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1

Glossary Term - Proton Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Previous Term (Proton) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Quark) Quark Proton Emission After proton emission, an atom contains one less proton. Proton emission is one process...

2

Improvements to the on-line mass separator, RAMA, and the beta-delayed charged-particle emission of proton-rich sd shell nuclei  

SciTech Connect

To overcome the extreme difficulties encountered in the experimental decay studies of proton drip line nuclei, several techniques have been utilized, including a helium-jet transport system, particle identification detectors and mass separation. Improvements to the ion source/extraction region of the He-jet coupled on-line Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer (RAMA) and its target/ion source coupling resulted in significant increases in RAMA efficiencies and its mass resolution, as well as reductions in the overall transit time. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, the decays of {sup 31}Cl, {sup 27}P and {sup 28}P, with half-lives of 150 msec, 260 msec and 270.3 msec, respectively, were examined using a he-jet and low-energy gas {Delta}E-gas {Delta}E-silicon E detector telescopes. Total beta-delayed proton branches of 0.3% and 0.07% in {sup 31}Cl and {sub 27}P, respectively, were estimated. Several proton peaks that had been previously assigned to the decay of {sup 31}Cl were shown to be from the decay of {sup 25}Si. In {sup 27}P, two proton groups at 459 {+-} 14 keV and 610 {+-} 11 keV, with intensities of 7 {+-} 3% and 92 {+-} 4% relative to the main (100%) group were discovered. The Gamow-Teller component of the preceding beta-decay of each observed proton transition was compared to results from shell model calculations. Finally, a new proton transition was identified, following the {beta}-decay of {sup 28}P, at 1,444 {+-} 12 keV with a 1.7 {+-} 0.5% relative intensity to the 100% group. Using similar low-energy detector telescopes and the mass separator TISOL at TRIUMF, the 109 msec and 173 msec activities, {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar, were studied. A new proton group with energy 729 {+-} 15 keV was observed following the beta-decay of {sup 17}Ne. Several discrepancies between earlier works as to the energies, intensities and assignments of several proton transitions from {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar were resolved.

Ognibene, T.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Delayed neutron emission measurements for U-235 and Pu-239  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The delayed neutron emission rates of U-235 and Pu-239 samples were measured accurately from a thermal fission reaction. A Monte Carlo calculation using the Geant4 code was used to demonstrate the neutron energy independence of the detector used in the counting station. A set of highly purified actinide samples (U-235 and Pu-239) was irradiated in these experiments by using the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor. A fast pneumatic transfer system, an integrated computer control system, and a graphite-moderated counting system were constructed to perform all these experiments. The calculated values for the five-group U-235 delayed neutron parameters and the six-group Pu-239 delayed neutron parameters were compared with the values recommended by Keepin et al. (1957) and Waldo et al. (1981). These new values differ slightly from literature values. The graphite-moderated counting station and the computerized pneumatic system are now operational for further delayed neutron measurement.

Chen, Yong

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

DELAYED ONSET OF HIGH-ENERGY EMISSIONS IN LEPTONIC AND HADRONIC MODELS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

The temporal-spectral evolution of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts is simulated numerically for both leptonic and hadronic models. For weak enough magnetic fields, leptonic models can reproduce the few seconds delay of the onset of GeV photon emission observed by Fermi-LAT, due to the slow growth of the target photon field for inverse Compton scattering. For stronger magnetic fields, the GeV delay can be explained with hadronic models, due to the long acceleration timescale of protons and the continuous photopion production after the end of the particle injection. While the FWHMs of the MeV and GeV light curves are almost the same in one-zone leptonic models, the FWHMs of the 1-30 GeV light curves in hadronic models are significantly wider than those of the 0.1-1 MeV light curves. The amount of the GeV delay depends on the importance of the Klein-Nishina effect in both the leptonic and hadronic models. In our examples of hadronic models the energies of the escaped neutrons are comparable to the gamma-ray energy, although their contribution to the ultra high-energy cosmic rays is still subdominant. The resulting neutrino spectra are hard enough to avoid the flux limit constraint from IceCube. The delay of the neutrino emission onset is up to several times longer than the corresponding delay of the GeV photon emission onset. The quantitative differences in the light curves for various models may be further tested with future atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes whose effective area is larger than that of Fermi-LAT, such as CTA.

Asano, Katsuaki [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Meszaros, Peter, E-mail: asano@phys.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: nnp@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Glossary Term - Proton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prometheus Previous Term (Prometheus) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Proton Emission) Proton Emission Proton A Proton Protons are positively charged particles found within atomic...

6

Delayed Light Emission in Green Plant Meterials:Temperature-Dependence and Quantum Yield  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discovery of the delayed light emission of plant materials by Strahler and Arnold in 1951 has stimulated a good deal of interest in this rather remarkable property. The emitted light has been shown to be due to an electronic transition between the first excited singlet state of chlorophyll and the ground state. At room temperature, a luminescence is observable from about 0.01 seconds to several minutes after excitation. Thus, the electronic transition cannot be rate-determining and the process represents neither normal fluorescence nor normal phosphorescence. Indeed, there is some evidence that the decay curve of the luminescence is the resultant of more than one rate-limiting process. Strahler and co-workers have been able to demonstrate the existence of many relationships between delayed light emission and photosynthesis and thus have been led to interpret the luminescence phenomena as a consequence of the reversibility of some of the enzymatic photosynthetic reactions. Moreover, Tollin and Calvin have shown that the faster decaying components of the delayed light are present to as low a temperature as -100 C, suggesting that the early processes following light-absorption are non-enzymatic in nature. These latter observations, in conjunction with several other types of experimental and theoretical information, have suggested an interpretation of the physical processes leading to delayed light emission, and, by analogy, to photosynthesis, in terms of semiconductor theory. The earlier investigations in this laboratory have been limited to the study of the light emitted approximately 0.1 seconds after excitation by a flash discharge. The recent reports of luminescences at still shorter times after excitation have prompted the construction of a device capable of continuously observing the light emission of a sample of plant material from 0.0015 seconds to about 30 seconds after the onset of flash excitation. The present work describes a series of experiments carried out with this apparatus.

Tollin, G.; Fujimori, E.; Calvin, M.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The neutron long counter NERO for studies of beta-delayed neutron emission in the r-process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron long counter NERO was built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, for measuring beta-delayed neutron-emission probabilities. The detector was designed to work in conjunction with a beta-decay implantation station, so that beta decays and beta-delayed neutrons emitted from implanted nuclei can be measured simultaneously. The high efficiency of about 40%, for the range of energies of interest, along with the small background, are crucial for measuring beta-delayed neutron emission branchings for neutron-rich r-process nuclei produced as low intensity fragmentation beams in in-flight separator facilities.

J. Pereira; P. Hosmer; G. Lorusso; P. Santi; A. Couture; J. Daly; M. Del Santo; T. Elliot; J. Goerres; C. Herlitzius; K. -L. Kratz; L. O. Lamm; H. Y. Lee; F. Montes; M. Ouellette; E. Pellegrini; P. Reeder; H. Schatz; F. Schertz; L. Schnorrenberger; K. Smith; E. Stech; E. Strandberg; C. Ugalde; M. Wiescher; A. Woehr

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

Description of true and delayed ternary nuclear fission accompanied by the emission of various third particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms and the features of the main types of nuclear ternary fission (that is, true ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted before the rupture of the fissioning nucleus into fragments, and delayed ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted from fission fragments going apart) are investigated within quantum-mechanical fission theory. The features of T-odd asymmetry in true ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are investigated for the cases where alpha particles, prescission neutrons, and photons appear as third particles emitted by fissioning nuclei, the Coriolis interaction of the spin of the polarized fissioning nucleus with the spin of the third particle and the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances excited in the fissioning nucleus in the case of projectile-neutron capture being taken into account. For the cases where third particles emitted by fission fragments are evaporated neutrons or photons, T-odd asymmetries in delayed ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are analyzed with allowance for the mechanism of pumping of large fission-fragment spins oriented orthogonally to the fragment-emission direction and with allowance for the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances.

Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@vsu.ru; Kadmensky, S. S.; Lyubashevsky, D. E. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Characterization of ceramics and glass using proton-induced X-ray emission  

SciTech Connect

Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) is one of various chemical analysis tools that uses X-rays to identify individual elements. It is closely related to X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and electron microprobe analysis (EMA). Although XRF and EMA are routinely used by materials engineers, PIXE is relatively uncommon. On the other hand, PIXE has proved to be the preferred technique in several specialized applications in environmental and biological studies. Many of the authors of this paper have recently demonstrated the utility of the technique in analyzing various commercial glass plates with and without transition-metal oxide coatings. The recent development of focused proton beams increases the potential of PIXE for the analysis of engineering materials.

Shackelford, J.F.; Risbud, S.H. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science); Kusko, B.H.; Cahill, T.A. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Crocker Nuclear Lab); Bihuniak, P.P.; Hanson, M.E. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Advanced Research Div.)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Measurements of nuclear $?$-ray line emission in interactions of protons and $?$ particles with N, O, Ne and Si  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$\\gamma$-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne and Si and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong $\\gamma$-ray lines of $^{16}$O produced in proton and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O and Ne and a thick foil was used for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and 39 MeV for $\\alpha$-particles have been delivered by the IPN-Orsay tandem accelerator. The $\\gamma$ rays have been detected with four HP-Ge detectors in the angular range 30$^{\\circ}$ to 135$^{\\circ}$. We extracted 36 cross section excitation functions for proton reactions and 14 for $\\alpha$-particle reactions. For the majority of the excitation functions no other data exist to our knowledge. Where comparison with existing data was possible usually a very good agreement was found. It is shown that these data are very interesting for constraining nuclear reaction models. In particular the agreement of cross section calculations in the nuclear reaction code TALYS with the measured data could be improved by adjusting the coupling schemes of collective levels in the target nuclei $^{14}$N, $^{20,22}$Ne and $^{28}$Si. The importance of these results for the modeling of nuclear $\\gamma$-ray line emission in astrophysical sites is discussed.

H. Benhabiles-Mezhoud; J. Kiener; J. -P. Thibaud; V. Tatischeff; I. Deloncle; A. Coc; J. Duprat; C. Hamadache; A. Lefebvre-Schuhl; J. -C. Dalouzy; F. De Grancey; F. De Oliveira; F. Dayras; N. De Srville; M. -G. Pellegriti; L. Lamia; S. Ouichaoui

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Proton emission from cone-in-shell fast-ignition experiments at Omega  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of energetic protons from cone-in-shell fast-igniton implosions at Omega have been conducted. In these experiments, charged-particle spectrometers were used to measure a significant population (>10{sup 13}) of energetic protons (7.5 MeV max.), indicating the presence of strong electric fields. These energetic protons, observed in directions both transverse and forward relative to the direction of the short-pulse laser beam, have been used to study aspects of coupling efficiency of the petawatt fast-ignitior beam. Approximately 5% of the laser energy coupled to hot electrons was lost to fast ions. Forward going protons were less energetic and showed no dependence on laser intensity or whether the cone tip was intact when the short-pulse laser was fired. Maximum energies of protons emitted transverse to the cone-in-shell target scale with incident on-target laser intensity (2-6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18}W-cm{sup -2}), as described by the ponderomotive scaling ({proportional_to}I{sup 1/2}). It is shown that these protons are accelerated from the entire cone, rather than from the cone tip alone. These protons were used to estimate the lower limit on the hot-electron temperature, which was found to be hotter than the ponderomotive scaling by factors of 2-3.

Sinenian, N.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Stephens, R. B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Measurements of delayed neutron emission from Np-237, Am-241, and Am-243  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isotopes of transuranic elements are produced as a result of successive radiative capture reactions in the fuel of a nuclear reactor. Typically, these transuranic isotopes decay through long chains, have long half lives and dominate the long term toxicity of the spent reactor fuel. One of the options for waste management is to remove the transuranic from spent fuel by chemical processing, to load them into new special fuel elements, and to transmute them by neutron induced fission into shorter-lived fission fragments. Previous studies have shown the feasibility of actinide transmutation in either Light Water Reactors or Liquid Metal Fast Reactors. Due to the anticipated high transuranic loadings in the fuel of actinide burner reactors, the neutronic properties of the transuranic isotopes will have a significant effect on the operational and safety characteristics of such reactors. Experiments to determine delayed neutron group yields and decay constants for Np-237, Am-241, and Am-243 have been designed and carried out. The experiments were conducted at Texas A&M University TRIGA reactor using a very fast pneumatic transfer system.

Saleh, H.H.; Parish, T.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Raman, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Proton emission imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A proton core imaging system has been developed and extensively used for measuring the nuclear burn regions of inertial confinement fusion implosions. These imaging cameras, mounted to the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility, use ...

DeCiantis, Joseph Loreto

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Delayed X-ray emission from fallback in compact-object mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When double neutron star or neutron star-black hole binaries merge, the final remnant may comprise a central solar-mass black hole surrounded by a 0.01-0.1 solar masses torus. The subsequent evolution of this disc may be responsible for short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). A comparable amount of mass is ejected into eccentric orbits and will eventually fall back to the merger site after approximately 0.01 seconds. In this Paper, we investigate analytically the fate of the fallback matter, which may provide a luminous signal long after the disc is exhausted. We find that matter in the eccentric tail returns at a super-Eddington rate and is eventually (0.1 sec) unable to cool via neutrino emission and accrete all the way to the black hole. Therefore, contrary to previous claims, our analysis suggests that fallback matter is not an efficient source of late time accretion power and is unlikely to cause the late flaring activity observed in SGRB afterglows. The fallback matter rather forms a radiation-driven wind or a bound atmosphere. In both cases, the emitting plasma is very opaque and photons are released with a degraded energy in the X-ray band. We therefore suggest that compact binary mergers could be followed by an "X-ray renaissance", as late as several days to weeks after the merger. This might be observed by the next generation of X-ray detectors.

Elena M. Rossi; Mitchell C. Begelman

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

15

Proton interrogation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

Morris, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Quark cluster contribution to cumulative proton emission in fragmentation of carbon ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the FRAGM experiment at heavy ion accelerator complex TWAC-ITEP, the proton yields at an angle 3.5$^\\circ$ have been measured at fragmentation of carbon ions at $T_0 = $ 0.6, 0.95 and 2.0 GeV/nucleon on beryllium target. The data are presented as invariant proton yields on cumulative variable $x$ in the range 0.9 carbon nuclei are estimated to be 8--12% for six-quark clusters and 0.2--0.6% for nine-quark clusters.

B. M. Abramov; P. N. Alekseev; Yu. A. Borodin; S. A. Bulychjov; I. A. Dukhovskoy; A. I. Khanov; A. P. Krutenkova; V. V. Kulikov; M. A. Martemyanov; M. A. Matsyuk; E. N. Turdakina

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

17

Neutron to proton ratios of quasiprojectile and midrapidity emission in the {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni reaction at 52 MeV/nucleon  

SciTech Connect

By combining data from a charged particle {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni experiment at 52 MeV/nucleon with an {sup 36}Ar+{sup 58}Ni experiment at 50 MeV/nucleon for which free neutrons have been detected, an increase in the neutron to proton ratio of the whole nuclear material at midrapidity has been experimentally observed in the reaction {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni at 52 MeV/nucleon. The neutron-to-proton ratio of the quasi-projectile emission is analyzed for the same reactions and is seen to decrease below the ratio of the initial system. Those observations suggest that an asymmetric exchange of neutrons and protons between the quasiprojectile and the midrapidity region exists.

Theriault, D.; Vallee, A.; Gingras, L.; Larochelle, Y.; Roy, R.; April, A.; Beaulieu, L.; Grenier, F.; Lemieux, F.; Moisan, J.; St-Pierre, C.; Turbide, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire, Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada); Samri, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et Applications, Universite Ibn Tofail, Kenitra (Morocco); Borderie, B.; Rivet, M. F. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Bougault, R.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Durand, D.; Lecolley, J.F. [LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ISMRA and Universite, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France)] [and others

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Delayed Gev Emission from Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts : Impact of a Relativistic Wind on External Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sudden collapse of a compact object, or coalescence of a compact binary, can generate an unsteady relativistic wind that lasts for a few seconds. The wind is likely to carry a high magnetic field; and its Lorentz factor depends on the extent to which it is 'loaded' with baryons. If the Lorentz factor is $\\sim 100$, internal dissipation and shocks in this wind produce a non-thermal gamma-ray burst, detectable in the range $0.1\\MeV \\siml E_\\gamma \\siml 0.1-1\\GeV$ out to cosmological distances. The cooled wind ejecta would subsequently be decelerated by the external medium. The resultant blast wave and reverse shock can then give rise to a second burst component, mainly detectable in the GeV range, with a time delay relative to the MeV burst ranging from minutes to hours.

P. Meszaros; M. J. Rees

1994-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

19

Protons - Cyclotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protons Protons The BASE Facility is capable of providing fluxes of up to 1E10 protons/cm2-sec (the limit of our standard, continuously reading ion chamber dosimetry), but works best in the 1E7 to 1E8 protons/cm2-sec range. Higher levels of flux are monitored using intermittent faraday cup readings. Standard proton energies include 13.5, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 55 MeV/nucleon. Energies below 13.5 MeV/nucleon can be run in vacuum in Cave 4B. All proton testing is performed in air. Shielding materials, laser alignment tools, and mounting fixtures are available. Holes are provided through the cave shielding blocks for connecting additional test equipment, with a distance of approximately 10 feet from the test bench to the top of the shielding block (10 BNC cables are permanently installed and available for use; additional cables can be added).

20

Predicting Ignition Delay for Gas Turbine Fuel Flexibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Predicting Ignition Delay for Gas Turbine Fuel Flexibility 15 m * Low emission combustion systems have been carefully optimized for natural gas * Future fuel diversity (including...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Measurements of nuclear $\\gamma$-ray line emission in interactions of protons and $\\alpha$ particles with N, O, Ne and Si  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$\\gamma$-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne and Si and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong $\\gamma$-ray lines of $^{16}$O produced in proton and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O and Ne and a thick foil was used for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and 39 MeV for $\\alpha$-particles have been delivered by the IPN-Orsay tandem accelerator. The $\\gamma$ rays have been detected with four HP-Ge detectors in the angular range 30$^{\\circ}$ to 135$^{\\circ}$. We extracted 36 cross section excitation functions for proton reactions and 14 for $\\alpha$-particle reactions. For the majority of the excitation functions no other data exist to our knowledge. Where comparison with existing data was possible usually a very good agreement was found. It is shown that these data are very in...

Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H; Thibaud, J -P; Tatischeff, V; Deloncle, I; Coc, A; Duprat, J; Hamadache, C; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A; Dalouzy, J -C; De Grancey, F; De Oliveira, F; Dayras, F; De Srville, N; Pellegriti, M -G; Lamia, L; Ouichaoui, S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Active interrogation using energetic protons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

Morris, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chung, Kiwhan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greene, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hogan, Gary E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makela, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mariam, Fesseha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Milner, Edward C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murray, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spaulding, Randy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waters, Laurie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wysocki, Frederick [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Neutron-to-proton ratios of quasiprojectile and midrapidity emission in the {sup 64}Zn + {sup 64}Zn reaction at 45 MeV/nucleon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurement of both neutrons and charged particles emitted in the reaction {sup 64}Zn + {sup 64}Zn at 45 MeV/nucleon allows comparison of the neutron to proton ratio at midrapidity with that at projectile rapidity. The evolution of N/Z in both rapidity regimes with increasing centrality is examined. For the completely reconstructed midrapidity material one finds that the neutron to proton ratio is above that of the overall {sup 64}Zn + {sup 64}Zn system. In contrast, the reconstructed ratio for the quasiprojectile is below that of the overall system. This difference provides the most complete evidence to date of neutron enrichment of midrapidity nuclear matter at the expense of the quasiprojectile.

Theriault, D.; Gauthier, J.; Grenier, F.; Moisan, F.; St-Pierre, C.; Roy, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire, Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Davin, B.; Hudan, S.; Paduszynski, T.; Souza, R. T. de [Department of Chemistry and Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Bell, E.; Garey, J.; Iglio, J.; Keksis, A. L.; Parketon, S.; Richers, C.; Shetty, D. V.; Soisson, S. N.; Souliotis, G. A.; Stein, B. C. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] (and others)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Impact of Delaying the Delay Announcements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many service providers use delay announcements to inform customers of anticipated delays. However, this information is usually not provided immediately but after a short period of time (spent either waiting or occupied by the system). The focus of this ... Keywords: Noncooperative game, access control, admission control, queues, real-time information, strategic consumer, tandem queues

Gad Allon; Achal Bassamboo

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

Clemensen, R.E.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Digital time delay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

Martin, A.D.

1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

27

Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions and Emission Controls In conjunction with the research efforts at FEERC to improve fuel efficiency and reduce petroleum use, research on emissions is conducted with two...

28

Proton structure and tensor gluons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a possibility that inside the proton and, more generally, inside the hadrons there are additional partons - tensor-gluons, which can carry a part of the proton momentum. The tensor-gluons have zero electric charge, like gluons, but have a larger spin. Inside the proton a nonzero density of the tensor-gluons can be generated by the emission of tensor-gluons by gluons. The last mechanism is typical for non-Abelian tensor gauge theories, in which there exists a gluon-tensor-tensor vertex of order g. Therefore the number of gluons changes not only because a quark may radiate a gluon or because a gluon may split into a quark-antiquark pair or into two gluons, but also because a gluon can split into two tensor-gluons. The process of gluon splitting suggests that part of the proton momentum which was carried by neutral partons is shared between vector and tensor gluons. We derive evolution equations for the parton distribution functions which take into account these new processes. The momentum sum rule allows to find the tensor-gluons contribution to the Callan-Simanzik beta function and to calculate the corresponding anomalous dimensions. This contribution changes the behavior of the structure functions, and the logarithmic correction to the Bjorken scaling becomes more mild. This also influences the unification scale at which the coupling constants of the Standard Model merge, shifting its value to lower energies of order of 40 TeV.

George Savvidy

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

29

Downhole delay assembly for blasting with series delay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole delay assembly is provided which can be placed into a blasthole for initiation of explosive in the blasthole. The downhole delay assembly includes at least two detonating time delay devices in series in order to effect a time delay of longer than about 200 milliseconds in a round of explosions. The downhole delay assembly provides a protective housing to prevent detonation of explosive in the blasthole in response to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device. There is further provided a connection between the first and second time delay devices. The connection is responsive to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device and initiates the second detonating time delay device. A plurality of such downhole delay assemblies are placed downhole in unfragmented formation and are initiated simultaneously for providing a round of explosive expansions. The explosive expansions can be used to form an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles.

Ricketts, Thomas E. (Grand Junction, CO)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

Yip, K.

2011-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

31

Impact of delayed neutron precursor mobility in fissile solution systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research version of the Monte Carlo software package MCNP6 is modified to incorporate advection and diffusion of delayed neutron precursors, resulting in the emission of delayed neutrons at locations different from the original fission sites. Results of two test problems, a pipe carrying flowing fissile solution and a sphere of fissile solution with precursor diffusion, show that the fission product mobility tends to perturb the fundamental mode, has a negative reactivity effect, and, perhaps most importantly, causes a decrease in the effective delayed neutron fraction. (authors)

Kiedrowski, B. C. [X-Computational Physics Div., Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS A143, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

LANL | Physics | Proton Radiography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pioneering proton radiography Pioneering proton radiography Invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory, proton radiography employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials driven by high explosives. The penetrating power of high-energy protons, like that of x-rays, makes them an excellent probe of a wide range of materials under extreme pressures, strains, and strain rates. The charge of the particles both affects scattering in interesting ways but allows them to be imaged with magnetic optics that gives them unique advantages for penetrating radiography. The incredible efficacy and versatility of proton radiography also stems from the ability to produce multiple proton pulses in an accelerator coupled with multiple optical viewing systems that can result

33

Congestion delays at hub airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A deterministic model was developed to study the effects of inefficient scheduling on flight delays at hub airports. The model bases the delay calculation on published schedule data and on user-defined airport capacities. ...

St. George, Martin J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Programmable Differential Delay Circuit With Fine Delay Adjustment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Circuitry that provides additional delay to early arriving signals such that all data signals arrive at a receiving latch with same path delay. The delay of a forwarded clock reference is also controlled such that the capturing clock edge will be optimally positioned near quadrature (depending on latch setup/hold requirements). The circuitry continuously adapts to data and clock path delay changes and digital filtering of phase measurements reduce errors brought on by jittering data edges. The circuitry utilizes only the minimum amount of delay necessary to achieve objective thereby limiting any unintended jitter. Particularly, this programmable differential delay circuit with fine delay adjustment is designed to allow the skew between ASICS to be minimized. This includes skew between data bits, between data bits and clocks as well as minimizing the overall skew in a channel between ASICS.

DeRyckere, John F. (Eau Claire, WI); Jenkins, Philip Nord (Eau Claire, WI); Cornett, Frank Nolan (Chippewa Falls, WI)

2002-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

35

Physics Out Loud - Proton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photomultiplier Tube Previous Video (Photomultiplier Tube) Physics Out Loud Main Index Next Video (Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD)) Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) Proton Learn about the...

36

Electron-capture delayed fission properties of 244Es  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron-capture delayed fission was observed in {sup 244}Es produced via the {sup 237}Np({sup 12}C,5n){sup 244}Es reaction at 81 MeV (on target) with a production cross section of 0.31{+-}0.12 {micro}b. The mass-yield distribution of the fission fragments is highly asymmetric. The average preneutron-emission total kinetic energy of the fragments was measured to be 186{+-}19 MeV. Based on the ratio of the number of fission events to the measured number of {alpha} decays from the electron-capture daughter {sup 244}Cf (100% {alpha} branch), the probability of delayed fission was determined to be (1.2{+-}0.4) x 10{sup -4}. This value for the delayed fission probability fits the experimentally observed trend of increasing delayed fission probability with increasing Q value for electron-capture.

Shaughnessy, Dawn A.; Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Adams, Jeb L.; Lane, Michael R.; Laue, Carola A.; Lee, Diana M.; McGrath, Christopher A.; Ninov, Victor; Patin, Joshua B.; Strellis, Dan A.; Sylwester, Eric R.; Wilk, Philip A.; Hoffman, Darleane C.

2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

37

Delayed cure bismaleimide resins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

Adams, Johnnie E. (Grandview, MO); Jamieson, Donald R. (Merriam, KS)

1984-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

PRECISION TIME-DELAY CIRCUIT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tine-delay circuit which produces a delay time in d. The circuit a capacitor, an te back resistance, connected serially with the anode of the diode going to ground. At the start of the time delay a negative stepfunction is applied to the series circuit and initiates a half-cycle transient oscillatory voltage terminated by a transient oscillatory voltage of substantially higher frequency. The output of the delay circuit is taken at the junction of the inductor and diode where a sudden voltage rise appears after the initiation of the higher frequency transient oscillations.

Creveling, R.

1959-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

39

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Silver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mode Branching Percentage 93 No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available Electron Capture No Data Available Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission No Data...

40

High resolution digital delay timer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

Martin, Albert D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Apparatus for proton radiography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

Martin, Ronald L. (La Grange, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Proton computed tomography  

SciTech Connect

The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible.

Hanson, K.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The search for proton decay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following a very brief description of the theoretical developments which motivated the search for proton decay

R. Bionta; G. Blewitt; C. B. Bratton; D. Casper; B. G. Cortez; G. W. Foster; W. Gajewski; K. S. Ganezer; M. Goldhaber; T. J. Haines; T. W. Jones; D. Kielczewka; W. R. Kropp; J. G. Learned; E. Lehmann; J. M. LoSecco; H. S. Park; J. Shultz; S. Seidel; H. W. Sobel; J. L. Stone; L. R. Sulak; J. C. van der Velde

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Proton Polarimetry at RHIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The techniques used to measure precisely the polarization of the proton beams at RHIC are presented and discussed. Fast polarization measurements are performed using polarimeters based on pC elastic scattering. The absolute normalization is provided by a polarized hydrogen gas jet target. During the 2004 polarized proton run a relative precision on the beam polarization ?P beam /P beam of 6.6% has been achieved.

Alessandro Bravar; RHIC Polarimetry group

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Revisiting TCP congestion control using delay gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional loss-based TCP congestion control (CC) tends to induce high queuing delays and perform badly across paths containing links that exhibit packet losses unrelated to congestion. Delay-based TCP CC algorithms infer congestion from delay measurements ...

David A. Hayes; Grenville Armitage

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Communication link with constant delay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a technique that enables the transmission of data on a transmission and reception of data. A programmable delay element is fixed in the transmission line and programmed to add or subtract an appropriate amount of delay to compensate for changes and thereby maintain the overall delay at a predetermined value. The electrical transmission system is coupled via an optical coupler to a fiber optic line. The destination of the fiber optic line is equipped with a means for reflecting a portion of the transmitted information so as to provide an indication of a round trip delay at the transmitting end. By using continuous time compensation, the communication does not distort information as a phase compensated system would do, and also allows higher accuracy for synchronization between transmitter and receiver.

Miller, S.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Improved Mapping of Tropospheric Delays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors compare several methods to map the a priori tropospheric delay of global positioning system (GPS) signals from the zenith direction to lower elevations. This is commonly achieved with so-called mapping functions. Dry mapping functions ...

Christian Rocken; Sergey Sokolovskiy; James M. Johnson; Doug Hunt

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to

49

A Model of Proton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I suggest to consider a proton as a body in a state of free precession. Such approach allows to define a proton as periodic system with two rotary degrees of freedom with corresponding frequency ratio and resonances. In result on a power scale the points corresponding to a birth of leptons are designated. The interrelation between masses of leptons is established through a fine structure constant. The given approach is distributed to a nucleus. Other representation is given on the nature of X-rays which connect with a charge of a nucleus and its mass.

Vladislav Shchegolev

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

50

Delayed neutron measurements from fast fission of actinide waste isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was performed to determine the delayed neutron emission properties from fast fission of several actinide waste isotopes. The specific isotopes evaluated were U-235, Np-237, and Am-243. A calculational technique based on the microscopic method was used to predict initial guesses for the delayed neutron parameters (group decay constants and yields). Based on these calculations, an alternate "seven-group" structure, in contrast to the traditional "six-group" structure used previously, was suggested which would yield a superior fit to the measured data. A series of measurements were performed to test the hypothesis suggested by this alternate group structure. Using a set of highly purified actinide samples (provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory), the delayed neutron emission decay constants and yields for six groups of the "seven-group" structure were measured for U-235, Np-237, and Am-243. These experiments were performed using the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor, a quick pneumatic transfer system, an integrated computer control and counting system, and a specially designed in-core irradiation device. The values for the total delayed neutron yield (per 100 fissions) from fast-neutron induced fission of U-235, Np237, and Am-243 were determined to be 1.67 ?0.08, 1.14 ?0.07, 0.86 ?0.05, respectively. The newly measured values were compared with other values recommended by Keepin et al., Waldo et al., Saleh et al., and Brady and England. Good agreement was found in all cases. The "seven-group" structure was shown to yield a superior fit to the measured data, as well as, provide a more direct correlation between delayed neutron groups and their associated delayed neutron precursors.

Charlton, William S.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Holmium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Emission 100.00% 141 4.1 milliseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 142 0.4 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission > 0.00% 143 No Data...

52

Development of a Low-Energy Proton Accelerator System for the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of a Low-Energy Proton Accelerator System for the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP)

Han, J M

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Contruction of User Facilities for the Proton Beam Utilization of PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contruction of User Facilities for the Proton Beam Utilization of PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project)

Kim, K R; Lee, H R; Nam, K Y; Park, B S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Proton-Proton Scattering at 105 Mev and 75 Mev  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The scattering of protons by protons provides an important method for studying the nature of nuclear forces. Recent proton-proton scattering experiments at energies as high as thirty Mev{sup 1} have failed to show any appreciable contribution to the cross section from higher angular momentum states, but it is necessary to bring in tensor forces to explain the magnitude of the observed cross section.

Birge, R. W.; Kruse, U. E.; Ramsey, N. F.

1951-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton exchange membrane, also known as polymer electrolyte membrane, fuel cells (PEMFCs) offer the promise of efficient conversion of chemical energy of fuel, such as hydrogen or methanol, into electricity with minimal pollution. Their widespread use to power zero-emission automobiles as part of a hydrogen economy can contribute to enhanced energy security and reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. However, the commercial viability of PEMFC technology is hindered by high cost associated with the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and poor membrane durability under prolonged operation at elevated temperature. Membranes for automotive fuel cell applications need to perform well over a period comparable to the life of an automotive engine and under heavy load cycling including start-stop cycling under sub-freezing conditions. The combination of elevated temperature, changes in humidity levels, physical stresses and harsh chemical environment contribute to membrane degradation. Perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA)-based membranes, such as Nafion, have been the mainstay of PEMFC technology. Their limitations, in terms of cost and poor conductivity at low hydration, have led to continuing research into membranes that have good proton conductivity at elevated temperatures above 120 C and under low humidity conditions. Such membranes have the potential to avoid catalyst poisoning, simplify fuel cell design and reduce the cost of fuel cells. Hydrocarbon-based membranes are being developed as alternatives to PFSA membranes, but concerns about chemical and mechanical stability and durability remain. Novel anhydrous membranes based on polymer gels infused with protic ionic liquids have also been recently proposed, but considerable fundamental research is needed to understand proton transport in novel membranes and evaluate durability under fuel cell operating conditions. In order to advance this promising technology, it is essential to rationally design the next generation of PEMs based on an understanding of chemistry, membrane morphology and proton transport obtained from experiment, theory and computer simulation.

Devanathan, Ramaswami

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Radiative proton-antiproton annihilation to a lepton pair  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annihilation of proton and antiproton to an electron-positron pair, including radiative corrections due to the emission of virtual and real photons is considered. The results are generalized to leading and next-to leading approximations. The relevant distributions are derived and numerical applications are given in the kinematical range accessible to the PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility.

Ahmadov, A. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Bytev, V. V.; Kuraev, E. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Tomasi-Gustafsson, E. [CEA, IRFU, SPhN, Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France, and CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, UMR 8608, 91405 Orsay (France)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

History of Proton Linear Accelerators  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Some personal recollections are presented that relate to the author`s experience developing linear accelerators, particularly for protons. (LEW)

Alvarez, L. W.

1987-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

58

Delay Dependent Exponential Stability for Fuzzy Recurrent Neural Networks with Interval Time-Varying Delay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the problem of delay-dependent exponential stability for fuzzy recurrent neural networks with interval time-varying delay is investigated. The delay interval has been decomposed into multiple non equidistant subintervals, on these interval ... Keywords: Delay decomposition, Fuzzy recurrent neural networks, Interval time-varying delay, Maximum admissible upper bound (MAUB), Maximum exponential convergent rate (MECR)

R. Chandran; P. Balasubramaniam

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Solar proton fluxes since 1956  

SciTech Connect

The fluxes of protons emitted during solar flares since 1956 were evaluated. The depth-versus-activity profiles of /sup 56/Co in several lunar rocks are consistent with the solar-proton fluxes detected by experiments on several satellites. Only about 20% of the solar-proton-induced activities of /sup 22/Na and /sup 55/Fe in lunar rocks from early Apollo missions were produced by protons emitted from the sun during solar cycle 20 (1965--1975). The depth-versus-activity data for these radionuclides in several lunar rocks were used to determine the fluxes of protons during solar cycle 19 (1954--1964). The average proton fluxes for cycle 19 are about five times those for both the last million years and for cycle 20. These solar-proton flux variations correlate with changes in sunspot activity.

Reedy, R.C.

1977-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

60

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Science of Chocolate The Science of Chocolate Previous Video (The Science of Chocolate) Science Series Video Archive Next Video (Adventures in Infectious Diseases) Adventures in Infectious Diseases Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives Dr. Cynthia Keppel - Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute October 25, 2011 In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Calculation of delayed-neutron energy spectra in a QRPA-Hauser-Feshbach model  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical {beta}-delayed-neutron spectra are calculated based on the Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA) and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Neutron emissions from an excited daughter nucleus after {beta} decay to the granddaughter residual are more accurately calculated than in previous evaluations, including all the microscopic nuclear structure information, such as a Gamow-Teller strength distribution and discrete states in the granddaughter. The calculated delayed-neutron spectra agree reasonably well with those evaluations in the ENDF decay library, which are based on experimental data. The model was adopted to generate the delayed-neutron spectra for all 271 precursors.

Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moller, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Proton Size Anomaly  

SciTech Connect

A measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen yields a charge radius of the proton that is smaller than the CODATA value by about 5 standard deviations. We explore the possibility that new scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and tensor flavor-conserving nonuniversal interactions may be responsible for the discrepancy. We consider exotic particles that, among leptons, couple preferentially to muons and mediate an attractive nucleon-muon interaction. We find that the many constraints from low energy data disfavor new spin-0, spin-1, and spin-2 particles as an explanation.

Barger, Vernon [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Chiang, Cheng-Wei [Department of Physics and Center for Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, National Central University, Chungli, Taiwan 32001 (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11925 (China); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Keung, Wai-Yee [Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Marfatia, Danny [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Investigating the proton's strange sea  

SciTech Connect

Several research groups are conducting experiments to determine the exact contributions of strange quarks in the quark-gluon ''sea'' to the proton's charge distribution and magnetization.

David Armstrong; Kandice Carter

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

64

Delay-Insensitivity and Semi-Modularity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of asynchronous circuit behaviors in the presence of component and wire delays has received a great deal of attention. In this paper, we consider asynchronous circuits whose components can be any non-deterministic sequential machines of ... Keywords: asynchronous, bisimulation, delay-dense, delay-insensitive, isochronic, module, network, semi-modular, speedindependent

J. A. Brzozowski; H. Zhang

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

1953-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

66

Energy Dependence of High Moments for Net-proton Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High moments of multiplicity distributions of conserved quantities are predicted to be sensitive to critical fluctuations. To understand the effect of the non-critical physics backgrounds on the proposed observable, we have studied various moments of net-proton distributions with AMPT, Hijing, Therminator and UrQMD models, in which no QCD critical point physics is implemented. It is found that the centrality evolution of various moments of net-proton distributions can be uniformly described by a superposition of emission sources. In addition, in the absence of critical phenomena, some moment products of net-proton distributions, related to the baryon number susceptibilities in Lattice QCD calculations, are predicted to be constant as a function of the collision centrality. We argue that a non-monotonic dependence of the moment products as a function of the beam energy may be used to locate the QCD critical point.

Luo, Xiaofeng; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Ritter, Hans Georg; Xu, Nu

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

67

Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal for imaging small tumors within patients for targeted proton therapy. March 25, 2013 Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head. Proton radiography, which was invented at Los Alamos, employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials. Los Alamos researchers and German collaborators have investigated the application of giga-electron volt (GeV, or billion electron volts) energy proton beams for medical imaging in combination with proton radiation treatment for cancer. The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal

68

Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal for imaging small tumors within patients for targeted proton therapy. March 25, 2013 Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head. Proton radiography, which was invented at Los Alamos, employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials. Los Alamos researchers and German collaborators have investigated the application of giga-electron volt (GeV, or billion electron volts) energy proton beams for medical imaging in combination with proton radiation treatment for cancer. The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal

69

Low Temperature Proton Conductivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and and MEAs at Freezing Temperatures Thomas A. Zawodzinski, Jr. Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, Ohio 2 Freezing Fuel Cells: Impact on MEAS Below 0 o C *Transport processes/motions slow down: questions re: lower conductivity,water mobility etc *Residual water will have various physical effects in different portions of the MEA questions re: durability of components 3 3 'States' of Water in Proton Conductors ? Freezing (bulk), bound freezable, bound non freezable water states claimed based on DSC * Freezing water more mobile, allegedly important for high conductivity Analysis common for porous systems Does the presence of these states matter? Why? 4 'State of Water' in PEMs At T < 0 o C *'Liquid-like' water freezes *'Non-freezing' fraction: water of solvation at pore

70

Optimal integer delay budgeting on directed acyclic graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delay budget is an excess delay each component of a design can tolerate under a given timing constraint. Delay budgeting has been widely exploited to improve the design quality. We present an optimal integer delay budgeting algorithm. Due to numerical ...

E. Bozorgzadeh; S. Ghiasi; A. Takahashi; M. Sarrafzadeh

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Self-proton/ion radiography of laser-produced proton/ion beam from thin foil targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protons and multicharged ions generated from high-intensity laser interactions with thin foil targets have been studied with a 100 TW laser system. Protons/ions with energies up to 10 MeV are accelerated either from the front or the rear surface of the target material. We have observed for the first time that the protons/ions accelerated from the front surface of the target, in a direction opposite to the laser propagation direction, are turned around and pulled back to the rear surface, in the laser propagation direction. This proton/ion beam is able to create a self-radiograph of the target and glass stalk holding the target itself recorded through the radiochromic film stack. This unique result indicates strong long-living (ns time scale) magnetic fields present in the laser-produced plasma, which are extremely important in energy transport during the intense laser irradiation. The magnetic field from laser main pulse expands rapidly in the preformed plasma to rotate the laser produced protons. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations and ray tracing found that the magnetic field created by the amplified spontaneous emission prepulse is not sufficient to explain the particle trajectories, but the additional field created by the main pulse interaction estimated from particle-in-cell simulation is able to change the particle trajectories.

Paudel, Y.; Renard-Le Galloudec, N.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Shrestha, I.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Sentoku, Y. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Nicolai, Ph.; D'Humieres, E. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, 33405 Talence (France); Faenov, A.Ya. [Joint Institute for High Temperature, Russian Academy of Science, Izhirskaya Street, Moscow (Russian Federation) and Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Variable-delay feedback control of unstable steady states in retarded time-delayed systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the stability of unstable steady states in scalar retarded time-delayed systems subjected to a variable-delay feedback control. The important aspect of such a control problem is that time-delayed systems are already infinite-dimensional before the delayed feedback control is turned on. When the frequency of the modulation is large compared to the system's dynamics, the analytic approach consists of relating the stability properties of the resulting variable-delay system with those of an analogous distributed delay system. Otherwise, the stability domains are obtained by a numerical integration of the linearized variable-delay system. The analysis shows that the control domains are significantly larger than those in the usual time-delayed feedback control, and that the complexity of the domain structure depends on the form and the frequency of the delay modulation.

Aleksandar Gjurchinovski; Viktor Urumov

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

73

RHIC Polarized proton operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above injection, the polarized hydrogen jet target runs for every fill with both beams. Based on the known analyzing power, there is very little polarization loss between injection and 100 GeV. An alternative way is to measure the asymmetry at 100 GeV followed by ramping up to 250 GeV and back down to 100 GeV and then to measure the asymmetry again at 100 GeV. If the asymmetry after the down ramp is similar to the measurement before the up ramp, polarization was also preserved during the ramp to 250 GeV. The analyzing power at storage energy can then be extracted from the asymmetries measured at 100 GeV and 250 GeV. The tune and orbit feedbacks are essential for the down ramp to be possible. The polarized proton operation is still going on. We will push bunch intensity higher until reaching the beam-beam limit. The even higher intensity will have to wait for the electron lenses to compensate the beam-beam effect. To understand the details of spin dynamics in RHIC with two snakes, spin simulation with the real magnet fields have been developed recently. The study will provide guidance for possible polarization loss schemes. Further polarization gain will requires a polarized source upgrade; more careful setup jump quads in the AGS to get full benefit; and control emittance in the whole accelerator chain.

Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

74

Predicting Ignition Delay for Gas Turbine Fuel Flexibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Delay for Ignition Delay for Gas Turbine Fuel Flexibility 15 μm * Low emission combustion systems have been carefully optimized for natural gas * Future fuel diversity (including H2 containing fuels) may generate auto-ignition damage * Existing theories vary in predicting propensity for auto-ignition damage * Theory A vs Theory B shows factor of 100 difference-which is right? * UC Irvine improved and validated design tools for ignition delay allow designers to evaluate the risk for auto-ignition in advanced combustion systems with future fuels * Models are available to engine OEM's to shorten design cycle time and save $$ UC Irvine Scott Samuelsen / Vince McDonell #112 1000/T (1/K) 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 τ [O 2 ] 0.5 [F] 0.25 (sec(mol/cm 3 ) 0.75 ) 10 -10 10 -9 10 -8 10 -7 10 -6 10 -5

75

Muon - proton inelastic scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This experiment will examine muon-proton inelastic scattering for virtual-photon energies of 10 to 110 GeV and for |q{sup 2}| values of 0.2 to 20.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The virtual-photon total cross sections {sigma}{sub t} + {epsilon}{sigma}{sub s}, or the equivalent expression in W{sub 1} and W{sub 2}, will be measured over this range of virtual-photon energies and q{sup 2} values. Some separation of {sigma}{sub T} and {sigma}{sub S}, or equivalently W{sub 1} and W{sub 2}, will be made. The multiplicity, momentum spectra and angular spectra of the charged hadrons produced in this reaction will be measured. Some channels such as {mu} + P {yields} {mu} + P + P{sup 0} will be isolated and completely analyzed. The experiment uses a hydrogen target, wire spark chambers and an analyzing magnet of conventional design.

Dieterle, B.; Lakin, W.; Martin, F.; Perl, M.; Petraske, E.; Tenebaum, J.; Toner, W.; Zipf, T.; /SLAC

1970-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Proton acceleration experiments with Z-Petawatt.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outline of this presentation: (1) Proton acceleration with high-power lasers - Target Normal Sheath Acceleration concept; (2) Proton acceleration with mass-reduced targets - Breaking the 60 MeV threshold; (3) Proton beam divergence control - Novel focusing target geometry; and (4) New experimental capability development - Proton radiography on Z.

Arefiev, A. (University of Texas at Austin); Schaumann, G. (Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Germany); Deppert, O. (Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Germany); Rambo, Patrick K.; Roth, M. (Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Germany); Geissel, Matthias; Schwarz, Jens; Sefkow, Adam B.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Kimmel, Mark W.; Schollmeier, Marius; Breizman, B. (University of Texas at Austin)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

High intensity protons in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

Montag, C.; Ahrens& #44; L.; Blaskiewicz& #44; M.; Brennan& #44; J.M.; Drees& #44; K.A.; Fischer& #44; W.; Huang& #44; H.; Minty& #44; M.; Robert-Demolaize& #44; G.; Thieberger& #44; P.; Yip& #44; K.

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

78

Time dependent estimates of delays and delay costs at major airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two queuing models appropriate for estimating time dependent delays and delay costs at major airports are reviewed. The models use the demand and capacity profiles at any given airport as well as the number of runways there ...

Hengsbach, Gerd

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Strangeness production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In these lectures we discuss the investigation of the strange meson production in proton-proton ($pp$) and in proton-nucleus ($pA$) reactions within an effective Lagrangian model. The kaon production proceeds mainly via the excitations of $N^*$(1650), $N^*$(1710), and $N^*$(1720) resonant intermediate nucleonic states, in the collision of two initial state nucleons. Therefore, the strangeness production is expected to provide information about the resonances lying at higher excitation energies. For beam energies very close to the kaon production threshold the hyperon-proton final state interaction effects are quite important. Thus, these studies provide a check on the models of hyperon-nucleon interactions. The in-medium production of kaons show strong sensitivity to the self energies of the intermediate mesons.

Radhey Shyam

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

80

Analysis on delay-dependent stability for neural networks with time-varying delays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the problem of delay-dependent stability criteria for neural networks with time-varying delays. First, by constructing a newly augmented Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, a less conservative stability criterion is established in terms ... Keywords: Lyapunov method, Neural networks, Stability, Time-varying delays

O. M. Kwon; Ju H. Park; S. M. Lee; E. J. Cha

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

TCP with delayed ack for wireless networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the TCP performance with delayed ack in wireless networks (including ad hoc and WLANs) which use IEEE 802.11 MAC protocol as the underlying medium access control. Our analysis and simulations show that TCP throughput does not always ... Keywords: Adaptive delayed ack, Congestion control, Friendliness, TCP, Wireless medium access/contention

Jiwei Chen; Mario Gerla; Yeng Zhong Lee; M. Y. Sanadidi

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Novel delay-dependent asymptotic stability criteria for neural networks with time-varying delays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of delay-dependent asymptotic stability criteria for neural networks (NNs) with time-varying delays is investigated. An improved linear matrix inequality based on delay-dependent stability test is introduced to ensure a large upper bound ... Keywords: 34K20, 34K25, 37C20, 37C25, 37C75, 37N35, 37N40, 93C10, 93C83, 93D05, 93D20, Delay-dependent, Linear matrix inequality (LMI), Neural networks (NNs), Time-varying delay

Junkang Tian; Dongsheng Xu; Jian Zu

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Service Provider Competition: Delay Cost Structure, Segmentation, and Cost Advantage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We model competition between two providers who serve delay-sensitive customers. We compare a generalized delay cost structure, where a customer's delay cost depends on her service valuation, with the traditional additive delay cost structure, where the ... Keywords: delay cost structure, service competition, value-based market segmentation

Maxim Afanasyev; Haim Mendelson

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Oorja Protonics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oorja Protonics Oorja Protonics Jump to: navigation, search Name Oorja Protonics Address 40923 Encyclopedia Circle Place Fremont, California Zip 94538 Sector Fuel Cell Product Maker of methanol fuel cell Website http://www.oorjaprotonics.com/ Coordinates 37.5155329°, -121.9858875° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.5155329,"lon":-121.9858875,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

85

Proton SOFC SECA.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Based Based Solid Oxide Fuel Cells S. Elangovan, F. Zhao, J. Hartvigsen, D. Ramirez, and D. Larsen 11 th Annual SECA Workshop July 27, 2010 Pittsburgh, PA Supported by DOE SBIR Grant: DE- G02- 6ER84595 Outline  Thermodynamic Analysis Shows Higher Efficiency for Proton Cells compared to Oxygen Cells  Stability addressed by the use of composite electrolyte  Anode supported composite electrolyte cell shows good performance  Stability in high CO 2 containing fuel demonstrated 2 Driving Force Comparison  High driving force even at high fuel utilization 3 Max. Efficiency Comparison  Proton Cell 4  Oxygen Cell Single Stage Two Stage BaCeO 3 Proton Conductivity and Transference Number  Highest conductivity range from 0.01 to 0.016 in 700° to 800°C range  ~ half the oxygen ion conductivity of 8YSZ

86

Jet fuel ignition delay times: Shock tube experiments over wide conditions and surrogate model predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ignition delay times were measured for gas-phase jet fuel (Jet-A and JP-8) in air behind reflected shock waves in a heated high-pressure shock tube. Initial reflected shock conditions were as follows: temperatures of 715-1229 K, pressures of 17-51 atm, equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1, and oxygen concentrations of 10 and 21% in synthetic air. Ignition delay times were measured using sidewall pressure and OH* emission at 306 nm. Longer ignition delay times at low temperatures (715-850 K) were accessed by utilizing driver-gas tailoring methods. Also presented is a review of previous ignition delay time measurements of kerosene-based fuels and recent work on surrogate fuel and kinetic mechanism development. To our knowledge, we report the first gas-phase shock tube ignition delay time data for JP-8, and our measurements for Jet-A are for a broader range of conditions than previously available. Our results have very low scatter and are in excellent agreement with the limited previous shock tube data for Jet-A. Although JP-8 and Jet-A have slightly different compositions, their ignition delay times are very similar. A simple 1/P dependence was found for ignition delay times from 874 to 1220 K for the pressure range studied for both fuels. Ignition delay time variations with equivalence ratio and oxygen concentration were also investigated. The new experimental results were compared with predictions of several kinetic mechanisms, using different jet fuel surrogate mixtures. (author)

Vasu, Subith S.; Davidson, David F.; Hanson, Ronald K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Department of Energy and USEC Announce Decision to Delay USEC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USEC Announce Decision to Delay USEC Loan Guarantee Application Final Review Department of Energy and USEC Announce Decision to Delay USEC Loan Guarantee Application Final Review...

88

Department of Energy and USEC Announce Decision to Delay USEC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy and USEC Announce Decision to Delay USEC Loan Guarantee Application Final Review Department of Energy and USEC Announce Decision to Delay USEC Loan Guarantee...

89

Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Proton radiography application to medical imaging  

SciTech Connect

In order to demonstrate the potential advantages of proton radiography for medical imaging, a 205 MeV proton radiography beam was developed using the Argonne National Laboratory Booster I synchrotron. Data were taken using a narrow scanning beam and an electronic detector system. The proton radiographs presented here demonstrate a significant dose reduction and improved mass resolution over conventional x-ray techniques. The radiographs also show significant differences in the proton stopping power of biological tissues and, therefore, considerable potential in soft tissue imaging. Also presented is the motivation for the interest in developing a proton tomographic scan system.

Kramer, S.L.; Moffett, D.R.; Martin, R.L.; Colton, E.P.; Steward, V.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fast triggers for a proton injector at PEFP  

SciTech Connect

A fast timing system has been developed to control transistor transistor logic (TTL) trigger signals which are used to extract the pulsed proton beam from an ion source with the precision of less than submicro seconds. The system has been designed to set a delay and duty of the pulses, respectively, and prohibit the beam pulse by an external interlock signal. The system is based on VME which is composed of VME CPU and fast I/O boards with fan-out modules. The software of the system has been developed by the record/device supports and channel access in the core of the EPICS environments. In the paper, we describe software configurations and hardware drivers.

Song, Young-Gi; Hong, In-Seok; Cho, Yong-Sub; Cho, Yong-Hwan [Proton Engineering Frontier Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

93

Dynamic Protonation Equilibrium of Solvated Acetic Acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, the dynamic protonation equilibrium between an amino acid side chain analogue and bulk water as well as the diffusion properties of the excess proton were successfully reproduced through unbiased computer simulations. During a 50 ns Q-HOP MD simulation, two different regimes of proton transfer were observed. Extended phases of frequent proton swapping between acetic acid and nearby water were separated by phases where the proton freely diffuses in the simulation box until it is captured again by acetic acid. The pKa of acetic acid was calculated around 3.0 based on the relative population of protonated and deprotonated states and the diffusion coefficient of excess proton was computed from the average mean squared displacement in the simulation. Both calculated values agree well with the experimental measurements.

Gu, Wei; Frigato, Tomaso; Straatsma, TP; Helms, Volkhard H.

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

94

RECIPIENT: Oo~a Protonics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oo~a Protonics Oo~a Protonics .STATE: CA PROJECT Deployment Testing of Alternative-Fuel Fuel Cell Technologies for Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling TITLE: Equipment; NREL Tracking No. 11-005 Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number NREL-11-005 G010337 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the foUowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 86.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

95

Delayed switching applied to memristor neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic flux and electric charge are linked in a memristor. We reported recently that a memristor has a peculiar effect in which the switching takes place with a time delay because a memristor possesses a certain inertia. This effect was named the ''delayed switching effect.'' In this work, we elaborate on the importance of delayed switching in a brain-like computer using memristor neural networks. The effect is used to control the switching of a memristor synapse between two neurons that fire together (the Hebbian rule). A theoretical formula is found, and the design is verified by a simulation. We have also built an experimental setup consisting of electronic memristive synapses and electronic neurons.

Wang, Frank Z.; Yang Xiao; Lim Guan [Future Computing Group, School of Computing, University of Kent, Canterbury (United Kingdom); Helian Na [School of Computer Science, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield (United Kingdom); Wu Sining [Xyratex, Havant (United Kingdom); Guo Yike [Department of Computing, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Rashid, Md Mamunur [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Solid-state proton conductors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this program was to survey the field of solid-state proton conductors (SSPC), identify conductors that could be used to develop solid-state fuel cells suitable for use with coal derived fuel gases, and begin the experimental research required for the development of these fuel cells. This document covers the following topics: the history of developments and current status of the SSPC, including a review of proton conducting electrolyte structures, the current status of the medium temperature SSPC development, electrodes for moderate temperature (SSPC) fuel cell, basic material and measurement techniques applicable for SSPC development, modeling and optimization studies. Correlation and optimization studies, to include correlation studies on proton conduction and oxide cathode optimization for the SSPC fuel cell. Experiments with the SSPC fuel cells including the fabrication of the electrolyte disks, apparatus for conducting measurements, the strontium-cerium based electrolyte, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with solid foil electrodes, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with porous electrodes, and conduction mechanisms. 164 refs., 27 figs., 13 tabs.

Jewulski, J.R.; Osif, T.L.; Remick, R.J.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

High-Intensity Proton Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

Jay L. Hirshfield

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

Improvements for group delay fringe tracking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Group delay fringe tracking using spectrally-dispersed fringes is suitable for stabilising the optical path difference in ground-based astronomical optical interferometers in low light situations. We discuss the performance of group delay tracking algorithms when the effects of atmospheric dispersion, high-frequency atmospheric temporal phase variations, non-ideal path modulation, non-ideal spectral sampling, and the detection artifacts introduced by electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) are taken into account, and we present ways in which the tracking capability can be optimised in the presence of these effects.

A. G. Basden; D. F. Buscher

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

Uncertainty evaluation of delayed neutron decay parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a nuclear reactor, delayed neutrons play a critical role in sustaining a controllable chain reaction. Delayed neutrons relative yields and decay constants are very important for modeling reactivity control and have been studied for decades. Researchers have tried different experimental and numerical methods to assess these delayed neutron parameters. The reported parameter values vary widely, much more than the small statistical errors reported with these parameters. Interestingly, the reported parameters fit their individual measurement data well in spite of these differences. This dissertation focuses on evaluation of the errors and methods of delayed neutron relative yields and decay constants for thermal fission of U-235. Various numerical methods used to extract the delayed neutron parameter from the measured data, including Matrix Inverse, Levenberg-Marquardt, and Quasi-Newton methods, were studied extensively using simulated delayed neutron data. This simulated data was Poisson distributed around Keepins theoretical data. The extraction methods produced totally different results for the same data set, and some of the above numerical methods could not even find solutions for some data sets. Further investigation found that ill-conditioned matrices in the objective function were the reason for the inconsistent results. To find a reasonable solution with small variation, a regularization parameter was introduced using a numerical method called Ridge Regression. The results from the Ridge Regression method, in terms of goodness of fit to the data, were good and often better than the other methods. Due to the introduction of a regularization number in the algorithm, the fitted result contains a small additional bias, but this method can guarantee convergence no matter how large the coefficient matrix condition number. Both saturation and pulse modes were simulated to focus on different groups. Some of the factors that affect the solution stability were investigated including initial count rate, sample flight time, initial guess values. Finally, because comparing reported delayed neutron parameters among different experiments is useless to determine if their data actually differs, methods are proposed that can be used to compare the delayed neutron data sets.

Wang, Jinkai

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

HFC Emissions Estinating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dioxide Emissions Reporting Year: January December, 200x Agent Type GWP Total Emission by Agent Type, kg Equivalent CO2 Emission by ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

CO2 Emissions - Gibraltar  

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Gibraltar CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gibraltar...

103

CO2 Emissions - Mozambique  

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Mozambique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mozambique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mozambique image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mozambique...

104

CO2 Emissions - Macau  

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Far East Macau CO2 Emissions from Macau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macau...

105

CO2 Emissions - Guadeloupe  

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106

CO2 Emissions - Ghana  

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Africa Ghana Graphics CO2 Emissions from Ghana Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ghana image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ghana...

107

CO2 Emissions - Ireland  

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Ireland CO2 Emissions from Ireland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ireland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ireland...

108

CO2 Emissions - Malta  

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Western Europe Malta CO2 Emissions from Malta Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malta image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malta...

109

CO2 Emissions - Kyrgyzstan  

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Centrally Planned Europe Kyrgyzstan CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kyrgyzstan...

110

CO2 Emissions - Mali  

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111

CO2 Emissions - Portugal  

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Western Europe Portugal CO2 Emissions from Portugal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Portugal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Portugal...

112

CO2 Emissions - Paraguay  

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Paraguay Graphics CO2 Emissions from Paraguay Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Paraguay image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Paraguay...

113

CO2 Emissions - Macedonia  

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Western Europe Macedonia CO2 Emissions from Macedonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macedonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macedonia...

114

CO2 Emissions - Malawi  

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Malawi Graphics CO2 Emissions from Malawi Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malawi image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malawi...

115

CO2 Emissions - Gabon  

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Africa Gabon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gabon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gabon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gabon...

116

CO2 Emissions - Grenada  

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Grenada Graphics CO2 Emissions from Grenada Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Grenada image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Grenada...

117

CO2 Emissions - Kiribati  

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Oceania Kiribati Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kiribati Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kiribati image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kiribati...

118

CO2 Emissions - Israel  

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Israel Graphics CO2 Emissions from Israel Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Israel image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Israel...

119

CO2 Emissions - Phillippines  

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120

CO2 Emissions - Niger  

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Africa Niger Graphics CO2 Emissions from Niger Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Niger image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Niger...

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121

CO2 Emissions - Mauritius  

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Africa Mauritius Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritius Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritius image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritius...

122

CO2 Emissions - Malaysia  

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Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malaysia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malaysia...

123

CO2 Emissions - Reunion  

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Reunion Graphics CO2 Emissions from Reunion Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Reunion image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Reunion...

124

CO2 Emissions - Guatemala  

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Guatemala Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guatemala Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guatemala image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guatemala...

125

CO2 Emissions - Iceland  

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Iceland CO2 Emissions from Iceland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iceland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iceland...

126

CO2 Emissions - Mongolia  

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Asia Mongolia CO2 Emissions from Mongolia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mongolia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mongolia...

127

CO2 Emissions - Romania  

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Centrally Planned Europe Romania CO2 Emissions from Romania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Romania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Romania...

128

CO2 Emissions - Panama  

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Panama Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Panama...

129

CO2 Emissions - Madagascar  

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Madagascar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Madagascar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Madagascar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Madagascar...

130

CO2 Emissions - Netherlands  

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Netherlands CO2 Emissions from Netherlands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherlands image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Netherlands...

131

CO2 Emissions - Greenland  

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Greenland Graphics CO2 Emissions from Greenland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greenland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greenland...

132

CO2 Emissions - Norway  

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Norway CO2 Emissions from Norway Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Norway image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Norway...

133

CO2 Emissions - Guyana  

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Guyana Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guyana Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guyana image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guyana...

134

CO2 Emissions - Mauritania  

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Africa Mauritania Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritania...

135

CO2 Emissions - Lithuania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Lithuania CO2 Emissions from Lithuania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lithuania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lithuania...

136

CO2 Emissions - Kenya  

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Africa Kenya Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kenya Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kenya image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kenya...

137

CO2 Emissions - Latvia  

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Centrally Planned Europe Latvia CO2 Emissions from Latvia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Latvia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Latvia...

138

CO2 Emissions - Georgia  

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Centrally Planned Europe Georgia CO2 Emissions from Georgia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Georgia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Georgia...

139

CO2 Emissions - Gambia  

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Gambia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gambia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gambia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gambia...

140

CO2 Emissions - Montenegro  

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Centrally Planned Europe Montenegro CO2 Emissions from Montenegro Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montenegro image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Montenegro...

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141

CO2 Emissions - Oman  

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Middle East Oman Graphics CO2 Emissions from Oman Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Oman image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Oman...

142

CO2 Emissions - Kuwait  

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Middle East Kuwait Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kuwait Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kuwait image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kuwait...

143

CO2 Emissions - Lebanon  

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Middle East Lebanon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Lebanon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lebanon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lebanon...

144

CO2 Emissions - Nigeria  

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Africa Nigeria Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nigeria Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nigeria image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nigeria...

145

CO2 Emissions - Maldives  

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Far East Maldives CO2 Emissions from Maldives Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Maldives image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Maldives...

146

CO2 Emissions - Morocco  

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Morocco Graphics CO2 Emissions from Morocco Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Morocco image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Morocco...

147

CO2 Emissions - Pakistan  

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Far East Pakistan CO2 Emissions from Pakistan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Pakistan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Pakistan...

148

CO2 Emissions - Palau  

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Oceania Palau CO2 Emissions from Palau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Palau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Palau...

149

CO2 Emissions - Qatar  

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Middle East Qatar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Qatar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Qatar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Qatar...

150

CO2 Emissions - Guam  

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Oceania Guam Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guam Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guam image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guam...

151

CO2 Emissions - Rwanda  

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Africa Rwanda Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rwanda Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rwanda image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Rwanda...

152

CO2 Emissions - Guinea  

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Africa Guinea Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea...

153

CO2 Emissions - Luxembourg  

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Western Europe Luxembourg CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Luxembourg...

154

CO2 Emissions - Liberia  

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Africa Liberia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Liberia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Liberia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Liberia...

155

CO2 Emissions - Haiti  

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Haiti Graphics CO2 Emissions from Haiti Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Haiti image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Haiti...

156

CO2 Emissions - Iraq  

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Iraq Graphics CO2 Emissions from Iraq Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iraq image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iraq...

157

CO2 Emissions - Hungary  

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Centrally Planned Europe Hungary CO2 Emissions from Hungary Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hungary image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hungary...

158

CO2 Emissions - Nepal  

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Far East Nepal CO2 Emissions from Nepal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nepal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nepal...

159

CO2 Emissions - Nauru  

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Nauru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nauru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nauru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nauru...

160

CO2 Emissions - Myanmar  

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Myanmar CO2 Emissions from Myanmar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Myanmar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Myanmar...

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161

Glossary Term - Neutron Emission  

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Neutron Previous Term (Neutron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Niobe) Niobe Neutron Emission After neutron emission, an atom contains one less neutron. Neutron emission is one...

162

CO2 Emissions - Jordan  

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Middle East Jordan Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jordan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jordan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Jordan...

163

CO2 Emissions - Greece  

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Western Europe Greece CO2 Emissions from Greece Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greece image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greece...

164

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Cesium  

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microseconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay No Data Available 114 0.57 seconds Electron Capture 99.98% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 8.70% Electron Capture...

165

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Technetium  

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85 0.5 seconds Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 86 54 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission No Data Available 87...

166

Shielding measurements for a 230 MeV proton beam  

SciTech Connect

Energetic secondary neutrons produced as protons interact with accelerator components and patients dominate the radiation shielding environment for proton radiotherapy facilities. Due to the scarcity of data describing neutron production, attenuation, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent values, these parameters were measured for 230 MeV proton bombardment of stopping length Al, Fe, and Pb targets at emission angles of 0{degree}, 22{degree}, 45{degree}, and 90{degree} in a thick concrete shield. Low pressure tissue-equivalent proportional counters with volumes ranging from 1 cm{sup 3} to 1000 cm{sup 3} were used to obtain microdosimetric spectra from which absorbed dose and radiation quality are deduced. Does equivalent values and attenuation lengths determined at depth in the shield were found to vary sharply with angle, but were found to be independent of target material. Neutron dose and radiation length values are compared with Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations performed using the Los Alamos High Energy Transport Code (LAHET). Calculations used 230 MeV protons incident upon an Fe target in a shielding geometry similar to that used in the experiment. LAHET calculations overestimated measured attenuation values at 0{degree}, 22{degree}, and 45{degree}, yet correctly predicted the attenuation length at 90{degree}. Comparison of the mean radiation quality estimated with the Monte Carlo calculations with measurements suggest that neutron quality factors should be increased by a factor of 1.4. These results are useful for the shielding design of new facilities as well as for testing neutron production and transport calculations.

Siebers, J.V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Can we delay a greenhouse warming  

SciTech Connect

The author comments on the EPA report dated September 1983 Can We Delay A Greenhouse Warming. He takes exception to the widely-held interpretation that the answer is not much. The contribution of other greenhouse gases such as methane and nitrous oxide to the EPA scenarios is pointed out, and the lack of understanding of their role is emphasised. (ACR)

Perry, A.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

On reducing energy management delays in disks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprise computing systems consume a large amount of energy, the cost of which contributes significantly to the operating budget. Consequently, dynamic energy management techniques are prevalent. Unfortunately, dynamic energy management for disks impose ... Keywords: Disk energy management, Peer memory sharing, Spin-up delay reduction

Krish K.R., Guanying Wang, Puranjoy Bhattacharjee, Ali R. Butt, Chris Gniady

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

CO2 Emissions - Namibia  

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Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Africa Namibia CO2 Emissions from Namibia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Namibia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

170

Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials A method of producing a proton conducting material. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials A method of producing a proton conducting material, comprising adding a pyrophosphate salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved pyrophosphate salt; adding an inorganic acid salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved inorganic acid salt; adding the dissolved inorganic acid salt to the dissolved pyrophosphate salt to produce a mixture; substantially evaporating the solvent from the mixture to produce a precipitate; and calcining the precipitate at a temperature of from about 400.degree. C. to about

171

Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

Pomes, R.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Redlands, CA); Olsen, Howard B. (Colton, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

173

Photoproduction of proton antiproton resonances  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results are reported on the reaction {gamma}p {yields} pp{bar p}. The data were obtained at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility utilizing the CLAS detector and a tagged photon beam of 4.8 to 5.2 GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The focus of this study is to search for possible intermediate resonances which decay to {bar p}p. Both final state protons were detected in CLAS whereas the antiproton was identified via missing mass. General features of the accepted data are presented.

P. Eugenio

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (San Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Longmeadow, MA); Olsen, Howard B. (Irvine, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

175

Proton beam therapy control system  

SciTech Connect

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

176

Proton beam therapy control system  

SciTech Connect

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

177

SuperProtonic | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name SuperProtonic Place Pasadena, California Zip 91101 Product Established to market and commercialize the solid acid fuel cell (SAFC) technology developed and patented by...

178

Recent Development in Proton Spin Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development in Proton Spin Physics Feng YUAN [8] H. Jackson,investigations. These important physics, together with otherthat the transverse spin physics is playing a very important

Yuan, Feng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Low temperature proton conducting oxide devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for conducting protons at a temperature below 550.degree. C. includes a LAMOX ceramic body characterized by an alpha crystalline structure.

Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Payzant, Edward A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Speakman, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Greenblatt, Martha (Highland Park, NJ)

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

180

Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project  

SciTech Connect

Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

2004-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project  

SciTech Connect

Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

182

Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer  

SciTech Connect

The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

Rasmussen, Paul (Livermore, CA); Bernhardt, Anthony (Berkeley, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Simultaneous multiparticle emissions in hot nuclei evaporation process  

SciTech Connect

This work presents a new mechanism for the evaporation with simultaneous particles emission mechanism in the evaporation chain as new channels opened to high excitation energy regime of the compound nucleus. The probability of multiple simultaneous emissions is determined based on phase space approach. A Monte Carlo simulation is employed to compute the final average yield of emitted particles after the decay chain. The neutron, proton, alpha and fission yields are obtained and compared to the conventional calculation with sequential simple particles emission and the relevance of the different channels in competition is also analyzed.

Santos, B. M. [Instituto de Fisica - Universidade Federal Fluminense Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, 24210-346 Niteroi. RJ (Brazil); De Assis, L. P.; Duarte, S. B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas - CBPF Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro. RJ (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

184

High-level test synthesis for delay fault testability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-level test synthesis (HLTS) method targeted for delay fault testability is presented. The proposed method, when combined with hierarchical test pattern generation for embedded modules, guarantees 100% delay test coverage for detectable faults ...

Sying-Jyan Wang; Tung-Hua Yeh

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

On proton CT reconstruction using MVCT-converted virtual proton projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe a novel methodology of converting megavoltage x-ray projections into virtual proton projections that are otherwise missing due to the proton range limit. These converted virtual proton projections can be used in the reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). Methods: Relations exist between proton projections and multispectral megavoltage x-ray projections for human tissue. Based on these relations, these tissues can be categorized into: (a) adipose tissue; (b) nonadipose soft tissues; and (c) bone. These three tissue categories can be visibly identified on a regular megavoltage x-ray computed tomography (MVCT) image. With an MVCT image and its projection data available, the x-ray projections through heterogeneous anatomy can be converted to the corresponding proton projections using predetermined calibration curves for individual materials, aided by a coarse segmentation on the x-ray CT image. To show the feasibility of this approach, mathematical simulations were carried out. The converted proton projections, plotted on a proton sinogram, were compared to the simulated ground truth. Proton stopping power images were reconstructed using either the virtual proton projections only or a blend of physically available proton projections and virtual proton projections that make up for those missing due to the range limit. These images were compared to a reference image reconstructed from theoretically calculated proton projections. Results: The converted virtual projections had an uncertainty of {+-}0.8% compared to the calculated ground truth. Proton stopping power images reconstructed using a blend of converted virtual projections (48%) and physically available projections (52%) had an uncertainty of {+-}0.86% compared with that reconstructed from theoretically calculated projections. Reconstruction solely from converted virtual proton projections had an uncertainty of {+-}1.1% compared with that reconstructed from theoretical projections. If these images are used for treatment planning, the average proton range uncertainty is estimated to be less than 1.5% for an imaging dose in the milligray range. Conclusions: The proposed method can be used to convert x-ray projections into virtual proton projections. The converted proton projections can be blended with existing proton projections or can be used solely for pCT reconstruction, addressing the range limit problem of pCT using current therapeutic proton machines.

Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T. Rockwell; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Morgridge Institute of Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Oncophysics Institute, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

PRODUCTION OF HIGH BRIGHTNESS PROTON BUNCHES.  

SciTech Connect

Strongly pulsed proton beams for secondary beam production are required for projects such as pulsed spallation neutron sources or neutrino factories where accurate time-of-flight information is required. To meet these demands techniques to produce multi-GeV proton bunches with very high longitudinal brightness are being developed. A review of the present status is presented.

ROSER,T.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

187

Transverse instability in high intensity proton rings  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, many applications are being considered for low energy high intensity proton synchrotrons. Most high intensity proton rings are at low energy below transition. Several aspects of the beam dynamics of this kind of rings are different from the electron or high energy rings. The transverse microwave instabilities will be discussed in this article.

Zhang, S.Y.; Weng, W.T.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

BEAM SCRUBBING FOR RHIC POLARIZED PROTON RUN.  

SciTech Connect

One of the intensity limiting factor of RHIC polarized proton beam is the electron cloud induced pressure rise. A beam scrubbing study shows that with a reasonable period of time of running high intensity 112-bunch proton beam, the pressure rise can be reduced, allowing higher beam intensity.

ZHANG,S.Y.FISCHER,W.HUANG,H.ROSER,T.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

Bayesian Inference Underlies the Contraction Bias in Delayed Comparison Tasks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Delayed comparison tasks are widely used in the study of working memory and perception in psychology and neuroscience.

Ashourian, Paymon

190

Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

Elangovan, S. (South Jordan, UT); Nair, Balakrishnan G. (Sandy, UT); Small, Troy (Midvale, UT); Heck, Brian (Salt Lake City, UT)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

191

Forward correction and fountain codes in delay-tolerant networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delay-tolerant ad hoc networks leverage the mobility of relay nodes to compensate for lack of permanent connectivity and thus enable communication between nodes that are out of range of each other. To decrease delivery delay, the information to be delivered ... Keywords: delay-tolerant networks (DTNs), forward correction, fountain codes, mobile ad hoc networks

Eitan Altman; Francesco De Pellegrini

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Diffuse TeV Emission at the Galactic Centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The High-Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) has detected intense diffuse TeV emission correlated with the distribution of molecular gas along the galactic ridge at the centre of our Galaxy. Earlier HESS observations of this region had already revealed the presence of several point sources at these energies, one of them (HESS J1745-290) coincident with the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A*. It is still not entirely clear what the origin of the TeV emission is, nor even whether it is due to hadronic or leptonic interactions. It is reasonable to suppose, however, that at least for the diffuse emission, the tight correlation of the intensity distribution with the molecular gas indicates a pionic-decay process involving relativistic protons. In this paper, we explore the possible source(s) of energetic hadrons at the galactic centre, and their propagation through a turbulent medium. We conclude that though Sagittarius A* itself may be the source of cosmic rays producing the emission in HESS J1745-290, it cannot be responsible for the diffuse emission farther out. A distribution of point sources, such as pulsar wind nebulae dispersed along the galactic plane, similarly do not produce a TeV emission profile consistent with the HESS map. We conclude that only a relativistic proton distribution accelerated throughout the inter-cloud medium can account for the TeV emission profile measured with HESS.

Elizabeth Wommer; Fulvio Melia; Marco Fatuzzo

2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

193

Delayed neutrons from the neutron irradiation of ?U  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of experiments was performed with the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) to verify ?U delayed neutron emission rates. A custom device was created to accurately measure a sample's pneumatic flight time and the Nuclear Science Center's (NSC's) pneumatic transfer system (PTS) was redesigned to reduce a sample's pneumatic flight time from over 1,600 milliseconds to less than 450 milliseconds. Four saturation irradiations were performed at reactor powers of 100 and 200 kW for 300 seconds and one burst irradiation was performed using a $1.61 pulse producing 19.11 MW-s of energy. Experimental results agreed extremely well with those of Keepin. By comparing the first ten seconds of collected data, the first saturation irradiation deviated ~1.869% with a dead time of 2 microseconds, while the burst irradiation deviated ~0.303% with a dead time of 5 microseconds. Saturation irradiations one, three and four were normalized to the initial count rate of saturation irradiation two to determine the system reproducibility, and deviated ~0.449%, ~0.343% and ~0.389%, respectively.

Heinrich, Aaron David

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13 percent). U.S. nitrous oxide emissions rose from 1990 to 1994, fell from 1994 to 2002, and returned to an upward trajectory from 2003 to 2007, largely as a result of increased use of synthetic fertilizers. Fertilizers are the primary contributor of emissions from nitrogen fertilization of soils, which grew by more than 30 percent from

195

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential wood consumption accounted for just over 45 percent of U.S. methane emissions from stationary combustion in 2009.

196

CO2 Emissions - Peru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Peru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Peru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

197

CO2 Emissions - Bolivia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Bolivia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Bolivia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Bolivia image Per capita CO2 Emission...

198

CO2 Emissions - Jamaica  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Jamaica Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jamaica Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jamaica image Per capita CO2 Emission...

199

SF6 Emission Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emission Reduction Steve Lowder Bonneville Power Administration 2010.09 slide 1 Emission Reduction Emission Reduction is the reason for why we do all of this - because:...

200

Generalized parton distributions in proton-proton collisions at LHC  

SciTech Connect

Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) describe the distributions of quarks and gluons in the proton with respect to both longitudinal momentum and transverse position. The transverse spatial distributions of partons can be extracted from measurements of the t-dependence of hard exclusive processes in e-p scattering, such as J/psi photoproduction at HERA (gluons). This information is an important ingredient in the theory of high-energy p-p collisions with hard QCD processes (dijets, Higgs boson production). We summarize recent results obtained from applying these ideas to (a) inclusive p-p scattering (hard processes as a trigger on central collisions, approach to the unitarity limit), (b) diffractive p-p scattering (rapidity gap survival, Higgs boson search at LHC). We also comment on the possibilities of using high-energy p-p scattering with hard processes as a means to ''measure'' the GPDs, complementing the information obtained from e-p scattering.

Christian Weiss

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project  

SciTech Connect

Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking. The following deliverables are scheduled from the two projects of the three-year JIP: (1) A novel method for enhancing liquid yields from delayed cokers and data that provide insight as to the optimum temperature to remove hydrogen sulfide from furnace gases. (2) An understanding of what causes foaming in c

Michael Volk Jr; Keith Wisecarver

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Phase-flip and amplitude death in time delay systems with delayed feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a network of delay dynamical systems connected in a ring via unidirectional positive feedback with the delay in coupling being modulated in time. For the specific case of Mackey-Glass systems on the ring topology, we capture the phenomena of amplitude death, synchronization and phase-flip bifurcation in our model as the relevant parameters are tuned. Using linear stability analysis we predict the region of amplitude death in the parameter space and study the nature of transitions between the different states. For a large number of systems in the same dynamical configuration, we observe splay states, mixed splay states and phase locked clusters.

Chiranjit Mitra; G. Ambika; Soumitro Banerjee

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

203

Effects of delaying the operation of a nuclear power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a study of an actual 24-month nuclear power plant licensing delay. A representative utility was chosen for examination. The research was oriented toward determination of the licensing delay's impact on the utility's operating results, ratepayers, and security issues. The methodology utilized to estimate those impacts involved the recursive interaction of a generation costing program to estimate replacement fuel costs and a financial regulatory model to concomitantly determine the impact on the utility, its ratepayers and security issues. The latter model was executed under six alternate scenarios: (1) no delay in the plant's operation; (2) a 24-month delay; (3) a 24-month delay but further assuming all replacement power was generated by coal-fired plants; (4) a 24-month delay assuming all replacement power from oil-fired plants; (5) no delay but assuming the capital cost of the plant was twice as large; and (6) a 24-month delay with the capital cost of the plant twice as large. Three primary conclusions were made. First, under all scenarios, a 24-month delay in operation of the plant has an adverse impact on the utility's internal generation of funds. Second, although electricity rates are not appreciably affected by the delay, the direction of electricity price changes is contingent on the source of fuel used for replacement power. Finally, a 24-month delay has an adverse impact on the indicators used to evaluate the financial soundness of the utility in all cases under consideration.

Hill, L.J.; Rainey, J.A.; Tepel, R.C.; Van Dyke, J.W.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Polarized proton acceleration program at the AGS  

SciTech Connect

The unexpected importance of high energy spin effects and the success of the ZGS in correcting many intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances led us to attempt to accelerate polarized protons in the AGS. A multi-university/laboratory collaborative effort involving Argonne, Brookhaven, Michigan, Rice and Yale is underway to improve and modify to accelerate polarized protons. From the experience at the ZGS and careful studies made us confident of the feasibility of achieving a polarization of over 60 percent up to 26 GeV/c with an intensity of 10/sup 11/ approx. 10/sup 12/ per pulse. The first polarized proton acceleration at the AGS is expected in 1983.

Lee, Y.Y.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Proton Radiography: Its uses and Resolution Scaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory has used high energy protons as a probe in flash radiography for over a decade. In this time the proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons, provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose over five-hundred dynamic experiments in support of stockpile stewardship programs as well as basic materials science. Through this effort significant experience has been gained in using charged particles as direct radiographic probes to diagnose transient systems. The results of this experience will be discussed through the presentation of data from experiments recently performed at the LANL pRad.

Mariam, Fesseha G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

Attosecond neutron Compton scattering from protons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of "anomalous" scattering of neutrons and electrons from protons in the electron-volt energy-transfer range is considered, and related experimental results are mentioned. A recent independent confirmation of this effect with a new data analysis procedure is presented. Due to the very short characteristic scattering time, there is no well defined separation of time scales of electronic and protonic motions. An outline of a proposed theoretical interpretation is presented, which is based on the fact that scattering protons represent \\textit{open} quantum systems, thus being subject to decoherence.

C. Aris Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

CO2 Emissions - Montserrat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Montserrat Graphics CO2 Emissions from Montserrat Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montserrat image Per capita CO2...

208

CO2 Emissions - Martinique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Martinique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Martinique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Martinique image Per capita CO2...

209

CO2 Emissions - Honduras  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Honduras Graphics CO2 Emissions from Honduras Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Honduras image Per capita CO2...

210

CO2 Emissions - Nicaragua  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Nicaragua Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua image Per capita CO2...

211

Trends Online Methane Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Introduction Annual Estimates of Global Anthropogenic Methane Emissions: 1860-1994 - D.I. Stern and R.K. Kaufmann Contents-Trends | CDIAC Home 102001...

212

Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus that can reduce the apparent coherence length of a laser beam so the beam can be used with an inexpensive homogenizer to produce an output beam with a uniform spatial intensity across its entire cross section. It is a further object of the invention to provide an improved homogenizer with a variable aperture size that is simple and easily made. It is still an additional object of the invention to provide an improved liquid filled homogenizer utilizing total internal reflection for improved efficiency. These, and other objects of the invention are realized by using a ``coherence delay line,`` according to the present invention, in series between a laser and a homogenizer. The coherence delay line is an optical ``line`` that comprises two mirrors, one partially reflecting, and one totally reflecting, arranged so that light incident from the laser first strikes the partially reflecting mirror. A portion of the beam passes through, and a portion is reflected back to the totally reflecting mirror.

Rasmussen, P.; Bernhardt, A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Proton trajectories and electric fields in a laser-accelerated focused proton beam  

SciTech Connect

The focusing properties of a laser generated proton beam have been investigated using hemispherical targets in both freestanding and enclosed cone-shaped geometries. The proton trajectories and focusing were strongly affected by the electric fields in the beam, bending the trajectories near the axis. In the cone targets, a sheath field effectively channels the proton beam through the open cone tip, substantially improving the beam focusing from Almost-Equal-To 90 {mu}m to Almost-Equal-To 55 {mu}m diameter for protons with energies >3 MeV. The proton generation and focusing were modeled using 2D hybrid particle-in-cell simulations, which compared well with the experimental results. Simulations predict further improvement in focusing with more uniform target illumination. These results are of significant interest to proton fast ignition and other high energy density physics applications.

Foord, M. E.; Bellei, C.; Key, M.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H. S.; Jarrott, L. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Bartal, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Flippo, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Stephens, R. B.; Wei, M. S. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Beg, F. N. [University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

215

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

controlling NOx emissions from lean engines is challenging. Traditionally, for the stoichiometric gasoline engine vehicles that dominate the U.S. passenger car market, a three-way...

216

A compact electron cyclotron resonance proton source for the Paul Scherrer Institute's proton accelerator facility  

SciTech Connect

A compact electron cyclotron resonance proton source has been developed and installed recently at thePaul Scherrer Institute's high intensity proton accelerator. Operation at the ion source test stand and the accelerator demonstrates a high reliability and stability of the new source. When operated at a 10 - 12 mA net proton current the lifetime of the source exceeds 2000 h. The essential development steps towards the observed performance are described.

Baumgarten, C.; Barchetti, A.; Einenkel, H.; Goetz, D.; Schmelzbach, P. A. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Memory device using movement of protons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An enhancement of an electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure during an anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. Device operation is enhanced by concluding this anneal step with a sudden cooling. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronics elements on the same silicon substrate.

Warren, William L. (900 N. Randolph St., Arlington, VA 22203); Vanheusden, Karel J. R. (8401 Spain Rd., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Fleetwood, Daniel M. (5513 Estrellita del Norte, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Devine, Roderick A. B. (12 Impasse de la Liberation, 38950 St. Martin le Vinoux, FR); Archer, Leo B. (3108 Vicky Ct., Garland, TX 75044); Brown, George A. (1512 Ridgeview Dr., Arlington, TX 76012-1940); Wallace, Robert M. (428 Park Bend Dr., Richardson, TX 75081)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Resolution of the Proton Spin Problem  

SciTech Connect

A number of lines of investigation into the structure of the nucleon have converged to the point where we believe that one has a consistent explanation of the well known proton spin crisis.

F. Myhrer; A. W. Thomas

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

219

Low energy neutron-proton interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There have been few measurements of cross sections for neutron-proton scattering and radiative capture below 1 MeV. Those measurements which do exist are at a small number of energies and are often inconsistent with ...

Daub, Brian (Brian Hollenberg)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Magellan Tackles the Mysterious Proton Spin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magellan Tackles Magellan Tackles Mysterious Proton Spin Magellan Tackles Mysterious Proton Spin July 28, 2011 | Tags: Accelerator Science, Data Transfer, ESnet, Magellan Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 The STAR experiment's detector records the decay of subatomic smash-ups to uncover how the fundamental building blocks of the universe work. What makes a proton spin? That is one of the biggest mysteries in physics. Although researchers do not fully understand the underlying physics of this phenomenon, they do know that it contributes to the stability of the universe, magnetic interactions, and are a vital component of technologies like Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machines that are used in hospitals around the globe. To solve this mystery, researchers are smashing together polarized proton

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Physics at a new Fermilab proton driver  

SciTech Connect

In 2004, motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics, the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future. At the end of 2004 the APS ''Study on the Physics of Neutrinos'' concluded that the future US neutrino program should have, as one of its components, ''A proton driver in the megawatt class or above and neutrino superbeam with an appropriate very large detector capable of observing Cp violation and measuring the neutrino mass-squared differences and mixing parameters with high precision''. The presently proposed Fermilab Proton Driver is designed to accomplish these goals, and is based on, and would help develop, Linear Collider technology. In this paper the Proton Driver parameters are summarized, and the potential physics program is described.

Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Memory device using movement of protons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element.

Warren, William L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vanheusden, Karel J. R. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleetwood, Daniel M. (Albuquerque, NM); Devine, Roderick A. B. (St. Martin le Vinoux, FR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

FIRST POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.  

SciTech Connect

We successfully injected polarized protons in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. Each snake consists of four helical superconducting dipoles which rotate the polarization by 180{sup o} about a horizontal axis. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV.

ROSER,T.; AHRENS,L.; ALESSI,J.; BAI,M.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BROWN,K.A.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.D.; DREES,A.; FISCHER,W.; FLILLER,R.,III: GLENN,W.; HUANG,H.; LUCCIO,A.U.; MACKAY,W.W.; MAKDISI,Y.; MONTAG,C.; PILAT,F.; PTITSYN,V.; SATOGATA,T.

2002-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

224

Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration  

SciTech Connect

How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

Lehman, S K

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

225

Cross section and recoil properties of copper isotopes from uranium bombarded with 12-GeV protons  

SciTech Connect

Cross sections and thick-target recoil properties have been measured on of /sup 238/U with protons. The kinetic energies are much smaller than expected From a conventional fission process, even for the neutron-rich /sup 67/Cu. It is proposed thai these Cu nuclides are produced at proton energies above 3 GeV by the fission of low mass nuclei which are the residues of an intranuclear cascade process involving high deposition energy and the emission of fragments prior to fission both in the fast cascade and the evaporation stage. (auth)

Chang, S.K.; Sugarman, N.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Delayed neutron measurements for Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron emission rates from five very pure actinide samples (Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium) were measured following equilibrium irradiation in fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The relative abundances (alphas) for the first four groups were calculated from the delayed neutron emission (counts vs. time) data using Keepin's 6-group decay constants (lambdas) for Th-232, Pu-239 and depleted uranium (both fast and thermal neutron induced fissions). The relative abundances (alphas) for the first five groups were calculated for the fast neutron induced fission of Np-237 using the 7-group lambdas obtained by Charlton (1997). The relative abundances for the first five groups were also calculated using the 7-group lambdas proposed by Loaiza and Haskin (2000), the 8-group lambdas proposed by Campbell and Spriggs (1998) and the 8-group lambdas proposed by Piksaikin (2000) for all of the samples (fast neutron induced fission only for Th-232 and Np-237, fast and thermal neutron induced fission for the remainder). Fission product yield and delayed neutron emission probability data from the ENDF-349 and JEF 2.2 nuclear data libraries were also used to simulate neutron emission data from the samples. The calculated neutron yield curves were used to obtain group relative abundances for each of the five actinide samples (fast neutron induced fission only for Th-232 and Np-237, fast and thermal neutron induced fission for the remainder) based on each set of proposed lambdas. The relative abundances obtained from the experiments and calculations are compared and the differences are noted and discussed.

Stone, Joseph C.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

Rauch, Philipp J. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Faculty of Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Park, Henry S. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Knisely, Jonathan P.S. [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York (United States); Chiang, Veronica L. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Vortmeyer, Alexander O., E-mail: alexander.vortmeyer@yale.edu [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Microsecond delays on non-real time operating systems  

SciTech Connect

We have developed microsecond timing and profiling software that runs on standard Windows and Linux based operating systems. This software is orders of magnitudes better than most of the standard native functions in wide use. Our software libraries calibrate RDTSC in microseconds or seconds to provide two different types of delays: a ''Guaranteed Minimum'' and a precision ''Long Delay'', which releases to the kernel. Both return profiling information of the actual delay.

Angstadt, R.; Estrada, J.; Diehl, H.T.; Flaugher, B.; Johnson, M.; /Fermilab

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Delayed Start or Cancellation of Business Hours | Argonne National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Twitter Delayed Start or Cancellation of Business Hours Winter Road Closings Winter Weather FAQs Westgate Alternate Routes Reporting IllegalUnethical Activity Working Remotely...

230

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil production dropping by 28 percent from 1990 to 2009, methane emissions from petroleum exploration and production have declined by the same percentage. Residential wood...

231

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels (for purposes other than their energy value) create carbon dioxide emissions and also sequester carbon in nonfuel products, ...

232

SSPC (Solid State Proton Conductors 15 Meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The field of solid state protonics has had a small but dedicated following for the past several decades. The collection of papers compiled in this special issue of Solid State Ionics were presented at the most recent international conference focused specifically on this topic, the 15th International Conference on Solid State Proton Conductors (SSPC-15) held in Santa Barbara, California, United States, August 15-20, 2010. Early recognition of the importance of proton transport in solids led to the establishment of the first meeting in this series in 1981, held in Paris in the form of a Danish-Frenchworkshop. The subsequent thirteen meetingswere all held inWestern Europe,with increasing participation from Asian, Eastern European and North and South American researchers. In recognition of the growing international interest in the field, SSPC-14 was held in Kyoto, Japan. SSPC-15, the first North American meeting in this series, built on the momentum of internationalization achieved in SSPC-14, ensuring that the best and brightest minds continue to contribute to the important problems still facing the understanding and manipulation of proton transport in solids. This occasion warrants an update to the SSPC history, and is given. Overall, the oxide proton conductors were the topic of greatest interest, reflecting the deep history of Japanese involvement in these materials. Critical advances were described in both the understanding of the transport properties and the fabrication of technological devices, with particular emphasis on fuel cells. Interest in polymer and oxyacid proton conductors was also high, as with previous meetings. Again, advances in fundamental mechanistic understanding of proton transport pathways were reported in parallel with advances in device development. While only a subset of papers presented at SSPC-15 are included in this special issue, the articles reflect the breadth of topics covered. The reader is encouraged to browse the papers beyond his or her area of expertise to experience directly the remarkable breakthroughs reported at SSPC-15.

Speakers; Shu Yamaguchi; George Rossman; M. Saiful Islam; Maria Gomez; Stephen Paddison

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

233

Proton damage effects on light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the effects of 16-MeV proton irradiation on the performance of a variety of light emitting diodes (LED's) emitting between 820 and 1300 nm. Total light output and current were measured at room temperature as a function of forward bias prior to and following a sequence of room temperature 16-MeV proton irradiations. Our results indicate that the relative amount of proton-induced degradation from one LED type to another is similar to that observed for neutron and gamma irradiations. More specifically, the most sensitive device is the amphoterically Si-doped GaAs LED which is characterized by a long preirradiation minority carrier lifetime. The most resistant LEDs are the high radiance GaAlAs (820 nm) and InGaAsP (1300 nm) LEDs. As in the case of Si devices, the degradation rate per irradiating particle fluence is significantly greater for proton irradiation of these LEDs than it is for neutron exposure. Neutron damage data presented herein indicate that the ratio of proton-to-neutron degradation rates can be as high as 100. Lifetime-damage constant products for constant current operation are calculated for each LED type and vary from 1.5 x 10/sup -13/ cm/sup 2//p for the InGaAsP LED to 1.1 x 10/sup -10/ cm/sup 2//p for the amphoterically Si-doped GaAs LED.

Rose, B.H.; Barnes, C.E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Upgrade of the Proton West secondary beamline  

SciTech Connect

As originally designed and operated, protons entering PW6 were steered by a series of EPB dipoles into a single interaction length beryllium target, some 43 feet from the enclosure wall. Ensuing secondary beams, either p{sup +}/{pi}{sup +} or p{sup -}/{pi}{sup -}, were collected by a string of quadrupoles following the target, steered westward, away from the Proton Center line, through PW6 and PW7, and ultimately focussed on experiment production targets located within the large PW8 hall. Around the Spring of 1988 it was decided to upgrade the existing Proton West secondary beamline to allow for transport of a primary proton beam, anticipated to be either 800 or 900 GeV/c, through PW8. This upgrade project, which is now nearing completion, was largely motivated by the then recent approval of E-771, a hadronic beauty production experiment located in PW8. E-771 represents the third in a series of experiments for the large-acceptance dimuon spectrometer presently located at the end of the Proton West beamline. This Technical Memo is a summary of the upgrade --- an explanation of the underlying strategy and a documentation of the final locations of the secondary beamline elements. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Spiegel, L.

1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

235

EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN POSITRON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

26-29, 1979 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION INLBL-9783 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION INl. LBL-9783 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN

Gullberg, G.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Oorja Protonics Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oorja Protonics Inc Oorja Protonics Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Oorja Protonics Inc Place Fremont, California Zip 94538 Product Manufacturer of direct methanol fuel cells. Coordinates 44.2605°, -88.880509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.2605,"lon":-88.880509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

237

Proton radius puzzle and large extra dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a theoretical scenario to solve the proton radius puzzle which recently arises from the muonic hydrogen experiment. In this framework, 4 + n dimensional theory is incorporated with modified gravity. The extra gravitational interaction between the proton and muon at very short range provides an energy shift which accounts for the discrepancy between spectroscopic results from muonic and electronic hydrogen experiments. Assuming the modified gravity is a small perturbation to the existing electromagnetic interaction, we find the puzzle can be solved with stringent constraint on the range of the new force. Our result not only provides a possible solution to the proton radius puzzle but also suggest a direction to test new physics at very small length scale.

Li-Bang Wang; Wei-Tou Ni

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

238

Estimating Beijing's travel delays at intersections with floating car data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we presented a technical framework to calculate the turn delays on road network with floating car data (FCD). Firstly the original FCD collected with GPS equipped taxies was cleaned and matched to a street map with a distributed system ... Keywords: float car data, intersection delay, principal curves, trajectory

Xiliang Liu; Feng Lu; Hengcai Zhang; Peiyuan Qiu

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Delay and resource analysis in MANETs in presence of throwboxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the delay analysis and resource consumption in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) equipped with throwboxes. Throwboxes are stationary, wireless devices that act as relays, and that are deployed to increase the connectivity between mobile ... Keywords: Delay analysis, MANET, Markov models, Mobility model, Throwbox

Mouhamad Ibrahim; Ahmad Al Hanbali; Philippe Nain

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Broadband optical delay with large dynamic range using atomic dispersion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a tunable all-optical delay line for pulses with optical frequency within the Rb $D_2$ absorption line. Pulses of 10 ns duration are delayed in a 10 cm hot vapour cell by up to 40 ns where the transmission reduces to approximately 10%. Using an optical frequency between absorption components from different isotopes allows the delay to be increased or decreased by optical pumping with a second laser, producing rapid tuning over a range more than 40% of the initial delay. We investigate the frequency and intensity ranges in which this delay line can be realised. Our observations are in good agreement with a numerical model of the system.

Vanner, M R; Sidorov, A I; Hannaford, P; Akulshin, A M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Metastability evaluation method by propagation delay distribution measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper suggests an experimental method for determining metastability properties based on deliberately inducing metastability in edge-triggered flip-flops. It offers the opportunity to analyze the impact of input signals time relationship on the output ... Keywords: MTBF, PLD, VLSI, analytical representation, asynchronous circuits, asynchronous logic, automatic data acquisition, complex architecture microsystems, custom CMOS, data acquisition, delays, edge-triggered flip-flops, failure analysis, fault diagnosis, fault events, flip-flop normal propagation delay, flip-flops, graphical representation, input signals time relationship, integrated circuit reliability, integrated propagation delay density distribution function, latch devices, logic design, logic testing, metastability, output signal timing characteristics, propagation delay density distribution function, propagation delay distribution measurement, reliability analysis, resolution time constant, statistical measurement

B. M. Rogina; B. Vojnovic

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Driving your vehicle can yield both greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from your vehicle's tailpipe and GHG emissions related to the production of the fuel used to power your vehicle. For example, activities associated with fuel production such as feedstock extraction, feedstock transport to a processing plant, and conversion of feedstock to motor fuel, as well as distribution of the motor fuel, can all produce GHG emissions. The Fuel Economy and Environment Label provides a Greenhouse Gas Rating, from 1 (worst) to 10 (best), based on the vehicle's tailpipe carbon dioxide emissions only, and this rating does not reflect any GHG emissions associated with fuel production.

243

Excess Emissions (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation establishes requirements for a source whose operation results in an excess emission and to establish criteria for a source whose operation results in an excess emission to claim an...

244

Ionic (Proton) Transport Hydrogen Separation Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Proton) (Proton) Transport Hydrogen Separation Systems Summary Session Participants -- Ionic Transport Balachandran, Balu Cornelius, Chris Fleming, Greg Glass, Robert Hartvigsen, Joseph Higgins, Richard King, David Paster, Mark Paul, Dilo Robbins, John Samells, Anthony Schwartz, Michael Schinski, Bill Smith, Ronald Van Bibber, Lawrence Zalesky, Rick Argonne National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Air Liquide Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Cerametec, Inc. CeraMem Corporation Battelle, PNNL DOE Science Applications International Corporation ExxonMobil Eltron Research, Inc. ITN Energy Systems ChevronTexaco SRI Consulting SAIC ChevronTexaco Technology Ventures Performance Goals 4-5 years (5 years upper limit) (100,000 hrs is 12 years) High durability 250-350

245

RHIC OPERATION WITH LONGITUDINALLY POLARIZED PROTONS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polarized proton beams have been accelerated, stored and collided at 100GeV per beam in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with longitudinal polarization. The essential equipment includes four Siberian snakes, eight spin rotators and fast relative polarimeters in each of the two RHIC rings as well as local polarimeters at the STAR and PHENIX detectors. This paper summarizes the performance of RHIC as a polarized proton collider in the FY03 run with emphasis on polarization issues. Preliminary data from the FY04 run is also shown.

HUANG,H.BAI,M.BEEBE-WANG,J.ET AL.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

246

Photo-Production of Proton Antiproton Pairs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are reported on the reaction gammap --> ppp-bar . A high statistic data set was obtained at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility utilizing the CLAS detector and a tagged photon beam of 4.8 to 5.2 GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The focus of this study was to search for possible intermediate resonances which decay to proton-antiproton. Both final state protons were detected in the CLAS apparatus whereas the antiproton was identified via missing mass. General features of the data are presented along with results on narrow and broad resonance studies.

Paul Eugenio; Burnham Stokes

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Nuclear fusion of protons with boron  

SciTech Connect

Two methods are investigated in this paper to convert the released fusion energy directly in electric power. The first is very simply the use of a beam of protons traversing a fixed target of Boron. Unfortunately this method cannot be made to work, but its investigation naturally yields to the second method which makes use of two beams, one of protons and one of ions of Boron, colliding with each other. This second method is feasible but it requires a significant amount of research and development in accelerator technology.

Ruggiero, A.G.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

CO2 Emissions - Guinea Bissau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guinea Bissau Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea Bissau...

249

CO2 Emissions - Peninsular Malaysia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Far East Peninsular Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia image Per...

250

CO2 Emissions - New Caledonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Caledonia Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Caledonia...

251

CO2 Emissions - United Korea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Centrally Planned Asia United Korea CO2 Emissions from United Korea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from United Korea...

252

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are calculated using the eGRID post 2006 emission factor for all subject years (1990-2009); the CA-CP Calculator uses a different (lower) factor (eGRID pre 2006) for years 1990-2006. WUSTL deviated from the CA-CP Calculator on this emission factor because using the pre and post eGRID factors skews GHG emissions

Dobbins, Ian G.

253

Small Business Innovation Research Award Success Story: Proton Energy Systems  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This success story describes Proton Energy Systems, a small business that designs and manufactures proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis sytems to produce hydrogen from water. The U.S. Departmen

254

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Proton Power Systems Plc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Proton Power Systems Plc Proton Power Systems Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name Proton Power Systems Plc Place Starnberg, Bavaria, Germany Zip D-82319 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product UK-based parent company of Proton Motor GmbH, which operates in Germany. The Company is engaged in developing hydrogen fuel cells and fuel cell hybrid systems. Coordinates 47.99959°, 11.342172° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.99959,"lon":11.342172,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

256

Proton Energy Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Proton Energy Systems Inc Proton Energy Systems Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Proton Energy Systems Inc Place Wallingford, Connecticut Zip 6492 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Develops, manufactures and sells proprietary Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) cell stacks and incorporates them into products that serve existing industrial infrastructure and the emerging hydrogen economy. Coordinates 43.473755°, -72.976925° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.473755,"lon":-72.976925,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

257

CHALLENGES FACING HIGH POWER PROTON ACCELERATORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges of high power proton accelerators such as SNS, J-PARC, etc., and what we have learned from recent experiences. Beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate beam loss will also be discussed.

Plum, Michael A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

PROTON RADIOGRAPHY FOR AN ADVANCED HYDROTEST FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of data from BNL experiment 933 is presented. Results demonstrate that proton radiography can meet many of the requirements for an Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF). Results for background, position resolution, metrology, quantitative radiography, material identification, and edge resolution are presented.

C. MORRIS

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Polarized proton target-IV. Operations manual  

SciTech Connect

Standard operating procedures are presented for the vacuum, cryogenic, and electronic systems of a polarized proton target. The systems are comprised of (1) a target cryostat; (2) a $sup 4$He pumping system; (3) a $sup 3$He pumping system; (4) a microwave system; (5) a magnet and power supply; (6) a computerized polarization monitor; and (7) miscellaneous auxiliary equipment. (PMA)

Hill, D.; Fletcher, O.; Moretti, A.; Onesto, F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Modeling biological systems with delays in Bio-PEPA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Delays in biological systems may be used to model events for which the underlying dynamics cannot be precisely observed, or to provide abstraction of some behavior of the system resulting more compact models. In this paper we enrich the stochastic process algebra Bio-PEPA, with the possibility of assigning delays to actions, yielding a new non-Markovian process algebra: Bio-PEPAd. This is a conservative extension meaning that the original syntax of Bio-PEPA is retained and the delay specification which can now be associated with actions may be added to existing Bio-PEPA models. The semantics of the firing of the actions with delays is the delay-as-duration approach, earlier presented in papers on the stochastic simulation of biological systems with delays. These semantics of the algebra are given in the Starting-Terminating style, meaning that the state and the completion of an action are observed as two separate events, as required by delays. Furthermore we outline how to perform stochastic simulation of Bio...

Caravagna, Giulio; 10.4204/EPTCS.40.7

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Delayed feedback control of fractional-order chaotic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the possibility to stabilize unstable steady states and unstable periodic orbits in chaotic fractional-order dynamical systems by the time-delayed feedback method. By performing a linear stability analysis, we establish the parameter ranges for successful stabilization of unstable equilibria in the plane parametrizad by the feedback gain and the time delay. An insight into the control mechanism is gained by analyzing the characteristic equation of the controlled system, showing that the control scheme fails to control unstable equilibria having an odd number of positive real eigenvalues. We demonstrate that the method can also stabilize unstable periodic orbits for a suitable choice of the feedback gain, providing that the time delay is chosen to coincide with the period of the target orbit. In addition, it is shown numerically that delayed feedback control with a sinusoidally modulated time delay significantly enlarges the stability region of the steady states in comparison to the classical time-delayed feedback scheme with a constant delay.

Aleksandar Gjurchinovski; Trifce Sandev; Viktor Urumov

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

262

Development of a statistically based access delay timeline methodology.  

SciTech Connect

The charter for adversarial delay is to hinder access to critical resources through the use of physical systems increasing an adversary's task time. The traditional method for characterizing access delay has been a simple model focused on accumulating times required to complete each task with little regard to uncertainty, complexity, or decreased efficiency associated with multiple sequential tasks or stress. The delay associated with any given barrier or path is further discounted to worst-case, and often unrealistic, times based on a high-level adversary, resulting in a highly conservative calculation of total delay. This leads to delay systems that require significant funding and personnel resources in order to defend against the assumed threat, which for many sites and applications becomes cost prohibitive. A new methodology has been developed that considers the uncertainties inherent in the problem to develop a realistic timeline distribution for a given adversary path. This new methodology incorporates advanced Bayesian statistical theory and methodologies, taking into account small sample size, expert judgment, human factors and threat uncertainty. The result is an algorithm that can calculate a probability distribution function of delay times directly related to system risk. Through further analysis, the access delay analyst or end user can use the results in making informed decisions while weighing benefits against risks, ultimately resulting in greater system effectiveness with lower cost.

Rivera, W. Gary; Robinson, David Gerald; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Galactic Diffuse Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

264

State Emissions Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) constitutes over 80 percent of total emissions, the state energy-related CO 2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO 2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The state-level emissions estimates are based on energy consumption data for the following fuel categories: three categories of coal (residential/commercial, industrial, and electric power sector); natural gas; and ten petroleum products including-- asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases

265

Angular distribution and azimuthal asymmetry for pentaquark production in proton-proton collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Angular distributions for production of the $\\Theta^+$ pentaquark are calculated for the collisions of polarized protons with polarized target protons. We compare calculations based on different assumptions concerning spin and parity ($J=1/2^\\pm,3/2^\\pm$) of the $\\Theta^+$ state. For a wide class of interactions the spin correlation parameters describing the asymmetric angular distributions are calculated up to 250 MeV above production threshold. The deviations from the near threshold behavior are investigated.

H. W. Barz; M. Zetenyi

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

None

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

267

Laser-seeded modulation instability within LHC proton beams  

SciTech Connect

A new method for seeding the modulation instability (MI) within an SPS-LHC proton beam using a laser pulse is presented. Using simulations, we show that a laser pulse placed ahead of a proton beam excites axially symmetric selfmodulation modes within the proton beam and leads to peak accelerating fields that are comparable to previously proposed seeding methods.

Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Yi, S. Austin; Pukhov, Alexander; Shvets, Gennady [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, 80805 Muenchen (Germany); University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

Parity nonconservation in proton-proton and proton-water scattering at 1. 5 GeV/c  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments searching for parity nonconservation in the scattering of 1.5 GeV/c (800 MeV) polarized protons from an unpolarized water target and a liquid hydrogen target are described. The intensity of the incident proton beam was measured upstream and downstream of the target by a pair of ionization detectors. The beam helicity was reversed at a 30-Hz rate. Auxiliary detectors monitored beam properties that could give rise to false effects. The result for the longitudinal asymmetry from the water is A/sub L/ = (1.7 +- 3.3 +- 1.4) x 10/sup -7/, where the first error is statistical and the second is an estimate of systematic effects. The hydrogen data yield a preliminary result of A/sub L/ = (1.0 +- 1.6) x 10/sup -7/. The systematic errors for p-p are expected to be < 1 x 10/sup -7/.

Mischke, R.E.; Bowman, J.D.; Carlini, R.; MacArthur, D.; Nagle, D.E.; Frauenfelder, H.; Harper, R.W.; Yuan, V.; McDonald, A.B.; Talaga, R.L.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Adaptive control of time delay systems and applications to automotive control problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is about the adaptive control of time delay systems with applications to automotive control problems. The stabilization of systems involving time delays is a difficult problem since the existence of a delay may ...

Yildiz, Yildiray

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Effects of Simulated Inertia and Force Prediction on Delayed Telepresence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents two methods aimed at alleviating the negative effects of network delays on teleoperation. The problem of telepresence across delayed networks is well known. A delay in feedback information such as visual and haptic data can make the ...

Stella Clarke; Gerhard Schillhuber; Michael F. Zaeh; Heinz Ulbrich

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Delayed Nickel Decay in Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently observed emission lines in the X-ray afterglow of gamma ray bursts suggest that iron group elements are either produced in the gamma ray burst, or are present nearby. If this material is the product of a thermonuclear burn, then such material would be expected to be rich in Nickel-56. If the nickel remains partially ionized, this prevents the electron capture reaction normally associated with the decay of Nickel-56, dramatically increasing the decay timescale. Here we examine the consequences of rapid ejection of a fraction of a solar mass of iron group material from the center of a collapsar/hypernova. The exact rate of decay then depends on the details of the ionization and therefore the ejection process. Future observations of iron, nickel and cobalt lines can be used to diagnose the origin of these elements and to better understand the astrophysical site of gamma ray bursts. In this model, the X-ray lines of these iron-group elements could be detected in suspected hypernovae that did not produce an observable gamma ray burst due to beaming.

G. C. McLaughlin; R. A. M. J. Wijers

2002-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

272

MHK Technologies/Tidal Delay | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delay Delay < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Delay.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Woodshed Technologies Ltd Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Overtopping Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Tidal Delay utilizes an existing natural land formation such as a peninsula or isthmus that creates a natural tidal barrier separating moving rising and falling bodies of seawater As the seawater on each side of the natural barrier rises and falls the device captures the energy resulting from the difference in water levels across the barrier using proven hydroelectric technology The device utilizes a standard impulse turbine installed in siphon pipe over under the natural barrier

273

Real Time Models of the Asynchronous Circuits: The Delay Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chapter from the book introduces the delay theory, whose purpose is the modeling of the asynchronous circuits from digital electrical engineering with ordinary and differential pseudo-boolean equations.

Serban E. Vlad

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

274

Opportunities for Process Monitoring Techniques at Delayed Access Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Except for specific cases where the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) maintains a continuous presence at a facility (such as the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant), there is always a period of time or delay between the moment a State is notified or aware of an upcoming inspection, and the time the inspector actually enters the material balance area or facility. Termed by the authors as delayed access, this period of time between inspection notice and inspector entrance to a facility poses a concern. Delayed access also has the potential to reduce the effectiveness of measures applied as part of the Safeguards Approach for a facility (such as short-notice inspections). This report investigates the feasibility of using process monitoring to address safeguards challenges posed by delayed access at a subset of facility types.

Curtis, Michael M.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Johnson, Shirley J.; Schanfein, Mark; Toomey, Christopher

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Evaluating passenger delays in the US domestic air transportation system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fundamental component of any National Airspace System (NAS) performance evaluation is the cost impact of air traffic delays, and more generally capacity limitations, on the traveling passengers. In previous research it ...

Umang, Nitish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Statistical modelling of delays in a rail freight transportation network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the transportation network of a major rail freight operator in order to obtain a model of delay propagation of trains connecting intermodal terminals. Operational management of a rail freight operator needs to take into account deviations ...

Jnos Barta; Andrea Emilio Rizzoli; Matteo Salani; Luca Maria Gambardella

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

278

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

279

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

280

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Mercury Emissions Control NETL managed the largest funded research program in the country to develop an in-depth understanding of fossil combustion-based mercury emissions. The program goal was to develop effective control options that would allow generators to comply with regulations. Research focus areas included measurement and characterization of mercury emissions, as well as the development of cost-effective control technologies for the U.S. coal-fired electric generating industry. Control Technologies Field Testing Phase I & II Phase III Novel Concepts APCD Co-benefits Emissions Characterization

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emissions emissions Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for emissions. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords emissions New Zealand projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2010 New Zealand emissions outlook (xls, 1.2 MiB)

282

Delayed-fission properties of neutron-deficient americium nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of the delayed-fission decay mode in light americium nuclei have been investigated. Measurements on the unknown isotopes {sup 230}Am and {sup 236}Am were attempted, and upper limits on the delayed-fission branches of these nuclei were determined. Evidence of the existence of {sup 236}Am was observed in radiochemical separations. Total kinetic energy and mass-yield distributions of the electron-capture delayed-fission mode were measured for {sup 232}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 1.31 {plus minus} 0.04 min) and for {sup 234}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 2.32 {plus minus} 0.08 min), and delayed-fission probabilities of 6.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} and 6.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}, respectively, were determined. The total kinetic energy and the asymmetric mass-yield distributions are typical of fission of mid-range actinides. No discernible influence of the anomalous triple-peaked mass division characteristic of the thorium-radium region was detected. Measurements of the time correlation between the electron-capture x-rays and the subsequent fission conform that the observed fissions arise from the electron-capture delayed-fission mechanism. Delayed fission has provided a unique opportunity to extend the range of low-energy fission studies to previously inaccessible regions. 71 refs., 44 figs., 13 tabs.

Hall, H.L. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

283

On Interference Networks with Feedback and Delayed CSI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The degrees of freedom (DoF) region of the two-user MIMO interference channel (IC) is completely characterized in the presence of noiseless channel output feedback from each receiver to its respective transmitter and with the assumption of delayed channel state information (CSI) at the transmitters. It is shown that having output feedback and delayed CSI at the transmitters can strictly enlarge the DoF region when compared to the case in which only delayed CSI is available at the transmitters. The proposed coding schemes that achieve the corresponding DoF region with feedback and delayed CSI utilize both resources, i.e., feedback and delayed CSI in a non-trivial manner. Furthermore, cases are identified in which output feedback and delayed CSI alone are sufficient to achieve the DoF region achievable with perfect, instantaneous CSI. Also, the DoF region of the scalar 2x2x2 two-hop interference network is characterized. It is shown that the total DoF for this network collapses from 2 (with perfect, instantaneo...

Tandon, Ravi; Poor, H Vincent; Shamai, Shlomo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

285

Mercury Emissions Data Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the visual materials included in presentations given at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina on April 3, 2002. Participants included representatives from EPRI, DOE, RMB Consulting & Research, and EERC. The MACT Working Group gave a presentation on "Variability in Hg Emissions Based on SCEM Data." The visuals in the report are a set of graphs documenting results of mercury emissions over time, using semi-continuous emissions monitor (SCEM) data. The EPA Utility Working Group gave a ...

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

286

Greenhouse Gas Emission Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... climate change as a serious problem and that greenhouse gas (GHG ... models to determine the baselines of GHG emissions and the effect of GHG ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

287

SF6 Emissions Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emissions Overview Joanna Eckstein and Penny Avery Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned...

288

Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Others wanting to learn more about greenhouse gas emissions and their reduction. About the ... based on ensuring the sustainability of finite natural resources.

289

NETL: Emissions Characterization - CMU Emissions Characterization Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Emissions Characterization Study Source Emissions Characterization Study The emissions characterization study is being performed in conjunction with the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study [PDF-744KB], a larger effort that includes ambient measurements and atmospheric modeling of the Pittsburgh region. The main objectives of this portion of the study are: To achieve advanced characterization of the PM in the Pittsburgh region. Measurements include the PM size, surface, volume, and mass distribution; chemical composition as a function of size and on a single particle basis; temporal and spatial variability. To obtain accurate current fingerprints of the major primary PM sources in the Pittsburgh region using traditional filter-based sampling and state-of-the-art techniques such as dilution sampling and single particle analysis using mass spectroscopy and LIBS.

290

Annihilation Emission from the Galactic Black Hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both diffuse high energy gamma-rays and an extended electron-positron annihilation line emission have been observed in the Galactic Center (GC) region. Although X-ray observations indicate that the galactic black hole Sgr A$^*$ is inactive now, we suggest that Sgr A$^*$ can become active when a captured star is tidally disrupted and matter is accreted into the black hole. As a consequence the galactic black hole could be a powerful source of relativistic protons. We are able to explain the current observed diffuse gamma-rays and the very detailed 511 keV annihilation line of secondary positrons by $p-p$ collisions of such protons, with appropriate injection times and energy. Relativistic protons could have been injected into the ambient material if the black hole captured a 50M$_\\odot$ star at several tens million years ago. An alternative possibility is that the black hole continues to capture stars with $\\sim$1M$_\\odot$ every hundred thousand years. Secondary positrons produced by $p-p$ collisions at energies $\\ga 30$ MeV are cooled down to thermal energies by Coulomb collisions, and annihilate in the warm neutral and ionized phases of the interstellar medium with temperatures about several eV, because the annihilation cross-section reaches its maximum at these temperatures. It takes about ten million years for the positrons to cool down to thermal temperatures so they can diffuse into a very large extended region around the Galactic center. A much more recent star capture may be also able to account for recent TeV observations within 10 pc of the galactic center as well as for the unidentified GeV gamma-ray sources found by EGRET at GC. The spectral difference between the GeV flux and the TeV flux could be explained naturally in this model as well.

K. S. Cheng; D. O. Chernyshov; V. A. Dogiel

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8  

SciTech Connect

During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

292

Electron-capture delayed fission properties of neutron-deficient einsteinium nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron-capture delayed fission (ECDF) properties of neutron-deficient einsteinium isotopes were investigated using a combination of chemical separations and on-line radiation detection methods. {sup 242}Es was produced via the {sup 233}U({sup 14}N,5n){sup 242}Es reaction at a beam energy of 87 MeV (on target) in the lab system, and was found to decay with a half-life of 11 {+-} 3 seconds. The ECDF of {sup 242}Es showed a highly asymmetric mass distribution with an average pre-neutron emission total kinetic energy (TKE) of 183 {+-} 18 MeV. The probability of delayed fission (P{sub DF}) was measured to be 0.006 {+-} 0.002. In conjunction with this experiment, the excitation functions of the {sup 233}U({sup 14}N,xn){sup 247{minus}x}Es and {sup 233}U({sup 15}N,xn){sup 248{minus}x}Es reactions were measured for {sup 243}Es, {sup 244}Es and {sup 245}Es at projectile energies between 80 MeV and 100 MeV.

Shaughnessy, Dawn A.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

293

On physical interpretation of two dimensional time-correlations regarding time delay velocities and eddy shaping  

SciTech Connect

Time delay estimation (TDE) techniques are frequently used to estimate the flow velocity from fluctuating measurements. Tilted structures carried by the flow lead to misinterpretation of the time delays in terms of velocity direction and amplitude. It affects TDE measurements from probes, and is also intrinsically important for beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging measurements. Local eddy shapes estimated from 2D fluctuating field are necessary to gain a more accurate flow estimate from TDE, as illustrated by Langmuir probe array measurements. A least square regression approach is proposed to estimate both flow field and shaping parameters. The technique is applied to a test case built from numerical simulation of interchange fluctuations. The local eddy shape does not only provide corrections for the velocity field but also quantitative information about the statistical interaction mechanisms between local eddies and E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear. The technique is then tested on gaz puff imaging data collected at the edge of EAST tokamak plasmas. It is shown that poloidal asymmetries of the fluctuation fields-velocity and eddy shape-are consistent at least qualitatively with a ballooning type of turbulence immersed in a radially sheared equilibrium flow.

Fedorczak, N. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Manz, P. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut feur Plasmaphysik, Association Euratom-IPP, 85748Garching (Germany); Thakur, S. C.; Xu, M.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Search for GeV Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Milagro Scaler Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prompt and Delayed High­Energy Emission from Cosmological Gamma­Ray Bursts Markus B¨ottcher a, Washington, DC 20375­5352 Abstract In the cosmological blast­wave model for gamma ray bursts (GRBs), high if they are indeed associated with star­forming regions. 3 Comparison with Gamma Rays from Hadronic Processes

California at Santa Cruz, University of

295

Proton decay matrix elements on the lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hadronic matrix elements of proton decay are essential ingredients to bridge the grand unification theory to low energy observables like proton lifetime. In this paper we non-perturbatively calculate the matrix elements, relevant for the process of a nucleon decaying into a pseudoscalar meson and an anti-lepton through generic baryon number violating four-fermi operators. Lattice QCD with 2+1 flavor dynamical domain-wall fermions with the {\\it direct} method, which is direct measurement of matrix element from three-point function without chiral perturbation theory, are used for this study to have good control over the lattice discretization error, operator renormalization, and chiral extrapolation. The relevant form factors for possible transition process from an initial proton or neutron to a final pion or kaon induced by all types of three quark operators are obtained through three-point functions of (nucleon)-(three-quark operator)-(meson) with physical kinematics. In this study all the relevant systematic uncertainties of the form factors are taken into account for the first time, and the total error is found to be the range 30%-40% for $\\pi$ and 20%-40% for $K$ final states.

Y. Aoki; E. Shintani; A. Soni

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

296

A new luminescence beam profile monitor for intense proton and heavy ion beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new luminescence beam profile monitor is realized in the polarized hydrogen gas jet target at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. In addition to the spin polarization of the proton beam being routinely measured by the hydrogen gas jet, the luminescence produced by beam-hydrogen excitation leads to a strong Balmer series lines emission. A selected hydrogen Balmer line is spectrally filtered and imaged to produce the transverse RHIC proton beam shape with unprecedented details on the RHIC beam profile. Alternatively, when the passage of the high energy RHIC gold ion beam excited only the residual gas molecules in the beam path, sufficient ion beam induced luminescence is produced and the transverse gold ion beam profile is obtained. The measured transverse beam sizes and the calculated emittances provide an independent confirmation of the RHIC beam characteristics and to verify the emittance conservation along the RHIC accelerator. This optical beam diagnostic technique by making use of the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas offers a truly noninvasive particle beam characterization, and provides a visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. Combined with a longitudinal bunch measurement system, a 3-dimensional spatial particle beam profile can be reconstructed tomographically.

Tsang,T.; Bellavia, S.; Connolly, R.; Gassner, D.; Makdisi, Y.; Russo, T.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Zelenski, A.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Generalized z-scaling in proton-proton collisions at high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New generalization of z-scaling in inclusive particle production is proposed. The scaling variable z is fractal measure which depends on kinematical characteristics of the underlying sub-process expressed in terms of the momentum fractions x1 and x2 of the incoming protons. In the generalized approach, the x1 and x2 are functions of the momentum fractions ya and yb of the scattered and recoil constituents carried out by the inclusive particle and recoil object, respectively. The scaling function psi(z) for charged and identified hadrons produced in proton-proton collisions is constructed. The fractal dimensions and heat capacity of the produced medium entering definition of the z are established to obtain energy, angular and multiplicity independence of the psi(z). The scheme allows unique description of data on inclusive cross sections of charged particles, pions, kaons, antiprotons and lambdas at high energies. The obtained results are of interest to use z-scaling as a tool for searching for new physics phenomena of particle production in high transverse momentum and high multiplicity region at proton-proton colliders RHIC and LHC.

I. Zborovsky; M. Tokarev

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Bounds in proton-proton elastic scattering at low momentum transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a bound on the imaginary part of the single helicity-flip amplitude for spin 1/2-spin 1/2 scattering at small momentum transfer. The variational method of Lagrange multipliers is employed to optimize the single-flip amplitude using the values of the total cross section, the elastic cross section and diffraction slope as equality constraints in addition to the inequality constraints resulting from unitarity. Such bounds provide important information related to the determination of polarization of a proton beam. In the case of elastic proton collisions the analyzing power at small scattering angles inside the Coulomb Nuclear Interference region offers a method of measuring the polarization of a proton beam, the accuracy of the polarization measurement depending on the single helicity-flip amplitude. The bound obtained on the imaginary part of the single helicity-flip amplitude indicates that the analyzing power for proton-proton collisions in the Coulomb nuclear interference region should take positive nonzero values at high energies.

A. T. Bates; N. H. Buttimore

2000-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

299

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for controlling NOx from lean engines are studied in great detail at FEERC. Lean NOx Traps (LNTs) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) are two catalyst technologies of interest. Catalysts are studied from the nanoscale to full scale. On the nanoscale, catalyst powders are analyzed with chemisorptions techniques to determine the active metal surface area where catalysis occurs. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy is used to observe the chemical reactions occurring on the catalyst surface during catalyst operation. Both powder and coated catalyst samples are analyzed on bench flow reactors in controlled simulated exhaust environments to better characterize the chemical

300

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Beta Decay of the Proton-Rich Nuclei 102Sn and 104Sn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The {beta} decays of {sup 102}Sn and {sup 104}Sn were studied by using high-resolution germanium detectors as well as a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS). For {sup 104}Sn, with three new {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays identified, the total Gamow-Teller strength (BGT) value of 2.7(3) was obtained. For {sup 102}Sn, the {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence data were collected for the first time, allowing us to considerably extend the decay scheme. This scheme was used to unfold the TAS data and to deduce a BGT value of 4.2(8) for this decay. This result is compared to shell model predictions, yielding a hindrance factor of 3.6(7) in agreement with those obtained previously for {sup 98}Cd and {sup 100}In. Together with the latter two, {sup 102}Sn completes the triplet of Z {le} 50, N {ge} 50 nuclei with two proton holes, one proton hole and one neutron particle, and two neutron particles with respect to the doubly magic {sup 100}Sn core.

Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Batist, L. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute; Banu, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Becker, F. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Blazhev, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Brown, B. A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Bruchle, W. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Doring, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Faestermann, T. [Technische Universitat Munchen; Gorska, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Grawe, H. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Jungclaus, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid; Kavatsyuk, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kavatsyuk, O. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kirchner, R. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; La Commara, M. [Universita Federico II and INFN Napoli; Mandal, S. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mazzocchi, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Mukha, I. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Muralithar, S. [University of Warsaw; Plettner, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Plochocki, A. [University of Warsaw; Roeckl, E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Romoli, M. [Universita Federico II and INFN Napoli; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Schadel, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schmidt, K. [University of Warsaw; Schwengner, R. [University of Warsaw; Zylicz, J. [University of Warsaw

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patil, D. S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Emissions Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Control Emissions Characterization In anticipation of the 1990 CAAAs, specifically the draft Title III regarding the characterization of potential HAPs from electric steam generating units, DOE initiated a new Air Toxics Program in 1989. The DOE Mercury Measurement and Control Program evolved as a result of the findings from the comprehensive assessment of hazardous air pollutants studies conducted by DOE from 1990 through 1997. DOE, in collaboration with EPRI, performed stack tests at a number of coal-fired power plants (identified on map below) to accurately determine the emission rates of a series of potentially toxic chemicals. These tests had not been conducted previously because of their cost, about $1 million per test, so conventional wisdom on emissions was based on emission factors derived from analyses of coal. In general, actual emissions were found to be about one-tenth previous estimates, due to a high fraction of the pollutants being captured by existing particulate control systems. These data resulted in a decision by EPA that most of these pollutants were not a threat to the environment, and needed no further regulation at power plants. This shielded the coal-fired power industry from major (tens of millions) costs that would have resulted from further controlling these emissions. However, another finding of these studies was that mercury was not effectively controlled in coal-fired utility boiler systems. Moreover, EPA concluded that a plausible link exists between these emissions and adverse health effects. Ineffective control of mercury by existing control technologies resulted from a number of factors, including variation in coal composition and variability in the form of the mercury in flue gases. The volatility of mercury was the main contributor for less removal, as compared to the less volatile trace elements/metals which were being removed at efficiencies over 99% with the fly ash. In addition, it was determined that there was no reliable mercury speciation method to accurately distinguish between the elemental and oxidized forms of mercury in the flue gas. These two forms of mercury respond differently to removal techniques in existing air pollution control devices utilized by the coal-fired utility industry.

304

Dissociative ionization of H{sub 2} in an attosecond pulse train and delayed laser pulse  

SciTech Connect

The ionization of H{sub 2} in a single attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulse generates a nuclear wave packet in H{sub 2}{sup +}, which is entangled with the emitted photoelectron wave packet. The nuclear wave-packet dynamics can be observed by dissociating H{sub 2}{sup +} in a delayed IR laser pulse. If H{sub 2} is ionized by a sequence of XUV pulses of an attosecond pulse train, whether or not the corresponding sequence of nuclear wave packets in H{sub 2}{sup +} is detected as a coherent or incoherent superposition depends on whether and how the photoelectrons are observed. We simulate the nuclear dynamics in this XUV-pump-IR-probe scenario and analyze our numerical results for both single attosecond pump pulses and pump-pulse trains of different lengths and temporal spacings between individual XUV pulses. By superimposing nuclear wave packets in H{sub 2}{sup +} generated by individual pulses in the pump-pulse train incoherently, we calculate proton kinetic energy release spectra that are in good qualitative agreement with the recent experiment of Kelkensberg et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 123005 (2009)].

He Feng; Thumm, Uwe [James R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2604 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Quarkonium production in high energyproton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarization studies. Afterwards, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in broader perpectives, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

del Valle, Z C; Corcella, G; Fleuret, F; Ferreiro, E G; Kartvelishvili, V; Kopeliovich, B; Lansberg, J P; Lourenco, C; Martinez, G; Papadimitriou, V; Satz, H; Scomparin, E; Ullrich, T; Teryaev, O; Vogt, R; Wang, J X

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

Proton-Proton Fusion in Effective Field Theory to Fifth Order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proton-proton fusion process p p->d e^+ nu_e is calculated at threshold to fifth order in pionless effective field theory. There are two unknown two-body currents contributing at the second and fourth orders. Combined with the previous results for neutrino-deuteron and antineutrino-deuteron scattering, computed to third order in the same approach, we conclude that a 10% measurement of reactor antineutrino-deuteron scattering measurement could constrain the p p->d e^+ nu_e rate to ~7% while a ~3% measurement of nu_e d-> e^- p p could constrain the pp rate to ~2%.

Butler, M; Butler, Malcolm; Chen, Jiunn-Wei

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Nuclear like effects in proton-proton collisions at high energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that several effects considered nuclear effects are not nuclear in the sense that they do not only occur in nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus collisions but, as well, they are present in hadron-hadron (proton-proton) collisions. The matter creation mechanism in hh, hA and AA collisions is always the same. The pT suppression of particles produced in large multiplicity events compared to low multiplicity events, the elliptic flow and the Cronin effect are predicted to occur in pp collisions at LHC energies as a consequence of the obtained high density partonic medium.

L. Cunqueiro; J. Dias de Deus; C. Pajares

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

308

Proton-Proton Fusion in Effective Field Theory to Fifth Order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proton-proton fusion process p p->d e^+ nu_e is calculated at threshold to fifth order in pionless effective field theory. There are two unknown two-body currents contributing at the second and fourth orders. Combined with the previous results for neutrino-deuteron and antineutrino-deuteron scattering, computed to third order in the same approach, we conclude that a 10% measurement of reactor antineutrino-deuteron scattering measurement could constrain the p p->d e^+ nu_e rate to ~7% while a ~3% measurement of nu_e d-> e^- p p could constrain the pp rate to ~2%.

Malcolm Butler; Jiunn-Wei Chen

2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

309

Direct and bulk-scattered forward-shock emissions: sources of X-ray afterglow diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I describe the modifications to the standard forward-shock model required to account for the X-ray light-curve features discovered by Swift in the early afterglow emission and propose that a delayed, pair-enriched, and highly relativistic outflow, which bulk-scatters the forward-shock synchrotron emission, yields sometimes a brighter X-ray emission, producing short-lived X-ray flares, X-ray light-curve plateaus ending with chromatic breaks, and fast post-plateau X-ray decays.

A. Panaitescu

2008-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

310

Routing Algorithms for Delay-insensitive and Delay-sensitive Applications in Underwater Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underwater sensor networks consist of sensors and vehicles deployed to perform collaborative monitoring tasks over a given region. Underwater sensor networks will find applications in oceanographic data collection, pollution monitoring, offshore exploration, disaster prevention, assisted navigation, tactical surveillance, and mine reconnaissance. Underwater acoustic networking is the enabling technology for these applications. In this paper, an architecture for three-dimensional underwater sensor networks is considered, and a model characterizing the acoustic channel utilization efficiency is introduced, which allows investigating some fundamental characteristics of the underwater environment. In particular, the model allows setting the optimal packet size for underwater communications given monitored volume, density of the sensor network, and application requirements. Moreover, the problem of data gathering is investigated at the network layer by considering the cross-layer interactions between the routing functions and the characteristics of the underwater acoustic channel. Two distributed routing algorithms are introduced for delay-insensitive and delaysensitive applications. The proposed solutions allow each node to select its next hop, with the objective of minimizing the energy consumption taking the varying condition of the underwater channel and the different application requirements into account. The proposed routing solutions are shown to achieve the performance targets by means of simulation.

Dario Pompili; Tommaso Melodia; Ian F. Akyildiz

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Continuous-time nonlinear model predictive control of time-delayed Wiener-type systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a novel method of continuous-time model predictive control for nonlinear time-delayed systems. The problems regarding time delays are solved by incorporating delayed and undelayed model outputs in the control-law derivation. Nonlinear-mapping ... Keywords: Wiener-type model, continuous system, nonlinear predictive control, time-delayed system

Simon Oblak; Igor krjanc

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Laser-driven proton acceleration using a conical nanobrush target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conical nanobrush target is proposed to improve the total proton energy-conversion efficiency in proton beam acceleration and investigated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell (2D-PIC) simulations. Results indicate a significant enhancement of the number and energies of hot electrons through the target rear side of the conical nanobrush target. Compared with the plain target, the field increases several times. We observe enhancements of the average proton energy and total laser-proton energy conversion efficiency of 105%. This enhancement is attributed to both nanobrush and conical configurations. The proton beam is well collimated with a divergence angle less than 28{sup Degree-Sign }. The proposed target may serve as a new method for increasing laser to proton energy-conversion efficiency.

Yu Jinqing [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Vacuum Electronics National Laboratory, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhao Zongqing; Yan Yonghong; Zhou Weimin; Cao Leifeng; Gu Yuqiu [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Jin Xiaolin; Li Bin [Vacuum Electronics National Laboratory, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Wu Fengjuan [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Laboratory of Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Pulsed Photofission Delayed Gamma Ray Detection for Nuclear Material Identification  

SciTech Connect

Innovative systems with increased sensitivity and resolution are in great demand to detect diversion and to prevent misuse in support of nuclear materials management for the U.S. fuel cycle. Nuclear fission is the most important multiplicative process involved in non-destructive active interrogation. This process produces the most easily recognizable signature for nuclear materials. High-energy gamma rays can also excite a nucleus and cause fission through a process known as photofission. After photofission reactions, delayed signals are easily distinguishable from the interrogating radiation. Linac-based, advanced inspection techniques utilizing the fission signals after photofission have been extensively studied for homeland security applications. Previous research also showed that a unique delayed gamma ray energy spectrum exists for each fissionable isotope. Isotopic composition measurement methods based on delayed gamma ray spectroscopy will be the primary focus of this work.

John Kavouras; Xianfei Wen; Daren R. Norman; Dante R. Nakazawa; Haori Yang

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Time delays across saddles as a test of modified gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modified gravity theories can produce strong signals in the vicinity of the saddles of the total gravitational potential. In a sub-class of these models this translates into diverging time-delays for echoes crossing the saddles. Such models arise from the possibility that gravity might be infrared divergent or confined, and if suitably designed they are very difficult to rule out. We show that Lunar Laser Ranging during an eclipse could probe the time-delay effect within meters of the saddle, thereby proving or excluding these models. Very Large Baseline Interferometry, instead, could target delays across the Jupiter-Sun saddle. Such experiments would shed light on the infrared behaviour of gravity and examine the puzzling possibility that there might be well-hidden regions of strong gravity and even singularities inside the solar system.

Joao Magueijo; Ali Mozaffari

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Gels under stress: the origins of delayed collapse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attractive colloidal particles can form a disordered elastic solid or gel when quenched into a two-phase region, if the volume fraction is sufficiently large. When the interactions are comparable to thermal energies the stress-bearing network within the gel restructures over time as individual particle bonds break and reform. Typically, under gravity such weak gels show a prolonged period of either no or very slow settling, followed by a sudden and rapid collapse - a phenomenon known as delayed collapse. The link between local bond breaking events and the macroscopic process of delayed collapse is not well understood. Here we summarize the main features of delayed collapse and discuss the microscopic processes which cause it. We present a plausible model which connects the kinetics of bond breaking to gel collapse and test the model by exploring the effect of an applied external force on the stability of a gel.

Lisa J. Teece; James M. Hart; Kerry Yen Ni Hsu; Malcolm A. Faers; Paul Bartlett

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

CO2 Emissions - New Zealand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania New Zealand Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Zealand Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Zealand image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Zealand...

317

CO2 Emissions - Hong Kong  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Hong Kong CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hong Kong...

318

CO2 Emissions - Wake Island  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Wake Island Graphics CO2 Emissions from Wake Island Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Wake Island image Per capita CO2...

319

NETL: Turbine Projects - Emissions Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Reduction Turbine Projects Emissions Reduction Pre-Mixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels DataFact Sheets Low-NOX Emissions in a Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustor Design...

320

Low energy proton storage ring with longitudinal magnetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proton energy 1,75 MeV Energy spread ±3,2 % = ±56 keV (2) Current (DC) 100 mkA Transverse size ±10 mm (2Low energy proton storage ring with longitudinal magnetic field and electron cooling M.I. Bryzgunov energy protons. In this particular case it is reaction for production of resonant gamma-quant (9.17 Me

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Observation of Spin Flips with a Single Trapped Proton  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radio-frequency induced spin transitions of one individual proton are observed. The spin quantum jumps are detected via the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, which is used in an experiment with a single proton stored in a cryogenic Penning trap. This is an important milestone towards a direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of the proton and a new test of the matter-antimatter symmetry in the baryon sector.

Ulmer, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Ruprecht Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69047 Heidelberg (Germany); Rodegheri, C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruprecht Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69047 Heidelberg (Germany); Kracke, H.; Mooser, A.; Walz, J. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Quint, W. [Ruprecht Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69047 Heidelberg (Germany); GSI--Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Proton scattering on an electron gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown in the case of proton scattering on an electron gas target that the Closed Time Path formalism can handle final state interactions of the target in equilibrium in a simple and natural manner. The leading order cross section is proportional to the photon density of states. The scattering needs a partial resummation of the perturbation series when the electron gas forms long living quasi-particles with high density of state during the collision. A strong cancellation between real and virtual electron-hole pairs is found in this case.

Mansouri, F; Zazoua, K; Zekri, N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Proton scattering on an electron gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown in the case of proton scattering on an electron gas target that the Closed Time Path formalism can handle final state interactions of the target in equilibrium in a simple and natural manner. The leading order cross section is proportional to the photon density of states. The scattering needs a partial resummation of the perturbation series when the electron gas forms long living quasi-particles with high density of state during the collision. A strong cancellation between real and virtual electron-hole pairs is found in this case.

F. Mansouri; J. Polonyi; K. Zazoua; N. Zekri

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

324

V.: Security considerations in space and delay tolerant networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the Internet-inspired security work on delay tolerant networking, in particular, as it might apply to space missions, and identifies some challenges arising, for both the Internet security community and for space missions. These challenges include the development of key management schemes suited for space missions as well as a characterization of the actual security requirements applying. A specific goal of this paper is therefore to elicit feedback from space mission IT specialists in order to guide the development of security mechanisms for delay tolerant networking. 1.

Stephen Farrell; Vinny Cahill

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Carbon Emission Estimates image image Global Per Capita Carbon Emission Estimates...

326

The Diffuse Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Model for GLAST LAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffuse emission from the Milky Way dominates the gamma-ray sky. About 80% of the high-energy luminosity of the Milky Way comes from processes in the interstellar medium. The Galactic diffuse emission traces interactions of energetic particles, primarily protons and electrons, with the interstellar gas and radiation field, thus delivering information about cosmic-ray spectra and interstellar mass in distant locations. Additionally, the Galactic diffuse emission is the celestial foreground for the study of gamma-ray point sources and the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission. We will report on the latest developments in the modelling of the Galactic diffuse emission, which will be used for the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) investigations.

Porter, T A; Grenier, I A; Moskalenko, I V; Strong, A W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Diffuse Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Model for GLAST LAT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diffuse emission from the Milky Way dominates the gamma-ray sky. About 80% of the high-energy luminosity of the Milky Way comes from processes in the interstellar medium. The Galactic diffuse emission traces interactions of energetic particles, primarily protons and electrons, with the interstellar gas and radiation field, thus delivering information about cosmic-ray spectra and interstellar mass in distant locations. Additionally, the Galactic diffuse emission is the celestial foreground for the study of gamma-ray point sources and the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission. We will report on the latest developments in the modeling of the Galactic diffuse emission, which will be used for the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) investigations.

Porter, T.A.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Digel, S.W.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Grenier, I.A.; /Saclay; Moskalenko, I.V.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Strong, A.W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hard Collisions of Spinning Protons - History and Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There will be a review of the history of polarized proton beams, and a discussion of the unexpected and still unexplained large transverse spin effects found in several high energy proton-proton spin experiments at the ZGS, AGS, Fermilab and RHIC. Next there will be a discussion of possible future experiments on the violent collisions elastic collisions of polarized protons at the 70 GeV U-70 accelerator at IHEP-Protvino in Russia and the new high intensity 50 GeV J-PARC at Tokai in Japan.

A. D. Krisch

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

329

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Cost Optimization of Proton...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

density for future scenarios of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology; estimate manufacturing cost of PEMFCs. Performer Principal Investigator: Suresh Sriramulu...

330

Search for the Dirac Monopole with 30-bev Protons  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A search was made at the Brookhaven alternating gradient synchrotron for magnetic monopoles produced either in collisions of 30-Bev protons with light nuclei, or produced by gamma rays secondary to these protons in the Coulomb field of protons or of carbon nuclei. In runs using 5.7 x 10{sup 15} circulating protons, no monopole-like event was found. This implies an upper limit for production in protonnucleon interactions of about 2 x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}. Experimental limits are also derived for the photoproduction of pole pairs. (auth)

Purcell, E.M.; Collins, G.B.; Fujii, T.; Hornbostel, J.; Turkot, F.

1963-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Design on Elevated-Temperature and Methanol-Blocking Proton ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Design on Elevated-Temperature and Methanol-Blocking Proton Exchange Membrane for Fuel Cell Application. Author(s), Yan Xiang.

332

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic...

333

Dynamical effects in proton breakup from exotic nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This contribution discusses dynamical effects in proton breakup from a weakly bound state in an exotic nucleus on a heavy target. The Coulomb interactions between the proton and the core and the proton and the target are treated to all orders, including also the full multipole expansion of the Coulomb potential. The dynamics of proton Coulomb breakup is compared to that of an equivalent neutron of larger binding energy in order to elucidate the differences with the well understood neutron breakup mechanism. A number of experimentally measurable observables such as parallel momentum distributions, proton angular distributions and total breakup cross sections can be calculated. With respect to nuclear breakup it is found that a proton behaves exactly as a neutron of larger binding energy. The extra 'effective energy' is due to the combined core-target Coulomb barrier. In Coulomb breakup we distinguish the effect of the core-target Coulomb potential (called recoil effect), with respect to which the proton behaves again as a more bound neutron, from the direct proton-target Coulomb potential. The latter gives cross sections about an order of magnitude larger than the recoil term. The two effects give rise to complicated interferences in the parallel momentum distributions. They are instead easily separable in the proton angular distributions which are therefore suggested as a very useful observable for future experimental studies.

Bonaccorso, Angela; Kumar, Ravinder [INFN, Sez. di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sez. di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa and Department of Physics, Deenbandhu Chhoturam University of Science and Technology, Murthal, Sonepat, Haryana, 131039 (India)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Fast timing detectors for forward protons at the LHC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author discusses the development of high precision timing detectors for high momentum protons at the LHC, and their application in studying exclusive Higgs boson production.

Albrow, Michael; /Fermilab

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

336

CO2 Emissions - Netherland Antilles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Netherland Antilles Graphics CO2 Emissions from Netherland Antilles Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherland...

337

CO2 Emissions - Ryukyu Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Ryukyu Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands image...

338

CO2 Emissions - Leeward Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Leeward Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands image...

339

carbon emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords capacity carbon emissions energy demand Energy Generation fossil fuels GHG emissions UK Data applicationvnd.openxmlformats-office...

340

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Advanced NOx Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Advanced NOx Emissions Control Adv....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Brief paper: Delay-dependent robust H? filtering for uncertain discrete-time singular systems with interval time-varying delay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the delay-dependent robust H"~ filtering for uncertain discrete-time singular systems with interval time-varying delay. The uncertainty considered is a convex compact set of polytopic type. The purpose is the design of a linear ... Keywords: Discrete-time singular systems, Interval time-varying delay, Linear matrix inequality, Robust H? filter

Jong Hae Kim

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Engines - Emissions Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are attractive options for increasing vehicle fuel economy and reducing emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases. Two automobile manufacturers have already introduced HEVs, and other manufacturers are planning to introduce their own models. One available HEV combines mass reduction (also applicable to conventional vehicles) with idle-stop, regenerative braking, and electric-drive assist to achieve a fuel economy more than 2.5 times the current Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standard. The second HEV combines idle-stop, regenerative braking, electric assist acceleration, and continuously variable transmission (CVT) to achieve a fuel economy of more than twice the current CAFÉ standard, qualifying as a super ultra-low emissions vehicle (SULEV).

343

Pulsar Emission Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emission spectrum is calculated for a weak axisymmetric pulsar. Also calculated are the observed spectrum, efficiency, and the observed efficiency. The underlying flow of electrons and positrons turns out to be curiously intricate.

Gruzinov, Andrei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

China Energy and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030 (2 nd Edition) David Fridley, Nina Zheng, Nan Zhou, Jing Ke, Ali Hasanbeigi, Bill Morrow, and Lynn Price China Energy Group, Energy...

345

Nitrous oxide emissions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of key operating parameters, the relative importance of coal type, and the potentially significant coal properties for producing N{sub 2}O emissions in an atmospheric circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) and pressurized bubbling fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The generation of N{sub 2}O emissions is quantified in an empirical model based on the experimental data.

Mann, M.D.; Collings, M.E.; Young, B.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Nitrous oxide emissions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of key operating parameters, the relative importance of coal type, and the potentially significant coal properties for producing N[sub 2]O emissions in an atmospheric circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) and pressurized bubbling fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The generation of N[sub 2]O emissions is quantified in an empirical model based on the experimental data.

Mann, M.D.; Collings, M.E.; Young, B.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Field emission electron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Gas Turbine Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack of regulatory interest in the 'real world' test results coupled with the difficulties of gathering analogous bench test data for systems employing gas turbines with Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG) and steam injection. It appears that the agencies are getting a better grasp of emissions, but there are still problem areas, particularly CO and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. The lag in data has resulted in the imposition of a CO reactor as BACT for the gas turbine. With the renewed concern about the environment, air permits will have a high profile with offsets being the next fix beyond BACT. 'The manner in which technology developers and electric utilities will share emissions reductions in the coming era of pollution allowance trading is becoming prominent on the agendas of strategic planners at technology vendors and the electric power industry....' (1) Therefore, it becomes increasingly important that the proponents of gas turbine-based facilities establish more reliable data on their proposed emissions. This paper addresses the gas turbine emissions experiences of eight cogeneration plants utilizing: 1) steam injection for both NOx control and power augmentation, 2) CO reactors, 3) selective catalytic reduction units. It also looks at possible regulatory actions.

Frederick, J. D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The determination of protonation states in proteins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The protonation states of aspartic acids and glutamic acids as well as histidine are investigated in four X-ray cases: Ni,Ca concanavalin A at 0.94 {angstrom}, a thrombin-hirugen binary complex at 1.26 {angstrom} resolution and two thrombin-hirugen-inhibitor ternary complexes at 1.32 and 1.39 {angstrom} resolution. The truncation of the Ni,Ca concanavalin A data at various test resolutions between 0.94 and 1.50 {angstrom} provided a test comparator for the 'unknown' thrombin-hirugen carboxylate bond lengths. The protonation states of aspartic acids and glutamic acids can be determined (on the basis of convincing evidence) even to the modest resolution of 1.20 {angstrom} as exemplified by our X-ray crystal structure refinements of Ni and Mn concanavalin A and also as indicated in the 1.26 {angstrom} structure of thrombin, both of which are reported here. The protonation-state indication of an Asp or a Glu is valid provided that the following criteria are met (in order of importance). (i) The acidic residue must have a single occupancy. (ii) Anisotropic refinement at a minimum diffraction resolution of 1.20 {angstrom} (X-ray data-to-parameter ratio of 3.5:1) is required. (iii) Both of the bond lengths must agree with the expectation (i.e. dictionary values), thus allowing some relaxation of the bond-distance standard uncertainties required to 0.025 {angstrom} for a '3' determination or 0.04 {angstrom} for a '2' determination, although some variation of the expected bond-distance values must be allowed according to the microenvironment of the hydrogen of interest. (iv) Although the F{sub o}-F{sub c} map peaks are most likely to be unreliable at the resolution range around 1.20 {angstrom}, if admitted as evidence the peak at the hydrogen position must be greater than or equal to 2.5 and in the correct geometry. (v) The atomic B factors need to be less than 10 {angstrom}2 for bond-length differentiation; furthermore, the C=O bond can also be expected to be observed with continuous 2F{sub o}-F{sub c} electron density and the C-OH bond with discontinuous electron density provided that the atomic B factors are less than approximately 20 {angstrom}{sup 2} and the contour level is increased. The final decisive option is to carry out more than one experiment, e.g. multiple X-ray crystallography experiments and ideally neutron crystallography. The complementary technique of neutron protein crystallography has provided evidence of the protonation states of histidine and acidic residues in concanavalin A and also the correct orientations of asparagine and glutamine side chains. Again, the truncation of the neutron data at various test resolutions between 2.5 and 3.0 {angstrom}, even 3.25 and 3.75 {angstrom} resolution, examines the limits of the neutron probe. These various studies indicate a widening of the scope of both X-ray and neutron probes in certain circumstances to elucidate the protonation states in proteins.

Ahmed, H.U.; Blakeley, M.P.; Cianci, M.; Cruickshank, D.W. J.; Hubbard, J.A.; Helliwell, J.R. (EMBL); (SCF); (Manchester); (GSK)

2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

Tracking Down the ENSO Delayed Oscillator with an Adjoint OGCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to the delayed-oscillator picture of ENSO, a positive SST anomaly in the eastern tropical Pacific will cause westerly wind anomalies closer to the date line to first give a positive feedback, and later, via planetary wave reflection at ...

Geert Jan van Oldenborgh; Gerrit Burgers; Stephan Venzke; Christian Eckert; Ralf Giering

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

GPS Meteorology: Mapping Zenith Wet Delays onto Precipitable Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging networks of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers can be used in the remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. The time-varying zenith wet delay observed at each GPS receiver in a network can be transformed into an estimate of the ...

Michael Bevis; Steven Businger; Steven Chiswell; Thomas A. Herring; Richard A. Anthes; Christian Rocken; Randolph H. Ware

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Delay of intrusion detection in wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider sensor networks for intrusion detection, such that node deployment, node failures and node behavior result in coverage gaps and a fraction of disconnected nodes in an otherwise dense and well-connected network. We focus on the ... Keywords: delay, intrusion detection, percolation, sensor networks

Olivier Dousse; Christina Tavoularis; Patrick Thiran

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Why Can Wind Delay the Shedding of Loop Current Eddies?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is first shown that wind in the Gulf of Mexico can delay the shedding of Loop Current eddies. A time-dependent, three-dimensional numerical experiment forced by a spatially and temporally constant westward wind stress within the Gulf is ...

Y.-L. Chang; L.-Y. Oey

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Transportation Center Seminar "Flight Delays, Capacity Investment and Welfare under  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Center Seminar "Flight Delays, Capacity Investment and Welfare under Air Transport University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Thurs. April 4, 2013 4:00 ­ 5:00 pm Location: Transportation Center in the air transportation system. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and local airport agencies have

Bustamante, Fabián E.

355

Energy efficient searching in delay-tolerant wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider the problem of information discovery in densely deployed and delay-tolerant Wireless Sensor Network (WSN), where the initiator of search is unaware of the location of target information. We propose Increasing Ray Search (IRS), ... Keywords: energy efficiency, query, search, wireless sensor networks

Kiran Rachuri; A. Antony Franklin; C. Siva Ram Murthy

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES  

SciTech Connect

We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

Kawate, T. [Kwasan and Hida Observatory, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nishizuka, N. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Oi, A. [College of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Ohyama, M. [Faculty of Education, Shiga University, 2-5-1 Hiratsu, Otsu, Shiga 1-1, Baba Hikone city, Siga 522-8522 (Japan); Nakajima, H., E-mail: kawate@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory, NAOJ, Nobeyama, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

357

Measurements of neutron dose equivalent for a proton therapy center using uniform scanning proton beams  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Neutron exposure is of concern in proton therapy, and varies with beam delivery technique, nozzle design, and treatment conditions. Uniform scanning is an emerging treatment technique in proton therapy, but neutron exposure for this technique has not been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, under various treatment conditions for uniform scanning beams employed at our proton therapy center. Methods: Using a wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, ThermoScientific, MA), the authors measured H/D at 50 cm lateral to the isocenter as a function of proton range, modulation width, beam scanning area, collimated field size, and snout position. They also studied the influence of other factors on neutron dose equivalent, such as aperture material, the presence of a compensator, and measurement locations. They measured H/D for various treatment sites using patient-specific treatment parameters. Finally, they compared H/D values for various beam delivery techniques at various facilities under similar conditions. Results: H/D increased rapidly with proton range and modulation width, varying from about 0.2 mSv/Gy for a 5 cm range and 2 cm modulation width beam to 2.7 mSv/Gy for a 30 cm range and 30 cm modulation width beam when 18 Multiplication-Sign 18 cm{sup 2} uniform scanning beams were used. H/D increased linearly with the beam scanning area, and decreased slowly with aperture size and snout retraction. The presence of a compensator reduced the H/D slightly compared with that without a compensator present. Aperture material and compensator material also have an influence on neutron dose equivalent, but the influence is relatively small. H/D varied from about 0.5 mSv/Gy for a brain tumor treatment to about 3.5 mSv/Gy for a pelvic case. Conclusions: This study presents H/D as a function of various treatment parameters for uniform scanning proton beams. For similar treatment conditions, the H/D value per uncollimated beam size for uniform scanning beams was slightly lower than that from a passive scattering beam and higher than that from a pencil beam scanning beam, within a factor of 2. Minimizing beam scanning area could effectively reduce neutron dose equivalent for uniform scanning beams, down to the level close to pencil beam scanning.

Zheng Yuanshui; Liu Yaxi; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Andries Niek; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); INTEGRIS Cancer Insititute, 5911 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H{sup {minus}} beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H{sup {minus}} beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H{sup {minus}} beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H{sup {minus}} beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H{sup {minus}} beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H{sup {minus}} beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser. 9 figs.

Johnstone, C.J.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

359

Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

Johnstone, Carol J. (Warrenville, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Sulfonated Nanoplates in Proton Conducting Membranes for Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface-functionalized nanoplates are synthesized by anchoring sulfonic acid containing siloxanes on zirconium phosphate, and in turn blended with Nafion to fabricate proton conducting membranes. The effects of these sulfonated nanoplates on proton conduction, hydro-characteristics and fuel cell performance are reported.

Chen, W.F.; Nimah, H.; Yu-Cheng Shen, Y.-C.; Kuo, P.-L.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Different Protonation Equilibria of 4-Methylimidazole and Acetic Acid  

SciTech Connect

The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Dynamic protonation equilibria in water of one 4-methylimidazole molecule as well as for pairs and groups consisting of 4- methylimidazole, acetic acid and bridging water molecules are studied using Q-HOP molecular dynamics simulation. We find a qualitatively different protonation behavior of 4-methylimidazole compared to that of acetic acid. On one hand, deprotonated, neutral 4-methylimidazole cannot as easily attract a freely diffusing extra proton from solution. Once the proton is bound, however, it remains tightly bound on a time scale of tens of nanoseconds. In a linear chain composed of acetic acid, a separating water molecule and 4-methylimidazole, an excess proton is equally shared between 4-methylimidazole and water. When a water molecule is linearly placed between two acetic acid molecules, the excess proton is always found on the central water. On the other hand, an excess proton in a 4-methylimidazole-water- 4-methylimidazole chain is always localized on one of the two 4- methylimidazoles. These findings are of interest to the discussion of proton transfer along chains of amino acids and water molecules in biomolecules.

Gu, Wei; Helms, Volkhard H.

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

362

GHG emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG emissions GHG emissions Dataset Summary Description These datasets include GHG and CO2 emissions statistics for the European Union (EU). The statistics are available from the European Commission. Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels CO2 emissions EU GHG emissions Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Total GHG and CO2 Emissions for EU (xls, 853.5 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions by Sector, all member countries (xls, 2 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions from Transport, all member countries (xls, 1.3 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by sector, all member countries (xls, 2.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by transport, all member countries (xls, 1.5 MiB)

363

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview Diagram Notes [a] CO2 emissions related to petroleum consumption (includes 64 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [b] CO2 emissions related to coal consumption (includes 0.3 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [c] CO2 emissions related to natural gas consumption (includes 13 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [d] Excludes carbon sequestered in nonfuel fossil products. [e] CO2 emissions from the plastics portion of municipal solid waste (11 MMTCO2) combusted for electricity generation and very small amounts (0.4 MMTCO2) of geothermal-related emissions.

364

Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

The LHC as a Proton-Nucleus Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following its initial operation as a proton-proton (p-p) and heavy-ion (208Pb82+-208Pb82+) collider, the LHC is expected to operate as a p-Pb collider. Later it may collide protons with other lighter nuclei such as 40Ar18+ or 16O8+. We show how the existing proton and lead-ion injector chains may be efficiently operated in tandem to provide these hybrid collisions. The two-in-one magnet design of the LHC main rings imposes different revolution frequencies for the two beams in part of the magnetic cycle. We discuss and evaluate the consequences for beam dynamics and estimate the potential performance of the LHC as a proton-nucleus collider.

Carli, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Gamma-ray Emission from Crushed Clouds in Supernova Remnants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the radio and gamma-ray emission observed from newly-found "GeV-bright" supernova remnants (SNRs) can be explained by a model, in which a shocked cloud and shock-accelerated cosmic rays (CRs) frozen in it are simultaneously compressed by the supernova blastwave as a result of formation of a radiative cloud shock. Simple reacceleration of pre-existing CRs is generally sufficient to power the observed gamma-ray emission through the decays of neutral pions produced in hadronic interactions between high-energy protons (nuclei) and gas in the compressed-cloud layer. This model provides a natural account of the observed synchrotron radiation in SNRs W51C, W44 and IC 443 with flat radio spectral index, which can be ascribed to a combination of secondary and reaccelerated electrons and positrons.

Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Funk, Stefan; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takaaki

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Strange Electric Form Factor of the Proton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By combining the constraints of charge symmetry with new chiral extrapolation techniques and recent low-mass quenched lattice QCD simulations of the individual quark contributions to the electric charge radii of the baryon octet, we obtain an accurate determination of the strange electric charge radius of the proton. While this analysis provides a value for G_E^s(Q^2=0.1 GeV^2) in agreement with the best current data, the theoretical error is comparable with that expected from future HAPPEx results from JLab. Together with the earlier determination of G_M^s, this result considerably constrains the role of hidden flavor in the structure of the nucleon.

D. B. Leinweber; S. Boinepalli; A. W. Thomas; P. Wang; A. G. Williams; R. D. Young; J. M. Zanotti; J. B. Zhang

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

368

Nanostructured polymer membranes for proton conduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polymers having an improved ability to entrain water are characterized, in some embodiments, by unusual humidity-induced phase transitions. The described polymers (e.g., hydrophilically functionalized block copolymers) have a disordered state and one or more ordered states (e.g., a lamellar state, a gyroid state, etc.). In one aspect, the polymers are capable of undergoing a disorder-to-order transition while the polymer is exposed to an increasing temperature at a constant relative humidity. In some aspects the polymer includes a plurality of portions, wherein a first portion forms proton-conductive channels within the membrane and wherein the channels have a width of less than about 6 nm. The described polymers are capable of entraining and preserving water at high temperature and low humidity. Surprisingly, in some embodiments, the polymers are capable of entraining greater amounts of water with the increase of temperature. The polymers can be used in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes in fuel cells.

Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Park, Moon Jeong

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

369

Ion-/proton-conducting apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A c-axis-oriented HAP thin film synthesized by seeded growth on a palladium hydrogen membrane substrate. An exemplary synthetic process includes electrochemical seeding on the substrate, and secondary and tertiary hydrothermal treatments under conditions that favor growth along c-axes and a-axes in sequence. By adjusting corresponding synthetic conditions, an HAP this film can be grown to a controllable thickness with a dense coverage on the underlying substrate. The thin films have relatively high proton conductivity under hydrogen atmosphere and high temperature conditions. The c-axis oriented films may be integrated into fuel cells for application in the intermediate temperature range of 200-600.degree. C. The electrochemical-hydrothermal deposition technique may be applied to create other oriented crystal materials having optimized properties, useful for separations and catalysis as well as electronic and electrochemical applications, electrochemical membrane reactors, and in chemical sensors.

Yates, Matthew (Penfield, NY); Liu, Dongxia (Rochester, NY)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Quest for Spinning Glue in High-Energy Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a spin physics program colliding transverse or longitudinal polarized proton beams at {radical}(s) = 200-500 GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. These studies provide fundamental tests of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).One of the main objectives of the STAR spin physics program is the determination of the polarized gluon distribution function through a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A{sub LL}, for various processes. Recent results will be shown on the measurement of A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production, neutral pion production and charged pion production at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV.

Surrow, Bernd [Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

371

Progress on High Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy for Direct Assay of Pu in Spent Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct, nondestructive measurement of fissile and fissionable isotopes in spent fuel is not yet possible. Current methods which infer plutonium content through proxy measurements and confirmatory burnup calculations have relatively large uncertainty and do not satisfy the desire for a measurement that is independent of operator declarations. We are currently exploring the High Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy (HEDGS) technique for direct, independent Pu measurement in light-water reactor fuels. HEDGS exploits the unique distribution of fission-product nuclei from each of the fissile isotopes. Fission is stimulated in the sample with a source of interrogating neutrons, and delayed gamma rays from the decay of the short-lived fission-product nuclei are measured. The measured gamma spectrum from the unknown sample is then fit with a linear combination of gamma spectra from pure U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241, as deduced from the known fission-product yield curves and decay properties of the fission-product nuclei, to determine the original proportions of these fissile isotopes. In previous work, we performed preliminary modeling studies of HEDGS on idealized single fuel pins of various burnups. Here, we report progress on extending our GEANT-based modeling tools to efficiently model full pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies using variance reduction techniques specific to the background emissions and induced signal, as appropriate. Predicted performance for a nominal HEDGS instrument design, is reported for the assay of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 in spent fuel assemblies ranging from fresh to 60 GWd/MTU in burnup.

Campbell, Luke W.; Smith, Leon E.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

372

A BiCMOS front-end system with binary delay line for capacitive detector read-out  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the field of elementary particle physics, trajectories of charged particles are reconstructed from data obtained from tracking detectors. In the future large Hadron collider (LHC) accelerator at CERN, bunches of protons will collide every 25 ns. Large detector systems are constructed around the points of collision. These detectors often include smaller tracking subdetectors of different types like silicon, GaAs, or gaseous detectors--capacitive detectors that are read out by appropriate electronics located close to the collision region where the radiation levels are high. Here, as part of the entire readout chip, a low-power high-gain transresistance amplifier has been developed, followed by a high-speed, low-power small offset comparator and a binary delay line. The amplifier is balanced, fully differential in circuit topology, and symmetrical in layout, making it radiation tolerant and relatively insensitive to varying magnetic fields. Also, the comparator is fully symmetrical with a balanced input stage. Before irradiation (Pre-rad) the transresistance amplifier has a measured differential gain of 110 mV/4 fC, an average 10/90% rise time (t{sub 10/90%}) of 20 to 50 ns depending on the bias conditions, a noise figure of 433 {circle_plus} 93{center_dot}(C{sub t}){sup 1.08} and a power consumption of 750 {micro}W. The comparator uses bipolar transistors in the regenerative stage resulting in a small offset, a sensitivity <1.5 mV, and a power consumption of {approx}350 {micro}W at 40 MHz. The maximum pre-rad frequency at which the comparator is still functioning correctly is {approx}100 MHz. Pre-rad, the binary delay line has a delay of 2.1 {micro}s at 40 MHz and a power consumption of {approx}450 {micro}W/channel for a four-channel design. The complete readout channel--amplifier, comparator, and binary delay line--consumes {approx}1.5 mW. The entire readout system was implemented in the radiation-hard 0.8-{micro}m SOI-SIMOX BiCMOS-PJFET technology of DMILL.

Wulleman, J. [Interuniversity Inst. for High Energies, Brussels (Belgium)]|[Free Univ. of Brussels (Belgium)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Generalized z-scaling in proton-proton collisions at high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New generalization of z-scaling in inclusive particle production is proposed. The scaling variable z is fractal measure which depends on kinematical characteristics of the underlying sub-process expressed in terms of the momentum fractions x1 and x2 of the incoming protons. In the generalized approach, the x1 and x2 are functions of the momentum fractions ya and yb of the scattered and recoil constituents carried out by the inclusive particle and recoil object, respectively. The scaling function psi(z) for charged and identified hadrons produced in proton-proton collisions is constructed. The fractal dimensions and heat capacity of the produced medium entering definition of the z are established to obtain energy, angular and multiplicity independence of the psi(z). The scheme allows unique description of data on inclusive cross sections of charged particles, pions, kaons, antiprotons and lambdas at high energies. The obtained results are of interest to use z-scaling as a tool for searching for new physics phe...

Zborovsk, I

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Doppler-shift proton fraction measurement on a CW proton injector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectrometer/Optical Multi-channel Analyzer has been used to measure the proton fraction of the cw proton injector developed for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) and the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) at Los Alamos. This technique, pioneered by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), was subsequently adopted by the international fusion community as the standard for determining the extracted ion fractions of neutral beam injectors. Proton fractions up to 95 {+-} 3% have been measured on the LEDA injector. These values are in good agreement with results obtained by magnetically sweeping the ion beam, collimated by a slit, across a Faraday cup. Since the velocity distribution of each beam species is measured, it also can be used to determine beam divergence. While divergence has not yet been ascertained due to the wide slit widths in use, non-Gaussian distributions have been observed during operation above the design-matched perveance. An additional feature is that the presence of extracted water ions can be observed. During ion source conditioning at 75 kV, an extracted water fraction > 30% was briefly observed.

Kamperschroer, J.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Sherman, J.D.; Zaugg, T.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Arvin, A.H.; Bolt, A.S.; Richards, M.C. [Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Pion production in proton-proton collisions in a covariant one boson exchange model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the renewed interest in studying the pion production on nuclei with protons at few GeV incident energies, we investigate the pion production in proton-proton collisions over an energy range of 300 MeV to 2 GeV. Starting from a realistic one-boson exchange model with parameters fitted to the amplitudes of the elastic nucleon-nucleon scattering, we perform fully covariant calculations for the total, double and triple differential cross-sections of the p(p,n\\pi^+)p and p(p,p\\pi^0)p reactions. The calculations incorporate the exchange of \\pi, \\rho,\\omega and \\sigma mesons and treat nucleon and delta isobar as intermediate states. We obtain a reasonably good agreement with the experimental data in the entire range of beam energies. The form of the covariant delta propagator, the cut-off parameter for the \\pi NN and \\pi N\\Delta vertex form factors and the energy dependence of the delta isobar decay width is investigated.

Engel, A; Shyam, R; Mosel, U

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Pion production in proton-proton collisions in a covariant one boson exchange model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the renewed interest in studying the pion production on nuclei with protons at few GeV incident energies, we investigate the pion production in proton-proton collisions over an energy range of 300 $MeV$ to 2 $GeV$. Starting from a realistic one-boson exchange model with parameters fitted to the amplitudes of the elastic nucleon-nucleon scattering, we perform fully covariant calculations for the total, double and triple differential cross-sections of the $p(p,n\\pi^+)p$ and $p(p,p\\pi^0)p$ reactions. The calculations incorporate the exchange of $\\pi, \\rho,\\omega$ and $\\sigma$ mesons and treat nucleon and delta isobar as intermediate states. We obtain a reasonably good agreement with the experimental data in the entire range of beam energies. The form of the covariant delta propagator, the cut-off parameter for the $\\pi NN$ and $\\pi N\\Delta$ vertex form factors and the energy dependence of the delta isobar decay width is investigated.

A. Engel; A. K. Dutt-Mazumder; R. Shyam; U. Mosel

1996-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

377

Gas turbine plant emissions  

SciTech Connect

Many cogeneration facilities use gas turbines combined with heat recovery boilers, and the number is increasing. At the start of 1986, over 75% of filings for new cogeneration plants included plans to burn natural gas. Depending on the geographic region, gas turbines are still one of the most popular prime movers. Emissions of pollutants from these turbines pose potential risks to the environment, particularly in geographical areas that already have high concentrations of cogeneration facilities. Although environmental regulations have concentrated on nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) in the past, it is now necessary to evaluate emission controls for other pollutants as well.

Davidson, L.N.; Gullett, D.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Amplitude death phenomena in delay--coupled Hamiltonian systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hamiltonian systems, when coupled {\\it via} time--delayed interactions, do not remain conservative. In the uncoupled system, the motion can typically be periodic, quasiperiodic or chaotic. This changes drastically when delay coupling is introduced since now attractors can be created in the phase space. In particular for sufficiently strong coupling there can be amplitude death (AD), namely the stabilization of point attractors and the cessation of oscillatory motion. The approach to the state of AD or oscillation death is also accompanied by a phase--flip in the transient dynamics. A discussion and analysis of the phenomenology is made through an application to the specific cases of harmonic as well as anharmoniccoupled oscillators, in particular the H\\'enon-Heiles system.

Garima Saxena; Awadhesh Prasad; Ram Ramaswamy

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

379

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

380

Chloromethyl chlorosulfate as a voltage delay inhibitor in lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Chloromethyl chlorosulfate (CMCS) is used as a passive film growth inhibitor in electrochemical cells to minimize voltage delay and low-voltage discharge. Film growth on lithium anodes is significantly diminished when CMCS is added to SOCl{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} electrolytes of lithium batteries. The CMCS also has the effect of extending the shelf-life of Li/SOCl{sub 2} and Li/SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} batteries.

Delnick, F.M.

1991-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Chloromethyl chlorosulfate as a voltage delay inhibitor in lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Chloromethyl chlorosulfate (CMCS) is used as a passive film growth inhibitor in electrochemical cells to minimize voltage delay and low-voltage discharge. Film growth on lithium anodes is significantly diminished when CMCS is added to SOCl.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 electrolytes of lithium batteries. The CMCS also has the effect of extending the shelf-life of Li/SOCl.sub.2 and Li/SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 batteries.

Delnick, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Chloromethyl chlorosulfate as a voltage delay inhibitor in lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Chloromethyl chlorosulfate (CMCS) is used as a passive film growth inhibitor in electrochemical cells to minimize voltage delay and low-voltage discharge. Film growth on lithium anodes is significantly diminished when CMCS is added to SOCl[sub 2] and SO[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] electrolytes of lithium batteries. The CMCS also has the effect of extending the shelf-life of Li/SOCl[sub 2] and Li/SO[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] batteries.

Delnick, F.M.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

383

The density of surface states as the total time delay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a scattering problem of tight-binding Bloch electrons by a weak random surface potential, a generalized Levinson theorem is put forward showing the equality of the total density of surface states and the density of the total time delay. The proof uses explicit formulas for the wave operators in the new rescaled energy and interaction (REI) representation, as well as an index theorem for adequate associated operator algebras.

Hermann Schulz-Baldes

2013-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

384

Statistical delay budget partitioning in wireless mesh networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs) are currently attracting strong attention due to their great potential in supporting multimedia applications with real-time transport with last-mile Internet access. Multimedia end-to-end transmission requires Quality of ... Keywords: Delay budget partitioning, End-to-end QoS, IEEE 802.11s, IEEE 802.16j, Radio resource management, Wireless mesh networks

Najah A. Abu-Ali; Hossam S. Hassanein

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

ELECTRON AND PROTON ACCELERATION DURING THE FIRST GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT EVENT OF SOLAR CYCLE 24  

SciTech Connect

High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 {+-} 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 {+-} 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active region has been performed to provide escape channels for flare-accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released {approx}10 minutes later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combining multi-wavelength imaging data of the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain evidence that GLE protons, with an estimated kinetic energy of {approx}1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to {approx}3.07 solar radii. The time-of-maximum spectrum of protons is typical for shock wave acceleration.

Li, C.; Sun, L. P. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Firoz, Kazi A. [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Miroshnichenko, L. I., E-mail: lic@nju.edu.cn [N. V. Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN), Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, 142190 Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions of Protons in Host Metals at Picometre Distance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review is given for the explanation of the measurements of Miley et al. of a fully reproducible generation of nuclei of the whole periodic table by protons in host metals during a several-weeks reaction. Similar low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) were observed by other groups. The fact that the heavy nuclides are not due to pollution can be seen from the fact that such very rare elements as thulium and terbium were detected by unique K-shell X-ray spectra. The nuclear reaction energy goes into the heavy nuclei as measured from much bigger traces in CR39 than from alphas. The fact that any reaction of the protons results in stable daughter nuclei is confirmed by the fact that the highest energy gain is resulting with stable reaction products. This has been explained in Ref. 2, and the energy gain for the heavy element generation by a compound reaction was discussed. The explanation is based on the model of the authors from 1989 to assume free motion of the protons contrary to localized crystalline states. A relation of the reaction time U on distance d of the reacting nuclei by a power law with an exponent 34.8 was derived. Based on few reproducible D-D reactions, a reaction time near the range of megaseconds and a reaction distance of nanometers was concluded. A splendid confirmation of the picometre-megasecond reactions was achieved by Li et al. from his direct quantum mechanical calculations of the hot fusion D-T reactions based on a one-step selective resonance tunneling model. Li et al. were able for the first time to derive the cross sections of the hot fusion. Li's application to picometre distance showed megasecond reaction times with no neutron or gamma emission. Because of the imaginary part in the Schroedinger potential, the problem of the level width is reduced by damping.

Heinrich Hora; George H. Miley; Jak C. Kelly

2000-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

387

Femtosecond Time-Delay X-ray Holography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time-Delay X-ray Holography Time-Delay X-ray Holography X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) will produce photon pulses with a unique and desirable combination of properties. Their short X-ray wavelengths allow penetration into materials and the ability to probe structure at and below the nanometer scale. Their ultra-short duration gives information about this structure at the fundamental time-scales of atoms and molecules. The extreme intensity of the pulses will allow this information to be acquired in a single shot, so that these studies can be carried out on non-repeatable processes or on weakly-scattering objects that will be modified by the pulse. A fourth property of XFEL pulses is their high transverse coherence, which brings the promise of decades of innovation in visible optics to the X-ray regime, such as holography, interferometry, and laser-based imaging. Making an effective use of XFEL pulses, however, will benefit from innovations that are new to both X-ray science and coherent optics. One such innovation is the new method of time-delay X-ray holography [i], recently demonstrated at the FLASH FEL at DESY in Hamburg, to measure the evolution of objects irradiated by intense pulses.

388

Controlled Nonlinear Stochastic Delay Equations: Part I: Modeling and Approximations  

SciTech Connect

This two-part paper deals with 'foundational' issues that have not been previously considered in the modeling and numerical optimization of nonlinear stochastic delay systems. There are new classes of models, such as those with nonlinear functions of several controls (such as products), each with is own delay, controlled random Poisson measure driving terms, admissions control with delayed retrials, and others. There are two basic and interconnected themes for these models. The first, dealt with in this part, concerns the definition of admissible control. The classical definition of an admissible control as a nonanticipative relaxed control is inadequate for these models and needs to be extended. This is needed for the convergence proofs of numerical approximations for optimal controls as well as to have a well-defined model. It is shown that the new classes of admissible controls do not enlarge the range of the value functions, is closed (together with the associated paths) under weak convergence, and is approximatable by ordinary controls. The second theme, dealt with in Part II, concerns transportation equation representations, and their role in the development of numerical algorithms with much reduced memory and computational requirements.

Kushner, Harold J., E-mail: hjk@dam.brown.edu [Brown University, Applied Math (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Imaging atherosclerotic plaque inflammation with [18F]- fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tracer CI Confidence interval CO2 Carbon dioxide CRP C-reactive protein CT Computed tomography DPM Decays per minute eNOS Endothelial nitric oxide synthase EDTA Ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid ETL Echo train... rabbit p Probability PBMC Peripheral blood mononuclear cells PBS Phosphate-buffered saline PDGF Platelet-derived growth factor PDW Proton density-weighted PET Positron emission tomography PK11195 1-(2-chlorophenyl...

Rudd, James H. F.

2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

Constraints on proton structure from precision atomic physics measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ground-state hyperfine splittings in hydrogen and muonium are extremely well measured. The difference between them, after correcting for the different magnetic moments of the muon and proton and for reduced mass effects, is due solely to the structure of the proton - the large QED contributions for a pointlike nucleus essentially cancel. A major contribution to the rescaled hyperfine difference is proportional to the Zemach radius, a fundamental measure of the proton which can be computed as an integral over the product of the elastic electric and magnetic form factors of the proton. The remaining proton structure corrections, the polarization contribution from inelastic states in the spin-dependent virtual Compton amplitude and the proton size dependence of the relativistic recoil corrections, have small uncertainties. The resulting high precision determination of the Zemach radius (1.013 {+-} 0.016) fm from atomic physics provides an important constraint on fits to accelerator measurements of the proton electric and magnetic form factors. Conversely, the authors use the muonium data to extract an 'experimental' value for the QED corrections to the hyperfine splitting of hydrogenic atoms. There is a significant discrepancy between measurement and theory which is in the same direction as a corresponding discrepancy in positronium.

Brodsky, S

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

391

Getting There: Exploring the Role of Expectations and Preproduction Delays in Processes of Organizational Founding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of preproduction delays, environmental conditions at founding cannot explain organization-building decisions taken earlier. As a consequence, environmental conditions at founding cannot explain organizational founding. Future levels of resource ... Keywords: computer simulation, delays, feedback models, organizational founding, preproduction

Alessandro Lomi; Erik R. Larsen; Filippo Carlo Wezel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Scheduling algorithms for throughput maximization in time-varying networks with reconfiguration delays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the control of possibly time-varying wireless networks under reconfiguration delays. Reconfiguration delay is the time it takes to switch network resources from one subset of nodes to another and it is a ...

Celik, Guner Dincer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

VTrack: Accurate, energy-aware road traffic delay estimation using mobile phones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traffic delays and congestion are a major source of inefficiency, wasted fuel, and commuter frustration. Measuring and localizing these delays, and routing users around them, is an important step towards reducing the time ...

Thiagarajan, Arvind

394

A Soft X-ray Split and Delay System for LCLS | Stanford Synchrotron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Room 108A Brendan Murphy, LCLS In this talk I will describe the development and commissioning of the x-ray split and delay (XRSD) system at LCLS. The XRSD is a two-mirror delay...

395

A Study of Delays in Making Tide Gauge Data Available to Tsunami Warning Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This short note provides conclusions of a study of the various factors that determine the delay between tsunami arrival at a tide gauge station and data being made available at tsunami warning centers. The various delays involved include those ...

S. J. Holgate; P. L. Woodworth; P. R. Foden; J. Pugh

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Accuracy and Variability of GPS Tropospheric Delay Measurements of Water Vapor in the Western Mediterranean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a preliminary step for assessing the impact of global positioning system (GPS) refractive delay data in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, the GPS zenith tropospheric delays (ZTDs) are analyzed from 51 permanent GPS sites in the ...

Jennifer Haase; Maorong Ge; Henrik Vedel; Eric Calais

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Significance of joint features derived from the modified group delay function in speech processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the significance of combining cepstral features derived from the modified group delay function and from the short-time spectral magnitude like the MFCC. The conventional group delay function fails to capture the resonant structure ...

Rajesh M. Hegde; Hema A. Murthy; V. R. R. Gadde

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today's technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Munoz-Ramos, Karina (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Pratt, Joseph William; Akhil, Abbas Ali (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Schenkman, Benjamin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Electron and proton heating by solar wind turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous formulations of heating and transport associated with strong magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are generalized to incorporate separate internal energy equations for electrons and protons. Electron heat conduction is included. Energy is supplied by turbulent heating that affects both electrons and protons, and is exchanged between them via collisions. Comparison to available Ulysses data shows that a reasonable accounting for the data is provided when (i) the energy exchange timescale is very long and (ii) the deposition of heat due to turbulence is divided, with 60% going to proton heating and 40% into electron heating. Heat conduction, determined here by an empirical fit, plays a major role in describing the electron data.

Breech, B; Cranmer, S R; Kasper, J C; Oughton, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Self-Excitation and Feedback Cooling of an Isolated Proton  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first one-proton self-excited oscillator (SEO) and one-proton feedback cooling are demonstrated. In a Penning trap with a large magnetic gradient, the SEO frequency is resolved to the high precision needed to detect a one-proton spin flip. This is after undamped magnetron motion is sideband cooled to a 14 mK theoretical limit, and despite random frequency shifts (typically larger than those from a spin flip) that take place every time sideband cooling is applied. The observations open a possible path towards a million-fold improved comparison of the p and p magnetic moments.

Guise, N.; DiSciacca, J.; Gabrielse, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.  

SciTech Connect

One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

2002-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Monoenergetic Proton Beams Accelerated by a Radiation Pressure Driven Shock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on the acceleration of impurity-free quasimononenergetic proton beams from an initially gaseous hydrogen target driven by an intense infrared ({lambda} = 10 {micro}m) laser. The front surface of the target was observed by optical probing to be driven forward by the radiation pressure of the laser. A proton beam of MeV energy was simultaneously recorded with narrow energy spread ({sigma}-4%), low normalized emittance (-8 nm), and negligible background. The scaling of proton energy with the ratio of intensity over density (I/n) confirms that the acceleration is due to the radiation pressure driven shock.

Palmer, C.A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Dover, N.P.; Babzien, M.; Dudnikova, G.I.; Ispiriyan, M.; Polyanskiy, M.N.; Schreiber, J.; Shkolnikov, P.; Yakimenko, V.; Najmudin, Z.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Opportunistic media access control and routing for delay-tolerant mobile ad hoc networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In delay-tolerant mobile ad hoc networks, motion of network nodes, network sparsity and sporadic density can cause a lack of guaranteed connectivity. These networks experience significant link delay and their routing protocols must take a store-and-forward ... Keywords: Cross-layer adaptation design, Delay-tolerant network, Mobile ad hoc network, Opportunistic routing, Vehicular ad hoc network

Liang Dong

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Short Survey: Intelligent switching expert system for delayed coking unit based on iterative learning strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delayed coking is the most effective process to decarbonize and demetallize heavy petroleum residues. However, it relies much on the field engineers' experiences and expertise in practice for operating the controllers effectively and compatibly in delayed ... Keywords: Delayed coking, Expert system, Intelligent control, Iterative learning

Xiaodong Yu; Yujie Wei; Dexian Huang; Yongheng Jiang; Bo Liu; Yihui Jin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Adaptive posicast controller for time-delay systems with relative degree n*?2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an Adaptive Posicast Controller that deals with parametric uncertainties in linear systems with delays. It is assumed that the plant has no right half plane zeros and the delay is known. The adaptive controller is based on the ... Keywords: Adaptive control, Model matching, Time-delay systems

Yildiray Yildiz; Anuradha Annaswamy; Ilya V. Kolmanovsky; Diana Yanakiev

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Sliding mode for detection and accommodation of computation time delay fault  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computation time delay in digital control systems reduces its robustness as well as degrades its performance. In this paper, the computation time delay is assumed to be constant and smaller than the sampling time and is treated as a fault to be detected, ... Keywords: Computation time delay, Discrete-time sliding mode control, Fault detection, Sliding mode observer

Jos Paulo F. Garcia; Lizete Maria C. F. Garcia; Gisele C. Apolinrio; Fernando B. Rodrigues

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Coping with buffer delay change due to power and ground noise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variation of power and ground levels affect VLSI circuit performance. Trends in device technology and in packaging have necessitated a revision in conventional delay models. In particular, simple scalable models are needed to predict delays in the presence ... Keywords: common mode noise, differential mode noise, incremental delay change, power and ground noise

Lauren Hui Chen; Malgorzata Marek-Sadowska; Forrest Brewer

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Finite-time robust stochastic stability of uncertain stochastic delayed reaction-diffusion genetic regulatory networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the problem of finite-time stability analysis for uncertain stochastic delayed reaction-diffusion genetic regulatory networks. The parameter uncertainties are assumed to be norm-bounded, and the time delays are assumed to ... Keywords: Finite-time stochastic stability, Genetic regulatory networks, Reaction-diffusion, Stochastic noise, Time delays

Jianping Zhou; Shengyuan Xu; Hao Shen

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Energy-Delay Tradeoffs in Combinational Logic using Gate Sizing and Supply Voltage Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy-Delay Tradeoffs in Combinational Logic using Gate Sizing and Supply Voltage Optimization savings to the energy profile of a circuit. These savings are obtained by using gate sizing and supply of energy to delay is derived from a linear delay model extended to multiple supplies. The optimizations

Nikolic, Borivoje

410

Verification and Implementation of Delay-Insensitive Processes in Restrictive Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A delay-insensitive module communicates with its environment through wires of unbounded delay. To avoid transmission interference, the absorption of a signal transition must be acknowledged before another one is propagated along the same wire. The environment ... Keywords: Asynchronous circuits, Closed systems, Delay-insensitivity, Process algebra, Restrictive environments, Verification

Hemangee K. Kapoor; Mark B. Josephs; Dennis P. Furey

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

CO2 Emissions - Puerto Rico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Puerto Rico Graphics CO2 Emissions from Puerto Rico Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Puerto Rico image Per capita...

412

Reducing SF6 Emissions @ PPPL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

96.4 88.4 Fuel Consumption Emissions 2015 1823.8 Fugitive Emissions Refrigerant 160 241.2 SF6 38360 21042.8 Scope 2 -Indirect Electricity Purchase 13816 13855 Scope 3 -...

413

BPA SF6 Emission Info  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BPA SF 6 Emission Info Steve Lowder - 2012.12 slide 1 Discovering Emission Locations slide 2 BPA uses a FLIR leak detection camera (other methods available) Allows leaks to...

414

SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTON CONDUCTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The morphological and electrical properties of yttrium (Y) and indium (In) doped barium cerate perovskites of the form BaIn{sub 0.3-x}Y{sub x}Ce{sub 0.7}O{sub 3-{delta}} (with x=0-0.3) prepared by a modified Pechini method were investigated as potential high temperature proton conductors with improved chemical stability. The sinterability increased with the increase of In-doping, and the perovskite phase was found in the BaIn{sub 0.3-x}Y{sub x}Ce{sub 0.7}O{sub 3-{delta}} solid solutions over the range 0 {le} x {le} 0.3. The conductivities decreased (from x to x, insert quantitative values) while the tolerance to wet CO{sub 2} improved for BaIn{sub 0.3-x}Y{sub x}Ce{sub 0.7}O{sub 3-{delta}} samples with an increase of In-doping.

Brinkman, K.

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

415

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond results from the attractive dipolar interaction of a chemical group containing a hydrogen atom with a group containing an electronegative atom, such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine, in the same or a different molecule. Conventional wisdom has it that proton transfer from one molecule to another can only happen via hydrogen bonds. Recently, a team of Berkeley Lab and University of Southern California researchers, using the ALS, discovered to their surprise that in some cases, protons can find ways to transfer even when hydrogen bonds are blocked. Sometimes You Have to

416

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond...

417

Higher Moments of Net Proton Multiplicity Distributions at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first measurements of the kurtosis (? [kappa]), skewness (S), and variance (? [sigma] [superscript 2]) of net-proton multiplicity (N [subscript p]-N [subscript p?] ) distributions at midrapidity for Au+Au ...

Balewski, Jan T.

418

RADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. and Gupta, R. , Radiation Resistant Magnets for the RIARADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS A. F.HTS materials in high radiation environments requires that

Zeller, A.F.; Ronningen, R.M.; Godeke, A.; Heilbronn, L.H.; McMahan-Norris, P.; Gupta, R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

First measurements of laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present our first results about laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence in solids. In the first part, we describe the optimization of the proton source as a function of the target thickness as well as the laser pulse duration and energy. Due to the ultra high contrast ratio of our laser beam, we succeeded in using targets ranging from the micron scale down to nanometers thickness. The two optimal thicknesses we put in evidence are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Laser pulse duration shows a small influence on proton maximum energy, whereas the latter turns out to vary almost linearly as a function of laser energy. Thanks to this optimisation work, we have been able to acquire images of the proton energy deposition in a solid scintillator.

Floquet, V.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz Dufrenoy, S.; Bonnaud, G.; Monot, P.; Martin, Ph. [CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Gremillet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91297 Arpajon (France)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond results from the attractive dipolar interaction of a chemical group containing a hydrogen atom with a group containing an electronegative atom, such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine, in the same or a different molecule. Conventional wisdom has it that proton transfer from one molecule to another can only happen via hydrogen bonds. Recently, a team of Berkeley Lab and University of Southern California researchers, using the ALS, discovered to their surprise that in some cases, protons can find ways to transfer even when hydrogen bonds are blocked. Sometimes You Have to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

Brenholdt, I.R.

1957-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

422

Global emissions inventories  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric chemistry determines the concentrations of most of the important greenhouse gases except for carbon dioxide. The rate of removal of the greenhouse gases from the atmosphere is also controlled by atmospheric chemistry. The indirect effects of chemical forcing resulting from the chemical interactions of other species can also affect the concentrations of radiatively important gases such as ozone. In order to establish the contribution of any possible climatic change attributable to individual greenhouse gases, spatially and temporally resolved estimates of their emissions need to be established. Unfortunately, for most of the radiatively important species the global magnitudes of their individual fluxes are not known to better than a factor of two and their spatial distributions are even more poorly characterized. Efforts to estimate future projections of potential impacts and to monitor international agreements will require continued research to narrow the uncertainties of magnitude and geographical distribution of emissions.

Dignon, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Diesel hybridization and emissions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CTR Vehicle Systems and Fuels team a diesel hybrid powertrain. The goal of this experiment was to investigate and demonstrate the potential of diesel engines for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in a fuel economy and emissions. The test set-up consisted of a diesel engine coupled to an electric motor driving a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). This hybrid drive is connected to a dynamometer and a DC electrical power source creating a vehicle context by combining advanced computer models and emulation techniques. The experiment focuses on the impact of the hybrid control strategy on fuel economy and emissions-in particular, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM). The same hardware and test procedure were used throughout the entire experiment to assess the impact of different control approaches.

Pasquier, M.; Monnet, G.

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

424

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cameron KC. Nitrous oxide emissions from two dairy pastureand land use on N 2 O emissions from an imperfectly drainedoptions for N 2 O emissions from differently managed

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

CO2 Emissions - Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah Graphics CO2 Emissions from Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah image Per capita CO2 Emission...

426

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the public from airborne radionuclide emissions. We requestfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon FromFugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides from Diffuse Sources

Wahl, Linnea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-470E-201 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Preparedfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon FromFugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides from Diffuse Sources

Wahl, Linnea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2002 update of this manual, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been extremely active in its efforts to expand continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) requirements through a variety of regulatory instruments. Additional monitoring requirements have resulted from EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. EPA attempted to impose mercury (Hg) monitoring requirements in its now-vacated Clean Air Mercury Rule. Most recently, EPA has proposed mercury, particulate mat...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

429

Engineering Design of a Continuous Duty $\\gamma$ -Production Proton Target for the Contraband Detection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Design of a Continuous Duty $\\gamma$ -Production Proton Target for the Contraband Detection System

Rathke, J; Klein, J

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Low-lying Proton Intruder State in 13B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neturon rich nucleus 13B was studied via the proton transfer reaction 4He(12Be,13B \\gamma) at 50AMeV. The known 4.83-MeV excited state was strongly populated and its spin and parity were assigned to 1/2+ by comparing the angular differential cross section data with DWBA calculations. This low-lying 1/2+ state is interpreted as a proton intruder state and indicates a deformation of the nucleus.

S. Ota; S. Shimoura; H. Iwasaki; M. Kurokawa; S. Michimasa; N. Aoi; H. Baba; K. Demichi; Z. Elekes; T. Fukuchi; T. Gomi; S. Kanno; S. Kubono; K. Kurita; H. Hasegawa; E. Ideguchi; N. Iwasa; Y. U. Matsuyama; K. L. Yurkewicz; T. Minemura; T. Motobayashi; T. Murakami; M. Notani; A. Odahara; A. Saito; H. Sakurai; E. Takeshita; S. Takeuchi; M. Tamaki; T. Teranishi; Y. Yanagisawa; K. Yamada; M. Ishihara

2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

431

Nonperturbative Vacuum-Polarization Effects in Proton-Laser Collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the collision of a high-energy proton beam and a strong laser field, merging of laser photons can occur due to the polarization of vacuum. The probability of photon merging is calculated by exactly accounting for the laser field which involves a highly nonperturbative dependence on the laser intensity and frequency. It is shown that the nonperturbative vacuum-polarization effects can be experimentally measured by combining the next generation of tabletop petawatt lasers with proton accelerators presently available.

Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

432

POLARIZED PROTON OPERATIONS IN THE AGS AND RHIC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polarized proton beam has been accelerated and stored at 100 GeV in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to study spin effects in the hadronic reactions. The essential equipment includes four Siberian snakes and eight spin rotators in two RHIC rings, a partial snake in the AGS, fast relative polarimeters, and ac dipoles in the AGS and RHIC. This paper summarizes the performance of RHIC as a polarized proton collider and of AGS as the injector to RHIC.

HUANG,H.; AHRENS,L.; BAI,M.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; ALESSI,J.; ALEKSEEV,I.; BRARVAR,S.; BRENNAN,M.; BROWN,K.; BUNCE,G.; DREES,A.; FISCHER,W.; GARDNER,C.; GLENN,W.; IGO,G.; JINNOCHI,O.; LUCCIO,A.; MACKAY,W.; MONTAG,C.; PILAT,F.; PTITSYN,V.; ROSER,T.; SATOGATA,T.; SPINKA,H.; SVIRIDA,D.; TEPIKIAN,S.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; TSOUPAS,N.; UNDERWOOD,D.; VANZEIJTS,J.; WOOD,J.; ZELENSKI,A.; ZENO,K.; ZHANG,S.Y.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

433

Modeling Uranium-Proton Ion Exchange in Biosorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Uranium-Proton Ion Exchange in Biosorption J I N B A I Y A N G A N D B O H U M I L V O L E, Quebec, Canada H3A 2B2 Biosorption of uranium metal ions by a nonliving protonated Sargassum fluitans seaweed biomass was used to remove the heavy metal uranium from the aqueous solution. Uranium biosorption

Volesky, Bohumil

434

Spin structure functions: Proton / deuteron measurements in the resonance region  

SciTech Connect

The RSS experiment ran in Hall C at Jefferson Lab and measured the proton and deuteron beam-target asymmetries for parallel and perpendicular target fields over a W range from pion threshold to 1.9 GeV at Q{sup 2} {approx} 1.3 GeV{sup 2}. Preliminary results for the proton spin structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} are presented.

Mark Jones; RSS Collaboration

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Trace element emissions  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Hassett, D.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A numerical study of bench blast row delay timing and its influence on percent-cast  

SciTech Connect

The computer program, DMC (Distinct Motion Code), which was developed for simulating the rock motion associated with blasting, has been used to study the influence of row delay timing on rock motion. The numerical simulations correspond with field observations in that very short delays (< 50ms) and very long delays (> 300ms) produce a lower percent-cast than a medium delay (100 to 200 ms). The DMC predicted relationship between row delay timing and percent-cast is more complex than expected with a dip in the curve where the optimum timing might be expected. More study is required to gain a full understanding of this phenomenon.

Preece, D.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Wednesday, 27 January 2010 00:00 Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

438

Protonation enthalpies of metal oxides from high temperature electrophoresis.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface protonation reactions play an important role in the behavior of mineral and colloidal systems, specifically in hydrothermal aqueous environments. However, studies addressing the reactions at the solid/liquid interface at temperatures above 100 C are scarce. In this study, newly and previously obtained high temperature electrophoresis data (up to 260 C) - zeta potentials and isoelectric points - for metal oxides, including SiO{sub 2}, SnO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, were used in thermodynamic analysis to derive the standard enthalpies of their surface protonation. Two different approaches were used for calculating the protonation enthalpy: one is based on thermodynamic description of the 1-pKa model for surface protonation, and another one - on a combination of crystal chemistry and solvation theories which link the relative permittivity of the solid phase and the ratio of the Pauling bond strength and bond length to standard protonation enthalpy. From this analysis, two expressions relating the protonation enthalpy to the relative permittivity of the solid phase were obtained.

Rodriguez-Santiago, V [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Fedkin, Mark V [ORNL; Lvov, Serguei N. [Pennsylvania State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Protonation enthalpies of metal oxides from high temperature electrophoresis  

SciTech Connect

Surface protonation reactions play an important role in the behavior of mineral and colloidal systems, specifically in hydrothermal aqueous environments. However, studies addressing the reactions at the solid/liquid interface at temperatures above 100 C are scarce. In this study, newly and previously obtained high temperature electrophoresis data (up to 260 C) zeta potentials and isoelectric points for metal oxides, including SiO2, SnO2, ZrO2, TiO2, and Fe3O4, were used in thermodynamic analysis to derive the standard enthalpies of their surface protonation. Two different approaches were used for calculating the protonation enthalpy: one is based on thermodynamic description of the 1-pKa model for surface protonation, and another one on a combination of crystal chemistry and solvation theories which link the relative permittivity of the solid phase and the ratio of the Pauling bond strength and bond length to standard protonation enthalpy. From this analysis, two expressions relating the protonation enthalpy to the relative permittivity of the solid phase were obtained.

Rodriguez-Santiago, V [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Fedkin, Mark V. [Pennsylvania State University; Lvov, Serguei N. [Pennsylvania State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Velocity-Space Proton Diffusion in the Solar Wind Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a velocity-space quasilinear diffusion of the solar wind protons driven by oblique Alfven turbulence at proton kinetic scales. Turbulent fluctuations at these scales possess properties of kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) that are efficient in Cherenkov resonant interactions. The proton diffusion proceeds via Cherenkov kicks and forms a quasilinear plateau - nonthermal proton tail in the velocity distribution function (VDF). The tails extend in velocity space along the mean magnetic field from 1 to (1.5-3) VA, depending on the spectral break position, turbulence amplitude at the spectral break, and spectral slope after the break. The most favorable conditions for the tail generation occur in the regions where the proton thermal and Alfven velocities are about the same, VTp/VA = 1. The estimated formation times are within 1-2 h for typical tails at 1 AU, which is much shorter than the solar wind expansion time. Our results suggest that the nonthermal proton tails, observed in-situ at all heliocentric distan...

Voitenko, Yuriy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Design and economics for low pressure delayed coking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current refining trend is to run heavier crudes with a growing emphasis on bottom of the barrel resid upgrading. In general, a reduction in light crude availability and a corresponding increase in the price differential between light and heavy crudes makes the processing of heavier crudes highly attractive. US Department of Energy data indicate that between 1985 and 1989 the average API gravity of crude being processed in the US dropped from 32.46 to 32.14 degrees while the average sulfur content increased 0.15 wt%. As crudes get heavier and the demand for light, clean fuels increases, expanded resid upgrading capacity is rapidly becoming a necessity for most refiners. The coking process has existed since the early 1900's, and delayed coking is still favored as a relatively low cost resid upgrading option. Consistent with the objective of maximizing resid conversion, recent trends in delayed coking include maximizing liquid yields and reducing the production of petroleum coke by operating coke drums at lower pressures. Typically, the incremental liquid gained at lower pressures is worth significantly more than coke and can be further upgraded to lighter products. In addition, the driving force to minimize coke make has been accelerated by the worsening quality of crude oils. As vacuum resid feedstocks become heavier, contaminants in coke such as sulfur and metals are increased, making the coke less marketable. In the case of an existing coker which is capacity limited by coke make, a reduction in coke yield can be quite valuable. This paper discusses the design features and presents the economics associated with building a low pressure delayed coker with a 15 psig coke drum operating pressure versus a more conventional 25 psig design.

Bansal, B.B.; Moretta, J.C.; Gentry, A.R. (M.W. Kellogg Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Herding, Contrarianism and Delay in Financial Market Trading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-orders depending on the passage of time, and they do not employ information that could (theoretically) trigger herding or contrarianism. Ivanov, Levin, and Peck (2008) implement Levin and Peck (2008), which is a model of fixed capital (green-field), non... tells the final subject that there are no more informative actions to come, and so no further reason to delay. 16 pressing the pass-button would count as one of the actions that they were allowed. It was stressed to the subjects that their virtual...

Park, A; Sgroi, Daniel

443

Dijet production in polarized proton-proton collisions at [the square root of sigma] = 200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polarized deep inelastic scattering (DIS) experiments indicate that quarks only carry approximately 30% of the proton spin, which led to interest in measuring the contributions of other components. Through polarized ...

Walker, Matthew (Matthew Hsing Hung)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Infrared renormalons and single meson production in proton-proton collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, we investigate the contribution of the higher-twist Feynman diagrams to the large-p{sub T} inclusive pion production cross section in proton-proton collisions and present the general formulas for the higher-twist differential cross sections in the case of the running coupling and frozen coupling approaches. The structure of infrared renormalon singularities of the higher-twist subprocess cross section and the resummed expression (the Borel sum) for it are found. We compared the resummed higher-twist cross sections with the ones obtained in the framework of the frozen coupling approach and leading-twist cross section. We obtain, that ratio R=({sigma}{sub {pi}{sup +}}{sup HT}){sup res}/({sigma}{sub {pi}{sup +}}{sup HT}){sup 0}, for all values of the transverse momentum p{sub T} of the pion identically equivalent to ratio r=({delta}{sub {pi}}{sup HT}){sup res}/({delta}{sub {pi}}{sup HT}){sup 0}. It is shown that the resummed result depends on the choice of the meson wave functions used in calculation. Phenomenological effects of the obtained results are discussed.

Ahmadov, A. I. [Institute for Physical Problems, Baku State University, Z. Khalilov Street 23, AZ-1148, Baku (Azerbaijan); Aydin, Coskun; Hakan, Yilmaz A. [Department of Physics, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Nagiyev, Sh. M.; Dadashov, E. A. [Institute of Physics of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, H. Javid Avenue, 33, AZ-1143, Baku (Azerbaijan)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Measurement of the Strange Quark Contribution to Proton Structure through Parity Violating Electron-Proton Scattering  

SciTech Connect

The G0 (G-Zero) forward angle experiment completed in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) has measured the parity violating asymmetries in elastic electron-proton scattering over a Q2 range of 0.12 < Q2 < 1.0 (GeV/c)2. A linear combination of the strange electric (GsE) and magnetic (GsM) form factors calculated from these asymmetries indicate a non-zero contribution of the strange quark to the charge and magnetization structure of the proton in the above kinematic range at a 89% confidence level. The results show a previously unmeasured Q2 dependence of the strange form factors. Combining the G0 results with previous parity violating experiments show that at Q2 = 0.1 (GeV/c)2 GsM = 0.62+-0.31 GsE = -0.013+-0.028 At intermediate Q2 of about 0.23 (GeV/c)2, a consistent value of GsM is seen compared to previous experiments, together with a measurement that may imply a negative value of GsE. For Q2 above 0.5 (GeV/c)2 a consistently positive value for the linear combination of the strange form factors is seen.

Kazutaka Nakahara

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Time delays in heavy-ion-induced fission of medium-Z nuclei, measured by crystal blocking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time delays in fission induced by bombardment of Mo with 170- and 180-MeV {sup 32}S, 225- and 240-MeV {sup 48}Ti, and 300-MeV {sup 58}Ni have been measured by observation of crystal blocking of fission fragments. In contrast to earlier measurements with a W target, the results are consistent with fission of a compound nucleus in competition with mainly neutron emission. Most of the fissions happen on a time scale much shorter than attoseconds but there is a significant component of fission with much longer lifetimes. The measurements are reproduced with a standard statistical model, including a Kramers correction to fission widths from the viscosity of hot nuclear matter. These new results support the interpretation of our earlier measurements with a W target, which indicate that there is a transition in heavy-ion-induced fission at large atomic number and mass, from multichance fission in the standard Bohr-Wheeler picture to fission without formation of a compound nucleus. The process is slowed down by nuclear viscosity, with measured delays of order attoseconds.

Andersen, J. U. [Aarhus University; Chevallier, J. [University of Aarhus, Denmark; Forster, J. S. [Universite de Montreal; Karamian, S. A. [FLNR-JINR, Russia; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Beene, James R [ORNL; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Krause, Herbert F [ORNL; Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Uguzzoni, A. [University of Bologna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

EIA - AEO2010 - Emissions projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Projections Emissions Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Emissions Projections Figure 93. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 94. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 95. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Growth of carbon dioxide emissions slows in the projections Federal and State energy policies recently enacted will stimulate increased use of renewable technologies and efficiency improvements in the future, slowing the growth of energy-related CO2 emissions through 2035. In the Reference case, emissions do not exceed pre-recession 2007 levels until 2025. In 2035, energy-related CO2 emissions total 6,320 million metric tons, about 6 percent higher than in 2007 and 9 percent higher than in 2008 (Figure 93). On average, emissions in the Reference case grow by 0.3 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, compared with 0.7 percent per year from 1980 to 2008.

448

High-spin structures of 124-131Te: Competition of proton and neutron pair breakings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 124-131Te nuclei have been produced as fission fragments in two fusion reactions induced by heavy-ions (12C + 238U at 90 MeV bombarding energy and 18O + 208Pb at 85 MeV) and studied with the Euroball array. Their high-spin level schemes have been extended to higher excitation energy from the triple gamma-ray coincidence data. The gamma-gamma angular correlations have been analyzed in order to assign spin and parity values to many observed states. Moreover the half-lives of isomeric states have been measured from the delayed coincidences between the fission-fragment detector SAPhIR and Euroball, as well as from the timing information of the Ge detectors. The behaviors of the yrast structures identified in the present work are first discussed in comparison with the general features known in the mass region, particularly the breakings of neutron pairs occupying the nuh11/2 orbit identified in the neighboring Sn nuclei. The experimental level schemes are then compared to shell-model calculations performed in this work. The analysis of the wave functions shows the effects of the proton-pair breaking along the yrast lines of the heavy Te isotopes.

A. Astier; M. -G. Porquet; Ts. Venkova; Ch. Theisen; G. Duchene; F. Azaiez; G. Barreau; D. Curien; I. Deloncle; O. Dorvaux; B. J. P. Gall; M. Houry; R. Lucas; N. Redon; M. Rousseau; O. Stezowski

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

449

Environmental software systems for emission inventories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric emission inventories are important tools for environmental decision making. The need to include transparency and reproducibility in emission calculation also fostered the development of environmental software systems for emission inventories. ... Keywords: Emission inventory theory, Model validation, Upper Austria

Wilfried Winiwarter; Gerald Schimak

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Optimal Forwarding in Delay Tolerant Networks with Multiple Destinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the trade-off between delivery delay and energy consumption in a delay tolerant network in which a message (or a file) has to be delivered to each of several destinations by epidemic relaying. In addition to the destinations, there are several other nodes in the network that can assist in relaying the message. We first assume that, at every instant, all the nodes know the number of relays carrying the packet and the number of destinations that have received the packet. We formulate the problem as a controlled continuous time Markov chain and derive the optimal closed loop control (i.e., forwarding policy). However, in practice, the intermittent connectivity in the network implies that the nodes may not have the required perfect knowledge of the system state. To address this issue, we obtain an ODE (i.e., a deterministic fluid) approximation for the optimally controlled Markov chain. This fluid approximation also yields an asymptotically optimal open loop policy. Finally, we evaluate the performance o...

Singh, Chandramani; Kumar, Anurag; Sundaresan, Rajesh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

On X-Channels with Feedback and Delayed CSI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sum degrees of freedom (DoF) of the two-user MIMO X-channel is characterized in the presence of output feedback and delayed channel state information (CSI). The number of antennas at each transmitters is assumed to be M and the number of antennas at each of the receivers is assumed to be N. It is shown that the sum DoF of the two-user MIMO X-channel is the same as the sum DoF of a two-user MIMO broadcast channel with 2M transmit antennas, and N antennas at each receiver. Hence, for this symmetric antenna configuration, there is no performance loss in the sum degrees of freedom due to the distributed nature of the transmitters. This result highlights the usefulness of feedback and delayed CSI for the MIMO X-channel. The K-user X-channel with single antenna at each transmitter and each receiver is also studied. In this network, each transmitter has a message intended for each receiver. For this network, it is shown that the sum DoF with partial output feedback alone is at least 2K/(K+1). This lower bound is...

Tandon, Ravi; Poor, H Vincent; Shamai, Shlomo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Positron Emission Tomography (PET)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

Welch, M. J.

1990-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

453

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1.1 Total emissions Total U.S. anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 were 5.8 percent below the 2008 total (Table 1). The decline in total emissions-from 6,983 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2008 to 6,576 MMTCO2e in 2009-was the largest since emissions have been tracked over the 1990-2009 time frame. It was largely the result of a 419-MMTCO2e drop in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (7.1 percent). There was a small increase of 7 MMTCO2e (0.9 percent) in methane (CH4) emissions, and an increase of 8 MMTCO2e (4.9 percent), based on partial data, in emissions of man-made gases with high global warming potentials (high-GWP gases). (Draft estimates for emissions of HFC and PFC

454

An investigation of the relationship between total and stopped delay at signalized intersections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigated the relationship between total delay and stopped delay at signalized intersections. As the 1.3 value used in the 1985 HCM was obtained empirically, an analytical model was developed to account for the relevant variables such as approach speeds and associated deceleration and acceleration rates. By studying the effects of the relevant parameters, the relationship between delay components was analyzed with respect to the different operating conditions at signalized intersections. The TRAF-NETSIM computer simulation program was used to provide reference values for the results from the analytical model under the same operating conditions. Actual traffic delay data were collected in the field to validate the model's results. Statistical analysis was used as an important tool to achieve this goal. The results from this study indicated that the ratio of total delay to stopped delay was not a constant as the operating conditions changed. Specifically, as approach speed increased, this delay ratio increased when other parameters were assigned reasonable values. A similar trend was observed from the field measurements. The reason for this phenomenon is that higher deceleration or acceleration rates are generally used by most drivers to decelerate from or accelerate to higher speeds,thus changing the composition of total delay. In conclusion, the ratio of total delay to stopped delay should not be treated as a constant and should be calculated using an appropriate model.

Ouyang, Yang

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Calculations of Branching Ratios for Radiative-Capture, One-Proton, and Two-Neutron Channels in the Fusion Reaction $^{209}$Bi+$^{70}$Zn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the possibility of the non-one-neutron emission channels in the cold fusion reaction $^{70}$Zn + $^{209}$Bi to produce the element Z=113. For this purpose, we calculate the evaporation-residue cross sections of one-proton, radiative-capture, and two-neutron emissions relative to the one-neutron emission in the reaction $^{70}$Zn + $^{209}$Bi. To estimate the upper bounds of those quantities, we vary model parameters in the calculations, such as the level-density parameter and the height of the fission barrier. We conclude that the highest possibility is for the 2n reaction channel, and its upper bounds are 2.4$%$ and at most less than 7.9% with unrealistic parameter values, under the actual experimental conditions of [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. {\\bf 73} (2004) 2593].

Takatoshi Ichikawa; Akira Iwamoto

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

456

Calculations of Branching Ratios for Radiative-Capture, One-Proton, and Two-Neutron Channels in the Fusion Reaction $^{209}$Bi+$^{70}$Zn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the possibility of the non-one-neutron emission channels in the cold fusion reaction $^{70}$Zn + $^{209}$Bi to produce the element Z=113. For this purpose, we calculate the evaporation-residue cross sections of one-proton, radiative-capture, and two-neutron emissions relative to the one-neutron emission in the reaction $^{70}$Zn + $^{209}$Bi. To estimate the upper bounds of those quantities, we vary model parameters in the calculations, such as the level-density parameter and the height of the fission barrier. We conclude that the highest possibility is for the 2n reaction channel, and its upper bounds are 2.4$%$ and at most less than 7.9% with unrealistic parameter values, under the actual experimental conditions of [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. {\\bf 73} (2004) 2593].

Ichikawa, Takatoshi; 10.1143/JPSJ.79.074201

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Robust optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is highly sensitive to range uncertainties and uncertainties caused by setup variation. The conventional inverse treatment planning of IMPT optimized based on the planning target volume (PTV) is not often sufficient to ensure robustness of treatment plans. In this paper, a method that takes the uncertainties into account during plan optimization is used to mitigate the influence of uncertainties in IMPT. Methods: The authors use the so-called ''worst-case robust optimization'' to render IMPT plans robust in the face of uncertainties. For each iteration, nine different dose distributions are computed--one each for {+-} setup uncertainties along anteroposterior (A-P), lateral (R-L) and superior-inferior (S-I) directions, for {+-} range uncertainty, and the nominal dose distribution. The worst-case dose distribution is obtained by assigning the lowest dose among the nine doses to each voxel in the clinical target volume (CTV) and the highest dose to each voxel outside the CTV. Conceptually, the use of worst-case dose distribution is similar to the dose distribution achieved based on the use of PTV in traditional planning. The objective function value for a given iteration is computed using this worst-case dose distribution. The objective function used has been extended to further constrain the target dose inhomogeneity. Results: The worst-case robust optimization method is applied to a lung case, a skull base case, and a prostate case. Compared with IMPT plans optimized using conventional methods based on the PTV, our method yields plans that are considerably less sensitive to range and setup uncertainties. An interesting finding of the work presented here is that, in addition to reducing sensitivity to uncertainties, robust optimization also leads to improved optimality of treatment plans compared to the PTV-based optimization. This is reflected in reduction in plan scores and in the lower normal tissue doses for the same coverage of the target volume when subjected to uncertainties. Conclusions: The authors find that the worst-case robust optimization provides robust target coverage without sacrificing, and possibly even improving, the sparing of normal tissues. Our results demonstrate the importance of robust optimization. The authors assert that all IMPT plans should be robustly optimized.

Liu Wei; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Yupeng; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Zero emission coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

460

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "delayed proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

462

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

463

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

464

PROTON-CONDUCTING DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is aimed at preparation of thin (1-10? m) membranes of a modified strontium ceramic material with improved hydrogen permeance on mesoporous substrates. The research work conducted in this reporting period was focused on the following three aspects: (1) preparation of thick proton-conducting ceramic membranes and synthesis of porous substrates as support for thin proton-conducting ceramic film, (2) setting up RF sputter deposition unit for deposition of thin ceramic films and performing deposition experiments with the sputter deposition unit, and (3) modeling hydrogen permeation through the proton-conducting ceramic membranes. Proton-conducting thulium doped strontium cerate membranes were reproducibly prepared by the citrate method. Mesoporous ceria membranes were fabricated by a sol-gel method. The membranes will be used as the substrate for coating thin strontium cerate films. A magnetron sputter deposition unit was set up and good quality thin metal alloy films were formed on the mesoporous substrates by an alternative deposition method with the sputter deposition unit. A theoretical model has been developed for hydrogen permeation through proton conducting ceramic membranes. This model can be used to quantitatively describe the hydrogen permeation data.

Jerry Y.S. Lin

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

465

The proton form factor ratio results from Jefferson Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of the proton form factors, GE p/GMp, has been measured extensively, from Q2 of 0.5 GeV2 to 8.5 GeV2, at the Jefferson Laboratory, using the polarization transfer method. This ratio is extracted directly from the measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the recoiling proton in elastic electron-proton scattering. The polarization transfer results are of unprecedented high precision and accuracy, due in large part to the small systematic uncertainties associated with the experimental technique. There is an approved experiment at JLab, GEP(5), to continue the ratio measurements to 12 GeV2. A dedicated experimental setup, the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS), will be built for this purpose. It will be equipped with a focal plane polarimeter to measure the polarization of the recoil protons. The scattered electrons will be detected in an electromagnetic calorimeter. In this presentation, I will review the status of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors and discuss a number of theoretical approaches to describe nucleon form factors.

Vina Punjabi

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Questions and Answers - Why do protons and neutrons stay together in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charge of proton and neutron? Charge of proton and neutron? Previous Question (Charge of proton and neutron?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (How many times bigger is a proton than an electron?) How many times bigger isa proton than an electron? Why do protons and neutrons stay together in the nucleus? The nucleus of an atom is held together by the strong nuclear force that binds together protons and neutrons. Although the strong nuclear force is the strongest of the four fundamental forces, it acts only over very short - typically nuclear - distances. It binds together the protons and neutrons in the nucleus. It also holds together the quarks that make up those protons and neutrons and the other hadrons. Author: Mac Mestayer, Staff Scientist (Other answers by Mac Mestayer)

467

Just the Basics: Vehicle Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Are Exhaust Are Exhaust Emissions? In most heavily settled areas of the U.S., the personal automobile is the single greatest producer of harmful vehicle exhaust emissions. Exhaust emissions are generated by the fuel-air mixture burning in internal combus- tion engines, both gasoline-powered and diesel-powered. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation within the vehicle when it is stopped, and again during fueling. The constituents of car (gasoline and diesel) and truck (diesel) emissions vary depending on fuel type and indi- vidual vehicle operating characteris- tics. The bulk of vehicular emissions are composed of water vapor, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen (in unconsumed air). There are other pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned fuel, and

468

An improved result on the stability of uncertain T-S fuzzy systems with interval time-varying delay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the stability of uncertain T-S fuzzy systems with interval time-varying delay. By uniformly dividing the delay interval into multiple segments and constructing an appropriate augmented Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, some ... Keywords: Delay-partitioning, Fuzzy system models, Interval time-varying delay, Linear matrix inequalities (LMIs)

Chen Peng; Min-Rui Fei

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Experiments on multiple short-delay blasting of coal  

SciTech Connect

Investigation was made to determine conditions under which short-delay multiple blasting could be used in coal mines without causing ignition of gas, coal dust, or mixtures of gas and dust. Additional aims were to determine effects of blasting on mine roof; to find quantity and breakage of coal produced by multiple blasting; to measure amount of float dust formed during shooting; and to study relative time requirement in different blasting procedures. Various recommendations that should help greatly to reduce incidence of misfires are presented. Paper presented at Seventh International Conference of Directors of Safety in Mines Research at the Safety in Mines Research Establishment, Ministry of Fuel and Power, Buxton, England, July 7-12, 1952.

Nagy, J.; Hartmann, I.; Christofel, F.P.; Seiler, E.C.

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Delayed Seasonal Cycle and African Monsoon in a Warmer Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing greenhouse gases will change many aspects of the Earth's climate, from its annual mean to the frequency of extremes such as heat waves and droughts. Here we report that the current generation of climate models predicts a delay in the seasonal cycle of global rainfall and ocean temperature in response to increasing greenhouse gases, with important implications for the regional monsoons. In particular, the rainy season of the semi-arid African Sahel is projected to start later and become shorter: an undesirable change for local rainfed agriculture and pastoralism. Previous work has highlighted the uncertainty in this region's response to anthropogenic global warming: summer rainfall is predicted either to decrease or increase by up to 30% depending which model is used. The robust agreement across models on the seasonal distribution of rainfall changes signifies that the onset date and length of the rainy season should be more predictable than annual mean anomalies.

Biasutti, Michela

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Spectrometer employing optical fiber time delays for frequency resolution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides different length glass fibers for providing a broad range of optical time delays for short incident chromatic light pulses for the selective spatial and frequency analysis of the light with a single light detector. To this end, the frequencies of the incident light are orientated and matched with the different length fibers by dispersing the separate frequencies in space according to the respective fiber locations and lengths at the input terminal of the glass fibers. This makes the different length fibers useful in the field of plasma physics. To this end the short light pulses can be scattered by a plasma and then passed through the fibers for analyzing and diagnosing the plasma while it varies rapidly with time.

Schuss, Jack J. (Providence, RI); Johnson, Larry C. (Princeton, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

WAVE DELAYING STRUCTURE FOR RECTANGULAR WAVE-GUIDES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to wave-guides and in particular describes wave delaying structure located within a wave-guide. The disclosed wave-guide has an elongated fiat metal sheet arranged in a central plane of the guide and formed with a series of transverse inductive slots such that each face presents an inductive impedance to the guide. The sheet is thickened in the area between slots to increase the self capacity of the slots. Experimental results indicate that in a wave-guide loaded in accordance with the invention the guided wavelength changes more slowly as the air wavelength is changed than the guided wavelength does in wave-guides loaded by means of corrugations.

Robertson-Shersby-Harvie, R.B.; Dain, J.

1956-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

473

Efficient Algorithms for Renewable Energy Allocation to Delay Tolerant Consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the problem of allocating energy from renewable sources to flexible consumers in electricity markets. We assume there is a renewable energy supplier that provides energy according to a time-varying (and possibly unpredictable) supply process. The plant must serve consumers within a specified delay window, and incurs a cost of drawing energy from other (possibly non-renewable) sources if its own supply is not sufficient to meet the deadlines. We formulate two stochastic optimization problems: The first seeks to minimize the time average cost of using the other sources (and hence strives for the most efficient utilization of the renewable source). The second allows the renewable source to dynamically set a price for its service, and seeks to maximize the resulting time average profit. These problems are solved via the Lyapunov optimization technique. Our resulting algorithms do not require knowledge of the statistics of the time-varying supply and demand processes and are robust to arbitrary samp...

Neely, Michael J; Dimakis, Alexandros G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Surface-electronic-state effects in electron emission from the Be(0001) surface  

SciTech Connect

We study the electron emission produced by swift protons impinging grazingly on a Be(0001) surface. The process is described within a collisional formalism using the band-structure-based (BSB) approximation to represent the electron-surface interaction. The BSB model provides an accurate description of the electronic band structure of the solid and the surface-induced potential. Within this approach we derive both bulk and surface electronic states, with these latter characterized by a strong localization at the crystal surface. We found that such surface electronic states play an important role in double-differential energy- and angle-resolved electron emission probabilities, producing noticeable structures in the electron emission spectra.

Archubi, C. D. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gravielle, M. S. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Silkin, V. M. [Donostia International Physics Center, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 1072, E-20080 San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, E-48011 Bilbao (Spain)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of the state's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation, Illinois established provisions for the disclosure of fuel mix and emissions data. All electric utilities and alternative...

476

Emissions trading and technological change.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Emissions trading programmes have grown in number and scope over the last forty years, and in the last decade they have become a centrepiece of (more)

Calel, Raphael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for the Petroleum and Coal Products Industry, 1994. Petroleum refining is by far the largest component of the petroleum and ...

478

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Oregon's 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires electricity companies and electric service suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions of electric...

479

Biodiesel and Pollutant Emissions (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents the results from three methods of testing--engine, chassis, and PEM--for testing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from B20.

McCormick, R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Hayes, B.

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

480

EPA Revises Emissions Estimation Methodology  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The changes to the historical emission estimates are the result of revisions to the data and estimation ... b K.D . Smythe, RAND ... RAND Environmental Science and ...

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481

High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Power Superconducting Continuous Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions

482

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Project Summary Full Title: Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Project ID: 196 Principal Investigator: Eric Carlson Keywords: Fuel cells, fuel cell vehicles (FCV), transportation, costs Purpose Assess the cost of an 80 kW direct hydrogen fuel cell system relative to the DOE 2005 target of $125/kW. The system includes the fuel cell stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) components for water, thermal, and fuel management, but not hydrogen storage. Performer Principal Investigator: Eric Carlson Organization: TIAX, LLC Address: 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140-2328 Telephone: 617-498-5903 Email: carlson.e@tiaxllc.com Additional Performers: P. Kopf, TIAX, LLC; J. Sinha, TIAX, LLC; S. Sriramulu, TIAX, LLC

483

The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Path a Proton Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane October 11, 2012 | Tags: Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Chemistry, Franklin, Hopper Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 Ram.jpg The cover represents the environment around the side chain. The right side is the water network that exists between the sulfonate groups shown in yellow. The left side is the short chain with the sulfonate group. Many experts believe that fuel cells may someday serve as revolutionary clean energy conversion devices for transportation and other portable power applications. Because they generate electricity by converting chemical hydrogen and oxygen into water, fuel cells generate energy much