National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for delayed proton emission

  1. -delayed ?-proton decay in ??Zn: Analysis of the charged-particle spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrigo, S. E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Cceres, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Fujita, H.; Ganio?lu, E.; Gerbaux, M.; Kozer, H. C.; Kucuk, L.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Popescu, L.; Rogers, A. M.; Susoy, G.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thomas, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = 2 nucleus ??Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focusing on the charged particle spectrum.

  2. PROMPT HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM PROTON-DOMINATED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PROMPT HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM PROTON-DOMINATED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PROMPT HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM PROTON-DOMINATED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS The ...

  3. Experimental study of the beta-delayed proton precursors /sup 33/Ar and /sup 49/Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU Xiao-ji; GUO Jun-sheng; GUO Ying-xiang; ZHAO Zhi-zheng; LUO Yi-xiao

    1985-01-01

    Beta-delayed proton precursors /sup 33/Ar and /sup 49/Fe have been produced via the (/sup 12/C,3n) reaction in 65-MeV carbon bombardments of /sup 24/Mg and /sup 40/Ca, respectively. The major proton peaks are at 3.28 +- 0.07 MeV for /sup 33/Ar and 1.98 +- 0.04 MeV for /sup 49/Fe. The corresponding cross section for /sup 33/Ar is 0.40 +- 0.08 ..mu..b, and for /sup 49/Fe 0.70 +- 0.14 ..mu..b. The half-life of /sup 33/Ar was determined to be 167 +- 24 ms.

  4. PROMPT HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM PROTON-DOMINATED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect PROMPT HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM PROTON-DOMINATED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PROMPT HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM PROTON-DOMINATED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS The prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is widely thought to be radiation from accelerated electrons, but an appreciably larger amount of energy could be carried by accelerated protons, particularly if GRBs are the sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). We model the

  5. {sup 12}O resonant structure evaluated by the two-proton emission process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leite, T. N.; Teruya, N.; Dimarco, A.; Duarte, S. B.; Tavares, O. A. P.

    2009-07-15

    The characteristics of the {sup 12}O resonant ground state are investigated through the analysis of the experimental data for the two-proton decay process. The sequential and simultaneous two-proton emission decay modes have been considered in a statistical calculation of the decay energy distribution. The resonant structures of {sup 11}N have been employed as intermediate states for the sequential mode, having their parameters determined by considering the structure of single particle resonance in quantum scattering problem. The width of the {sup 12}O resonant ground state has been extracted from a best fit to the experimental data. The contributions from the different channels to the decay energy distribution have been evaluated, and width and peak location parameters of the {sup 12}O resonant ground state are compared with results of other works for the sequential and simultaneous two-proton decay modes.

  6. Characterization of Delayed-Particle Emission Signatures for Pyroprocessing. Part 1: ABTR Fuel Assembly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, Jr., Joe W.

    2015-06-19

    A three-part study is conducted using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo radiation-transport code to calculate delayed-neutron (DN) and delayed-gamma (DG) emission signatures for nondestructive assay (NDA) metal-fuel pyroprocessing. In Part 1, MCNP6 is used to produce irradiation-induced used nuclear fuel (UNF) isotopic inventories for an Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) preconceptual design fuel assembly (FA) model. The initial fuel inventory consists of uranium mixed with light-water-reactor transuranic (TRU) waste and 10 wt% zirconium (U-LWR-SFTRU-10%Zr). To facilitate understanding, parametric evaluation is done using models for 3% and 5% initial 235U a% enrichments, burnups of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, …, 120 GWd/MTIHM, and 3-, 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30- year cooling times. Detailed delayed-particle radioisotope source terms for the irradiate FA are created using BAMF-DRT and SOURCES3A. Using simulation tallies, DG activity ratios (DGARs) are developed for 134Cs/137Cs 134Cs/154Eu, and 154Eu/137Cs markers as a function of (1) burnup and (2) actinide mass, including elemental uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Spectral-integrated DN emission is also tallied. The study reveals a rich assortment of DGAR behavior as a function of DGAR type, enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Similarly, DN emission plots show variation as a function of burnup and of actinide mass. Sensitivity of DGAR and DN signatures to initial 235U enrichment, burnup, and cooling time is evident. Comparisons of the ABTR radiation signatures and radiation signatures previously reported for a generic Westinghouse oxide-fuel assembly indicate that there are pronounced differences in the ABTR and Westinghouse oxide-fuel DN and DG signatures. These differences are largely attributable to the initial TRU inventory in the ABTR fuel. The actinide and nonactinide inventories for the FA models serve as source materials for the pre- and postelectrorefining models to be reported in Parts 2 and 3.

  7. Description of true and delayed ternary nuclear fission accompanied by the emission of various third particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@vsu.ru; Kadmensky, S. S.; Lyubashevsky, D. E. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-15

    The mechanisms and the features of the main types of nuclear ternary fission (that is, true ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted before the rupture of the fissioning nucleus into fragments, and delayed ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted from fission fragments going apart) are investigated within quantum-mechanical fission theory. The features of T-odd asymmetry in true ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are investigated for the cases where alpha particles, prescission neutrons, and photons appear as third particles emitted by fissioning nuclei, the Coriolis interaction of the spin of the polarized fissioning nucleus with the spin of the third particle and the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances excited in the fissioning nucleus in the case of projectile-neutron capture being taken into account. For the cases where third particles emitted by fission fragments are evaporated neutrons or photons, T-odd asymmetries in delayed ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are analyzed with allowance for the mechanism of pumping of large fission-fragment spins oriented orthogonally to the fragment-emission direction and with allowance for the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances.

  8. Recent activities for ?-decay half-lives and ?-delayed neutron emission of very neutron-rich isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillmann, Iris; Abriola, Daniel; Singh, Balraj

    2014-05-02

    Beta-delayed neutron (?n) emitters play an important, two-fold role in the stellar nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in the 'rapid neutron-capture process' (r process). On one hand they lead to a detour of the material ?-decaying back to stability. On the other hand, the released neutrons increase the neutron-to-seed ratio, and are re-captured during the freeze-out phase and thus influence the final solar r-abundance curve. A large fraction of the isotopes inside the r-process reaction path are not yet experimentally accessible and are located in the (experimental) 'Terra Incognita'. With the next generation of fragmentation and ISOL facilities presently being built or already in operation, one of the main motivation of all projects is the investigation of these very neutron-rich isotopes. A short overview of one of the planned programs to measure ?n-emitters at the limits of the presently know isotopes, the BRIKEN campaign (Beta delayed neutron emission measurements at RIKEN) will be given. Presently, about 600 ?-delayed one-neutron emitters are accessible, but only for a third of them experimental data are available. Reaching more neutron-rich isotopes means also that multiple neutron-emission becomes the dominant decay mechanism. About 460 ?-delayed two-, three-or four-neutron emitters are identified up to now but for only 30 of them experimental data about the neutron branching ratios are available, most of them in the light mass region below A=30. The International Atomic and Energy Agency (IAEA) has identified the urgency and picked up this topic recently in a 'Coordinated Research Project' on a 'Reference Database for Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Data'. This project will review, compile, and evaluate the existing data for neutron-branching ratios and half-lives of ?-delayed neutron emitters and help to ensure a reliable database for the future discoveries of new isotopes and help to constrain astrophysical and theoretical models.

  9. ß-delayed γ-proton decay in ⁵⁶Zn: Analysis of the charged-particle spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Orrigo, S. E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Gelletly, W.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Cáceres, L.; et al

    2015-01-01

    A study of the β decay of the proton-rich Tz = –2 nucleus ⁵⁶Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, β-de-layed γ-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focusing on the charged particle spectrum.

  10. Optical emission spectroscopy of the Linac4 and superconducting proton Linac plasma generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettry, J.; Kronberger, M.; Mahner, E.; Schmitzer, C.; Sanchez, J.; Scrivens, R.; Midttun, O.; O'Neil, M.; Pereira, H.; Paoluzzi, M.; Fantz, U.; Wuenderlich, D.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Myllyperkioe, P.; Tarvainen, O.

    2012-02-15

    CERN's superconducting proton Linac (SPL) study investigates a 50 Hz high-energy, high-power Linac for H{sup -} ions. The SPL plasma generator is an evolution of the DESY ion source plasma generator currently operated at CERN's Linac4 test stand. The plasma generator is a step towards a particle source for the SPL, it is designed to handle 100 kW peak RF-power at a 6% duty factor. While the acquisition of an integrated hydrogen plasma optical spectrum is straightforward, the measurement of a time-resolved spectrum requires dedicated amplification schemes. The experimental setup for visible light based on photomultipliers and narrow bandwidth filters and the UV spectrometer setup are described. The H{sub {alpha}}, H{sub {beta}}, and H{sub {gamma}} Balmer line intensities, the Lyman band and alpha transition were measured. A parametric study of the optical emission from the Linac4 ion source and the SPL plasma generator as a function of RF-power and gas pressure is presented. The potential of optical emission spectrometry coupled to RF-power coupling measurements for on-line monitoring of short RF heated hydrogen plasma pulses is discussed.

  11. SU-E-J-247: A Simulation of X-Ray Emission with Gold Nanoparticle Irradiated by Energetic Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newpower, M; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the proton induced X-ray emissions in gold-water mixture materials. Methods: In this study a Monte Carlo simulation was created using the GEANT4 toolkit (version 4.9.6). The geometry in this setup includes a 2 cm × 2 cm × 2 cm target, a scoring sphere (radius = 10 cm) and a 65 MeV planar proton source (2 cm × 2 cm). Four concentrations of a gold-water solution were irradiated with 5×10{sup 5} incident protons at a distance of 0.5 cm perpendicular to the surface of the target. The solutions of gold-water mixture had 10%, 5%, 1% and 0.5% of gold by mass, respectively. The number of photon emitting for the target was counted in the scoring sphere for the energy range of 0-86.0 keV in 0.1 keV bins. For this study the reference physics list PhysListEmStandard was used together with the x-ray fluorescence, Auger electron and PIXE (particle induced xray emission) options enabled. The range cuts for photons and electrons were set at 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm, respectively. Results: In the energy spectra of emitting X-ray fluorescence, peaks from gold K shell characteristic x-rays (68.8 and 66.9 keV) were observed. The number of counts under the peaks of Ka1 and Ka2 was found to increase with the increasing of the gold concentrations in the mixture materials. The X-ray yields (for both Ka1 and Ka2) when fitted with least-square method as a function of gold concentration demonstrate a linear dependency with R{sup 2} > 0.96. The Ka1yield per incident proton was found to be 0.0016 for 10% gold-water mixture solutions. Conclusion: This preliminary study with PIXE technique with gold nanoparticle has demonstrated potentials for its utilization in the development of range and dose verification methodology that is currently of great interest in the field of proton radiation therapy.

  12. SU-E-T-519: Emission of Secondary Particles From a PMMA Phantom During Proton Irradiation: A Simulation Study with the Geant4 Monte Carlo Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, A; Chen, Y; Ahmad, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Proton therapy exhibits several advantages over photon therapy due to depth-dose distributions from proton interactions within the target material. However, uncertainties associated with protons beam range in the patient limit the advantage of proton therapy applications. To quantify beam range, positron-emitting nuclei (PEN) and prompt gamma (PG) techniques have been developed. These techniques use de-excitation photons to describe the location of the beam in the patient. To develop a detector system for implementing the PG technique for range verification applications in proton therapy, we studied the yields, energy and angular distributions of the secondary particles emitted from a PMMA phantom. Methods: Proton pencil beams of various energies incident onto a PMMA phantom with dimensions of 5 x 5 x 50 cm3 were used for simulation with the Geant4 toolkit using the standard electromagnetic packages as well as the packages based on the binary-cascade nuclear model. The emitted secondary particles are analyzed . Results: For 160 MeV incident protons, the yields of secondary neutrons and photons per 100 incident protons were ~6 and ~15 respectively. Secondary photon energy spectrum showed several energy peaks in the range between 0 and 10 MeV. The energy peaks located between 4 and 6 MeV were attributed to originate from direct proton interactions with 12C (~ 4.4 MeV) and 16O (~ 6 MeV), respectively. Most of the escaping secondary neutrons were found to have energies between 10 and 100 MeV. Isotropic emissions were found for lower energy neutrons (<10 MeV) and photons for all energies, while higher energy neutrons were emitted predominantly in the forward direction. The yields of emitted photons and neutrons increased with the increase of incident proton energies. Conclusions: A detector system is currently being developed incorporating the yields, energy and angular distributions of secondary particles from proton interactions obtained from this study.

  13. Research on anisotropy of fusion-produced protons and neutrons emission from high-current plasma-focus discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowski, K. Sadowski, M. J.; Szydlowski, A.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Czaus, K.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Zaloga, D.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.

    2015-01-15

    The paper concerns fast protons and neutrons from D-D fusion reactions in a Plasma-Focus-1000U facility. Measurements were performed with nuclear-track detectors arranged in sandwiches of an Al-foil and two PM-355 detectors separated by a polyethylene-plate. The Al-foil eliminated all primary deuterons, but was penetrable for fast fusion protons. The foil and first PM-355 detector were penetrable for fast neutrons, which were converted into recoil-protons in the polyethylene and recorded in the second PM-355 detector. The sandwiches were irradiated by discharges of comparable neutron-yields. Analyses of etched tracks and computer simulations of the fusion-products behavior in the detectors were performed.

  14. Non-thermal gamma-ray emission from delayed pair breakdown in a magnetized and photon-rich outflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, Ramandeep; Thompson, Christopher, E-mail: rgill@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    We consider delayed, volumetric heating in a magnetized outflow that has broken out of a confining medium and expanded to a high Lorentz factor (? ? 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}) and low optical depth to scattering (? {sub T} ? 10{sup 3}-10{sup 2}). The energy flux at breakout is dominated by the magnetic field, with a modest contribution from quasi-thermal gamma rays whose spectrum was calculated in Paper I. We focus on the case of extreme baryon depletion in the magnetized material, but allow for a separate baryonic component that is entrained from a confining medium. Dissipation is driven by relativistic motion between these two components, which develops once the photon compactness drops below 4 10{sup 3}(Y{sub e} /0.5){sup 1}. We first calculate the acceleration of the magnetized component following breakout, showing that embedded MHD turbulence provides significant inertia, the neglect of which leads to unrealistically high estimates of flow Lorentz factor. After reheating begins, the pair and photon distributions are evolved self-consistently using a one-zone kinetic code that incorporates an exact treatment of Compton scattering, pair production and annihilation, and Coulomb scattering. Heating leads to a surge in pair creation, and the scattering depth saturates at ? {sub T} ? 1-4. The plasma maintains a very low ratio of particle to magnetic pressure, and can support strong anisotropy in the charged particle distribution, with cooling dominated by Compton scattering. High-energy power-law spectra with photon indices in the range observed in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; 3 < ? < 3/2) are obtained by varying the ratio of heat input to the seed energy in quasi-thermal photons. We contrast our results with those for continuous heating across an expanding photosphere, and show that the latter model produces soft-to-hard evolution that is inconsistent with observations of GRBs.

  15. TH-C-BRD-01: Analytical Computation of Prompt Gamma Ray Emission and Detection for Proton Range Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterpin, E; Vynckier, S; Janssens, G; Smeets, J; Prieels, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A prompt gamma (PG) slit camera prototype demonstrated that on-line range monitoring within 12 mm could be performed by comparing expected and measured PG detection profiles. Monte Carlo (MC) can simulate the expected PG profile but this would result in prohibitive computation time for a complete pencil beam treatment plan. We implemented a much faster method that is based on analytical processing of pre-computed MC data. Methods: The formation of the PG detection signal can be separated into: 1) production of PGs and 2) detection by the camera detectors after PG transport in geometry. For proton energies from 40 to 230 MeV, PG productions in depth were pre-computed by MC (PENH) for 12C, 14N, 16O, 31P and 40Ca. The PG production was then modeled analytically by adding the PG production for each element according to local proton energy and tissue composition.PG transport in the patient/camera geometries and the detector response were modeled by convolving the PG production profile with a transfer function. The latter is interpolated from a database of transfer functions fitted to pre-computed MC data (PENELOPE). The database was generated for a photon source in a cylindrical phantom with various radiuses and a camera placed at various positions.As a benchmark, the analytical model was compared to PENH for a water phantom, a phantom with different slabs (adipose, muscle, lung) and a thoracic CT. Results: Good agreement (within 5%) was observed between the analytical model and PENH for the PG production. Similar accuracy for detecting range shifts was also observed. Speed of around 250 ms per profile was achieved (single CPU) using a non-optimized MatLab implementation. Conclusion: We devised a fast analytical model for generating PG detection profiles. In the test cases considered in this study, similar accuracy than MC was achieved for detecting range shifts. This research is supported by IBA.

  16. Emissions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... oil based on data in EIA's Petroleum Supply Annual and other surces (see App I), lt ... To compare the aggregate greenhouse effect of all emissions from all fuel cycles, the ...

  17. Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emission intensities and line ratios from a fast neutral helium beam J-W. Ahn a͒ Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA D. Craig, b͒ G. Fiksel, and D. J. Den Hartog Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA J. K. Anderson Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA M. G.

  18. Sub-nanosecond delays of light emitted by streamer in atmospheric pressure air: Analysis of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}Π{sub u}) and N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}Σ{sub u}{sup +}) emissions and fundamental streamer structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoder, T.; Bonaventura, Z.; Bourdon, A.; Šimek, M.

    2015-02-21

    Theoretical analysis of ultra-short phenomena occurring during the positive streamer propagation in atmospheric pressure air is presented. Motivated by experimental results obtained with tens-of-picoseconds and tens-of-microns precision, it is shown that when the streamer head passes a spatial coordinate, emission maxima from N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}{sup +} radiative states follow with different delays. These different delays are caused by differences in the dynamics of populating the radiative states, due to different excitation and quenching rates. Associating the position of the streamer head with the maximum value of the self-enhanced electric field, a delay of 160 ps was experimentally found for the peak emission of the first negative system of N{sub 2}{sup +}. A delay dilatation was observed experimentally on early-stage streamers and the general mechanism of this phenomenon is clarified theoretically. In the case of the second positive system of N{sub 2}, the delay can reach as much as 400 ps. In contrast to the highly nonlinear behavior of streamer events, it is shown theoretically that emission maximum delays linearly depend on the ratio of the streamer radius and its velocity. This is found to be one of the fundamental streamer features and its use in streamer head diagnostics is proposed. Moreover, radially resolved spectra are synthesized for selected subsequent picosecond moments in order to visualize spectrometric fingerprints of radial structures of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}Π{sub u}) and N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}Σ{sub u}{sup +}) populations created by streamer-head electrons.

  19. VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clemensen, R.E.

    1959-11-01

    An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

  20. Digital time delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  1. Time delay spectrum conditioner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Norman R.

    1980-01-01

    A device for delaying specified frequencies of a multiple frequency laser beam. The device separates the multiple frequency beam into a series of spatially separated single frequency beams. The propagation distance of the single frequency beam is subsequently altered to provide the desired delay for each specific frequency. Focusing reflectors can be utilized to provide a simple but nonadjustable system or, flat reflectors with collimating and focusing optics can be utilized to provide an adjustable system.

  2. What's In a Proton?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  3. Fine Structure Studies in Proton Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact are public documents issued by a Federal agency briefly presenting the reasons why an action for which the agency has prepared an environmental assessment will not have a significant effect on the human environment and, therefore, will not require preparation of an environmental impact statement. If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact

  4. Downhole delay assembly for blasting with series delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1982-01-01

    A downhole delay assembly is provided which can be placed into a blasthole for initiation of explosive in the blasthole. The downhole delay assembly includes at least two detonating time delay devices in series in order to effect a time delay of longer than about 200 milliseconds in a round of explosions. The downhole delay assembly provides a protective housing to prevent detonation of explosive in the blasthole in response to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device. There is further provided a connection between the first and second time delay devices. The connection is responsive to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device and initiates the second detonating time delay device. A plurality of such downhole delay assemblies are placed downhole in unfragmented formation and are initiated simultaneously for providing a round of explosive expansions. The explosive expansions can be used to form an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles.

  5. PROTON RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as a i i . : lJIiaSJ :ShUiI,,:;II. Iii II; PROTON RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY IN 29p LAWRENCE H. JAMES Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory Department of Physics North Carolina State University 1989 - - .. - .. - .. Abstract James, Lawrence Hoy Proton Resonance Spectroscopy in 29 p (Under the direc- tion of Gary E. Mitchell) Proton elastic scattering on 28Si was measured with good beam energy resolution in the proton energy range Ep=1.4 to E =3.75 MeV, and proton inelastic scattering on p 28Si

  6. Taking pictures with protons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Taking pictures with protons Taking pictures with protons A new facility for using protons to take microscopic images has been commissioned at the ring accelerator of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH in Germany. June 17, 2014 A wristwatch was one of the first items imaged by the new proton radiography system. At left the inner workings of the mechanism are visible. A wristwatch was one of the first items imaged by the new proton radiography system. At left, the inner

  7. Protons - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protons The BASE Facility is capable of providing fluxes of up to 1E9 protons/cm2-sec (the limit of our standard, continuously reading ion chamber dosimetry), but works best in the 1E7 to 1E8 protons/cm2-sec range. Higher levels of flux are monitored using intermittent faraday cup readings. Standard proton energies include 13.5, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 55 MeV, and are performed in air in Cave 4A. Energies below 10 MeV are run in vacuum in Cave 4B. Shielding materials, laser alignment tools, and

  8. Proton-Antiproton

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Dernière session du cours sur proton-antiproton du Cern Accelarator School. John Peoples, directeur de Fermilab fait un exposà suivi de questions.

  9. Programmable Differential Delay Circuit With Fine Delay Adjustment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRyckere, John F.; Jenkins, Philip Nord; Cornett, Frank Nolan

    2002-07-09

    Circuitry that provides additional delay to early arriving signals such that all data signals arrive at a receiving latch with same path delay. The delay of a forwarded clock reference is also controlled such that the capturing clock edge will be optimally positioned near quadrature (depending on latch setup/hold requirements). The circuitry continuously adapts to data and clock path delay changes and digital filtering of phase measurements reduce errors brought on by jittering data edges. The circuitry utilizes only the minimum amount of delay necessary to achieve objective thereby limiting any unintended jitter. Particularly, this programmable differential delay circuit with fine delay adjustment is designed to allow the skew between ASICS to be minimized. This includes skew between data bits, between data bits and clocks as well as minimizing the overall skew in a channel between ASICS.

  10. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  11. Soviet delays raise prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, I.

    1992-01-15

    The breakup of the Soviet Union is causing massive disruptions to methanol exports. The changeover to a Commonwealth of independent States has created logistical problems which have led some shipments of Russian methanol to be cancelled and delayed other deliveries by up to two weeks. In recent years the Soviet Union has exported 700,000 m.t./year-900,000 m.t./year of methanol, mainly to Western Europe. The product is made at 750,000-m.t./year plants at Tomsk and Gubakha in Russia and transported by rail for shipment from the ports of Ventspils, Latvia, on the Baltic Sea and Yuzhnyy in Ukraine, on the Black Sea. The exports were handled by state export agency Soyuzagrochim, mainly under contract to West European traders and consumers in areas like Scandinavia and France.

  12. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1984-08-07

    Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

  13. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... in the proton beam by an open feedback loop. There is also a 10w-pass-fiJtered loop feeding back to the bending magnet which compensates for any drift in the magnetic field. 3. ...

  14. PRECISION TIME-DELAY CIRCUIT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creveling, R.

    1959-03-17

    A tine-delay circuit which produces a delay time in d. The circuit a capacitor, an te back resistance, connected serially with the anode of the diode going to ground. At the start of the time delay a negative stepfunction is applied to the series circuit and initiates a half-cycle transient oscillatory voltage terminated by a transient oscillatory voltage of substantially higher frequency. The output of the delay circuit is taken at the junction of the inductor and diode where a sudden voltage rise appears after the initiation of the higher frequency transient oscillations.

  15. Calculation of delayed-neutron energy spectra in a QRPA-Hauser-Feshbach

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    model (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Calculation of delayed-neutron energy spectra in a QRPA-Hauser-Feshbach model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Calculation of delayed-neutron energy spectra in a QRPA-Hauser-Feshbach model Theoretical {beta}-delayed-neutron spectra are calculated based on the Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA) and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Neutron emissions from an excited daughter nucleus after {beta} decay to the granddaughter

  16. Delayed unlatching mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M.

    2015-05-19

    In various embodiments an apparatus is presented for securing a structure such as a door, window, hatch, or gate that moves between an open and a closed position relative to a fixed structure to provide or deny access to a compartment, a room, an outdoor area, or a facility. Various embodiments provide a delay in opening the closure of sufficient duration to frustrate a rapid activation that might be desired by a person who is attempting to pass through the closure for some illicit purpose. Typically, hydraulics are used to activate the apparatus and no electrical energy or electronic signals are employed. In one embodiment, a plurality of actuations of a hand lever operates a hydraulic pump that moves a locking bolt from a first position in which a locking bolt is engaged with a recess in the fixed structure (preventing opening of a gate) to a second position in which the locking bolt is disengaged from the recess to permit opening of the gate.

  17. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  18. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to

  19. Proton Bunching Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.B.

    2009-10-19

    Muon Colliders need intense, very short, proton bunches. The requirements are presented and a number of possible bunching systems discussed. The best solution uses a small super-conducting buncher ring with 6 bunches that are taken though separate transports and combined on the target.

  20. History of Proton Linear Accelerators

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Alvarez, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    Some personal recollections are presented that relate to the author`s experience developing linear accelerators, particularly for protons. (LEW)

  1. A system for the measurement of delayed neutrons and gammas from special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Goorley, J. T.; Kelly, D. G.

    2014-11-27

    The delayed neutron counting (DNC) system at the Royal Military College of Canada has been upgraded to accommodate concurrent delayed neutron and gamma measurements. This delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) system uses a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor to irradiate fissile materials before their transfer to a counting arrangement consisting of six He and one HPGe detector. The application of this system is demonstrated in an example where delayed neutron and gamma emissions are used in complement to examine U content and determine fissile mass with an average relative error and accuracy of -2.2 and 1.5 %, respectively.

  2. A system for the measurement of delayed neutrons and gammas from special nuclear materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Andrews, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Goorley, J. T.; Kelly, D. G.

    2014-11-27

    The delayed neutron counting (DNC) system at the Royal Military College of Canada has been upgraded to accommodate concurrent delayed neutron and gamma measurements. This delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) system uses a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor to irradiate fissile materials before their transfer to a counting arrangement consisting of six ³He and one HPGe detector. The application of this system is demonstrated in an example where delayed neutron and gamma emissions are used in complement to examine ²³³U content and determine fissile mass with an average relative error and accuracy of -2.2 and 1.5 %, respectively.

  3. Smashing Protons to Smithereens

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Marc-André Pleier

    2010-09-01

    Pleier discusses the extraordinary research taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ? the world?s newest, biggest, and highest energy particle accelerator located at CERN. Pleier is one of hundreds of researchers from around the world working on ATLAS, a seven-story particle detector positioned at a point where the LHC?s oppositely circulating beams of protons slam into one another head-on.

  4. UWB delay and multiply receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2013-09-10

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) delay and multiply receiver is formed of a receive antenna; a variable gain attenuator connected to the receive antenna; a signal splitter connected to the variable gain attenuator; a multiplier having one input connected to an undelayed signal from the signal splitter and another input connected to a delayed signal from the signal splitter, the delay between the splitter signals being equal to the spacing between pulses from a transmitter whose pulses are being received by the receive antenna; a peak detection circuit connected to the output of the multiplier and connected to the variable gain attenuator to control the variable gain attenuator to maintain a constant amplitude output from the multiplier; and a digital output circuit connected to the output of the multiplier.

  5. Analysis of incident-energy dependence of delayed neutron yields in actinides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasir, Mohamad Nasrun bin Mohd Metorima, Kouhei Ohsawa, Takaaki Hashimoto, Kengo

    2015-04-29

    The changes of delayed neutron yields (?{sub d}) of Actinides have been analyzed for incident energy up to 20MeV using realized data of precursor after prompt neutron emission, from semi-empirical model, and delayed neutron emission probability data (P{sub n}) to carry out a summation method. The evaluated nuclear data of the delayed neutron yields of actinide nuclides are still uncertain at the present and the cause of the energy dependence has not been fully understood. In this study, the fission yields of precursor were calculated considering the change of the fission fragment mass yield based on the superposition of fives Gaussian distribution; and the change of the prompt neutrons number associated with the incident energy dependence. Thus, the incident energy dependent behavior of delayed neutron was analyzed.The total number of delayed neutron is expressed as ?{sub d}=?Y{sub i} P{sub ni} in the summation method, where Y{sub i} is the mass yields of precursor i and P{sub ni} is the delayed neutron emission probability of precursor i. The value of Y{sub i} is derived from calculation of post neutron emission mass distribution using 5 Gaussian equations with the consideration of large distribution of the fission fragments. The prompt neutron emission ?{sub p} increases at higher incident-energy but there are two different models; one model says that the fission fragment mass dependence that prompt neutron emission increases uniformly regardless of the fission fragments mass; and the other says that the major increases occur at heavy fission fragments area. In this study, the changes of delayed neutron yields by the two models have been investigated.

  6. Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal for imaging small tumors within patients for targeted proton therapy. March 25, 2013 Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head. Proton radiography, which was invented at Los Alamos, employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials. Los Alamos

  7. Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal for imaging small tumors within patients for targeted proton therapy. March 25, 2013 Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head. Proton radiography, which was invented at Los Alamos, employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials. Los Alamos

  8. Proton Energy Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Proton Energy Systems Inc Place: Wallingford, Connecticut Zip: 6492 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Develops, manufactures and sells proprietary Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM)...

  9. New Type of Asymmetric Fission in Proton-Rich Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Elseviers, J.; Huyse, M.; Van Duppen, P.; Bree, N.; Cocolios, T. E.; Diriken, J.; Ivanov, O.; Van den Bergh, P.; Antalic, S.; Barzakh, A.; Fedorov, D.; Comas, V. F.; Heredia, J. A.; Fedosseev, V.; Marsh, B. A.; Van De Walle, J.; Franchoo, S.; Nishio, K.

    2010-12-17

    A very exotic process of {beta}-delayed fission of {sup 180}Tl is studied in detail by using resonant laser ionization with subsequent mass separation at ISOLDE (CERN). In contrast to common expectations, the fission-fragment mass distribution of the post-{beta}-decay daughter nucleus {sup 180}Hg (N/Z=1.25) is asymmetric. This asymmetry is more surprising since a mass-symmetric split of this extremely neutron-deficient nucleus would lead to two {sup 90}Zr fragments, with magic N=50 and semimagic Z=40. This is a new type of asymmetric fission, not caused by large shell effects related to fragment magic proton and neutron numbers, as observed in the actinide region. The newly measured branching ratio for {beta}-delayed fission of {sup 180}Tl is 3.6(7)x10{sup -3}%, approximately 2 orders of magnitude larger than in an earlier study.

  10. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above injection, the polarized hydrogen jet target runs for every fill with both beams. Based on the known analyzing power, there is very little polarization loss between injection and 100 GeV. An alternative way is to measure the asymmetry at 100 GeV followed by ramping up to 250 GeV and back down to 100 GeV and then to measure the asymmetry again at 100 GeV. If the asymmetry after the down ramp is similar to the measurement before the up ramp, polarization was also preserved during the ramp to 250 GeV. The analyzing power at storage energy can then be extracted from the asymmetries measured at 100 GeV and 250 GeV. The tune and orbit feedbacks are essential for the down ramp to be possible. The polarized proton operation is still going on. We will push bunch intensity higher until reaching the beam-beam limit. The even higher intensity will have to wait for the electron lenses to compensate the beam-beam effect. To understand the details of spin dynamics in RHIC with two snakes, spin simulation with the real magnet fields have been developed recently. The study will provide guidance for possible polarization loss schemes. Further polarization gain will requires a polarized source upgrade; more careful setup jump quads in the AGS to get full benefit; and control emittance in the whole accelerator chain.

  11. Deficiency in Homologous Recombination Renders Mammalian Cells More Sensitive to Proton Versus Photon Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosse, Nicole; Fontana, Andrea O. [Laboratory for Molecular Radiobiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Hug, Eugen B.; Lomax, Antony; Coray, Adolf [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Augsburger, Marc [Laboratory for Molecular Radiobiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sartori, Alessandro A. [Institute of Molecular Cancer Research, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Pruschy, Martin, E-mail: martin.pruschy@usz.ch [Laboratory for Molecular Radiobiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of the 2 major DNA repair machineries on cellular survival in response to irradiation with the 2 types of ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: The DNA repair and cell survival endpoints in wild-type, homologous recombination (HR)-deficient, and nonhomologous end-joining-deficient cells were analyzed after irradiation with clinically relevant, low-linear energy transfer (LET) protons and 200-keV photons. Results: All cell lines were more sensitive to proton irradiation compared with photon irradiation, despite no differences in the induction of DNA breaks. Interestingly, HR-deficient cells and wild-type cells with small interfering RNA-down-regulated Rad51 were markedly hypersensitive to proton irradiation, resulting in an increased relative biological effectiveness in comparison with the relative biological effectiveness determined in wild-type cells. In contrast, lack of nonhomologous end-joining did not result in hypersensitivity toward proton irradiation. Repair kinetics of DNA damage in wild-type cells were equal after both types of irradiation, although proton irradiation resulted in more lethal chromosomal aberrations. Finally, repair kinetics in HR-deficient cells were significantly delayed after proton irradiation, with elevated amounts of residual ?H2AX foci after irradiation. Conclusion: Our data indicate a differential quality of DNA damage by proton versus photon irradiation, with a specific requirement for homologous recombination for DNA repair and enhanced cell survival. This has potential relevance for clinical stratification of patients carrying mutations in the DNA damage response pathways.

  12. PRECISION TIME-DELAY GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, B.J.; Peckham, V.D.

    1959-06-16

    A precision time-delay generator circuit with low jitter is described. The first thyratron has a series resonant circuit and a diode which is connected to the second thyratron. The first thyratron is triggered at the begin-ning of a time delay and a capacitor is discharged through the first thyratron and the diode, thereby, triggering the second thyratron. (T.R.H.) l6l9O The instrument described can measure pressures between sea level and 300,000 ft. The pressure- sensing transducer of the instrument is a small cylindrical tube with a thin foil of titanium-tritium fastened around the inside of the tube. Output is a digital signal which can be used for storage or telemetering more conveniently than an analog signal. (W.D.M.) l6l9l An experimental study was made on rolling contacts in the temperature range of 550 to 1000 deg F. Variables such as material composition, hardness, and operating conditions were investigated in a rolling test stand. Ball bearing tests were run to determine the effect of design parameters, bearing materials, lubricants, and operating conditions. (auth)

  13. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karlsson, Niklas; ,

    2008-01-29

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e{sup {+-}}, {nu}{sub e}, {bar {nu}}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the {Delta}(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c{sup 2}. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a pencil beam of protons varies drastically with viewing angle. A fanned proton jet with a Gaussian intensity profile impinging on surrounding material is given as a more realistic example. As the observer is moved off the jet axis, the peak of the spectrum is moved to lower energies.

  14. Testing the Delayed Gamma Capability in MCNP6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weldon, Robert A.; Fensin, Michael L.; Mckinney, Gregg W.

    2014-01-01

    The mission of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office is to quickly and reliably detect unauthorized attempts to import or transport special nuclear material for use against the United States. Developing detection equipment to meet this objective requires accurate simulation of both the detectable signature and detection mechanism. A delayed particle capability was initially added to MCNPX 2.6.A in 2005 to sample the radioactive fission product parents and emit decay particles resulting from the decay chain. To meet the objectives of detection scenario modelling, the capability was designed to sample a particular time for emitting particular multiplicity of a particular energy. Because the sampling process of selecting both time and energy is interdependent, to linearize the time and emission sampling, atom densities are computed at several discrete time steps, and the time integrated production is computed by multiplying the atom density by the decay constant and time step size to produce a cumulative distribution function for sampling the emission time, energy and multiplicity. The delayed particle capability was initially given a time bin structure to help reasonably reproduce, from a qualitative sense, a fission benchmark by D. Beddingfield, which examined the delayed gamma emission. This original benchmark was only qualitative and did not contain the magnitudes of the actual measured data, but did contain relative graphical representation of the spectra. A better benchmark with measured data was later provided by A. W.Hunt, Vladimir Mozin, E.T.E. Reedy, H.A. Selpel and Steve Tobin at the Idaho Accelerator Center; however, due to the complexity of the benchmark setup, sizable systematic errors were expected in the modeling, and initial results compared to MCNPX 2.7.0 showed errors outside of statistical fluctuation. Presented here is a more simplified approach to benchmarking, utilizing closed form analytic solutions to the granddaughter equations for 2 particular sets of decay systems. We examine five different decay chains (two stage decay to stable), and show the predictability of the MCNP6 delayed gamma feature. Results do show that while the default delayed gamma calculations available in the MCNP6 1.0 release can give accurate results for some isotopes (e.g. Ba-137), the percent differences between the closed form analytic solutions and the MCNP6 calculations were often greater than 40% (Mg-28, Al-28, K- 42, Ca-47, Sc-47, Co-60). With the MNCP6 1.1 Beta release, the 10th entry on the DBCN card allows improved calculation within less than 5% as compared to the closed form analytic solutions for immediate parent emissions and transient equilibrium systems. While the 10th entry on the DBCN card for MCNP6 1.1 gives much better results for transient equilibrium systems and parent emissions in general, it did little to improve daughter emissions of secular equilibrium systems. Hypotheses were presented as to why daughter emissions of secular equilibrium systems might be mispredicted in some cases and not in others.

  15. LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING, CLOSURE, OR EMERGENCY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DELAYED OPENING, CLOSURE, OR EMERGENCY Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may at times experience a work delay or closure due to inclement weather or unexpected Laboratory emergencies. In the event of a delay, closure, or emergency, Laboratory New Hires should call the following number to receive information regarding the delay or closure: LANL Update Hotline: 505-667-6622, 1-877-723-4101, and/or http://www.lanl.gov (Please note, the LANL hotline and webpage are updated by 5:30 a.m.) New Hire

  16. Long-range azimuthal correlations in protonproton and protonnucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    In this study, we show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest partonparton cross-section of ? = 1.5 3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in protonproton and protonnucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  17. Laser generated proton beam focusing and high temperature isochoric heating of solid matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snavely, R. A.; Hatchett, S. P.; Key, M. H.; Langdon, A. B.; Lasinski, B. F.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Patel, P.; Town, R.; Wilks, S. C.; Zhang, B.; Akli, K.; Hey, D.; King, J.; Chen, Z.; Izawa, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kodama, R.; Lei, A.; Tampo, M.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2007-09-15

    The results of laser-driven proton beam focusing and heating with a high energy (170 J) short pulse are reported. Thin hemispherical aluminum shells are illuminated with the Gekko petawatt laser using 1 {mu}m light at intensities of {approx}3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} and measured heating of thin Al slabs. The heating pattern is inferred by imaging visible and extreme-ultraviolet light Planckian emission from the rear surface. When Al slabs 100 {mu}m thick were placed at distances spanning the proton focus beam waist, the highest temperatures were produced at 0.94x the hemisphere radius beyond the equatorial plane. Isochoric heating temperatures reached 81 eV in 15 {mu}m thick foils. The heating with a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of proton transport with self-consistent heating and proton stopping in hot plasma was modeled.

  18. Gluon polarization in the proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, Steven D.; Casey, Andrew; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2011-03-15

    We combine heavy-quark renormalization group arguments with our understanding of the nucleon's wave function to deduce a bound on the gluon polarization {Delta}g in the proton. The bound is consistent with the values extracted from spin experiments at COMPASS and RHIC.

  19. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui; Jung, Seunho; Kwon, Chanho

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  20. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  1. Accelerating Polarized Protons to High Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, M.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I. G.; Alessi, J.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bravar, A.; Brennan, J. M.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Butler, J.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Delong, J.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.

    2007-06-13

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  2. Fast ignition of a compressed inertial confinement fusion hemispherical capsule by two proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temporal, Mauro

    2006-12-15

    A hemispherical conically guided indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion capsule has been considered. The fast ignition of the precompressed capsule driven by one or two laser-accelerated proton beams has been numerically investigated. The energy distribution of the protons is Gaussian with a mean energy of 12 MeV and a full width at half maximum of 1 MeV. A new scheme that uses two laser-accelerated proton beams is proposed. It is found that the energy deposition of 1 kJ provided by a first proton beam generates a low-density cylindrical channel and launches a forward shock. A second proton beam, delayed by a few tens of ps and driving the energy of 6 kJ, crosses the low-density channel and heats the dense shocked region where the ignition of the deuterium-tritium nuclear fuel is achieved. For the considered capsule, this new two-beam configuration reduces the ignition energy threshold to 7 kJ.

  3. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  4. MHK Technologies/Tidal Delay | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tidal Delay < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Delay.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Woodshed Technologies Ltd...

  5. Fault-induced delayed voltage recovery in a long inhomogeneous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Fault-induced delayed voltage recovery in a long inhomogeneous power-distribution feeder Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fault-induced delayed voltage ...

  6. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    We show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest partonparton cross-section of ?=1.53 mb?=1.53 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in protonproton and protonnucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  7. Proton-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... its magnetic moment interaction, but in the nn case the magnetic moment interaction only. ... of the Nijmegen group, used in their global N N phase-shift analysis (PSA) Sto93. ...

  8. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  9. Call issued for Proton Radiography Facility proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Call issued for Proton Radiography Facility proposals Call issued for Proton Radiography Facility proposals The proposal deadline is Feb. 6 for experiments to be carried out during Fiscal Year 2016 (Oct. 1, 2015 to Sept. 30, 2016), with consideration for extensions into FY17. January 5, 2015 Amy Clarke and Seth Imhoff of Materials Technology-Metallurgy (MST-6) align a copper density calibration object for a proton radiography experiment. Amy Clarke and Seth Imhoff of Materials

  10. Delayed gamma technique for fissile material assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mozin, Vladimir; Tobin, Stephen; Vujie, Jasmina; Hunt, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Research sponsored by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative are investigating several non-destructive assay techniques for the quantification of fissile plutonium mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies. AppHcation of the delayed gamma signatures is investigated in this context. The objective of the research is to assess whether the delayed gamma assay instrument can provide sufficient sensitivity, isotope specificity and accuracy as required in nuclear material safeguards. This effort includes theoretical and experimental components for the optimal combination of interrogation parameters. A new modeling algorithm offering a high level of detail was developed specifically for this purpose and was validated in series of benchmark experiments. Preliminary modeling of the delayed gamma response from spent fuel assemblies was accomplished offering a future direction for the design process.

  11. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A.; Beloussov, Alexandre V.; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B.; Salem, Dana

    2010-09-21

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  12. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A.; Beloussov, Alexandre V.; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B.; Salem, Dana

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  13. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-12-03

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  14. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-06-25

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  15. Low temperature proton conducting oxide devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Timothy R.; Payzant, Edward A.; Speakman, Scott A.; Greenblatt, Martha

    2008-08-19

    A device for conducting protons at a temperature below 550.degree. C. includes a LAMOX ceramic body characterized by an alpha crystalline structure.

  16. Protons Pair Up With Neutrons | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protons Pair Up With Neutrons Embargoed: Not for Release Until 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time Thursday, 29 May Contact: Kandice Carter 757-269-7263 Protons Pair Up With Neutrons NEWPORT NEWS, VA - Research performed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has found that protons are about 20 times more likely to pair up with neutrons than with other protons in the nucleus. The result will be published online by the journal Science, at the Science Express website.

  17. Oorja Protonics Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Protonics Inc Place: Fremont, California Zip: 94538 Product: Manufacturer of direct methanol fuel cells. Coordinates: 44.2605, -88.880509 Show Map Loading map......

  18. Delay correlation analysis and representation for vital complaint VHDL models

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rich, Marvin J.; Misra, Ashutosh

    2004-11-09

    A method and system unbind a rise/fall tuple of a VHDL generic variable and create rise time and fall time generics of each generic variable that are independent of each other. Then, according to a predetermined correlation policy, the method and system collect delay values in a VHDL standard delay file, sort the delay values, remove duplicate delay values, group the delay values into correlation sets, and output an analysis file. The correlation policy may include collecting all generic variables in a VHDL standard delay file, selecting each generic variable, and performing reductions on the set of delay values associated with each selected generic variable.

  19. Measurement of proton and anti-proton intensities in the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Pordes et al.

    2003-06-04

    This paper describes the techniques used to measure the intensities of the proton (p) and anti-proton ({bar p}) beams in the Tevatron collider. The systems provide simultaneous measurements of the intensity of the 36 proton and 36 antiproton bunches and their longitudinal profiles.

  20. Photoinduced processes in protonated tryptamine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, H.; Jouvet, C.; Dedonder-Lardeux, C.; Martrenchard, S.; Charriere, C.; Gregoire, G.; Desfrancois, C.; Schermann, J.P.; Barat, M.; Fayeton, J.A.

    2005-02-22

    The electronic excited state dynamics of protonated tryptamine ions generated by an electrospray source have been studied by means of photoinduced dissociation technique on the femtosecond time scale. The result is that the initially excited state decays very quickly within 250 fs. The photoinduced dissociation channels observed can be sorted in two groups of fragments coming from two competing primary processes on the singlet electronic surface. The first one corresponds to a hydrogen-atom loss channel that creates a tryptamine radical cation. The radical cation subsequently fragments to smaller ions. The second process is internal conversion due to the H-atom recombination on the electronic ground state. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations show that an excited {pi}{sigma}* state dissociative along the protonated amino N-H stretch crosses both the locally excited {pi}{pi}* state and the electronic ground state S{sub 0} and thus triggers the photofragmentation reactions. The two processes have equivalent quantum yields, {approx_equal}50% of the fragments coming from the H-atom loss reaction. The two primary reaction paths can clearly be distinguished by their femtosecond pump/probe dynamics recorded on the different fragmentation channels.

  1. Physics at an upgraded Fermilab proton driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    In 2004 the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future, primarily motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics. Over the last few months a physics study has developed the physics case for the Fermilab Proton Driver. The potential physics opportunities are discussed.

  2. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elangovan, S.; Nair, Balakrishnan G.; Small, Troy; Heck, Brian

    2011-09-06

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  3. Visualizing electron delocalization, electron-proton correlations, and the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox during the photodissociation of a diatomic molecule using two ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, Andre D.

    2010-06-15

    We investigate theoretically the dissociative ionization of an H{sub 2}{sup +} molecule using two ultrashort laser (pump-probe) pulses. The pump pulse prepares a dissociating nuclear wave packet on an ungerade surface of H{sub 2}{sup +}. Next, an ultraviolet [or extreme ultraviolet (XUV)] probe pulse ionizes this dissociating state at large (R=20-100 bohr) internuclear distance. We calculate the momenta distributions of protons and photoelectrons which show a (two-slit-like) interference structure. A general, simple interference formula is obtained which depends on the electron and protons momenta, as well as, on the pump-probe delay and also on the durations and polarizations of the laser pulses. This pump-probe scheme reveals a striking quantum delocalization of the electron over two protons which intuitively should be localized on just one of the protons separated by the distance R much larger than the atomic Bohr orbit.

  4. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board ...

  5. Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of protons in nanoconfined water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water Deep inelastic neutron ...

  6. Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon We ...

  7. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible bymore » simply extending the data acquisition time.« less

  8. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible by simply extending the data acquisition time.

  9. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

    2003-09-26

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

  10. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

    2004-09-26

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

  11. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, P.; Bernhardt, A.

    1993-06-29

    The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

  12. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Paul (Livermore, CA); Bernhardt, Anthony (Berkeley, CA)

    1993-01-01

    The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

  13. WE-G-BRE-07: Proton Therapy Enhanced by Tumor-Targeting Gold Nanoparticles: A Pilot in Vivo Experiment at The Proton Therapy Center at MD Anderson Cancer Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, T; Grant, J; Wolfe, A; Gillin, M; Krishnan, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Assess tumor-growth delay and survival in a mouse model of prostate cancer treated with tumor-targeting gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and proton therapy. Methods: We first examined the accumulation of targeting nanoparticles within prostate tumors by imaging AuNPs with ultrasound-guided photoacoustics at 24h after the intravenous administration of goserelin-conjugated AuNPs (gAuNP) in three mice. Nanoparticles were also imaged at the cellular level with TEM in PC3 cells incubated with gAuNP for 24h. Pegylated AuNPs (pAuNP) were also imaged in vivo and in vitro for comparison. PC3 cells were then implanted subcutaneously in nude mice; 51mice with 810mm tumors were included. AuNPs were injected intravenously at 0.2%w/w final gold concentration 24h before irradiation. A special jig was designed to facilitate tumor irradiation perpendicular to the proton beam. Proton energy was set to 180MeV, the radiation field was 1818cm{sup 2}, and 9cm or 13.5cm thick solid-water compensators were used to position the tumors at either the beam entrance (BE) or the SOBP. Physical doses of 5Gy were delivered to all tumors on a patient beam line at MD Anderson's Proton Therapy Center. Results: The photoacoustic experiment reveled that our nanoparticles leak from the tumor-feeding vasculature and accumulate within the tumor volume over time. Additionally, TEM images showed gAuNP are internalized in cancer cells, accumulating within the cytoplasm, whereas pAuNP are not. Tumor-growth was delayed by 11 or 32days in mice receiving gAuNP irradiated at the BE or the SOBP, relative to proton radiation alone. Survival curves (ongoing experiment) reveal that gAuNPs improved survival by 36% or 74% for tumors irradiated at the BE or SOBP. Conclusion: These important, albeit preliminary, in vivo findings reveal nanoparticles to be potent sensitizers to proton therapy. Further, conjugation of AuNPs to tumor-specific antigens that promote enhanced cellular internalization improved both tumor-growth delay and survival of mice after proton therapy.

  14. Proton Radiography: Its uses and Resolution Scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariam, Fesseha G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-09

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has used high energy protons as a probe in flash radiography for over a decade. In this time the proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons, provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose over five-hundred dynamic experiments in support of stockpile stewardship programs as well as basic materials science. Through this effort significant experience has been gained in using charged particles as direct radiographic probes to diagnose transient systems. The results of this experience will be discussed through the presentation of data from experiments recently performed at the LANL pRad.

  15. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. Methane Emissions 3.1. Total emissions The major sources of U.S. methane emissions are energy production, distribution, and use; agriculture; and waste management (Figure 17). U.S. methane emissions in 2009 totaled 731 MMTCO2e, 0.9 percent higher than the 2008 total of 724 MMTCO2e (Table 17). Methane emissions declined steadily from 1990 to 2001, as emissions from coal mining and landfills fell, then rose from 2002 to 2009 as a result of moderate increases in emissions related to energy,

  16. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13

  17. Call issued for Proton Radiography Facility proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2015 Amy Clarke and Seth Imhoff of Materials Technology-Metallurgy (MST-6) align a copper density calibration object for a proton radiography experiment. Amy Clarke and Seth...

  18. Probing the Proton's Weak Side | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as those that may be produced by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Europe. "The weak charge for the proton is exquisitely, accurately predicted by the Standard Model. ...

  19. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, W.L.; Vanheusden, K.J.R.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Devine, R.A.B.

    1998-11-03

    An electrically written memory element is disclosed utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element. 19 figs.

  20. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, William L.; Vanheusden, Karel J. R.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Devine, Roderick A. B.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element.

  1. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, William L.; Vanheusden, Karel J. R.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Devine, Roderick A. B.; Archer, Leo B.; Brown, George A.; Wallace, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    An enhancement of an electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure during an anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. Device operation is enhanced by concluding this anneal step with a sudden cooling. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronics elements on the same silicon substrate.

  2. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, William L.; Vanheusden, Karel J. R.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Devine, Roderick A. B.

    2000-01-01

    An electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element.

  3. Proton storage ring: man/machine interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lander, R.F.; Clout, P.N.

    1985-01-01

    The human interface of the Proton Storage Ring Control System at Los Alamos is described in some detail, together with the software environment in which operator interaction programs are written. Some examples of operator interaction programs are given.

  4. Proton Power Systems Plc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Systems Plc Place: Starnberg, Bavaria, Germany Zip: D-82319 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: UK-based parent company of Proton Motor GmbH, which operates in Germany. The...

  5. Extraction of CP Properties of the H(125) Boson Discovered in Proton-Proton

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Collisions at√s = 7 and 8 TeV with the CMS Detector at the LHC (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Thesis/Dissertation: Extraction of CP Properties of the H(125) Boson Discovered in Proton-Proton Collisions at√s = 7 and 8 TeV with the CMS Detector at the LHC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Extraction of CP Properties of the H(125) Boson Discovered in Proton-Proton Collisions at√s = 7 and 8 TeV with the CMS Detector at the LHC In this thesis

  6. Extraction of CP Properties of the H(125) Boson Discovered in Proton-Proton

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Collisions at√s = 7 and 8 TeV with the CMS Detector at the LHC (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Extraction of CP Properties of the H(125) Boson Discovered in Proton-Proton Collisions at√s = 7 and 8 TeV with the CMS Detector at the LHC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Extraction of CP Properties of the H(125) Boson Discovered in Proton-Proton Collisions at√s = 7 and 8 TeV with the CMS Detector at the LHC × You are accessing a document from the

  7. Delays in Reducing Waterborne and Water-related Infectious Diseases in China under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, Maggie; Belle, Jessica; Carlton, Elizabeth; Liang, Song; Li, Huazhong; Luo, Wei; Freeman, Matthew C.; Liu, Yang; Gao, Yang; Hess, Jeremy; Remais, Justin V.

    2014-12-01

    Despite China’s rapid progress improving water, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) infrastructure and access, in 2011, 471 million people lacked access to improved sanitation, and 401 million people lacked access to household piped water. Infectious diseases are sensitive to changes in climate, particularly temperature, and WSH conditions. To explore possible impacts of climate change on these diseases in China in 2020 and 2030, we coupled estimates of the temperature sensitivity of diarrheal disease and three vector-borne diseases, temperature projections from global climate models using four emissions pathways, WSH-infrastructure development scenarios and projected demographic changes. By 2030, the projected impacts would delay China’s historically rapid progress toward reducing the burden of WSH-attributable infectious disease by 8-85 months. This developmental delay provides a key summary measure of the impact of climate change in China, and in other societies undergoing rapid social, economic, and environmental change.

  8. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Volk Jr; Keith Wisecarver

    2005-10-01

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking. The following deliverables are scheduled from the two projects of the three-year JIP: (1) A novel method for enhancing liquid yields from delayed cokers and data that provide insight as to the optimum temperature to remove hydrogen sulfide from furnace gases. (2) An understanding of what causes foaming in c

  9. Proton's Weak Charge Determined for First Time | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton's Weak Charge Determined for First Time Proton's Weak Charge Determined for First Time Q-weak at Jefferson Lab has measured the proton's weak charge Q-weak at Jefferson Lab has measured the proton's weak charge. NEWPORT NEWS, VA, Sept. 17, 2013 - Researchers have made the first experimental determination of the weak charge of the proton in research carried out at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). The results, accepted for

  10. Quarks Pair Up in Protons (and Neutrons) | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarks Pair Up in Protons (and Neutrons) Graph of up quark/down quark contributions Researchers have published intriguing new observations for how the different kinds of quarks behave inside protons and neutrons. In the proton, the down quark contributes surprisingly little to electron-proton interaction. Also, the up quark contributes much less to electron-neutron interaction than one would expect if all three quarks behaved in similar ways. Quarks Pair Up in Protons (and Neutrons) Ordinarily,

  11. HAPPEx Results Hint at Strangely Magnetic Proton | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HAPPEx Results Hint at Strangely Magnetic Proton HAPPEx Results Hint at Strangely Magnetic Proton April 20, 2005 New results from research performed at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab hint that strange quarks may contribute to the proton's magnetic moment. If confirmed by data to be taken later this year, these surprising results would indicate that strange quarks in the proton's quark-gluon sea contribute to at least one of the proton's intrinsic properties. The HAPPEx results

  12. First Measurement of Bose-Einstein Correlations in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=0.9$ and 2.36 TeV at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Er, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai

    2010-05-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations have been measured using samples of proton-proton collisions at 0.9 and 2.36 TeV center-of-mass energies, recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The signal is observed in the form of an enhancement of pairs of same-sign charged particles with small relative four-momentum. The size of the correlated particle emission region is seen to increase significantly with the particle multiplicity of the event.

  13. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Commercial sector emissions declined by 6.5 percent in 2009. Lighting accounts for a ... The transportation sector has led all U.S. end-use sectors in emissions of carbon dioxide ...

  14. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-09

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  15. A New High-Current Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleland, M. R.; Galloway, R. A.; DeSanto, L.; Jongen, Y.

    2009-03-10

    A high-current (>20 mA) dc proton accelerator is being developed for applications such as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the detection of explosive materials by nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma radiation. The high-voltage dc accelerator (adjustable between 1.4 and 2.8 MeV) will be a single-ended industrial Dynamitron registered system equipped with a compact high-current, microwave-driven proton source. A magnetic mass analyzer inserted between the ion source and the acceleration tube will select the protons and reject heavier ions. A sorption pump near the ion source will minimize the flow of neutral hydrogen gas into the acceleration tube. For BNCT, a lithium target for generating epithermal neutrons is being developed that will be capable of dissipating the high power (>40 kW) of the proton beam. For NRA, special targets will be used to generate gamma rays with suitable energies for exciting nuclides typically present in explosive materials. Proton accelerators with such high-current and high-power capabilities in this energy range have not been developed previously.

  16. A Detector for Proton Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blazey, G.; et al.,

    2013-12-06

    Radiation therapy is a widely recognized treatment for cancer. Energetic protons have distinct features that set them apart from photons and make them desirable for cancer therapy as well as medical imaging. The clinical interest in heavy ion therapy is due to the fact that ions deposit almost all of their energy in a sharp peak the Bragg peak- at the very end of their path. Proton beams can be used to precisely localize a tumor and deliver an exact dose to the tumor with small doses to the surrounding tissue. Proton computed tomography (pCT) provides direct information on the location on the target tumor, and avoids position uncertainty caused by treatment planning based on imaging with X-ray CT. The pCT project goal is to measure and reconstruct the proton relative stopping power distribution directly in situ. To ensure the full advantage of cancer treatment with 200 MeV proton beams, pCT must be realized.

  17. Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-06

    How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

  18. Peru action simmering despite privatization delays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-07

    After months of delays, the sale of Petroleos del Peru SA (Petroperu) was postponed earlier this year until after the elections, which saw Peru`s incumbent President Alberto Fujimori reelected. In June, Fujimori appointed Amado Yataco Minister of Energy and Mines. Yataco, also serving as president of the privatization commission Copri, said a decision on the sale of Petroperu would be made quickly, perhaps by July 28, ahead of this report`s presstime. The uncertain status of Petroperu has not, however, slowed activity in Peru`s petroleum sector. The paper first discusses privatization plans and Petroperu`s budget, then describes exploration and development activities in the supergiant Camisea gas/condensate fields in the central southern jungle. Activities in several smaller fields are briefly described.

  19. Delayed Fission Gamma-ray Characteristics of Th-232 U-233 U-235 U-238 and Pu-239

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Taylor; Parma, Edward J.

    2015-08-01

    Delayed fission gamma-rays play an important role in determining the time dependent ioniz- ing dose for experiments in the central irradiation cavity of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Delayed gamma-rays are produced from both fission product decay and from acti- vation of materials in the core, such as cladding and support structures. Knowing both the delayed gamma-ray emission rate and the time-dependent gamma-ray energy spectrum is nec- essary in order to properly determine the dose contributions from delayed fission gamma-rays. This information is especially important when attempting to deconvolute the time-dependent neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray contribution to the response of a diamond photo-conducting diode (PCD) or fission chamber in time frames of milliseconds to seconds following a reactor pulse. This work focused on investigating delayed gamma-ray character- istics produced from fission products from thermal, fast, and high energy fission of Th-232, U-233, U-235, U-238, and Pu-239. This work uses a modified version of CINDER2008, a transmutation code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, to model time and energy dependent photon characteristics due to fission. This modified code adds the capability to track photon-induced transmutations, photo-fission, and the subsequent radiation caused by fission products due to photo-fission. The data is compared against previous work done with SNL- modified CINDER2008 [ 1 ] and experimental data [ 2 , 3 ] and other published literature, includ- ing ENDF/B-VII.1 [ 4 ]. The ability to produce a high-fidelity (7,428 group) energy-dependent photon fluence at various times post-fission can improve the delayed photon characterization for radiation effects tests at research reactors, as well as other applications.

  20. Microsecond delays on non-real time operating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angstadt, R.; Estrada, J.; Diehl, H.T.; Flaugher, B.; Johnson, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    We have developed microsecond timing and profiling software that runs on standard Windows and Linux based operating systems. This software is orders of magnitudes better than most of the standard native functions in wide use. Our software libraries calibrate RDTSC in microseconds or seconds to provide two different types of delays: a ''Guaranteed Minimum'' and a precision ''Long Delay'', which releases to the kernel. Both return profiling information of the actual delay.

  1. Fast, moment-based estimation methods for delay network tomography...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Much of the previous literature deals with discrete delay distributions by discretizing ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 42; MONITORING; PROBES; ...

  2. LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE DUE TO INCLEAMENT WEATHER During the winter months, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may at times...

  3. Vehicle Emissions Review- 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews vehicle emission control highlighting representative studies that illustrate the state-of-the-art

  4. Small Business Innovation Research Award Success Story: Proton Energy Systems

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This success story describes Proton Energy Systems, a small business that designs and manufactures proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis sytems to produce hydrogen from water. The U.S. Departmen

  5. Proton Therapy for Cancer: Current Status, Promise and Challenges...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 9, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium Proton Therapy for Cancer: Current Status, Promise and Challenges Dr. Dennis Mah ProCure Proton Therapy Center Colloquium...

  6. A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Wednesday, 25 July 2012 00:00 Hydrogen bonds are...

  7. Proton Motor Fuel Cell GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motor Fuel Cell GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: Proton Motor Fuel Cell GmbH Place: Starnberg, Germany Zip: D-82319 Product: Proton Motor Fuel Cell has been developing and...

  8. The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane October 11, 2012 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 Ram.jpg The cover ...

  9. Active Diesel Emission Control Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conferencen Presentation: RYPOS Active Diesel Emission Control Systems

  10. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsher, Richard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Seagraves, David T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  11. PROTON RADIOGRAPHY FOR AN ADVANCED HYDROTEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. MORRIS

    2000-11-01

    Analysis of data from BNL experiment 933 is presented. Results demonstrate that proton radiography can meet many of the requirements for an Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF). Results for background, position resolution, metrology, quantitative radiography, material identification, and edge resolution are presented.

  12. Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon We investigate the influence of proton irradiation on thermal conductivity in single crystal silicon. We apply laser based modulated thermoreflectance technique to extract the change in conductivity of the thin layer damaged by proton irradiation. Unlike time domain thermoreflectance techniques

  13. Oct. 25 Lecture Highlights Treatment Technology of HU's Proton Therapy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute | Jefferson Lab Oct. 25 Lecture Highlights Treatment Technology of HU's Proton Therapy Institute Oct. 25 Lecture Highlights Treatment Technology of HU's Proton Therapy Institute Cynthia Keppel Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute Scientific and Technical Director, Cynthia Keppel, will present a public lecture titled "Accelerating Protons to Save Lives" on Oct. 25 at Jefferson Lab in Newport News. NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Sept. 29, 2011 - Jefferson Lab's 2011 Fall Science

  14. COLLOQUIUM: Proton Therapy for Cancer: Current Status, Promise and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenges | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 25, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium, PPPL (284 cap.) COLLOQUIUM: Proton Therapy for Cancer: Current Status, Promise and Challenges Dr. Dennis Mah ProCure Proton Therapy Center This presentation will provide a physicist's perspective on a proton therapy for cancer treatment. It will include a context of how radiation therapy fits into cancer management overall with an emphasis on the differences between proton and conventional

  15. Proton's party pals may alter its internal structure | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton's party pals may alter its internal structure Proton's party pals may alter its internal structure NEWPORT NEWS, VA, November 18, 2009 - A recent experiment at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has found that a proton's nearest neighbors in the nucleus of the atom may modify the proton's internal structure. The result was published in the November 13 issue of the journal Physical Review Letters. When comparing large nuclei to small nuclei, past

  16. Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy Presentation by Everett Anderson, PROTON ON SITE, at the NREL Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop, April 19, 2011 PDF icon rev_fc_wkshp_anderson.pdf More Documents & Publications Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Regenerative Fuel Cells for Energy Storage Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Award Success Story: Proton Energy Systems

  17. Creating a Well-focused Laser-accelerated Proton Beam as a Driver...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Creating a Well-focused Laser-accelerated Proton Beam as a Driver for Proton Fast Ignition ... Creating a Well-focused Laser-accelerated Proton Beam as a Driver for Proton Fast Ignition ...

  18. Studying the proton 'radius' puzzle with ?p elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilman, R.

    2013-11-07

    The disagreement between the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen and from electronic measurements is called the proton radius puzzle. The resolution of the puzzle remains unclear and appears to require new experimental results. An experiment to measure muon-proton elastic scattering is presented here.

  19. PROTON BEAM REQUIREMENTS FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2009-12-11

    Both a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider place stringent demands on the proton beam used to generate the desired beam of muons. Here we discuss the advantages and challenges of muon accelerators and the rationale behind the requirements on proton beam energy, intensity, bunch length, and repetition rate. Example proton driver configurations that have been considered in recent years are also briefly indicated.

  20. Hardness assurance for proton direct ionization-induced SEEs using a high-energy proton beam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Dodd, Paul E.; Doyle, Barney Lee; Trinczek, M.; Blackmore, E. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Reed, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; et al

    2014-11-06

    The low-energy proton energy spectra of all shielded space environments have the same shape. This shape is easily reproduced in the laboratory by degrading a high-energy proton beam, producing a high-fidelity test environment. We use this test environment to dramatically simplify rate prediction for proton direct ionization effects, allowing the work to be done at high-energy proton facilities, on encapsulated parts, without knowledge of the IC design, and with little or no computer simulations required. Proton direct ionization (PDI) is predicted to significantly contribute to the total error rate under the conditions investigated. Scaling effects are discussed using data frommore » 65-nm, 45-nm, and 32-nm SOI SRAMs. These data also show that grazing-angle protons will dominate the PDI-induced error rate due to their higher effective LET, so PDI hardness assurance methods must account for angular effects to be conservative. As a result, we show that this angular dependence can be exploited to quickly assess whether an IC is susceptible to PDI.« less

  1. SU-E-T-329: Tissue-Equivalent Phantom Materials for Neutron Dosimetry in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halg, R; Lomax, A; Clarke, S; Wieger, B; Pryser, E; Arghal, R; Pozzi, S; Bashkirov, V; Schulte, R; Schneider, U

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize tissue equivalence of phantom materials in terms of secondary neutron production and dose deposition from neutrons produced in radiation therapy phantom materials in the context of proton therapy using Monte Carlo simulations and measurements. Methods: In order to study the influence of material choice on neutron production in therapeutic proton beams, Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 and MCNPX-PoliMi transport codes were performed to generate the neutron fields produced by protons of 155 and 200 MeV. A simple irradiation geometry was used to investigate the effect of different materials. The proton beams were stopped in slab phantoms to study the production of secondary neutrons. The investigated materials were water, Lucite, and tissue-equivalent phantom materials (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA). Neutron energy spectra and absorbed dose by neutrons and their secondary particles were scored. In addition, simulations were performed for reference tissues (ICRP/ICRU) to assess tissue equivalence with respect to neutron generation and transport. In order to benchmark the simulation results, measurements were performed with a system developed at the University of Michigan; organic liquid scintillators were used to detect the neutron emissions from the irradiation of tissue-equivalent materials. Additionally, the MPPost code was used to calculate the scintillator response from the MCNPX-PoliMi output. Results: The simulated energy spectra and depth dose curves of the neutrons produced in different phantom materials showed similar shape. The differences of spectra and fluences between all studied materials and reference tissues were well within the achievable precision of neutron dosimetry. The shape of the simulated detector response of the liquid scintillators agreed well with measurements on the proton beamline. Conclusion: Based on Geant4 and MCNPX-PoliMi simulations, the investigated materials appear to be suitable to study the production of neutrons in proton therapy. MC simulations were verified with neutron measurements in therapeutic proton beams. This work was funded in part by the ANDANTE grant of the European Commission in the 7th Framework Program.

  2. Parity Nonconservation in Proton-Proton and Proton-Water Scattering at 1.5 GeV/c

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Mischke, R. E.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R.; MacArthur, D.; Nagle, D. E.; Frauenfelder, H.; Harper, R. W.; Yuan, V.; McDonald, A. B.; Talaga, R. L.

    1984-07-01

    Experiments searching for parity nonconservation in the scattering of 1.5 GeV/c (800 MeV) polarized protons from an unpolarized water target and a liquid hydrogen target are described. The intensity of the incident proton beam was measured upstream and downstream of the target by a pair of ionization detectors. The beam helicity was reversed at a 30-Hz rate. Auxiliary detectors monitored beam properties that could give rise to false effects. The result for the longitudinal asymmetry from the water is A{sub L} = (1.7 +- 3.3 +- 1.4) x 10{sup -7}, where the first error is statistical and the second is an estimate of systematic effects. The hydrogen data yield a preliminary result of A{sub L} = (1.0 +- 1.6) x 10{sup -7}. The systematic errors for p-p are expected to be < 1 x 10{sup -7}.

  3. Zooming in on a proton packed with surprises | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zooming in on a proton packed with surprises The shape of the proton can differ, depending on the angular momentum of quarks The shape of the proton can differ, depending on the angular momentum of quarks. (Gerald A. Miller/University of Washington) Zooming in on a proton packed with surprises December 3, 2003 The structure of the proton is under the microscope at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, where a

  4. SU-E-T-264: Preliminary Results On New Optically Stimulated Luminescent Materials for Proton Therapy Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doull, B; Zheng, Y; Yukihara, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to test the premise that luminescence materials with less under-response to proton beams can be identified by testing their dose response to low-LET radiation. The goal is to develop new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) materials with improved response for proton therapy dosimetry. Methods: We first measured the dose response of new OSL materials, synthesized in our laboratory, to low-LET radiation (beta rays from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source) and selected two materials having different OSL saturation characteristics and good dosimetric properties, namely MgB4O7:Ce,Li and MgO:Li. Commercial Al2O3:C was also used for comparison. These materials were then irradiated at several depths along a pristine proton beam. The luminescence responses of the materials, relative to the entrance response, were compared with the depth dose profile measured by a multiple-layer ion chamber. Results: The OSL signals of MgB4O7:Ce,Li and MgO:Li were characterized for signal stability, dose response, and response to a clinical proton beam. The materials were also compared with the commercial Al2O3:C. The signals from both MgB4O7:Ce,Li and MgO:Li were relatively stable after a one day delay following irradiation. The low-LET dose response of the materials showed that, over the dose range investigated (up to ∼800 Gy), MgB4O7:Ce,Li did not saturate, whereas MgO:Li and Al2O3:C saturated at doses of ∼100 Gy. MgB4O7:Ce,Li showed less underresponse to proton beams than MgO:Li and Al2O3:C. Conclusion: In general the material with the highest saturation doses for low-LET radiation (MgB4O7:Ce,Li) showed the least under-response to proton beams, which suggests that it may be possible to develop better OSL materials for proton dosimetry if the dose response can be controlled during synthesis. Nevertheless, the degree in which the response to proton beams can be controlled remains to be determined. The research is funded by the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST), project number HR12-055.

  5. Carbon Emissions: Food Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct....

  6. Development of a statistically based access delay timeline methodology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, W. Gary; Robinson, David Gerald; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2013-02-01

    The charter for adversarial delay is to hinder access to critical resources through the use of physical systems increasing an adversary's task time. The traditional method for characterizing access delay has been a simple model focused on accumulating times required to complete each task with little regard to uncertainty, complexity, or decreased efficiency associated with multiple sequential tasks or stress. The delay associated with any given barrier or path is further discounted to worst-case, and often unrealistic, times based on a high-level adversary, resulting in a highly conservative calculation of total delay. This leads to delay systems that require significant funding and personnel resources in order to defend against the assumed threat, which for many sites and applications becomes cost prohibitive. A new methodology has been developed that considers the uncertainties inherent in the problem to develop a realistic timeline distribution for a given adversary path. This new methodology incorporates advanced Bayesian statistical theory and methodologies, taking into account small sample size, expert judgment, human factors and threat uncertainty. The result is an algorithm that can calculate a probability distribution function of delay times directly related to system risk. Through further analysis, the access delay analyst or end user can use the results in making informed decisions while weighing benefits against risks, ultimately resulting in greater system effectiveness with lower cost.

  7. Proton form factor effects in hydrogenic atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daza, F. Garcia; Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.

    2011-10-21

    The proton structure corrections to the hyperfine splittings in electronic and muonic hydrogen are evaluated using the Breit potential with electromagnetic form factors. In contrast to other methods, the Breit equation with q{sup 2} dependent form factors is just an extension of the standard Breit equation which gives the hyperfine splitting Hamiltonian. Precise QED corrections are comparable to the structure corrections which therefore need to be evaluated ab initio.

  8. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-10-06

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  9. LOW ENERGY PROTON CAPTURE STUDY OF THE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LOW ENERGY PROTON CAPTURE STUDY OF THE 14 N(p, γ) 15 O REACTION Stephen Michael Daigle A dissertation submitted to the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Depart- ment of Physics and Astronomy. Chapel Hill 2013 Approved by: Arthur E. Champagne Gerald Cecil Jonathan Engel Reyco Henning Christian Iliadis c 2013 Stephen Michael Daigle ALL RIGHTS RESERVED ii ABSTRACT Stephen Michael

  10. Proton structure functions at small x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hentschinski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Proton structure functions are measured in electron-proton collision through inelastic scattering of virtual photons with virtuality Q on protons; x denotes the momentum fraction carried by the struck parton. Proton structure functions are currently described with excellent accuracy in terms of scale dependent parton distribution functions, defined in terms of collinear factorization and DGLAP evolution in Q. With decreasing x however, parton densities increase and are ultimately expected to saturate. In this regime DGLAP evolution will finally break down and non-linear evolution equations w.r.t x are expected to take over. In the first part of the talk we present recent result on an implementation of physical DGLAP evolution. Unlike the conventional description in terms of parton distribution functions, the former describes directly the Q dependence of the measured structure functions. It is therefore physical insensitive to factorization scheme and scale ambiguities. It therefore provides a more stringent test of DGLAP evolution and eases the manifestation of (non-linear) small x effects. It however requires a precise measurement of both structure functions F2 and FL, which will be only possible at future facilities, such as an Electron Ion Collider. In the second part we present a recent analysis of the small x region of the combined HERA data on the structure function F2. We demonstrate that (linear) next-to-leading order BFKL evolution describes the effective Pomeron intercept, determined from the combined HERA data, once a resummation of collinear enhanced terms is included and the renormalization scale is fixed using the BLM optimal scale setting procedure. We also provide a detailed description of the Q and x dependence of the full structure functions F2 in the small x region, as measured at HERA. As a result, predictions for the structure function FL are found to be in agreement with the existing HERA data.

  11. Method of synthesis of proton conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando Henry; Einsla, Melinda Lou; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2010-06-15

    A method of producing a proton conducting material, comprising adding a pyrophosphate salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved pyrophosphate salt; adding an inorganic acid salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved inorganic acid salt; adding the dissolved inorganic acid salt to the dissolved pyrophosphate salt to produce a mixture; substantially evaporating the solvent from the mixture to produce a precipitate; and calcining the precipitate at a temperature of from about 400.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C.

  12. Proton structure functions at small x

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hentschinski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Proton structure functions are measured in electron-proton collision through inelastic scattering of virtual photons with virtuality Q on protons; x denotes the momentum fraction carried by the struck parton. Proton structure functions are currently described with excellent accuracy in terms of scale dependent parton distribution functions, defined in terms of collinear factorization and DGLAP evolution in Q. With decreasing x however, parton densities increase and are ultimately expected to saturate. In this regime DGLAP evolution will finally break down and non-linear evolution equations w.r.t x are expected to take over. In the first part of the talk we present recentmore » result on an implementation of physical DGLAP evolution. Unlike the conventional description in terms of parton distribution functions, the former describes directly the Q dependence of the measured structure functions. It is therefore physical insensitive to factorization scheme and scale ambiguities. It therefore provides a more stringent test of DGLAP evolution and eases the manifestation of (non-linear) small x effects. It however requires a precise measurement of both structure functions F2 and FL, which will be only possible at future facilities, such as an Electron Ion Collider. In the second part we present a recent analysis of the small x region of the combined HERA data on the structure function F2. We demonstrate that (linear) next-to-leading order BFKL evolution describes the effective Pomeron intercept, determined from the combined HERA data, once a resummation of collinear enhanced terms is included and the renormalization scale is fixed using the BLM optimal scale setting procedure. We also provide a detailed description of the Q and x dependence of the full structure functions F2 in the small x region, as measured at HERA. As a result, predictions for the structure function FL are found to be in agreement with the existing HERA data.« less

  13. FFAG ACCELERATOR PROTON DRIVER FOR NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUGGIERO, A.

    2005-06-21

    This paper is the summary of a conceptual study of a Proton Driver for Neutrino Factory based on the use of a Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) Accelerator. The required proton energy range for an optimum neutrino production is 5 to 12 GeV. This can be accomplished with a group of three concentric rings each with 807 m circumference [1]. FFAG Accelerators [2] have the capability to accelerate charged particles over a large momentum range ({+-}30-50%) and the feature of constant bending and focusing fields. Particles can be accelerated very fast at the rate given by the accelerating field of RF cavities placed in proper locations between magnets. The performance of FFAG accelerators is to be placed between that of Super-Conducting Linear Accelerators (SCL), with which they share the fast acceleration rate, and Rapid-Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS), as they allow the beam to re-circulate over fewer revolutions. Brookhaven National Laboratory is involved in the study of feasibility of FFAG Accelerators to accelerate intense beams of protons in the GeV energy range for a variety of applications the most important of which is the Upgrade of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) with a new FFAG injector [3] accelerating from 400 MeV to 1.5 GeV. The ring would be housed in the AGS tunnel and has henceforth a circumference of 807 m.

  14. Modification for complex-particle emission probability in the pre-equilibrium exciton model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao Ron-zhi; Wu Guo-hua; Zheng Wei-han; Liu Jian-ye; Yu Chao-fan; Yu Xie

    1986-04-01

    Starting from a state density formula that distinguishes between neutrons and protons, we have derived corrections for the emission probability W/sub alphabeta/ for complex particles and the purely combinatorial probability R/sub alphabeta/. The calculated results agree well with experimental data and show clear improvement over previous calculations.

  15. A clinically feasible method for the detection of potential collision in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou Wei; Lin Haibo; Plastaras, John P.; Wang Huanshu; Bui, Viet; Vapiwala, Neha; McDonough, James; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Potential collision between the patient/couch and the gantry could delay the start of the treatment and reduce clinical efficiency. The ability to accurately detect possible collisions during the treatment planning phase is desired. Such collision detection should account for the specific proton gantry design, the treatment beam configuration, couch orientation, and the patient specific geometry. In this paper the authors developed an approach to detect possible patient-machine collisions using patient treatment plan data. Methods: The geometry of the machine and the patient was reconstructed relative to the isocenter of the proton treatment room. The surface contour of the gantry was first captured from the proton computer aided design and reconstructed to account for specific gantry rotation, snout position, collimator rotation, and range compensator dimensions based on the patient treatment plan data. The patient body and couch contours were captured from the patient's CT DICOM structure file. They were reconstructed relative to the isocenter taking into account treatment couch rotation. For potential collision that occurs at body portions where no CT images exist, scout images are used to construct the body contour. A software program was developed using a ray casting algorithm that was applied to detect collisions by determining if any of the patient and couch contour points fall into the spatial polygons formed by the proton gantry surfaces. Results: Twenty-four patient plans with or without potential collisions were retrospectively identified and analyzed using the collision detection software. In addition, five collision cases were artificially generated using an anthropomorphic phantom. The program successfully detected the collisions in all cases. The calculation time for each case was within 20 s. The software program was implemented in the authors' clinic to detect patient-gantry or gantry-couch collisions in the treatment planning phase. Conclusions: The authors developed a fast and clinically feasible patient-specific collision detection program for proton therapy based on a ray casting algorithm. If incorporated during the treatment planning phase it may lead to improved clinical efficiency. This methodology could also be applied to patient collision detection in photon therapy.

  16. A new luminescence beam profile monitor for intense proton and heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang,T.; Bellavia, S.; Connolly, R.; Gassner, D.; Makdisi, Y.; Russo, T.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Zelenski, A.

    2008-10-01

    A new luminescence beam profile monitor is realized in the polarized hydrogen gas jet target at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. In addition to the spin polarization of the proton beam being routinely measured by the hydrogen gas jet, the luminescence produced by beam-hydrogen excitation leads to a strong Balmer series lines emission. A selected hydrogen Balmer line is spectrally filtered and imaged to produce the transverse RHIC proton beam shape with unprecedented details on the RHIC beam profile. Alternatively, when the passage of the high energy RHIC gold ion beam excited only the residual gas molecules in the beam path, sufficient ion beam induced luminescence is produced and the transverse gold ion beam profile is obtained. The measured transverse beam sizes and the calculated emittances provide an independent confirmation of the RHIC beam characteristics and to verify the emittance conservation along the RHIC accelerator. This optical beam diagnostic technique by making use of the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas offers a truly noninvasive particle beam characterization, and provides a visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. Combined with a longitudinal bunch measurement system, a 3-dimensional spatial particle beam profile can be reconstructed tomographically.

  17. Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on High Energy Delayed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on High Energy Delayed Gamma-Rays From Gamma-Ray Bursts Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on...

  18. Opportunities for Process Monitoring Techniques at Delayed Access Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Johnson, Shirley J.; Schanfein, Mark; Toomey, Christopher

    2013-09-20

    Except for specific cases where the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) maintains a continuous presence at a facility (such as the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant), there is always a period of time or delay between the moment a State is notified or aware of an upcoming inspection, and the time the inspector actually enters the material balance area or facility. Termed by the authors as “delayed access,” this period of time between inspection notice and inspector entrance to a facility poses a concern. Delayed access also has the potential to reduce the effectiveness of measures applied as part of the Safeguards Approach for a facility (such as short-notice inspections). This report investigates the feasibility of using process monitoring to address safeguards challenges posed by delayed access at a subset of facility types.

  19. Femtosecond Time-Delay X-ray Holography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time-Delay X-ray Holography X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) will produce photon pulses with a unique and desirable combination of properties. Their short X-ray wavelengths allow...

  20. Time-delayed directional beam phased array antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fund, Douglas Eugene; Cable, John William; Cecil, Tony Myron

    2004-10-19

    An antenna comprising a phased array of quadrifilar helix or other multifilar antenna elements and a time-delaying feed network adapted to feed the elements. The feed network can employ a plurality of coaxial cables that physically bridge a microstrip feed circuitry to feed power signals to the elements. The cables provide an incremental time delay which is related to their physical lengths, such that replacing cables having a first set of lengths with cables having a second set of lengths functions to change the time delay and shift or steer the antenna's main beam. Alternatively, the coaxial cables may be replaced with a programmable signal processor unit adapted to introduce the time delay using signal processing techniques applied to the power signals.

  1. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  2. Fault-induced delayed voltage recovery in a long inhomogeneous

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    power-distribution feeder (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Fault-induced delayed voltage recovery in a long inhomogeneous power-distribution feeder Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fault-induced delayed voltage recovery in a long inhomogeneous power-distribution feeder Authors: Stolbova, Irina ; Backhaus, Scott ; Chertkov, Michael Publication Date: 2015-02-23 OSTI Identifier: 1180264 Grant/Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

  3. Device For Trapping Laser Pulses In An Optical Delay Line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, David U. L.; Bullock, Donald L.

    1997-12-23

    A device for maintaining a high-energy laser pulse within a recirculating optical delay line for a period time to optimize the interaction of the pulse with an electron beam pulse train comprising closely spaced electron micropulses. The delay line allows a single optical pulse to interact with many of the electron micropulses in a single electron beam macropulse in sequence and for the introduction of additional optical pulses to interact with the micropulses of additional electron beam macropulses. The device comprises a polarization-sensitive beam splitter for admitting an optical pulse to and ejecting it from the delay line according to its polarization state, a Pockels cell to control the polarization of the pulse within the delay line for the purpose of maintaining it within the delay line or ejecting it from the delay line, a pair of focusing mirrors positioned so that a collimated incoming optical pulse is focused by one of them to a focal point where the pulse interacts with the electron beam and then afterwards the pulse is recollimated by the second focusing mirror, and a timing device which synchronizes the introduction of the laser pulse into the optical delay line with the arrival of the electron macropulse at the delay line to ensure the interaction of the laser pulse with a prescribed number of electron micropulses in sequence. In a first embodiment of the invention, the principal optical elements are mounted with their axes collinear. In a second embodiment, all principal optical elements are mounted in the configuration of a ring.

  4. Comprehensive description of J/? production in proton-proton collisions at collider energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Yan-Qing; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-11-04

    We employ a small x Color Glass Condensate (CGC)+ Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) formalism to compute J/ production at low p? in proton-proton collisions at collider energies. Very good agreement is obtained for total cross-sections, rapidity distributions and low momentum p? distributions. Similar agreement is obtained for production. We observe an overlap region in p? where our results match smoothly to those obtained in a next-to-leading order (NLO) collinearly factorized NRQCD formalism. The relative contribution of color singlet and color octet contributions can be quantified in the CGC+NRQCD framework, with the former contributing approximately 10% of the total cross-section.

  5. Comprehensive description of J/ψ production in proton-proton collisions at collider energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Yan -Qing; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-11-04

    We employ a small x Color Glass Condensate + Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) formalism to compute J/ψ production at low p⊥ in proton-proton collisions at collider energies. Very good agreement is obtained for total cross-sections, rapidity distributions and low momentum p⊥ distributions. Similar agreement is obtained for ψ' production. We observe an overlap region in p⊥ where our results match smoothly to those obtained in a next-to-leading order (NLO) collinearly factorized NRQCD formalism. The relative contribution of color singlet and color octet contributions can be quantified in the CGC+NRQCD framework, with the former contributing approximately 10% of the total cross-section.

  6. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; et al

    2015-05-22

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented.

  7. Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen Proton

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Markets | Department of Energy Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Markets Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Markets This document provides information about near-term markets (such as for forklifts and telecommunications) for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. PDF icon pemfc_econ_2006_report_final_0407.pdf More Documents &

  8. Researchers create enormous simulation of proton collisions | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Researchers create enormous simulation of proton collisions By Jared Sagoff * December 12, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago have created one of the world's largest samples of Monte Carlo simulated proton-proton collisions. The data sample contains 400 million events, each of which contains 5500 particles on average, totaling more than 2 trillion generated particles. Each

  9. Moving Quarks Help Solve Proton Spin Puzzle | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moving Quarks Help Solve Proton Spin Puzzle Moving Quarks Help Solve Proton Spin Puzzle NEWPORT NEWS, VA., Sept. 11, 2008 - New theory work at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has shown that more than half of the spin of the proton is the result of the movement of its building blocks: quarks. The result, published in the Sept. 5 issue of Physical Review Letters, agrees with recent experiments and supercomputer calculations. It was thought that the

  10. Proton adsorption onto alumina: extension of multisite complexation (MUSIC) theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagashima, K.; Blum, F.D.

    1999-09-01

    The adsorption isotherm of protons onto a commercial {gamma}-alumina sample was determined in aqueous nitric acid with sodium nitrate as a background electrolyte. Three discrete regions could be discerned in the log-log plots of the proton isotherm determined at the solution pH 5 to 2. The multisite complexation (MUSIC) model was modified to analyze the simultaneous adsorption of protons onto various kinds of surface species.

  11. Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed Dipole

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Correctors and Crystals (Conference) | SciTech Connect Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed Dipole Correctors and Crystals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed Dipole Correctors and Crystals Slow extraction of protons beams from circular accelerators is currently widely used for a variety of beam-based experiments. The method has some deficiencies including limited efficiency of extraction,

  12. The Future of High Energy Polarized Proton Beams (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect The Future of High Energy Polarized Proton Beams Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Future of High Energy Polarized Proton Beams The acceleration and storage of high energy polarized proton beams has made tremendous progress over the last forty years challenging along the way the technologies, precision and the understanding of the beam dynamics of accelerators. This progress is most evident in that one can now contemplate high energy colliders with polarized

  13. Mass Evaluation for Proton Rich Nuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Xu, X.; Pfeiffer, B.; Kondev, F. G.

    2011-11-30

    The Atomic mass evaluation (AME) provides the reliable resource for the values related to atomic masses. Since the publication of the latest version of AME in 2003, many developments for atomic mass determination have been done and important results changed significantly our knowledge. A preliminary version of AME was released in April 2011, and an official version is foreseen to be published in early 2013. The general status of AME is presented and some specific features of AME for proton-rich nuclides are discussed.

  14. Neutrino emission in the jet propagation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, D.; Dai, Z. G.

    2014-07-20

    Relativistic jets are universal in long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) models. Before breaking out, they must propagate in the progenitor envelope along with a forward shock and a reverse shock forming at the jet head. Both electrons and protons will be accelerated by the shocks. High-energy neutrinos could be produced by these protons interacting with stellar materials and electron-radiating photons. The jet will probably be collimated, which may have a strong effect on the final neutrino flux. Under the assumption of a power-law stellar-envelope density profile ??r {sup ?} with index ?, we calculate the neutrino emission flux by these shocks for low-luminosity GRBs (LL-GRBs) and ultra-long GRBs (UL-GRBs) in different collimation regimes, using the jet propagation framework developed by Bromberg et al. We find that LL-GRBs and UL-GRBs are capable of producing detectable high-energy neutrinos up to ?PeV, from which the final neutrino spectrum can be obtained. Further, we conclude that a larger ? corresponds to greater neutrino flux at the high-energy end (?PeV) and to higher maximum neutrino energy as well. However, such differences are so small that it is not promising for us to be able to distinguish these in observations, given the energy resolution we have now.

  15. Electron-capture delayed fission properties of neutron-deficient einsteinium nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaughnessy, Dawn A.

    2000-01-05

    Electron-capture delayed fission (ECDF) properties of neutron-deficient einsteinium isotopes were investigated using a combination of chemical separations and on-line radiation detection methods. {sup 242}Es was produced via the {sup 233}U({sup 14}N,5n){sup 242}Es reaction at a beam energy of 87 MeV (on target) in the lab system, and was found to decay with a half-life of 11 {+-} 3 seconds. The ECDF of {sup 242}Es showed a highly asymmetric mass distribution with an average pre-neutron emission total kinetic energy (TKE) of 183 {+-} 18 MeV. The probability of delayed fission (P{sub DF}) was measured to be 0.006 {+-} 0.002. In conjunction with this experiment, the excitation functions of the {sup 233}U({sup 14}N,xn){sup 247{minus}x}Es and {sup 233}U({sup 15}N,xn){sup 248{minus}x}Es reactions were measured for {sup 243}Es, {sup 244}Es and {sup 245}Es at projectile energies between 80 MeV and 100 MeV.

  16. Physics Highlight Proton radiography at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Physics Highlight The penetrating power of protons makes possible detailed radiographic ... contact Dale Tupa: tupa@lanl.gov Physics Highlight Physics Highlight pRad provides ...

  17. Proton transfer in nucleobases is mediated by water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khistyaev, Kirill; Golan, Amir; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Orms, Natalie; Krylov, Anna I.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-29

    Water plays a central role in chemistry and biology by mediating the interactions between molecules, altering energy levels of solvated species, modifying potential energy proles along reaction coordinates, and facilitating ecient proton transport through ion channels and interfaces. This study investigates proton transfer in a model system comprising dry and microhydrated clusters of nucleobases. With mass spectrometry and tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation, we show that water shuts down ionization-induced proton transfer between nucleobases, which is very ecient in dry clusters. Instead, a new pathway opens up in which protonated nucleo bases are generated by proton transfer from the ionized water molecule and elimination of a hydroxyl radical. Electronic structure calculations reveal that the shape of the potential energy prole along the proton transfer coordinate depends strongly on the character of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed, i.e., the proton transfer from water to nucleobases is barrierless when an ionized state localized on water is accessed. The computed energetics of proton transfer is in excellent agreement with the experimental appearance energies. Possible adiabatic passage on the ground electronic state of the ionized system, while energetically accessible at lower energies, is not ecient. Thus, proton transfer is controlled electronically, by the character of the ionized state, rather than statistically, by simple energy considerations.

  18. New Measurement Explores Fine Details of Proton Structure | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Measurement Explores Fine Details of Proton Structure New Measurement Explores Fine Details of Proton Structure BigCal, contained 1,744 lead glass bars The new calorimeter, called BigCal, contained 1,744 lead glass bars, such as the one shown, for detecting the scattered electrons. A collaboration of scientists is probing deep inside the proton at Jefferson Lab by measuring quantities that relate to the proton's shape and size. These so-called form factors give scientists a tool for studying

  19. Fast timing detectors for forward protons at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrow, Michael; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01

    The author discusses the development of high precision timing detectors for high momentum protons at the LHC, and their application in studying exclusive Higgs boson production.

  20. Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ring at Fermilab. The proposed method of non-resonant slow extraction of protons by bent crystals in combination with orbit fast deflectors shows great promise in...

  1. A Proton Recoil Telescope Detector for Neutron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocci, F.; Cinausero, M.; Rizzi, V.; Barbui, M.; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Lunardon, M.; Pesente, S.; Fontana, A.; Gemignian, G.; Bonomi, G.; Donzella, A.; Zenoni, A.; Fabris, D.; Morando, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Viesti, G.

    2007-10-26

    A compact and versatile Proton Recoil Telescope (PRT) detector has been realized to measure neutron energy spectra in the range from few to hundred MeV. The PRT is a position sensitive detector made by: an active multilayer segmented plastic scintillator as neutron to proton converter, two silicon strip detectors for proton energy and position measurement and a final thick CsI(T1) scintillator to measure the residual proton energy. The detector has been tested with the {sup 13}C(d,n) reaction at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud using a 40 MeV deuteron beam.

  2. Dynamical effects in proton breakup from exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonaccorso, Angela; Kumar, Ravinder

    2012-10-20

    This contribution discusses dynamical effects in proton breakup from a weakly bound state in an exotic nucleus on a heavy target. The Coulomb interactions between the proton and the core and the proton and the target are treated to all orders, including also the full multipole expansion of the Coulomb potential. The dynamics of proton Coulomb breakup is compared to that of an equivalent neutron of larger binding energy in order to elucidate the differences with the well understood neutron breakup mechanism. A number of experimentally measurable observables such as parallel momentum distributions, proton angular distributions and total breakup cross sections can be calculated. With respect to nuclear breakup it is found that a proton behaves exactly as a neutron of larger binding energy. The extra 'effective energy' is due to the combined core-target Coulomb barrier. In Coulomb breakup we distinguish the effect of the core-target Coulomb potential (called recoil effect), with respect to which the proton behaves again as a more bound neutron, from the direct proton-target Coulomb potential. The latter gives cross sections about an order of magnitude larger than the recoil term. The two effects give rise to complicated interferences in the parallel momentum distributions. They are instead easily separable in the proton angular distributions which are therefore suggested as a very useful observable for future experimental studies.

  3. Model independent extraction of the proton magnetic radius from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Model independent extraction of the proton magnetic radius from electron scattering Authors: Epstein, Zachary ; Paz, Gil ; Roy, Joydeep Publication Date: 2014-10-20 OSTI ...

  4. Proton Radiography at the AGS (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Proton Radiography at the AGS Authors: Saunders, Alexander 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos ...

  5. Reactive Molecular Simulations of Protonation of Water Clusters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Water Clusters and Depletion of Acidity in H-ZSM-5 Zeolite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reactive Molecular Simulations of Protonation of Water Clusters ...

  6. Measuring the Weak Charge of the Proton via Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Donald C.

    2015-10-01

    The Qweak experiment which ran in Hall C at Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA, and completed data taking in May 2012, measured the weak charge of the proton QpW via elastic electron-proton scattering. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered from an unpolarized liquid hydrogen target. The helicity of the electron beam was flipped at approximately 1 kHz between left and right spin states. The Standard Model predicts a small parity-violating asymmetry of scattering rates between right and left helicity states due to the weak interaction. An initial result using 4% of the data was published in October 2013 [1] with a measured parity-violating asymmetry of -279 ± 35(stat) ± 31 (syst) ppb. This asymmetry, along with other data from parity-violating electron scattering experiments, provided the world's first determination of the weak charge of the proton. The weak charge of the proton was found to be pW = 0.064 ± 0.012, in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction of pW(SM) = 0.0708 ± 0.0003[2].

  7. Vehicle Emissions Review- 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and general technology approaches for heavy- and light-duty vehicle emissions control - filter technology, new catalysts, NOx control, diesel oxidation catalysts, gasoline particulate filters

  8. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  9. Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994...

  10. Secondary Emission Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winn, David Roberts

    2015-03-24

    This report describes R&D on a new type of calorimeter using secondary emission to measure the energy of radiation, particularly high energy particles.

  11. National Emission Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air Pollutants Calendar Year 1999 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 1999 June 2000 June 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office ...

  12. Ion/proton-conducting apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yates, Matthew; Xue, Wei

    2014-12-23

    A c-axis-oriented HAP thin film synthesized by seeded growth on a palladium hydrogen membrane substrate. An exemplary synthetic process includes electrochemical seeding on the substrate, and secondary and tertiary hydrothermal treatments under conditions that favor growth along c-axes and a-axes in sequence. By adjusting corresponding synthetic conditions, an HAP this film can be grown to a controllable thickness with a dense coverage on the underlying substrate. The thin films have relatively high proton conductivity under hydrogen atmosphere and high temperature conditions. The c-axis oriented films may be integrated into fuel cells for application in the intermediate temperature range of 200-600.degree. C. The electrochemical-hydrothermal deposition technique may be applied to create other oriented crystal materials having optimized properties, useful for separations and catalysis as well as electronic and electrochemical applications, electrochemical membrane reactors, and in chemical sensors. Additional high-density and gas-tight HAP film compositions may be deposited using a two-step deposition method that includes an electrochemical deposition method followed by a hydrothermal deposition method. The two-step method uses a single hydrothermal deposition solution composition. The method may be used to deposit HAP films including but not limited to at least doped HAP films, and more particularly including carbonated HAP films. In addition, the high-density and gas-tight HAP films may be used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  13. Impacts of Time Delays on Distributed Algorithms for Economic Dispatch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Tao; Wu, Di; Sun, Yannan; Lian, Jianming

    2015-07-26

    Economic dispatch problem (EDP) is an important problem in power systems. It can be formulated as an optimization problem with the objective to minimize the total generation cost subject to the power balance constraint and generator capacity limits. Recently, several consensus-based algorithms have been proposed to solve EDP in a distributed manner. However, impacts of communication time delays on these distributed algorithms are not fully understood, especially for the case where the communication network is directed, i.e., the information exchange is unidirectional. This paper investigates communication time delay effects on a distributed algorithm for directed communication networks. The algorithm has been tested by applying time delays to different types of information exchange. Several case studies are carried out to evaluate the effectiveness and performance of the algorithm in the presence of time delays in communication networks. It is found that time delay effects have negative effects on the convergence rate, and can even result in an incorrect converge value or fail the algorithm to converge.

  14. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  15. A hadronic-leptonic model for the Fermi bubbles: Cosmic-rays in the galactic halo and radio emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2014-07-01

    We investigate non-thermal emission from the Fermi bubbles in a hadronic model. Cosmic-ray (CR) protons are accelerated at the forward shock of the bubbles. They interact with the background gas in the Galactic halo and create ?{sup 0}-decay gamma-rays and secondary electrons through proton-proton interaction. We follow the evolution of the CR protons and electrons by calculating their distribution functions. We find that the spectrum and the intensity profiles of ?{sup 0}-decay gamma-rays are consistent with observations. We predict that the shock front is located far ahead of the gamma-ray boundary of the Fermi bubbles. This naturally explains the fact that a clear temperature jump of thermal gas was not discovered at the gamma-ray boundary in recent Suzaku observations. We also consider re-acceleration of the background CRs in the Galactic halo at the shock front. We find that it can significantly affect the gamma-rays from the Fermi bubbles, unless the density of the background CRs is ? 10% of that in the Galactic disk. We indicate that secondary electrons alone cannot produce the observed radio emission from the Fermi bubbles. However, the radio emission from the outermost region of the bubbles can be explained if electrons are directly accelerated at the shock front with an efficiency of ?0.1% of that of protons.

  16. Measurements of neutron dose equivalent for a proton therapy center using uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Liu Yaxi; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Andries Niek; Keole, Sameer

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Neutron exposure is of concern in proton therapy, and varies with beam delivery technique, nozzle design, and treatment conditions. Uniform scanning is an emerging treatment technique in proton therapy, but neutron exposure for this technique has not been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, under various treatment conditions for uniform scanning beams employed at our proton therapy center. Methods: Using a wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, ThermoScientific, MA), the authors measured H/D at 50 cm lateral to the isocenter as a function of proton range, modulation width, beam scanning area, collimated field size, and snout position. They also studied the influence of other factors on neutron dose equivalent, such as aperture material, the presence of a compensator, and measurement locations. They measured H/D for various treatment sites using patient-specific treatment parameters. Finally, they compared H/D values for various beam delivery techniques at various facilities under similar conditions. Results: H/D increased rapidly with proton range and modulation width, varying from about 0.2 mSv/Gy for a 5 cm range and 2 cm modulation width beam to 2.7 mSv/Gy for a 30 cm range and 30 cm modulation width beam when 18 Multiplication-Sign 18 cm{sup 2} uniform scanning beams were used. H/D increased linearly with the beam scanning area, and decreased slowly with aperture size and snout retraction. The presence of a compensator reduced the H/D slightly compared with that without a compensator present. Aperture material and compensator material also have an influence on neutron dose equivalent, but the influence is relatively small. H/D varied from about 0.5 mSv/Gy for a brain tumor treatment to about 3.5 mSv/Gy for a pelvic case. Conclusions: This study presents H/D as a function of various treatment parameters for uniform scanning proton beams. For similar treatment conditions, the H/D value per uncollimated beam size for uniform scanning beams was slightly lower than that from a passive scattering beam and higher than that from a pencil beam scanning beam, within a factor of 2. Minimizing beam scanning area could effectively reduce neutron dose equivalent for uniform scanning beams, down to the level close to pencil beam scanning.

  17. Mass Determination of Two-Proton Radioactive Nuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miernik, Krzysztof A

    2012-01-01

    The masses of heavy two-proton emitters (45Fe, 48Ni and 54Zn) are calculated, basing on experimentally measured two-proton decay energies. The results are compared with theoretical predictions and extrapolations.

  18. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Carol J.

    1998-01-01

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

  19. Epoxy-crosslinked sulfonated poly (phenylene) copolymer proton exchange membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hibbs, Michael; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Norman, Kirsten; Hickner, Michael A.

    2010-10-19

    An epoxy-crosslinked sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer composition used as proton exchange membranes, methods of making the same, and their use as proton exchange membranes (PEM) in hydrogen fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cell, in electrode casting solutions and electrodes, and in sulfur dioxide electrolyzers. These improved membranes are tougher, have higher temperature capability, and lower SO.sub.2 crossover rates.

  20. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnstone, C.J.

    1998-06-02

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H{sup {minus}} beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H{sup {minus}} beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H{sup {minus}} beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H{sup {minus}} beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H{sup {minus}} beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H{sup {minus}} beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser. 9 figs.

  1. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The MIEC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  2. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu

    2011-04-26

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  3. Nanostructured polymer membranes for proton conduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Park, Moon Jeong

    2013-06-18

    Polymers having an improved ability to entrain water are characterized, in some embodiments, by unusual humidity-induced phase transitions. The described polymers (e.g., hydrophilically functionalized block copolymers) have a disordered state and one or more ordered states (e.g., a lamellar state, a gyroid state, etc.). In one aspect, the polymers are capable of undergoing a disorder-to-order transition while the polymer is exposed to an increasing temperature at a constant relative humidity. In some aspects the polymer includes a plurality of portions, wherein a first portion forms proton-conductive channels within the membrane and wherein the channels have a width of less than about 6 nm. The described polymers are capable of entraining and preserving water at high temperature and low humidity. Surprisingly, in some embodiments, the polymers are capable of entraining greater amounts of water with the increase of temperature. The polymers can be used in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes in fuel cells.

  4. Ion-/proton-conducting apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yates, Matthew; Liu, Dongxia

    2011-05-17

    A c-axis-oriented HAP thin film synthesized by seeded growth on a palladium hydrogen membrane substrate. An exemplary synthetic process includes electrochemical seeding on the substrate, and secondary and tertiary hydrothermal treatments under conditions that favor growth along c-axes and a-axes in sequence. By adjusting corresponding synthetic conditions, an HAP this film can be grown to a controllable thickness with a dense coverage on the underlying substrate. The thin films have relatively high proton conductivity under hydrogen atmosphere and high temperature conditions. The c-axis oriented films may be integrated into fuel cells for application in the intermediate temperature range of 200-600.degree. C. The electrochemical-hydrothermal deposition technique may be applied to create other oriented crystal materials having optimized properties, useful for separations and catalysis as well as electronic and electrochemical applications, electrochemical membrane reactors, and in chemical sensors.

  5. Search for disappearing tracks in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-19

    A search is presented for long-lived charged particles that decay within the CMS detector and produce the signature of a disappearing track. Disappearing tracks are identified as those with little or no associated calorimeter energy deposits and with missing hits in the outer layers of the tracker. The search uses proton-proton collision data recorded at ?s = 8 TeV that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. The results of the search are interpreted in the context of the anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) model. The number of observed events is in agreement with the background expectation, and limits are set on the cross section of direct electroweak chargino production in terms of the chargino mass and mean proper lifetime. At 95% confidence level, AMSB models with a chargino mass less than 260 GeV, corresponding to a mean proper lifetime of 0.2 ns, are excluded.

  6. Search for disappearing tracks in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-19

    A search is presented for long-lived charged particles that decay within the CMS detector and produce the signature of a disappearing track. Disappearing tracks are identified as those with little or no associated calorimeter energy deposits and with missing hits in the outer layers of the tracker. The search uses proton-proton collision data recorded at ?s = 8 TeV that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. The results of the search are interpreted in the context of the anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) model. The number of observed events is in agreement with the background expectation, and limits aremoreset on the cross section of direct electroweak chargino production in terms of the chargino mass and mean proper lifetime. At 95% confidence level, AMSB models with a chargino mass less than 260 GeV, corresponding to a mean proper lifetime of 0.2 ns, are excluded.less

  7. The Quest for Spinning Glue in High-Energy Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surrow, Bernd

    2007-10-26

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a spin physics program colliding transverse or longitudinal polarized proton beams at {radical}(s) = 200-500 GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. These studies provide fundamental tests of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).One of the main objectives of the STAR spin physics program is the determination of the polarized gluon distribution function through a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A{sub LL}, for various processes. Recent results will be shown on the measurement of A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production, neutral pion production and charged pion production at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV.

  8. Energy dependence of the ridge in high multiplicity proton-proton collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dusling, Kevin; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2016-01-27

    In this study, we demonstrate that the recent measurement of azimuthally collimated, long-range rapidity (“ridge”) correlations in √s=13 TeV proton-proton (p+p) collisions by the ATLAS Collaboration at the LHC are in agreement with expectations from the color glass condensate effective theory of high-energy QCD. The observation that the integrated near-side yield as a function of multiplicity is independent of collision energy is a natural consequence of the fact that multiparticle production is driven by a single semihard saturation scale in the color glass condensate framework. We argue further that the azimuthal structure of these recent ATLAS ridge measurements strongly constrainsmore » hydrodynamic interpretations of such correlations in high-multiplicity p+p collisions.« less

  9. RHIC polarized proton-proton operation at 100 GeV in Run 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoefer, V.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atoian, G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K. A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; D Ottavio, T.; Drees, K. A.; Dutheil, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Gu, X.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Narayan, G.; Nemesure, S.; Pile, P.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, W. B.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; White, S.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2015-05-03

    The first part of RHIC Run 15 consisted of ten weeks of polarized proton on proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV at two interaction points. In this paper we discuss several of the upgrades to the collider complex that allowed for improved performance. The largest effort consisted in commissioning of the electron lenses, one in each ring, which are designed to compensate one of the two beam-beam interactions experienced by the proton bunches. The e-lenses raise the per bunch intensity at which luminosity becomes beam-beam limited. A new lattice was designed to create the phase advances necessary for a beam-beam compensation with the e-lens, which also has an improved off-momentum dynamic aperture relative to previous runs. In order to take advantage of the new, higher intensity limit without suffering intensity driven emittance deterioration, other features were commissioned including a continuous transverse bunch-by-bunch damper in RHIC and a double harmonic RF cature scheme in the Booster. Other high intensity protections include improvements to the abort system and the installation of masks to intercept beam lost due to abort kicker pre-fires.

  10. Emission Abatement System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander

    2003-05-13

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  11. Delayed energy injection model for gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, J. J.; Huang, Y. F.; Yu, Y. B. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, X. F., E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-12-10

    The shallow decay phase and flares in the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are widely believed to be associated with the later activation of the central engine. Some models of energy injection involve a continuous energy flow since the GRB trigger time, such as the magnetic dipole radiation from a magnetar. However, in the scenario involving a black hole accretion system, the energy flow from the fall-back accretion may be delayed for a fall-back time ?t {sub fb}. Thus, we propose a delayed energy injection model. The delayed energy would cause a notable rise to the Lorentz factor of the external shock, which will 'generate' a bump in the multiple band afterglows. If the delayed time is very short, our model degenerates to the previous models. Our model can explain the significant re-brightening in the optical and infrared light curves of GRB 081029 and GRB 100621A. A considerable fall-back mass is needed to provide the later energy; this indicates that GRBs accompanied with fall-back material may be associated with a low energy supernova so that the fraction of the envelope can survive during eruption. The fall-back time can give meaningful information on the properties of GRB progenitor stars.

  12. Particulate and Gaseous Emissions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... formation during cofiring of coal and biomass (Figure 3). Particulate-and-Gaseous-Emissions3-300x134 Figure 2. Important reaction pathways for conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to ...

  13. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  14. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  15. Combustion and Emissions Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combustion and Emissions Modeling This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - Computational Fluid Dynamics Project Leader Background Modern transportation engines are designed to use the available fuel resources efficiently and minimize harmful emissions. Optimization of these designs is based on a wealth of practical design, construction and operating experiences, and use of modern testing facilities and sophisticated analyses of the combustion

  16. Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions of Protons in Host Metals at Picometre Distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinrich Hora; George H. Miley; Jak C. Kelly

    2000-11-12

    A review is given for the explanation of the measurements of Miley et al. of a fully reproducible generation of nuclei of the whole periodic table by protons in host metals during a several-weeks reaction. Similar low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) were observed by other groups. The fact that the heavy nuclides are not due to pollution can be seen from the fact that such very rare elements as thulium and terbium were detected by unique K-shell X-ray spectra. The nuclear reaction energy goes into the heavy nuclei as measured from much bigger traces in CR39 than from alphas. The fact that any reaction of the protons results in stable daughter nuclei is confirmed by the fact that the highest energy gain is resulting with stable reaction products. This has been explained in Ref. 2, and the energy gain for the heavy element generation by a compound reaction was discussed. The explanation is based on the model of the authors from 1989 to assume free motion of the protons contrary to localized crystalline states. A relation of the reaction time U on distance d of the reacting nuclei by a power law with an exponent 34.8 was derived. Based on few reproducible D-D reactions, a reaction time near the range of megaseconds and a reaction distance of nanometers was concluded. A splendid confirmation of the picometre-megasecond reactions was achieved by Li et al. from his direct quantum mechanical calculations of the hot fusion D-T reactions based on a one-step selective resonance tunneling model. Li et al. were able for the first time to derive the cross sections of the hot fusion. Li's application to picometre distance showed megasecond reaction times with no neutron or gamma emission. Because of the imaginary part in the Schroedinger potential, the problem of the level width is reduced by damping.

  17. Mixed anion materials and compounds for novel proton conducting membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poling, Steven Andrew; Nelson, Carly R.; Martin, Steve W.

    2006-09-05

    The present invention provides new amorphous or partially crystalline mixed anion chalcogenide compounds for use in proton exchange membranes which are able to operate over a wide variety of temperature ranges, including in the intermediate temperature range of about 100 .degree. C. to 300.degree. C., and new uses for crystalline mixed anion chalcogenide compounds in such proton exchange membranes. In one embodiment, the proton conductivity of the compounds is between about 10.sup.-8 S/cm and 10.sup.-1 S/cm within a temperature range of between about -60 and 300.degree. C. and a relative humidity of less than about 12%..

  18. Improved Limits on Spin-Dependent WIMP-Proton Interactions from a Two Liter CF$_3$I Bubble Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behnke, E.; Behnke, J.; Brice, S.J.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Collar, J.I.; Cooper, P.S.; Crisler, M.; Dahl, C.E.; Fustin, D.; Hall, J.; Hinnefeld, J.H.; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    Data from the operation of a bubble chamber filled with 3.5 kg of CF{sub 3}I in a shallow underground site are reported. An analysis of ultrasound signals accompanying bubble nucleations confirms that alpha decays generate a significantly louder acoustic emission than single nuclear recoils, leading to an efficient background discrimination. Three dark matter candidate events were observed during an effective exposure of 28.1 kg-day, consistent with a neutron background. This observation provides the strongest direct detection constraint to date on WIMP-proton spin-dependent scattering for WIMP masses > 20 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  19. GRB 131231A: IMPLICATIONS OF THE GeV EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Bin; Chen, Wei; Liang, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Bei; He, Hao-Ning; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming [Key laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Shao, Lang, E-mail: liangyf@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: beizhou@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2014-05-20

    GRB 131231A was detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Space Gamma-ray Telescope. The high-energy gamma-ray (>100MeV) afterglow emission spectrum is F {sub ?}??{sup 0.54} {sup } {sup 0.15} in the first ?1300s after the trigger and the most energetic photon has an energy of ?62GeV, arriving at t ? 520s. With reasonable parameters of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow as well as the density of the circum-burst medium, the synchrotron radiation of electrons or protons accelerated at an external forward shock have difficulty accounting for the data. Rather, the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of the forward shock-accelerated electrons can account for both the spectrum and temporal behavior of theGeV afterglow emission. We also show that the prospect for detecting GRB 131231A-like GRBs with the Cherenkov Telescope Array is promising.

  20. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Munoz-Ramos, Karina; Pratt, Joseph William; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

    2011-05-01

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today's technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

  1. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Joesph W.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Munoz-Ramos, Karina; Akhil, Abbas A.; Curgus, Dita B.; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

    2011-05-01

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today’s technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

  2. Competing decay modes of a high-spin isomer in the proton-unbound nucleus ??Ta*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, R. J.; Page, R. D.; Joss, D. T.; Uusitalo, J.; Darby, I. G.; Andgren, K.; Cederwall, B.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Gray-Jones, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hadinia, B.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Leppnen, A. -P.; Nyman, M.; O'Donnell, D.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarn, J.; Scholey, C.; Seweryniak, D.; Simpson, J.

    2015-01-01

    An isomeric state at high spin and excitation energy was recently observed in the proton-unbound nucleus 158Ta. This state was observed to decay by both ? and ? decay modes. The large spin change required to decay via ?-ray emission incurs a lifetime long enough for ? decay to compete. The ? decay has an energy of 8644(11) keV, which is among the highest observed in the region, a partial half-life of 440(70) ?s and changes the spin by 11?. In this study, additional evidence supporting the assignment of this ? decay to the high-spin isomer in 158Ta will be presented.

  3. Rapid Disease Progression With Delay in Treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Kestin, Larry Llyn, E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Grills, Inga Siiner; Battu, Madhu; Fitch, Dwight Lamar [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Wong, Ching-yee Oliver [Department of Nuclear Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Margolis, Jeffrey Harold [Department of Medical Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Chmielewski, Gary William; Welsh, Robert James [Department of Thoracic Surgery, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To assess rate of disease progression from diagnosis to initiation of treatment for Stage I-IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Forty patients with NSCLC underwent at least two sets of computed tomography (CT) and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) scans at various time intervals before treatment. Progression was defined as development of any new lymph node involvement, site of disease, or stage change. Results: Median time interval between first and second CT scans was 13.4 weeks, and between first and second PET scans was 9.0 weeks. Median initial primary maximum tumor dimension (MTD) was 3.5 cm (0.6-8.5 cm) with a median standardized uptake value (SUV) of 13.0 (1.7-38.5). The median MTD increased by a median of 1.0 cm (mean, 1.6 cm) between scans for a median relative MTD increase of 35% (mean, 59%). Nineteen patients (48%) progressed between scans. Rate of any progression was 13%, 31%, and 46% at 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. Upstaging occurred in 3%, 13%, and 21% at these intervals. Distant metastasis became evident in 3%, 13%, and 13% after 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. T and N stage were associated with progression, whereas histology, grade, sex, age, and maximum SUV were not. At 3 years, overall survival for Stage III patients with vs. without progression was 18% vs. 67%, p = 0.05. Conclusions: With NSCLC, treatment delay can lead to disease progression. Diagnosis, staging, and treatment initiation should be expedited. After 4-8 weeks of delay, complete restaging should be strongly considered.

  4. Polarized proton beam for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, H.; Meot, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.

    2015-05-03

    RHIC has provided polarized proton collisions from 31 GeV to 255 GeV in the past decade. To preserve polarization through numerous depolarizing resonances through the whole accelerator chain, harmonic orbit correction, partial snakes, horizontal tune jump system and full snakes have been used. In addition, close attentions have been paid to betatron tune control, orbit control and beam line alignment. The polarization of 60% at 255 GeV has been delivered to experiments with 1.8×1011 bunch intensity. For the eRHIC era, the beam brightness has to be maintained to reach the desired luminosity. Since we only have one hadron ring in the eRHIC era, existing spin rotator and snakes can be converted to six snake configuration for one hadron ring. With properly arranged six snakes, the polarization can be maintained at 70% at 250 GeV. This paper summarizes the effort and plan to reach high polarization with small emittance for eRHIC.

  5. Prompt proton decay in the vicinity of {sup 56}Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, E. K.; Rudolph, D.; Andersson, L-L.; Fahlander, C.; Rietz, R. du; Torres, D. A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Charity, R. J.; Chiara, C. J.; Hoel, C.; Pechenaya, O. L.; Reviol, W.; Sarantites, D. G.; Sobotka, L. G.; Ekman, J.

    2007-11-30

    A new decay mode, the so called prompt proton decay, was discovered in 1998. It has since proven to be an important decay mechanism for several neutron deficient nuclei in the A{approx}60 region. To measure with high accuracy the energies and angular distributions of these protons, a state-of-the-art charged particle detector--LuWuSiA--was developed. It was first utilized during a fusion-evaporation reaction experiment performed at Argonne National Laboratory, U.S.A. In this contribution, the characteristics of the prompt proton decay are discussed along with the special features of LuWuSiA as well as a revisit to the prompt proton decay in {sup 58}Cu.

  6. A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    liquid water and ice, and they hold together the two strands of a DNA molecule. But Golan et al. asked themselves: Does proton transfer really require the assistance of...

  7. Proton Research Earns 2008 JSA Thesis Prize | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The proton contains three quarks, and each quark carries an electric charge and magnetic moment. As they move, the charged quarks produce a magnetic field. The result of quarks ...

  8. Mitochondrial complex I - energy conversion by a giant proton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitochondrial complex I - energy conversion by a giant proton pump Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Volker Zickermann, Goethe...

  9. Coupling effect on the proton optics from the electron lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Gu, X.; Fischer, W.

    2010-08-01

    In this note we calculate the effect of the electron lense solenoids on the proton optics. Electron lenses (e-lenses) are to be used for head-on beam-beam compensation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Electron lenses are to be used for head-on beam-beam compensation in the polarized proton (pp) runs to compensate the large tune spread generated by the head-on proton-proton beam-beam interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The main part of an electron lens is a superconducting solenoid with a longitudinal magnetic field up to 6 T. In this report, we will estimate the e-elenses effects on the {beta} and dispersion functions with 100 GeV and 250 GeV pp run lattices. Table 1 lists some lattice and beam parameters to be used in the following study.

  10. Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam at CERN's HiRadMat Facility ... 6th International Particle Accelerator Conference. Richmond, Virginia, USA, 3-8 May 2015.

  11. A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond...

  12. STAR results on central exclusive production in proton-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Przybycien, Mariusz

    2015-04-10

    We present a preliminary measurement of the Central Exclusive Production of the two oppositely charged pions produced in the process pp ? pp?{sup +} ?{sup ?}, obtained with the STAR detector at RHIC at ?(s)=200 GeV. Silicon strip detectors placed in Roman Pots were used for tagging forward protons while pion pair tracks were reconstructed in the STAR Time Projection Chamber. Predictions of models based on Regge phenomenology are compared to the spectra of the kinematical variables corrected for detector acceptance and efficiency.

  13. Model independent extraction of the proton magnetic radius from electron

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    scattering (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Model independent extraction of the proton magnetic radius from electron scattering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Model independent extraction of the proton magnetic radius from electron scattering Authors: Epstein, Zachary ; Paz, Gil ; Roy, Joydeep Publication Date: 2014-10-20 OSTI Identifier: 1181119 Grant/Contract Number: FG02-13ER41997 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal

  14. A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond results from the attractive dipolar interaction of a chemical group containing a hydrogen atom with a group containing an electronegative atom, such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine, in the same or a different molecule. Conventional wisdom has it that proton transfer from one molecule to another can only happen via

  15. Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? Guided by the recent experimental confirmation of the validity of the Effective Momentum Approximation (EMA) in quasi-elastic scattering off nuclei, we have re-examined the extraction of the Longitudinal and Transverse Response Functions in medium-weight and heavy

  16. Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Conference: Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology.

  17. A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond results from the attractive dipolar interaction of a chemical group containing a hydrogen atom with a group containing an electronegative atom, such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine, in the same or a different molecule. Conventional wisdom has it that proton transfer from one molecule to another can only happen via

  18. A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond results from the attractive dipolar interaction of a chemical group containing a hydrogen atom with a group containing an electronegative atom, such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine, in the same or a different molecule. Conventional wisdom has it that proton transfer from one molecule to another can only happen via

  19. A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond results from the attractive dipolar interaction of a chemical group containing a hydrogen atom with a group containing an electronegative atom, such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine, in the same or a different molecule. Conventional wisdom has it that proton transfer from one molecule to another can only happen via

  20. A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Wednesday, 25 July 2012 00:00 Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond results from the attractive dipolar interaction of a chemical group containing a hydrogen atom with a group containing an electronegative atom, such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine, in the same or a different molecule. Conventional

  1. Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels

  2. Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels

  3. Measuring the proton beam polarization from the source to RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makdisi,Y.

    2007-09-10

    Polarimeters are necessary tools for measuring the beam polarization during the acceleration process as well as a yardstick for performing spin physics experiments. In what follows, I will describe the principles of measuring the proton beam polarization and the techniques that are employed at various energies. I will present a tour of the polarimetry employed at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion collider (RHIC) polarized proton complex as it spans the full spectrum from the source to collider energies.

  4. Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels

  5. Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels

  6. Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels

  7. Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels

  8. Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels

  9. Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Wednesday, 27 January 2010 00:00 Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the

  10. Development of Novel Non Pt Group Metal Electrocatalysts for Proton

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Applications | Department of Energy Novel Non Pt Group Metal Electrocatalysts for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Applications Development of Novel Non Pt Group Metal Electrocatalysts for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Applications These slides were presented at the 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on September 28, 2010. PDF icon 6_northeastern_mukerjee.pdf More Documents & Publications Science Magazine Highlight: Moving Towards Near Zero Platinum

  11. Stochastic dynamics of a delayed bistable system with multiplicative noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dung, Nguyen Tien E-mail: dungnt@fpt.edu.vn

    2014-05-15

    In this paper we investigate the properties of a delayed bistable system under the effect of multiplicative noise. We first prove the existence and uniqueness of the positive solution and show that its moments are uniformly bounded. Then, we study stochastic dynamics of the solution in long time, the lower and upper bounds for the paths and an estimate for the average value are provided.

  12. Chloromethyl chlorosulfate as a voltage delay inhibitor in lithium cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delnick, F.M.

    1991-04-05

    Chloromethyl chlorosulfate (CMCS) is used as a passive film growth inhibitor in electrochemical cells to minimize voltage delay and low-voltage discharge. Film growth on lithium anodes is significantly diminished when CMCS is added to SOCl{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} electrolytes of lithium batteries. The CMCS also has the effect of extending the shelf-life of Li/SOCl{sub 2} and Li/SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} batteries.

  13. Complex network synchronization of chaotic systems with delay coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theesar, S. Jeeva Sathya Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-03-05

    The study of complex networks enables us to understand the collective behavior of the interconnected elements and provides vast real time applications from biology to laser dynamics. In this paper, synchronization of complex network of chaotic systems has been studied. Every identical node in the complex network is assumed to be in Lur’e system form. In particular, delayed coupling has been assumed along with identical sector bounded nonlinear systems which are interconnected over network topology.

  14. VERNIER CHRONOTRON UTILIZING AT LEAST TWO SHORTED DELAY LINES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rufer, R.P.

    1964-02-25

    An improved vernier chronotron featuring pulse-forming circuits of a ringing'' or back and forth'' oscillatory type is described. A delay line shorted at both ends together with transistor circuitry to introduce a pulse into that line and also to provide reinforcement of the pulse as it oscillates between the pulse-reflective extremities is provided. A transistorized coincidence circuit is also provided. Enhanced measurement of time intervals in the nanosecond range is afforded. (AEC)

  15. Chloromethyl chlorosulfate as a voltage delay inhibitor in lithium cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delnick, Frank M.

    1993-01-01

    Chloromethyl chlorosulfate (CMCS) is used as a passive film growth inhibitor in electrochemical cells to minimize voltage delay and low-voltage discharge. Film growth on lithium anodes is significantly diminished when CMCS is added to SOCl.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 electrolytes of lithium batteries. The CMCS also has the effect of extending the shelf-life of Li/SOCl.sub.2 and Li/SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 batteries.

  16. Chloromethyl chlorosulfate as a voltage delay inhibitor in lithium cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delnick, F.M.

    1993-04-13

    Chloromethyl chlorosulfate (CMCS) is used as a passive film growth inhibitor in electrochemical cells to minimize voltage delay and low-voltage discharge. Film growth on lithium anodes is significantly diminished when CMCS is added to SOCl[sub 2] and SO[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] electrolytes of lithium batteries. The CMCS also has the effect of extending the shelf-life of Li/SOCl[sub 2] and Li/SO[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] batteries.

  17. Kinetics of solid-solid phase transitions in metals using proton radiography (u)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Cynthia L; Rigg, Paulo A; Hixson, Rob S; Jensen, Brian J

    2011-01-25

    When a compressed material changes phase it doesn't do so instantly. Instead it transitions through a mixed phase as it transforms to the end state phase for a given pressure, volume and temperature. Common phase diagrams show the phase boundaries as sharp lines when compression has been slowly applied and held for an infinite amount of time. When the compression is applied with high strain rate, however, the phase boundaries are no longer crisp as the kinetic effects of the crystal reorientation delay the transitions, resulting in regions of mixed phase. This opens up the possibility that some degree of metastability exists for such transition in dynamic compression. The compression path can go past the equilibrium phase boundary and the transition happen from a metastable state because of the very short timescale of the compression process. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations recently have been used to examine shock-induced phase transitions in single crystal materials illustrating an orientation dependence of the transition stress, mechanisms, kinetics, and Hugoniot response. For example, the [100] orientation of iron had a simulated transition stress higher than the experimentally determined polycrystalline value of 13 GPa by 2 GPa. Previously, dynamic experiments on iron have observed a non-zero transition time and width in the solid-solid {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition. Using Proton Radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, we have performed plate impact experiments on iron to further study the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition which occurs at 13 GPa. A 40mm bore powder gun was coupled to a proton radiography beam line and imaging system and synchronized to the impact of the projectile on the target sample with the proton beam pattern. A typical experimental configuration for the iron study, as shown below in 3 color-enhanced radiographs, is a 40mm diameter aluminum sabot impacting a 40mm diameter sample of polycrystalline ARMCO iron. The iron is backed by a sapphire optical window for velocimetry measurements. The aluminum flyer on the left of the iron is barely visible for visual display purposes.

  18. Network analysis of proton transfer in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shevchuk, Roman; Rao, Francesco; Agmon, Noam

    2014-06-28

    Proton transfer in macromolecular systems is a fascinating yet elusive process. In the last ten years, molecular simulations have shown to be a useful tool to unveil the atomistic mechanism. Notwithstanding, the large number of degrees of freedom involved make the accurate description of the process very hard even for the case of proton diffusion in bulk water. Here, multi-state empirical valence bond molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with complex network analysis are applied to study proton transfer in liquid water. Making use of a transition network formalism, this approach takes into account the time evolution of several coordinates simultaneously. Our results provide evidence for a strong dependence of proton transfer on the length of the hydrogen bond solvating the Zundel complex, with proton transfer enhancement as shorter bonds are formed at the acceptor site. We identify six major states (nodes) on the network leading from the special pair to a more symmetric Zundel complex required for transferring the proton. Moreover, the second solvation shell specifically rearranges to promote the transfer, reiterating the idea that solvation beyond the first shell of the Zundel complex plays a crucial role in the process.

  19. Progress Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Emission Reduction Specialists

  20. Centrality measures highlight proton traps and access points to proton highways in kinetic Monte Carlo trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, Rachel A.; Haibach, Frederick G.; Fry, Dana L.; Gomez, Maria A.

    2015-04-21

    A centrality measure based on the time of first returns rather than the number of steps is developed and applied to finding proton traps and access points to proton highways in the doped perovskite oxides: AZr{sub 0.875}D{sub 0.125}O{sub 3}, where A is Ba or Sr and the dopant D is Y or Al. The high centrality region near the dopant is wider in the SrZrO{sub 3} systems than the BaZrO{sub 3} systems. In the aluminum-doped systems, a region of intermediate centrality (secondary region) is found in a plane away from the dopant. Kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) trajectories show that this secondary region is an entry to fast conduction planes in the aluminum-doped systems in contrast to the highest centrality area near the dopant trap. The yttrium-doped systems do not show this secondary region because the fast conduction routes are in the same plane as the dopant and hence already in the high centrality trapped area. This centrality measure complements kMC by highlighting key areas in trajectories. The limiting activation barriers found via kMC are in very good agreement with experiments and related to the barriers to escape dopant traps.

  1. Long-Range Near-Side Angular Correlations in Proton-Proton Interactions in CMS.

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The CMS Collaboration Results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles emitted in proton-proton collisions at center of mass energies of 0.9, 2.36 and 7TeV over a broad range of pseudorapidity (?) and azimuthal angle (f) are presented using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Short-range correlations in ??, which are studied in minimum bias events, are characterized using a simple independent cluster parameterization in order to quantify their strength (cluster size) and their extent in ? (cluster decay width). Long-range azimuthal correlations are studied more differentially as a function of charged particle multiplicity and particle transverse momentum using a 980nb-1 data set at 7TeV. In high multiplicity events, a pronounced structure emerges in the two-dimensional correlation function for particles in intermediate pT?s of 1-3GeV/c, 2.0< |??|<4.8 and ?f?0. This is the ?rst observation of such a ridge-like feature in two-particle correlation functions in pp or p-pbar collisions. EVO Universe, password "seminar"; Phone Bridge ID: 2330444 Password: 5142

  2. Long-Range Near-Side Angular Correlations in Proton-Proton Interactions in CMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-21

    The CMS Collaboration Results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles emitted in proton-proton collisions at center of mass energies of 0.9, 2.36 and 7TeV over a broad range of pseudorapidity (?) and azimuthal angle (f) are presented using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Short-range correlations in ??, which are studied in minimum bias events, are characterized using a simple independent cluster parameterization in order to quantify their strength (cluster size) and their extent in ? (cluster decay width). Long-range azimuthal correlations are studied more differentially as a function of charged particle multiplicity and particle transverse momentum using a 980nb-1 data set at 7TeV. In high multiplicity events, a pronounced structure emerges in the two-dimensional correlation function for particles in intermediate pTs of 1-3GeV/c, 2.0< |??|<4.8 and ?f0. This is the ?rst observation of such a ridge-like feature in two-particle correlation functions in pp or p-pbar collisions. EVO Universe, password "seminar"; Phone Bridge ID: 2330444 Password: 5142

  3. Hard x-ray delay line for x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hard x-ray delay line for x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and jitter-free pump-probe experiments at LCLS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hard x-ray delay line for...

  4. Flexible pulse delay control up to picosecond for high-intensity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Flexible pulse delay control up to picosecond for high-intensity twin electron bunches Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Flexible pulse delay control up to picosecond for ...

  5. The Impact of Near-term Climate Policy Choices on Technology and Emissions Transition Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Edmonds, James A.; Krey, Volker; Johnson, Nils; Longden, Thomas; Luderer, Gunnar; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the implications of delays associated with currently formulated climate policies (compared to optimal policies) for long-term transition pathways to limit climate forcing to 450ppm CO2e on the basis of the AMPERE Work Package 2 model comparison study. The paper highlights the critical importance of the 2030-2050 period for ambitious mitigation strategies. In this period, the most rapid shift to non-greenhouse gas emitting technology occurs. In the delayed response emissions mitigation scenarios, an even faster transition rate in this period is required to compensate for the additional emissions before 2030. Our physical deployment measures indicate that, without CCS, technology deployment rates in the 2030-2050 period would become considerably high. Yet the presence of CCS greatly alleviates the challenges to the transition particularly after the delayed climate policies. The results also highlight the critical role that bioenergy and CO2 capture and storage (BECCS) could play. If this technology is available, transition pathways exceed the emissions budget in the mid-term, removing the excess with BECCS in the long term. Excluding either BE or CCS from the technology portfolio implies that emission reductions need to take place much earlier.

  6. Measurement of the spin-spin correlation parameter C/sub LL/(THETA) in proton-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    The experimental procedures and methods of data analysis used to measure the spin-spin correlation parameter C/sub LL/(THETA) in proton-proton scattering at thirteen different energies in the range 300 to 800 MeV are presented. The results compare favorably with previous data. Good agreement is found with phase shift predictions at energies below 500 MeV.

  7. Jefferson Lab News - HAPPEx II reveals proton isn't very strange |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab HAPPEx II reveals proton isn't very strange HAPPEx II reveals proton isn't very strange April 23, 2006 The most precise measurement yet of strange quarks in the proton, performed at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) by the second phase of the Hall A Proton Parity Experiment (HAPPEx II), shows that the strange quark contribution to the proton's overall charge distribution and magnetic moment is small, indeed: it's so

  8. G-Zero Finds that Ghostly Strange Quarks Influence Proton Structure |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab G-Zero Finds that Ghostly Strange Quarks Influence Proton Structure G-Zero Finds that Ghostly Strange Quarks Influence Proton Structure June 17, 2005 In research performed at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab, nuclear physicists have found that strange quarks do contribute to the structure of the proton. This result indicates that, just as previous experiments have hinted, strange quarks in the proton's quark-gluon sea contribute to a proton's properties. The result

  9. Contribution of charge-transfer processes to ion-induced electron emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roesler, M.

    1996-12-01

    Charge changing events of ions moving inside metals are shown to contribute significantly to electron emission in the intermediate velocity regime via electrons coming from projectile ionization. Inclusion of equilibrium charge state fractions, together with two-electron Auger processes and resonant-coherent electron loss from the projectile, results in reasonable agreement with previous calculations for frozen protons, though a significant part of the emission is now interpreted in terms of charge exchange. The quantal character of the surface barrier transmission is shown to play an important role. The theory compares well with experimental observations for {ital H} projectiles. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Search for particle emission from a gas-loaded deuterium-palladium system in the alpha-beta phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, J.P.

    1996-12-01

    Neutron and proton emission due to possible solid state fusion events is monitored from a palladium sample loaded with deuterium gas to atomic fractions up to 0.7. Most of the experimental runs show no detectable activity above background rates, indicating a fusion rate <2.7x10{sup -22} s{sup -1}/deuterium-deuterium (D-D) pair. Two brief excursions by the proton counter might indicate a temporary rate of 3.5x10{sup -21} s{sup -1}/D-D pair. 25 refs., 1 fig.

  11. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1.1 Total emissions Total U.S. anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 were 5.8 percent below the 2008 total (Table 1). The decline in total emissions-from 6,983 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2008 to 6,576 MMTCO2e in 2009-was the largest since emissions have been tracked over the 1990-2009 time frame. It was largely the result of a 419-MMTCO2e drop in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (7.1 percent). There was a

  12. DETECTION OF 36GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASER EMISSION TOWARD NGC253

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingsen, Simon P.; Chen, Xi; Qiao, Hai-Hua; Baan, Willem; An, Tao; Li, Juan; Breen, Shari L.

    2014-08-01

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array to search for emission from the 4{sub 1} ? 3{sub 0} E transition of methanol (36.2GHz) toward the center of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC253. Two regions of emission were detected, offset from the nucleus along the same position angle as the inner spiral arms. The emission is largely unresolved on a scale of 5'', has a FWHM line width of <30 km s{sup 1}, and an isotropic luminosity orders of a magnitude larger than that observed in any Galactic star formation region. These characteristics suggest that the 36.2GHz methanol emission is most likely a maser, although observations with higher angular and spectral resolution are required to confirm this. If it is a maser, this represents the first detection of a class I methanol maser outside the Milky Way. The 36.2GHz methanol emission in NGC253 has more than an order of magnitude higher isotropic luminosity than the widespread emission recently detected toward the center of the Milky Way. If emission from this transition scales with the nuclear star formation rate, then it may be detectable in the central regions of many starburst galaxies. Detection of methanol emission in ultra-luminous infrared galaxies would open up a new tool for testing for variations in fundamental constants (particularly the proton-to-electron mass ratio) on cosmological scales.

  13. Fast, moment-based estimation methods for delay network tomography (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Fast, moment-based estimation methods for delay network tomography Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fast, moment-based estimation methods for delay network tomography Consider the delay network tomography problem where the goal is to estimate distributions of delays at the link-level using data on end-to-end delays. These measurements are obtained using probes that are injected at nodes located on the periphery of the network and sent to other nodes also

  14. Lithium/fluorinated carbon battery with no voltage delay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tung, H.S.; Friedland, D.J.; Sukornick, B.; Mc Curry, L.E.; Eibeck, R.E.; Lockyer, G.D.

    1987-07-21

    A method is described for producing an improved fluorinated carbon, for use as a cathode active material in a lithium fluorinated carbon battery, which inhibits initial voltage delay upon discharge, which comprises: (a) introducing a comminuted carbon into a static bed reactor; (b) foring a bed of the carbon to a depth of at least 0.5 cm; and (c) subjecting the carbon bed to a fluorination reaction under controlled reaction time with fluorine to produce an inhomogeneous fluorinated carbon product and until the carbon attains a weight gain of at least 10 percent.

  15. Progress in Fast Ignition Studies with Electrons and Protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKinnon, A. J.; Chen, H.; Hey, D.; Key, M. H.; MacPhee, A. G.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Chawla, S.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; King, J. A.; Ma, T.; Wei, M. S.; Chen, C. D.; Chowdhury, E.; Link, A.

    2009-09-10

    Isochoric heating of inertially confined fusion plasmas by laser driven MeV electrons or protons is an area of great topical interest in the inertial confinement fusion community, particularly with respect to the fast ignition (FI) concept for initiating burn in a fusion capsule. In order to investigate critical aspects needed for a FI point design, experiments were performed to study 1) laser-to-electrons or protons conversion issues and 2) laser-cone interactions including prepulse effects. A large suite of diagnostics was utilized to study these important parameters. Using cone--wire surrogate targets it is found that pre-pulse levels on medium scale lasers such as Titan at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory produce long scale length plasmas that strongly effect coupling of the laser to FI relevant electrons inside cones. The cone wall thickness also affects coupling to the wire. Conversion efficiency to protons has also been measured and modeled as a function of target thickness, material. Conclusions from the proton and electron source experiments will be presented. Recent advances in modeling electron transport and innovative target designs for reducing igniter energy and increasing gain curves will also be discussed. In conclusion, a program of study will be presented based on understanding the fundamental physics of the electron or proton source relevant to FI.

  16. Protonated Forms of Monoclinic Zirconia: A Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantz, Yves A.; Gemmen, Randall S.

    2010-05-06

    In various materials applications of zirconia, protonated forms of monoclinic zirconia may be formed, motivating their study within the framework of density-functional theory. Using the HCTH/120 exchange-correlation functional, the equations of state of yttria and of the three low-pressure zirconia polymorphs are computed, to verify our approach. Next, the favored charge state of a hydrogen atom in monoclinic zirconia is shown to be positive for all Fermilevel energies in the band gap, by the computation of defect formation energies.This result is consistent with a single previous theoretical prediction at midgap as well as muonium spectroscopy experiments. For the formally positively (+1e) charged system of a proton in monoclinic zirconia (with a homogeneous neutralizing background charge densityimplicitly included), modeled using up to a 3 x 3 x 3 arrangement of unit cells, different stable and metastable structures are identified. They are similar to those structures previously proposed for the neutral system of hydrogen-doedmonoclinic zirconia, at a similar level of theory. As predicted using the HCTH/120 functional, the lowest energy structure of the proton bonded to one of the two available oxygen atom types, O1, is favored by 0.39 eV compared to that of the proton bonded to O2. The rate of proton transfer between O1 ions is slower than that for hydrogen-dopedmonoclinic zirconia, whose transition-state structures may be lowered in energy by the extra electron.

  17. A high intensity 200 mA proton source for the FRANZ-Project (Frankfurt-Neutron-Source at the Stern-Gerlach-Center)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, W. Ratzinger, U.; Klump, B.; Volk, K.

    2014-02-15

    At the University of Frankfurt a high current proton source has been developed and tested for the FRANZ-Project [U. Ratzinger, L. P. Chau, O. Meusel, A. Schempp, K. Volk, M. Heil, F. Kppeler, and R. Stieglitz, Intense pulsed neutron source FRANZ in the 1500 keV range, ICANS-XVIII Proceedings, Dongguan, April 2007, p. 210]. The ion source is a filament driven arc discharge ion source. The new design consists of a plasma generator, equipped with a filter magnet to produce nearly pure proton beams (92 %), and a compact triode extraction system. The beam current density has been enhanced up to 521 mA/cm{sup 2}. Using an emission opening radius of 4 mm, a proton beam current of 240 mA at 50 keV beam energy in continuous wave mode (cw) has been extracted. This paper will present the current status of the proton source including experimental results of detailed investigations of the beam composition in dependence of different plasma parameters. Both, cw and pulsed mode were studied. Furthermore, the performance of the ion source was studied with deuterium as working gas.

  18. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.; Dorsey, George F.; West, Brian H.

    1998-01-01

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  19. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Dorsey, G.F.; West, B.H.

    1998-05-05

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO{sub x} emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  20. ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brenholdt, I.R.

    1957-11-19

    >An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

  1. Particulate and Gaseous Emissions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Gaseous Emissions - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  2. Power plant emissions reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy

    2015-10-20

    A system for improved emissions performance of a power plant generally includes an exhaust gas recirculation system having an exhaust gas compressor disposed downstream from the combustor, a condensation collection system at least partially disposed upstream from the exhaust gas compressor, and a mixing chamber in fluid communication with the exhaust gas compressor and the condensation collection system, where the mixing chamber is in fluid communication with the combustor.

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  4. Comments on Injector Proton Beam Study in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    During the entire period of injector proton study in run 2014, it seems that the beam transverse emittance out of Booster is larger than that in run 2013. The emittance measured at the BtA transfer line and also the transmission from Booster late to AGS late are presented for this argument. In addition to this problem, it seems that the multiturn Booster injection, which defines the transverse emittance, needs more attention. Moreover, for high intensity operations, the space charge effect may be already relevant in RHIC polarized proton runs. With the RHIC proton intensity improvement in the next several years, higher Booster input intensity is needed, therefore, the space charge effect at the Booster injection and early ramp may become a new limiting factor.

  5. The State of Water in Proton Conducting Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allcock, Harry R., Benesi, Alan, Macdonald, Digby, D.

    2010-08-27

    The research carried out under grant No. DE-FG02-07ER46371, "The State of Water in Proton Conducting Membranes", during the period June 1, 2008 -May 31, 2010 was comprised of three related parts. These are: 1. An examination of the state of water in classical proton conduction membranes with the use of deuterium T1 NMR spectroscopy (Allcock and Benesi groups). 2. A dielectric relaxation examination of the behavior of water in classical ionomer membranes (Macdonald program). 3. Attempts to synthesize new proton-conduction polymers and membranes derived from the polyphosphazene system. (Allcock program) All three are closely related, crucial aspects of the design and development of new and improved polymer electrolyte fuel cell membranes on which the future of fuel cell technology for portable applications depends.

  6. RHIC 100 GeV Polarized Proton Luminosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-01-17

    A big problem in RHIC 100 GeV proton run 2009 was the significantly lower luminosity lifetime than all previous runs. It is shown in this note that the beam intensity decay in run 2009 is caused by the RF voltage ramping in store. It is also shown that the beam decay is not clearly related to the beam momentum spread, therefore, not directly due to the 0.7m. β* Furthermore, the most important factor regarding the low luminosity lifetime is the faster transverse emittance growth in store, which is also much worse than the previous runs, and is also related to the RF ramping. In 100 GeV proton run 2012a, the RF ramping was abandoned, but the β* was increased to 0.85m, with more than 20% loss of luminosity, which is not necessary. It is strongly suggested to use smaller β* in 100 GeV polarized proton run 2015/2016

  7. R and D on Proton Extinction Monitor for COMET Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakadozono, N.; Masaharu, A.; Kuno, Y.; Sato, A.; Yano, T.; Ito, N.; Taniguchi, T.

    2010-03-30

    The COMET experiment searches for a muon to electron conversion process that is one of the lepton flavor violation processes. We use an 8-GeV pulsed proton beam. The proton extinction ratio is an important parameter. In order to measure this ratio pulse-by-pulse, we are developing a monitoring device. This device is called Proton Extinction Monitor and is a gas Cerenkov detector with gating photomultiplier tubes(PMT). The result of the investigation is that ethane is a promising gas for the Cerenkov radiator gas. A gating PMT is under development. We fabricated a divider circuit which switches at 10-kHz and has a cutoff ratio of 10{sup -6}.

  8. The State of Water in Proton Conducting Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allcock, Harry R.; Benesi, Alan; Macdonald, Digby D.

    2010-08-27

    The research carried out under grant No. DE-FG02-07ER46371, "The State of Water in Proton Conducting Membranes", during the period June 1, 2008 - May 31, 2010 was comprised of three related parts. These are: 1. An examination of the state of water in classical proton conduction membranes with the use of deuterium T1 NMR spectroscopy (Allcock and Benesi groups). 2. A dielectric relaxation examination of the behavior of water in classical ionomer membranes (Macdonald program). 3. Attempts to synthesize new proton-conduction polymers and membranes derived from the polyphosphazene system. (Allcock program) All three are closely related, crucial aspects of the design and development of new and improved polymer electrolyte fuel cell membranes on which the future of fuel cell technology for portable applications depends.

  9. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Detailed Energy-Related Carbon Emissions All Industry Groups 1994 emissions Selected Industries Petroleum refining Chemicals Iron & Steel...

  10. The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane October 11, 2012 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 Ram.jpg The cover represents the environment around the side chain. The right side is the water network that exists between the sulfonate groups shown in yellow. The left side is the short chain with the sulfonate group. Many experts believe that fuel cells may someday serve as revolutionary clean energy conversion devices for

  11. Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marat Khafizov; Clarissa Yablinsky; Todd Allen; David Hurley

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of proton irradiation on thermal conductivity in single crystal silicon. We apply laser based modulated thermoreflectance technique to extract the change in conductivity of the thin layer damaged by proton irradiation. Unlike time domain thermoreflectance techniques that require application of a metal film, we perform our measurement on uncoated samples. This provides greater sensitivity to the change in conductivity of the thin damaged layer. Using sample temperature as a parameter provides a means to deduce the primary defect structures that limit thermal transport. We find that under high temperature irradiation the degradation of thermal conductivity is caused primarily by extended defects.

  12. Exotic modes of excitation in proton rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paar, N.

    2011-11-30

    The framework of relativistic energy density functional has been applied in description of excitation phenomena in nuclei close to the proton drip line. In particular, low-lying dipole excitations have been studied using relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation, based on effective Lagrangians with density dependent meson nucleon couplings. In the isovector dipole channel, the occurrence of pronounced low-lying dipole peaks is predicted, corresponding to the proton pygmy dipole resonance. Since this exotic mode still awaits its experimental confirmation, systematic calculations have been conducted within a pool of neutron deficient nuclei, in order to identify the best possible candidates for measurements.

  13. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide

  14. Thick-target neutron, gamma-ray, and radionuclide production for protons below 12 MeV on nickel and carbon beam-stops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.; Wilson, W.B.

    1998-03-01

    Nuclear model calculations using the GNASH code are described for protons below 12 MeV incident on nickel and carbon isotopes, for beam stop design in the Los Alamos Accelerator Production of Tritium Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) project. The GNASH calculations apply Hauser-Feshbach and preequilibrium reaction theories and can make use of pre-calculated direct reaction cross sections to low-lying residual nucleus states. From calculated thin target cross sections, thick target 6.7 MeV and 12 MeV proton-induced production of neutrons, gamma rays, and radionuclides are determined. Emission spectra of the secondary neutrons and gamma rays are also determined. The model calculations are validated through comparisons with experimental thin- and thick-target measurements. The results of this work are being utilized as source terms in MCNP analyses for LEDA.

  15. Discovery of GeV emission from the direction of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 2146

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Thomas Tam, Pak-Hin, E-mail: xywang@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-10

    Recent detections of high-energy gamma-ray emission from starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253 suggest that starburst galaxies are huge reservoirs of cosmic rays and these cosmic rays convert a significant fraction of their energy into gamma-rays by colliding with the dense interstellar medium. In this paper, we report the search for high-energy gamma-ray emission from several nearby star-forming and starburst galaxies using the 68 month data obtained with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We found a ?5.5? detection of gamma-ray emission above 200 MeV from a source spatially coincident with the location of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 2146. Also taking into account the temporal and spectral properties of the gamma-ray emission, we suggest that the gamma-ray source is likely to be the counterpart of NGC 2146. The gamma-ray luminosity suggests that cosmic rays in NGC 2146 convert most of their energy into secondary pions, so NGC 2146 is a 'proton calorimeter'. It is also found that NGC 2146 obeys the quasi-linear scaling relation between gamma-ray luminosity and total infrared luminosity for star-forming galaxies, strengthening the connection between massive star formation and gamma-ray emission of star-forming galaxies. Possible TeV emission from NGC 2146 is predicted and the implications for high-energy neutrino emission from starburst galaxies are discussed.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  17. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carver, Donald W. (Knoxville, TN); Whittaker, Jerry W. (Knoxville, TN)

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  18. GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GHG Emissions GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions EERE Presentation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions/Resource Potential PDF icon gbtl_workshop_ghg_emissions.pdf More Documents & Publications GBTL Opening Presentation_Tech Barriers February GBTL Webinar BETO Conversion Program

  19. Observation of parametric X-rays produced by 400 GeV/c protons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The intensity of PXR emitted from halo protons in a bent crystal used as a primary ... to control crystal collimator alignment by analyzing PXR spectra produced by halo protons. ...

  20. Observation of Parametric X-Rays Produced by 400-GeV/C Protons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The intensity of PXR emitted from halo protons in a bent crystal used as a primary ... to control crystal collimator alignment by analyzing PXR spectra produced by halo protons. ...

  1. Protons Hog the Momentum in Neutron-Rich Nuclei | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protons Hog the Momentum in Neutron-Rich Nuclei theories large nuclei and has implications for ultra-cold atomic gas systems and neutron stars Research has shown that protons and...

  2. WAVE DELAYING STRUCTURE FOR RECTANGULAR WAVE-GUIDES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson-Shersby-Harvie, R.B.; Dain, J.

    1956-11-13

    This patent relates to wave-guides and in particular describes wave delaying structure located within a wave-guide. The disclosed wave-guide has an elongated fiat metal sheet arranged in a central plane of the guide and formed with a series of transverse inductive slots such that each face presents an inductive impedance to the guide. The sheet is thickened in the area between slots to increase the self capacity of the slots. Experimental results indicate that in a wave-guide loaded in accordance with the invention the guided wavelength changes more slowly as the air wavelength is changed than the guided wavelength does in wave-guides loaded by means of corrugations.

  3. Spectrometer employing optical fiber time delays for frequency resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuss, Jack J.; Johnson, Larry C.

    1979-01-01

    This invention provides different length glass fibers for providing a broad range of optical time delays for short incident chromatic light pulses for the selective spatial and frequency analysis of the light with a single light detector. To this end, the frequencies of the incident light are orientated and matched with the different length fibers by dispersing the separate frequencies in space according to the respective fiber locations and lengths at the input terminal of the glass fibers. This makes the different length fibers useful in the field of plasma physics. To this end the short light pulses can be scattered by a plasma and then passed through the fibers for analyzing and diagnosing the plasma while it varies rapidly with time.

  4. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies...

  5. A Case Study in Proton Pencil-Beam Scanning Delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kooy, Hanne M.; Clasie, Benjamin M.; Lu, H.-M.; Madden, Thomas M.; Bentefour, Hassan; Depauw, Nicolas M.S.; Adams, Judy A.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Demaret, Denis; Delaney, Thomas F.; Flanz, Jacob B.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: We completed an implementation of pencil-beam scanning (PBS), a technology whereby a focused beam of protons, of variable intensity and energy, is scanned over a plane perpendicular to the beam axis and in depth. The aim of radiotherapy is to improve the target to healthy tissue dose differential. We illustrate how PBS achieves this aim in a patient with a bulky tumor. Methods and Materials: Our first deployment of PBS uses 'broad' pencil-beams ranging from 20 to 35 mm (full-width-half-maximum) over the range interval from 32 to 7 g/cm{sup 2}. Such beam-brushes offer a unique opportunity for treating bulky tumors. We present a case study of a large (4,295 cc clinical target volume) retroperitoneal sarcoma treated to 50.4 Gy relative biological effectiveness (RBE) (presurgery) using a course of photons and protons to the clinical target volume and a course of protons to the gross target volume. Results: We describe our system and present the dosimetry for all courses and provide an interdosimetric comparison. Discussion: The use of PBS for bulky targets reduces the complexity of treatment planning and delivery compared with collimated proton fields. In addition, PBS obviates, especially for cases as presented here, the significant cost incurred in the construction of field-specific hardware. PBS offers improved dose distributions, reduced treatment time, and reduced cost of treatment.

  6. STUDY OF ELECTRON -PROTON BEAM-BEAM INTERACTION IN ERHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAO,Y.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; MONTAG, C.; POZDEYEV, E.; PTITSYN, V.

    2007-06-25

    Beam-beam effects present one of major factors limiting the luminosity of colliders. In the linac-ring option of eRHIC design, an electron beam accelerated in a superconducting energy recovery linac collides with a proton beam circulating in the RHIC ring. There are some features of beam-beam effects, which require careful examination in linac-ring configuration. First, the beam-beam interaction can induce specific head-tail type instability of the proton beam referred to as a ''kink'' instability. Thus, beam stability conditions should be established to avoid proton beam loss. Also, the electron beam transverse disruption by collisions has to be evaluated to ensure beam quality is good enough for the energy recovery pass. In addition, fluctuations of electron beam current and/or electron beam size, as well as transverse offset, can cause proton beam emittance growth. The tolerances for those factors should be determined and possible countermeasures should be developed to mitigate the emittance growth. In this paper, a soft Gaussian strong-strong simulation is used to study all of mentioned beam-beam interaction features and possible techniques to reduce the emittance growth.

  7. Assessment of Proton Deflectometry for Exploding Wire Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat Nadeem

    2013-09-25

    This project provides the first demonstration of the application of proton deflectometry for the diagnosis of electromagnetic field topology and current-carrying regions in Z-pinch plasma experiments. Over the course of this project several milestones were achieved. High-energy proton beam generation was demonstrated on the short-pulse high-intensity Leopard laser, (10 Joules in ~350 femtoseconds, and the proton beam generation was shown to be reproducible. Next, protons were used to probe the electromagnetic field structure of short circuit loads in order to benchmark the two numerical codes, the resistive-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code, Gorgon, and the hybrid particle-in-cell code, LSP for the interpretation of results. Lastly, the proton deflectometry technique was used to map the magnetic field structure of pulsed-power-driven plasma loads including wires and supersonic jets formed with metallic foils. Good agreement between the modeling and experiments has been obtained. The demonstrated technique holds great promise to significantly improve the understanding of current flow and electromagnetic field topology in pulsed power driven high energy density plasmas. Proton probing with a high intensity laser was for the first time implemented in the presence of the harsh debris and x-ray producing z-pinch environment driven by a mega-ampere-scale pulsed-power machine. The intellectual merit of the program was that it investigated strongly driven MHD systems and the influence of magnetic field topology on plasma evolution in pulsed power driven plasmas. The experimental program involved intense field-matter interaction in the generation of the proton probe, as well as the generation of plasma subjected to 1 MegaGauss scale magnetic fields. The computational aspect included two well-documented codes, in combination for the first time to provide accurate interpretation of the experimental results. The broader impact included the support of 2 graduate students, one at UCSD and one at NTF, who were exposed to both the experimental physics work, the MHD and PIC modeling of the system. A first generation college undergraduate student was employed to assist in experiments and data analysis throughout the project. Data resulting from the research program were broadly disseminated by publication in scientific journals, and presentation at international and national conferences and workshops.

  8. Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water Deep inelastic neutron scattering provides a means of directly and accurately measuring the momentum distribution of protons in water, which is determined primarily by the proton ground-state wave function.We find that in water confined on scales of 20 A, this wave

  9. Electromagnetic structure of the proton within the CP-violation hypothesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krutov, A. F. Kudinov, M. Yu.

    2013-11-15

    The so-called non-Rosenbluth behavior of the proton electromagnetic form factors can be explained within the hypothesis of CP violation in electromagnetic processes involving composite systems of strongly interacting particles. It is shown that this hypothesis leads to the appearance of an additional, anapole, form factor of the proton. The proton electromagnetic form factors, including the anapole form factor, are estimated on the basis of experimental data on elastic electron-proton scattering.

  10. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  11. Zero emission coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

  12. A Community Emissions Data System (CEDS) for Historical Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Zhou, Yuyu; Kyle, G. Page; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Hongbin

    2015-04-21

    Historical emission estimates for anthropogenic aerosol and precursor compounds are key data needed for Earth system models, climate models, and atmospheric chemistry and transport models; both for general analysis and assessment and also for model validation through comparisons with observations. Current global emission data sets have a number of shortcomings, including timeliness and transparency. Satellite and other earth-system data are increasingly available in near real-time, but global emission estimates lag by 5-10 years. The CEDS project will construct a data-driven, open source framework to produce annually updated emission estimates. The basic methodologies to be used for this system have been used for SO2 (Smith et al. 2011, Klimont, Smith and Cofala 2013), and are designed to complement existing inventory efforts. The goal of this system is to consistently extend current emission estimates both forward in time to recent years and also back over the entire industrial era. The project will produce improved datasets for global and (potentially) regional model, allow analysis of trends across time, countries, and sectors of emissions and emission factors, and facilitate improved scientific analysis in general. Consistent estimation of uncertainty will be an integral part of this system. This effort will facilitate community evaluation of emissions and further emission-related research more generally.

  13. Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Award Success Story: Proton Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This success story describes Proton Energy Systems, a small business that designs and manufactures proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis sytems to produce hydrogen from water. The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program has supported much of Proton's technology development through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Awards and other non-SBIR funding.

  14. Department of Energy and USEC Announce Decision to Delay USEC Loan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guarantee Application Final Review | Department of Energy USEC Announce Decision to Delay USEC Loan Guarantee Application Final Review Department of Energy and USEC Announce Decision to Delay USEC Loan Guarantee Application Final Review August 4, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington DC --- The Department of Energy and USEC Inc. (NYSE: USU) today announced an agreement to delay a final review on the company's loan guarantee application for the American Centrifuge Plant in Piketon, OH. The

  15. System for sensing droplet formation time delay in a flow cytometer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Patent) | SciTech Connect System for sensing droplet formation time delay in a flow cytometer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: System for sensing droplet formation time delay in a flow cytometer A droplet flow cytometer system which includes a system to optimize the droplet formation time delay based on conditions actually experienced includes an automatic droplet sampler which rapidly moves a plurality of containers stepwise through the droplet stream while simultaneously

  16. Surface-electronic-state effects in electron emission from the Be(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archubi, C. D.; Gravielle, M. S.; Silkin, V. M.

    2011-07-15

    We study the electron emission produced by swift protons impinging grazingly on a Be(0001) surface. The process is described within a collisional formalism using the band-structure-based (BSB) approximation to represent the electron-surface interaction. The BSB model provides an accurate description of the electronic band structure of the solid and the surface-induced potential. Within this approach we derive both bulk and surface electronic states, with these latter characterized by a strong localization at the crystal surface. We found that such surface electronic states play an important role in double-differential energy- and angle-resolved electron emission probabilities, producing noticeable structures in the electron emission spectra.

  17. Heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in the LHC era: from proton-proton to heavy-ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Andronic, A.; Arleo, F.; Arnaldi, R.; Beraudo, A.; Bruna, E.; Caffarri, D.; del Valle, Z. C.; Contreras, J. G.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; et al

    2016-02-29

    This report reviews the study of open heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in high-energy hadronic collisions, as tools to investigate fundamental aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics, from the proton and nucleus structure at high energy to deconfinement and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Emphasis is given to the lessons learnt from LHC Run 1 results, which are reviewed in a global picture with the results from SPS and RHIC at lower energies, as well as to the questions to be addressed in the future. The report covers heavy flavour and quarkonium production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes discussionmore » of the effects of hot and cold strongly interacting matter, quarkonium photo-production in nucleus-nucleus collisions and perspectives on the study of heavy flavour and quarkonium with upgrades of existing experiments and new experiments. The report results from the activity of the SaporeGravis network of the I3 Hadron Physics programme of the European Union 7th Framework Programme.« less

  18. Calculation of delayed-neutron energy spectra in a QRPA-Hauser...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The model was adopted to generate the delayed-neutron spectra for all 271 precursors. Authors: Kawano, Toshihiko 1 ; Moller, Peter 1 ; Wilson, William B 1 + Show Author ...

  19. Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased array

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    radars. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased array radars. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased array radars. An ultra-compact optical true time delay device is demonstrated that can support 112 antenna elements with better than six bits of delay in a volume 16-inch x 5-inch x 4-inch including the box and electronics. Free-space beams circulate in a White cell,

  20. SU-E-J-175: Proton Dose Calculation On Scatter-Corrected CBCT Image: Feasibility Study for Adaptive Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Y; Winey, B; Sharp, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate feasibility of proton dose calculation on scattercorrected CBCT images for the purpose of adaptive proton therapy. Methods: Two CBCT image sets were acquired from a prostate cancer patient and a thorax phantom using an on-board imaging system of an Elekta infinity linear accelerator. 2-D scatter maps were estimated using a previously introduced CT-based technique, and were subtracted from each raw projection image. A CBCT image set was then reconstructed with an open source reconstruction toolkit (RTK). Conversion from the CBCT number to HU was performed by soft tissue-based shifting with reference to the plan CT. Passively scattered proton plans were simulated on the plan CT and corrected/uncorrected CBCT images using the XiO treatment planning system. For quantitative evaluation, water equivalent path length (WEPL) was compared in those treatment plans. Results: The scatter correction method significantly improved image quality and HU accuracy in the prostate case where large scatter artifacts were obvious. However, the correction technique showed limited effects on the thorax case that was associated with fewer scatter artifacts. Mean absolute WEPL errors from the plans with the uncorrected and corrected images were 1.3 mm and 5.1 mm in the thorax case and 13.5 mm and 3.1 mm in the prostate case. The prostate plan dose distribution of the corrected image demonstrated better agreement with the reference one than that of the uncorrected image. Conclusion: A priori CT-based CBCT scatter correction can reduce the proton dose calculation error when large scatter artifacts are involved. If scatter artifacts are low, an uncorrected CBCT image is also promising for proton dose calculation when it is calibrated with the soft-tissue based shifting.

  1. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electricity suppliers and electricity companies must also provide a fuel mix report to customers twice annually, within the June and December billing cycles. Emissions information must be disclos...

  2. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fuel Disclosure: Virginia’s 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding...

  3. Biodiesel and Pollutant Emissions (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Hayes, B.

    2006-09-28

    Presents the results from three methods of testing--engine, chassis, and PEM--for testing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from B20.

  4. A LINGERING NON-THERMAL COMPONENT IN THE GAMMA-RAY BURST PROMPT EMISSION: PREDICTING GeV EMISSION FROM THE MeV SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R., E-mail: rupalb@tifr.res.in, E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2013-09-20

    The high-energy GeV emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by Fermi/LAT has a significantly different morphology compared to the lower energy MeV emission detected by Fermi/GBM. Though the late-time GeV emission is believed to be synchrotron radiation produced via an external shock, this emission as early as the prompt phase is puzzling. A meaningful connection between these two emissions can be drawn only by an accurate description of the prompt MeV spectrum. We perform a time-resolved spectroscopy of the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) data of long GRBs with significant GeV emission, using a model consisting of two blackbodies and a power law. We examine in detail the evolution of the spectral components and find that GRBs with high GeV emission (GRB 090902B and GRB 090926A) have a delayed onset of the power-law component in the GBM spectrum, which lingers at the later part of the prompt emission. This behavior mimics the flux evolution in the Large Area Telescope (LAT). In contrast, bright GBM GRBs with an order of magnitude lower GeV emission (GRB 100724B and GRB 091003) show a coupled variability of the total and the power-law flux. Further, by analyzing the data for a set of 17 GRBs, we find a strong correlation between the power-law fluence in the MeV and the LAT fluence (Pearson correlation: r = 0.88 and Spearman correlation: ? = 0.81). We demonstrate that this correlation is not influenced by the correlation between the total and the power-law fluences at a confidence level of 2.3?. We speculate the possible radiation mechanisms responsible for the correlation.

  5. Improved Limits on Spin-Dependent WIMP-Proton Interactions from a Two Liter CF{sub 3}I Bubble Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behnke, E.; Behnke, J.; Hinnefeld, J. H.; Levine, I.; Shepherd, T.; Brice, S. J.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Cooper, P. S.; Crisler, M.; Hall, J.; Hu, M.; Ramberg, E.; Sonnenschein, A.; Collar, J. I.; Dahl, C. E.; Fustin, D.; Szydagis, M.

    2011-01-14

    Data from the operation of a bubble chamber filled with 3.5 kg of CF{sub 3}I in a shallow underground site are reported. An analysis of ultrasound signals accompanying bubble nucleations confirms that alpha decays generate a significantly louder acoustic emission than single nuclear recoils, leading to an efficient background discrimination. Three dark matter candidate events were observed during an effective exposure of 28.1 kg day, consistent with a neutron background. This observation provides strong direct detection constraints on weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-proton spin-dependent scattering for WIMP masses >20 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  6. PROMPT X-RAY AND OPTICAL EXCESS EMISSION DUE TO HADRONIC CASCADES IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asano, Katsuaki; Inoue, Susumu; Meszaros, Peter E-mail: inoue@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.j

    2010-12-20

    A fraction of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) exhibit distinct spectral features in their prompt emission below few tens of keV that exceed simple extrapolations of the low-energy power-law portion of the Band spectral model. This is also true for the prompt optical emission observed in several bursts. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we model such low-energy spectral excess components as hadronic cascade emission initiated by photomeson interactions of ultra-high-energy protons accelerated within GRB outflows. Synchrotron radiation from the cascading, secondary electron-positron pairs can naturally reproduce the observed soft spectra in the X-ray band, and in some cases the optical spectra as well. These components can be directly related to the higher energy radiation at GeV energies due to the hadronic cascades. Depending on the spectral shape, the total energy in protons is required to be comparable to or appreciably larger than the observed total photon energy. In particular, we apply our model to the excess X-ray and GeV emission of GRB 090902B, and the bright optical emission of the 'naked-eye' GRB 080319B. Besides the hard GeV components detected by Fermi, such X-ray or optical spectral excesses are further potential signatures of ultra-high-energy cosmic ray production in GRBs.

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on

  8. Competing decay modes of a high-spin isomer in the proton-unbound nucleus ¹⁵⁸Ta*

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carroll, R. J.; Page, R. D.; Joss, D. T.; Uusitalo, J.; Darby, I. G.; Andgren, K.; Cederwall, B.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Gray-Jones, C.; et al

    2015-01-01

    An isomeric state at high spin and excitation energy was recently observed in the proton-unbound nucleus 158Ta. This state was observed to decay by both α and γ decay modes. The large spin change required to decay via γ-ray emission incurs a lifetime long enough for α decay to compete. The α decay has an energy of 8644(11) keV, which is among the highest observed in the region, a partial half-life of 440(70) μs and changes the spin by 11ℏ. In this study, additional evidence supporting the assignment of this α decay to the high-spin isomer in 158Ta will bemore » presented.« less

  9. Materials for use as proton conducting membranes for fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Einsla, Brian R.; McGrath, James E.

    2009-01-06

    A family of polymers having pendent sulfonate moieties connected to polymeric main chain phenyl groups are described. These polymers are prepared by the steps of polymerization (using a monomer with a phenyl with an alkoxy substitution), deportation by converting the alkoxy to a hydroxyl, and functionalization of the polymer with a pendant sulfonate group. As an example, sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers with pendent sulfonic acid groups are synthesized by the direct copolymerization of methoxy-containing poly(arylene ether sulfone)s, then converting the methoxy groups to the reactive hydroxyl form, and finally functionalizing the hydroxyl form with proton-conducting sites through nucleophilic substitution. The family of polymers may have application in proton exchange membranes and in other applications.

  10. Volume Reflection of a Proton Beam in a Bent Crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Yu. M.; Petrunin, A. A.; Skorobogatov, V. V.; Gavrikov, Yu. A.; Gelamkov, A. V.; Lapina, L. P.; Schetkovsky, A. I.; Vavilov, S. A.; Baranov, V. I.; Chesnokov, Yu. A.; Afonin, A. G.; Baranov, V. T.; Chepegin, V. N.; Guidi, V.; Vomiero, A.

    2006-10-06

    Volume reflection predicted in the mid-1980s by Taratin and Vorobiev has been observed for the first time in the interactions of a 70 GeV proton beam with a short bent crystal. Incident protons deviate from convex atomic planes in the bulk of the crystal as a result of coherent interaction with bent lattice around the tangency point of particle trajectory with a curved atomic plane. The deflection angle 2{theta}{sub R} was found to be (39.5{+-}2.0) {mu}rad, or (1.65{+-}0.08){theta}{sub c} in terms of the critical angle for channeling. The process has a large probability with respect to channeling and takes place in the angular range equal to the bend angle of atomic planes. It could possibly open new fields of application of crystals in high-energy particle beam optics.

  11. Electron- and proton-induced ionization of pyrimidine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele; Weck, Philippe F

    2015-03-27

    This present work describes a quantum-mechanically based model of the electron- and proton-induced ionization of isolated pyrimidine molecules. The impact energies range from the target ionization threshold up to ~1 keV for electrons and from 10 keV up to 10 MeV for protons. The cross-section calculations are performed within the 1st Born approximation in which the ejected electron is described by a Coulomb wave whereas the incident and the scattered projectiles are both described by plane waves. The pyrimidine target is described using the Gaussian 09 software package. Furthermore, our theoretical predictions obtained are in good agreement with experimental absolutemore » total cross sections, while large discrepancies are observed between existing semi-empirical models and the present calculations.« less

  12. Production of sodium-22 from proton irradiated aluminum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Heaton, Richard C.; Jamriska, David J.

    1996-01-01

    A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from a proton irradiated minum target including dissolving a proton irradiated aluminum target in hydrochloric acid to form a first solution including aluminum ions and sodium ions, separating a portion of the aluminum ions from the first solution by crystallization of an aluminum salt, contacting the remaining first solution with an anion exchange resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of iron and copper are selectively absorbed by the anion exchange resin while aluminum ions and sodium ions remain in solution, contacting the solution with an cation exchange resin whereby aluminum ions and sodium ions are adsorbed by the cation exchange resin, and, contacting the cation exchange resin with an acid solution capable of selectively separating the adsorbed sodium ions from the cation exchange resin while aluminum ions remain adsorbed on the cation exchange resin is disclosed.

  13. Electron- and proton-induced ionization of pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele; Weck, Philippe F

    2015-03-27

    This present work describes a quantum-mechanically based model of the electron- and proton-induced ionization of isolated pyrimidine molecules. The impact energies range from the target ionization threshold up to ~1 keV for electrons and from 10 keV up to 10 MeV for protons. The cross-section calculations are performed within the 1st Born approximation in which the ejected electron is described by a Coulomb wave whereas the incident and the scattered projectiles are both described by plane waves. The pyrimidine target is described using the Gaussian 09 software package. Furthermore, our theoretical predictions obtained are in good agreement with experimental absolute total cross sections, while large discrepancies are observed between existing semi-empirical models and the present calculations.

  14. Carbonate fuel cell and components thereof for in-situ delayed addition of carbonate electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Richard; Yuh, Chao-Yi; Farooque, Mohammad

    2011-05-10

    An apparatus and method in which a delayed carbonate electrolyte is stored in the storage areas of a non-electrolyte matrix fuel cell component and is of a preselected content so as to obtain a delayed time release of the electrolyte in the storage areas in the operating temperature range of the fuel cell.

  15. Electron Proton Hydrogen Deuterium Tritium Neutron Fusion Basics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Hydrogen Deuterium Tritium Neutron Fusion Basics Throughout history, the way in which the sun and stars produce their energy remained a mystery. During the 20th century, scientists discovered that the energy is produced through the fusion of light atoms. Albert Einstein's familiar formula, E=mc 2 , provided the basis for understanding that mass can be converted into energy. With fission, heavy atoms - such as uranium - can be split to release the internal energy that holds them together.

  16. Dynamic aperture evaluation for the RHIC 2009 polarized proton runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Tepikain, S.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Fischer, W.; Montag, c.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-05-04

    In this article we numerically evaluate the dynamic apertures of the proposed lattices for the coming Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 2009 polarized proton (pp) 100 GeV and 250 GeV runs. One goal of this study is to find out the appropriate {beta}* for the coming 2009 pp runs. Another goal is to check the effect of second order chromaticity correction in the RHIC pp runs.

  17. High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Heavy-Ions| U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy

  18. Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrow, Brian H.; Shen, Jana K.; Eike, David M.; Murch, Bruce P.; Koenig, Peter H.

    2014-08-28

    Knowledge of the protonation behavior of pH-sensitive molecules in micelles and bilayers has significant implications in consumer product development and biomedical applications. However, the calculation of pK{sub a}s in such environments proves challenging using traditional structure-based calculations. Here we apply all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics with explicit ions and titratable water to calculate the pK{sub a} of a fatty acid molecule in a micelle of dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride and liquid as well as gel-phase bilayers of diethyl ester dimethylammonium chloride. Interestingly, the pK{sub a} of the fatty acid in the gel bilayer is 5.4, 0.4 units lower than that in the analogous liquid bilayer or micelle, despite the fact that the protonated carboxylic group is significantly more desolvated in the gel bilayer. This work illustrates the capability of all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics in capturing the delicate balance in the free energies of desolvation and Coulombic interactions. It also shows the importance of the explicit treatment of ions in sampling the protonation states. The ability to model dynamics of pH-responsive substrates in a bilayer environment is useful for improving fabric care products as well as our understanding of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  19. Paths and ionization losses of proton energy in different substances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilovskiy, I.M.; Karpov, I.I.; Petrukhin, V.I.; Prokoshkin, Yu.D.

    1986-02-14

    Ionization energy losses of charged particles in a substance are described by the well-known Bethe-Bloch formula. However, the magnitudes of the ionization potentials in region of low proton energies (E < 100 MeV) for heavy elements prove to be considerably larger than those at high energies. Thus, studies of ionization losses in the region of high energies are the main source of the experimental information necessary for the correction of the Bethe-Bloch formula and determination of magnitudes of ionization potentials I. The purpose of this work was to measure the magnitudes of ionization losses dE/ds, paths R and ionization potentials I at a proton energy of E 670 MeV. The measurements were taken by the relative method for different substances of x, and the magnitudes of q sub x=(dE/ds) sub x/(dE/ds) sub Al and px=R sub x/R sub Al were found. Quantities qx and px weakly depend on the energy E where at E=200-600 MeV, a=(2-4).10-2 for different substances. The proton energy was determined with an accuracy of 2 MeV.

  20. Generalized local emission tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katsevich, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

  1. Search for resonant tt¯ production in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-10

    A search is performed for the production of heavy resonances decaying into top-antitop quark pairs in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. Data used for the analyses were collected with the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1. The search is performed using events with three different final states, defined by the number of leptons (electrons and muons) from the tt¯ → WbWb decay. The analyses are optimized for reconstruction of top quarks with high Lorentz boosts, where jet substructure techniques are used to enhance the sensitivity. Results are presented for all channels and a combination is performed. Furthermore, no significant excess of events relative to the expected yield from standard model processes is observed.

  2. Particle-number fluctuations and neutron-proton pairing effects on proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douici, M.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2012-10-20

    The particle-number fluctuation effect on the root-mean-square (rms) proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei is studied in the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing case using an exact particle-number projection method and the Woods-Saxon model.

  3. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  4. Measurement of the weak mixing angle with the Drell-Yan process in proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2011-12-01

    A multivariate likelihood method to measure electroweak couplings with the Drell-Yan process at the LHC is presented. The process is described by the dilepton rapidity, invariant mass, and decay angle distributions. The decay angle ambiguity due to the unknown assignment of the scattered constituent quark and antiquark to the two protons in a collision is resolved statistically using correlations between the observables. The method is applied to a sample of dimuon events from proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.1 inverse femtobarns. From the dominant u-ubar, d-dbar to gamma*/Z to opposite sign dimuons process, the effective weak mixing angle parameter is measured to be sin^2(theta[eff]) = 0.2287 +/- 0.0020 (stat.) +/- 0.0025 (syst.). This result is consistent with measurements from other processes, as expected within the standard model.

  5. Metal tritides helium emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beavis, L.C.

    1980-02-01

    Over the past several years, we have been measuring the release of helium from metal tritides (primarily erbium tritide). We find that qualitatively all tritides of interest to us behave the same. When they are first formed, the helium is released at a low rate that appears to be related to the amount of surface area which has access to the outside of the material (either film or bulk). For example, erbium tritide films initially release about 0.3% of the helium generated. Most tritide films emit helium at about this rate initially. At some later time, which depends upon the amount of helium generated, the parent occluding element and the degree of tritium saturation of the dihydride phase the helium emission changes to a new mode in which it is released at approximately the rate at which it is generated (for example, we measure this value to be approx. = .31 He/Er for ErT/sub 1/./sub 9/ films). If erbium ditritide is saturated beyond 1.9 T/Er, the critical helium/metal ratio decreases. For example, in bulk powders ErT/sub 2/./sub 15/ reaches critical release concentration at approx. = 0.03. Moderate elevation of temperature above room temperature has little impact on the helium release rate. It appears that the process may have approx. = 2 kcal/mol activation energy. The first helium formed is well bound. As the tritide ages, the helium is found in higher energy sites. Similar but less extensive measurements on scandium, titanium, and zirconium tritides are also described. Finally, the thermal desorption of erbium tritides of various ages from 50 days to 3154 days is discussed. Significant helium is desorbed along with the tritium in all but the youngest samples during thermodesorption.

  6. Trading Emissions PLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trading Emissions PLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Trading Emissions PLC Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: EC2N 4AW Product: Trading Emissions PLC is an investment fund...

  7. Nuclear reactor with internal thimble-type delayed neutron detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C.; Poloncsik, John; Lambert, John D. B.

    1990-01-01

    This invention teaches improved apparatus for the method of detecting a breach in cladded fuel used in a nuclear reactor. The detector apparatus is located in the primary heat exchanger which conveys part of the reactor coolant past at least three separate delayed-neutron detectors mounted in this heat exchanger. The detectors are spaced apart such that the coolant flow time from the core to each detector is different, and these differences are known. The delayed-neutron activity at the detectors is a function of the delay time after the reaction in the fuel until the coolant carrying the delayed-neutron emitter passes the respective detector. This time delay is broken down into separate components including an isotopic holdup time required for the emitter to move through the fuel from the reaction to the coolant at the breach, and two transit times required for the emitter now in the coolant to flow from the breach to the detector loop and then via the loop to the detector. At least two of these time components are determined during calibrated operation of the reactor. Thereafter during normal reactor operation, repeated comparisons are made by the method of regression approximation of the third time component for the best-fit line correlating measured delayed-neutron activity against activity that is approximated according to specific equations. The equations use these time-delay components and known parameter values of the fuel and of the part and emitting daughter isotopes.

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center:

  9. Developing the model of laser ablation by considering the interplay between emission and expansion of aluminum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezaei, F.; Tavassoli, S. H.

    2013-01-15

    In the present study, the ablation behavior of aluminum target and its plasma radiation in noble ambient gases by a laser pulse with wavelength of 266 nm and pulse duration of 10 ns are numerically studied. A thermal model of laser ablation considering heat conduction, Euler equations, Saha-Eggert equations, Knudsen layer, mass and energy balance relations and optical shielding effects are used for calculation of plasma parameters. Effects of excitation energy on plasma expansion and its emissivity are investigated. Time and spatial-resolved plasma emission including bremsstrahlung, recombination and spectral emission at early delay times after laser irradiation is obtained. Effects of two ambient gases (He and Ar) as well as different gas pressures of 100, 300, 500, and 760 Torr on plasma expansion and its spectrum are studied. Results illustrate that at initial delay times, especially at high noble gas pressures, ionic lines have the maximum intensities, while at later times neutral lines dominate. When the pressure of ambient gas increases, a confinement of the plasma plume is predicted and the intensity of neutral lines decreases. Continuous emission increases with wavelength in both ambient gases. Spatially resolved analysis shows that an intense continuous emission is predicted next to the sample surface decreasing with distance from the latter.

  10. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  11. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ACES is a cooperative multi-party effort to characterize emissions and possible health effects of new, advanced heavy duty engine and control systems and fuels in the market 2007 - 2010.

  12. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  13. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Data Tables 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential, 1990-2009 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors, 1990-2009 3 Distribution of ...

  14. emissions | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    cities CO2 emissions OpenEI suburbs US New research from the University of California-Berkeley shows that those who live in cities in the United States have significantly smaller...

  15. Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT’ Emission Control System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission Control System for NOx and PM Emission ... Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission Control System for NOx and PM Emission ...

  16. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies Measurement and Characterization ...

  17. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

  18. IGES GHG Emissions Data | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.iges.or.jpencdmreportkyoto.html References: IGES GHG Emissions Data1 Summary "IGES GHG Emissions Data is aimed at...

  19. Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program - Bangladesh ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program - Bangladesh Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Retrieved from...

  20. Zero Emissions Leasing LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zero Emissions Leasing LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zero Emissions Leasing LLC Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96822 Sector: Solar Product: Honolulu-based developer of solar...

  1. How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    dioxide emissions are the main component of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activity. Carbon dioxide is emitted mostly as a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels...

  2. Steinbeis Technology Transfer Centre for Emissions Trading |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Steinbeis Technology Transfer Centre for Emissions Trading Jump to: navigation, search Name: Steinbeis Technology Transfer Centre for Emissions Trading Place: Augsburg, Bavaria,...

  3. IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Emission Factor Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IPCC Emission Factor Database AgencyCompany Organization: World Meteorological Organization,...

  4. Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The EMission FACtors (EMFAC) model is used to calculate emission rates from all motor vehicles, such as passenger cars to heavy-duty trucks, operating on highways, freeways...

  5. Importance of hydrophobic traps for proton diffusion in lyotropic liquid crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McDaniel, Jesse G.; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-03-04

    The diffusion of protons in self-assembled systems is potentially important for the design of efficient proton exchange membranes. In this work, we study proton dynamics in a low-water content, lamellar phase of an sodium-carboxylate gemini surfactant/water system using computer simulations. The hopping of protons via the Grotthuss mechanism is explicity allowed through the multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) method. We find that the hydronium ion is trapped on the hydrophobic side of the surfactant-water interface, and proton diffusion then proceeds by hopping between surface sites. The importance of hydrophobic traps is surprising, because one would expect the hydronium ions tomore » be trapped at the charged head-groups. The physics illustrated in this system should be relevant to the proton dynamics in other amphiphilic membrane systems, whenever there exists exposed hydrophobic surface regions.« less

  6. The effects of the RHIC E-lenses magnetic structure layout on the proton beam trajectory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Luo, Y.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Raparia, D.

    2011-03-28

    We are designing two electron lenses (E-lens) to compensate for the large beam-beam tune spread from proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). They will be installed in RHIC IR10. First, the layout of these two E-lenses is introduced. Then the effects of e-lenses on proton beam are discussed. For example, the transverse fields of the e-lens bending solenoids and the fringe field of the main solenoids will shift the proton beam. For the effects of the e-lens on proton beam trajectory, we calculate the transverse kicks that the proton beam receives in the electron lens via Opera at first. Then, after incorporating the simplified E-lens lattice in the RHIC lattice, we obtain the closed orbit effect with the Simtrack Code.

  7. Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiter, George F; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Paddison, Stephen J; Platzman, P. M.; Moravsky, Alexander P.; Adams, Mark A.; Mayers, Dr. Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Deep inelastic neutron scattering provides a means of directly and accurately measuring the momentum distribution of protons in water, which is determined primarily by the proton ground-state wave function.We find that in water confined on scales of 20 A, this wave function responds to the details of the confinement, corresponds to a strongly anharmonic local potential, shows evidence in some cases of coherent delocalization in double wells, and involves changes in zero-point kinetic energy of the protons from 40 to +120 meV difference from that of bulk water at room temperature. This behavior appears to be a generic feature of nanoscale confinement. It is exhibited here in 16 A inner diameter carbon nanotubes, two different hydrated proton exchange membranes (PEMs), Nafion 1120 and Dow 858, and has been seen earlier in xerogel and 14 A diameter carbon nanotubes. The proton conductivity in the PEM samples correlates with the degree of coherent delocalization of the proton.

  8. Laser-seeded modulation instability in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Austin Yi, S.; Shvets, Gennady; Pukhov, Alexander

    2013-10-15

    A new method for initiating the modulation instability (MI) of a proton beam in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator using a short laser pulse preceding the beam is presented. A diffracting laser pulse is used to produce a plasma wave that provides a seeding modulation of the proton bunch with the period equal to that of the plasma wave. Using the envelope description of the proton beam, this method of seeding the MI is analytically compared with the earlier suggested seeding technique that involves an abrupt truncation of the proton bunch. The full kinetic simulation of a realistic proton bunch is used to validate the analytic results. It is further used to demonstrate that a plasma density ramp placed in the early stages of the laser-seeded MI leads to its stabilization, resulting in sustained accelerating electric fields (of order several hundred MV/m) over long propagation distances (?1001000 m)

  9. Multi-images deconvolution improves signal-to-noise ratio on gated stimulated emission depletion microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castello, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2014-12-08

    Time-gated detection, namely, only collecting the fluorescence photons after a time-delay from the excitation events, reduces complexity, cost, and illumination intensity of a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope. In the gated continuous-wave- (CW-) STED implementation, the spatial resolution improves with increased time-delay, but the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduces. Thus, in sub-optimal conditions, such as a low photon-budget regime, the SNR reduction can cancel-out the expected gain in resolution. Here, we propose a method which does not discard photons, but instead collects all the photons in different time-gates and recombines them through a multi-image deconvolution. Our results, obtained on simulated and experimental data, show that the SNR of the restored image improves relative to the gated image, thereby improving the effective resolution.

  10. Effects of Protonation State on a Tyrosine-Histidine Bioinspired Redox

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mediator Effects of Protonation State on a Tyrosine-Histidine Bioinspired Redox Mediator Authors: Moore, G. F., Hambourger, M., Kodis, G., Michl, W., Gust, D., Moore, T. A., and Moore, A. L. Title: Effects of Protonation State on a Tyrosine-Histidine Bioinspired Redox Mediator Source: Journal of Physical Chemistry B Year: 2010 Volume: 114 Pages: 14450-14457 ABSTRACT: The conversion of tyrosine to the corresponding tyrosyl radical in photosytem II (PSII) is an example of proton-coupled

  11. Polarized Proton Acceleration in AGS and RHIC (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Polarized Proton Acceleration in AGS and RHIC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Polarized Proton Acceleration in AGS and RHIC As the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent superconducting rings RHIC has operated with a wide range of beam energies and particle species including polarized proton beams. The acceleration of polarized beams in both the injector and the collider rings is complicated by numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Partial and

  12. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy.

  13. Neutron-proton pairing correlations in odd mass systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellah, M. Allal, N. H.; Oudih, M. R.

    2015-03-30

    An expression of the ground-state which describes odd mass systems within the BCS approach in the isovector neutron-proton pairing case is proposed using the blocked level technique. The gap equations as well as the energy expression are then derived. It is shown that they exactly generalize the expressions obtained in the pairing between like-particles case. The various gap parameters and the energy are then numerically studied as a function of the pairing-strength within the schematic one-level model.

  14. PROTON RESOf\j ANCE SPECTRO~3COPY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( ( ( ( ( . :( ( ( ( [ assea::::;: $_ r PROTON RESOf\j ANCE SPECTRO~3COPY IN 28Si AND 30p JI" II RONALD OWEN NELSON JI ~jL======.~=~=n=====_= ___====~.======~~ - Triangle Unive\'"$~t!es Nuclear l.oboratGry Deportment of Physics Duke University 1983 PROWN REHNAN <E Sl?EcrR.OS coPY IN 2 8 8i AND 30 p by Ronald Owen Nel son Department of Phy si cs Duke U niv er si ty Da te: Approved: E. G. Bilpuch, Sllperv isor Dissertation sllbmitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for

  15. Development of hollow electron beams for proton and ion collimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancari, G.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.G.; Assmann, R.; Kabantsev, A.

    2010-06-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams.

  16. Proton resonance spectroscopy. Final performance report, June 1987--May 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    1998-09-01

    This report gives a brief summary of accomplishments made on this project. Approximately 22 refereed papers were published with support from this grant; reprints are attached with this report. Topics studied include amplitude distributions in proton resonance reactions, chaos in nuclei, and tests of detailed balance and of parity violation with resonance reactions. Appendix 1 lists personnel and collaborators associated with this work, including the undergraduate students hired with grant funds, while Appendix 2 provides a list of talks, abstracts, dissertations and theses, etc. associated with the work supported by this grant.

  17. Scaling properties of proton-nucleus total reaction cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-Ibrahim, Badawy; Kohama, Akihisa

    2010-05-15

    We study the scaling properties of proton-nucleus total reaction cross sections for stable nuclei and propose an approximate expression in proportion to Z{sup 2/3}sigma{sub pp}{sup total}+N{sup 2/3}sigma{sub pn}{sup total}. Based on this expression, we can derive a relation that enables us to predict a total reaction cross section for any stable nucleus within 10% uncertainty at most, using the empirical value of the total reaction cross section of a given nucleus.

  18. Proton spin tracking with symplectic integration of orbit motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Dutheil, Y.; Huang, H.; Meot, F.; Ranjbar, V.

    2015-05-03

    Symplectic integration had been adopted for orbital motion tracking in code SimTrack. SimTrack has been extensively used for dynamic aperture calculation with beam-beam interaction for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Recently proton spin tracking has been implemented on top of symplectic orbital motion in this code. In this article, we will explain the implementation of spin motion based on Thomas-BMT equation, and the benchmarking with other spin tracking codes currently used for RHIC. Examples to calculate spin closed orbit and spin tunes are presented too.

  19. Ionoacoustic characterization of the proton Bragg peak with submillimeter accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assmann, W. Reinhardt, S.; Lehrack, S.; Edlich, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Parodi, K.; Kellnberger, S.; Omar, M.; Ntziachristos, V.; Moser, M.; Dollinger, G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Range verification in ion beam therapy relies to date on nuclear imaging techniques which require complex and costly detector systems. A different approach is the detection of thermoacoustic signals that are generated due to localized energy loss of ion beams in tissue (ionoacoustics). Aim of this work was to study experimentally the achievable position resolution of ionoacoustics under idealized conditions using high frequency ultrasonic transducers and a specifically selected probing beam. Methods: A water phantom was irradiated by a pulsed 20 MeV proton beam with varying pulse intensity and length. The acoustic signal of single proton pulses was measured by different PZT-based ultrasound detectors (3.5 and 10 MHz central frequencies). The proton dose distribution in water was calculated by Geant4 and used as input for simulation of the generated acoustic wave by the matlab toolbox k-WAVE. Results: In measurements from this study, a clear signal of the Bragg peak was observed for an energy deposition as low as 10{sup 12} eV. The signal amplitude showed a linear increase with particle number per pulse and thus, dose. Bragg peak position measurements were reproducible within 30 ?m and agreed with Geant4 simulations to better than 100 ?m. The ionoacoustic signal pattern allowed for a detailed analysis of the Bragg peak and could be well reproduced by k-WAVE simulations. Conclusions: The authors have studied the ionoacoustic signal of the Bragg peak in experiments using a 20 MeV proton beam with its correspondingly localized energy deposition, demonstrating submillimeter position resolution and providing a deep insight in the correlation between the acoustic signal and Bragg peak shape. These results, together with earlier experiments and new simulations (including the results in this study) at higher energies, suggest ionoacoustics as a technique for range verification in particle therapy at locations, where the tumor can be localized by ultrasound imaging. This acoustic range verification approach could offer the possibility of combining anatomical ultrasound and Bragg peak imaging, but further studies are required for translation of these findings to clinical application.

  20. Proton Transport in Imidazoles: Unraveling the Role of Supramolecular Structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cosby, James T.; Holt, Adam P.; Griffin, Phillip; Wang, Yangyang; Sangoro, Joshua R.

    2015-09-18

    The impact of supramolecular hydrogen bonded networks on dynamics and charge transport in 2-ethyl-4-methylimidazole (2E4MIm), a model proton-conducting system, is investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy, depolarized dynamic light scattering, viscometry, and calorimetry. It is observed that the slow, Debye-like relaxation reflecting the supramolecular structure in neat 2E4MIm is eliminated upon the addition of minute amounts of levulinic acid. This is attributed to the dissociation of imidazole molecules and the breaking down of hydrogen-bonded chains, which leads to a 10-fold enhancement of ionic conductivity.

  1. High intensity proton operation at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, L.A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Onillon, E.; Reece, R.K.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A.

    1994-08-01

    With the completion of the AGS rf upgrade, and the implementation of a transition {open_quotes}jump{close_quotes}, all of accelerator systems were in place in 1994 to allow acceleration of the proton intensity available from the AGS Booster injector to AGS extraction energy and delivery to the high energy users. Beam commissioning results with these new systems are presented. Progress in identifying and overcoming other obstacles to higher intensity are given. These include a careful exploration of the stopband strengths present on the AGS injection magnetic porch, and implementation of the AGS single bunch transverse dampers throughout the acceleration cycle.

  2. Correlation studies between solar wind parameters and the decimetric radio emission from Jupiter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolton, S.J.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M.J.; De Pater, I.; Thompson, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Results of a study comparing long-term time variations (years) in Jupiter's synchrotron radio emission with a variety of solar wind parameters and the 10.7-cm solar flux are reported. Data from 1963 through 1985 were analyzed, and the results suggest that many solar wind parameters are correlated with the intensity of the synchrotron emission produced by the relativistic electrons in the Jovian Van Allen radiation belts. Significant nonzero correlation coefficients appear to be associated with solar wind ion density, ram pressure, thermal pressure, flow velocity, momentum, and ion temperature. The highest correlation coefficients are obtained for solar wind ram pressure (NV/sup 2/) and thermal pressure (NT). The correlation analysis suggests that the delay time between fluctuations in the solar wind and changes in the Jovian synchrotron emission is typically about 2 years. The delay time of the correlation places important constraints on the theoretical models describing the radiation belts. The implication of these results, if the correlations are real, is that the solar wind is influencing the supply and/or loss of electrons to Jupiter's inner magnetosphere. We note that the data for this work spans only about two periods of the solar activity cycle, and because of the long time scales of the observed variations, it is important to confirm these results with additional observations. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  3. High-Efficiency Deflection of High-Energy Protons through Axial Channeling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in a Bent Crystal (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect High-Efficiency Deflection of High-Energy Protons through Axial Channeling in a Bent Crystal Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High-Efficiency Deflection of High-Energy Protons through Axial Channeling in a Bent Crystal Beam deflection due to axial channeling in a silicon crystal bent along the <111> axis was observed with 400 GeV/c protons at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. The condition for doughnut scattering of

  4. Proton Radiography at LANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    is the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility, or DARHT. Recently completed at ... of proton radiography's ability to measure small density differences inside a test object. ...

  5. Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slides presented at the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton" on May 23, 2011.

  6. Webinar: Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the webinar, Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton, originally presented on May 23, 2011.

  7. Protons Hog the Momentum in Neutron-Rich Nuclei | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Protons Hog the Momentum in Neutron-Rich Nuclei Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science ...

  8. Proton-hydrogen reaction in an effectively two-body model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pupyshev, V. V., E-mail: pupyshev@theor.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    A model of total interaction between a proton incident to a hydrogen atom and the proton that is the nucleus of this atom is proposed. This interaction is assumed to be the sum of the short-range nuclear Reid potential and the long-range Thomas-Fermi potential induced by the Coulomb interaction of the electron with the nucleus of the hydrogen atom. The explicit low-energy asymptotic behavior of the cross section for the proton-hydrogen reaction leading to deuteron production is found. It is shown that this cross section increases in inverse proportion to the collision energy for the proton and hydrogen atom in its zero limit.

  9. Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor for proton radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seco, Joao; Depauw, Nicolas

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) in producing proton radiographic images using the proton beam at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Methods: A CMOS APS, previously tested for use in s-ray radiation therapy applications, was used for proton beam radiographic imaging at the MGH. Two different setups were used as a proof of principle that CMOS can be used as proton imaging device: (i) a pen with two metal screws to assess spatial resolution of the CMOS and (ii) a phantom with lung tissue, bone tissue, and water to assess tissue contrast of the CMOS. The sensor was then traversed by a double scattered monoenergetic proton beam at 117 MeV, and the energy deposition inside the detector was recorded to assess its energy response. Conventional x-ray images with similar setup at voltages of 70 kVp and proton images using commercial Gafchromic EBT 2 and Kodak X-Omat V films were also taken for comparison purposes. Results: Images were successfully acquired and compared to x-ray kVp and proton EBT2/X-Omat film images. The spatial resolution of the CMOS detector image is subjectively comparable to the EBT2 and Kodak X-Omat V film images obtained at the same object-detector distance. X-rays have apparent higher spatial resolution than the CMOS. However, further studies with different commercial films using proton beam irradiation demonstrate that the distance of the detector to the object is important to the amount of proton scatter contributing to the proton image. Proton images obtained with films at different distances from the source indicate that proton scatter significantly affects the CMOS image quality. Conclusion: Proton radiographic images were successfully acquired at MGH using a CMOS active pixel sensor detector. The CMOS demonstrated spatial resolution subjectively comparable to films at the same object-detector distance. Further work will be done in order to establish the spatial and energy resolution of the CMOS detector for protons. The development and use of CMOS in proton radiography could allow in vivo proton range checks, patient setup QA, and real-time tumor tracking.

  10. High-Efficiency Deflection of High-Energy Protons through Axial Channeling in a Bent Crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scandale, Walter; Vomiero, Alberto; Baricordi, Stefano; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Guidi, Vincenzo; Mazzolari, Andrea; Della Mea, Gianantonio; Milan, Riccardo; Ambrosi, Giovanni; Bertucci, Bruna; Burger, William J.; Zuccon, Paolo; Cavoto, Gianluca; Luci, Claudio; Santacesaria, Roberta; Valente, Paolo; Vallazza, Erik; Afonin, Alexander G.; Chesnokov, Yury A.

    2008-10-17

    Beam deflection due to axial channeling in a silicon crystal bent along the <111> axis was observed with 400 GeV/c protons at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. The condition for doughnut scattering of protons by the atomic strings of the crystal was attained. Such a condition allowed one to observe a beam deflection of 50 {mu}rad with about 30% efficiency. The contribution of hyperchanneled states of protons to the observed beam deflection was less than 2% according to simulation results.

  11. Effect of the electron lenses on the RHIC proton beam closed orbit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, X.; Luo, Y.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Montag, C.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.; Raparia, D.

    2011-02-01

    We are designing two electron lenses (E-lens) to compensate for the large beam-beam tune spread from proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). They will be installed at RHIC IR10. The transverse fields of the E-lenses bending solenoids and the fringe field of the main solenoids will shift the proton beam. We calculate the transverse kicks that the proton beam receives in the electron lens via Opera. Then, after incorporating the simplified E-lens lattice in the RHIC lattice, we obtain the closed orbit effect with the Simtrack Code.

  12. Protons and Neutrons for Testing at LBNL | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Protons and Neutrons for Testing at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of ...

  13. High-intensity laser-driven proton acceleration enhancement from hydrogen containing ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dollar, F.; Reed, S. A.; Matsuoka, T.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; McGuffey, C.; Rousseau, P.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Litzenberg, D. W.

    2013-09-30

    Laser driven proton acceleration experiments from micron and submicron thick targets using high intensity (2 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}), high contrast (10{sup ?15}) laser pulses show an enhancement of maximum energy when hydrogen containing targets were used instead of non-hydrogen containing. In our experiments, using thin (<1?m) plastic foil targets resulted in maximum proton energies that were consistently 20%100% higher than when equivalent thickness inorganic targets, including Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Al, were used. Proton energies up to 20 MeV were measured with a flux of 10{sup 7} protons/MeV/sr.

  14. Volume Reflection Dependence of 400 GeV/c Protons on the Bent Crystal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Curvature (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Volume Reflection Dependence of 400 GeV/c Protons on the Bent Crystal Curvature Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Volume Reflection Dependence of 400 GeV/c Protons on the Bent Crystal Curvature The trend of volume reflection parameters (deflection angle and efficiency) in a bent (110) silicon crystal has been investigated as a function of the crystal curvature with 400 GeV/c protons on the H8 beam line at the CERN Super Proton

  15. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is an initial investigation of the use of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells on-board commercial aircraft.

  16. SELF-CONSISTENT ION CYCLOTRON ANISOTROPY-BETA RELATION FOR SOLAR WIND PROTONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isenberg, Philip A.; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kasper, Justin C. E-mail: bmaruca@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2013-08-20

    We derive a set of self-consistent marginally stable states for a system of ion-cyclotron waves propagating parallel to the large-scale magnetic field through a homogeneous proton-electron plasma. The proton distributions and the wave dispersions are related through the condition that no further ion-cyclotron resonant particle scattering or wave growth/damping may take place. The thermal anisotropy of the protons in these states therefore defines the threshold value for triggering the proton-cyclotron anisotropy instability. A number of recent papers have noted that the anisotropy of solar wind protons at 1 AU does not seem to be limited by the proton-cyclotron anisotropy threshold, even at low plasma beta. However, this puzzle seems to be due solely to the estimation of this anisotropy threshold under the assumption that the protons have a bi-Maxwellian distribution. We note that bi-Maxwellian distributions are never marginally stable to the resonant cyclotron interaction, so these estimates do not represent physically valid thresholds. The threshold anisotropies obtained from our marginally stable states are much larger, as a function of proton parallel beta, than the bi-Maxwellian estimates, and we show that the measured data remains below these more rigorous thresholds. Thus, the results of this paper resolve the apparent contradiction presented by the solar wind anisotropy observations at 1 AU: the bi-Maxwellian anisotropies are not rigorous thresholds, and so do not limit the proton distributions in the solar wind.

  17. Cosmic-ray induced gamma-ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xilu; Fields, Brian D.

    2014-05-09

    Cosmic rays in galaxies interact with the interstellar medium and give us a direct view of nuclear and particle interactions in the cosmos. For example, cosmic-ray proton interactions with interstellar hydrogen produce gamma rays via PcrPism??{sup 0}???. For a 'normal' star-forming galaxy like the Milky Way, most cosmic rays escape the Galaxy before such collisions, but in starburst galaxies with dense gas and huge star formation rate, most cosmic rays do suffer these interactions [1,2]. We construct a 'thick-target' model for starburst galaxies, in which cosmic rays are accelerated by supernovae, and escape is neglected. This model gives an upper limit to the gamma-ray emission. Only two free parameters are involved in the model: cosmic-ray proton acceleration energy rate from supernova and the proton injection spectral index. The pionic gamma-radiation is calculated from 10 MeV to 10 TeV for the starburst galaxy NGC 253, and compared to Fermi and HESS data. Our model fits NGC 253 well, suggesting that cosmic rays in this starburst are in the thick target limit, and that this galaxy is a gamma-ray calorimeter.

  18. Modulating resonance behaviors by noise recycling in bistable systems with time delay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Zhongkui Xu, Wei; Yang, Xiaoli; Xiao, Yuzhu

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the impact of noise recycling on resonance behaviors is studied theoretically and numerically in a prototypical bistable system with delayed feedback. According to the interior cooperating and interacting activity of noise recycling, a theory has been proposed by reducing the non-Markovian problem into a two-state model, wherein both the master equation and the transition rates depend on not only the current state but also the earlier two states due to the recycling lag and the feedback delay. By virtue of this theory, the formulae of the power spectrum density and the linear response function have been found analytically. And the theoretical results are well verified by numerical simulations. It has been demonstrated that both the recycling lag and the feedback delay play a crucial role in the resonance behaviors. In addition, the results also suggest an alternative scheme to modulate or control the coherence or stochastic resonance in bistable systems with time delay.

  19. Remote facility sharing with ATM networks [PC based ATM Link Delay Simulator (LDS)]. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kung, H. T.

    2001-06-01

    The ATM Link Delay Simulator (LDS) adds propagation delay to the ATM link on which it is installed, to allow control of link propagation delay in network protocol experiments simulating an adjustable piece of optical fiber. Our LDS simulates a delay of between 1.5 and 500 milliseconds and is built with commodity PC hardware, only the ATM network interface card is not generally available. Our implementation is special in that it preserves the exact spacing of ATM data cells a feature that requires sustained high performance. Our implementation shows that applications demanding sustained high performance are possible on commodity PC hardware. This illustrates the promise that PC hardware has for adaptability to demanding specialized testing of high speed network.

  20. Flexible pulse delay control up to picosecond for high-intensity twin

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electron bunches (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Flexible pulse delay control up to picosecond for high-intensity twin electron bunches Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Flexible pulse delay control up to picosecond for high-intensity twin electron bunches Authors: Zhang, Zhen ; Ding, Yuantao ; Emma, Paul ; Huang, Zhirong ; Marinelli, Agostino ; Tang, Chuanxiang Publication Date: 2015-09-10 OSTI Identifier: 1233964 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Type: Published Article

  1. Flexible pulse delay control up to picosecond for high-intensity twin electron bunches

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Zhen; Ding, Yuantao; Emma, Paul; Huang, Zhirong; Marinelli, Agostino; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2015-09-10

    Two closely spaced electron bunches have attracted strong interest due to their applications in two color X-ray free-electron lasers as well as witness bunch acceleration in plasmas and dielectric structures. In this paper, we propose a new scheme of delay system to vary the time delay up to several picoseconds while not affecting the bunch compression. Numerical simulations based on the Linac Coherent Light Source are performed to demonstrate the feasibility of this method.

  2. Dissertation: Precompound Emission of Energetic Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerby, Leslie Marie

    2015-08-04

    Emission of light fragments (LF) from nuclear reactions is an open question. Different reaction mechanisms contribute to their production; the relative roles of each, and how they change with incident energy, mass number of the target, and the type and emission energy of the fragments is not completely understood. None of the available models are able to accurately predict emission of LF from arbitrary reactions. However, the ability to describe production of LF (especially at energies ≳ 30 MeV) from many reactions is important for different applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced Single Event Upsets (SEUs), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams, to name just a few. The Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) version 03.03 and the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) version 03.03 event generators in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code version 6 (MCNP6) describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to ⁴He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies (up to ~ 5 GeV for CEM and up to ~ 1 TeV/A for LAQGSM). However, they do not predict the high energy tails of LF spectra heavier than ⁴He well. Most LF with energies above several tens of MeV are emitted during the precompound stage of a reaction. The current versions of the CEM and LAQGSM event generators do not account for precompound emission of LF larger than ⁴He. The aim of our work is to extend the precompound model in them to include such processes, leading to an increase of predictive power of LF-production in MCNP6. This entails upgrading the Modified Exciton Model currently used at the preequilibrium stage in CEM and LAQGSM. It also includes expansion and examination of the coalescence and Fermi break-up models used in the precompound stages of spallation reactions within CEM and LAQGSM. Extending our models to include emission of fragments heavier than ⁴He at the precompound stage has indeed provided results that have much better agreement with experimental data.

  3. n-Butane: Ignition delay measurements at high pressure and detailed chemical kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healy, D.; Curran, H.J.; Donato, N.S.; Aul, C.J.; Petersen, E.L.; Zinner, C.M.; Bourque, G.

    2010-08-15

    Ignition delay time measurements were recorded at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2 for n-butane at pressures of approximately 1, 10, 20, 30 and 45 atm at temperatures from 690 to 1430 K in both a rapid compression machine and in a shock tube. A detailed chemical kinetic model consisting of 1328 reactions involving 230 species was constructed and used to validate the delay times. Moreover, this mechanism has been used to simulate previously published ignition delay times at atmospheric and higher pressure. Arrhenius-type ignition delay correlations were developed for temperatures greater than 1025 K which relate ignition delay time to temperature and concentration of the mixture. Furthermore, a detailed sensitivity analysis and a reaction pathway analysis were performed to give further insight to the chemistry at various conditions. When compared to existing data from the literature, the model performs quite well, and in several instances the conditions of earlier experiments were duplicated in the laboratory with overall good agreement. To the authors' knowledge, the present paper presents the most comprehensive set of ignition delay time experiments and kinetic model validation for n-butane oxidation in air. (author)

  4. System for sensing droplet formation time delay in a flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA); Esposito, Richard J. (Seattle, WA)

    1997-01-01

    A droplet flow cytometer system which includes a system to optimize the droplet formation time delay based on conditions actually experienced includes an automatic droplet sampler which rapidly moves a plurality of containers stepwise through the droplet stream while simultaneously adjusting the droplet time delay. Through the system sampling of an actual substance to be processed can be used to minimize the effect of the substances variations or the determination of which time delay is optimal. Analysis such as cell counting and the like may be conducted manually or automatically and input to a time delay adjustment which may then act with analysis equipment to revise the time delay estimate actually applied during processing. The automatic sampler can be controlled through a microprocessor and appropriate programming to bracket an initial droplet formation time delay estimate. When maximization counts through volume, weight, or other types of analysis exists in the containers, the increment may then be reduced for a more accurate ultimate setting. This may be accomplished while actually processing the sample without interruption.

  5. Delayed muons in extensive air showers and double-front showers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beisembaev, R. U.; Vavilov, Yu. N. Vildanov, N. G.; Kruglov, A. V.; Stepanov, A. V.; Takibaev, J. S.

    2009-11-15

    The results of a long-term experiment performed in the period between 1995 and 2006 with the aid of the MUON-T underground (20 mwe) scintillation facility arranged at the Tien Shan mountain research station at an altitude of 3340 m above sea level are presented. The time distribution of delayed muons with an energy in excess of 5 GeV in extensive air showers of energy not lower than 106 GeV with respect to the shower front was obtained with a high statistical significance in the delay interval between 30 and 150 ns. An effect of the geomagnetic field in detecting delayed muons in extensive air showers was discovered. This effect leads to the asymmetry of their appearance with respect to the north-south direction. The connection between delayed muons and extensive air showers featuring two fronts separated by a time interval of several tens of to two hundred nanoseconds is discussed. This connection gives sufficient grounds to assume that delayed muons originate from the decays of pions and kaons produced in the second, delayed, front of extensive air showers.

  6. Collision dynamics of proton with formaldehyde: Fragmentation and ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing; Gao, Cong-Zhang; Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 ; Calvayrac, Florent; Zhang, Feng-Shou; Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875; Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000

    2014-03-28

    Using time-dependent density functional theory, applied to the valence electrons and coupled non-adiabatically to molecular dynamics of the ions, we study the ionization and fragmentation of formaldehyde in collision with a proton. Four different impact energies: 35 eV, 85 eV, 135 eV, and 300 eV are chosen in order to study the energy effect in the low energy region, and ten different incident orientations at 85 eV are considered for investigating the steric effect. Fragmentation ratios, single, double, and total electron ionization cross sections are calculated. For large impact parameters, these results are close to zero irrespective of the incident orientations due to a weak projectile-target interaction. For small impact parameters, the results strongly depend on the collision energy and orientation. We also give the kinetic energy releases and scattering angles of protons, as well as the cross section of different ion fragments and the corresponding reaction channels.

  7. Use of proton beams with breast prostheses and tissue expanders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyers, Michael F.; Mah, Dennis; Boyer, Sean P.; Chang, Chang; Pankuch, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Since the early 2000s, a small but rapidly increasing number of patients with breast cancer have been treated with proton beams. Some of these patients have had breast prostheses or tissue expanders in place during their courses of treatment. Procedures must be implemented to plan the treatments of these patients. The density, kilovoltage x-ray computed tomography numbers (kVXCTNs), and proton relative linear stopping powers (pRLSPs) were calculated and measured for several test sample devices. The calculated and measured kVXCTNs of saline were 1% and 2.4% higher than the values for distilled water while the calculated RLSP for saline was within 0.2% of the value for distilled water. The measured kVXCTN and pRLSP of the silicone filling material for the test samples were approximately 1120 and 0.935, respectively. The conversion of kVXCTNs to pRLSPs by the treatment planning system standard tissue conversion function is adequate for saline-filled devices but for silicone-filled devices manual reassignment of the pRLSPs is required.

  8. Fusion proton diagnostic for the C-2 field reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, R. M. Clary, R.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Garate, E.; Knapp, K.; Tkachev, A.

    2014-11-15

    Measurements of the flux of fusion products from high temperature plasmas provide valuable insights into the ion energy distribution, as the fusion reaction rate is a very sensitive function of ion energy. In C-2, where field reversed configuration plasmas are formed by the collision of two compact toroids and partially sustained by high power neutral beam injection [M. Binderbauer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 045003 (2010); M. Tuszewski et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012)], measurements of DD fusion neutron flux are used to diagnose ion temperature and study fast ion confinement and dynamics. In this paper, we will describe the development of a new 3 MeV proton detector that will complement existing neutron detectors. The detector is a large area (50?cm{sup 2}), partially depleted, ion implanted silicon diode operated in a pulse counting regime. While the scintillator-based neutron detectors allow for high time resolution measurements (?100 kHz), they have no spatial or energy resolution. The proton detector will provide 10 cm spatial resolution, allowing us to determine if the axial distribution of fast ions is consistent with classical fast ion theory or whether anomalous scattering mechanisms are active. We will describe in detail the diagnostic design and present initial data from a neutral beam test chamber.

  9. Experimental evidence for a shell structure of the proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levintov, I.I.

    1983-11-01

    Spin effects in nucleon-nucleon scattering are explained by the interaction of Fock configurations of the type (qqQQ-barq), having the structure of p shells. The number of nucleon p shells is N = n/sub f/ -1 (n/sub f/ is the number of flavors). The strong spin effect in p/sub arrow-up/p/sub arrow-up/ scattering for p/sup 2//sub perpendicular/ > or approx. =4 (GeV/c)/sup 2/ (the Argonne effect) is explained by the presence of the configuration (qqcc-barq) in the proton. An analogous effect in the region p/sup 2//sub perpendicular/ > or approx. =100 (GeV/c)/sup 2/, due to the configuration (qqbb-barq), is predicted. In scattering of unpolarized hadrons by a polarized proton target for constant theta/sub cms/ and variation of s (i.e., p/sup 2//sub perpendicular/), it is predicted that there are structures in the asymmetry in the region p/sup 2//sub perpendicular/ approx.4m/sup 2//sub Q/ (Q = c, b, ...).

  10. Diesel Emission Control Review | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and technology approaches for diesel emission control for heavy and light duty applications PDF icon deer10_tjohnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Review of Emerging Diesel Emissions and Control Diesel Emission Control Technology in Review Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012

  11. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. P. Evans

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  12. Advanced Emission Control Development Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, A.P.

    1997-12-31

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  13. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Holmes

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  14. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. P. Evans

    1998-12-03

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W?s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  15. Software solutions for emission monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFriez, H.; Schillinger, S.; Seraji, H.

    1996-12-31

    Industry and state and federal environmental regulatory agencies are becoming ever more conciliatory due to the high cost of implementing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) for the operation of Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS). In many cases the modifications do nothing to reduce emissions or even to measure the pollution, but simply let the source owner or operator and the permitting authority agree on a monitoring method and/or program. The EPA methods and standards developed under the Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs) have proven to be extremely costly and burdensome. Now, the USEPA and state agencies are making efforts to assure that emissions data has a strong technical basis to demonstrate compliance with regulations such as Title V.

  16. Emission Market Opportunities for Federal Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Shah, C.

    2005-06-01

    This document assists federal agencies in incorporating emissions market opportunities in their energy projects, including emission reduction credit markets and cap and trade. It looks at how potential emissions costs/revenues can be incorporated into project proposals, how groups can apply for emissions allowances, and how agencies can sell emissions allowances and receive the financial benefit. The fact sheet also outlines how FEMP can provide assistance throughout the process.

  17. Search for $$W' \\to tb$$ in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = $$ 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-02-18

    A search is performed for the production of a massive W' boson decaying to a top and a bottom quark. The data analysed correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fbmore » $$^{–1}$$ collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV. The hadronic decay products of the top quark with high Lorentz boost from the W' boson decay are detected as a single top flavoured jet. The use of jet substructure algorithms allows the top quark jet to be distinguished from standard model QCD background. Limits on the production cross section of a right-handed W' boson are obtained, together with constraints on the left-handed and right-handed couplings of the W' boson to quarks. The production of a right-handed W' boson with a mass below 2.02 TeV decaying to a hadronic final state is excluded at 95% confidence level. Furthermore, this mass limit increases to 2.15 TeV when both hadronic and leptonic decays are considered, and is the most stringent lower mass limit to date in the tb decay mode.« less

  18. Search for disappearing tracks in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-19

    In this study, a search is presented for long-lived charged particles that decay within the CMS detector and produce the signature of a disappearing track. Disappearing tracks are identified as those with little or no associated calorimeter energy deposits and with missing hits in the outer layers of the tracker. The search uses proton-proton collision data recorded at √s = 8 TeV that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb–1. The results of the search are interpreted in the context of the anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) model. The number of observed events is in agreement with the background expectation, and limits are set on the cross section of direct electroweak chargino production in terms of the chargino mass and mean proper lifetime. At 95% confidence level, AMSB models with a chargino mass less than 260 GeV, corresponding to a mean proper lifetime of 0.2 ns, are excluded.

  19. Search for excited leptons in proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-05

    Our search for compositeness of electrons and muons is presented using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √(s) = 8 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. Excited leptons (ℓ*) produced via contact interactions in conjunction with a standard model lepton are considered, and a search is made for their gauge decay modes. The decays considered are ℓ* →ℓγ and ℓ* → ℓZ, which give final states of two leptons and a photon or, depending on the Z-boson decay mode, four leptons or two leptons and two jets. The number of events observed in data is consistent with the standard model prediction. Exclusion limits are set on the excited lepton mass, and the compositeness scale L. For the case Mℓ* = L the existence of excited electrons (muons) is excluded up to masses of 2.45 (2.47) TeV at 95% confidence level. The neutral current decays of excited leptons are considered for the first time, and limits are extended to include the possibility that the weight factors f and f ', which determine the couplings between standard model leptons and excited leptons via gauge mediated interactions, have opposite sign.

  20. Search for disappearing tracks in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-19

    In this study, a search is presented for long-lived charged particles that decay within the CMS detector and produce the signature of a disappearing track. Disappearing tracks are identified as those with little or no associated calorimeter energy deposits and with missing hits in the outer layers of the tracker. The search uses proton-proton collision data recorded at √s = 8 TeV that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb–1. The results of the search are interpreted in the context of the anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) model. The number of observed events is in agreement with the background expectation,more » and limits are set on the cross section of direct electroweak chargino production in terms of the chargino mass and mean proper lifetime. At 95% confidence level, AMSB models with a chargino mass less than 260 GeV, corresponding to a mean proper lifetime of 0.2 ns, are excluded.« less

  1. Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for Alternative Vehicles Emissions Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Nigel

    2012-01-31

    The overall objective of this project was to perform research to quantify and improve the energy efficiency and the exhaust emissions reduction from advanced technology vehicles using clean, renewable and alternative fuels. Advanced vehicle and alternative fuel fleets were to be identified, and selected vehicles characterized for emissions and efficiency. Target vehicles were to include transit buses, school buses, vocational trucks, delivery trucks, and tractor-trailers. Gaseous species measured were to include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter. An objective was to characterize particulate matter more deeply than by mass. Accurate characterization of efficiency and emissions was to be accomplished using a state-of-the-art portable emissions measurement system and an accompanying chassis dynamometer available at West Virginia University. These two units, combined, are termed the Transportable Laboratory. An objective was to load the vehicles in a real-world fashion, using coast down data to establish rolling resistance and wind drag, and to apply the coast down data to the dynamometer control. Test schedules created from actual vehicle operation were to be employed, and a specific objective of the research was to assess the effect of choosing a test schedule which the subject vehicle either cannot follow or can substantially outperform. In addition the vehicle loading objective was to be met better with an improved flywheel system.

  2. Low emission internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karaba, Albert M.

    1979-01-01

    A low emission, internal combustion compression ignition engine having a cylinder, a piston movable in the cylinder and a pre-combustion chamber communicating with the cylinder near the top thereof and in which low emissions of NO.sub.x are achieved by constructing the pre-combustion chamber to have a volume of between 70% and 85% of the combined pre-chamber and main combustion chamber volume when the piston is at top dead center and by variably controlling the initiation of fuel injection into the pre-combustion chamber.

  3. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. K. Zohner

    1999-10-01

    This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  4. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  5. Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  6. Measurement of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV by the CMS and TOTEM experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-10-29

    Pseudorapidity ( $\\eta $ ) distributions of charged particles produced in protonproton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 $~\\text {TeV}$ are measured in the ranges $|\\eta | moredepleted in single diffractive dissociation events. The data are compared to models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions. None of the models considered provide a consistent description of the measured distributions.less

  7. Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-06-15

    A monoenergetic proton source has been characterized and a modeling tool developed for proton radiography experiments at the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)] laser facility. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to measure global isotropy levels in proton fluence and images of the proton source itself provided information on local uniformity relevant to proton radiography experiments. Global fluence uniformity was assessed by multiple yield diagnostics and deviations were calculated to be {approx}16% and {approx}26% of the mean for DD and D{sup 3}He fusion protons, respectively. From individual fluence images, it was found that the angular frequencies of Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 50 rad{sup -1} contributed less than a few percent to local nonuniformity levels. A model was constructed using the Geant4 [S. Agostinelli et al., Nuc. Inst. Meth. A 506, 250 (2003)] framework to simulate proton radiography experiments. The simulation implements realistic source parameters and various target geometries. The model was benchmarked with the radiographs of cold-matter targets to within experimental accuracy. To validate the use of this code, the cold-matter approximation for the scattering of fusion protons in plasma is discussed using a typical laser-foil experiment as an example case. It is shown that an analytic cold-matter approximation is accurate to within Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10% of the analytic plasma model in the example scenario.

  8. Multi-block sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer proton exchange membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Hibbs, Michael; Ambrosini, Andrea

    2012-02-07

    Improved multi-block sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer compositions, methods of making the same, and their use as proton exchange membranes (PEM) in hydrogen fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cells, in electrode casting solutions and electrodes. The multi-block architecture has defined, controllable hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. These improved membranes have better ion transport (proton conductivity) and water swelling properties.

  9. First principles studies of proton conduction in KTaO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Sung Gu; Sholl, David S.

    2014-07-14

    KTaO{sub 3} (KTO) is a useful prototypical perovskite for examining the mechanisms of proton transport in perovskites. Previously, Gomez et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 194701 (2007)] reported density functional theory (DFT) calculations describing proton hopping in defect-free KTO. We use DFT calculations to extend that work in two directions, namely, understanding isotope effects in low and high temperature proton transport and the role of native point defects in KTO. At cryogenic temperatures, quantum tunneling plays a vital role in the net hopping of protons in KTO. At the elevated temperature characteristic of applications involving proton-conducting perovskites, tunneling is negligible but zero point energy effects still lead to non-negligible isotope effects for H{sup +}, D{sup +}, and T{sup +}. We also use DFT to characterize the populations of relevant point defects in KTO as a function of experimental conditions, and to examine the migration of protons that are close in proximity to these defects. This information gives useful insight into the overall transport rates of protons through KTO under a variety of external environments. We also assess the overall diffusivity of protons in KTO at various ranges of oxygen vacancy concentrations by performing kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

  10. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; et al

    2014-04-14

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, the overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5h etch in 6N NaOH at 80°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detectionmore » of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 ×106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.« less

  11. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J. Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; and others

    2014-04-15

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ∼0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 °C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ∼50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  12. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.58 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.74.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ?3 106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  13. Final Project Report for project titled "Fluoroalkylphosphonic-acid-based proton conductors"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Creager

    2011-12-08

    The overall objective of this research was to create new proton-conducting polymer electrolytes for use in energy conversion devices including hydrogen fuel cells that could operate at high temperatures (95-130 C) and under low relative humidity (< 50% RH) conditions. The new polymers were based on the fluoroalkylphosphonic and phosphinic acid (FPA) groups (see illustration below) which offer prospects for rapid proton transport by a proton-hopping mechanism similar to that which operates in phosphoric acid, a well-known proton-transporting electrolyte that is used in a class of hydrogen fuel cells that work well under the conditions noted above and are already commercially successful. The two specific project objectives were as follows: (1) synthesize and characterize new proton-conducting electrolytes based on the fluoroalkylphosphonic and phosphinic acid (FPA) functional groups; and (2) create and apply new computer models to study protonic conduction in FPA-based electrolytes. The project was successful in creating the desired polymer electrolytes and also a series of molecular model compounds which were used to study proton transport in FPA electrolytes in general. Computer models were created to study both structure and proton-transport dynamics in the electrolytes, particularly the molecular model compounds. Rapid proton transport by a hopping mechanism was found in many of the model compounds and correlations with transport rates with molecular structure were identified. Several polymeric analogs of FPA model compounds were prepared and studied, however FPA-based polymeric materials having very high protonic conductivities under either wet or dry conditions were not obtained. Several possible reasons for the failure of polymeric materials to exhibit the expected high protonic conductivities were identified, including a failure of the polymers to adopt the phase-separated secondary structure/morphology necessary for high proton conductivity, and an unexpected polymer crosslinking effect of acidic groups having two P-OH groups. The project has lent insight into how FPA groups transport protons in both liquid and polymeric forms, which provides guidance to future efforts to design and prepare future generations of proton-conducting polymer electrolytes for hydrogen fuel cells and other types of electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices.

  14. Deterministic proton transport solving a one dimensional Fokker-Planck equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, D.; Prael, R.; Adams, K.; Alcouffe, R.

    1997-10-01

    The transport of protons through matter is characterized by many interactions which cause small deflections and slight energy losses. The few which are catastrophic or cause large angle scattering can be viewed as extinction for many applications. The transport of protons at this level of approximation can be described by a Fokker Planck Equation. This equation is solved using a deterministic multigroup differencing scheme with a highly resolved set of discrete ordinates centered around the beam direction which is adequate to properly account for deflections and energy losses due to multiple Coulomb scattering. Comparisons with LAHET for a large variety of problems ranging from 800 MeV protons on a copper step wedge to 10 GeV protons on a sandwich of material are presented. The good agreement with the Monte Carlo code shows that the solution method is robust and useful for approximate solutions of selected proton transport problems.

  15. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Olsen, Khris B.

    1992-01-01

    A method of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis and optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis.

  16. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, J.W.; Olsen, K.B.

    1992-02-04

    A method is described of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species. The method uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having an electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has an optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited in the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis. Optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis. 18 figs.

  17. Fission Particle Emission Multiplicity Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-09-27

    Simulates discrete neutron and gamma-ray emission from the fission of heavy nuclei that is either spontaneous or neutron induced. This is a function library that encapsulates the fission physics and is intended to be called Monte Carlo transport code.

  18. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Christine S.; Yock, Torunn I.; Nelson, Kerrie; Xu, Yang; Keating, Nancy L.; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study, these results should be viewed as hypothesis generating.

  19. Percolation in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Catalyst Layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stacy, Stephen; Allen, Jeffrey

    2012-07-01

    Water management in the catalyst layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is confronted by two issues, flooding and dry out, both of which result in improper functioning of the fuel cell and lead to poor performance and degradation. At the present time, the data that has been reported about water percolation and wettability within a fuel cell catalyst layer is limited. A method and apparatus for measuring the percolation pressure in the catalyst layer has been developed based upon an experimental apparatus used to test water percolation in porous transport layers (PTL). The experimental setup uses a pseudo Hele-Shaw type testing where samples are compressed and a fluid is injected into the sample. Testing the samples gives percolation pressure plots which show trends in increasing percolation pressure with an increase in flow rate. A decrease in pressure was seen as percolation occurred in one sample, however the pressure only had a rising effect in the other sample.

  20. Performance modelling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, C.; Li, X.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents a performance model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell that has sufficient accuracy for engineering applications with reduced computational requirements. The model includes electrochemical reaction in the catalyst layers and formulation for electrical resistance in the membrane, electrodes and bipolar plates, and employs engineering correlation for the reactant gas transport in the flow channels and through the electrodes. It is shown that the present model predictions are in reasonable agreement with known experimental observations, indicating that the present model can be employed for fuel cell stack and system modeling. The effect of various operating and design parameters on the cell performance has been investigated. It is found that mass transport limitations are the largest cause of performance loss in the cell when graphite is used as the material for bipolar plates and electrodes. If conducting polymers are substituted as construction materials, cell performance is expected to suffer considerably at high current densities due to their reduced electrical conductivity.

  1. Precision Measurements of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Higinbotham

    2010-08-01

    New high precision polarization measurements of the proton elastic form factor ratio in the Q^2 from 0.3 to 0.7 [GeV/c]^2 have been made. These elastic H(e,e'p) measurementswere done in Jefferson Lab's Hall A using 80% longitudinally polarized electrons and recoil polarimetry. For Q^2 greater than 1 [GeV/c]^2, previous polarization data indicated a strong deviation of the form factor ratio from unity which sparked renewed theoretical and experimental interest in how two-photon diagrams have been taken into account. The new high precision data indicate that the deviation from unity, while small, persists even at Q^2 less than 1 [GeV/c]^2.

  2. NN inversion potentials intermediate energy proton-nucleus elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arellano, H.F.; Brieva, F.A.; Love, W.G.; Geramb, H.V. von

    1995-10-01

    Recently developed nucleon-nucleon interactions using the quantum inverse scattering method shed new fight on the off-shell properties of the internucleon effective force for nucleon-nucleus scattering. Calculations of proton elastic scattering from {sup 40}Ca and {sup 208}Pb in the 500 MeV region show that variations in off-shell contributions are determined to a great extent by the accuracy with which the nucleon-nucleon phase shifts are reproduced. The study is based on the full-folding approach to the nucleon-nucleus optical potential which allows a deep understanding of the interplay between on- and off-shell effects in nucleon scattering. Results and the promising extension offered by the inversion potentials beyond the range of validity of the low-energy internucleon forces will be discussed.

  3. Resonances above the proton threshold in 26Si

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chipps, Kelly A.

    2016-03-06

    26Al remains an intriguing target for observational gamma-ray astronomy, thanks to its characteristic decay. The 25Al(p, )26Si reaction is part of a chain that bypasses the production of the observable 26Alg in favor of the isomeric state; its rate at novae temperatures is dominated by a resonance around 400 keV, the precise location and J assignment of which has been hotly debated. Considerable confusion in this regard has arisen from the use of outdated excitation energies and masses. Here, a reanalysis of previous work is completed to first, elucidate the confusion regarding the level structure just above the proton threshold,more » and second, provide focus to future studies.« less

  4. Copper K-shell emission cross sections for lasersolid experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, J. R.; Betti, R.; Nilson, P. M.; Solodov, A. A.

    2013-08-15

    Published measurements and models of the cross section for electrons causing K-shell emission from copper are reviewed to find a suitable expression to use when analyzing K{sub ?}-emission measurements in lasersolid experiments at peak intensities above 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. Few measurements exist in the 0.1- to 10-MeV electron energy range currently of interest, leaving a number of possible suitable models that are summarized here with a number of typing errors corrected. Two different limiting forms for the cross section at relativistic energies are used, and existing measurements do not give a clear indication as to which is correct. Comparison with the limiting form of electron stopping power indicates an alternative relativistic form and also that the density-effect correction will be important in copper above 10 MeV. For data analysis relying on relative K{sub ?} emission caused by electrons with energy much greater than the K-shell binding energy, the existing uncertainty in cross sections is unimportant, but it will be a source of uncertainty when using absolute values and for electron energies up to ?6 the binding energy. K-shell emission caused by photons and protons is also briefly reviewed.

  5. Improvement of Prostate Treatment by Anterior Proton Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Shikui; Both, Stefan; Bentefour, Hassan; Paly, Jonathan J.; Tochner, Zelig; Efstathiou, Jason; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: We performed a treatment planning study to demonstrate the potential dosimetric benefits of anterior-oriented fields for prostate irradiation by proton beam. A novel in vivo beam range control method shows millimeter accuracy, suggesting that such fields could be safely used to spare the rectum given the sharp distal penumbra of protons. Methods and Materials: Ten prostate patients treated with water-filled endorectal balloon were selected. Bilateral fields were planned following the conventional treatment protocol. Three anterior-oriented fields (0, +30, -30 Degree-Sign ) were planned, with the range compensators manually adjusted to improve rectal sparing. Dose distributions to the clinical target volume, rectum, anterior rectal wall (ARW), bladder, bladder wall (BW), and femoral heads were compared for: A) equally weighted bilateral fields, B) a single straight anterior field, and C) two equally weighted anterior-oblique fields. Results: The anterior-oriented fields required much less beam energy, {approx}10 cm water equivalent path length less than lateral fields. For ARW, the V{sub 95%} for Plans A, B, and C were 39%, 8%, and 6%, respectively; the corresponding V{sub 80%} were 59%, 27%, and 26%, respectively (p = 0.002 when Plan A was compared with B or C). Plan B irradiated a larger volume of BW than did Plan A by 3% at V{sub 95%}, 11% at V{sub 80%}, and 16% at V{sub 50%} (p = 0.002), whereas Plan C differs little from Plan A for BW at these dose levels. The femoral heads received {approx}40% of the prescription dose in Plan A, but negligible dose in Plans B and C. Conclusions: Compared to lateral fields, anterior-oriented fields can significantly reduce dose to the ARW, particularly at high dose levels. These fields alone, or in combination with lateral fields, allow for the possibility of either reducing treatment toxicity at current prescription doses or further dose escalation in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  6. Robust random number generation using steady-state emission of gain-switched laser diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Z. L. Lucamarini, M.; Dynes, J. F.; Frhlich, B.; Plews, A.; Shields, A. J.

    2014-06-30

    We demonstrate robust, high-speed random number generation using interference of the steady-state emission of guaranteed random phases, obtained through gain-switching a semiconductor laser diode. Steady-state emission tolerates large temporal pulse misalignments and therefore significantly improves the interference quality. Using an 8-bit digitizer followed by a finite-impulse-response unbiasing algorithm, we achieve random number generation rates of 8 and 20?Gb/s, for laser repetition rates of 1 and 2.5?GHz, respectively, with a 20% tolerance in the interferometer differential delay. We also report a generation rate of 80?Gb/s using partially phase-correlated short pulses. In relation to the field of quantum key distribution, our results confirm the gain-switched laser diode as a suitable light source, capable of providing phase-randomized coherent pulses at a clock rate of up to 2.5?GHz.

  7. Spin-dependent delay time in ferromagnet/insulator/ferromagnet heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, ZhengWei; Zheng Shi, De; Lv, HouXiang

    2014-07-07

    We study theoretically spin-dependent group delay and dwell time in ferromagnet/insulator/ferromagnet (FM/I/FM) heterostructure. The results indicate that, when the electrons with different spin orientations tunnel through the FM/I/FM junction, the spin-up process and the spin-down process are separated on the time scales. As the self-interference delay has the spin-dependent features, the variations of spin-dependent dwell-time and spin-dependent group-delay time with the structure parameters appear different features, especially, in low incident energy range. These different features show up as that the group delay times for the spin-up electrons are always longer than those for spin-down electrons when the barrier height or incident energy increase. In contrast, the dwell times for the spin-up electrons are longer (shorter) than those for spin-down electrons when the barrier heights (the incident energy) are under a certain value. When the barrier heights (the incident energy) exceed a certain value, the dwell times for the spin-up electrons turn out to be shorter (longer) than those for spin-down electrons. In addition, the group delay time and the dwell time for spin-up and down electrons also relies on the comparative direction of magnetization in two FM layers and tends to saturation with the thickness of the barrier.

  8. Time delay and magnification centroid due to gravitational lensing by black holes and naked singularities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virbhadra, K. S.; Keeton, C. R.

    2008-06-15

    We model the massive dark object at the center of the Galaxy as a Schwarzschild black hole as well as Janis-Newman-Winicour naked singularities, characterized by the mass and scalar charge parameters, and study gravitational lensing (particularly time delay, magnification centroid, and total magnification) by them. We find that the lensing features are qualitatively similar (though quantitatively different) for Schwarzschild black holes, weakly naked, and marginally strongly naked singularities. However, the lensing characteristics of strongly naked singularities are qualitatively very different from those due to Schwarzschild black holes. The images produced by Schwarzschild black hole lenses and weakly naked and marginally strongly naked singularity lenses always have positive time delays. On the other hand, strongly naked singularity lenses can give rise to images with positive, zero, or negative time delays. In particular, for a large angular source position the direct image (the outermost image on the same side as the source) due to strongly naked singularity lensing always has a negative time delay. We also found that the scalar field decreases the time delay and increases the total magnification of images; this result could have important implications for cosmology. As the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric also describes the exterior gravitational field of a scalar star, naked singularities as well as scalar star lenses, if these exist in nature, will serve as more efficient cosmic telescopes than regular gravitational lenses.

  9. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N.; Balooch, Mehdi; McLean, II, William; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    2002-01-01

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  10. Search for proton decay via p→νK+ using 260 kiloton·year data of Super-Kamiokande

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abe, K.; Hayato, Y.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakayama, S.; Wendell, R. A.; Sekiya, H.; et al

    2014-10-14

    We have searched for proton decay via p→νK+ using Super-Kamiokande data from April 1996 to February 2013, 260 kiloton•year exposure in total. No evidence for this proton decay mode is found. A lower limit of the proton lifetime is set to τ/B(p→νK+)>5.9×1033 years at 90% confidence level.

  11. Search for proton decay via p??K+ using 260 kilotonyear data of Super-Kamiokande

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abe, K.; Hayato, Y.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakayama, S.; Wendell, R.?A.; Sekiya, H.; et al

    2014-10-14

    We have searched for proton decay via p??K+ using Super-Kamiokande data from April 1996 to February 2013, 260 kilotonyear exposure in total. No evidence for this proton decay mode is found. A lower limit of the proton lifetime is set to ?/B(p??K+)>5.91033 years at 90% confidence level.

  12. Production of K⁺K⁻ pairs in proton-proton collisions at 2.83 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ye, Q. J.; Hartmann, M.; Maeda, Y.; Barsov, S.; Büscher, M.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Dzyuba, A.; Gao, H.; Gebel, R.; et al

    2012-03-30

    Differential and total cross sections for the pp→ppK⁺K⁻ reaction have been measured at a proton beam energy of 2.83 GeV using the COSY-ANKE magnetic spectrometer. Detailed model descriptions fitted to a variety of one-dimensional distributions permit the separation of the pp→ppφ cross section from that of non-φ production. The differential spectra show that higher partial waves represent the majority of the pp→ppφ total cross section at an excess energy of 76 MeV, whose energy dependence would then seem to require some s-wave φp enhancement near threshold. The non-φ data can be described in terms of the combined effects of two-bodymore » final state interactions using the same effective scattering parameters determined from lower energy data.« less

  13. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyer, K.-U. Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (Umweltbundesamt), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 1824 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD) model of the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, 2006, was used to estimate the methane emissions from MBT landfills. Due to the calculation made by the authors emissions in the range of 60,000135,000 t CO{sub 2-eq.}/a for all German MBT landfills can be expected. This wide range shows the uncertainties when the here used procedure and the limited available data are applied. It is therefore necessary to generate more data in the future in order to calculate more precise methane emission rates from MBT landfills. This is important for the overall calculation of the climate gas production in Germany which is required once a year by the German Government.

  14. Gaussian approximations for stochastic systems with delay: Chemical Langevin equation and application to a Brusselator system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett, Tobias Galla, Tobias

    2014-03-28

    We present a heuristic derivation of Gaussian approximations for stochastic chemical reaction systems with distributed delay. In particular, we derive the corresponding chemical Langevin equation. Due to the non-Markovian character of the underlying dynamics, these equations are integro-differential equations, and the noise in the Gaussian approximation is coloured. Following on from the chemical Langevin equation, a further reduction leads to the linear-noise approximation. We apply the formalism to a delay variant of the celebrated Brusselator model, and show how it can be used to characterise noise-driven quasi-cycles, as well as noise-triggered spiking. We find surprisingly intricate dependence of the typical frequency of quasi-cycles on the delay period.

  15. Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poulsen, Peter

    2005-11-08

    A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

  16. Delayed Complications in Patients Surviving at Least 3 Years After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Women's Medical University Medical Center East, Tokyo ; Kawabe, Takuya; Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyoto ; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Sato, Yasunori; Nariai, Tadashi; Barfod, Bierta E.; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about delayed complications after stereotactic radiosurgery in long-surviving patients with brain metastases. We studied the actual incidence and predictors of delayed complications. Patients and Methods: This was an institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study that used our database. Among our consecutive series of 2000 patients with brain metastases who underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) from 1991-2008, 167 patients (8.4%, 89 women, 78 men, mean age 62 years [range, 19-88 years]) who survived at least 3 years after GKRS were studied. Results: Among the 167 patients, 17 (10.2%, 18 lesions) experienced delayed complications (mass lesions with or without cyst in 8, cyst alone in 8, edema in 2) occurring 24.0-121.0 months (median, 57.5 months) after GKRS. The actuarial incidences of delayed complications estimated by competing risk analysis were 4.2% and 21.2% at the 60th month and 120th month, respectively, after GKRS. Among various pre-GKRS clinical factors, univariate analysis demonstrated tumor volume-related factors: largest tumor volume (hazard ratio [HR], 1.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.018-1.154; P=.0174) and tumor volume {<=}10 cc vs >10 cc (HR, 4.343; 95% CI, 1.444-12.14; P=.0108) to be the only significant predictors of delayed complications. Univariate analysis revealed no correlations between delayed complications and radiosurgical parameters (ie, radiosurgical doses, conformity and gradient indexes, and brain volumes receiving >5 Gy and >12 Gy). After GKRS, an area of prolonged enhancement at the irradiated lesion was shown to be a possible risk factor for the development of delayed complications (HR, 8.751; 95% CI, 1.785-157.9; P=.0037). Neurosurgical interventions were performed in 13 patients (14 lesions) and mass removal for 6 lesions and Ommaya reservoir placement for the other 8. The results were favorable. Conclusions: Long-term follow-up is crucial for patients with brain metastases treated with GKRS because the risk of complications long after treatment is not insignificant. However, even when delayed complications occur, favorable outcomes can be expected with timely neurosurgical intervention.

  17. Draft HAB Advice on Delaying Decisions Associated with the Final Tank Closure and Waste

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committee Draft Advice - TC&WM EIS Delayed Decisions v1 - Mattson, et.al. Page 1/1 Draft HAB Advice on Delaying Decisions Associated with the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS Background: The Hanford Advisory Board (HAB or Board) spent a considerable amount of time developing advice on the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (TC&WM EIS, EIS). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has spent over $80 million on the EIS, and thousands of people

  18. System for sensing droplet formation time delay in a flow cytometer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Patent) | SciTech Connect System for sensing droplet formation time delay in a flow cytometer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: System for sensing droplet formation time delay in a flow cytometer × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and

  19. Time delay of wave packets during their tunnelling through a quantum diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, N A; Skalozub, V V

    2014-04-28

    A modified saddle-point method is used to investigate the process of propagation of a wave packet through a quantum diode. A scattering matrix is constructed for the structure in question. The case of tunnelling of a packet with a Gaussian envelope through the diode is considered in detail. The time delay and the shape of the wave packet transmitted are calculated. The dependence of the delay time on the characteristics of the input packet and the internal characteristics of the quantum diode is studied. Possible applications of the results obtained are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. Emissions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Even thc)ugh the number of VMT by HDVs is small, most alternative fuels fare so much worse in heavy-duty applications that inclusion of even the small amount of HDV VMT ...

  1. Anisotropic Lyman-alpha emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zheng; Wallace, Joshua

    2014-10-20

    As a result of resonant scatterings off hydrogen atoms, Lyα emission from star-forming galaxies provides a probe of the (hardly isotropic) neutral gas environment around them. We study the effect of the environmental anisotropy on the observed Lyα emission by performing radiative transfer calculations for models of neutral hydrogen clouds with prescriptions of spatial and kinematic anisotropies. The environmental anisotropy leads to corresponding anisotropy in the Lyα flux and spectral properties and induces correlations among them. The Lyα flux (or observed luminosity) depends on the viewing angle and shows an approximate correlation with the initial Lyα optical depth in the viewing direction relative to those in all other directions. The distribution of Lyα flux from a set of randomly oriented clouds is skewed to high values, providing a natural contribution to the Lyα equivalent width (EW) distribution seen in observation. A narrower EW distribution is found at a larger peak offset of the Lyα line, similar to the trend suggested in observation. The peak offset appears to correlate with the line shape (full width at half-maximum and asymmetry), pointing to a possibility of using Lyα line features alone to determine the systemic redshifts of galaxies. The study suggests that anisotropies in the spatial and kinematic distributions of neutral hydrogen can be an important ingredient in shaping the observed properties of Lyα emission from star-forming galaxies. We discuss the implications of using Lyα emission to probe the circumgalactic and intergalactic environments of galaxies.

  2. Effects of Biodiesel on NOx Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.

    2005-06-01

    A presentation about the effects of biodiesel on nitrogen oxide emissions presented at the ARB Biodiesel Workshop June 8, 2005.

  3. Module: Estimating Historical Emissions from Deforestation |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Website: www.leafasia.orgtoolstechnical-guidance-series-estimating-historical Cost: Free Language: English Module: Estimating Historical Emissions from Deforestation Screenshot...

  4. Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics November 22, 2013 - 2:07pm Addthis Vehicle emissions are the gases emitted by the tailpipes of vehicles that use internal combustion engines. These vehicles can run on gasoline, diesel, biofuels, natural gas, or propane. Vehicle emissions are composed of varying amounts of: water vapor carbon dioxide (CO2) nitrogen oxygen pollutants such as: carbon monoxide (CO) nitrogen oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs) volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

  5. Biological Air Emissions Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Air Emissions Control Biological Air Emissions Control Innovative Technology Enables Low-Cost, Energy-Efficient Treatment of Industrial Exhaust Streams Air quality standards are becoming more stringent for the U.S. wood products industry. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (including methanol, formaldehyde, acetylaldehyde, and acrolein) during production of wood products must be tightly controlled. Conventional VOCs and HAPs emission

  6. FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SRP radioactive waste releases. Startup through 1959 Ashley, C. 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS;...

  7. Enhanced water window x-ray emission from in situ formed carbon clusters irradiated by intense ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakravarty, U.; Rao, B. S.; Arora, V.; Upadhyay, A.; Singhal, H.; Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Mukherjee, C.; Gupta, P. D.

    2013-07-29

    Enhanced water window x-ray emission (23–44 Å) from carbon clusters, formed in situ using a pre-pulse, irradiated by intense (I > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) ultra-short laser pulse, is demonstrated. An order of magnitude x-ray enhancement over planar graphite target is observed in carbon clusters, formed by a sub-ns pre-pulse, interacting with intense main pulse after a delay. The effect of the delay and the duration of the main pulse is studied for optimizing the x-ray emission in the water window region. This x-ray source has added advantages of being an efficient, high repetition rate, and low debris x-ray source.

  8. Fast proton hopping detection in ice I{sub h} by quasi-elastic neutron

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    scattering. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Fast proton hopping detection in ice I{sub h} by quasi-elastic neutron scattering. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fast proton hopping detection in ice I{sub h} by quasi-elastic neutron scattering. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was employed on samples of HCl-doped polycrystalline ice I{sub h}. The analysis of the scattering signal provides the excess proton hopping time, {tau}{sub hop}, in the temperature range of 140-195 K. The

  9. Measurement of Muon Capture on the Proton (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Measurement of Muon Capture on the Proton Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of Muon Capture on the Proton The goal of the {mu}Cap experiment is a 1% precision measurement of the muon capture rate on the free proton, which will determine the weak pseudoscalar form factor gP to 7%. At the end of 2004, the {mu}Cap detector was completed and commissioned and first physics data were taken. The analysis of these data is in an advanced stage. The muon capture rate will

  10. Jefferson Lab scientist puts intriguing view on spin of the proton |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab scientist puts intriguing view on spin of the proton Jefferson Lab scientist puts intriguing view on spin of the proton April 17, 2007 Newport News, Va. - A new result from the HERMES experiment at The German Electron Synchrotron DESY indicates that the gluons which bind quarks into the proton show only slight polarization. The result will be presented by Elke-Caroline Aschenauer, a former HERMES spokesperson and current 12 GeV Upgrade Hall D Leader at the Department of

  11. Observation of Multiple Volume Reflection of Ultrarelativistic Protons by a Sequence of Several Bent Silicon Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scandale, W.; Vomiero, A.; Baricordi, S.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Della Mea, G.; Milan, R.; Ambrosi, G.; Zuccon, P.; Bertucci, B.; Burger, W.; Duranti, M.; Cavoto, G.; Santacesaria, R.; Valente, P.; Luci, C.; Iacoangeli, F.; Vallazza, E.

    2009-02-27

    The interactions of 400 GeV protons with different sequences of bent silicon crystals have been investigated at the H8 beam line of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. The multiple volume reflection of the proton beam has been studied in detail on a five-crystal reflector measuring an angular beam deflection {theta}=52.96{+-}0.14 {mu}rad. The efficiency was found larger than 80% for an angular acceptance at the reflector entrance of 70 {mu}rad, with a maximal efficiency value of {epsilon}=0.90{+-}0.01{+-}0.03.

  12. Proton-Nucleus Scattering Approximations and Implications for LHC Crystal Collimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, Robert; ,

    2010-06-07

    In particle accelerators, scattered protons with energies close to the incident particles may travel considerable distances with the beam before impacting on accelerator components downstream. To analyze such problems, angular deflection and energy loss of scattered particles are the main quantities to be simulated since these lead to changes in the beam's phase space distribution and particle loss. Simple approximations for nuclear scattering processes causing limited energy loss to high-energy protons traversing matter are developed which are suitable for rapid estimates and reduced-description Monte Carlo simulations. The implications for proton loss in the Large Hadron Collider due to nuclear scattering on collimation crystals are discussed.

  13. Observation of Parametric X-Rays Produced by 400-GeV/C Protons in Bent

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Crystals (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Parametric X-Rays Produced by 400-GeV/C Protons in Bent Crystals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observation of Parametric X-Rays Produced by 400-GeV/C Protons in Bent Crystals Spectral maxima of parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) produced by 400 GeV/c protons in bent silicon crystals aligned with the beam have been observed in an experiment at the H8 external beam of the CERN SPS. The total yield of PXR photons was about 10{sup -6} per

  14. Observation of parametric X-rays produced by 400 GeV/c protons in bent

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    crystals (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect parametric X-rays produced by 400 GeV/c protons in bent crystals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observation of parametric X-rays produced by 400 GeV/c protons in bent crystals Spectral maxima of parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) produced by 400 GeV/c protons in bent silicon crystals aligned with the beam have been observed in an experiment at the H8 external beam of the CERN SPS. The total yield of PXR photons was about 10{sup -6} per

  15. Generation of energetic protons in the interaction of Gaussian laser pulses with surface modulated targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W. Q.; Yin, Y. Yu, T. P.; Hu, L. X.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Shao, F. Q.; Xu, H.

    2014-12-15

    The radiation pressure acceleration of protons in the interaction of Gaussian laser pulses and surface modulated targets is examined by multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that strong longitudinal quasi-static magnetic field is generated on the modulated surface of the target, which significantly enhances the transverse diffusion of electrons. This is beneficial for suppressing the transverse Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Finally, the surface of the accelerated proton beams becomes smoother than that in the case of the planar target, and a final mono-energetic proton beam is obtained by using the surface modulated target.

  16. Compounds for novel proton conducting membranes and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poling, Steven A.; Martin, Steve W.; Sutherland, Jacob T.

    2006-03-28

    The present invention provides new compounds for use in proton exchange membranes which are able to operate in a wide variety of temperature ranges, including in the intermediate temperature range of about 100.degree. C. to 700.degree. C., and new and improved methods of making these compounds. The present invention also provides new and improved methods for making chalcogenide compounds, including, but not limited to, non-protonated sulfide, selenide and telluride compounds. In one embodiment, the proton conductivity of the compounds is between about 10.sup.-8 S/cm and 10.sup.-1 S/cm within a temperature range of between about -50 and 500.degree. C.

  17. New Developments in Proton Radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, C. L.; Brown, E. N.; Agee, C.; Bernert, T.; Bourke, M. A. M.; Burkett, M. W.; Buttler, W. T.; Byler, D. D.; Chen, C. F.; Clarke, A. J.; Cooley, J. C.; Gibbs, P. J.; Imhoff, S. D.; Jones, R.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Murray, M. M.; Olinger, C. T.; Oro, D. M.; Nedrow, P.; Saunders, A.; Terrones, G.; Trouw, F.; Tupa, D.; Vogan, W.; Winkler, B.; Wang, Z.; Zellner, M. B.

    2015-12-30

    An application of nuclear physics, a facility for using protons for flash radiography, was developed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Protons have proven far superior to high energy x-rays for flash radiography because of their long mean free path, good position resolution, and low scatter background. Although this facility is primarily used for studying very fast phenomena such as high explosive driven experiments, it is finding increasing application to other fields, such as tomography of static objects, phase changes in materials and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The advantages of protons are discussed, data from some recent experiments will be reviewed and concepts for new techniques are introduced.

  18. The modeling of RF stacking of protons in the Accumulator (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: The modeling of RF stacking of protons in the Accumulator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The modeling of RF stacking of protons in the Accumulator When the Run2 collider program is terminated in 2009, the present pbar source will be available for other usages. One possible application is to convert the Antiproton Accumulator to a proton accumulator so that the beam power from the Main Injector could be greatly enhanced [1]. The

  19. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Emission...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Emission Factors Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Emission Factors and Global Warming Potentials The greenhouse gas emission factors and global warming potentials ...

  20. Attachment C - Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL Attachment C - Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL File Attachment C - Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL More Documents & Publications Attachment C

  1. Attachment C Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL Attachment C Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL File Attachment-C-Summary-GHG-Emissions-Data-FINAL.xlsx More Documents & Publications Attachment C -

  2. Optimization of an Advanced Passive/Active Diesel Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Diesel Particulate Filters and NO2 Emission Limits Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Transport Refrigeration Units Active Diesel Emission ...

  3. PHEV Engine Cold Start Emissions Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cold Start Emissions Management PHEV Engine Cold Start Emissions Management Coordination of engine and powertrain supervisory control strategies to minimize cold start emissions ...

  4. Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere Composition and Health Responses to Inhaled Emissions 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference ...

  5. Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference ...

  6. Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction ...

  7. Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions ...

  8. Module: Emission Factors for Deforestation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.leafasia.orgtoolstechnical-guidance-series-emission-factors-defo Cost: Free Language: English Module: Emission Factors for Deforestation Screenshot Logo: Module: Emission...

  9. Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National Nuclear Security ... Home NNSA Blog Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection Reducing emissions ...

  10. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, by Industry, 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Total Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Manufacturing Industries, 1994 Carbon Emissions (million...

  11. Catalyzing Cooperative Action for Low Emissions Development Agenda...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Emissions Development Agenda Jump to: navigation, search Low Emission Development Strategies Global Partnership Advancing climate-resilient, low-emission development around the...

  12. 2010 Emissions from an Electronics Perspective | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions from an Electronics Perspective 2010 Emissions from an Electronics Perspective 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon ...

  13. Clinical Implementation of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Thoracic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Li, Heng; Zhu, X. Ronald; Liao, Zhongxing; Zhao, Lina; Liu, Amy; Li, Yupeng; Sahoo, Narayan; Poenisch, Falk; Gomez, Daniel R.; Wu, Richard; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) can improve dose conformality and better spare normal tissue over passive scattering techniques, but range uncertainties complicate its use, particularly for moving targets. We report our early experience with IMPT for thoracic malignancies in terms of motion analysis and management, plan optimization and robustness, and quality assurance. Methods and Materials: Thirty-four consecutive patients with lung/mediastinal cancers received IMPT to a median 66 Gy(relative biological equivalence [RBE]). All patients were able to undergo definitive radiation therapy. IMPT was used when the treating physician judged that IMPT conferred a dosimetric advantage; all patients had minimal tumor motion (<5 mm) and underwent individualized tumor-motion dose-uncertainty analysis and 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic (CT)-based treatment simulation and motion analysis. Plan robustness was optimized by using a worst-case scenario method. All patients had 4D CT repeated simulation during treatment. Results: IMPT produced lower mean lung dose (MLD), lung V{sub 5} and V{sub 20}, heart V{sub 40}, and esophageal V{sub 60} than did IMRT (P<.05) and lower MLD, lung V{sub 20}, and esophageal V{sub 60} than did passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) (P<.05). D{sub 5} to the gross tumor volume and clinical target volume was higher with IMPT than with intensity modulated radiation therapy or PSPT (P<.05). All cases were analyzed for beam-angle-specific motion, water-equivalent thickness, and robustness. Beam angles were chosen to minimize the effect of respiratory motion and avoid previously treated regions, and the maximum deviation from the nominal dose-volume histogram values was kept at <5% for the target dose and met the normal tissue constraints under a worst-case scenario. Patient-specific quality assurance measurements showed that a median 99% (range, 95% to 100%) of the pixels met the 3% dose/3 mm distance criteria for the γ index. Adaptive replanning was used for 9 patients (26.5%). Conclusions: IMPT using 4D CT-based planning, motion management, and optimization was implemented successfully and met our quality assurance parameters for treating challenging thoracic cancers.

  14. Calculation of delayed-neutron energy spectra in a QRPA-Hauser...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA) and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. ... EMISSION; NUCLEAR STRUCTURE; SPECTRA; STATISTICAL MODELS Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  15. Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: Measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bon, D.M.; Springston, S.; M.Ulbrich, I.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D.; Fall, R.; Jimenez, J. L., Herndon, S. C.; Huey, L. G.; Knighton, W. B.; Ortega, J.; Vargas, O.

    2011-03-16

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios were measured with two different instruments at the T1 ground site in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March of 2006. A gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) quantified 18 light alkanes, alkenes and acetylene while a proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) quantified 12 VOC species including oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and aromatics. A GC separation system was used in conjunction with the PIT-MS (GC-PIT-MS) to evaluate PIT-MS measurements and to aid in the identification of unknown VOCs. The VOC measurements are also compared to simultaneous canister samples and to two independent proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) deployed on a mobile and an airborne platform during MILAGRO. VOC diurnal cycles demonstrate the large influence of vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissions during the night and photochemical processing during the afternoon. Emission ratios for VOCs and OVOCs relative to CO are derived from early-morning measurements. Average emission ratios for non-oxygenated species relative to CO are on average a factor of {approx}2 higher than measured for US cities. Emission ratios for OVOCs are estimated and compared to literature values the northeastern US and to tunnel studies in California. Positive matrix factorization analysis (PMF) is used to provide insight into VOC sources and processing. Three PMF factors were distinguished by the analysis including the emissions from vehicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of secondary VOCs + long-lived species. Emission ratios to CO calculated from the results of PMF analysis are compared to emission ratios calculated directly from measurements. The total PIT-MS signal is summed to estimate the fraction of identified versus unidentified VOC species.

  16. Forward fitting of experimental data from a NE213 neutron detector installed with the magnetic proton recoil upgraded spectrometer at JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binda, F. Ericsson, G.; Eriksson, J.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Sundn, E. Andersson; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Team

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we present the results obtained from the data analysis of neutron spectra measured with a NE213 liquid scintillator at JET. We calculated the neutron response matrix of the instrument combining MCNPX simulations, a generic proton light output function measured with another detector and the fit of data from ohmic pulses. For the analysis, we selected a set of pulses with neutral beam injection heating (NBI) only and we applied a forward fitting procedure of modeled spectral components to extract the fraction of thermal neutron emission. The results showed the same trend of the ones obtained with the dedicated spectrometer TOFOR, even though the values from the NE213 analysis were systematically higher. This discrepancy is probably due to the different lines of sight of the two spectrometers (tangential for the NE213, vertical for TOFOR). The uncertainties on the thermal fraction estimates were from 4 to 7 times higher than the ones from the TOFOR analysis.

  17. Study of double parton scattering using W + 2-jet events in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-05

    Double parton scattering is investigated in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV where the final state includes a W boson, which decays into a muon and a neutrino, and two jets. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb–1, collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Observables sensitive to double parton scattering are investigated after being corrected for detector effects and selection efficiencies. The fraction of W + 2-jet events due to double parton scattering is measured to be 0.055 +/- 0.002 (stat.) +/- 0.014 (syst.). Finally, the effective cross section, σeff, characterizing the effectivemore » transverse area of hard partonic interactions in collisions between protons is measured to be 20.7 +/- 0.8 (stat.) +/- 6.6 (syst.) mb.« less

  18. 2009 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2010-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2009. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  19. 2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2011-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  20. 2008 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2009-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2008. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.