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1

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 40. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 41. Primary energy use by fuel, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Levels Off Through 2030 Because energy use for housing, services, and travel in the United States is closely linked to population levels, energy use per capita is relatively stable (Figure 40). In addition, the economy is becoming less dependent on energy in general. Energy intensity (energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP) declines by an average

2

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

3

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module projects energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region projection using the SEDS1 data.

4

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

5

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

6

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

7

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

8

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

9

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

10

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

11

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight, rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

12

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

13

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the projection horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the projection horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

14

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Demand Natural Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Natural Gas Demand Figure 72. Natural gas consumption by sector, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 73. Total natural gas consumption, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Fastest Increase in Natural Gas Use Is Expected for the Buildings Sectors In the reference case, total natural gas consumption increases from 21.7 trillion cubic feet in 2006 to a peak value of 23.8 trillion cubic feet in 2016, followed by a decline to 22.7 trillion cubic feet in 2030. The natural gas share of total energy consumption drops from 22 percent in 2006

15

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

16

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comleted Copy in PDF Format Comleted Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook 2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO 2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The

17

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated

18

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

19

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

20

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

22

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

23

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The energy-intensive industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow accounting procedure, whereas the nonenergy-intensive and the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 14). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated by using the SEDS24 data.

24

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

commercial.gif (5196 bytes) commercial.gif (5196 bytes) The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings, however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

25

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential.gif (5487 bytes) residential.gif (5487 bytes) The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

26

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

27

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

28

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

transportation.gif (5318 bytes) transportation.gif (5318 bytes) The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

29

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new

30

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

31

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS25 data.

32

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

33

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

34

Energy demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The basic forces pushing up energy demand are population increase and economic growth. From ... of these it is possible to estimate future energy requirements.

Geoffrey Greenhalgh

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

ANNUAL ENERGY  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(93) (93) ANNUAL ENERGY OUTLOOK 1993 With Projections to 2010 EIk Energy Information Administration January 1993 For Further Information ... The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222). General questions concerning energy demand or energy markets may be addressed to Mark E. Rodekohr (202/586-1130), Director of the Energy Demand and Integration Division. General questions regarding energy supply and conversion activities may be addressed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Acting Director of the Energy Supply and Conversion Division. Detailed questions may be addressed to the following EIA analysts: Framing the 1993 Energy Outlook ............. Susan H. Shaw (202/586-4838)

36

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

37

Global energy demand to 2060  

SciTech Connect

The projection of global energy demand to the year 2060 is of particular interest because of its relevance to the current greenhouse concerns. The long-term growth of global energy demand in the time scale of climatic change has received relatively little attention in the public discussion of national policy alternatives. The sociological, political, and economic issues have rarely been mentioned in this context. This study emphasizes that the two major driving forces are global population growth and economic growth (gross national product per capita), as would be expected. The modest annual increases assumed in this study result in a year 2060 annual energy use of >4 times the total global current use (year 1986) if present trends continue, and >2 times with extreme efficiency improvements in energy use. Even assuming a zero per capita growth for energy and economics, the population increase by the year 2060 results in a 1.5 times increase in total annual energy use.

Starr, C. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Measured energy savings and demand reduction from a reflective roof membrane on a large retail store in Austin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the abated annual energy and demand expenditures, simplea/c annual abated energy and demand expenditures and presentof future abated energy and demand expenditures is estimated

Konopacki, Steven J.; Akbari, Hashem

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

World Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A reliable forecast of energy resources, energy consumption, and population in the future is a ... So, instead of absolute figures about future energy demand and sources worldwide, which would become...3.1 correl...

Giovanni Petrecca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Energy Demand Forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents alternative approaches used in forecasting energy demand and discusses their pros and cons. It... Chaps. 3 and 4 ...

S. C. Bhattacharyya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response:both the avoided energy costs (and demand charges) as wellCoordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response,

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Energy Demand Staff Scientist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused on End-Use Energy Efficiency ~ 40 Current Projects in China Collaborations with ~50 Institutions in China Researcher #12;Talk OutlineTalk Outline · Overview · China's energy use and CO2 emission trends · Energy

Eisen, Michael

43

Energy Demand Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From the end of World War II until the early 1970s there was a strong and steady increase in the demand for energy. The abundant supplies of fossil and other ... an actual fall in the real price of energy of abou...

S. L. Schwartz

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11) | April 2011 11) | April 2011 with Projections to 2035 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 For further information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2011 was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.gov, 202-586-2222), Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.gov, 202/586-1284), Co-Acting Director, Office of Integrated and International Energy Analysis, and Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team; Joseph A. Beamon (joseph.beamon@eia.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis; A. Michael Schaal (michael.schaal@eia.gov, 202/586-5590), Director, Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuel Analysis;

45

Annual Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Distribution Category UC-950 Annual Energy Outlook 1998 With Projections to 2020 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administra- tion and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other or- ganization. The Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Informa- tion Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling

46

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

47

Understanding and Analysing Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter introduces the concept of energy demand using basic micro-economics and presents the three-stage decision making process of energy demand. It then provides a set of simple ... (such as price and inco...

Subhes C. Bhattacharyya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Annual Energy Outlook 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Annual Energy Outlook 2001 With Projections to 2020 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2001 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses the macroeconomic projections, world oil and natural gas markets, oxygenates in gasoline, distributed electricity generation, electricity industry restructuring, and carbon dioxide emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends.

49

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District Small Business Summer Solutions: Energy and DemandSummer Solutions: Energy and Demand Impacts Monthly Energy> B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Release date: June 2008 Next release date: March 2009 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Petroleum Market Module

51

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

annual per-capita electricity consumption by demand15 California electricity consumption projections by demandannual per-capita electricity consumption by demand

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Annual Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2) 2) December 2001 Annual Energy Outlook 2002 With Projections to 2020 December 2001 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2002 (AEO2002) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@ eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@ eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; Susan H. Holte (sholte@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4838), Director, Demand and Integration Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director, Oil and Gas Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor. For ordering information and questions on other energy statistics available from EIA, please contact EIA's National

53

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World: Renewable Energy and Demand Response Proliferation intogether the renewable energy and demand response communityimpacts of renewable energy and demand response integration

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Annual Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2000 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses current energy issues—appliance standards, gasoline and diesel fuel standards, natural gas industry expansion, competitive electricity pricing, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends.

55

Changing Energy Demand Behavior: Potential of Demand-Side Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a great theoretical potential to save resources by managing our demand for energy. However, demand-side management (DSM) programs targeting behavioral patterns of...

Dr. Sylvia Breukers; Dr. Ruth Mourik

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Annual Energy Review, 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions.

None

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

36 Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 6 Table A3. Energy prices by sector and source (2010 dollars per million Btu, unless otherwise...

60

Energy Demand and Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The world consumption of primary energy has been on the increase ever since the Industrial Revolution . The energy consumption in 1860 is estimated to have ... particularly marked since WWII when the sources of primary

Kimio Uno

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Annual Energy Review 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2002 125 a Unfinished oils, motor gasoline blending components, aviation gasoline blending components, and other...

63

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Release Date: June 25, 2012 | Next Early Release Date: December 5, 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383(2012) Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Executive Summary Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2012 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the complete June 2012 published report. Executive summary The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012) focus on the factors that shape the

64

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2013 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the full report. The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) focus on the factors that shape the

65

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2013 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the full report. The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) focus on the factors that shape the

66

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050 RyanCEC (2003a) California energy demand 2003-2013 forecast.CEC (2005a) California energy demand 2006-2016: Staff energy

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Regional maps Figure F3. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts 216 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Figure F3. Petroleum...

69

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Table G1. Heat rates Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

70

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-- -- -- -- not reported. See notes at end of table. (continued on next page) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 116 Comparison with other...

71

World Energy Use Trends in Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to provide adequate energy supplies in the future, trends in energy demand must be evaluated and projections of future demand developed. World energy use is far from static, and an understanding of the demand

Randy Hudson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response & Energy Efficiency International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 2 ?Less than 5..., 2009 4 An Innovative Solution to Get the Ball Rolling ? Demand Response (DR) ? Monitoring Based Commissioning (MBCx) EnerNOC has a solution involving two complementary offerings. ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference...

73

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

74

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the nnual Energy Outlook Assumptions to the nnual Energy Outlook EIA Glossary Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 Report #: DOE/EIA-0554(2004) Release date: February 2004 Next release date:February 2005 The Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook. Table of Contents Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Household Expenditures Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module Appendix A Adobe Acrobat Logo

75

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO 2008 AEO 2008 Annual Energy Outlook 2008 The Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008) presents projections and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. The AEO2008 includes the reference case, additional cases examining energy markets, and complete documentation. Analytical Overview: Energy Trends to 2030 In preparing projections for AEO2008, we evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets between today and 2030. The overview focuses on one case, the reference case. ...see full Overview Section You are encouraged to review the full range of alternative cases included in the analysis of other sections of AEO2008 -

76

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and may differ slightly from official EIA data reports. Sources: 2010 data based on: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 28 and Annual (Oak...

77

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Federal Highway Administration, Highway Statistics 2009 (Washington, DC, April 2011); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 30 and Annual (Oak...

78

Energy Demand-Energy Supplies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Just a few years after the U.S. celebrated its first centennial it passed another milestone. In about 1885, coal replaced wood as the nations primary energy source. Wood, properly managed, is a renewable reso...

V. P. Kenney; J. W. Lucey

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response - Policy Demand Response - Policy Since its inception, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been committed to modernizing the nation's...

80

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response A pilot program from NSTAR in Massachusetts,Massachusetts, aiming to test whether an intensive program of energy efficiency and demand response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy demand and population changes  

SciTech Connect

Since World War II, US energy demand has grown more rapidly than population, so that per capita consumption of energy was about 60% higher in 1978 than in 1947. Population growth and the expansion of per capita real incomes have led to a greater use of energy. The aging of the US population is expected to increase per capita energy consumption, despite the increase in the proportion of persons over 65, who consume less energy than employed persons. The sharp decline in the population under 18 has led to an expansion in the relative proportion of population in the prime-labor-force age groups. Employed persons are heavy users of energy. The growth of the work force and GNP is largely attributable to the growing participation of females. Another important consequence of female employment is the growth in ownership of personal automobiles. A third factor pushing up labor-force growth is the steady influx of illegal aliens.

Allen, E.L.; Edmonds, J.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Annual Energy Review 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4(95) 4(95) Distribution Category UC-950 Annual Energy Review 1995 July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Annual Energy Review 1995 The Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Ad- ministration's historical energy statistics. For most series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1995. The statistics, expressed in either physical units or British thermal units, cover all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade,

83

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Release date: April 2007 Next release date: March 2008 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Petroleum Market Module

84

Annual Energy Outlook Evaluation, 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook Evaluation, 2005 1 Outlook Evaluation, 2005 1 Annual Energy Outlook Evaluation, 2005 * Then Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose or advocate future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes,

85

Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current world-wide increase of energy demand cannot be matched by energy production and power grid updateModeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers G. Di Bella, L. Giarr`e, M. Ippolito, A. Jean-Marie, G. Neglia and I. Tinnirello § January 2, 2014 Abstract Energy demand aggregators

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

Energy demand forecasting: industry practices and challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate forecasting of energy demand plays a key role for utility companies, network operators, producers and suppliers of energy. Demand forecasts are utilized for unit commitment, market bidding, network operation and maintenance, integration of renewable ... Keywords: analytics, energy demand forecasting, machine learning, renewable energy sources, smart grids, smart meters

Mathieu Sinn

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2010 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions Download the Report Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Report Cover. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

88

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that energy intensity is not necessarily a good indicator of energy efficiency, whereas by controllingUS Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Massimo www.cepe.ethz.ch #12;US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

89

Energy Demand Analysis at a Disaggregated Level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this chapter is to consider energy demand at the fuel level or at the ... . This chapter first presents the disaggregation of energy demand, discusses the information issues and introduces framewor...

Subhes C. Bhattacharyya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Seasonal temperature variations and energy demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an empirical study of the relationship between residential energy demand and temperature. Unlike previous studies in this ... different regions and to the contrasting effects on energy demand ...

Enrica De Cian; Elisa Lanzi; Roberto Roson

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Energy Demand Figure 42. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1970-2025 (index, 1970 = 1). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Average Energy Use per Person Increases in the Forecast Energy intensity, as measured by energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP, is projected to decline at an average annual rate of 1.6 percent, with efficiency gains and structural shifts in the economy offsetting growth in demand for energy services (Figure 42). The projected rate of decline falls between the average rate of 2.3 percent from 1970 through 1986, when energy prices increased in real terms, and the 0.7-percent rate from 1986 through

92

Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mayer Brown Annual Global Energy Conference May 15, 2014 | Houston, TX By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil...

93

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 The Early Release for next year's Annual Energy Outlook will be presented at the John Hopkins Kenney Auditorium on December 14th This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2009 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions

94

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ED2, September. CEC (2005b) Energy demand forecast methodsCalifornia Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advancedof a baseline scenario for energy demand in California for a

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by by Esmeralda Sanchez The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an evaluation of the forecasts in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) annually since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on that of the prior year by adding the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. However, the underlying reasons for deviations between the projections and realized history tend to be the same from one evaluation to the next. The most significant conclusions are: * Over the last two decades, there have been many significant changes in laws, policies, and regulations that could not have been anticipated and were not assumed in the projections prior to their implementation. Many of these actions have had significant impacts on energy supply, demand, and prices; however, the

96

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

97

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 27 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing

98

Demand Charges | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Charges Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleDemandCharges&oldid488967"...

99

Annual Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) Annual Energy Outlook 1999 With Projections to 2020 December 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222).

100

Annual Energy Review 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Exported Energy Coal Other NGPL Other Adjustments Total Consumption Total Supply Nucle ar Rene wable s Crude Oil and Products Fossil Fuels Renewables Domestic Production Industrial Use Transportation Use Residential and Commercial Use Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Nuclear Imported Energy Fossil Fuels Coal Crude Oil Natural Gas Energy Information Administration July 1998 DOE/EIA-0384(97) Annual Energy Review 1997 The Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Admin- istration's historical energy statistics. For many series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1997. The statistics, expressed in either physical units or British thermal units, cover all major energy activities, in- cluding consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices, for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels, electricity, and renewable en-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Annual Energy Review 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Review Review 2000 www.eia.doe.gov On the Web at: www.eia.doe.gov/aer Energy Information Administration DOE/EIA-0384(2000) August 2001 Annual Energy Review 2000 The Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Admin- istration's historical energy statistics. For many series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 2000. The statistics, expressed in either physical units or British thermal units, cover all major energy activities, in- cluding consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices, for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels, electricity, and renewable en- ergy sources. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95-91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with re- sponsibilities given to the Energy Information Administration under Sec- tion 205(a)(2), which

102

SAN ANTONIO SPURS DEMAND FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As a city that experiences seasonal spikes in energy demand and accompanying energy bills, San Antonio, Texas, wanted to help homeowners and businesses reduce their energy use and save on energy...

103

Annual Energy Outlook 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

96) 96) Distribution Category UC-950 Annual Energy Outlook 1996 With Projections to 2015 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222). General questions may be addressed to Arthur T. Andersen (aanderse@eia.doe.gov, 202/ 586-1130),

104

Annual Energy Outlook 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Annual Energy Outlook 1997 With Projections to 2015 December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 1997 (AEO97) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222). General questions may be addressed to Arthur T. Andersen (aanderse@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441),

105

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2040. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

106

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

description of six energy and demand management concepts.how quickly it can modify energy demand. This is not a newimprovements in both energy efficiency and demand response (

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute, Curbing Global Energy Demand Growth: The Energyup Assessment of Energy Demand in India Transportationa profound effect on energy demand. Policy analysts wishing

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2010 213 Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central South Atlantic Mountain Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012

109

Definition: Peak Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peak Demand Peak Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Peak Demand The highest hourly integrated Net Energy For Load within a Balancing Authority Area occurring within a given period (e.g., day, month, season, or year)., The highest instantaneous demand within the Balancing Authority Area.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Peak demand is used to refer to a historically high point in the sales record of a particular product. In terms of energy use, peak demand describes a period of strong consumer demand. Related Terms Balancing Authority Area, energy, demand, balancing authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from

110

Renewable energy annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents summary data on renewable energy consumption, the status of each of the primary renewable technologies, a profile of each of the associated industries, an analysis of topical issues related to renewable energy, and information on renewable energy projects worldwide. It is the second in a series of annual reports on renewable energy. The renewable energy resources included in the report are biomass (wood and ethanol); municipal solid waste, including waste-to-energy and landfill gas; geothermal; wind; and solar energy, including solar thermal and photovoltaic. The report also includes various appendices and a glossary.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage For Further Information... The Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Susan H. Holte (sholte@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4838), Director of the Demand and Integration Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director of the Oil and Gas Division; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Director of the Coal and Electric Power Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Modeling Analyst. For ordering information and questions on other energy statistics available from EIA, please contact EIA’s National Energy Information Center. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows:

112

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2010 The Annual Energy Outlook presents a projection and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2035. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. The AEO2010 includes Reference case, additional cases examining alternative energy markets. Executive Summary Issues in Focus includes: Market Trends in Economic Activity No Sunset and Extended Policies cases Energy Demand Projections World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 Electricity Projections Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Oil and Natural Gas Projections Natural gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives Coal Projections Factors affecting the relationship between crude oil and natural gas prices

113

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Evaluation Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation by Esmeralda Sanchez The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an evaluation of the forecasts in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) annually since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on that of the prior year by adding the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. However, the underlying reasons for deviations between the projections and realized history tend to be the same from one evaluation to the next. The most significant conclusions are: Over the last two decades, there have been many significant changes in laws, policies, and regulations that could not have been anticipated and were not assumed in the projections prior to their implementation. Many of these actions have had significant impacts on energy supply, demand, and prices; however, the impacts were not incorporated in the AEO projections until their enactment or effective dates in accordance with EIA's requirement to remain policy neutral and include only current laws and regulations in the AEO reference case projections.

114

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 53 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module (IDM) estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are subdivided further into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure. The non-manufacturing industries are modeled with less detail because processes are simpler and there is less available data. The petroleum refining

115

Definition: Demand Side Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Side Management Side Management Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand Side Management The term for all activities or programs undertaken by Load-Serving Entity or its customers to influence the amount or timing of electricity they use.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Energy demand management, also known as demand side management (DSM), is the modification of consumer demand for energy through various methods such as financial incentives and education. Usually, the goal of demand side management is to encourage the consumer to use less energy during peak hours, or to move the time of energy use to off-peak times such as nighttime and weekends. Peak demand management does not necessarily decrease total energy consumption, but could be expected to reduce the need

116

International Energy Annual, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules.

Not Available

1994-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Energy Demand Forecasting System of the National Energy Board  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the National Energy Boards long term energy demand forecasting model in its present state of ... results of recent research at the NEB. Energy demand forecasts developed with the aid of this....

R. A. Preece; L. B. Harsanyi; H. M. Webster

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Annual Energy Review 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 The Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Admin- istration's historical energy statistics. For many series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1999. The statistics, expressed in either physical units or British thermal units, cover all major energy activities, in- cluding consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices, for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels, electricity, and renewable en- ergy sources. Publication of this report is in keeping with responsibilities given to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2) that: "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a cen- tral, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble,

120

Annual Energy Review, 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The The Annual Energy Review (AER) is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. General information may be obtained from W. Calvin Kilgore, Director, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, 202-586-1617, or Katherine E. Seiferlein, Chief, Integrated Statistics Branch, 202-586-5695. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the AER may be referred to Samuel E. Brown, 202-586-5103; Leigh Carleton, 202-586-1132; or the following subject specialists via telephone or Internet e-mail: Contacts 1. Energy Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sam.Brown@eia.doe.gov 202-586-5103 Leigh.Carleton@eia.doe.gov 202-586-1132 2. End-Use Energy Consumption Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey . . . . . . . Mark.Schipper@eia.doe.gov 202-586-1136 Residential Energy Consumption Survey . . . . . . . . Michael.Laurence@eia.doe.gov 202-586-2453 Residential Transportation Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Annual Energy Review 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Admin- istration's historical energy statistics. For many series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1998. The statistics, expressed in either physical units or British thermal units, cover all major energy activities, in- cluding consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices, for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels, electricity, and renewable en- ergy sources. Publication of this report is in keeping with responsibilities given to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2) that: "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble,

122

Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities  

SciTech Connect

July 29, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

Arun Majumdar

2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

123

Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

July 29, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

Arun Majumdar

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

124

Transportation energy demand: Model development and use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes work undertaken and sponsored by the Energy Commission to improve transportation energy demand forecasting and policy analysis for California. Two ... , the paper discusses some of the import...

Chris Kavalec

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Drivers of Future Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

trends - Household income migration urbanization * Policy: China Energy Outlook - Air pollution - Climate change 4 (1) Industrial energy intensity: The energy intensity of...

126

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Title Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2010 Authors Goldman, Charles A., Michael Reid, Roger Levy, and Alison Silverstein Pagination 74 Date Published 01/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025.1 Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries-which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity-is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that "the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW" by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

127

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review 1 Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006) * The Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards-or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require implementing regulations

128

Real-Time Demand Side Energy Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-Time Demand Side Energy Management Annelize Victor Michael Brodkorb Sr. Business Consultant Business Development Manager Aspen Technology, Inc. Aspen Technology Espaa, S.A. Houston, TX Barcelona, Spain ABSTRACT To remain... competitive, manufacturers must capture opportunities to increase bottom-line profitability. The goal of this paper is to present a new methodology for reducing energy costs Demand-Side Energy Management. Learn how process manufacturers assess energy...

Victor, A.; Brodkorb, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

contact.gif (4492 bytes) contact.gif (4492 bytes) The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222). General questions may be addressed to Arthur T. Andersen (aanderse@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441), Director of the International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gas Division; Susan H. Holte (sholte@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4838), Director of the Demand and Integration Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director of the Oil and Gas Division; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Director of the Coal and Electric Power Division; or Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Modeling Analyst. Detailed questions about the forecasts and related model components may be addressed to the following analysts:

130

Annual energy review 1994  

SciTech Connect

This 13th edition presents the Energy Information Administration`s historical energy statistics. For most series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1994; thus, this report is well-suited to long-term trend analyses. It covers all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels and electricity. Statistics on renewable energy sources are also included: this year, for the first time, usage of renewables by other consumers as well as by electric utilities is included. Also new is a two-part, comprehensive presentation of data on petroleum products supplied by sector for 1949 through 1994. Data from electric utilities and nonutilities are integrated as ``electric power industry`` data; nonutility power gross generation are presented for the first time. One section presents international statistics (for more detail see EIA`s International Energy Annual).

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling Speaker(s): Nan Zhou Date: October 8, 2009 (All day) Location: 90-3122 As a consequence of soaring energy demand due to the staggering pace of its economic growth, China overtook the United States in 2007 to become the world's biggest contributor to CO2 emissions (IEA, 2007). Since China is still in an early stage of industrialization and urbanization, economic development promises to keep China's energy demand growing strongly. Furthermore, China's reliance on fossil fuel is unlikely to change in the long term, and increased needs will only heighten concerns about energy security and climate change. In response, the Chinese government has developed a series of policies and targets aimed at improving energy efficiency, including both short-term targets and long-term strategic

132

Driving Demand | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

how they should invest in energy efficiency for their homes and buildings. Effective marketing can address this issue. By providing relevant information in compelling ways, energy...

133

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 - overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Release Date: April 26, 2011 | Next Early Release Date: January 23, 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383(2011) Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Changes from Previous AEO Executive Summary Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2011 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the complete April 2011 published report. Changes from previous AEO2010 Significant update of the technically recoverable U.S. shale gas

134

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 - overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Release Date: April 26, 2011 | Next Early Release Date: January 23, 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383(2011) Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Changes from Previous AEO Executive Summary Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2011 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the complete April 2011 published report. Changes from previous AEO2010 Significant update of the technically recoverable U.S. shale gas

135

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecast Evaluation 2005 Forecast Evaluation 2005 Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation 2005 Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation 2005 * Then Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose or advocate future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes, when defined, are reflected.

136

Industry continues to cut energy demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S.'s 10 most energy-intensive industries are continuing to reduce their energy demand, with the chemical industry emerging as a leader in industrial energy conservation, says the Department of Energy in a report to Congress.The chemical industry is ...

1981-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

137

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Agency/Company /Organization: Victoria Transport Policy Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm12.htm Cost: Free Language: English References: Victoria Transport Policy Institute[1] "The Online TDM Encyclopedia is the world's most comprehensive information resource concerning innovative transportation management strategies. It describes dozens of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies and contains information on TDM planning, evaluation and implementation. It has thousands of hyperlinks that provide instant access

138

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation by Susan H. Holte In this paper, the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluates the projections published in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), (1) by comparing the projections from the Annual Energy Outlook 1982 through the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 with actual historical values. A set of major consumption, production, net import, price, economic, and carbon dioxide emissions variables are included in the evaluation, updating similar papers from previous years. These evaluations also present the reasons and rationales for significant differences. The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an

140

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iv Chapter 5: National energy demand and potential energyAs Figure 1-2 shows, HVAC energy demand is comparable to thefor reducing this high energy demand reaches beyond

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS27 data.

142

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.14

143

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment

144

Annual Energy Outlook 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 (AEO2005) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-2222), Director, Integrated Analysis and Forecasting and International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gas Division; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director, Demand and Integration Division; Joseph A. Beamon (jbeamon@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director, Oil and Gas Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe. gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor. For ordering information and questions on other energy statistics available from EIA, please contact EIA's National Energy Information Center. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center,

145

Energy technologies and their impact on demand  

SciTech Connect

Despite the uncertainties, energy demand forecasts must be made to guide government policies and public and private-sector capital investment programs. Three principles can be identified in considering long-term energy prospects. First energy demand will continue to grow, driven by population growth, economic development, and the current low per capita energy consumption in developing countries. Second, energy technology advancements alone will not solve the problem. Energy-efficient technologies, renewable resource technologies, and advanced electric power technologies will all play a major role but will not be able to keep up with the growth in world energy demand. Third, environmental concerns will limit the energy technology choices. Increasing concern for environmental protection around the world will restrict primarily large, centralized energy supply facilities. The conclusion is that energy system diversity is the only solution. The energy system must be planned with consideration of both supply and demand technologies, must not rely on a single source of energy, must take advantage of all available technologies that are specially suited to unique local conditions, must be built with long-term perspectives, and must be able to adapt to change.

Drucker, H.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Contacts Specific questions about the information in this report may be directed to: Introduction Paul D. Holtberg 202/586-1284 Macroeconomic Activity Module Ronald F. Earley Yvonne Taylor 202/586-1398 202/586-1398 International Energy Module G. Daniel Butler 202/586-9503 Household Expenditures Module/ Residential Demand Module John H. Cymbalsky 202/586-4815 Commercial Demand Module Erin E. Boedecker 202/586-4791 Industrial Demand Module T. Crawford Honeycutt 202/586-1420 Transportation Demand Module John D. Maples 202/586-1757 Electricity Market Module Laura Martin 202/586-1494 Oil and Gas Supply Module/Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Joseph Benneche 202/586-6132 Petroleum Market Module Bill Brown 202/586-8181

147

Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook Outlook 2010 Restrospective Review July 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Depa rtment of Energy W ashington, DC 20585 This page inTenTionally lefT blank 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review While the integrated nature of NEMS may result in some feedback that slightly modifies the initial assumptions about world oil price and the macroeconomic growth environment, these feedbacks tend to be relatively small, so that the initial assumptions for world oil price and the macroeconomic growth environment largely determine the overall projection environ- ment. To the extent that this general environment deviates from the initial assumptions, the NEMS projection results will also deviate. Table 2 provides a summary of the percentage of years in

148

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Index (click to jump links) Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Energy Demand in Alternative Technology Cases Annual Growth in Energy Use Is Projected To Continue Net energy delivered to consumers represents only a part of total primary energy consumption. Primary consumption includes energy losses associated with the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity, which are allocated to the end-use sectors (residential, commercial, and industrial) in proportion to each sector’s share of electricity use [103]. Figure 45. Primary and delivered energy consumption, excluding transportation use, 1970-2025 (quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

149

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review provides a yearly comparison between realized energy outcomes and the Reference case projections included in previous Annual Energy Outlooks (AEO) beginning with 1982. This edition of the report adds the AEO 2012 projections and updates the historical data to incorporate the latest data revisions.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an “early release” version of the AEO2008 reference case in December 2007; however, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA2007), which was enacted later that month, will have a major impact on energy markets, and given the year-long life of AEO2008 and its use as a baseline for analyses of proposed policy changes, EIA decided to update the reference case to reflect the provisions of EISA2007.

151

Annual Energy Outlook 1998 Forecasts - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 With Projections to 2020 1998 With Projections to 2020 Annual Energy Outlook 1999 Report will be Available on December 9, 1998 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO98 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses three current energy issues—electricity restructuring, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis

152

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Executive Summary Executive Summary Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012) Reference case focus on the factors that shape U.S. energy markets in the long term, under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain generally unchanged throughout the projection period. The AEO2012 Reference case provides the basis for examination and discussion of energy market trends and serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in U.S. energy policies, rules, or regulations or potential technology breakthroughs. Some of the highlights in the AEO2012 Reference case include: Projected growth of energy use slows over the projection period, reflecting an extended economic recovery and increasing energy efficiency in end-use applications Projected transportation energy demand grows at an annual rate of 0.2

153

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Energy Review Annual Energy Review Superseded -- see MER for key annual tables Annual Energy Review archives for data year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 all archives Go EIA has expanded the Monthly Energy Review (MER) to include annual data as far back as 1949 for those data tables that are found in both the Annual Energy Review (AER) and the MER . During this transition, EIA will not publish the 2012 edition of the AER. In the list of tables below, grayed-out table numbers now go to MER tables that contain 1949-2012 (and later) data series. New interactive tables and graphs have also been added and are currently on EIA's Beta site. Data categories + EXPAND ALL Energy Overview 1.0 Total Energy Flow, GRAPH 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949- PDF XLS CSV INTERACTIVE 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source, 1949- PDF XLS CSV INTERACTIVE

154

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 17 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents interactions between the U.S. economy and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP), is a key determinant of growth in the demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected

155

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

these trends lead to declining natural gas consumption byNatural gas demand has been rising in California and this trendnatural gas demands regionally, to account for variability in energy usage trends

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Behavioral Aspects in Simulating the Future US Building Energy Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Importance Total off- site energy demand (2030) 20% decreaseImportance Total off-site energy demand (2030) 20% decreaseImportance Total off-site energy demand (2030) 20% decrease

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Cumulative energy demand for selected renewable energy technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculation of Cumulative Energy Demand (CED) of various energy systems and the computation of their Energy Yield Ratio (EYR) suggests that one single renewable energy technology cannot be said to be the ... Due ...

Dirk Grzenich; Jyotirmay Mathur

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Energy demand simulation for East European countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis and created statistical models of energy consumption tendencies in the European Union (EU25), including new countries in transition, are presented. The EU15 market economy countries and countries in transition are classified into six clusters by relative indicators of Gross Domestic Product (GDP/P) and energy demand (W/P) per capita. The specified statistical models of energy intensity W/GDP non-linear stochastic tendencies have been discovered with respect to the clusters of classified countries. The new energy demand simulation models have been developed for the demand management in time??territory hierarchy in various scenarios of short-term and long-term perspective on the basis of comparative analysis methodology. The non-linear statistical models were modified to GDP, W/P and electricity (E/P) final consumption long-term forecasts for new associated East European countries and, as an example, for the Baltic Countries, including Lithuania.

Jonas Algirdas Kugelevicius; Algirdas Kuprys; Jonas Kugelevicius

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Demand Response Initiatives at CPS Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Initiatives at CPS Energy Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Conference December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-53 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 CPSEs DR Program DR... than the military bases and Toyota combined. Schools & Universities contributed 6 MWs of Demand Response in 2013. 2013 DR Participants Trinity University - $5,654 Fort Sam ISD - $18,860 Judson ISD - $45,540 Alamo Colleges - $98,222 UTSA - $168...

Luna, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Title Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4849E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2010 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords cement industry, cement sector, demand response, electricity use, energy efficiency, market sectors, mineral manufacturing, technologies Abstract This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 16, 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Table Title Formats Summary Reference Case Tables Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption

162

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Table Title Formats Summary Reference Case Tables Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption

163

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

O F = = | = = g u n e = O M N O O F = = | = = g u n e = O M N O w i t h P r o j e c t i o n s t o 2 0 3 5 A n n u a l E n e r g y Ou t l o o k 2 0 1 2 For further information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2012 was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.gov, 202/586-2222), Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia. gov, 202/586-1284), Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team, Office of Integrated and International Energy Analysis; Joseph A. Beamon (joseph.beamon@eia.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis; Sam A. Napolitano (sam.napolitano@eia.gov, 202/586-0687), Director, Office of Integrated and International Energy Analysis; A. Michael

164

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market clearing method is used to determine the price at which worldwide demand for oil is equal to the worldwide supply. The module determines new values for oil production and demand for regions outside the United States, along with a new world oil price that balances supply and demand in the international oil market. A detailed description of the International Energy Module is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M071(06), (Washington, DC, February 2006).

165

Overview of Demand Side Response | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Energy Officials Need to Know High Electric Demand Days: Clean Energy Strategies for Improving Air Quality Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence...

166

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg251500.pdf....

167

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Retrospective Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

S e p t e mb e r 2 0 0 8 S e p t e mb e r 2 0 0 8 N e x t R e l e a s e D a t e : S e p t e mb e r 2 0 0 9 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Retrospective Review 1 Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2008) The Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and

168

Annual Energy Outlook 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

[1] [1] The projections in AEO2005 are based on Federal and State laws and regulations in effect on October 31, 2004. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards-or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require funds or imple- menting regulations that have not been provided or speci- fied-are not reflected in the projections. Legislation and Regulations [2]The SEER is a measure of cooling performance that is used to rate the efficiency of central air conditioners and heat pumps. It is defined as the ratio of cooling output (in Btu) to total electric energy input (in watthours) during normal annual usage. [3] National Resources Defense Council v. Abraham, U.S. Court of Appeals, 2nd District. [4]U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, "National Emis- sion Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Indus- trial, Commercial,

169

Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information Speaker(s): Sebastien Houde Date: September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Christopher Payne The goal of this talk is to discuss two interrelated research projects that aim to assess the welfare effects of energy policies that rely on standards and information. The first project focuses on the Energy Star certification program. Using unique micro-data on the US refrigerator market, I first show that consumers respond to certification in different ways. Some consumers appear to rely heavily on Energy Star and pay little attention to electricity costs, others are the reverse, and still others appear to be insensitive to both electricity costs and Energy Star. I then develop a

170

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030, based on results from EIAs National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an early release version of the AEO2009 reference case in December 2008.

None

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

DemandDirect | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DemandDirect DemandDirect Jump to: navigation, search Name DemandDirect Place Woodbury, Connecticut Zip 6798 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Product DemandDirect provides demand response, energy efficiency, load management, and distributed generation services to end-use electricity customers in order to reduce electricity consumption, improve grid reliability, and promote renewable energy. Coordinates 44.440496°, -72.414991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.440496,"lon":-72.414991,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

172

Reducing Energy Demand: What Are the Practical Limits?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reducing Energy Demand: What Are the Practical Limits? ... Global demand for energy could be reduced by up to 73% through practical efficiency improvements passive systems, the last technical components in each energy chain. ... This paper aims to draw attention to the opportunity for major reduction in energy demand, by presenting an analysis of how much of current global energy demand could be avoided. ...

Jonathan M. Cullen; Julian M. Allwood; Edward H. Borgstein

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 with Projections to 2025 5 with Projections to 2025 Report #: DOE/EIA-0383(2005) Release date full report: January 2005 Next release date full report: January 2006 Early Release Reference Case date: December 2005 The Annual Energy Outlook presents a midterm forecast and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. AEO2005 includes a reference case and over 30 sensitivities. Data Tables Summary Tables Adobe Acrobat Logo Yearly Tables Excel logo Regional and other detailed tables Excel logo (Supplemental) Contents Overview Market Drivers Trends in Economic Activity Economic Growth Cases International Oil Markets Energy Demand Projections Buildings Sector

174

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fede ral Highwa y Admi nistration, Highway Statistics 2008 (Washington, DC, April 2010); Oak Ridge N ational Labo ratory, Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 29 and Annual...

175

Geothermal Energy Association Annual Industry Briefing: 2015...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Geothermal Energy Association Annual Industry Briefing: 2015 State of Geothermal Geothermal Energy Association Annual Industry Briefing: 2015 State of Geothermal February 24, 2015...

176

AUTOMATION OF ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING Sanzad Siddique, B.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUTOMATION OF ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING by Sanzad Siddique, B.S. A Thesis submitted to the Faculty OF ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING Sanzad Siddique, B.S. Marquette University, 2013 Automation of energy demand of the energy demand forecasting are achieved by integrating nonlinear transformations within the models

Povinelli, Richard J.

177

Energy demand of German households and saving potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The implementation of the principles of sustainable development requires both using potentialities in saving resources and cutting down emissions (efficiency strategies) as well as more conscious patterns of behaviour of the actors involved (sufficiency strategies). Starting from the current situation of annual CO2 emissions of about 10 t and a sustainability goal of 1??2 t CO2 emissions per inhabitant and year, the question arises in how far households can contribute to achieve this goal. Therefore, in this paper, the environmental impacts of the energy demand of German households will be evaluated by means of describing its status quo and there from deriving saving potentials.

Anke Eber; Dominik Most; Otto Rentz; Thomas Lutzkendorf

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

& Analysis > AEO 2009 & Analysis > AEO 2009 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 The Early Release for next year's Annual Energy Outlook will be presented at the John Hopkins Kenney Auditorium on December 14th Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Service Report, April 2009 The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009) reference case was updated to reflect the provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) that were enacted in mid-February 2009. The reference case in the recently published AEO2009, which reflected laws and regulations in effect as of November 2008, does not include ARRA. The need to develop an updated reference case following the passage of ARRA also provided the Energy Information Administration (EIA) with an opportunity to update the

179

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Demand Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand Modeling Energy Demand Modeling The software is intended to be used for Energy Demand Modeling. This can be utilized from regional to national level. A Graphical User Interface of the software takes the input from the user in a quite logical and sequential manner. These input leads to output in two distinct form, first, it develops a Reference Energy System, which depicts the flow of energy from the source to sink with all the losses incorporated and second, it gives a MATLAB script file for advance post processing like graphs, visualization and optimizations to develop and evaluate the right energy mix policy frame work for a intended region. Keywords Reference Energy System, Software, GUI, Planning, Energy Demand Model EDM, Energy Policy Planning Validation/Testing

180

Demand Management Institute (DMI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand Management Institute (DMI) Demand Management Institute (DMI) Jump to: navigation, search Name Demand Management Institute (DMI) Address 35 Walnut Street Place Wellesley, Massachusetts Zip 02481 Sector Buildings Product Provides analysis for buildings on reducing energy use Website http://www.dmiinc.com/ Coordinates 42.3256508°, -71.2530294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3256508,"lon":-71.2530294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand and Supply Electricity Demand and Supply Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Electricity Demand and Supply Continued Growth in Electricity Use Is Expected in All Sectors Figure 66. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1970-2025 (billion kilowatthours). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Total electricity sales are projected to increase at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent in the AEO2005 reference case, from 3,481 billion kilowatthours in 2003 to 5,220 billion kilowatthours in 2025 (Figure 66). From 2003 to 2025, annual growth in electricity sales is projected to average 1.6 percent in the residential sector, 2.5 percent in the commercial sector, and 1.3 percent in the industrial sector.

182

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Demand and Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Demand and Consumption Electricity Demand and Consumption Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). The sectors included are: agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial (mining, food processing, wood and paper, chemicals, basic metals, other minor sectors); commercial; and residential. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago)

183

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-2222), Director, Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director, Demand and Integration Division; Joseph A. Beamon (jbeamon@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; A. Michael Schaal (michael.schaal@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-5590), Director, Oil and Gas Division; Glen E. Sweetnam (glen.sweetnam@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2188), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor.

184

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

185

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the...

186

Draft Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Demand-Side Resources Draft Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources Utilities in many states have been implementing energy efficiency and load management programs (collectively called...

187

Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Demand-Side Resources Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources Utilities in many states have been implementing energy efficiency and load management programs (collectively called...

188

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Title of Paper Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Title of Paper Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation by Susan H. Holte OIAF has been providing an evaluation of the forecasts in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) annually since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on that of the prior year by adding the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. However, the underlying reasons for deviations between the projections and realized history tend to be the same from one evaluation to the next. The most significant conclusions are: Natural gas has generally been the fuel with the least accurate forecasts of consumption, production, and prices. Natural gas was the last fossil fuel to be deregulated following the strong regulation of energy markets in the 1970s and early 1980s. Even after deregulation, the behavior

189

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 with Projections to 2025 4 with Projections to 2025 Report #: DOE/EIA-0383(2004) Release date: January 2004 Next release date: January 2005 Errata August 25, 2004 The Annual Energy Outlook presents a midterm forecast and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025 Table of Contents Summary Tables Adobe Acrobat Logo Yearly Tables MS Excel Viewer Regional and other detailed tables (Supplemental) MS Excel Viewer Overview Market Drivers Trends in Economic Activity Economic Growth Cases International Oil Markets Energy Demand Projections Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Alternative Technology Cases Electricity Forecast Electricity Sales Electricity Generating Capacity Electricity Fuel Costs and Prices Electricity from Nuclear Power

190

Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Issues in Focus  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Issues in Focus Issues in Focus Macroeconomic Forecasting with the Revised National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) Phasing Out MTBE in Gasoline World Oil Demand and Prices Distributed Electricity Generation Resources Natural Gas Supply Availability Restructuring of State Retail Markets for Electricity Carbon Dioxide Emissions in AEO2001 Macroeconomic Forecasting with the Revised National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) The NIPA Comprehensive Revision Economic activity is a key determinant of growth in U.S. energy supply and demand. The derivation of the forecast of economic activity is therefore a critical step in developing the energy forecast presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001). In turn, the forecast of economic activity is rooted fundamentally in the historical data series maintained by a

191

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 Conference  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of Last Year's Conference Summary of Last Year's Conference The Energy Information Administration (EIA) will host its eighth annual National Energy Modeling System/Annual Energy Outlook Conference on March 21, 2000, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott, 1700 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA, near the Crystal City Metro station. The conference includes speakers and attendees from Federal and State governments, private industry, and trade associations, discussing energy issues particularly related to EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2000, which was released in November 1999, and the National Energy Modeling System. Conference Registration Conference registration is free, but space is limited. You can register on-line or fax this form to: Peggy Wells Energy Information Administration, EI-84

192

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Intensity Intensity figure dataPopulation is a key determinant of energy consumption through its influence on demand for travel, housing, consumer goods, and services. U.S. energy use per capita was fairly constant over the 1990 to 2007 period, but it began to fall after 2007. In the AEO2012 Reference case, energy use per capita continues to decline due to the impact of an extended economic recovery and improving energy efficiency. Total U.S. population increases by 25 percent from 2010 to 2035, but energy use grows by only 10 percent, and energy use per capita declines at an annual average rate of 0.5 percent per year from 2010 to 2035 (Figure 9). figure dataFrom 1990 to 2010, energy use per dollar of GDP declined on average by 1.7 percent per year, in large part because of shifts within the

193

Demand-Side Management and Energy Efficiency Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPRI). 1984. Demand Side Management. Vol. 1:Overview of Key1993. Industrial Demand-Side Management Programs: WhatsJ. Kulick. 2004. Demand side management and energy e?ciency

Auffhammer, Maximilian; Blumstein, Carl; Fowlie, Meredith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Annual Energy Outlook with  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

with Projections to 2030 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 The Annual Energy Outlook 2007 presents a projection and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. The AEO2007 includes the reference case, additional cases examining energy markets, and complete documentation. The report is also released in print. Errata as of 10/15/07 Forecast Data Tables Reference Case Tables (links to individual excel and PDF files) High Economic Growth Case Tables (links to individual excel and PDF files) Low Economic Growth Case Tables (links to individual excel and PDF files) High Price Case Tables (links to individual excel and PDF files)

195

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Annual Energy Outlook with  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2006 with Projections to 2030 2006 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 presents a forecast and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. The AEO2006 includes the reference case, additional cases examining energy markets, and complete documentation. Forecast Data Tables Reference Case Tables (links to individual excel and PDF files) High Macroeconomic Growth Case Tables (links to individual excel files) Low Macroeconomic Growth Case Tables (links to individual excel files) High Price Case Tables (links to individual excel files) Low Price Case Tables (links to individual excel files)

196

Forecasting Energy Demand Using Fuzzy Seasonal Time Series  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand side energy management has become an important issue for energy management. In order to support energy planning and policy decisions forecasting the future demand is very important. Thus, forecasting the f...

?Irem Ual Sar?; Basar ztaysi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

services provided to the energy markets, Order 745 advancesin the wholesale energy market (both day-ahead and real-the capacity market is. The energy market does not feature

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Optimal Demand Response with Energy Storage Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider the problem of optimal demand response and energy storage management for a power consuming entity. The entity's objective is to find an optimal control policy for deciding how much load to consume, how much power to purchase from/sell to the power grid, and how to use the finite capacity energy storage device and renewable energy, to minimize his average cost, being the disutility due to load- shedding and cost for purchasing power. Due to the coupling effect of the finite size energy storage, such problems are challenging and are typically tackled using dynamic programming, which is often complex in computation and requires substantial statistical information of the system dynamics. We instead develop a low-complexity algorithm called Demand Response with Energy Storage Management (DR-ESM). DR-ESM does not require any statistical knowledge of the system dynamics, including the renewable energy and the power prices. It only requires the entity to solve a small convex optimization pr...

Huang, Longbo; Ramchandran, Kannan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

044E 044E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Charles Goldman, Michael Reid, Roger Levy and Alison Silverstein Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2010 The work described in this report was funded by the Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes

200

Annual Planning Summaries: 2014 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

4 Annual Planning Summaries: 2014 February 19, 2014 2014 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy The ongoing and projected...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Title Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2010 Authors Fuller, Merrian C., Cathy Kunkel, Mark Zimring, Ian M. Hoffman, Katie L. Soroye, and Charles A. Goldman Tertiary Authors Borgeson, Merrian Pagination 136 Date Published 09/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency-they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars1 flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements2, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula-and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs-there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers-especially those that are relatively new to the field, such as the over 2,000 towns, cities, states, and regions who are recipients of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act funds for clean energy programs. This report synthesizes lessons from first generation programs, highlights emerging best practices, and suggests methods and approaches to use in designing, implementing, and evaluating these programs. We examined 14 residential energy efficiency programs, conducted an extensive literature review, interviewed industry experts, and surveyed residential contractors to draw out these lessons.

202

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in significant energy and demand savings for refrigeratedbe modified to reduce energy demand during demand responsein refrigerated warehouse energy demand if they are not

Lekov, Alex

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

overview.gif (2907 bytes) overview.gif (2907 bytes) Key Issues A major issue in energy markets today is carbon emissions. Because the Kyoto Protocol has not been ratified by the United States and no specific policies for carbon reduction have been enacted, such policies are not included in the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99), although the Protocol and EIA’s recent analysis of its potential impacts are discussed. Economic developments in Asia over the past 18 months have weakened worldwide oil demand and lowered world oil prices—a trend that is likely to continue for several years and, therefore, is included in the AEO99 analysis of oil markets and prices. As in AEO98, the projections in AEO99 reflect ongoing changes in the financial structure of the U.S. electricity industry and cost reductions that are becoming evident with increased competition. A transition to retail competitive pricing is assumed in five regions—California, New York, New England, the Mid-Atlantic Area Council (Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey, and Maryland), and the Mid-America Interconnected Network (Illinois and parts of Wisconsin and Missouri). Provisions of the California legislation on stranded cost recovery and price caps are also included. In the other regions, stranded cost recovery is assumed to be phased out by 2008. No national renewable portfolio standard has been passed, but State standards and other programs intended to encourage renewables are included as enacted. The new standards for control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions by electricity generators are also incorporated.

204

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Module Energy Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 21 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Module The LFMM International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the LFMM IEM computes BRENT and WTI prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, and generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail. The IEM also provides, for each year of the projection period, endogenous and

205

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Facility Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on AddThis.com... Requirements by Subject

206

Evaluation of ground energy storage assisted electric vehicle DC fast charger for demand charge reduction and providing demand response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In 2012 there was approximately 2400 electric vehicle DC Fast Charging stations sold globally. According to Pike Research (Jerram and Gartner, 2012), it is anticipated that by 2020 there will be approximately 460,000 of them installed worldwide. A typical public DC fast charger delivers a maximum power output of 50kW which allows a typical passenger vehicle to be 80% charged in 1015min, compared with 68h for a 6.6kW AC level 2 charging unit. While DC fast chargers offer users the convenience of being able to rapidly charge their vehicle, the unit's high power demand has the potential to put sudden strain on the electricity network, and incur significant demand charges. Depending on the utility rate structure, a DC fast charger can experience annual demand charges of several thousand dollars. Therefore in these cases there is an opportunity to mitigate or even avoid the demand charges incurred by coupling the unit with an appropriately sized energy storage system and coordinating the way in which it integrates. This paper explores the technical and economical suitability of coupling a ground energy storage system with a DC fast charge unit for mitigation or avoidance of demand charges and lessening the impact on the local electricity network. This paper also discusses the concept of having the system participate in demand response programs in order to provide grid support and to further improve the economic suitability of an energy storage system.

Donald McPhail

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST. Mitch Tian prepared the peak demand forecast. Ted Dang prepared the historic energy consumption data in California and for climate zones within those areas. The staff California Energy Demand 2008-2018 forecast

208

Annual Energy Outlook 96 Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for for the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Introduction This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 (AEO96). In this context, assumptions include general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports listed in the Appendix. 1 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview. The National Energy Modeling System The projections

209

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

210

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

211

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two California Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities o #and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities

Olsen, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Balancing of Energy Supply and Residential Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power demand of private households shows daily fluctuations and ... (BEV) and heat pumps. This additional demand, especially when it remains unmanaged, will ... to an increase in fluctuations. To balance demand,

Martin Bock; Grit Walther

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle Conventional and Alternative Fuel Response Simulatormodified to include alternative fuel demand scenarios (whichvehicle adoption and alternative fuel demand) later in the

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Modeling supermarket refrigeration energy use and demand  

SciTech Connect

A computer model has been developed that can predict the performance of supermarket refrigeration equipment to within 3% of field test measurements. The Supermarket Refrigeration Energy Use and Demand Model has been used to simulate currently available refrigerants R-12, R-502 and R-22, and is being further developed to address alternative refrigerants. This paper reports that the model is expected to be important in the design, selection and operation of cost-effective, high-efficiency refrigeration systems. It can profile the operation and performance of different types of compressors, condensors, refrigerants and display cases. It can also simulate the effects of store humidity and temperature on display cases; the efficiency of various floating head pressure setpoints, defrost alternatives and subcooling methods; the efficiency and amount of heat reclaim from refrigeration systems; and the influence of other variables such as store lighting and building design. It can also be used to evaluate operational strategies such as variable-speed drive or cylinder unloading for capacity control. Development of the model began in 1986 as part of a major effort, sponsored by the U.S. electric utility industry, to evaluate energy performance of then conventional single compressor and state-of-the-art multiplex refrigeration systems, and to characterize the contribution of a variety of technology enhancement features on system energy use and demand.

Blatt, M.H.; Khattar, M.K. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (US)); Walker, D.H. (Foster Miller Inc., Waltham, MA (US))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)- Energy Production and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production and Imports Production and Imports Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Production and Imports Figure 5. Total energy production and consumption, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 6. Energy production by fuel, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Net imports of energy are expected to continue to meet a major share of total U.S. energy demand (Figure 5). In the AEO2008 reference case, the net import share of total U.S. energy consumption in 2030 is 29 percent, slightly less than the 30-percent share in 2006. Rising fuel prices over the projection period are expected to spur increases in domestic energy

216

Annual Energy Outlook 2005-Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AD AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AEO2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 AEO2005 Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Altos Altos Partners AMT Alternative Minimum Tax ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Btu British thermal unit CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CAMR Clean Air Mercury Rule CARB California Air Resources Board CBECS Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (EIA) CBO Congressional Budget Office CCCC Climate Change Credit Corporation CH 4 Methane CHP Combined heat and power CO 2 Carbon dioxide CTL Coal-to-liquids DB Deutsche Bank, A.G. E85 Fuel containing a blend of 70 to 85 percent ethanol and 30 to 15 percent gasoline by volume EEA Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. EIA Energy Information Administration EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT Energy Policy Act of 1992 ETBE Ethyl tertiary butyl ether EVA Energy Ventures Analysis, Incorporated FERC

217

Competitive Technologies, Equipment Vintages and the Demand for Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Macroeconometric modelling of energy demand resorts to two approaches leading to models ... of view. The first approach specifies the demand of a group of consumers for a single form of energy, independent of the...

F. Carlevaro

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic growth Economic growth Macroeconomic projections in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) are trend projections, with no major shocks assumed and with potential growth determined by the economyâ€(tm)s supply capability. Growth in aggregate supply depends on increases in the labor force, growth of capital stocks, and improvements in productivity. Long-term demand growth depends on labor force growth,income growth, and population growth. AEO2014 uses the U.S. Census Bureauâ€(tm)s December 2012 middle population projection. The U.S. Census Bureau revised its population projections primarily to reflect lower assumptions regarding international net migration. In AEO2014, U.S. population is expected to grow at an annual rate of 0.7% from 2012 to 2040, or 0.2 percentage points lower than the 0.9% average

219

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documents Documents » Annual Reports Annual Reports Note: Some of the following documents are in PDF and will require Adobe Reader for viewing. Freedom of Information Act Annual Reports Annual Report for 2012 Annual Report for 2011 Annual Report for 2010 Annual Report for 2009 Annual Report for 2008 (pdf) Annual Report for 2007 (pdf) Annual Report for 2006 (pdf) Annual Report for 2005 (pdf) Annual Report for 2004 (pdf) Annual Report for 2003 (pdf) Annual Report for 2002 (pdf) (Revised 11/03/03) Annual Report for 2001 (pdf) Annual Report for 2000 (pdf) Annual Report for 1999 (pdf) Annual Report for 1998 (pdf) Annual Report for 1997 (pdf) Annual Report for 1996 (pdf) Annual Report for 1995 (pdf) Annual Report for 1994 (pdf) Chief FOIA Officers Reports Aviation Management Green Leases

220

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

acronyms.gif (3491 bytes) acronyms.gif (3491 bytes) AD - Associated/dissolved natural gas AEO98 - Annual Energy Outlook 1998 AEO99 - Annual Energy Outlook 1999 AFVs - Alternative-fuel vehicles AGA - American Gas Association API - American Petroleum Institute BTAB - BT Alex Brown CAAA90 - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CCAP - Climate Change Action Plan CDM - Clean Development Mechanism CFCs - Chlorofluorocarbons CNG - Compressed natural gas CO - Carbon monoxide CO2 - Carbon dioxide DOE - U.S. Department of Energy DRI - DRI/McGraw-Hill EIA - Energy Information Administration EOR - Enhanced oil recovery EPA - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT - Energy Policy Act of 1992 ETBE - Ethyl tertiary butyl ether EU - European Union FERC - Federal Energy Regulatory Commission GDP - Gross domestic product

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-5719E Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two Summary #12;Introduction Energy Management · · · · · · · · · · #12;Demand Response #12;#12;Bentley Prince-Project Personnel Changes #12;Enablement of Demand Response Capabilities due to Energy Management Improvement

222

International energy annual, 1989. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production, consumption, reserves, trade, and prices for five primary energy sources: petroleum, natural gas, coal, hydroelectricity, and nuclear electricity. It also presents information on petroleum products. Since the early 1980's the world's total output of primary energy has increased steadily. The annual average growth rate of energy production during the decade was 1.9 percent. Throughout the 1980's, petroleum was the world's most heavily used type of energy. In 1989, three countries--the United States, the USSR, and China--were the leading producers and consumers of world energy. Together, these countries consumed and produced almost 50 percent of the world's total energy. Global production and consumption of crude oil and natural gas liquids increased during the 1980's, despite a decline in total production and demand in the early part of the decade. World production of dry natural gas continued to rise steadily in the 1980's. For the last several years, China has been the leading producer of coal, followed by the United States. In 1989, hydroelectricity supply declined slightly from the upward trend of the last 10 years. Nuclear power generation rose slightly from the 1988 level, compared with the marked growth in earlier years. Prices for major crude oils all increased between 1988 and 1989, but remained well below the price levels at the beginning of the decade. 26 figs., 36 tabs.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation » Bilateral Cooperation » International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports August 13, 2013 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the

224

Annual Energy Review 2011 - Released September 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 37 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2...

225

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENTS Biomass Energy Conversion in Hawaiiof Third Annual Biomass Energy Systems Conference, June 5-7,J. Leone, Marine Biomass Energy Project, (New Orleans, La. :

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand, Conflict and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 Energy Policies and Energy Demand in Northeastissue of whether rising energy demand generates new securityoverall regional energy demand (Fesharaki, Sara Banaszak,

Fesharaki, Fereidun; Banaszak, Sarah; WU, Kang; Valencia, Mark J.; Dorian, James P.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-2222), Director, Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director, Demand and Integration Division; Joseph A. Beamon (jbeamon@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; A. Michael Schaal (michael.schaal@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-5590), Director, Oil and Gas Division; Glen E. Sweetnam (glen.sweetnam@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2188), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor.

228

Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Mexico's energy relationship with the U.S. Mexico: New Energy Horizon May 29, 2014 | Mexico City By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator Mexico is an important supplier of crude oil...

229

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the public. 15 These values represent the energy obtained from uranium when it is used in light water reactors. The total energy content of uranium is much larger, but alternative...

230

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

waste coal. 2 These values represent the energy obtained from uranium when it is used in light water reactors. The total energy content of uranium is much larger, but alternative...

231

Renewable Energy Annual  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents five chapters covering various aspects of the renewable energy marketplace, along with detailed data tables and graphics. Particular focus is given to renewable energy trends in consumption and electricity; manufacturing activities of solar thermal collectors, solar photovoltaic cells/modules, and geothermal heat pumps; and green pricing and net metering programs. The Department of Energy provides detailed offshore

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Chapter 3 Demand-Side Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

resources result from one of two methods of reducing load: energy efficiency or demand response load management. The energy efficiency method designs and deploys technologies...

233

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Average Energy Use per Person Increases Through 2030 Figure 31. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Population growth is a key determinant of total energy consumption, closely linked to rising demand for housing, services, and travel. Energy consumption per capita, controlling for population growth, shows the combined effect of other factors, such as economic growth and technology improvement. In the AEO2006 reference case, energy consumption per capita grows faster than it has in recent history (Figure 31), as a result of continued growth in disposable income.

234

Annual Energy Review 1994. highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quadrillion Quadrillion Btu Highlights: Annual Energy Review 1994 At the halfway mark of this century, coal was the leading source of energy produced in the United States. Now, as we approach the end of the 20th century, coal is still the leading source of energy produced in this country (Figure 1). Between those points of time, however, dramatic changes occurred in the composition of our Nation's energy production. For example, crude oil and natural gas plant liquids production overtook coal production in the early 1950s. That source was matched by natural gas for a few years in the mid-1970s, and then, in the early 1980s, coal regained its prominence. After 1985, crude oil production suffered a nearly steady annual decline. While the fossil fuels moved up and down in their indi-

235

Supplement to the annual energy outlook 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is a companion document to the Annual Energy Outlook 1994 (AEO94), (DOE/EIA-0383(94)), released in Jan. 1994. Part I of the Supplement presents the key quantitative assumptions underlying the AEO94 projections, responding to requests by energy analysts for additional information on the forecasts. In Part II, the Supplement provides regional projections and other underlying details of the reference case projections in the AEO94. The AEO94 presents national forecasts of energy production, demand and prices through 2010 for five scenarios, including a reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices. These forecasts are used by Federal, State, and local governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers in the public and private sectors.

NONE

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 3 6 Table A18. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source (Million Metric Tons, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Residential Petroleum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 80 73 68 64 61 58 -1.2% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 259 261 263 263 262 260 0.0% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 -1.1% Electricity 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 872 820 757 778 833 878 916 0.4% Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1220 1160 1092 1110 1161 1202 1234 0.2% Commercial Petroleum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 43 39 38 38 37 37 -0.5% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 169 183 189 193 200 207 0.8% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

237

Monthly/Annual Energy Review - renewable section  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Monthly and latest annual statistics on renewable energy production and consumption and overviews of fuel ethanol and biodiesel.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Annual Energy Review, 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

that was generated from nonrenewable energy sources and -0.03 quadrillion Btu for hydroelectric pumped storage. Notes: Data are preliminary. Totals may not equal sum of...

239

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

plants that only produce electricity. 3 Includes electricity generation from fuel cells. 4 Includes non-biogenic municipal waste. The U.S. Energy Information Administration...

240

EnergySolve Demand Response | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnergySolve Demand Response EnergySolve Demand Response Jump to: navigation, search Name EnergySolve Demand Response Place Somerset, New Jersey Product Somerset-based utility bill outsourcing company that provides electronic utility bill auditing, tariff analysis, late fee avoidance, and flexible bill payment solutions. Coordinates 45.12402°, -92.675379° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.12402,"lon":-92.675379,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

International energy annual, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 200 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy includes hydroelectric, geothermal, solar and wind electric power and alcohol for fuel. The data were largely derived from published sources and reports from US Embassy personnel in foreign posts. EIA also used data from reputable secondary sources, industry reports, etc.

NONE

1995-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

242

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

243

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

244

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the foreseeable future. U.S. researchers are collaborating with nuclear scientists and engineers around the world to develop new technologies that will lower costs,

245

Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Outlook Oil and Gas Strategies Summit May 21, 2014 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil...

246

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

energy crops, natural gas, coal, extra-heavy oil, bitumen (oil sands), and kerogen (oil shale, not to be confused with shale oiltight oil). Includes both OPEC and non-OPEC...

247

Annual Energy Review 1998  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

207 Coal 18.72 Hydroelectric Power 3.14 Nuclear Electric Power 7.16 Petroleum 1.17 Natural Gas 3.32 Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 33.64 Electric Utilities Nonutility...

248

Annual Energy Review 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

207 Coal 18.44 Hydroelectric Power 3.49 Nuclear Electric Power 6.69 Petroleum 0.84 Natural Gas 3.03 Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 32.62 Electric Utilities Nonutility...

249

Annual Energy Review, 1996  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Nuclear Electric Power 7.17 Petroleum 0.73 Natural Gas 2.80 Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 32.13 Electric Utilities Nonutility Power Producers Gross Generation of...

250

Residential Energy Demand Reduction Analysis and Monitoring Platform - REDRAMP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dramatic Peak Residential Dramatic Peak Residential Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest Yahia Baghzouz Center for Energy Research University of Nevada, Las Vegas Golden, CO Overview * Project description * Subdivision energy efficiency features * Home energy monitoring * Demand side management * Feeder loading * Battery Energy Storage System * Future Work Team Members Project Objective and Methodology * The main objective is to reduce peak power demand of a housing subdivision by 65% (compared to housing development that is built to conventional code). * This objective will be achieved by - Energy efficient home construction with roof- integrated PV system - Demand Side Management - Battery Energy Storage System Project schematic Diagram Project Physical Location: Las Vegas, NV Red Rock Hotel/Casino

251

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Demand Response Quick Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Demand response quick assessment tool image The opportunities for demand reduction and cost savings with building demand responsive controls vary tremendously with building type and location. This assessment tool will predict the energy and demand savings, the economic savings, and the thermal comfort impact for various demand responsive strategies. Users of the tool will be asked to enter the basic building information such as types, square footage, building envelope, orientation, utility schedule, etc. The assessment tool will then use the prototypical simulation models to calculate the energy and demand reduction potential under certain demand responsive strategies, such as precooling, zonal temperature set up, and chilled water loop and air loop set points

252

Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs Solar Photovoltaic and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs Solar Photovoltaic and Demand Response October 10, 2012 ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS OVERVIEW ?Program rules and guidelines established by Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) ?All Texas investor...Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs Solar Photovoltaic and Demand Response October 10, 2012 ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS OVERVIEW ?Program rules and guidelines established by Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) ?All Texas investor...

Tyra, K.; Hanel, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABORATORY Japans Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030o r n i a Japans Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response underof Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response underof Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the forecast of total energy demand. Based on this, weadjustment spurred energy demand for construction of newenergy services. Primary energy demand grew at an average

Aden, Nathaniel T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis Papers > Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Analysis Papers > Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Release Date: February 2005 Next Release Date: February 2006 Printer-friendly version Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation* Table 1.Comparison of Absolute Percent Errors for Present and Current AEO Forecast Evaluations Printer Friendly Version Average Absolute Percent Error Variable AEO82 to AEO99 AEO82 to AEO2000 AEO82 to AEO2001 AEO82 to AEO2002 AEO82 to AEO2003 AEO82 to AEO2004 Consumption Total Energy Consumption 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 Total Petroleum Consumption 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 7.3 7.1 7.1 6.7 6.4 6.5 Total Coal Consumption 3.1 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 Total Electricity Sales 1.9 2.0 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.4 Production Crude Oil Production 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.6 4.7

257

2011 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting 1 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting 2011 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting As the largest domestic source of low-carbon energy, nuclear power is making major contributions toward meeting our nation's current and future energy demands. The United States must continue to ensure improvements and access to this technology so we can meet our economic, environmental and energy security goals. We rely on nuclear energy because it provides a consistent, reliable and stable source of base load electricity with an excellent safety record in the United States. To support nuclear energy's continued and expanded role in our energy platform, therefore, the United States must continually improve its knowledge, technology, and policy in order to:

258

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Early Release Summary Presentation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Early Release Energy Information Administration December 17, 2008 www.eia.doe.gov 2 EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Presentation -- December 17, 2008 The economy, oil prices, resources, policies, and behavior drive the AEO2009 reference case * Long-term economic growth averages about 2.5 percent per year between 2007 and 2030 * World crude oil prices recover from a near-term decline and reach $130 per barrel (in 2007 dollars) by 2030 * A robust domestic natural gas resource base allows for a steady expansion of production given projected growth in demand and prices * Recently-enacted policies and concerns over greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, combined with high energy prices, moderate projected growth in energy consumption and

259

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2011 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Annual 1 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2011 Annual Report Fiscal year (FY) 2011 marks the ten-year anniversary of the founding of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative, or I-NERI. Designed to foster international partnerships that address key issues affecting the future global use of nuclear energy, I-NERI is perhaps even more relevant today than at its establishment. In the face of increasing energy demands coupled with clean energy imperatives, we must clear the hurdles to expanding the role of nuclear power in our energy portfolio. And in an increasingly global society, the importance of international cooperation in these efforts has escalated. For ten years, I-NERI has been a vehicle for establishing bilateral

260

Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. McParland, "Open Automated Demand Response Communications2011. Utility & Demand Response Programs Energy ProviderAnnual Consumption (kWh) Demand Response Program Curtailment

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water heaters with embedded demand responsive controls can be designed to automatically provide day-ahead and real-time response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Distributed Automated Demand Response - Energy Innovation Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Distributed Automated Demand Response Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Contact LLNL About This Technology...

263

Demand Response (transactional control) - Energy Innovation Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Electricity Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Demand Response (transactional control) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Contact PNNL About...

264

Regulation Services with Demand Response - Energy Innovation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulation Services with Demand Response Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Contact PNNL About This Technology Using grid frequency information, researchers have created...

265

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the presence of renewable resources and on the amount ofprimarily from renewable resources, and to a limited extentintegration of renewable resources and deferrable demand. We

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

2012 Annual Planning Summary for Fossil Energy, National Energy...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

for Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, RMOTC, and Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Fossil Energy, National Energy...

267

Demand Response Energy Consulting LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Response Energy Consulting LLC Response Energy Consulting LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Demand Response & Energy Consulting LLC Place Delanson, New York Zip NY 12053 Sector Efficiency Product Delanson-based demand response and energy efficiency consultants. Coordinates 42.748995°, -74.185794° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.748995,"lon":-74.185794,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

268

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Source Demand per Household Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, Electricity Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, Electricity Demography Japan

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview Key Energy Issues to 2020 Prices Consumption Energy Intensity Electricity Generation Production and Imports Carbon Dioxide Emissions Key Energy Issues to 2020 Currently, most attention in energy markets is focused on near-term issues of world oil supply and prices, U.S. natural gas prices, and the transition to restructured electricity markets in several regions of the country. The Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) addresses the longer-term trends of electricity industry restructuring, fossil fuel supply and prices, and the impacts of economic growth on projected energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. AEO2001 does not project short-term events, such as supply disruptions or severe weather. The AEO2001 projections assume a transition to full competitive pricing of

270

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Esmeralda Sanchez by Esmeralda Sanchez Errata -(7/14/04) The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has produced an annual evaluation of the accuracy of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on the prior year by adding the projections from the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. The Forecast Evaluation examines the accuracy of AEO forecasts dating back to AEO82 by calculating the average absolute forecast errors for each of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2003. The average absolute forecast error, which for the purpose of this report will also be referred to simply as "average error" or "forecast error", is computed as the simple mean, or average, of all the absolute values of the percent errors, expressed as the percentage difference between the Reference Case projection and actual historic value, shown for every AEO and for each year in the forecast horizon (for a given variable). The historical data are typically taken from the Annual Energy Review (AER). The last column of Table 1 provides a summary of the most recent average absolute forecast errors. The calculation of the forecast error is shown in more detail in Tables 2 through 18. Because data for coal prices to electric generating plants were not available from the AER, data from the Monthly Energy Review (MER), July 2003 were used.

271

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

both types of programs. Xcel Energy markets both energyEnergy Efficiency Marketing Xcel Energy Paul Suskie Chairman

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Retrofitting Existing Buildings for Demand Response & Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Retrofitting Existing Buildings for Demand Response & Energy Efficiency www, enable demand response, improve productivity for older facilities. - Use technologies which minimize are notified by PG&E by 3pm the day prior to the critical event. - Customers with Auto-Demand Response enabled

California at Los Angeles, University of

273

Annual Coal Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Report Annual Coal Report Release Date: December 12, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report Previous Annual Coal / Coal Industry Annual Reports historical data (PDF): 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 before 2001 Industry Annual 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Go The Annual Coal Report (ACR) provides annual data on U.S. coal production, number of mines, productive capacity, recoverable reserves, employment, productivity, consumption, stocks, and prices. All data for 2012 and prior years are final. Highlights for 2012: U.S. coal production decreased 7.2 percent from 2011, driven by lower electric power sector demand, to roughly 1.02 billion short tons. Productive capacity of U.S. coal mines decreased 3.5 percent to 1.28

274

Energy demand and economic consequences of transport policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transport sector is a major consumer of energy. Concern of energy scarcity and price fluctuations enhanced significance of ... sector in national planning. This paper analyses energy demand for transport services...

J. B. Alam; Z. Wadud; J. B. Alam

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Energy Demand and the Environmental Effects of CSF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Greece the demand for energy is a substantial element in the analysis... energy is a crucial determinant of production costs. Thus, energy prices play a key role in assessing.....

Nicos Christodoulakis; Sarantis Kalyvitis

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Petroleum Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Coal Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Renewable Fuels Module . . . . . . . . . . .

277

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Annual 2 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the foreseeable future. U.S. researchers are collaborating with nuclear scientists and engineers around the world to develop new technologies that will lower costs, maximize safety, minimize proliferation risk, and handle used fuel and

278

Annual Energy Outlook 2001-Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Acronyms AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AEO Annual Energy Outlook AGA American Gas Association ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BEA Bureau of Economic Analysis (U.S. Department of Commerce) BRP Blue Ribbon Panel Btu British thermal unit CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CARB California Air Resources Board CBECS EIA’s 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey CCAP Climate Change Action Plan CCTI Climate Change Technology Initiative CDM Clean Development Mechanism CO Carbon monoxide DBAB Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown DOE U.S. Department of Energy DRI Standard & Poor’s DRI E85 Motor fuel containing 85 percent ethanol EIA Energy Information Administration EOR Enhanced oil recovery EPACT Energy Policy Act of 1992

279

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage ACEEE American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AEO Annual Energy Outlook AGA American Gas Association ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge API American Petroleum Institute BRP Blue Ribbon Panel Btu British thermal unit CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CARB California Air Resources Board CCAP Climate Change Action Plan CDM Clean Development Mechanism CECA Comprehensive Electricity Competition Act CIDI Compression ignition direct injection CO Carbon monoxide DBAB Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown DOE U.S. Department of Energy DRI Standard & Poor’s DRI EIA Energy Information Administration EOR Enhanced oil recovery EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT Energy Policy Act of 1992 ETBE Ethyl tertiary butyl ether

280

Network-Driven Demand Side Management Website | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UtilityElectricity Service Costs) for this property. This task of the International Energy Agency is a broad, systematic examination of the potential for demand-side...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy Efficient Grooming of Scheduled Sub-wavelength Traffic Demands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate how awareness of demand holding times can be exploited for energy efficient traffic grooming in optical networks. We present an optimal formulation for minimizing the...

Chen, Ying; Jaekel, Arunita

282

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Esmeralda Sánchez The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has produced an annual evaluation of the accuracy of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on the prior year by adding the projections from the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. The Forecast Evaluation examines the accuracy of AEO forecasts dating back to AEO82 by calculating the average absolute forecast errors for each of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2003. The average absolute forecast error, which for the purpose of this report will also be referred to simply as "average error" or "forecast error", is computed as the simple mean, or average, of all the absolute values of the percent errors,

283

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Jump to: navigation, search Name Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Software/modeling tools Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/news/Me Country Mexico UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections[1] "CEEESA and the team of experts from Mexico analyzed the country's entire energy supply and demand system using CEEESA's latest version of the popular ENPEP-BALANCE software. The team developed a system representation, a so-called energy network, using ENPEP's powerful graphical user

284

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, ElectricityEnergy Source Demand per Household Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat,ton of oil equivalent Considerable increases in demand for

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Solar in Demand | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar in Demand Solar in Demand Solar in Demand June 15, 2012 - 10:23am Addthis Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin Donovan's town home. | Credit: Dennis Schroeder. Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin Donovan's town home. | Credit: Dennis Schroeder. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? A new study says U.S. developers are likely to install about 3,300 megawatts of solar panels in 2012 -- almost twice the amount installed last year. In case you missed it... This week, the Wall Street Journal published an article, "U.S. Solar-Panel Demand Expected to Double," highlighting the successes of

286

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable energy spillage, operating costs and capacityfocused on renewable energy utilization, cost of operationssystem operating costs, renewable energy utilization,

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy scenarios to explore alternative energy pathways indo not include the alternative energy pathways (such asmodeling to investigate alternative energy supply strategies

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Model for Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED-2) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED-2) AgencyCompany Organization: International Atomic Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics: Pathways...

289

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sector Sector U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol.

290

The Integration of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Demand Response and Climate Change: Challenges and Opportunities for Evaluators and Planners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to inform projected energy and demand reductions in regionaldown to reflect energy and demand savings due to spillover (market and estimate the energy and demand savings associated

Vine, Edward

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis....

292

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis....

293

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty AfzalEnergy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty ?DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Energy Demand and Emission from Transport Sector in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper aims to present a comprehensive overview of the current status and future trends of energy demand and emissions from transportation sector in China. ... a brief review of the national profile of energy

Yin Huang; Mengjun Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Transaction Costs and their Impact on Energy Demand Behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The very recent trends in energy demand are incompatible with empirically fitted price elasticities. ... associated with investment decisions of households for energy conservation and/or fuel substitution may...

Erich Unterwurzacher; Franz Wirl

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.2 Limitations to Large-Scale Renewable EnergyImpacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of locational renewable energy production in each renewableto total renewable energy production, although accountingproduction data from the 2006 data set of the National Renewable Energy

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Programs Integrated Energy Audit Provide engineeringtechnicians performed energy audits and provided advice to8 PG&Es Integrated Energy Audit, a program for businesses

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg_251_500.pdf. Demand for Fossil Fuels. Renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be

300

Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the AEO using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO projections.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Annual Energy Review - financial indicators section  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Annual statistics on consumer energy prices and expenditures, fossil fuel production prices and value, and value of fossil fuel imports and exports back to 1949.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Energy Information Administration / Petroleum Marketing Annual...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

55 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997 Prices of Petroleum Products Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State...

303

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has for years used New York Energy $mart as the umbrellaevent days. The New York State Energy Research & DevelopmentEnergy Challenge). The New York State Energy Research and

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

with Projections to 2030 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) The early release version of the AEO2008 reference case does not include consideration of the H.R.6, "Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007," that was signed into law on December 19, 2007. EIA is compiling a revised reference case that includes the impact of H.R.6. The Annual Energy Outlook presents a midterm projection and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. The AEO2008 Early Release includes the reference case. The full publication, to be released in early 2008, will include complete documentation and additional cases examining energy markets.

305

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Annual Reports Services » Annual Reports Annual Reports Annual Reports December 28, 2012 Southeastern Power Administration 2012 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs,accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2011, and ending September 30, 2012. December 31, 2011 Southeastern Power Administration 2011 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2010, and ending September 31, 2011. December 27, 2010 Southeastern Power Administration 2010 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2009,

306

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Reports Annual Reports Annual Reports OHA Annual Reports Available for Download January 1, 2013 OHA 2012 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2011 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA). Here are highlights for the past year: September 30, 2011 OHA 2011 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2011 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 30, 2010 OHA 2010 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2010 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 8, 2009 OHA 2009 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2009 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 30, 2008 OHA 2008 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2008 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 30, 2007 OHA 2007 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2007 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals

307

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Executive Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Executive Summary Executive Summary Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Executive Summary The past year has been a tumultuous one for world energy markets, with oil prices soaring through the first half of 2008 and diving in its second half. The downturn in the world economy has had a significant impact on energy demand, and the near-term future of energy markets is tied to the downturn’s uncertain depth and persistence. The recovery of the world’s financial markets is especially important for the energy supply outlook, because the capital-intensive nature of most large energy projects makes access to financing a critical necessity. The projections in AEO2009 look beyond current economic and financial woes and focus on factors that drive U.S. energy markets in the longer term. Key issues highlighted in the AEO2009 include higher but uncertain world oil prices, growing concern about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and its impacts on energy investment decisions, the increasing use of renewable fuels, the increasing production of unconventional natural gas, the shift in the transportation fleet to more efficient vehicles, and improved efficiency in end-use appliances. Using a reference case and a broad range of sensitivity cases, AEO2009 illustrates these key energy market trends and explores important areas of uncertainty in the U.S. energy economy. The AEO2009 cases, which were developed before enactment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA2009) in February 2009, reflect laws and policies in effect as of November 2008.

308

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030-Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Graphic Data Figure 1. Total liquid fuels demand by sector Figure 1 Data Figure 2. Total natural gas supply by source Figure 2 Data Figure 3. New light-duty vehicle sales shares by type Figure 3 Data Figure 4. Proposed CAFE standards for passenger cars by vehicle footprint, model years 2011-2015 Figure 4 Data Figure 5. Proposed CAFE standards for light trucks by vehicle footprint, model years 2011-2015 Figure 5 Data Figure 6. Average fuel economy of new light-duty vehicles in the AEO2008 and AEO2009 projections, 1995-2030 Figure 6 Data Figure 7. Value of fuel saved by a PHEV compared with a conventional ICE vehicle over the life of the vehicles, by gasoline price and PHEV all-electric driving range

309

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 International Energy Module The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously global and U.S.A. petroleum liquids supply and demand curves (1 curve per year; 2008-2030; approximated, isoelastic fit to previous NEMS results). These quantities are not modeled directly in NEMS. Previous versions of the IEM adjusted these quantities after reading in initial values. In an attempt to more closely integrate the AEO2008 with IEO2007 and the STEO some functionality was removed from IEM while a new algorithm was implemented. Based on the difference between U.S. total petroleum liquids production (consumption) and the expected U.S. total liquids production (consumption) at the current WTI price, curves for global petroleum liquids consumption (production) were adjusted for each year. According to previous operations, a new WTI price path was generated. An exogenous oil supply module, Generate World Oil Balances (GWOB), was also used in IEM to provide annual regional (country) level production detail for conventional and unconventional liquids.

310

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Macroeconomic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

311

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Document>ation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2009), (Washington, DC, January 2009).

312

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

313

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2008), (Washington, DC, January 2008).

314

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections Release Date: March 16, 2012 | Next Release Date: March 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0640(2011) The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy production, consumption and prices each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). Each year, EIA also produces this AEO Retrospective Review document, which presents a comparison between realized energy outcomes and the Reference case projections included in previous editions of the AEO. The purpose of the AEO Retrospective is to demonstrate how the AEO projections have tracked actual energy indicators, enable trend analysis, and inform discussions of potential improvements to the AEO. The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of

315

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review - Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2012 and Prior Reference Case AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2012 and Prior Reference Case Projections Release Date: March 15, 2013 | Next Release Date: March 2014 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0640(2012) The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy production, consumption and prices each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). Each year, EIA also produces an AEO Retrospective Review document, which presents a comparison between realized energy outcomes and the Reference case projections included in previous editions of the AEO. The purpose of the Retrospective is to show the relationship between past AEO projections and actual energy indicators, enable trend analysis, and inform discussions of potential improvements to the AEO. The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of

316

2004 Office of Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

Annual report of fuel cell projects sponsored by Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory.

NETL

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency savings that are achieved through monitoring- based commissioning, as well as documenting best practicesEnergy Efficiency Alliance Sue Gander Director, Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources Division National Governors AssociationCenter for Best Practices

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

319

Annual Planning Summaries: 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Annual Planning Summaries: 2012 February 23, 2012 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Oak Ridge Office The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within the Oak Ridge Office. February 8, 2012 2012 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA Defense Nuclear NonProliferation The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within the NNSA Defense Nuclear NonProliferation. February 3, 2012 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Environmental Management The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Environmental Management. February 2, 2012 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

320

ENABLING ENERGY DEMAND RESPONSE WITH VEHICULAR MESH NETWORKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENABLING ENERGY DEMAND RESPONSE WITH VEHICULAR MESH NETWORKS Howard CheHao Chang1, Haining Du2. Using VMesh to connect disjoint sensor networks One of our expectations for VMesh is to enable demand response (DR) [1] for automatic utility usage retrievals and price dispatching. DR is a project in- itiated

Chuah, Chen-Nee

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

etc.) * Statutory and Regulatory requirements (RFS2, for example) * Prices of primary energy (crude oil, etc.) LP * Minimize cost to meet fuel demands and legal requirements *...

322

Assumptiions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Petroleum Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Coal Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Renewable Fuels Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation

323

Energy Demand Modelling Introduction to the PhD project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Demand Modelling Introduction to the PhD project Erika Zvingilaite Risø DTU System Analysis for optimization of energy systems Environmental effects Global externalities cost of CO2 Future scenarios for the Nordic energy systems 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040, 2050 (energy-production, consumption, emissions, net costs

324

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Key Issues Prices Consumption Energy Intensity Electricity Generation Production and Imports Carbon Emissions Key Issues Important energy issues addressed in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) include, among others, the ongoing restructuring of U.S. electricity markets, near-term prospects for world oil markets, and the impacts of energy use on carbon emissions. AEO2000 reflects the restructuring of U.S. electricity markets and the shift to increased competition by assuming changes in the financial structure of the industry. Ongoing efficiency and operating improvements are also assumed to continue. The projections assume a transition to full competitive pricing in States with specific deregulation plans—California, New York, New England, the Mid-Atlantic States, Illinois, Texas, Michigan, Ohio, Arizona, and New Mexico. Other States are assumed to continue cost-of-service electricity pricing. The provisions of the California legislation regarding stranded cost recovery and price caps are included. In other regions, stranded cost recovery is assumed to be phased out by 2008.

325

USA Energy Demand and World Markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the AEO95 model reference case scenario, the United States is projected to consume 104 quadrillion Btu of primary energy resources in 2010, 19 percent more than in 1993. Primary energy consumption includes ...

Charles E. Brown Ph.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

High Energy Demand and Supply Scenario  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An adequate energy supply system is a key issue in ... industrialization that will call for a significantly larger energy supply. Sustaining economic growth in the industrialized ... will add considerably to the ...

H.-H. Rogner; W. Sassin

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Issues in Focus  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Issues in Focus Issues in Focus Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Issues in Focus Introduction Each year, this section of the AEO provides in-depth discussions on topics of special interest that may affect annual projections, including significant changes in assumptions and recent developments in technologies for energy production, supply, and consumption. In view of recent increases in construction costs, including the costs of constructing power plants, refineries, and other energy-related facilities, this year's topics include a discussion of cost trends and the implications for energy markets. Other issues discussed this year include the implications of increased reliance on natural gas in the electricity generation sector, warming weather trends and their effects on energy demand, LNG imports, and world oil prices and production trends.

328

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2007 projections. Contents (Complete Report) Download complete Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

329

Annual Peer Review Meeting | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory. On April 22-25, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Geothermal Technologies Office held its annual Peer Review Meeting at the...

330

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.ieadsm.org/Files/Tasks/Task%20XIII%20-%20Demand%20Response%20Resou Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/estimating-demand-response-market-pot Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: Resource Integration Planning This resource presents demand response (DR) potential results from top-performing programs in the United States and Canada, as well as a DR

331

Annual Energy Review 2009 - Released August 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95-91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program

332

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fits into historical demand side management (DSM) concepts.response. Demand Side Management Energy Efficiency (Daily) -requirements and demand side management issues have also

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Agreement for Energy Conservation and Demand Side Management Services Template  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document features a template agreement between a U.S. Federal agency and a utility company for the implementation of energy conservation measures (ECMs) and demand side management (DSM) services.

334

Outlook for Energy Supply and Demand in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the new century, China has entered the phase of Homeland Construction. As the process of urbanization and industrialization accelerates, demand on energy has experienced unprecedentedly rapid growth. By far .....

Yande Dai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an "Overview" summarizing the AEO2004 reference case. The next section, "Legislation and Regulations," discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues. "Issues in Focus" includes discussions of future labor productivity growth; lower 48 natural gas depletion and productive capacity; natural gas supply options, with a focus on liquefied natural gas; natural gas demand for Canadian oil sands production; National Petroleum Council forecasts for natural gas; natural gas consumption in the industrial and electric power sectors; nuclear power plant construction costs; renewable electricity tax credits; and U.S. greenhouse gas intensity. It is followed by a discussion of "Energy Market Trends."

336

Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Hydrogen, Transportation Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/ Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/hydra Cost: Free Language: English References: http://maps.nrel.gov/hydra Logo: Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Use HyDRA to view, download, and analyze hydrogen data spatially and dynamically. HyDRA provides access to hydrogen demand, resource, infrastructure, cost, production, and distribution data. A user account is

337

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to ensure reliability. Capacity market programs: Customerswholesale, forward capacity markets offer new opportunitiesinto the forward-capacity market. Coordination of Energy

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OpportunitiesforEnergy EfficiencyandDemandResponseinAgricultural/WaterEnd?UseEnergyEfficiencyProgram. i1 4.0 EnergyEfficiencyandDemandResponse

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Annual Planning Summaries: 2010 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Annual Planning Summaries: 2010 February 24, 2010 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, any EISs expected to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. February 2, 2010 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Chief Financial Officer (CFO) Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, any EISs expected to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. February 1, 2010 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Oak Ridge (OR)

340

Guidance for Preparation of the 2013 Department of Energy Annual...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance for Preparation of the 2013 Department of Energy Annual Site Environmental Reports Guidance for Preparation of the 2013 Department of Energy Annual Site Environmental...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety and Health Report for Federal Employees to the Secretary of Labor Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual...

342

Fiscal Year 2012 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Fiscal Year 2012 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety and Health Report for Federal Employees to the Secretary of Labor Fiscal Year 2012 Department of Energy Annual...

343

Annual Report, Department of Energy - June 2008 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Report, Department of Energy - June 2008 Annual Report, Department of Energy - June 2008 June 2008 Report for Calendar Year 2007 on Status of Implementation of Integrated...

344

2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Energy Storage Technologies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Energy Storage Technologies 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Energy Storage Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies...

345

2012 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Energy Storage Technologies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Energy Storage Technologies 2012 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Energy Storage Technologies...

346

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity consumption include disaggregationfor annual residential electricity consumption through 2050.Saturation and unit electricity consumption are projected

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

LNG Annual Report - 2005 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2005 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2004 LNG Annual Report - 2006 LNG Annual Report -...

348

LNG Annual Report - 2006 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 LNG Annual Report - 2006 LNG Annual Report - 2006 LNG Annual Report - 2006 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2007 LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report -...

349

LNG Annual Report - 2004 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 LNG Annual Report - 2004 LNG Annual Report - 2004 LNG Annual Report - 2004 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2007 LNG Annual Report -...

350

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) February 2006 Annual Energy Outlook 2006 With Projections to 2030 February 2006 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-2222), Director, Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director, Demand and Integration Division; Joseph A. Beamon (jbeamon@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Acting Director, Oil and Gas Division and Senior Technical Advisor; and Glen E. Sweetnam (glen.sweetnam@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2188), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. For ordering information and questions on other energy statistics available

351

Energy Demand and GHG Mitigation Options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

N. African countries, although not committed to reduce their GHG emissions, can take advantage of their high ... CSP potential in order to contribute to the GHG mitigation effort by providing clean energy (potent...

Leonidas Paroussos; Pantelis Capros

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Modelling and Assessment of Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Until the four-fold increase in oil prices in 1973 energy* was generally taken as abundantly available cheap commodity with the result that its consumption was increasing very rapidly. It increased by a factor...

A. M. Khan

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Annual Energy Outlook | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Energy Outlook Annual Energy Outlook Dataset Summary Description Supplemental Table 147 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Source EIA Date Released December 08th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Annual Energy Outlook barrel btu conversion EIA energy Energy Information Administration kWh TEF transportation Transportation Energy Futures Data text/csv icon Conversion_Factors.csv (csv, 153.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote

354

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table A20. Macroeconomic Indicators (Billion 2005 Chain-Weighted Dollars, Unless Otherwise Noted) Indicators Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Real Gross Domestic Product . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13229 12881 15338 17422 20015 22735 25692 2.7% Components of Real Gross Domestic Product Real Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9265 9154 10444 11669 13277 15049 16978 2.4% Real Investment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1957 1516 2590 2991 3549 4132 4853 4.6% Real Government Spending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2503 2543 2555 2665 2796 2935 3069 0.7% Real Exports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1648 1491 2437 3381 4488 5763 7336 6.3% Real Imp orts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2152 1854 2622 3152 3845 4736 5912 4.6% Energy Inten sity (thousand Btu per 2005 dollar of GDP) Delivered Energy . . . . . . .

355

LEAPs and Boundsan Energy Demand and Constraint Optimised Model of the Irish Energy System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper builds a model of energy demand and supply for Ireland with a focus on evaluating, and providing insights for, energy efficiency policies. The demand-side comprises sectoral sub-models, with a ... line...

Fionn Rogan; Caiman J. Cahill; Hannah E. Daly; Denis Dineen

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Housing Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Appliance Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Technology Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Shell Integrity Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Fuel Consumption Submodule The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar thermal and geothermal energy. The RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of the RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts,

357

Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs in the United States (U.S.) (2010-2030) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs in the United States (U.S.) (2010-2030) Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.edisonfoundation.net/IEE/Documents/EPRI_AssessmentAchievableEEPote Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/assessment-achievable-potential-energ Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Mandates/Targets This report discusses the 2008 U.S. Energy Information Administration statistic that electricity consumption in the United States is predicted to

358

Annual Performance Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance Reports Performance Reports Annual Performance Reports The Annual Performance Report provides key performance information that demonstrates DOE's accountability to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions. These reports are produced as an alternative to the Performance and Accountability Report. Documents Available for Download February 1, 2012 FY 2011 Annual Performance Report Provides summary and detailed results associated with the Department's performance goals and associated annual targets that align with the budget activities. Also included are references to supporting documentation and the status of prior-year unmet measures. April 1, 2010

359

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA- M068(2006). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

360

Driving change : evaluating strategies to control automotive energy demand growth in China ; Evaluating strategies to control automotive energy demand growth in China .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As the number of vehicles in China has relentlessly grown in the past decade, the energy demand, fuel demand and greenhouse gas emissions associated with (more)

Bonde kerlind, Ingrid Gudrun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

LNG Annual Report - 2009 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 LNG Annual Report - 2009 LNG Annual Report - 2009 LNG Annual Report - 2009 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2008...

362

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters May 2, 2012 - 6:47pm Addthis Diagram of a tankless water heater. Diagram of a tankless water heater. How does it work? Tankless water heaters deliver hot water as it is needed, eliminating the need for storage tanks. Tankless water heaters, also known as demand-type or instantaneous water heaters, provide hot water only as it is needed. They don't produce the standby energy losses associated with storage water heaters, which can save you money. Here you'll find basic information about how they work, whether a tankless water heater might be right for your home, and what criteria to use when selecting the right model. Check out the Energy Saver 101: Water Heating infographic to learn if a tankless water heater is right for you.

363

annual energy consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy consumption energy consumption Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption by source and end use between 1989 and 2008. This data was published and compiled by the Energy Information Administration. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords annual energy consumption consumption EIA renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon historical_renewable_energy_consumption_by_sector_and_energy_source_1989-2008.xls (xls, 41 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 1989-2008 License License Creative Commons CCZero Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset

364

COMBINING DIVERSE DATA SOURCES FOR CEDSS, AN AGENT-BASED MODEL OF DOMESTIC ENERGY DEMAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

purposes of calculating energy demand for water-heating, thethese questions, and energy demand. Given the lack of real-to calculate useful energy demand for space heating. With

Gotts, Nicholas Mark; Polhill, Gary; Craig, Tony; Galan-Diaz, Carlos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Contact Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

For Further Information For Further Information Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-2222), Director, Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director, Demand and Integration Division; Joseph A. Beamon (jbeamon@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Acting Director, Oil and Gas Division and Senior Technical Advisor; and Glen E. Sweetnam (glen.sweetnam@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2188), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division.

366

Annual Energy Outlook 2007: With Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) June 2008 Annual Energy Outlook 2008 With Projections to 2030 DRAFT -- 6/24/2008 ***** NOT FOR RELEASE ***** For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2008 was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, under the direc- tion of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-2222), Director, Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director, Demand and Integration Division; Joseph A. Beamon (jbeamon@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; A. Michael Schaal (michael.schaal@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-5590), Director, Oil and Gas Division; Glen E. Sweetnam (glen.sweetnam@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2188), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor.

367

Annual Energy Outlook 2009: With Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) March 2009 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 With Projections to 2030 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, under the direc- tion of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-2222), Director, Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director, Demand and Integration Division; Joseph A. Beamon (jbeamon@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; A. Michael Schaal (michael.schaal@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-5590), Director, Oil and Gas Division; Glen E. Sweetnam (glen.sweetnam@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2188), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor. For ordering information and questions on other

368

Water supply and demand in an energy supply model  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a tool for water and energy-related policy analysis, the development of a water supply and demand sector in a linear programming model of energy supply in the United States. The model allows adjustments in the input mix and plant siting in response to water scarcity. Thus, on the demand side energy conversion facilities can substitute more costly dry cooling systems for conventional evaporative systems. On the supply side groundwater and water purchased from irrigators are available as more costly alternatives to unappropriated surface water. Water supply data is developed for 30 regions in 10 Western states. Preliminary results for a 1990 energy demand scenario suggest that, at this level of spatial analysis, water availability plays a minor role in plant siting. Future policy applications of the modeling system are discussed including the evaluation of alternative patterns of synthetic fuels development.

Abbey, D; Loose, V

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: eco3.org/wp-content/plugins/downloads-manager/upload/Report%20on%20Dem Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-conservation-and-commercializa Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: Resource Integration Planning

370

Annual Uncosted Balances Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uncosted Balances Reports Uncosted Balances Reports Annual Uncosted Balances Reports Section 2307 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (42 U.S.C. 13526) requires the Department of Energy (Department or DOE) to submit an annual report to Congress on the state of the Department's uncosted obligations. The section requires the report to identify the uncosted obligations at the end of the previous fiscal year (FY), describe the purpose of those funds, and describe the effect the information had on the annual budget request. Documents Available for Download May 29, 2013 FY 2012 Annual Uncosted Balances Report This report represents an analysis of the Department's uncosted balances for FY 2012. June 29, 2012 FY 2011 Annual Uncosted Balances Report This report represents an analysis of the Department's uncosted balances

371

Energy and Demand Savings from Implementation Costs in Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, electrical consumption, demand and fees were tracked separately. The remaining data include only one energy stream (e.g., natural gas) in each code [6]. Table 1. Energy Streams STREAM CODE Electrical Consumption EC Electrical Demand ED Other... Electrical Fees EF Electricity E1 Natural Gas E2 L.P.G. E3 #1 Fuel Oil E4 #2 Fuel Oil E5 #4 Fuel Oil E6 #6 Fuel Oil E7 Coal E8 Wood E9 Paper E10 Other Gas E11 Other Energy E12 ESL-IE-00-04-17 Proceedings from the Twenty-second National...

Razinha, J. A.; Heffington, W. M.

372

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

W W 32.9 30.5 See footnotes at end of table. 440 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...

373

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) (Washington, DC, March 2012). Other 2011 values: EIA, Annual Energy Review 2011, DOEEIA-0384(2011) (Washington, DC, September 2012). Projections: EIA, AEO2013 National...

374

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Electricity Market Module figure 6. Electricity Market Model Supply Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2009, DOE/EIA-M068(2009). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules

375

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Petroleum Market Module Figure 8. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohols, ethers, and bioesters natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of U.S. refining

376

ADB-Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ADB-Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection ADB-Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection Agency/Company /Organization: Asian Development Bank Sector: Energy Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Presentation, Software/modeling tools Website: cdm-mongolia.com/files/2_Methods_Hoseok_16May2010.pdf Cost: Free Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection Screenshot References: Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=ADB-Methods_and_Tools_for_Energy_Demand_Projection&oldid=398945" Categories:

377

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assumptions to the Annual Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table of Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 3

378

Energy demand and indoor climate of a traditional low-energy building in a hot climate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Energy demand in the built environment is quite important. China holds a large population and the energy use in the building sector is about (more)

Li, Ang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy-Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Consumption Total primary energy consumption in the AEO2008 reference case increases at an average rate of 0.9 percent per year, from 100.0 quadrillion Btu in 2006 to 123.8 quadrillion Btu in 2030—7.4 quadrillion Btu less than in the AEO2007 reference case. In 2030, the levels of consumption projected for liquid fuels, natural gas, and coal are all lower in the AEO2008 reference case than in the AEO2007 reference case. Among the most important factors resulting in lower total energy demand in the AEO2008 reference case are lower economic growth, higher energy prices, greater use of more efficient appliances, and slower growth in energy-intensive industries. Figure 2. Delivered energy consumption by sector, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

380

Application-oriented modelling of domestic energy demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Detailed residential energy consumption data can be used to offer advanced services and provide new business opportunities to all participants in the energy supply chain, including utilities, distributors and customers. The increasing interest in the residential consumption data is behind the roll-out of smart meters in large areas and led to intensified research efforts in new data acquisition technologies for the energy sector. This paper introduces a novel model for generation of residential energy consumption profiles based on the energy demand contribution of each household appliance and calculated by using a probabilistic approach. The model takes into consideration a wide range of household appliances and its modular structure provides a high degree of flexibility. Residential consumption data generated by the proposed model are suitable for development of new services and applications such as residential real-time pricing schemes or tools for energy demand prediction. To demonstrate the main features of the model, an individual household consumption was created and the effects of a possible change in the user behaviour and the appliance configuration presented. In order to show the flexibility offered in creation of the aggregated demand, the detailed simulation results of an energy demand management algorithm applied to an aggregated user group are used.

J.K. Gruber; S. Jahromizadeh; M. Prodanovi?; V. Rako?evi?

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Table A5. Commercial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Key Indicators and Consumption Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Key Indicators Total Floorsp ace (billion sq uare feet) Surviving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76.4 77.9 83.4 89.3 95.1 101.1 107.3 1.2% New Additions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 2.3 2.0 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 0.4% Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78.8 80.2 85.5 91.5 97.4 103.5 109.8 1.2% Energy Co nsum ption Intensity (thousand B tu per squa re foot) Delivered Energy Consumption . . . . . . . . . . 109.1 105.9 105.1 103.6 102.0 101.1 100.5 -0.2% Electricity Related Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125.0 120.6 116.2 117.0 117.7 118.2 118.3 -0.1% Total Energy Consumption . . . . . . . .

382

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table A2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Energy Consumption Residential Liquefied Petroleum Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.52 0.53 0.49 0.48 0.48 0.48 0.48 -0.4% Kerosene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.02 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 -1.5% Distillate Fuel O il . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.66 0.61 0.56 0.50 0.44 0.40 0.37 -1.9% Liquid Fuels and Other Petroleum Subtotal 1.20 1.16 1.07 0.99 0.94 0.90 0.87 -1.1% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.00 4.87 4.93 4.97 4.96 4.95 4.89 0.0% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -1.1% Renewable Energy 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.44 0.43 0.40 0.42 0.42 0.42 0.42 -0.1%

383

LNG Annual Report - 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 LNG Annual Report - 2011 LNG Annual Report - 2011 (Revised 3152012) LNG Annual Report 2011 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2013 LNG...

384

LNG Annual Report - 2007 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 LNG Annual Report - 2007 LNG Annual Report - 2007 (Revised 10102008) LNG Annual Report - 2007 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2008 LNG Annual Report - 2006...

385

LNG Annual Report - 2010 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 LNG Annual Report - 2010 LNG Annual Report - 2010 LNG Annual Report - 2010 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2009 LNG Annual Report - 2008...

386

LNG Annual Report - 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 LNG Annual Report - 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2012 (Revised 3212013) LNG Annual Report - 2012 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2013 LNG Annual Report - 2011 LNG...

387

Draft 2014 Annual Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Draft 2014 Annual Plan Draft 2014 Annual Plan Section 999: Draft 2014 Annual Plan Section 999 - Draft 2014 Annual Plan More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Plan 2013...

388

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an "Overview" summarizing the AEO2007 reference case. The next section, "Legislation and Regulations," discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including recently enacted legislation and regulation, such as the new Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for light-duty trucks finalized by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in March 2006. It also provides an update on the handling of key provisions in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT2005) that could not be incorporated in the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006) because of the absence of implementing regulations or funding appropriations. Finally, it provides a summary of how sunset provisions in selected Federal fuel taxes and tax credits are handled in AEO2007.

389

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. 1. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1) Population growth is a key determinant of total energy consumption, closely linked to rising demand for housing, services, and travel. Energy consumption per capita, controlling for population growth, shows the combined effect of other factors, such as economic growth and technology improvement. In the AEO- 2006 reference case, energy consumption per capita grows faster than it has in recent history (Figure 31), as a result of continued growth in disposable income. In dollar terms, the economy as a whole is becoming less dependent on energy, the Nation's growing reli- ance on imported fuel notwithstanding. Projected energy intensity, as measured by energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP, declines at an average annual rate of 1.8 percent in the reference case. Efficiency gains and faster growth

390

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2013 (See release cycle changes) | 16, 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Correction/Update May 13th & May 15th Revised data in the Issues in Focus chapter and the Market Trends chapters for Figures 38, 107, 198 & 111. One number on page 88 (first column) of the Market Trends Chapter text was corrected as indicated by the following bold value: Third paragraph, first sentence should read -"From 2011 to 2040,

391

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Correction/Update May 13th & May 15th Revised data in the Issues in Focus chapter and the Market Trends chapters for Figures 38, 107, 198 & 111. One number on page 88 (first column) of the Market Trends Chapter text was corrected as indicated by the following bold value: Third paragraph, first sentence should read -"From 2011 to 2040,

392

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Acronyms Acronyms List of Acronyms AEO Annual Energy Outlook LDV Light-duty vehicle AEO2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 LED Light emitting diode AEO20014 Annual Energy Outlook 2014 LNG Liquefied natural gas ATRA American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 LPG Liquefied petroleum gases bbl Barrels LRG Liquefied refinery gases Btu British thermal units MATS Mercury and Air Toxics Standards CAFE Corporate Average Fuel Economy MECS Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule MMbbl/d Million barrels per day CO2 Carbon dioxide MMBtu Million Btu CTL Coal-to-liquids MMst Million short tons DOE U.S. Department of Energy NEMS National Energy Modeling System E85 Motor fuel containing up to 85% ethanol NGL Natural gas liquids

393

CSM: Earth, Energy, Environment 2013 Annual Faculty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CSM: Earth, Energy, Environment 2013 Annual Faculty Conference Campus Update Terry Parker, Provost August 19, 2013 #12;CSM: Earth, Energy, Environment In Previous Years, we have discussed: · Campus budget on space overall and space location · Accreditation #12;CSM: Earth, Energy, Environment For this year, we

394

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Energy Reports and Performance Annual Energy Reports and Performance Published Annual Reports Visit the FEMP Library to search for read FEMP Annual Reports to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management. For more information, contact Chris Tremper. The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers information and data sets illustrating Federal agencies' annual progress in meeting facility energy goals. Additional detail about each agency's performance can be found in their Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans on the Performance.Gov website. Federal Facility Efficiency Investment and Progress toward Sustainability Goals: Get an overview of Federal progress made in facility energy management and sustainability based on preliminary fiscal year (FY) 2012 reported findings. (For facility-level data reported under Section 432 of EISA, see EISA CTS Reports and Data.)

395

EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy 2007 Annual Mitigation Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (July 2007) More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2010...

396

The impact of future energy demand on renewable energy production Case of Norway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Projections of energy demand are an important part of analyses of policies to promote conservation, efficiency, technology implementation and renewable energy production. The development of energy demand is a key driver of the future energy system. This paper presents long-term projections of the Norwegian energy demand as a two-step methodology of first using activities and intensities to calculate a demand of energy services, and secondly use this as input to the energy system model TIMES-Norway to optimize the Norwegian energy system. Long-term energy demand projections are uncertain and the purpose of this paper is to illustrate the impact of different projections on the energy system. The results of the analyses show that decreased energy demand results in a higher renewable fraction compared to an increased demand, and the renewable energy production increases with increased energy demand. The most profitable solution to cover increased demand is to increase the use of bio energy and to implement energy efficiency measures. To increase the wind power production, an increased renewable target or higher electricity export prices have to be fulfilled, in combination with more electricity export.

Eva Rosenberg; Arne Lind; Kari Aamodt Espegren

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 143 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Basis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 8.82 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEER for central air conditioner and heat pumps, increasing to 12 SEER in 2006. Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, c. Water Heaters Electric: Current standard .86 EF, incr easing to .90 EF in 2004. Gas: Curren

398

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. Figure 5. Residential Demand Module Structure RDM incorporates the effects of four broadly-defined determinants of energy consumption: economic and demographic effects, structural effects, technology turnover and advancement effects, and energy market effects. Economic and demographic effects include the number, dwelling type (single-family, multi-family or mobile homes), occupants per household, and location of housing units. Structural effects include increasing average dwelling size and changes in the mix of desired end-use services provided by energy (new end uses and/or increasing penetration of current end uses, such as the increasing popularity of electronic equipment and computers). Technology effects include changes in the stock of installed equipment caused by normal turnover of old, worn out equipment with newer versions which tend to be more energy efficient, the integrated effects of equipment and building shell (insulation level) in new construction, and in the projected availability of even more energy-efficient equipment in the future. Energy market effects include the short-run effects of energy prices on energy demands, the longer-run effects of energy prices on the efficiency of purchased equipment and the efficiency of building shells, and limitations on minimum levels of efficiency imposed by legislated efficiency standards.

399

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market Trends-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 33. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 34. Primary energy use by fuel, 2005-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Increases Through 2030 The future path of U.S. energy demand will depend on trends in population, economic growth, energy prices, and technology adoption. AEO2007 cases developed to illustrate the uncertainties associated with those factors include low and high economic growth cases, low and high price cases, and

400

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. 5. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours) Total electricity sales increase by 50 percent in the AEO2006 reference case, from 3,567 billion kilowatt- hours in 2004 to 5,341 billion kilowatthours in 2030 (Figure 55). The largest increase is in the commercial sector, as service industries continue to drive eco- nomic growth. By customer sector, electricity demand grows by 75 percent from 2004 to 2030 in the commercial sector, by 47 percent in the residential sector, and by 24 percent in the industrial sector. Efficiency gains are expected in both the residential and commercial sectors as a result of new standards in EPACT2005 and higher energy prices that prompt more investment in energy-efficient equipment. In the residential sector, the increase in electricity demand that results from a trend toward houses with more floorspace, in addition to population

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Annual Energy Review 2004 - August 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95-91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program

402

Annual Energy Review 2010 - Released October 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

M F = = | = = l c t o  e r = O M N N M F = = | = = l c t o  e r = O M N N w w w K e i ~ K g o v L ~ e r A n n u a l E n e r g y R e v i e w 2 0 1 0 The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95-91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states:

403

Annual Energy Review 2003 - September 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renew- able energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95-91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program

404

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A18. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector and source (million metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Petroleum .............................................................. 85 78 71 66 62 59 57 -1.1% Natural gas ............................................................ 267 256 245 241 236 230 225 -0.5% Coal ....................................................................... 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 -0.8% Electricity 1 .............................................................. 875 828 744 776 817 862 888 0.2%

405

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2006 reference case and comparing it with the AEO2005 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including recently enacted legislation and regulation, such as the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and some that are proposed. “Issues in Focus” includes a discussion of the basis of EIA’s substantial revision of the world oil price trend used in the projections. It also examines the following topics: implications of higher oil price expectations for economic growth; differences among types of crude oil available on world markets; energy technologies on the cusp of being introduced; nonconventional liquids technologies beginning to play a larger role in energy markets; advanced vehicle technologies included in AEO2006; mercury emissions control technologies; and U.S. greenhouse gas intensity. “Issues in Focus” is followed by “Energy Market Trends,” which provides a summary of the AEO2006 projections for energy markets.

406

United States Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (Early Release) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (Early Release) Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (Early Release) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: United States Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (Early Release) Focus Area: Other Renewable Electricity Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/er/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/united-states-annual-energy-outlook-2 Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: Utility/Electricity Service Costs The Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012) reference case overview evaluates a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for

407

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 This report presents major assumptions of NEMS that are used to generate the projections in the AEO2006. Contents (Complete Report) Download complete Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

408

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

industrial demand module (IDM) forecasts energy consumption for fuels and feedstocks for nine manufacturing industries and six nonmanufactur- ing industries, subject to delivered prices of energy and macroeconomic variables representing the value of output for each industry. The module includes industrial cogeneration of electricity that is either used in the industrial sector or sold to the electricity grid. The IDM structure is shown in Figure 7. industrial demand module (IDM) forecasts energy consumption for fuels and feedstocks for nine manufacturing industries and six nonmanufactur- ing industries, subject to delivered prices of energy and macroeconomic variables representing the value of output for each industry. The module includes industrial cogeneration of electricity that is either used in the industrial sector or sold to the electricity grid. The IDM structure is shown in Figure 7. Figure 7. Industrial Demand Module Structure Industrial energy demand is projected as a combination of “bottom up” characterizations of the energy-using technology and “top down” econometric estimates of behavior. The influence of energy prices on industrial energy consumption is modeled in terms of the efficiency of use of existing capital, the efficiency of new capital acquisitions, and the mix of fuels utilized, given existing capital stocks. Energy conservation from technological change is represented over time by trend-based “technology possibility curves.” These curves represent the aggregate efficiency of all new technologies that are likely to penetrate the future markets as well as the aggregate improvement in efficiency of 1994 technology.

409

A Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the dependency of an electronic system to primary energy sources (i.e. AC power or battery). For reliable energy generation and consumption parameters. The system uses economics inspired supply-demand modelA Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy Utilization

Bhunia, Swarup

410

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis Papers > Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation>Tables Analysis Papers > Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation>Tables Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Download Adobe Acrobat Reader Printer friendly version on our site are provided in Adobe Acrobat Spreadsheets are provided in Excel Actual vs. Forecasts Formats Table 2. Total Energy Consumption Excel, PDF Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption Excel, PDF Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption Excel, PDF Table 5. Total Coal Consumption Excel, PDF Table 6. Total Electricity Sales Excel, PDF Table 7. Crude Oil Production Excel, PDF Table 8. Natural Gas Production Excel, PDF Table 9. Coal Production Excel, PDF Table 10. Net Petroleum Imports Excel, PDF Table 11. Net Natural Gas Imports Excel, PDF Table 12. World Oil Prices Excel, PDF Table 13. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices

411

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation>Tables Modeling and Analysis Papers> Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation>Tables Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Actual vs. Forecasts Available formats Excel (.xls) for printable spreadsheet data (Microsoft Excel required) MS Excel Viewer PDF (Acrobat Reader required Download Acrobat Reader ) Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Table 2. Total Energy Consumption Excel, PDF Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption Excel, PDF Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption Excel, PDF Table 5. Total Coal Consumption Excel, PDF Table 6. Total Electricity Sales Excel, PDF Table 7. Crude Oil Production Excel, PDF Table 8. Natural Gas Production Excel, PDF Table 9. Coal Production Excel, PDF Table 10. Net Petroleum Imports Excel, PDF Table 11. Net Natural Gas Imports Excel, PDF

412

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table A3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source (2009 Dollars per Million Btu, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Residential Liquefied Petroleum Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29.46 24.63 29.80 32.21 33.92 34.86 35.05 1.4% Distillate Fuel O il . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24.75 18.12 21.14 24.32 25.96 26.92 27.56 1.6% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.62 11.88 10.31 10.95 11.91 12.63 13.51 0.5% Electricity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33.16 33.62 32.00 31.43 31.22 31.18 31.67 -0.2% Commercial Liquefied Petroleum Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26.70 21.49 26.34 28.73 30.42 31.34 31.52 1.5% Distillate Fuel O il . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.81 15.97 19.30 22.37 24.08 24.99 25.54 1.8% Resid ual Fu el Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.80 13.45 13.26

413

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Table A19. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by End Use (Million Metric Tons) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Residential Space Heating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292.32 279.39 272.20 270.28 268.24 266.48 263.11 -0.2% Space Cooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161.32 147.13 135.52 139.87 150.45 158.66 165.31 0.4% Water Heating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163.85 160.01 160.25 161.93 163.49 160.30 155.15 -0.1% Refrigeration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69.28 64.82 58.20 56.84 58.43 60.81 63.33 -0.1% Cooking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32.81 31.96 32.55 34.05 35.93 37.55 38.87 0.8% Clothes Drye rs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37.54 35.56 33.18 32.30 33.25 34.80 36.19 0.1% Freezers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.73 13.84 12.94 13.11 13.72

414

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table A6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Key Indicators and Consumption Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Key Indicators Value of Shipments (billion 2005 dollars) Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4680 4197 5278 5639 6010 6386 6761 1.9% Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2039 1821 2200 2317 2388 2443 2537 1.3% Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6720 6017 7478 7956 8397 8829 9298 1.7% Energy Prices (2009 dollars per million Btu) Liquefied Petroleum Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24.95 20.59 23.35 25.81 27.53 28.39 28.56 1.3% Motor Gasoline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16.48 16.59 25.95 28.11 29.59 30.34 30.77 2.4% Distillate Fuel O il . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22.57 16.56 19.39 22.47 24.27 25.15 25.69 1.7% Resid ual Fu el Oil

415

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 1 Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices Reference Case Annual Grow th 2007-2030 (percent) 2006 2007 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Production Crude O il and Lease Conden sate . . . . . . . . . . . 10.80 10.73 12.18 12.40 14.02 15.64 15.98 1.7% Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.36 2.41 2.52 2.50 2.52 2.56 2.55 0.3% Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.99 19.84 20.87 20.83 22.02 23.81 24.28 0.9% Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.79 23.50 24.21 24.56 24.41 25.05 26.79 0.6% Nuclear Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.21 8.41 8.45 8.68 9.00 9.05 9.44 0.5% Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.87 2.46 2.67 2.94 2.95 2.96 2.97 0.8% Biomass 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.97 3.23 4.20 5.16 6.49 7.86

416

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table A16. Renewable Energy Generating Capacity and Generation (Gigawatts, Unless Otherwise Noted) Capacity and Generation Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Electric Power Sector 1 Net Sum mer C apacity Conventional Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76.87 76.87 77.39 77.60 78.17 79.15 79.66 0.1% Geothermal 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.42 2.42 2.56 3.05 3.76 4.75 5.84 3.4% Municipa l W aste 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.37 3.37 3.37 3.37 3.37 3.37 3.37 -0.0% Wood and Other Biomass 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.19 0.0% Solar Thermal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.53 0.61 1.26 1.28 1.30 1.32 1.35 3.1% Solar P hotov oltaic 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.05 0.07 0.15 0.23 0.32 0.43 0.56 8.2% Wind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24.89 31.45 51.62 51.74 53.96

417

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that energy efficiency or energy intensity for a particularbased upon trends in energy intensity parameters which areBuilding type (12) Energy intensity Industrial Shipments

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Modeling Fossil Energy Demands of Primary Nonferrous Metal Production: The Case of Copper  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling Fossil Energy Demands of Primary Nonferrous Metal Production: The Case of Copper ... Alumbrera (Argentina) ...

Pilar Swart; Jo Dewulf

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

419

An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network Sheetalkumar Doshi of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol and suggests mechanisms for their imple- mentation. We of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol in terms of energy savings with an existing on-demand ad

420

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Overview Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Energy Trends to 2030 In preparing projections for the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets between today and 2030. This overview focuses on one case, the reference case, which is presented and compared with the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007) reference case (see Table 1). Readers are encouraged to review the full range of alternative cases included in other sections of AEO2008. As in previous editions of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), the reference case assumes that current policies affecting the energy sector remain unchanged throughout the projection period. The reference case provides a clear basis against which alternative cases and policies can be compared. Although current laws and regulations may change over the next 25 years, and new ones may be created, it is not possible to predict what they will be or how they will be implemented [1].

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

National patterns of energy demand and expenditures by Hispanics  

SciTech Connect

This paper is based on ongoing research, at Argonne National Laboratory, being done for the Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) of the US Department of Energy. Under its legislative mandate MI is required to assess the impact of government policy, programs, and actions on US minorities. In line with this mission Argonne is currently involved in characterizing and analyzing the patterns of energy demand and expenditures of minorities. A major barrier associated with this task is the availability of sufficient data. With the possible exception of blacks, analysis of the patterns of energy demand for most minority population categories is all but impossible because of small sample sizes. The major source of residential energy consumption data, the Residential Energy Consumption Survey, only collects data on 5000 to 7000 households. For many minority population categories, this number of observations make any meaningful statistical analysis at least at the regional Census level practically impossible, with any further refinement of the analysis becoming even more difficult. In this paper our primary purpose is to describe the patterns of energy demand for Hispanics and nonhispanics but ancillary to that briefly present one possible solution to the data availability problem.

Poyer, D.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

13th Semi-annual Implementation Report on Energy Conservation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

3th Semi-annual Implementation Report on Energy Conservation Standards Activities of the U.S. Department of Energy 13th Semi-annual Implementation Report on Energy Conservation...

423

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A15. Coal supply, disposition, and prices (million short tons per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Production 1 Appalachia ............................................................. 336 337 288 295 295 289 283 -0.6% Interior ................................................................... 156 171 198 203 212 217 226 1.0% West ...................................................................... 592 588 585 616 646 664 658 0.4% East of the Mississippi ........................................... 446 456 438 447 456 455 453 -0.0%

424

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction This page inTenTionally lefT blank 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [1] (AEO2013), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the AEO2013 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S.

425

LNG Annual Report - 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Annual Report - 2013 LNG Annual Report - 2013 LNG Annual Report - 2013 LNG 2013.pdf More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2012 LNG Monthly Report - August 2014...

426

LNG Annual Report - 2008 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 LNG Annual Report - 2008 LNG Annual Report - 2008 (Revised 10142009) LNG Annual Report - 2008 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2009...

427

Energy Efficiency Funds and Demand Response Programs - National Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funds and Demand Funds and Demand Response Programs - National Overview Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory November 2, 2006 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group San Francisco CA Overview of Talk * National Overview * Energy Efficiency Programs and Funds * Demand Response Programs and Funds * FEMP Resources on Public Benefit Funds *Suggestions for Federal Customers DSM Spending is increasing! * 2006 Utility DSM and Public Benefit spending is ~$2.5B$ - $1B for C&I EE programs * CA utilities account for 35% of total spending 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 1994 2000 2005 2006 Costs (in billion $) DSM Costs Load Management Gas EE Other States Electric EE California Electric EE EE Spending in 2006 (by State) $ Million < 1 (23) 1 - 10 (2) 11 - 50 (13) 51 - 100 (7) > 100 (5) 790 101 257

428

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2004 2004 * The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has produced annual evaluations of the accuracy of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on the prior year by adding the projections from the most recent AEO and replacing the historical year of data with the most recent. The forecast evaluation examines the accuracy of AEO forecasts dating back to AEO82 by calculating the average absolute percent errors for several of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2004. (There is no report titled Annual Energy Outlook 1988 due to a change in the naming convention of the AEOs.) The average absolute percent error is the simple mean of the absolute values of the percentage difference between the Reference Case projection and the

429

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2012 April 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2012) Acronyms List of Acronyms AB 32 Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 LDVs Light-duty vehicles AEO Annual Energy Outlook LFMM Liquid Fuel Market Module AEO20011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 LNG Liquefied natural gas AEO2012 Annual Energy Outlook 2012 MACT Maximum achievable control technology bpd barrels per day MATS Mercury and Air Toxics Standards Btu British thermal units mpg miles per gallon CAFE Corporate Average Fuel Economy NGL National gas liquids CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration CHP Combined heat and power NOx Nitrogen oxides CO2 Carbon dioxide OCS Outer Continental Shelf CTL Coal-to-liquids OECD Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development

430

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 20). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated by using the SEDS24 data. The energy-intensive industries (food and kindred products, paper and allied products, bulk chemicals, glass and glass products, hydraulic cement, blast furnace and basic steel products, and aluminum) are modeled in considerable detail. Each industry is modeled as three separate but interrelated components consisting of the Process Assembly (PA) Component, the Buildings Component (BLD), and the Boiler/Steam/Cogenera- tion (BSC) Component. The BSC Component satisfies the steam demand from the PA and BLD Components. In some industries, the PA Component produces byproducts that are consumed in the BSC Component. For the manufacturing industries, the PA Component is separated into the major production processes or end uses.

431

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

432

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

433

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

434

Breaking down the silos: the integration of energy efficiency, renewable energy, demand response and climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper explores the feasibility of integrating energy efficiency program evaluation with the emerging need for the evaluation of programs from different energy cultures (demand response, renewable energy, a...

Edward Vine

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Automated Demand Response Approaches to Household Energy Management in a Smart Grid Environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The advancement of renewable energy technologies and the deregulation of theelectricity market have seen the emergence of Demand response (DR) programs. Demand response is a (more)

Adika, Christopher Otieno

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 85. Cellulose ethanol production, 2005-2030 (billion gallons per year). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 86. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Lower Costs, Greater Demand Could Spur Cellulose Ethanol Production For AEO2007, two alternative ethanol cases examine the potential impact on ethanol demand of lower costs for cellulosic ethanol production, in combination with policies that increase sales of FFVs [170]. The reference case projects that 10.5 percent of new light-duty vehicles will be capable

438

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Index (click to jump links) Electricity Sales Electricity Generating Capacity Electricity Fuel Costs and Prices Nuclear Power Electricity from Renewable Sources Electricity Alternative Cases Electricity Sales Electricity Use Is Expected To Grow More Slowly Than GDP As generators and combined heat and power plants adjust to the evolving structure of the electricity market, they face slower growth in demand than in the past. Historically, demand for electricity has been related to economic growth; that positive relationship is expected to continue, but the ratio is uncertain. Figure 67. Population gross domestic product, and electricity sales, 1965-2025 (5-year moving average annual percent growth). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

439

Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020 - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

For Further Information..... For Further Information..... The Annual Energy Outlook 2002 (AEO2002) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Acting Administrator, EIA; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Acting Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Susan H. Holte (sholte@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4838), Director of the Demand and Integration Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director of the Oil and Gas Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor. For ordering information and questions on other energy statistics available from EIA, please contact EIA’s National Energy Information Center.

440

Annual Energy Outlook 2007: With Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Only Only Global Insights, Inc. (GII) produces a compre- hensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of AEO2007. Other organizations, however, address one or more aspects of the energy markets. The most recent projection from GII, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are compared here with the AEO2007 projections. Economic Growth In the AEO2007 reference case, the projected growth in real GDP, based on 2000 chain-weighted dollars, is 2.9 percent per year from 2005 to 2030. The AEO2007 projections for economic growth are based on the Au- gust short-term projection of GII, extended by EIA through 2030 and modified to reflect EIA's view on energy prices, demand, and production. Projections of the average annual GDP growth rate for the United States from 2005

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2005 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including legislation and regulations that have been enacted and some that are proposed. Next, the “Issues in Focus” section discusses key energy market issues and examines their potential impacts. In particular, it includes a discussion of the world oil price assumptions used in the reference case and four alternative world oil price cases examined in AEO2005. “Issues in Focus” is followed by “Market Trends,” which provides a summary of energy market trends in the AEO2005 forecast.

442

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 International Energy Module The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously derived supply curves, initial price paths and international regional supply and demand levels into NEMS. These quantities are not modeled directly in NEMS because NEMS is not an international model. Previous versions of the IEM adjusted these quantities after reading in initial values. In an attempt to more closely integrate the AEO2007 with the IEO2006 and the STEO some functionality was removed from the IEM. More analyst time was devoted to analyzing price relationships between marker crude oils and refined products. A new exogenous oil supply model, Generate World Oil Balances (GWOB), was also developed to incorporate actual investment occurring in the international oil market through 2015 and resource assumptions through 2030. The GWOB model provides annual country level oil production detail for eight conventional and unconventional oils.

443

DOE'EIA-0"38!3-(S Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

DOE'EIA-0"38!3-(S DOE'EIA-0"38!3-(S Annual Energy With Proectjions to 20 For Further Information ... The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222). General questions concerning energy demand or energy markets may be addressed to Mark E. Rodekohr (202/586-1130), Director of the Energy Demand and Integration Division. General questions concerning energy supply and conversion activities may be addressed to Scott Sitzer (202/586-2308), Director of the Energy Supply and Conversion Division. Detailed questions about the forecasts and related model components may be addressed to the following analysts: Highlights ..............................

444

Annual Federal Government Energy Use and Costs by Agency, 1975...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy use, and is further broken down by energy type, electricity, natural gas, petroleum types, coal, steam, and others. Data and Resources Annual Federal Government Energy...

445

Modelling future private car energy demand in Ireland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Targeted measures influencing vehicle technology are increasingly a tool of energy policy makers within the EU as a means of meeting energy efficiency, renewable energy, climate change and energy security goals. This paper develops the modelling capacity for analysing and evaluating such legislation, with a focus on private car energy demand. We populate a baseline car stock and car activity model for Ireland to 2025 using historical car stock data. The model takes account of the lifetime survival profile of different car types, the trends in vehicle activity over the fleet and the fuel price and income elasticities of new car sales and total fleet activity. The impacts of many policy alternatives may only be simulated by such a bottom-up approach, which can aid policy development and evaluation. The level of detail achieved provides specific insights into the technological drivers of energy consumption, thus aiding planning for meeting climate targets. This paper focuses on the methodology and baseline scenario. Baseline results for Ireland forecast a decline in private car energy demand growth (0.2%, compared with 4% in the period 20002008), caused by the relative growth in fleet efficiency compared with activity.

Hannah E. Daly; Brian P. Gallachir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand Gasoline and distillate demand impact of the Energy Independance and Security Act of 2007...

447

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

448

Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics as Applied to Energy Demand Analysis and Energy Efficiency Programs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics as Applied to Energy Demand Analysis and Energy Efficiency Programs EIA Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis July 17, 2013 | Washington, DC Meeting Agenda Jim Turnure, Director, Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis July 17, 2013 2 * EIA WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION (15 minutes) * ORIENTATION/PRESENTATION: OVERVIEW OF EIA RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODELS AND CURRENT METHODS FOR INCORPORATING ENERGY EFFICIENCY/EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS (30 minutes) * ORIENTATION/PRESENTATION: BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS GENERAL OVERVIEW AND DISCUSSION (45 minutes) * EXPERTS ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION/BRAINSTROMING: HOW CAN EIA BENEFIT FROM APPLICATION OF BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS TO RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL ENERGY DEMAND MODELING?

449

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year ActualWeather Data Title A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year ActualWeather Data Publication Type Journal Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Buildings consume more than one third of the world's total primary energy. Weather plays a unique and significant role as it directly affects the thermal loads and thus energy performance of buildings. The traditional simulated energy performance using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data represents the building performance for a typical year, but not necessarily the average or typical long-term performance as buildings with different energy systems and designs respond differently to weather changes. Furthermore, the single-year TMY simulations do not provide a range of results that capture yearly variations due to changing weather, which is important for building energy management, and for performing risk assessments of energy efficiency investments. This paper employs large-scale building simulation (a total of 3162 runs) to study the weather impact on peak electricity demand and energy use with the 30-year (1980 to 2009) Actual Meteorological Year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels, across all 17 ASHRAE climate zones. The simulated results using the AMY data are compared to those from the TMY3 data to determine and analyze the differences. Besides further demonstration, as done by other studies, that actual weather has a significant impact on both the peak electricity demand and energy use of buildings, the main findings from the current study include: 1) annual weather variation has a greater impact on the peak electricity demand than it does on energy use in buildings; 2) the simulated energy use using the TMY3 weather data is not necessarily representative of the average energy use over a long period, and the TMY3 results can be significantly higher or lower than those from the AMY data; 3) the weather impact is greater for buildings in colder climates than warmer climates; 4) the weather impact on the medium-sized office building was the greatest, followed by the large office and then the small office; and 5) simulated energy savings and peak demand reduction by energy conservation measures using the TMY3 weather data can be significantly underestimated or overestimated. It is crucial to run multi-decade simulations with AMY weather data to fully assess the impact of weather on the long-term performance of buildings, and to evaluate the energy savings potential of energy conservation measures for new and existing buildings from a life cycle perspective.

450

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produce the greatest energy and demand savings. Aeration andand C.Y. Chang (2005). "Energy Demand in Sludge Dewatering."be modified to reduce energy demand during demand response

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2003), (Washington, DC, January 2003).

452

Modeling Energy Demand Dependency in Smart Multi-Energy Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Smart local energy networks provide an opportunity for more penetration of distributed energy resources. However, these resources cause an ... for internal and external dependencies in Smart Multi-Energy Systems ...

N. Neyestani; Maziar Yazdani Damavandi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Footnote  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

[1] Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000), DOE/EIA-0383(2000), (Washington, DC, December 1999). [1] Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000), DOE/EIA-0383(2000), (Washington, DC, December 1999). [2] NEMS documentation reports are available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA Homepage (http://www.eia.gov/bookshelf.html). For ordering information on the CD-ROM, contact STAT-USA's toll free order number: 1-800-STAT-USA or by calling (202) 482-1986. [3] Energy Information Administration, The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998, DOE/EIA-0581(98), (Washington, DC, February 1998). [4] The underlying macroeconomic growth cases use Standard and Poor’s DRI August 1999 T250899 and February TO250299 and TP250299. [5] PennWell Publishing Co., International Petroleum Encyclopedia, (Tulsa, OK, 1999). [6] EIA, EIA Model Documentation: World Oil Refining Logistics Demand Model, “WORLD” Reference Manual, DOE/EIA-M058, (Washington, DC, March 1994).

454

Geothermal Energy Development annual report 1979  

SciTech Connect

This report is an exerpt from Earth Sciences Division Annual Report 1979 (LBL-10686). Progress in thirty-four research projects is reported including the following area: geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, and geothermal environmental research. Separate entries were prepared for each project. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

68.9 73.4 - 73.0 79.0 77.5 64.4 66.0 - 65.8 See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 117 Table 33. Oxygenated Motor...

456

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64.1 62.2 - 62.5 74.4 73.8 57.1 55.6 - 55.9 See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 117 Table 33. Oxygenated Motor...

457

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

63.3 53.6 73.5 60.8 82.9 63.8 68.1 56.2 See footnotes at end of table. 404 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table A1. RefinerReseller Motor...

458

Earth's Annual Global Mean Energy Budget  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to put forward a new estimate, in the context of previous assessments, of the annual global mean energy budget. A description is provided of the source of each component to this budget. The top-of-atmosphere shortwave ...

J. T. Kiehl; Kevin E. Trenberth

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference September 24, 2014 12:00PM PDT to September 25, 2014 9:00PM PDT Portland, Oregon The...

460

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane .............................................................. 0.53 0.53 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 -0.0% Kerosene ............................................................ 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -1.8% Distillate fuel oil ................................................... 0.58 0.59 0.51 0.45 0.40 0.36 0.32 -2.1%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Demand Response Resources for Energy and Ancillary Services (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind an solar power generation. However, DR in grid models is limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the co-optimization of DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model of the Colorado test system. We assume each DR resource can provide energy services by either shedding load or shifting its use between different times, as well as operating

Hummon, M.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Behavioral Economics Applied to Energy Demand Analysis: A Foundation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Neoclassical economics has shaped our understanding of human behavior for several decades. While still an important starting point for economic studies, neoclassical frameworks have generally imposed strong assumptions, for example regarding utility maximization, information, and foresight, while treating consumer preferences as given or external to the framework. In real life, however, such strong assumptions tend to be less than fully valid. Behavioral economics refers to the study and formalizing of theories regarding deviations from traditionally-modeled economic decision-making in the behavior of individuals. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has an interest in behavioral economics as one influence on energy demand.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Annual Energy Outlook-List of Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ABWR ABWR Advanced Boiling Water Reactor AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AECL Atomic Energy Canada Limited AEO2003 Annual Energy Outlook 2003 AEO2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 ALAPCO Association of Local Air Pollution Control Officials AMT Alternative Minimum Tax ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge AP1000 Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor ARI Advanced Resources International AT-PZEV Advanced technology partial zero-emission vehicle BLS Bureau of Labor Statistics BNFL British Nuclear Fuels Limited plc Btu British thermal unit CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CARB California Air Resources Board CBO Congressional Budget Office CCAP Climate Change Action Plan CGES Centre for Global Energy Studies CHP Combined heat and power CO 2 Carbon dioxide DB Deutsche Bank A.G. DES Department of Environmental Services (New Hampshire)

464

Meeting the Clean Energy Demand:? Nanostructure Architectures for Solar Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Meeting the Clean Energy Demand:? Nanostructure Architectures for Solar Energy Conversion ... This account further highlights some of the recent developments in these areas and points out the factors that limit the efficiency optimization. ...

Prashant V. Kamat

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Forecast Comparisons  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecast Comparisons Forecast Comparisons Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Only GII produces a comprehensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of AEO2006. Other organizations address one or more aspects of the energy markets. The most recent projection from GII, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are compared here with the AEO2006 projections. Economic Growth In the AEO2006 reference case, the projected growth in real GDP, based on 2000 chain-weighted dollars, is 3.0 percent per year from 2004 to 2030 (Table 19). For the period from 2004 to 2025, real GDP growth in the AEO2006 reference case is similar to the average annual growth projected in AEO2005. The AEO2006 projections of economic growth are based on the August short-term forecast of GII, extended by EIA through 2030 and modified to reflect EIA’s view on energy prices, demand, and production.

466

CALIFORNIA ENERGY CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2010-2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prepared the industrial forecast. Mark Ciminelli forecasted energy for transportation, communication developed the energy efficiency program estimates. Glen Sharp prepared the residential sector forecast ................................................................................................................... 2 EndUser Natural Gas Forecast Results

467

Division of IT Convergence Engineering Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division of IT Convergence Engineering Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under Real-time Demand and wastage through better demand-side management and control is considered a key solution ingredient of appliance specific adapters. Designed and implemented GHS Modeled the demand-side energy management

Boutaba, Raouf

468

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A17. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Marketed renewable energy 1 Residential (wood) ............................................... 0.44 0.45 0.44 0.44 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.1% Commercial (biomass) ........................................ 0.11 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.0% Industrial 2 ............................................................. 2.32 2.18 2.53 2.67 2.82 3.08 3.65 1.8% Conventional hydroelectric ................................. 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.0%

469

Annual Progress Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Annual Progress Reports Annual Progress Reports This page contains annual progress reports for the Fuel Cell Technologies Office and the Transportation Fuel Cell Power...

470

Energy Systems Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the major state agencies. The second task is to evaluate the feasibility of applying Cogeneration in selected state agencies and institutions. The third major task includes developing energy efficiency standards for all new buildings constructed... LABORATORY CONSORTIUM Acquisition and improvements of the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) have created a unique method for industries to become further involved in university programs. A consortium is being organized to provide direction and financing...

Anand, N. K.; Caton, J.; Heffington, W. M.; O'Neal, D. L.; Somasundaram, S.; Turner, W. D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 93. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 94. U.S. coal production, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Western Coal Production Continues To Increase Through 2030 In the AEO2008 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at existing plants and construction of a few new coal-fired plants lead to annual production increases that average 0.3 percent per year from 2006 to 2015, when total production is 24.5 quadrillion Btu. In the absence of restrictions on CO2 emissions, the growth in coal production

472

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Actual vs. Forecasts Available formats Excel (.xls) for printable spreadsheet data (Microsoft Excel required) PDF (Acrobat Reader required) Table 2. Total Energy Consumption HTML, Excel, PDF Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption HTML, Excel, PDF Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption HTML, Excel, PDF Table 5. Total Coal Consumption HTML, Excel, PDF Table 6. Total Electricity Sales HTML, Excel, PDF Table 7. Crude Oil Production HTML, Excel, PDF Table 8. Natural Gas Production HTML, Excel, PDF Table 9. Coal Production HTML, Excel, PDF Table 10. Net Petroleum Imports HTML, Excel, PDF Table 11. Net Natural Gas Imports HTML, Excel, PDF Table 12. Net Coal Exports HTML, Excel, PDF Table 13. World Oil Prices HTML, Excel, PDF

473

An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network Sheetalkumar Doshi the necessary features of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol and suggests mechanisms the performance of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol in terms of energy savings with an existing on

Brown, Timothy X.

474

STRENGTH AND ENERGY DEMANDS FROM THE AUGUST 1999 KOCAELI EARTHQUAKE GROUND MOTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STRENGTH AND ENERGY DEMANDS FROM THE AUGUST 1999 KOCAELI EARTHQUAKE GROUND MOTIONS A. Sari 1 and L the demands placed on structures during earthquakes one might also employ an energy-based approach, especially such as absorbed energy (Chou and Uang, 2000) and input energy (Chapman, 1999). Understanding seismic demands

Manuel, Lance

475

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Productions and Imports Productions and Imports figure dataNet imports of energy decline both in absolute terms and as a share of total U.S. energy consumption in the AEO2014 Reference case (Figure 10). The decline in energy imports reflects increased domestic production of petroleum and natural gas, along with demand reductions resulting from rising energy prices and gradual improvement in vehicle efficiency. At the same time, natural gas exports increase (as domestic supplies increase and it becomes attractive to liquefy the natural gas for export), along with exports of motor gasoline (as demand declines and refiners are left with more than they can sell domestically) and exports of crude oil (as lighter domestic crude oil is swapped for the heavier crudes more commonly run in modern refineries). The net import share of total U.S.

476

Energy Use in the Australian Manufacturing Industry: An Analysis of Energy Demand Elasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Use in the Australian Manufacturing Industry: An Analysis of Energy Demand Elasticity Chris in this paper. Energy consumption data was sourced from the Bureau of Resources and Energy Economics' Australian Energy Statistics publication. Price and income data were sourced from the Australian Bureau

477

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20041 (AEO2004), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview3, which is updated once every two years. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2004 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the U.S. Congress, the Administration, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies.

478

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Annual Energy Outlook with  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Evaluation, 2005 Evaluation, 2005 Annual Energy Outlook Evaluation, 2005 Each year since 1996, EIA's Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has produced a comparison between realized energy outcomes and the projections included in previous editions of the AEO. Each year, the comparison adds the projections from the most recent AEO and updates the historical data to the most recently available. The comparison summarizes the relationship of the AEO reference case projections since 1982 to realized outcomes by calculating the average absolute percent differences for several of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2005. Annual Energy Outlook Evaluation, 2005 Report Annual Energy Outlook Evaluation, 2005 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

479

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A16. Renewable energy generating capacity and generation (gigawatts, unless otherwise noted) Net summer capacity and generation Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Electric power sector 1 Net summer capacity Conventional hydropower .................................. 77.82 77.87 78.34 78.94 79.11 79.63 80.31 0.1% Geothermal 2 ....................................................... 2.38 2.38 3.63 4.34 5.70 6.60 7.46 4.0% Municipal waste 3 ................................................ 3.26 3.34 3.44 3.44 3.44 3.44 3.44 0.1%

480

ENERGY ANALYSIS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDIES Forecas Energy Demand for Hawaii H. Rudernan and P.summarized in Figure 1, The Hawaii Energy Demand ForecastingModel provided energy demand projections for each of the

Authors, Various

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand annual energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

U.S. Energy Demand: Some Low Energy Futures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sophistication for energy consumption. | Journal Article...ac-tivities related to fuel conservation. The...processes, not only in fuel con-servation...History ofthe Steam Engine (Cambridge Univ...coal-fired steam to diesel) but much is at-tributable...sophistication for energy consumption. The scenarios...

1978-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

482

National Action Plan on Demand Response | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response Presentation-given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008...

483

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

484

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Contact Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

For Further Information..... For Further Information..... The Annual Energy Outlook 2003 (AEO2003) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-6351), Director; Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director of the Demand and Integration Division; John Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4430), Director, International, Economic and Greenhouse Gases Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director of the Oil and Gas Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor.

485

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining

486

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

487

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Natural Gas Transmission and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

488

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and

489

Annual Energy Review 2011 - Released September 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

N F = = | = = p e p t e m e r = O M N O N F = = | = = p e p t e m e r = O M N O w w w K e i ~ K g o v L ~ e r A n n u a l E n e r g y R e v i e w 2 0 1 1 The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, and renewable energy; financial and environment indi- cators; and data unit conversions. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95-91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states:

490

AVTA: PHEV Demand and Energy Cost Demonstration Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes results from a demonstration with Tacoma Power on plug-in hybrid electric vehicle demand and energy cost, as informed by the AVTA's testing on plug-in electric vehicle charging equipment. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

491

Energy and Demand Savings from Implementation Costs in Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., natural gas) in each code [6]. Table 1. Energy Streams STREAM CODE Electrical Consumption EC Electrical Demand ED Other Electrical Fees EF Electricity E1 Natural Gas E2 L.P.G. E3 #1 Fuel Oil E4 #2 Fuel Oil E5 #4 Fuel Oil E6 #6 Fuel... that are widely scattered). Therefore, the correlations of implementation costs with electrical consumption and natural gas are also investigated in Tables 2 and 4, because they are highly important both nationally and in Texas. In fact, the total number...

Razinha, J. A.; Heffington, W. M.

492

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Intensity Intensity figure dataPopulation is a key determinant of energy consumption through its influence on demand for travel, housing, consumer goods, and services. U.S. energy use per capita was fairly constant from 1990 to 2007, but it began to fall after 2007. In the AEO2013 Reference case, energy use per capita continues to decline due to the impacts of improving energy efficiency (e.g., new appliance and CAFE standards) and changes in the ways energy is used in the U.S. economy. Total U.S. population increases by 29 percent from 2011 to 2040, but energy use grows by only 10 percent, with energy use per capita declining by 15 percent from 2011 to 2040 (Figure 8). From 1990 to 2011, energy use per dollar of GDP declined on average by 1.7 percent per year, in large part because of shifts within the economy from

493

2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Energy Storage Technologies...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Energy Storage Technologies 2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Energy Storage Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies research activities 2014amr02.pdf More...

494

2011 Annual Planning Summary for National Energy Technology Laboratory...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) 2011 Annual Planning Summary for National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and...

495

Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Electricity Working Group Meeting...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Analysis Team Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis Office of Energy Analysis Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Electricity Working Group Meeting July...

496

2012 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Energy Storage Technologies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Energy Storage Technologies 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Energy...

497

A critical review of single fuel and interfuel substitution residential energy demand models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this paper is to formulate a model of residential energy demand that adequately analyzes all aspects of residential consumer energy demand behavior and properly treats the penetration of new technologies, ...

Hartman, Raymond Steve

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

A Novel Harmony Search Algorithm for One-Year-Ahead Energy Demand Estimation Using Macroeconomic Variables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we tackle a problem of one-year ahead energy demand estimation from macroeconomic variables. A modified Harmony ... the proposed approach in a real problem of Energy demand estimation in Spain, from...

Sancho Salcedo-Sanz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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