Sample records for delp toshifumi hotchi

  1. Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Brett C. Singer, William W. Delp, Michael G. Apte, Philip N. Price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Implications Natural gas cooking burners and many cooking activities emit pollutants that can reach hazardous values and that less than half of the pollutants emitted by gas cooking burners are removed during many gas burners; Nitrogen dioxide; Range hood; Task ventilation; Unvented combustion. Practical

  2. Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Project Officer: Dan KingGreg Stillman Total budget: 300 K April 24 , 2013 Principal Investigator: Dr. Toshifumi...

  3. Guidelines for residential commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes”.Delp. 2000. “Residential Commissioning: A Review of Relatedfor Evaluating Residential Commissioning Metrics” Lawrence

  4. Instrumented home energy rating and commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes”.Delp. 2000. “Residential Commissioning: A Review of Related2001. “Residential Commissioning to Assess Envelope and HVAC

  5. The Astrophysical Journal, 715:651655, 2010 May 20 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/715/1/651 C 2010. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ; watanabe.kyoko@isas.jaxa.jp 2 Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way , Toshifumi Shimizu1 , Satoshi Masuda3 , and Kiyoshi Ichimoto4 1 Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450, USA 3 Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo

  6. arXiv:1112.1589v1[astro-ph.SR]7Dec2011 Astronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. article4 c ESO 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -mail: mverma@aip.de, hbalthasar@aip.de, cdenker@aip.de 2 New Jersey Institute of Technology, Space Weather Nordhoff St., Northridge, CA 91330, USA 4 Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210, Japan e-mail: shimizu.toshifumi@isas.jaxa

  7. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited; September 2013. Other requests shall be referred to NAVFAC EXWC or ESTCP.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Weiss, LBNL Nathan Finch, NAVFAC EXWC Craig Wray, LBNL Mark de Ogburn, NAVFAC Atlantic Woody Delp, LBNL Hashem Akbari, LBNL Scott Smaby, NAVFAC EXWC Ronnen Levinson, LBNL Bret Gean, NAVFAC EXWC SEI Group, Inc. #12 ESTCP Number: EW-200813 September 2013 Peter Ly, NAVFAC EXWC George Ban-Weiss, LBNL Nathan Finch, NAVFAC

  8. Effects of head-up tilt on mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and regional cardiac output distribution in aging rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael Wiechmann

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    on Mean Arterial Pressure, Heart Rate, and Regional Cardiac Output Distribution in Aging Rats. (December 2005) Michael Wiechmann Ramsey, B.S.; M.A., Sam Houston State University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Michael Delp Many senescent... to extend my gratitude to my friends as well as the faculty and staff that have supported me throughout my studies at Texas A&M University. Thanks also to Dr. Gary Oden who helped instill a love and appreciation of Exercise Physiology. A special thanks...

  9. Protecting buildings from a biological or chemical attack: Actions to take before or during a release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Delp, William W.; Lorenzetti, David M.; Finlayson, Elizabeth U.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Sextro, Richard G.; Derby, Elisabeth A.; Jarvis, Sondra A.

    2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents advice on how to operate a building to reduce casualties from a biological or chemical attack, as well as potential changes to the building (e.g. the design of the ventilation system) that could make it more secure. It also documents the assumptions and reasoning behind the advice. The particular circumstances of any attack, such as the ventilation system design, building occupancy, agent type, source strength and location, and so on, may differ from the assumptions made here, in which case actions other than our recommendations may be required; we hope that by understanding the rationale behind the advice, building operators can modify it as required for their circumstances. The advice was prepared by members of the Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group, which is part of the Indoor Environment Department at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The group's expertise in this area includes: tracer-gas measurements of airflows in buildings (Sextro, Thatcher); design and operation of commercial building ventilation systems (Delp); modeling and analysis of airflow and tracer gas transport in large indoor spaces (Finlayson, Gadgil, Price); modeling of gas releases in multi-zone buildings (Sohn, Lorenzetti, Finlayson, Sextro); and occupational health and safety experience related to building design and operation (Sextro, Delp). This report is concerned only with building design and operation; it is not a how-to manual for emergency response. Many important emergency response topics are not covered here, including crowd control, medical treatment, evidence gathering, decontamination methods, and rescue gear.

  10. Capture Efficiency of Cooking-Related Fine and Ultrafine Particles by Residential Exhaust Hoods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Delp, William W.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective exhaust hoods can mitigate the indoor air quality impacts of pollutant emissions from residential cooking. This study reports capture efficiencies (CE) measured for cooking generated particles for scripted cooking procedures in a 121-m3 chamber with kitchenette. CEs also were measured for burner produced CO2 during cooking and separately for pots and pans containing water. The study used four exhaust hoods previously tested by Delp and Singer (Environ. Sci. Technol., 2012, 46, 6167-6173). For pan-frying a hamburger over medium heat on the back burner, CEs for particles were similar to those for burner produced CO2 and mostly above 80percent. For stir-frying green beans in a wok (high heat, front burner), CEs for burner CO2 during cooking varied by hood and airflow: CEs were 34-38percent for low (51?68 L s-1) and 54?72percent for high (109?138 L s-1) settings. CEs for 0.3?2.0 ?m particles during front burner stir-frying were 3?11percent on low and 16?70percent on high settings. Results indicate that CEs measured for burner CO2 are not predictive of CEs of cooking-generated particles under all conditions, but they may be suitable to identify devices with CEs above 80percent both for burner combustion products and for cooking-related particles.