and Environment's (CIEE) Demand Response Emerging Technologies Development (DRETD) Program, under Work for Others

  2. THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response can help reduce the threat of planned rotational outages. Demand response is also widely regarded as having

  3. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to India (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013 2014Thousand343 342China (Million CubicIndia

  4. Internet Kiosks in Rural India: What Influences Success?#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kendall, Jake; Singh, Nirvikar

    2007-01-01

    Bank of India (2006), Handbook of Statistics on IndianIndia: What Influences Success? Table 6: Village/Kiosk Variables Summary Statistics

  5. India-Vulnerability Assessment and Enhancing Adaptive Capacities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    India-Vulnerability Assessment and Enhancing Adaptive Capacities to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Vulnerability Assessment and Enhancing Adaptive Capacities...

  6. Gauging Improvements in Urban Building Energy Policy in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    India’s local LEED-based building labeling program and otherLEED and the Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment (a domestically-developed building labeling

  7. Does Management Matter? Evidence from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloom, Nicholas; Eifert, Benn; Mahajan, Aprajit; McKenzie, David; Roberts, John

    2012-01-01

    DOES MANAGEMENT MATTER? EVIDENCE FROM INDIA Nicholas Bloombadly managed? Our experiment does not directly answer thisworks, imagine a plant that does not record quality defects.

  8. Does Management Matter? Evidence from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloom, Nicholas; Eifert, Benn; Mahajan, Aprajit; McKenzie, David; Roberts, John

    2012-01-01

    DOES MANAGEMENT MATTER? EVIDENCE FROM INDIA Nicholas Bloomis whether differences in management practices across firmsTo investigate this, we ran a management field experiment on

  9. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    Crude Oil .of which 72.1 Gt-km was crude oil. Compared with the 118.5a transportation route for crude oil imports, China has also

  10. SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perissin, Daniele

    ), the largest hydroelectric project in the world, is one of the most significant recent construction projects in China. The three main functions of the TGP, namely, flood control, power generation and navigational

  11. Housing policy in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Lu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    In the last three decades, the People's Republic of China (PRC) has managed to replace its welfare-based urban housing system with a market-based housing provision scheme. With such significant housing policy changes, the ...

  12. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01

    s Worldwide Quest for Energy Security, (Paris: OCED/IEA,s Worldwide Quest for Energy Security, (Paris: OCED/IEA,China’s Quest for Energy Security, (Washington: RAND Project

  13. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Since 1999, China’s bioethanol production has grown to abelow, most of China’s bioethanol production use grains as aexpansion of existing bioethanol production and halted new

  14. Conservation potential of compact fluorescent lamps in India and Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Martino Jannuzzi, G. de (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia)

    1989-07-01

    We evaluate the conservation potential of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) for managing the rapidly increasing electrical energy and peak demand in India and Brazil. Using very conservative assumptions, we find that the cost of conserved energy using 16 W CFLs is 4 and 6 times less than the long range marginal cost of electricity for the two countries. The cost of avoided peak installed capacity is 6 and 9.5 times less than the cost of new installed capacity for India and Brazil. The analysis is undertaken from the three separate perspectives of the national economies, the consumers, and the utilities. We find that because residential electricity is subsidized, the consumers have little or no incentive to purchase and install the CFLs, unless they too are subsidized. However, the benefits of CFL installation to the utility are so large that subsidizing them is a paying proposition for the utility are so large that subsidizing them is a paying proposition for the utility in almost all cases. As an illustration of a gradual introduction strategy for CFLs, we calculate a scenario where national savings of the order of US $1.2 million per day for India and US $2.5 million per day for Brazil are reached in 10 years by a small and gradual transfer of subsidy from residential electricity to CFLs. We then explore the barriers to immediate large scale introduction of these lamps in the two countries. Specific technical and marketing problems are identified and discussed, which would require solution before such an introduction can be attempted. Lastly, we discuss the range of policy instruments, in addition to a subsidy scheme, that can be used for promoting the diffusion of these lamps in the domestic and commercial sector. 47 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Balancing China's Seasonal Intercity Travel Demand: Alternatives for Freight Rail Expansion to Reduce Seasonal Passenger Rail Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Lingling

    2013-12-31

    overwhelmedintercity transportation systems, particularly passenger rail. This transportation problem has emerged due to spatial economic imbalance: workers have had to travel betweentheir homes in rural hinterlands to factory jobs on the industrial coast, which had...

  16. Energy demand and population changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, E.L.; Edmonds, J.A.

    1980-12-01

    Since World War II, US energy demand has grown more rapidly than population, so that per capita consumption of energy was about 60% higher in 1978 than in 1947. Population growth and the expansion of per capita real incomes have led to a greater use of energy. The aging of the US population is expected to increase per capita energy consumption, despite the increase in the proportion of persons over 65, who consume less energy than employed persons. The sharp decline in the population under 18 has led to an expansion in the relative proportion of population in the prime-labor-force age groups. Employed persons are heavy users of energy. The growth of the work force and GNP is largely attributable to the growing participation of females. Another important consequence of female employment is the growth in ownership of personal automobiles. A third factor pushing up labor-force growth is the steady influx of illegal aliens.

  17. Demande de casier 20142015 1. Demande ( remplir par l'lve)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demande de casier 20142015 1. Demande (à remplir par l'élève) Nom : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Demande l'attribution d'un casier pour y déposer) : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . En cas d'acceptation de ma demande, je retirerai ma clé contre un chèque de caution d'un montant de

  18. DEMANDE DE CONGE Cette demande doit tre effectue un mois avant le dbut du semestre.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halazonetis, Thanos

    DEMANDE DE CONGE Cette demande doit être effectuée un mois avant le début du semestre. Date de la demande .......................................................... NOM-mail .......................................................................................................................................................................... @etu.unige.ch Demande à être mis au bénéfice d'un congé pour le(s) semestre(s) suivant(s) (2 semestres

  19. Risk Management for Video-on-Demand Servers leveraging Demand Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Risk Management for Video-on-Demand Servers leveraging Demand Forecast Di Niu, Hong Xu, Baochun Li}@eecg.toronto.edu Shuqiao Zhao Multimedia Development Group UUSee, Inc. shuqiao.zhao@gmail.com ABSTRACT Video-on-demand (VoD) servers are usually over-provisioned for peak demands, incurring a low average resource effi- ciency

  20. Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes. Developing novel schemes for demand response in smart electric gird is an increasingly active research area/SCADA for demand response in smart infrastructures face the following dilemma: On one hand, in order to increase

  1. China's sustainable energy future: Scenarios of energy and carbon emissions (Summary)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    energy use. China’s Sustainable Energy Future Summary next31 -ii- China’s Sustainable Energy Future Executive Summarystudy, entitled China’s Sustainable Energy Future: Scenarios

  2. Comparison of large central and small decentralized power generation in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    This reports evaluates two options for providing reliable power to rural areas in India. The benefits and costs are compared for biomass based distributed generation (DG) systems versus a 1200-MW central grid coal-fired power plant. The biomass based DG systems are examined both as alternatives to grid extension and as supplements to central grid power. The benefits are divided into three categories: those associated with providing reliable power from any source, those associated specifically with biomass based DG technology, and benefits of a central grid coal plant. The report compares the estimated delivered costs of electricity from the DG systems to those of the central plant. The analysis includes estimates for a central grid coal plant and four potential DG system technologies: Stirling engines, direct-fired combustion turbines, fuel cells, and biomass integrated gasification combined cycles. The report also discusses issues affecting India`s rural electricity demand, including economic development, power reliability, and environmental concerns. The results of the costs of electricity comparison between the biomass DG systems and the coal-fired central grid station demonstrated that the DG technologies may be able to produce very competitively priced electricity by the start of the next century. The use of DG technology may provide a practical means of addressing many rural electricity issues that India will face in the future. Biomass DG technologies in particular offer unique advantages for the environment and for economic development that will make them especially attractive. 58 refs., 31 figs.

  3. Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anurag

    Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India Mote: A smart wireless device, comprising miniature amount of basic research in areas such as geographical packet routing, distributed statistical detection), Government of India, during the period 2006-2010. The following project team contributed to the work

  4. Introduction to Modern India History 310

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    1 Introduction to Modern India History 310 Consider Resources Primary Resources: diaries, letters. popular), theses, the Web Check subject guides under: Research by Subject History Find Background History, 1707-1947 REF DS463.M45 1985t Encyclopedia of India REF DS407 .E62 1992t Oxford Companion

  5. PVWatts (R) Calculator India (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01

    The PVWatts (R) Calculator for India was released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2013. The online tool estimates electricity production and the monetary value of that production of grid-connected roof- or ground-mounted crystalline silicon photovoltaics systems based on a few simple inputs. This factsheet provides a broad overview of the PVWatts (R) Calculator for India.

  6. ENGINEERING EDUCATION IN INDIA Draft Final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Rangan

    ENGINEERING EDUCATION IN INDIA Draft Final report Rangan Banerjee Vinayak P. Muley Sponsored by Observer Research Foundation Energy Systems Engineering, IIT Bombay Powai, Mumbai ­ 400076 September 14, 2007 #12;i Preface In India engineering is one of the preferred choices for good students at the 10

  7. Powering the people: India's capacity expansion plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, S.

    2009-05-15

    India has become a global business power even though hundreds of millions of its citizens still live in poverty. To sustain economic growth and lift its people out of poverty, India needs more and more reliable power. Details of government plans for achieving those goals demonstrate that pragmatism may be in shorter supply than ambition and political will. 1 ref., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee T.

    2009-01-01

    13 Table 2. Demand Side Management Framework for IndustrialDR Strategies The demand-side management (DSM) frameworkpresented in Table 2. Demand Side Management Framework for

  9. Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayand Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

  10. Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, June Han

    2009-01-01

    of Fully Automated Demand  Response in Large Facilities.  Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.  Open Automated  Demand Response Communication Standards: 

  11. Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, N.L.

    2008-01-01

    warming and electricity demand: A study of California.Extreme Heat, and Electricity Demand in California Norman L.high temperature and electricity demand for air-conditioned

  12. California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    Figure 16 Annual peak electricity demand by sector. Tableincludes an hourly electricity demand (i.e. power) profileof aggregating sectoral electricity demands into a statewide

  13. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used into added vehicle electricity demand in the BAU (no IGCC)to added vehicle electricity demand in the Mixed technology

  14. SAN ANTONIO SPURS DEMAND FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SAN ANTONIO SPURS DEMAND FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY SAN ANTONIO SPURS DEMAND FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY SAN ANTONIO SPURS DEMAND FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY As a city that experiences seasonal...

  15. Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, N.L.

    2008-01-01

    Peirson. 1998. Residential energy demand and the interactionresponse of residential cooling energy demand to climaterise in residential and commercial electricity demand can be

  16. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01

    Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

  17. Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    Roger. 2002. Using Demand Response to Link Wholesale andfor advanced metering, demand response, and dynamic pricing.EPRI. 2001. Managing Demand-Response To Achieve Multiple

  18. Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-01-01

    Goodin. 2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services. ” InOpen Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project. LBNL-

  19. Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

  20. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff