Sample records for delayed proton emission

  1. -delayed proton emission branches in 43Cr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomorski, M. [University of Warsaw; Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, W. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, H. [University of Warsaw; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabrowski, Ryszard [Warsaw University; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, M. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The + decay of very neutron-deficient 43Cr was studied by means of an imaging time projection chamber that allowed recording tracks of charged particles. Events of -delayed emission of one, two, and three protons were clearly identified. The absolute branching ratios for these channels were determined to be (81 4)%, (7.1 0.4)%, and (0.08 0.03)%, respectively. 43Cr is thus established as the second case in which the -3p decay occurs. Although the feeding to the proton-bound states in 43V is expected to be negligible, the large branching ratio of (12 4)% for decays without proton emission is found.

  2. Beta-delayed proton emission from $^{21}$Mg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, M V; Briz, J A; Cederkäll, J; Fynbo, H O U; Jensen, J H; Jonson, B; Laursen, K L; Nilsson, T; Perea, A; Pesudo, V; Riisager, K; Tengblad, O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beta-delayed proton emission from $^{21}$Mg has been measured at ISOLDE, CERN, with a detection setup including particle identification capabilities. $\\beta$-delayed protons with center of mass energies between 0.39$\\,$MeV and 7.2$\\,$MeV were measured and used to determine the half life of $^{21}$Mg as $118.6\\pm 0.5\\,$ms. From a line shape fit of the $\\beta p$ branches we extract spectroscopic information about the resonances of $^{21}$Na. Finally an improved interpretation of the decay scheme in accordance with the results obtained in reaction studies is presented.

  3. First Observation of Beta-Delayed Three-Proton Emission in 45Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, Wojciech [Warsaw University; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, Henryk [Warsaw University; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Djbrowski, R. [University of Warsaw; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, Mustafa [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of extremely neutron deficient 45Fe has been studied by means of a new type of a gaseous detector in which a technique of digital imaging was used to record tracks of charged particles. The + decay channels accompanied by proton emission were clearly identified. In addition to -delayed one-proton and -delayed two-proton decays, -delayed three-proton emission was recorded which represents the first direct and unambiguous observation of this decay channel. The branching ratio for the decay of 45Fe and the corresponding partial half-life are found to be 0.30 0.04 and T1/2( ) = 8.7 1.3 ms, respectively.

  4. First observation of {beta}-delayed three-proton emission in {sup 45}Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miernik, K.; Dominik, W.; Janas, Z.; Pfuetzner, M.; Czyrkowski, H.; Cwiok, M.; DaPbrowski, R.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Kusmierz, W. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Bingham, C. R.; Darby, I. G.; Liddick, S. N.; Rajabali, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Ginter, T.; Stolz, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Grzywacz, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Rykaczewski, K. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of extremely neutron deficient {sup 45}Fe has been studied by means of a new type of a gaseous detector in which a technique of digital imaging was used to record tracks of charged particles. The {beta}{sup +} decay channels accompanied by proton emission were clearly identified. In addition to {beta}-delayed one-proton and {beta}-delayed two-proton decays, {beta}-delayed three-proton emission was recorded which represents the first direct and unambiguous observation of this decay channel. The branching ratio for the {beta} decay of {sup 45}Fe and the corresponding partial half-life are found to be 0.30{+-}0.04 and T{sub 1/2}({beta})=8.7{+-}1.3 ms, respectively.

  5. The Effects of {beta}-Delayed Proton Emission on the Path of the rp-Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, R.N.

    2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The rp-process occurs in a hot hydrogen-rich stellar environment. Its trajectory passes through the most proton-rich nuclides in the periodic table. It has long been thought to be responsible for synthesizing at least the light p-process nuclides. Thus these nuclides can provide signatures for rp-process nucleosynthesis. Difficulties with various rp-process scenarios often focus on {sup 92,94}Mo and {sup 96,98}Ru p-nuclides, as their anomalously large abundances are difficult to produce in any model of nucleosynthesis. However, it now appears that they might be produced in the rp-process resulting from accretion onto a neutron star. If the rp-process does synthesize these nuclides, {beta}-delayed proton emission might well resolve some of the difficulties made evident by the model calculations.

  6. BETA-DELAYED PROTON EMISSION IN NEUTRON-DEFICIENT LRNTHANIDE ISOTOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witmarth, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J.C. Hardy and E. Hubert. "Beta-delayed Proton astd Alphahalf-lives from (a) the grou theory of beta decay and (b)from Nilsson/RPA beta-strength function calculations for the

  7. Beta delayed emission of a proton by a one-neutron halo nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Baye; E. M. Tursunov

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Some one-neutron halo nuclei can emit a proton in a beta decay of the halo neutron. The branching ratio towards this rare decay mode is calculated within a two-body potential model of the initial core+neutron bound state and final core+proton scattering states. The decay probability per second is evaluated for the $^{11}$Be, $^{19}$C and $^{31}$Ne one-neutron halo nuclei. It is very sensitive to the neutron separation energy.

  8. Beta delayed emission of a proton by a one-neutron halo nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baye, D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some one-neutron halo nuclei can emit a proton in a beta decay of the halo neutron. The branching ratio towards this rare decay mode is calculated within a two-body potential model of the initial core+neutron bound state and final core+proton scattering states. The decay probability per second is evaluated for the $^{11}$Be, $^{19}$C and $^{31}$Ne one-neutron halo nuclei. It is very sensitive to the neutron separation energy.

  9. Beta-Delayed Two-Particle Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borge, M.J.G.

    2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A panorama of beta-delayed nuclear decay is sketched. Beginning with beta-delayed two-neutron emission, the author moves on to beta-delayed two-proton emission and beta-delayed multiparticle emission. After touching briefly on the theoretical approach to understanding these phenomena, he reports on two experiments done at ISOLDE (CERN) on the decay of {sup 31}Ar with the goal of studying the mechanisms of {beta}-delayed two proton emission. This example shows the potentiality of the new technology that allows design setups with high efficiency for multiparticle detection. In combination with high-purity sources and the use of low-energy beams to produce point-like sources, information at the drip line can be extracted that is of comparable quality to that obtained near stability.

  10. Extension of the T{sub z} = {minus}3/2, A = 4n + 1 series of beta-delayed proton emitters to {sup 65}Se and {sup 73}Sr, and low energy beta-delayed proton emission from the T{sub z} = {minus}3/2, A = 4n + 3 nucleus {sup 23}Al

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batchelder, J.C.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The series of known Tz = {minus}3/2, A = 4n + 1 nuclei has been extended to include the previously undiscovered isotopes {sup 65}Se and {sup 73}Sr, through the observation of beta-delayed proton emission via the isobaric analog state (IAS) of the beta-daughter (emitter). Due to the relatively large proton energies involved, these experiments were conducted using standard Si-Si {Delta}E-E telescopes. Beta-delayed protons arising from {sup 65}Se have been observed at an energy (laboratory) of 3.55 {plus_minus} 0.03 MeV, corresponding to the decay of the T = 3/2 isobaric analog state in {sup 65}As to the ground state of {sup 64}Ge. Similarly, beta-delayed protons from {sup 73}Sr at an energy of 3.75 {plus_minus} 0.04 MeV have been observed, corresponding to decay of the T = 3/2 isobaric analog state in {sup 73}Rb to the ground state of {sup 72}Kr. From the energies of these proton transitions, an improved prediction of the mass excesses of the two parent nuclei ({sup 65}Se and {sup 73}Sr) is made through the use of a Coulomb displacement formula. These predictions are {minus}33.41 {plus_minus} 0.26 and {minus}31.87 {plus_minus} 0.24 MeV for {sup 65}Se and {sup 73}Sr, respectively. Studies of low energy (down to {approximately}200 keV) beta-delayed protons from {sup 23}Al necessitated that a particle identification telescope with a low energy threshold for observation and identification of protons be developed. {sup 23}Al is of interest because of its role in the breakout of the hot CNO cycle leading to the astrophysical rp process.

  11. Unique decay process: {beta}-delayed emission of a proton and a neutron by the {sup 11}Li halo nucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baye, D.; Descouvemont, P.; Tursunov, E. M. [Physique Quantique, CP 165/82, and Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, CP 229, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, 100214, Ulugbek, Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron-rich {sup 11}Li halo nucleus is unique among nuclei with known separation energies in its ability to emit a proton and a neutron in a {beta}-decay process. The branching ratio toward this rare decay mode is evaluated within a three-body model for the initial bound state and with Coulomb three-body final scattering states. The branching ratio should be comprised between two extreme cases, i.e., a lower bound 6x10{sup -12} obtained with a pure Coulomb wave and an upper bound 5x10{sup -10} obtained with a plane wave. A simple model with modified Coulomb waves provides plausible values between 0.8x10{sup -10} and 2.2x10{sup -10}, with most probable total energies of the proton and neutron between 0.15 and 0.3 MeV.

  12. A unique decay process: beta delayed emission of a proton and a neutron by the $^{11}$Li halo nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baye, D; Tursunov, E M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron-rich $^{11}$Li halo nucleus is unique among nuclei with known separation energies by its ability to emit a proton and a neutron in a $\\beta$ decay process. The branching ratio towards this rare decay mode is evaluated within a three-body model for the initial bound state and with Coulomb three-body final scattering states. The branching ratio should be comprised between two extreme cases, i.e.\\ a lower bound $6 \\times 10^{-12}$ obtained with a pure Coulomb wave and an upper bound $5 \\times 10^{-10}$ obtained with a plane wave. A simple model with modified Coulomb waves provides plausible values between between $0.8 \\times 10^{-10}$ and $2.2 \\times 10^{-10}$ with most probable total energies of the proton and neutron between 0.15 and 0.3 MeV.

  13. A unique decay process: beta delayed emission of a proton and a neutron by the $^{11}$Li halo nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Baye; P. Descouvemont; E. M. Tursunov

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron-rich $^{11}$Li halo nucleus is unique among nuclei with known separation energies by its ability to emit a proton and a neutron in a $\\beta$ decay process. The branching ratio towards this rare decay mode is evaluated within a three-body model for the initial bound state and with Coulomb three-body final scattering states. The branching ratio should be comprised between two extreme cases, i.e.\\ a lower bound $6 \\times 10^{-12}$ obtained with a pure Coulomb wave and an upper bound $5 \\times 10^{-10}$ obtained with a plane wave. A simple model with modified Coulomb waves provides plausible values between between $0.8 \\times 10^{-10}$ and $2.2 \\times 10^{-10}$ with most probable total energies of the proton and neutron between 0.15 and 0.3 MeV.

  14. Systematics of proton emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Delion; R. J. Liotta; R. Wyss

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A very simple formula is presented that relates the logarithm of the half-life, corrected by the centrifugal barrier, with the Coulomb parameter in proton decay processes. The corresponding experimental data lie on two straight lines which appear as a result of a sudden change in the nuclear shape marking two regions of deformation independently of the angular momentum of the outgoing proton. This feature provides a powerful tool to assign experimentally quantum numbers in proton emitters.

  15. \\b{eta}-delayed three-proton decay of 31Ar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lis, A A; Dominik, W; Janas, Z; Pfützner, M; Pomorski, M; Acosta, L; Baraeva, S; Casarejos, E; Duénas-Díaz, J; Dunin, V; Espino, J M; Estrade, A; Farinon, F; Fomichev, A; Geissel, H; Gorshkov, A; Kami?ski, G; Kiselev, O; Knöbel, R; Krupko, S; Kuich, M; Litvinov, Yu A; Marquinez-Durán, G; Martel, I; Mukha, I; Nociforo, C; Ordúz, A K; Pietri, S; Prochazka, A; Sánchez-Benítez, A M; Simon, H; Sitar, B; Slepnev, R; Stanoiu, M; Strmen, P; Szarka, I; Takechi, M; Tanaka, Y; Weick, H; Winfield, J S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beta decay of 31Ar, produced by fragmentation of a 36Ar beam at 880 MeV/nucleon, was investigated. Identified ions of 31Ar were stopped in a gaseous time projection chamber with optical readout allowing to record decay events with emission of protons. In addition to \\b{eta}-delayed emission of one and two protons we have clearly observed the beta-delayed three-proton branch. The branching ratio for this channel in 31Ar is found to be 0.07(2)%.

  16. \\b{eta}-delayed three-proton decay of 31Ar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Lis; C. Mazzocchi; W. Dominik; Z. Janas; M. Pfützner; M. Pomorski; L. Acosta; S. Baraeva; E. Casarejos; J. Duénas-Díaz; V. Dunin; J. M. Espino; A. Estrade; F. Farinon; A. Fomichev; H. Geissel; A. Gorshkov; G. Kami?ski; O. Kiselev; R. Knöbel; S. Krupko; M. Kuich; Yu. A. Litvinov; G. Marquinez-Durán; I. Martel; I. Mukha; C. Nociforo; A. K. Ordúz; S. Pietri; A. Prochazka; A. M. Sánchez-Benítez; H. Simon; B. Sitar; R. Slepnev; M. Stanoiu; P. Strmen; I. Szarka; M. Takechi; Y. Tanaka; H. Weick; J. S. Winfield

    2015-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The beta decay of 31Ar, produced by fragmentation of a 36Ar beam at 880 MeV/nucleon, was investigated. Identified ions of 31Ar were stopped in a gaseous time projection chamber with optical readout allowing to record decay events with emission of protons. In addition to \\b{eta}-delayed emission of one and two protons we have clearly observed the beta-delayed three-proton branch. The branching ratio for this channel in 31Ar is found to be 0.07(2)%.

  17. Beta delayed alpha emission from the neutron deficient rare earth isotopes {sup 152}Tm and {sup 150}Ho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nacher, E. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC - Univ. de Valencia (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Tain, J. L.; Rubio, B.; Algora, A.; Estevez Aguado, M. E.; Gadea, A. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC - Univ. de Valencia (Spain); Batist, L. [PNPI, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Briz, J. A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Cano-Ott, D. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Doering, J.; Mukha, I.; Plettner, C.; Roeckl, E. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Gierlik, M.; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of beta-delayed proton emission is a well known method to aid the determination of the beta strength distribution in nuclei far from the stability line. At the neutron deficient side of the nuclear chart the process of proton or alpha emission from excited states is energetically allowed when one goes far enough from stability. However, beta-delayed alphas have seldom been measured for nuclei heavier than A = 20. Here we present a study of the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission from {sup 152}Tm and {sup 150}Ho and their importance in the full B(GT) distribution.

  18. Proton emission induced by polarized photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Anguiano; G. Co'; A. M. Lallena

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton emission induced by polarized photons is studied in the energy range above the giant resonance region and below the pion emission threshold. Results for the 12C, 16O and 40Ca nuclei are presented. The sensitivity of various observables to final state interaction, meson exchange currents and short range correlations is analyzed. We found relevant effects due to the virtual excitation of the $\\Delta$ resonance.

  19. Beta-delayed particle emission from neutron-deficient isotopes in the Z approximately 50 region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tidemand-Petersson, P; Klepper, O; Plochocki, A; Roeckl, E; Schardt, D; Zylicz, J

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies of beta-delayed proton and alpha-particle emission from precursors in the region close to the double shell closure at N=Z=50 are described. The results range from identification of new precursors like /sup 96/Ag and /sup 103,105/Sn, to determination of branching ratios, feeding of excited levels after particle emission and the energy available for proton emission. Comparison of the results with statistical-model calculations points to a resonance in the beta-strength function in the decay of /sup 110,112/I, /sup 113/Xe, /sup 114,116/Cs and /sup 117/Ba. (39 refs).

  20. Time dependence of delayed neutron emission for fissionable isotope identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinlaw, M.T.; Hunt, A.W. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho 83209-8263 (United States); Department of Physics, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho 83209-8106 (United States)

    2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The time dependence of delayed neutron emission was examined as a method of fissionable isotope identification. A pulsed bremsstrahlung photon beam was used to induce photofission reactions in {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 239}Pu targets. The resulting delayed neutron emission was recorded between irradiating pulses and is a well-known technique for fissionable material detection. Monitoring the decay of delayed neutron emission between irradiating pulses demonstrates the ability to not only detect the presence of fissionable materials, but also to identify which fissionable isotope is present.

  1. Systematic trends in beta-delayed particle emitting nuclei: The case of beta-p-alpha emission from 21Mg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. V. Lund; M. J. G. Borge; J. A. Briz; J. Cederkäll; H. O. U. Fynbo; J. H. Jensen; B. Jonson; K. L. Laursen; T. Nilsson; A. Perea; V. Pesudo; K. Riisager; O. Tengblad

    2015-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed beta+-delayed alpha and p-alpha emission from the proton-rich nucleus 21Mg produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. The assignments were cross-checked with a time distribution analysis. This is the third identified case of beta-p-alpha emission. We discuss the systematic of beta-delayed particle emission decays, show that our observed decays fit naturally into the existing pattern, and argue that the patterns are to a large extent caused by odd-even effects.

  2. Experimental study of beta-delayed proton decay of (23)Al for nucleosynthesis in novae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saastamoinen, A.; Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Bentley, M. A.; Davinson, T.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Simmons, E.; Tabacaru, G.; Tribble, Robert E.; Woods, P. J.; Aysto, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beta-delayed gamma and proton decay of (23)Al has been studied with an alternative detector setup at the focal plane of the momentum achromat recoil separator MARS at Texas AandM University. We could detect protons down to an energy of 200 ke...

  3. Experimental study of beta-delayed proton decay of (23)Al for nucleosynthesis in novae 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saastamoinen, A.; Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Bentley, M. A.; Davinson, T.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Simmons, E.; Tabacaru, G.; Tribble, Robert E.; Woods, P. J.; Aysto, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beta-delayed gamma and proton decay of (23)Al has been studied with an alternative detector setup at the focal plane of the momentum achromat recoil separator MARS at Texas AandM University. We could detect protons down to an energy of 200 ke...

  4. One proton, two proton, and alpha emission from 14o+alpha resonance interactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Changbo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, proton, two proton, and emission from the 14O + a interactions were studied with the modified thick target inverse kinematics approach. The radioactive beam was obtained by using resonances in the 14N(p, n)14O reaction. The 14...

  5. Half-lives and delayed neutron emission probabilities of neutron-rich Li--Al nuclides (US)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeder, P.L.; Warner, R.A.; Hensley, W.K. (Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington (USA)); Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (USA))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beta-decay half-lives and delayed neutron emission probabilities of very neutron-rich nuclides from Li to Al have been measured by a delayed coincidence technique. Neutron-rich nuclides were produced by reaction of 800-MeV protons on a {sup 232}Th target and were individually identified by use of the time-of-flight isochronous spectrometer. For 16 previously measured nucides, the half-lives determined here agree with literature values within the uncertainties. The previously unmeasured half-lives for {sup 25}F (59{plus minus}40 ms) and {sup 28}Ne (14{plus minus}10 ms) have been determined. Delayed neutron emission has been measured for {sup 12}Be, {sup 14}B, {sup 17}C, {sup 18}N, {sup 25}F, and {sup 28}Ne. Emission probabilities are reported for 19 precursors and upper limits are reported for 12 other nuclides. These data are compared with predictions of several beta-decay models.

  6. Light meson emission in (anti)proton induced reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Kuraev; E. S. Kokoulina; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2015-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactions induced by high energy antiprotons on proton on nuclei are accompanied with large probability by the emission of a few mesons. Interesting phenomena can be observed and QCD tests can be performed, through the detection of one or more mesons. The collinear emission from high energy (anti)proton beams of a hard pion or vector meson, can be calculated similarly to the emission of a hard photon from an electron \\cite{Kuraev:2013izz}. This is a well known process in QED, and it is called the "Quasi-Real Electron method", where the incident particle is an electron and a hard photon is emitted leaving an 'almost on shell' electron impinging on the target \\cite{Baier:1973ms}. Such process is well known as Initial State Emission (ISR) method of scanning over incident energy, and can be used, in the hadron case, to produce different kind of particles in similar kinematical conditions. In case of emission of a charged light meson, $\\pi$ or $\\rho$-meson, in proton-proton(anti-proton) collisions, the meson can be deviated in a magnetic field and detected. The collinear emission (along the beam direction) of a charged meson may be used to produce high energy (anti)neutron beams. This can be very useful to measure the difference of the cross sections of (anti)proton and (anti)neutron scattering from the target and may open the way for checking sum rules with antiparticles. Hard meson emission allows also to enhance the cross section when the energy loss from one of the incident particles lowers the total energy up to the mass of a resonance. The cross section can be calculated, on the basis of factorized formulas, where the probability of emission of the light mesons multiplies the cross section of the sub-process. Multiplicity distributions for neutral and charged meson production are also given.

  7. Light meson emission in (anti)proton induced reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuraev, E A; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactions induced by high energy antiprotons on proton on nuclei are accompanied with large probability by the emission of a few mesons. Interesting phenomena can be observed and QCD tests can be performed, through the detection of one or more mesons. The collinear emission from high energy (anti)proton beams of a hard pion or vector meson, can be calculated similarly to the emission of a hard photon from an electron \\cite{Kuraev:2013izz}. This is a well known process in QED, and it is called the "Quasi-Real Electron method", where the incident particle is an electron and a hard photon is emitted leaving an 'almost on shell' electron impinging on the target \\cite{Baier:1973ms}. Such process is well known as Initial State Emission (ISR) method of scanning over incident energy, and can be used, in the hadron case, to produce different kind of particles in similar kinematical conditions. In case of emission of a charged light meson, $\\pi$ or $\\rho$-meson, in proton-proton(anti-proton) collisions, the meson can b...

  8. Delayed neutron emission probabilities of Li-F nuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeder, P.L.; Warner, R.A.; Hensley, W.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed neutron emission probabilities (P{sub n}) have been measured for 18 nuclides ranging from {sup 9}Li to {sup 25}F. Neutron-rich nuclides were produced by reaction of 800 MeV p on a {sup 232}Th target at the LAMPF accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Recoil nuclides were individually identified as to their mass, nuclear charged, and ionic charge by use of the Time-of-Flight Isochronous (TOFI) spectrometer. The distribution of time intervals between the arrival of a specific ion and the subsequent detection of a neutron was determined. The P{sub n} was calculated from the total number of ions observed, the initial neutron count rate, the neutron counting efficiency, and the half-life. The technique is shown to be valid for half-lives ranging from 10 ms ({sup 15}B) to 4 s ({sup 17}N) and for P{sub n} values as low as 0.3% ({sup 13}B). Delayed neutron emission has been measured for {sup 12}Be, {sup 14}B, {sup 17}C, {sup 18}N, {sup 21}N, and {sup 25}F for the first time. A small branch for beta-delayed two-neutron emission was observed in {sup 15}B (P{sub 2n} = 0.4 {plus minus} 0.2%). 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Prediction of average. beta. and. gamma. energies and probabilities of. beta. -delayed neutron emission in the region of fission products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, M.; Staudt, A.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mean {beta} and {gamma} energies and probabilities of {beta}-delayed neutron emission (P{sub n}) in the region of fission products are calculated using a proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation nuclear model. {beta}-decay properties of these nuclides are essential input parameters for decay heat calculations for nuclear reactors. The results are compared with recent measurements. Mean energies and the P{sub n} values of {approximately}150 experimentally unknown short-lived isotopes are predicted.

  10. Delayed and In-beam Spectroscopy on Francium and Astatine Nuclei at the Proton Drip Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uusitalo, J.; Jakobsson, U. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Collaboration: RITU-Gamma Gollaboration

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed and in-beam spectroscopy on francium and astatine nuclei at and beyond the proton drip line has been performed. In neutron deficient astatine nuclei a shift to deformed shapes as a function of decreasing neutron has been obtained. In neutron deficient francium isotope the same shift is evident.

  11. He-proton emission imaging for inertial-confinement-fusion experiments (invited)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D3 He-proton emission imaging for inertial-confinement-fusion experiments (invited) F. H. Séguin, Livermore, California 94550 (Presented on 19 April 2004; published 5 October 2004) Proton emission imaging cameras, in combination with proton spectrometers and a proton temporal diagnostic, provide a great deal

  12. The beta-delayed neutron emission in 78Ni region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. N. Borzov

    2004-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic study of the total $\\beta$-decay half-lives and $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission probabilities is performed. The $\\beta$-strength function is treated within the self-consistent density-functional + continuum-QRPA framework including the Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden transitions. The experimental total $\\beta$-decay half-lives for the Ni isotopes with $A\\leq$76 are described satisfactorily. The half-lives predicted from $A$=70 up to $A$=86 reveal fairly regular $A$-behaviour which results from simultaneous account for the Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden transitions. For $Z\\approx$ 28 nuclei, a suppression of the delayed neutron emission probability is found when the $N$=50 neutron closed shell is crossed. The effect originates from the high-energy first-forbidden transitions to the states outside the $Q_{\\beta} - S_n$-window in the daughter nuclei. PACS numbers: 23.40.Bw,21.60.Jz,25.30.Pt,26.30.+k

  13. The beta-delayed neutron emission in 78Ni region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borzov, I N

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic study of the total $\\beta$-decay half-lives and $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission probabilities is performed. The $\\beta$-strength function is treated within the self-consistent density-functional + continuum-QRPA framework including the Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden transitions. The experimental total $\\beta$-decay half-lives for the Ni isotopes with $A\\leq$76 are described satisfactorily. The half-lives predicted from $A$=70 up to $A$=86 reveal fairly regular $A$-behaviour which results from simultaneous account for the Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden transitions. For $Z\\approx$ 28 nuclei, a suppression of the delayed neutron emission probability is found when the $N$=50 neutron closed shell is crossed. The effect originates from the high-energy first-forbidden transitions to the states outside the $Q_{\\beta} - S_n$-window in the daughter nuclei. PACS numbers: 23.40.Bw,21.60.Jz,25.30.Pt,26.30.+k

  14. Volume 20. number 3 FEBS LETTERS February 1972 FLUORESCENCE AND DELAYED LIGHT EMISSION IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    : dichloroplenol indophenol; DLE: delayed light emission; NADP+: nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate; PDA (DLE) that of Jursinic and Govindjee [4]. For mea- surements of the recovery of fluorescence transients

  15. DELAYED ONSET OF HIGH-ENERGY EMISSIONS IN LEPTONIC AND HADRONIC MODELS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asano, Katsuaki [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Meszaros, Peter, E-mail: asano@phys.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: nnp@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The temporal-spectral evolution of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts is simulated numerically for both leptonic and hadronic models. For weak enough magnetic fields, leptonic models can reproduce the few seconds delay of the onset of GeV photon emission observed by Fermi-LAT, due to the slow growth of the target photon field for inverse Compton scattering. For stronger magnetic fields, the GeV delay can be explained with hadronic models, due to the long acceleration timescale of protons and the continuous photopion production after the end of the particle injection. While the FWHMs of the MeV and GeV light curves are almost the same in one-zone leptonic models, the FWHMs of the 1-30 GeV light curves in hadronic models are significantly wider than those of the 0.1-1 MeV light curves. The amount of the GeV delay depends on the importance of the Klein-Nishina effect in both the leptonic and hadronic models. In our examples of hadronic models the energies of the escaped neutrons are comparable to the gamma-ray energy, although their contribution to the ultra high-energy cosmic rays is still subdominant. The resulting neutrino spectra are hard enough to avoid the flux limit constraint from IceCube. The delay of the neutrino emission onset is up to several times longer than the corresponding delay of the GeV photon emission onset. The quantitative differences in the light curves for various models may be further tested with future atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes whose effective area is larger than that of Fermi-LAT, such as CTA.

  16. From peaks to continua: the study of delayed proton decay among light nuclei (A < 100)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, J C

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed proton precursors among nuclei with Aproton emitting levels in the 10/sup -16/ s region is described and applied to the decay of /sup 69/Se. (19 refs).

  17. Delayed neutron emission measurements for U-235 and Pu-239 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , and a graphite-moderated counting system were constructed to perform all these experiments. The calculated values for the five-group U-235 delayed neutron parameters and the six-group Pu-239 delayed neutron parameters were compared with the values...

  18. Search for beta -delayed three-neutron emission frum /sup 31/Na

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Détraz, C; Epherre-Rey-Campagnolle, Marcelle; Guillemaud, D; Klapisch, Robert; Langevin, M; Naulin, F; Thibault, C; Touchard, F

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An upper limit P/sub 3n/<5*10/sup -4/ is found for the branching ratio of the beta -delayed three-neutron emission from /sup 31/Na. (5 refs).

  19. Proc. of Atmospheric Studies by Optical Methods (2001) :16 Optical Emissions from Proton Aurora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. of Atmospheric Studies by Optical Methods (2001) :1­6 Optical Emissions from Proton Aurora D of proton aurora. The Doppler-shifted hydrogen emission lines can be inter- preted in terms of the mean in electron aurora, the relative brightness of emis- sion features differs from that in electron aurora

  20. Preliminary Pulsing Experiments to Measure Delayed Neutron Emission Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlton, W.S.; Parish, T.A.; Raman, S.

    1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent interest in delayed neutron parameters including comparisons between macroscopic (experimental) and microscopic (calculated) results have prompted a set of experiments using the 1MW Triga Reactor at the Texas A and M University (TAMU) Nuclear Science Center (NSC) designed to measure the complete set of seven-group delayed neutron parameters for several higher actinides. Operating the Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) in a pulsed mode, a complete set of delayed neutron parameters were measured for Np-237 and Am-243. The total delayed neutron yield per 100 fissions for Np-237 and Am-243 was found to be 1.14 {+-} 0.07 and 0.85 {+-} 0.05, respectively. Comparisons to previous measurements are made where such measurements are available.

  1. Different mechanism of two-proton emission from proton-rich nuclei $^{23}$Al and $^{22}$Mg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. G. Ma; D. Q. Fang; X. Y. Sun; P. Zhou; Y. Togano; N. Aoi; H. Baba; X. Z. Cai; X. G. Cao; J. G. Chen; Y. Fu; W. Guo; Y. Hara; T. Honda; Z. G. Hu; K. Ieki; Y. Ishibashi; Y. Ito; N. Iwasa; S. Kanno; T. Kawabata; H. Kimura; Y. Kondo; K. Kurita; M. Kurokawa; T. Moriguchi; H. Murakami; H. Ooishi; K. Okada; S. Ota; A. Ozawa; H. Sakurai; S. Shimoura; R. Shioda; E. Takeshita; S. Takeuchi; W. D. Tian; H. W. Wang; J. S. Wang; M. Wang; K. Yamada; Y. Yamada; Y. Yasuda; K. Yoneda; G. Q. Zhang; T. Motobayashi

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-proton relative momentum ($q_{pp}$) and opening angle ($\\theta_{pp}$) distributions from the three-body decay of two excited proton-rich nuclei, namely $^{23}$Al $\\rightarrow$ p + p + $^{21}$Na and $^{22}$Mg $\\rightarrow$ p + p + $^{20}$Ne, have been measured with the projectile fragment separator (RIPS) at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory. An evident peak at $q_{pp}\\sim20$ MeV/c as well as a peak in $\\theta_{pp}$ around 30$^\\circ$ are seen in the two-proton break-up channel from a highly-excited $^{22}$Mg. In contrast, such peaks are absent for the $^{23}$Al case. It is concluded that the two-proton emission mechanism of excited $^{22}$Mg is quite different from the $^{23}$Al case, with the former having a favorable diproton emission component at a highly excited state and the latter dominated by the sequential decay process.

  2. Different mechanism of two-proton emission from proton-rich nuclei $^{23}$Al and $^{22}$Mg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Y G; Sun, X Y; Zhou, P; Togano, Y; Aoi, N; Baba, H; Cai, X Z; Cao, X G; Chen, J G; Fu, Y; Guo, W; Hara, Y; Honda, T; Hu, Z G; Ieki, K; Ishibashi, Y; Ito, Y; Iwasa, N; Kanno, S; Kawabata, T; Kimura, H; Kondo, Y; Kurita, K; Kurokawa, M; Moriguchi, T; Murakami, H; Ooishi, H; Okada, K; Ota, S; Ozawa, A; Sakurai, H; Shimoura, S; Shioda, R; Takeshita, E; Takeuchi, S; Tian, W D; Wang, H W; Wang, J S; Wang, M; Yamada, K; Yamada, Y; Yasuda, Y; Yoneda, K; Zhang, G Q; Motobayashi, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-proton relative momentum ($q_{pp}$) and opening angle ($\\theta_{pp}$) distributions from the three-body decay of two excited proton-rich nuclei, namely $^{23}$Al $\\rightarrow$ p + p + $^{21}$Na and $^{22}$Mg $\\rightarrow$ p + p + $^{20}$Ne, have been measured with the projectile fragment separator (RIPS) at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory. An evident peak at $q_{pp}\\sim20$ MeV/c as well as a peak in $\\theta_{pp}$ around 30$^\\circ$ are seen in the two-proton break-up channel from a highly-excited $^{22}$Mg. In contrast, such peaks are absent for the $^{23}$Al case. It is concluded that the two-proton emission mechanism of excited $^{22}$Mg is quite different from the $^{23}$Al case, with the former having a favorable diproton emission component at a highly excited state and the latter dominated by the sequential decay process.

  3. Evidence for beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 31/Mg and /sup 32/Mg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaidins, C S; De Saint-Simon, M; Détraz, C; Epherre-Rey-Campagnolle, Marcelle; Guillemaud, D; Klapisch, Robert; Langevin, M; Naulin, F; Thibault, C; Touchard, F

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigates the time spectrum of beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 30-34/Na and their descendants using beta -neutron coincidence detection. The authors have been able to assign an upper limit of 0,4% to the probability of beta -delayed neutron emission, p/sub n/, from the /sup 30/Na daugher isotope /sup 30/Mg. In fitting the time spectra of beta -delayed neutrons from /sup 31/Na and /sup 32/Na, we find a definitive component from subsequent daughter decay as well. This provides evidence for beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 31/Mg and /sup 32/Mg with P/sub n/ values of the order of 2% for each. (7 refs).

  4. Delayed pulsar kicks from the emission of sterile neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusenko, Alexander; Mandal, Bhabani Prasad; Mukherjee, Alok [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India)

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed velocities of pulsars suggest the possibility that sterile neutrinos with mass of several keV are emitted from a cooling neutron star. The same sterile neutrinos could constitute all or part of cosmological dark matter. The neutrino-driven kicks can exhibit delays depending on the mass and the mixing angle, which can be compared with the pulsar data. We discuss the allowed ranges of sterile neutrino parameters, consistent with the latest cosmological and x-ray bounds, which can explain the pulsar kicks for different delay times.

  5. Systematics of delayed neutron emission probabilities in medium mass nuclides (fission products)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nir-El, Y

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The systematic behavior of emission probabilities was found to be determined by the nuclear pairing and the mass region of the precursor. The derivation of the systematics is based on a simplification of the general formula of the emission probability. The comparison made with the available experimental data leads to a semi- empirical formula for delayed neutron probabilities. This formula was used for the prediction of unknown values of emission probabilities for unidentified precursors.

  6. Biomedical applications of proton induced X-ray emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vis, R.D.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apart from studies on aerosols, the majority of applications of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) with a normal beam or a microprobe (micro-PIXE) is found in biology and medicine. Two aspects of broad beam PIXE are often decisive for the choice of this analytical technique. Compared to other techniques capable of analysis down beyond the ppm level, PIXE can be carried out with a very small amount of material and minute fractions of the composite samples, even in the scale of micrometers and quite often with minimal sample preparation, which are important requirements for biomedical investigations. Secondly, the speed of the total analysis opens the possibility to analyze large numbers of samples in a reasonable time, which is often necessary in biomedical studies in order to obtain sufficiently significant correlations between trace element concentrations and biomedical phenomena. Few, if any, techniques can compete with micro-PIXE; quantitative trace element analysis on a micrometer scale still represent a challenging problem. The electron microprobe normally lacks the sensitivity while the laser induced techniques suffer as yet from quantification problems. This paper describes recent developments especially in micro-PIXE in biomedical research.

  7. Competition between $\\beta$-delayed proton and $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$ decay of the exotic $T_z$ = -2 nucleus $^{56}$Zn and fragmentation of the IAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubio, B; Fujita, Y; Blank, B; Gelletly, W; Agramunt, J; Algora, A; Ascher, P; Bilgier, B; Cáceres, L; Cakirli, R B; Fujita, H; Ganioglu, E; Gerbaux, M; Giovinazzo, J; Grévy, S; Kamalou, O; Kozer, H C; Kucuk, L; Kurtukian-Nieto, T; Molina, F; Popescu, L; Rogers, A M; Susoy, G; Stodel, C; Suzuki, T; Tamii, A; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A very exotic decay mode at the proton drip-line, $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$-proton decay, has been observed in the $\\beta$ decay of the $T_z$ = -2 nucleus $^{56}$Zn. Three $\\gamma$-proton sequences have been observed following the $\\beta$ decay. The fragmentation of the IAS in $^{56}$Cu has also been observed for the first time. The results were reported in a recent publication. At the time of publication the authors were puzzled by the competition between proton and $\\gamma$ decays from the main component of the IAS. Here we outline a possible explanation based on the nuclear structure properties of the three nuclei involved, namely $^{56}$Zn, $^{56}$Cu and $^{55}$Ni, close to the doubly magic nucleus $^{56}$Ni. From the fragmentation of the Fermi strength and the excitation energy of the two populated 0$^{+}$ states we could deduce the off-diagonal matrix element of the charge-dependent part of the Hamiltonian responsible for the mixing. These results are compared with the decay of $^{55}$Cu with one proton ...

  8. Competition between $?$-delayed proton and $?$-delayed $?$ decay of the exotic $T_z$ = -2 nucleus $^{56}$Zn and fragmentation of the IAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Rubio; S. E. A. Orrigo; Y. Fujita; B. Blank; W. Gelletly; J. Agramunt; A. Algora; P. Ascher; B. Bilgier; L. Cáceres; R. B. Cakirli; H. Fujita; E. Ganioglu; M. Gerbaux; J. Giovinazzo; S. Grévy; O. Kamalou; H. C. Kozer; L. Kucuk; T. Kurtukian-Nieto; F. Molina; L. Popescu; A. M. Rogers; G. Susoy; C. Stodel; T. Suzuki; A. Tamii; J. C. Thomas

    2015-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A very exotic decay mode at the proton drip-line, $\\beta$-delayed $\\gamma$-proton decay, has been observed in the $\\beta$ decay of the $T_z$ = -2 nucleus $^{56}$Zn. Three $\\gamma$-proton sequences have been observed following the $\\beta$ decay. The fragmentation of the IAS in $^{56}$Cu has also been observed for the first time. The results were reported in a recent publication. At the time of publication the authors were puzzled by the competition between proton and $\\gamma$ decays from the main component of the IAS. Here we outline a possible explanation based on the nuclear structure properties of the three nuclei involved, namely $^{56}$Zn, $^{56}$Cu and $^{55}$Ni, close to the doubly magic nucleus $^{56}$Ni. From the fragmentation of the Fermi strength and the excitation energy of the two populated 0$^{+}$ states we could deduce the off-diagonal matrix element of the charge-dependent part of the Hamiltonian responsible for the mixing. These results are compared with the decay of $^{55}$Cu with one proton less than $^{56}$Zn. For completeness we summarise the results already published.

  9. Effect of beta-electron capture to a bound state on delayed-neutron emission from fission fragments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangrsky, Yu. P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Karpeshin, F. F. [St. Petersburg State University, Institute of Physics (Russian Federation); Trzhaskovskaya, M. B., E-mail: trzhask@thd.pnpi.spb.r [Russian Academy of Sciences, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Penionzhkevich, Yu. E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of ionization of the atomic electron shell on beta decay is investigated. The change in the beta-decay probability is due primarily to the appearance of the channel involving beta-electron capture to a bound state. It is shown that the effect may be significant at low beta-transition energies. The magnitude of the effect was studied in the case of the emission of one to three delayed neutrons following the beta decay of fission fragments. In the calculations, use was made of the beta-decay strength function with allowance for the population of isobaric resonances in daughter nuclei. The effect proved to be maximal for fragments where the numbers of protons and neutrons approach those in closed shells and subshells, thereby illustrating the role of the shell structure of the nucleus in fission.

  10. Large -Delayed Neutron Emission Probabilities in the 78Ni Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winger, J. A. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Shapira, Dan [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The -delayed neutron branching ratios (P n) for nuclei near doubly magic 78Ni have been directly measured using a new method combining high-resolution mass separation, reacceleration, and digital - spectroscopy of 238U fission products. The P n values for the very neutron-rich isotopes 76 78Cu and 83Ga were found to be much higher than previously reported and predicted. Revised calculations of the n process, accounting for new mass measurements and an inversion of the 2p3/2 and 1f5/2 orbitals, are in better agreement with these new experimental results.

  11. Transport properties and neutrino emissivity of dense neutron-star matter with localized protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Baiko; P. Haensel

    1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    As pointed out by Kutschera and W{\\'o}jcik, very low concentration of protons combined with a specific density dependence of effective neutron-proton interaction could lead to a localization of ``proton impurities'' in neutron medium at densities exceeding four times normal nuclear matter density. We study consequences of the localization of protons for transport processes in dense neutron star cores, assuming random distribution of proton impurities. Kinetic equations, relevant for the transport of charge, heat and momentum, are solved using variational method. Localization of protons removes a T^{-2} factor from the transport coefficients, which leads, at lower temperatures, to a strong decrease of thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and shear viscosity of neutron star matter, as compared to the standard case, where protons form a Fermi liquid. Due to the localization of protons a number of conventional neutrino emission processes (including modified URCA process) become inoperative in neutron star cores. On the other hand, the energy loss rate from neutrino-antineutrino pair bremsstrahlung due to electron and neutron scattering off (localized) protons, will have a specific T^6 dependence, which could modify the cooling of the neutron star core, as compared to the standard case. Possible astrophysical implications of the localization of protons for neutron star evolution and dynamics are discussed.

  12. Decarbonization and the time-delay between peak CO2 emissions and concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshadri, Ashwin K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon-dioxide (CO2) is the main contributor to anthropogenic global warming, and the timing of its peak concentration in the atmosphere is likely to govern the timing of maximum radiative forcing. While dynamics of atmospheric CO2 is governed by multiple time-constants, we idealize this by a single time-constant to consider some of the factors describing the time-delay between peaks in CO2 emissions and concentrations. This time-delay can be understood as the time required to bring CO2 emissions down from its peak to a small value, and is governed by the rate of decarbonizaton of economic activity. This decarbonization rate affects how rapidly emissions decline after having achieved their peak, and a rapid decline in emissions is essential for limiting peak radiative forcing. Long-term mitigation goals for CO2 should therefore consider not only the timing of peak emissions, but also the rate of decarbonization. We discuss implications for mitigation of the fact that the emissions peak corresponds to small bu...

  13. Proposal for ENDF formats that describe emission of post-fission beta-delayed photons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D; Pruet, J; Hedstrom, G; Hall, J; Descalle, M

    2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fission of heavy nuclides is accompanied by the birth of neutron rich fragment nuclei born in highly excited states. Following emission of prompt neutrons and {gamma}-rays, these fragments are typically left with atomic numbers that are 3-4 units smaller than stable nuclei with the same mass number. As these nuclides undergo {beta} decay to reach stability, a large number of {gamma}-rays are emitted. Figure 1 illustrates some of the processes leading to emission of {beta} delayed photons. A variety of applications (most notably those concerned with the detection and identification of clandestine fissile material) would benefit from a clear description of the spectral and temporal evolution of these {gamma}-rays. This proposal describes formats for representing emission of delayed photons and is based on the analysis presented in. At the present time, no single evaluated data set exists that directly provides for the temporal evolution of {gamma} rays from the decay of the fission products. However, evaluated data sets containing all of the physical parameters required for such calculations have been prepared. These include estimates of the independent and cumulative fission yields of all fission products, branching ratios in the decay of ground and isomeric states, lifetimes of these states, and the spectra of {gamma} rays emitted in their decay. Sizeable uncertainties and possibly significant errors are likely present concerning the shortest-lived fission products. However, the high-energy {gamma}-ray spectra generated from some of these data sets have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with initial experiments designed specifically to test them under conditions likely to be of interest to interrogation of sea-going cargo containers. For clarity we emphasize that the relationship between delayed neutron emission and delayed photon emission is tenuous. Only a small fraction of fission fragments - typically those characterized by large decay Q values - undergo {beta}{sup -}n emission. However, essentially all fission fragment decays result in the emission of a few photons. Also, it would be impractical to accurately specify and measure energies of delayed neutrons. By contrast, most fission fragments have decay spectra known to sub-keV accuracy that are readily resolved with inexpensive field HpGe detectors.

  14. Time delay anisotropy in photoelectron emission from the isotropic ground state of helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heuser, Sebastian; Cirelli, Claudio; Sabbar, Mazyar; Boge, Robert; Lucchini, Matteo; Gallmann, Lukas; Ivanov, Igor; Kheifets, Anatoli S; Dahlström, J Marcus; Lindroth, Eva; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando; Keller, Ursula

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time delays of electrons emitted from an isotropic initial state and leaving behind an isotropic ion are assumed to be angle-independent. Using an interferometric method involving XUV attosecond pulse trains and an IR probe field in combination with a detection scheme, which allows for full 3D momentum resolution, we show that time delays between electrons liberated from the $1s^{2}$ spherically symmetric ground state of He depend on the emission direction of the electrons with respect to the linear polarization axis of the ionizing XUV light. Such time delays can exhibit values as large as 60 attoseconds. With the help of refined theoretical models we can attribute the observed anisotropy to the interplay between different final quantum states, which arise naturally when two photons are involved in the photoionization process. Since most measurement techniques tracing attosecond electron dynamics have involved at least two photons so far, this is a general, significant, and initially unexpected effect that m...

  15. {beta}-delayed neutron emission from {sup 12,14}Be

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, U. C.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Hornshoej, P.; Riisager, K. [Aarhus Universitet (Denmark); Axelsson, L.; Forssen, C.; Jonson, B.; Markenroth, K.; Nyman, G.; Wenander, F. [Chalmers, Goeteborg (Sweden); Borge, M. J. G.; Tengblad, O. [CSIC Madrid (Spain); Fedoseyev, V. N.; Mishin, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences Troitsk (Russian Federation); Grevy, S.; Marques, F. M. [LPC, Caen (France); Jading, Y.; Nilsson, T.; Ravn, H. L.; Simon, H. [EP CERN (Switzerland)] (and others)

    1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of {beta}-delayed particle emission allows one to study the {beta}-strength distribution, and thereby the ground-state structure, of exotic drip-line nuclei. A time-correlation method has been applied to recent data on the heaviest Be-isotopes to determine their neutron branches. Improved results were obtained for {sup 12}Be and new results were found for the very short-lived neutron-emitter, {sup 14}Be.

  16. Beta-delayed two-neutron and three-neutron emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonson, B; Hansen, P G; Hoff, P; Larsson, P O; Mattsson, S; Nyman, G H; Rvan, H L; Schardt, D

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reviews experiments on /sup 11/Li that have led to the observation of two new active decay modes: beta-delayed two- and three-neutron emission. The 2n decay mode is also observed in /sup 30,31,32/Na and very recent results, reported for the first time, shown that it is detectable also in /sup 100/Rb with p/sub 2n//p/sub n/=0.027+or-0.007. (31 refs).

  17. {beta}-Delayed Neutron Emission from {sup 12,14}Be

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.C. Bergmann; L. Axelsson; M.J.G. Borge; V.N. Fedoseyev; C. Forssen; H.O.U. Fynbo; S. Grevy; P. Hornshoj; Y. Jading; B. Jonson; U. Koster; K. Markenroth; F.M. Marques; V.I. Mishin; T. Nilsson; G. Nyman; A. Oberstedt; H.L. Ravn; K. Riisager; G. Schrieder; V. Sebastian; H. Simon; O. Tengblad; F. Wenander; K. Wilhelmsen Rolander

    1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of {beta}-delayed particle emission allows one to study the {beta}-strength distribution, and thereby the ground-state structure, of exotic drip-line nuclei. A time-correlation method has been applied to recent data on the heaviest Be-isotopes to determine their neutron branches. Improved results were obtained for {sup 12}Be and new results were found for the very short-lived neutron-emitter, {sup 14}Be.

  18. One proton, two proton, and alpha emission from 14o+alpha resonance interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Changbo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ) reactions occurring at different places in the helium gas target were identified. With this information, we were able to measure a spectrum of protons corresponding to the population of 17F particle stable states in the 14O(a, p)17F reaction. This method...

  19. The neutron long counter NERO for studies of beta-delayed neutron emission in the r-process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, J; Lorusso, G; Santi, P; Couture, A; Daly, J; Del Santo, M; Elliot, T; Goerres, J; Herlitzius, C; Kratz, K -L; Lamm, L O; Lee, H Y; Montes, F; Ouellette, M; Pellegrini, E; Reeder, P; Schatz, H; Schertz, F; Schnorrenberger, L; Smith, K; Stech, E; Strandberg, E; Ugalde, C; Wiescher, M; Woehr, A; 10.1016/j.nima.2010.02.262

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron long counter NERO was built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, for measuring beta-delayed neutron-emission probabilities. The detector was designed to work in conjunction with a beta-decay implantation station, so that beta decays and beta-delayed neutrons emitted from implanted nuclei can be measured simultaneously. The high efficiency of about 40%, for the range of energies of interest, along with the small background, are crucial for measuring beta-delayed neutron emission branchings for neutron-rich r-process nuclei produced as low intensity fragmentation beams in in-flight separator facilities.

  20. The neutron long counter NERO for studies of beta-delayed neutron emission in the r-process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pereira; P. Hosmer; G. Lorusso; P. Santi; A. Couture; J. Daly; M. Del Santo; T. Elliot; J. Goerres; C. Herlitzius; K. -L. Kratz; L. O. Lamm; H. Y. Lee; F. Montes; M. Ouellette; E. Pellegrini; P. Reeder; H. Schatz; F. Schertz; L. Schnorrenberger; K. Smith; E. Stech; E. Strandberg; C. Ugalde; M. Wiescher; A. Woehr

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron long counter NERO was built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, for measuring beta-delayed neutron-emission probabilities. The detector was designed to work in conjunction with a beta-decay implantation station, so that beta decays and beta-delayed neutrons emitted from implanted nuclei can be measured simultaneously. The high efficiency of about 40%, for the range of energies of interest, along with the small background, are crucial for measuring beta-delayed neutron emission branchings for neutron-rich r-process nuclei produced as low intensity fragmentation beams in in-flight separator facilities.

  1. Microscopic description of the beta delayed deuteron emission from [sup 6]He

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Csoto, A.; Baye, D. (Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, C.P. 229, Campus Plaine, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium) Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 51 Debrecen, H-4001 (Hungary))

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beta delayed deuteron emission from [sup 6]He is studied in a dynamical microscopic cluster model. This model gives a reasonably good description for all the subsystems of [sup 6]He and [sup 6]Li in a coherent way, without any free parameter. The beta decay transition probability to the [sup 6]Li ground state is underestimated by a few percent. The theoretical beta delayed deuteron spectrum is close to experiment but it is also underestimated, by about a factor of 1.7. We argue that, in spite of their different magnitudes, both underestimations might have a common origin. The model confirms that the neutron halo part of the [sup 6]He wave function plays a crucial role in quenching the beta decay toward the [alpha]+[ital d] channel.

  2. {beta}-delayed neutron emission measurements around the third r-process abundance peak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caballero-Folch, R.; Cortes, G.; Calvino, F.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Riego, A. [INTE-DFEN, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Domingo-Pardo, C.; Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Rubio, B. [IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Algora, A. [IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain) and Inst. Nucl. Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Ameil, F.; Farinon, F.; Heil, M.; Knoebel, R.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Y.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution summarizes an experiment performed at GSI (Germany) in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126. The aim of this measurement is to provide the nuclear physics input of relevance for r-process model calculations, aiming at a better understanding of the third r-process abundance peak. Many exotic nuclei were measured around {sup 211}Hg and {sup 215}Tl. Final ion identification diagrams are given in this contribution. For most of them, we expect to derive halflives and and {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities. The detectors used in this experiment were the Silicon IMplantation and Beta Absorber (SIMBA) detector, based on an array of highly segmented silicon detectors, and the BEta deLayEd Neutron (BELEN) detector, which consisted of 30 3He counters embedded in a polyethylene matrix.

  3. Beta-delayed fission and neutron emission calculations for the actinide cosmochronometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, B.S.; Howard, W.M.; Mathews, G.J.; Takahashi, K.; Moeller, P.; Leander, G.A.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gamow-Teller beta-strength distributions for 19 neutron-rich nuclei, including ten of interest for the production of the actinide cosmochronometers, are computed microscopically with a code that treats nuclear deformation explicitly. The strength distributions are then used to calculate the beta-delayed fission, neutron emission, and gamma deexcitation probabilities for these nuclei. Fission is treated both in the complete damping and WKB approximations for penetrabilities through the nuclear potential-energy surface. The resulting fission probabilities differ by factors of 2 to 3 or more from the results of previous calculations using microscopically computed beta-strength distributions around the region of greatest interest for production of the cosmochronometers. The indications are that a consistent treatment of nuclear deformation, fission barriers, and beta-strength functions is important in the calculation of delayed fission probabilities and the production of the actinide cosmochronometers. Since we show that the results are very sensitive to relatively small changes in model assumptions, large chronometric ages for the Galaxy based upon high beta-delayed fission probabilities derived from an inconsistent set of nuclear data calculations must be considered quite uncertain.

  4. {beta}-delayed neutron emission in the {sup 78}Ni region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borzov, I.N. [University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic study of the total {beta}-decay half-lives and {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities is performed. The {beta}-strength function is treated within a self-consistent density-functional + continuum-quasiparticle-random-phase-approximation framework including the Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden transitions. The experimental total {beta}-decay half-lives for the Ni isotopes with A{<=}76 are described satisfactorily. The half-lives predicted from A=70 up to A=86 reveal fairly regular A behavior which results from simultaneous account for the Gamow-Teller and first-forbidden transitions. For Z{approx_equal}28 nuclei, a suppression of the delayed neutron emission probability is found when the N=50 neutron closed shell is crossed and the neutron excess becomes more than one major shell. The effect originates from the high-energy first-forbidden transitions to the states outside the Q{sub {beta}}-B{sub n} window in the daughter nuclei.

  5. Effects of hydroxylamine and silicomolybdate on the decay in delayed light emission in the 6-100 ps range after a single

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    origins of this emission are discussed. It is believed that the best explanation for residual DLE), 1,1 dimethylurea; DLE = delayed light emission; DPC = diphenylcarbazide. Photosynthesis Research 3, The Hague. Printed in the Netherlands. #12;162 that #s delayed light emission (DLE) is generated

  6. Status of delayed-neutron precursor data: Half-lives and neutron emission probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Pfeiffer; K. -L. Kratz; P. Moeller

    2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present in this paper a compilation of the present status of experimental delayed-neutron precursor data; i.e. beta-decay half-lives (T_1/2) and neutron emission probabilities (P_n) in the fission-product region (27 <= Z <= 57). These data are compared to two model predictions of substantially different sophistication: (i) an update of the empirical Kratz-Herrmann formula (KHF), and (ii) a unified macroscopic-microscopic model within the quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Both models are also used to calculate so far unknown T_1/2 and P_n values up to Z=63. A number of possible refinements in the microscopic calculations are suggested to further improve the nuclear-physics foundation of these data for reactor and astrophysical applications.

  7. Description of true and delayed ternary nuclear fission accompanied by the emission of various third particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@vsu.ru; Kadmensky, S. S.; Lyubashevsky, D. E. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanisms and the features of the main types of nuclear ternary fission (that is, true ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted before the rupture of the fissioning nucleus into fragments, and delayed ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted from fission fragments going apart) are investigated within quantum-mechanical fission theory. The features of T-odd asymmetry in true ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are investigated for the cases where alpha particles, prescission neutrons, and photons appear as third particles emitted by fissioning nuclei, the Coriolis interaction of the spin of the polarized fissioning nucleus with the spin of the third particle and the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances excited in the fissioning nucleus in the case of projectile-neutron capture being taken into account. For the cases where third particles emitted by fission fragments are evaporated neutrons or photons, T-odd asymmetries in delayed ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are analyzed with allowance for the mechanism of pumping of large fission-fragment spins oriented orthogonally to the fragment-emission direction and with allowance for the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances.

  8. Proton-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 HgPromisingProtectingSciTechProton DrippingWeakProton- 3

  9. Beta-Delayed gamma and Neutron Emission near the Double Shell Closure at 78Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzocchi, C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Grzywacz, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Batchelder, J. C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fong, D. [Vanderbilt University; Hamilton, J. H. [Vanderbilt University; Hwang, J. K. [Vanderbilt University; Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Krolas, W. [Vanderbilt University; Liddick, S. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Morton, A. C. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Mantica, P. F. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Mueller, W. F. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Steiner, M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Winger, J. A. [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment was performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University to investigate {beta} decay of very neutron-rich cobalt isotopes. Beta-delayed neutron emission from {sup 71-74}Co has been observed for the first time. Preliminary results are reported.

  10. Recent activities for ?-decay half-lives and ?-delayed neutron emission of very neutron-rich isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillmann, Iris [TRIUMF, Vancouver BC, V6T 2A3, Canada and GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Abriola, Daniel [Laboratorio Tandar, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, B1650KINA, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Singh, Balraj [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Beta-delayed neutron (?n) emitters play an important, two-fold role in the stellar nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in the 'rapid neutron-capture process' (r process). On one hand they lead to a detour of the material ?-decaying back to stability. On the other hand, the released neutrons increase the neutron-to-seed ratio, and are re-captured during the freeze-out phase and thus influence the final solar r-abundance curve. A large fraction of the isotopes inside the r-process reaction path are not yet experimentally accessible and are located in the (experimental) 'Terra Incognita'. With the next generation of fragmentation and ISOL facilities presently being built or already in operation, one of the main motivation of all projects is the investigation of these very neutron-rich isotopes. A short overview of one of the planned programs to measure ?n-emitters at the limits of the presently know isotopes, the BRIKEN campaign (Beta delayed neutron emission measurements at RIKEN) will be given. Presently, about 600 ?-delayed one-neutron emitters are accessible, but only for a third of them experimental data are available. Reaching more neutron-rich isotopes means also that multiple neutron-emission becomes the dominant decay mechanism. About 460 ?-delayed two-, three-or four-neutron emitters are identified up to now but for only 30 of them experimental data about the neutron branching ratios are available, most of them in the light mass region below A=30. The International Atomic and Energy Agency (IAEA) has identified the urgency and picked up this topic recently in a 'Coordinated Research Project' on a 'Reference Database for Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Data'. This project will review, compile, and evaluate the existing data for neutron-branching ratios and half-lives of ?-delayed neutron emitters and help to ensure a reliable database for the future discoveries of new isotopes and help to constrain astrophysical and theoretical models.

  11. BETA-DELAYED PROTON EMISSION IN NEUTRON-DEFICIENT LRNTHANIDE ISOTOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witmarth, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and 6 first generated on a Vax™ mainframe, then capturedspectra were analyzed with a Vax version of SAMFO [Rou69], afloppies were sent to the Vax via the file transfer program

  12. Investigating fusion plasma instabilities in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak using mega electron volt proton emissions (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, R. V., E-mail: rvale006@fiu.edu; Boeglin, W. U.; Angulo, A.; Avila, P.; Leon, O.; Lopez, C. [Department of Physics, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8 ST, CP204, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, James Forrestal Campus, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Cecconello, M.; Klimek, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-751 20 (Sweden); Allan, S. Y.; Akers, R. J.; Keeling, D. L.; McClements, K. G.; Scannell, R.; Conway, N. J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Turnyanskiy, M. [ITER Physics Department, EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Jones, O. M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Michael, C. A. [Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton detector (PD) measures 3 MeV proton yield distributions from deuterium-deuterium fusion reactions within the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). The PD’s compact four-channel system of collimated and individually oriented silicon detectors probes different regions of the plasma, detecting protons (with gyro radii large enough to be unconfined) leaving the plasma on curved trajectories during neutral beam injection. From first PD data obtained during plasma operation in 2013, proton production rates (up to several hundred kHz and 1 ms time resolution) during sawtooth events were compared to the corresponding MAST neutron camera data. Fitted proton emission profiles in the poloidal plane demonstrate the capabilities of this new system.

  13. Delayed neutron emission in the semi-gross theory of nuclear {beta}-decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tachibana, Takahiro; Yamada, Masami [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The semi-gross theory of nuclear {beta}-decay enables one to estimate some {beta}-decay properties such as half-lives and delayed neutron emission probabilities (P{sub n}-values) in the region far from the {beta}-stability line. This theory has been obtained by refining the conventional gross theory to take into account some shell effects of the parent nucleus. In this theory, the one-particle energy-levels are assumed to be discrete and non-uniform, and the one-particle strength function depends on the orbital and total angular momenta of the decaying nucleon. The P{sub n}-values obtained with use of the semi-gross theory are lower than the experimental values in many cases. In order to get more reasonable P{sub n}-values, the strength of the semi-gross theory in each small energy interval is spread with a width depending on the excitation energy. Modified P{sub n}-values thus obtained are compared with the experimental data as well as those estimated by the semi-gross theory.

  14. Optical emission spectroscopy of the Linac4 and superconducting proton Linac plasma generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettry, J.; Kronberger, M.; Mahner, E.; Schmitzer, C.; Sanchez, J.; Scrivens, R.; Midttun, O.; O'Neil, M.; Pereira, H.; Paoluzzi, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Fantz, U.; Wuenderlich, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, IPP, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Myllyperkioe, P.; Tarvainen, O. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, 40500 Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    CERN's superconducting proton Linac (SPL) study investigates a 50 Hz high-energy, high-power Linac for H{sup -} ions. The SPL plasma generator is an evolution of the DESY ion source plasma generator currently operated at CERN's Linac4 test stand. The plasma generator is a step towards a particle source for the SPL, it is designed to handle 100 kW peak RF-power at a 6% duty factor. While the acquisition of an integrated hydrogen plasma optical spectrum is straightforward, the measurement of a time-resolved spectrum requires dedicated amplification schemes. The experimental setup for visible light based on photomultipliers and narrow bandwidth filters and the UV spectrometer setup are described. The H{sub {alpha}}, H{sub {beta}}, and H{sub {gamma}} Balmer line intensities, the Lyman band and alpha transition were measured. A parametric study of the optical emission from the Linac4 ion source and the SPL plasma generator as a function of RF-power and gas pressure is presented. The potential of optical emission spectrometry coupled to RF-power coupling measurements for on-line monitoring of short RF heated hydrogen plasma pulses is discussed.

  15. Measurements of delayed neutrons yields and time spectra from 1 GeV protons interacting with thick {sup nat}Pb targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridikas, D. [CEA Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Barzakh, A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst., Leningrad district, 188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Blideanu, V.; David, J. C.; Dore, D. [CEA Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Fedorov, D. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst., Leningrad district, 188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Ledoux, X. [CEA Bruyeres, DIF/DPTA, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Moroz, F.; Panteleev, V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst., Leningrad district, 188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Plukis, A.; Plukiene, R. [Inst. of Physics, Savanoriu pr. 231, 02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Prevost, A. [CEA Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Shcherbakov, O.; Vorobyev, A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst., Leningrad district, 188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the preliminary results on measured delayed neutron (DN) yields and time spectra from 1 GeV protons interacting with thick {sup nat}Pb targets. In parallel, the MCNPX and PHTTS codes were used to predict the DN precursors and construct the theoretical DN tables. Different model parameters are examined and show significant dependence on the choice of the intra-nuclear cascade and fission-evaporation models used. These data and modeling are of great importance for the new generation spallation neutron sources based on liquid metal technologies where a significant amount of the DN precursor activity can be accumulated in the target fluid. (authors)

  16. Impurities in extruded cables: A proton-induced x-ray emission diagnostic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crine, J.P.; Hinrichsen, P.F.; Houdayer, A. (Institut de Recherche d'Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, PQ (Canada))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impurity contents and distributions in electrical trees grown in various field-aged XLPE distribution cables were measured by micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). The objectives pursued in this preliminary study were the following. Determination of any possible correlation between electrical tree initiation and the nature of some specific impurities. Evaluation of micro-PIXE as a reliable analytical technique to measure impurities in localized defects, such as small trees. For that purpose we used the micro-PIXE facility of the Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire at University of Montreal where proton beams of {approx}20 microns can be focused on small samples. From the emitted x-rays, it is possible to determine the nature and content of most impurities (whose content is above {approx}1 ppM). Cable samples with electrical trees grown either from insulation shield or from water trees were analyzed. A few field-aged cable samples containing breakdown channels of various sizes were also analyzed. The aim here was to determine whether impurities could still be detected after breakdown. The observations made can be summarized as follows: the electrical trees studied were heavily contaminated by a wide variety of impurities; electrical trees contain the same impurities as the connecting water trees and the amounts are about the same in both types of trees; provided that the energy released during breakdown is not too high, that is as long as breakdown channels remain small; the minimum level of contamination leading to tree growth is difficult to ascertain; no clear correlation can be established between the nature of impurities and electrical tree initiation; it cannot be determined whether contamination leads to tree initiation or whether contamination follows tree growth; and micro-PIXE is well suited to study impurities in electrical (and water) trees. 20 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. A FLUKA Study of $\\beta$-delayed Neutron Emission for the Ton-size DarkSide Dark Matter Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Empl, Anton

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the published cosmogenic background study for a ton-sized DarkSide dark matter search, only prompt neutron backgrounds coincident with cosmogenic muons or muon induced showers were considered, although observation of the initiating particle(s) was not required. The present paper now reports an initial investigation of the magnitude of cosmogenic background from $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission produced by cosmogenic activity in DarkSide. The study finds a background rate for $\\beta$-delayed neutrons in the fiducial volume of the detector on the order of < 0.1 event/year. However, detailed studies are required to obtain more precise estimates. The result should be compared to a radiogenic background event rate from the PMTs inside the DarkSide liquid scintillator veto of 0.2 events/year.

  18. Assessment of the use of prompt gamma emission for proton therapy range verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Styczynski, John R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PURPOSE: Prompt gamma rays emitted from proton-nucleus interactions in tissue present a promising non-invasive, in situ means of monitoring proton beam based radiotherapy. This study investigates the fluence and energy ...

  19. Delayed neutron emission measurements from fast fission of U-235 and Np-237

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlton, W.S.; Parish, T.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Raman, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shinohara, Nubuo; Andoh, Masaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been designed and conducted to measure the periods and yields of delayed neutrons from fast fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np. These measurements were performed in a pool type reactor using a fast flux in-core irradiation device. The energy dependent neutron flux spectrum within the irradiation device was characterized using a foil activation technique and the SAND-II unfolding code. Five delayed neutron groups were measured. The total yield (sum of the five group yields) for {sup 235}U was found to be 0.0141 {+-} 0. 0009. The total yield for {sup 237}Np was found to be 0.0102 {+-} 0. 0008. The total delayed neutron yield data were found to be in good agreement with previous measurements. The individual group yields reported here are preliminary and are being further refined.

  20. Investigation of delayed neutron emission through neutron and gamma- ray spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratz, K L; Ohm, H; Franz, H; Ristori, C; Zendel, M; Herrmann, G; Nuh, F M; Slaughter, D R; Shihab-Eldin, A A; Prussin, S G

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast radiochemical separations have permitted detailed and high resolution measurements of neutron and gamma -ray spectra from several delayed neutron emitting systems. The apparent discrete line structure in delayed neutron spectra, high intensity neutron branching to excited states in decay of intermediate levels in the emitter, and the peaking in the beta /sup -/-decay intensity to regions well above the neutron binding energy, indicate persistence of distinct nuclear structure effects at excitation energies of 5-7 MeV in the emitter nuclides.

  1. Agile Detection of Delayed Gamma-Ray Emission from the Short Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 090510

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuliani, A; Vianello, G; Marisaldi, M; Mereghetti, S; Tavani, M; Cutini, S; Barbiellini, G; Longo, F; Moretti, E; Feroci, M; Del Monte, E; Argan, A; Bulgarelli, A; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A W; Contessi, T; D'Ammando, F; Costa, E; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Ferrari, A; Fiorini, M; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Piano, G; Picozza, P; Pilia, M; Pucella, G; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Scalise, E; Striani, E; Soffitta, P; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vittorini, V; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Santolamazza, P; Giommi, P; Colafrancesco, S; Antonelli, L A; Salotti, L

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), typically lasting less than 2 s, are a special class of GRBs of great interest. We report the detection by the AGILE satellite of the short GRB 090510 which shows two clearly distinct emission phases: a prompt phase lasting ~ 200 msec and a second phase lasting tens of seconds. The burst is relatively intense in the 0.3-10 MeV range showing a spectrum of the prompt phase characterized by a large peak/cutoff energy near 3 MeV. Following the prompt phase, gamma-ray photons above 30 MeV were detected showing a power-law time decay of the flux of the type t^-1.3. The broad-band spectrum of this "delayed gamma-ray emission phase" is remarkably different from that of the prompt phase. It extends from sub-MeV to hundreds of MeV energies with a photon index alpha ~ 1.5. We present the timing and spectral data of GRB 090510 and briefly discuss its remarkable properties within the current models of gamma-ray emission of short GRBs.

  2. Measurements of nuclear $?$-ray line emission in interactions of protons and $?$ particles with N, O, Ne and Si

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Benhabiles-Mezhoud; J. Kiener; J. -P. Thibaud; V. Tatischeff; I. Deloncle; A. Coc; J. Duprat; C. Hamadache; A. Lefebvre-Schuhl; J. -C. Dalouzy; F. De Grancey; F. De Oliveira; F. Dayras; N. De Séréville; M. -G. Pellegriti; L. Lamia; S. Ouichaoui

    2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    $\\gamma$-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne and Si and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong $\\gamma$-ray lines of $^{16}$O produced in proton and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O and Ne and a thick foil was used for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and 39 MeV for $\\alpha$-particles have been delivered by the IPN-Orsay tandem accelerator. The $\\gamma$ rays have been detected with four HP-Ge detectors in the angular range 30$^{\\circ}$ to 135$^{\\circ}$. We extracted 36 cross section excitation functions for proton reactions and 14 for $\\alpha$-particle reactions. For the majority of the excitation functions no other data exist to our knowledge. Where comparison with existing data was possible usually a very good agreement was found. It is shown that these data are very interesting for constraining nuclear reaction models. In particular the agreement of cross section calculations in the nuclear reaction code TALYS with the measured data could be improved by adjusting the coupling schemes of collective levels in the target nuclei $^{14}$N, $^{20,22}$Ne and $^{28}$Si. The importance of these results for the modeling of nuclear $\\gamma$-ray line emission in astrophysical sites is discussed.

  3. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, W.S.; Li, X.L.; Wan, T.M.; Liu, J.F.; Zhang, G.L.; Li, Y. [Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM10 were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPS collected from various pollution Sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM10 is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM10 are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra.

  4. Energy deposition spectra of simultaneous electron emissions from low energy protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePriest, Kendall Russell

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    track is more complicated than the normal LET/RBE relationship. Recent measurements of atomic cross-section indicate that interactions of low energy protons with target atoms sometimes produce two or more electrons simultaneously. However, these cross...

  5. Proton emission imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCiantis, Joseph Loreto

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proton core imaging system has been developed and extensively used for measuring the nuclear burn regions of inertial confinement fusion implosions. These imaging cameras, mounted to the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility, use ...

  6. SU-E-J-121: Measuring Prompt Gamma Emission Profiles with a Multi-Stage Compton Camera During Proton Beam Irradiation: Initial Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polf, J; McCleskey, M [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Brown, S; Mann, J; He, Z [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mackin, D; Beddar, S [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Recent studies have suggested that the characteristics of prompt gammas (PG) emitted during proton beam irradiation are advantageous for determining beam range during treatment delivery. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of determining the proton beam range from PG data measured with a prototype Compton camera (CC) during proton beam irradiation. Methods: Using a prototype multi-stage CC the PG emission from a water phantom was measured during irradiation with clinical proton therapy beams. The measured PG emission data was used to reconstruct an image of the PG emission using a backprojection reconstruction algorithm. One dimensional (1D) profiles extracted from the PG images were compared to: 1) PG emission data measured at fixed depths using collimated high purity Germanium and Lanthanum Bromide detectors, and 2) the measured depth dose profiles of the proton beams. Results: Comparisons showed that the PG emission profiles reconstructed from CC measurements agreed very well with the measurements of PG emission as a function of depth made with the collimated detectors. The distal falloff of the measured PG profile was between 1 mm to 4 mm proximal to the distal edge of the Bragg peak for proton beam ranges from 4 cm to 16 cm in water. Doses of at least 5 Gy were needed for the CC to measure sufficient data to image the PG profile and localize the distal PG falloff. Conclusion: Initial tests of a prototype CC for imaging PG emission during proton beam irradiation indicated that measurement and reconstruction of the PG profile was possible. However, due to limitations of the operational parameters (energy range and count rate) of the current CC prototype, doses of greater than a typical treatment dose (?2 Gy) were needed to measure adequate PG signal to reconstruct viable images. Funding support for this project provided by a grant from DoD.

  7. Interpretation of delayed neutron emission using a non-statistical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihab-Eldin, A A; Nuh, F M; Prussin, S G

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data on several delayed neutron emitting systems exhibit characteristics not accounted for by the normal statistical model. Using a single-particle approach, the locations and relative beta - strengths to configurations in the emitter nuclides populated by allowed G.T. transitions have been calculated and are in qualitative agreement with strength function data for /sup 85/As, /sup 87/Br, /sup 135/Sb and /sup 137/I. Calculations of P/sub n/-values for the bromine precursors A=87 to 92 are also in good agreement with experimental data. The lack of high energy neutrons in spectra where excited states in the final nucleus are strongly populated can be traced qualitatively to particle-hole excitations contributing to the excited states. (16 refs).

  8. Large {beta}-Delayed Neutron Emission Probabilities in the {sup 78}Ni Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winger, J. A.; Ilyushkin, S. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi 39762 (United States); Rykaczewski, K. P.; Gross, C. J.; Shapira, D. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Batchelder, J. C. [UNIRIB, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Goodin, C.; Hamilton, J. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Grzywacz, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Korgul, A. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Warszawa, PL 00-681 (Poland); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Joint Institute for Heavy-Ion Reactions, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Krolas, W. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow, PL 31-342 (Poland); Joint Institute for Heavy-Ion Reactions, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Liddick, S. N. [UNIRIB, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Mazzocchi, C. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); IFGA, University of Milan and INFN, Milano, I-20133 (Italy); Padgett, S.; Rajabali, M. M. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E. F. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)] (and others)

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The {beta}-delayed neutron branching ratios (P{sub {beta}}{sub n}) for nuclei near doubly magic {sup 78}Ni have been directly measured using a new method combining high-resolution mass separation, reacceleration, and digital {beta}-{gamma} spectroscopy of {sup 238}U fission products. The P{sub {beta}}{sub n} values for the very neutron-rich isotopes {sup 76-78}Cu and {sup 83}Ga were found to be much higher than previously reported and predicted. Revised calculations of the {beta}n process, accounting for new mass measurements and an inversion of the {pi}2p{sub 3/2} and {pi}1f{sub 5/2} orbitals, are in better agreement with these new experimental results.

  9. Studies of Charged Particle Emission in the Decay of 45Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, W. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Grigorenko, L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, H. [University of Warsaw; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabrowski, Ryszard [Warsaw University; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, M. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of extremely neutron-deficient isotope 45Fe has been studied by using a new type of gaseous detector in which a technique of optical imaging is used to record tracks of charged particles. The two-proton radioactivity and the -decay channels accompanied by proton(s) emission were clearly identified. For the first time, the angular and energy correlations between two protons emitted from the 45Fe ground-state were measured. The obtained distributions were confronted with predictions of a three-body model. Studies of -decay channels of 45Fe provided first unambiguous evidence for the -delayed three proton emission.

  10. Pion absorption on {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He with emission of three energetic protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LADS Collaboration

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from a 4{pi} solid angle measurement of the reactions {sup 3}He({pi}{sup +},ppp) and {sup 4}He({pi}{sup +},ppp)n at incident pion energies of T{sub {pi}{sup +}}=70, 118, 162, 239, and 330 MeV are presented. For {sup 3}He the total absorption cross sections and their decomposition into two-proton and three-proton components are evaluated; for {sup 4}He the three-proton absorption cross sections are given. The differential distributions of the three-proton multinucleon absorption mode of both nuclei are analyzed and compared to each other by making use of a complete set of variables. The data are investigated for signatures of initial and final state interactions: it is found that more than half of the three-proton yield cannot be accounted for by cascade mechanisms. The remaining strength shows dependence on the incident pion angular momentum, but also structures that are not explained by simple semiclassical models. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Plastic damping of Alfv\\'en waves in magnetar flares and delayed afterglow emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinyu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetar flares generate Alfv\\'en waves bouncing in the closed magnetosphere with energy up to $\\sim 10^{46}$ erg. We show that on a 10-ms timescale the waves are transmitted into the star and form a compressed packet of high energy density. This packet strongly shears the stellar crust and initiates a plastic flow, heating the crust and melting it hundreds of meters below the surface. A fraction of the deposited plastic heat is eventually conducted to the stellar surface, contributing to the surface afterglow months to years after the flare. A large fraction of heat is lost to neutrino emission or conducted into the core of the neutron star.

  12. Measurements of delayed neutron emission from Np-237, Am-241, and Am-243

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleh, H.H.; Parish, T.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Raman, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotopes of transuranic elements are produced as a result of successive radiative capture reactions in the fuel of a nuclear reactor. Typically, these transuranic isotopes decay through long chains, have long half lives and dominate the long term toxicity of the spent reactor fuel. One of the options for waste management is to remove the transuranic from spent fuel by chemical processing, to load them into new special fuel elements, and to transmute them by neutron induced fission into shorter-lived fission fragments. Previous studies have shown the feasibility of actinide transmutation in either Light Water Reactors or Liquid Metal Fast Reactors. Due to the anticipated high transuranic loadings in the fuel of actinide burner reactors, the neutronic properties of the transuranic isotopes will have a significant effect on the operational and safety characteristics of such reactors. Experiments to determine delayed neutron group yields and decay constants for Np-237, Am-241, and Am-243 have been designed and carried out. The experiments were conducted at Texas A&M University TRIGA reactor using a very fast pneumatic transfer system.

  13. SU-E-J-247: A Simulation of X-Ray Emission with Gold Nanoparticle Irradiated by Energetic Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newpower, M; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the proton induced X-ray emissions in gold-water mixture materials. Methods: In this study a Monte Carlo simulation was created using the GEANT4 toolkit (version 4.9.6). The geometry in this setup includes a 2 cm × 2 cm × 2 cm target, a scoring sphere (radius = 10 cm) and a 65 MeV planar proton source (2 cm × 2 cm). Four concentrations of a gold-water solution were irradiated with 5×10{sup 5} incident protons at a distance of 0.5 cm perpendicular to the surface of the target. The solutions of gold-water mixture had 10%, 5%, 1% and 0.5% of gold by mass, respectively. The number of photon emitting for the target was counted in the scoring sphere for the energy range of 0-86.0 keV in 0.1 keV bins. For this study the reference physics list PhysListEmStandard was used together with the x-ray fluorescence, Auger electron and PIXE (particle induced xray emission) options enabled. The range cuts for photons and electrons were set at 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm, respectively. Results: In the energy spectra of emitting X-ray fluorescence, peaks from gold K shell characteristic x-rays (68.8 and 66.9 keV) were observed. The number of counts under the peaks of Ka1 and Ka2 was found to increase with the increasing of the gold concentrations in the mixture materials. The X-ray yields (for both Ka1 and Ka2) when fitted with least-square method as a function of gold concentration demonstrate a linear dependency with R{sup 2} > 0.96. The Ka1yield per incident proton was found to be 0.0016 for 10% gold-water mixture solutions. Conclusion: This preliminary study with PIXE technique with gold nanoparticle has demonstrated potentials for its utilization in the development of range and dose verification methodology that is currently of great interest in the field of proton radiation therapy.

  14. New Proton Radioactivity Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    New Proton Radioactivity Measurements Richard J. Irvine Thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor to search for examples of proton emission from ground and low­lying states in odd­Z nuclei at the proton into a double­sided silicon strip detector system, where their subsequent particle decays (proton or alpha) were

  15. {beta}-decay half-lives and {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities for neutron rich nuclei close to the N=82r-process path

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montes, F.; Estrade, A.; Hosmer, P.T.; Ouellette, M.; Schatz, H. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (United States); Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Liddick, S.N.; Mantica, P.F.; Tomlin, B.E. [Dept. of Chemistry, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Morton, A.C.; Mueller, W.F.; Santi, P.; Stolz, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Pellegrini, E. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Arndt, O.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, Fritz-Strassmann Weg 2, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); VISTARS-Virtuelles Institut der Struktur der Kerne und nuklearer Astrophysik, Mainz (Germany); Reeder, P. [Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Walters, W.B. [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Aprahamian, A.; Woehr, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, and Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46616 (United States)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    {beta}-delayed neutron emission branchings (or upper limits) for neutron rich {sup 116-120}Rh, {sup 120-122}Pd, and {sup 124}Ag have been measured. These branching ratios serve as direct inputs to astrophysical rapid neutron capture process models and affect the final abundances calculated in these models. In addition, half-lives for neutron rich {sup 114-115}Tc, {sup 114-118}Ru, {sup 116-121}Rh, and {sup 119-124}Pd near the proposed path of the r-process have also been measured. The results agree with theoretical quasiparticle random-phase approximation calculations within model uncertainties; the only exception is the delayed neutron branching in the decay of {sup 120}Rh, which is found to be much smaller than predicted.

  16. Semiclassical Distorted Wave Model Analysis of Backward Proton Emission from $(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ Reactions at Intermediate Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. K. Gaidarov; Y. Watanabe; K. Ogata; M. Kohno; M. Kawai; A. N. Antonov

    2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiclassical distorted wave (SCDW) model with Wigner transform of one-body density matrix is presented for multistep direct $(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ reactions to the continuum. The model uses Wigner distribution functions obtained in methods which include nucleon-nucleon correlations to a different extent, as well as Woods-Saxon (WS) single-particle wave function. The higher momentum components of target nucleons that play a crucial role in reproducing the high-energy part of the backward proton spectra are properly taken into account. This SCDW model is applied to analyses of multistep direct processes in $^{12}$C$(p,p^{\\prime}x)$, $^{40}$Ca$(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ and $^{90}$Zr$(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ in the incident energy range of 150--392 MeV. The double differential cross sections are calculated up to three-step processes. The calculated angular distributions are in good agreement with the experimental data, in particular at backward angles where the previous SCDW calculations with the WS single-particle wave function showed large underestimation. It is found that the result with the Wigner distribution function based on the coherent density fluctuation model provides overall better agreement with the experimental data over the whole emission energies.

  17. Beta-decay half-lives and beta-delayed neutron emission probabilities of nuclei in the region below A=110, relevant for the r-process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, J; Aprahamian, A; Arndt, O; Becerril, A; Elliot, T; Estrade, A; Galaviz, D; Kessler, R; Kratz, K -L; Lorusso, G; Mantica, P F; Matos, M; Møller, P; Montes, F; Pfeiffer, B; Schatz, H; Schertz, F; Schnorrenberger, L; Smith, E; Stolz, A; Quinn, M; Walters, W B; Wöhr, A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the beta-decay properties of r-process nuclei below A=110 have been completed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, at Michigan State University. Beta-decay half-lives for Y-105, Zr-106,107 and Mo-111, along with beta-delayed neutron emission probabilities of Y-104, Mo-109,110 and upper limits for Y-105, Zr-103,104,105,106,107 and Mo-108,111 have been measured for the first time. Studies on the basis of the quasi-random phase approximation are used to analyze the ground-state deformation of these nuclei.

  18. {beta}-decay half-lives and {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities of nuclei in the region A < or approx. 110, relevant for the r process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, J.; Galaviz, D.; Matos, M.; Montes, F. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Hennrich, S.; Kessler, R.; Schertz, F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Virtuelles Institut fuer Struktur der Kerne and Nuklearer Astrophysik, Mainz (Germany); Aprahamian, A.; Quinn, M.; Woehr, A. [Institute of Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana (United States); Arndt, O.; Pfeiffer, B. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Virtuelles Institut fuer Struktur der Kerne and Nuklearer Astrophysik, Mainz (Germany); Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Estrade, A.; Lorusso, G.; Schatz, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Kratz, K.-L. [Virtuelles Institut fuer Struktur der Kerne and Nuklearer Astrophysik, Mainz (Germany); Max Planck Institut fuer Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, Mainz (Germany); Mantica, P. F. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Moeller, P. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico (United States)] (and others)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of {beta}-decay properties of A < or approx. 110 r-process nuclei have been completed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. {beta}-decay half-lives for {sup 105}Y, {sup 106,107}Zr, and {sup 111}Mo, along with {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities of {sup 104}Y, {sup 109,110}Mo and upper limits for {sup 105}Y, {sup 103-107}Zr, and {sup 108,111}Mo have been measured for the first time. Studies on the basis of the quasi-random-phase approximation are used to analyze the ground-state deformation of these nuclei.

  19. Beta-decay half-lives and beta-delayed neutron emission probabilities of nuclei in the region below A=110, relevant for the r-process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pereira; S. Hennrich; A. Aprahamian; O. Arndt; A. Becerril; T. Elliot; A. Estrade; D. Galaviz; R. Kessler; K. -L. Kratz; G. Lorusso; P. F. Mantica; M. Matos; P. Moller; F. Montes; B. Pfeiffer; H. Schatz; F. Schertz; L. Schnorrenberger; E. Smith; A. Stolz; M. Quinn; W. B. Walters; A. Wohr

    2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the beta-decay properties of r-process nuclei below A=110 have been completed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, at Michigan State University. Beta-decay half-lives for Y-105, Zr-106,107 and Mo-111, along with beta-delayed neutron emission probabilities of Y-104, Mo-109,110 and upper limits for Y-105, Zr-103,104,105,106,107 and Mo-108,111 have been measured for the first time. Studies on the basis of the quasi-random phase approximation are used to analyze the ground-state deformation of these nuclei.

  20. Measurements of delayed-neutron emission from {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleh, H.H.; Parish, T.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Raman, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotopes of transuranic elements are produced by successive radiative capture reactions in the fuel of a nuclear reactor. Typically, these transuranic isotopes decay through long chains, have long half-lives, and dominate the long-term toxicity of the spent reactor fuel. One of the options for waste management is to remove the transuranics from spent fuel by chemical processing, to load them into new special fuel elements, and to transmute them by neutron-induced fission into shorter lived fission fragments. Previous studies have shown the feasibility of actinide transmutation in either light water reactors or liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors. Due to the anticipated high transuranic loadings in the fuel of actinide burner reactors, the neutronic properties of the transuranic isotopes will have a significant effect on the operational and safety characteristics of such reactors. Experiments to determine delayed-neutron group yields and decay constants for {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am have been designed and carried out. The experiments were conducted at Texas A&M University on the TRIGA reactor using a very fast pneumatic transfer system.

  1. Time features of delayed neutrons and partial emissive-fission cross sections for the neutron-induced fission of {sup 232}Th nuclei in the energy range 3.2-17.9 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roshchenko, V. A., E-mail: roshchenko@ippe.ru; Piksaikin, V. M., E-mail: piksa@ippe.ru; Korolev, G. G.; Egorov, A. S., E-mail: egorov@ippe.r [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy dependence of the relative abundances of delayed neutrons and the energy dependence of the half-lives of their precursors in the neutron-induced fission of {sup 232}Th nuclei in the energy range 3.2-17.9 MeV were measured for the first time. A systematics of the time features of delayed neutrons is developed. This systematics makes it possible to estimate the half-life of delayed-neutron precursors as a function of the nucleonic composition of fissile nuclei by using a single parameter set for all nuclides. The energy dependence of the partial cross sections for emissive fission in the reaction {sup 232}Th(n, f) was analyzed on the basis of data obtained for the relative abundances of delayed neutrons and the aforementioned half-lives and on the basis of the created systematics of the time features of delayed neutrons. It was shown experimentally for the first time that the decrease in the cross section after the reaction threshold in the fission of {sup 232}Th nuclei (it has a pronounced first-chance plateau) is not an exclusion among the already studied uranium, plutonium, and curium isotopes and complies with theoretical predictions obtained for the respective nuclei with allowance for shell, superfluid, and collective effects in the nuclear-level density and with allowance for preequilibrium neutron emission

  2. Studies of Charged Particle Emission in the Decay of 45Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, W. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Grigorenko, L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, H. [University of Warsaw; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabrowski, Ryszard [Warsaw University; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, Robert [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, Mustafa [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of extremely neutron-deficient isotope 45Fe has been studied by using a new type of gaseous detector in which a technique of optical imaging is used to record tracks of charged particles. The two-proton radioactivity and the beta-decay channels accompanied by proton(s) emission were clearly identified. For the first time, the angular and energy correlations between two protons emitted from the 45Fe ground-state were measured. The obtained distributions were confronted with predictions of a three-body model. Studies of beta-decay channels of 45Fe provided first unambiguous evidence for the beta-delayed three proton emission.

  3. Control of emission wavelength for InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells and laser structures on their basis by means of proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhlestina, S. A.; Vasil'ev, V. K.; Vikhrova, O. V., E-mail: vikhrova@nifti.unn.ru; Danilov, Yu. A.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Nekorkin, S. M. [Lobachevsky Nizhni Novgorod State University, Physicotechnical Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Features of controlling the wavelength of emission from laser heterostructures with strained InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells by irradiation with medium-energy (with the energy as high as 150 keV) protons are studied. It is established that irradiation with H{sup +} ions and subsequent thermal annealing at a temperature of 700 deg. C make it possible to decrease the wavelength of emission from quantum wells. As the dose of ions is increased from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, the magnitude of change in the wavelength increases to 20 nm. Starting with a dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, a significant decrease in the intensity of emission is observed. The optimum dose of H{sup +} ions (6 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}) and annealing temperature (700 deg. C) for modifying the InGaAs/GaAs/InGaP laser structures are determined; it is shown that, in this case, one can obtain a shift of {approx}(8-10) nm for the wavelength of laser radiation with low losses in intensity with the quality of the surface of laser structures retained. The observed 'blue' shift is caused by implantation-stimulated processes of intermixing of the In and Ga atoms at the InGaAs/GaAs interface.

  4. Electron Capture-delayed neutron-emissions in neutron star crust simulations using a Hauser-Feshbach model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Sanjib S.; Heger, A.; Moeller, P.; Kawano, T. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratories, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, Electron Captures (henceforth EC) into excited states of neutron-rich nuclei were shown by the LANL-Michigan State-Mainz collaboration to result in Neutron Star (henceforth NS) Crust heating which was 4-5 times that of previous calculations. That result also highlighted the importance of a spread in X-ray burst abundances over several mass chains which could contribute to substantial heating through large shell and sub-shell gaps showing up in the excitation energy spectrum of the EC daughter. Such effects did not dominate when a single beta-stable species was evolved in an accreted parcel of matter in earlier calculations. We are now exploring the nucleosynthesis and heating from neutron processes deeper in the NS Crust around 10{sup 11} gcm{sup -3}. Electron captures into excited states of neutron-rich nuclei above neutron separation energies requires a Hauser-Feshbach code to calculate the branchings between 1-, 2-, 3-,...neutron emission rates in the stellar environment. Since the evolving composition has a free neutron fraction at a very density, the equilibrium composition at a given depth requires readjustments with respect to both the electron chemical potential and the neutron chemical potential, and the emitted neutrons can be captured into other mass chains with a net release of heat. From a nucleosynthesis perspective, we have a very interesting and hitherto unexplored pattern of weak interactions and neutron processes similar to the r-process, with the exception that the weak processes are primarily density-driven in the rather cold crust (T{sub 9} = 0.4-0.6) and in the {beta}{sup +} direction, that is, toward increasing neutron richness.

  5. Half-lives and branchings for {\\beta}-delayed neutron emission for neutron-rich Co-Cu isotopes in the r-process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosmer, P; Aprahamian, A; Arndt, O; Clement, R R C; Estrade, A; Farouqi, K; Kratz, K -L; Liddick, S N; Lisetskiy, A F; Mantica, P F; Möller, P; Mueller, W F; Montes, F; Morton, A C; Ouellette, M; Pellegrini, E; Pereira, J; Pfeiffer, B; Reeder, P; Santi, P; Steiner, M; Stolz, A; Tomlin, B E; Walters, W B; Wöhr, A; 10.1103/PhysRevC.82.025806

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The {\\beta} decays of very neutron-rich nuclides in the Co-Zn region were studied experimentally at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using the NSCL {\\beta}-counting station in conjunction with the neutron detector NERO. We measured the branchings for {\\beta}-delayed neutron emission (Pn values) for 74Co (18 +/- 15%) and 75-77Ni (10 +/- 2.8%, 14 +/- 3.6%, and 30 +/- 24%, respectively) for the first time, and remeasured the Pn values of 77-79Cu, 79,81Zn, and 82Ga. For 77-79Cu and for 81Zn we obtain significantly larger Pn values compared to previous work. While the new half-lives for the Ni isotopes from this experiment had been reported before, we present here in addition the first half-life measurements of 75Co (30 +/- 11 ms) and 80Cu (170+110 -50 ms). Our results are compared with theoretical predictions, and their impact on various types of models for the astrophysical rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is explored. We find that with our new data, the classical r-process model is bet...

  6. Delay in Atomic Photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheifets, A. S. [Research School of Physical Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-4030 (United States); Ivanov, I. A. [Research School of Physical Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the time delay between emission of photoelectrons from the outer valence ns and np subshells in noble gas atoms following absorption of an attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulse. Various processes such as elastic scattering of the photoelectron on the parent ion and many-electron correlation affect the apparent 'time zero' when the photoelectron leaves the atom. This qualitatively explains the time delay between photoemission from the 2s and 2p subshells of Ne as determined experimentally by attosecond streaking [Science 328, 1658 (2010)]. However, with our extensive numerical modeling, we were only able to account for less than half of the measured time delay of 21{+-}5 as. We argue that the extreme ultraviolet pulse alone cannot produce such a large time delay and it is the streaking IR field that is most likely responsible for this effect.

  7. Half-lives and branchings for {beta}-delayed neutron emission for neutron-rich Co-Cu isotopes in the r-process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosmer, P.; Estrade, A.; Montes, F.; Ouellette, M.; Pellegrini, E. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Schatz, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Aprahamian, A. [Department of Physics and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Arndt, O.; Pfeiffer, B. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, Fritz-Strassmann Weg 2, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); HGF Virtuelles Institut fuer Kernstruktur und Nukleare Astrophysik (Germany); Clement, R. R. C.; Mueller, W. F.; Morton, A. C.; Pereira, J.; Santi, P.; Steiner, M.; Stolz, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Farouqi, K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Kratz, K.-L. [HGF Virtuelles Institut fuer Kernstruktur und Nukleare Astrophysik (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut), J.-J.-Becherweg 27, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Liddick, S. N.; Mantica, P. F. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The {beta} decays of very neutron-rich nuclides in the Co-Zn region were studied experimentally at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using the NSCL {beta}-counting station in conjunction with the neutron detector NERO. We measured the branchings for {beta}-delayed neutron emission (P{sub n} values) for {sup 74}Co (18{+-}15%) and {sup 75-77}Ni (10{+-}2.8%, 14{+-}3.6%, and 30{+-}24%, respectively) for the first time, and remeasured the P{sub n} values of {sup 77-79}Cu, {sup 79,81}Zn, and {sup 82}Ga. For {sup 77-79}Cu and for {sup 81}Zn we obtain significantly larger P{sub n} values compared to previous work. While the new half-lives for the Ni isotopes from this experiment had been reported before, we present here in addition the first half-life measurements of {sup 75}Co (30{+-}11 ms) and {sup 80}Cu (170{sub -50}{sup +110} ms). Our results are compared with theoretical predictions, and their impact on various types of models for the astrophysical rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is explored. We find that with our new data, the classical r-process model is better able to reproduce the A=78-80 abundance pattern inferred from the solar abundances. The new data also influence r-process models based on the neutrino-driven high-entropy winds in core collapse supernovae.

  8. Measured delayed neutron spectra from the fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlton, W.S.; Comfort, C.; Parish, T.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Raman, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas A and M University (Texas A and M) in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, have been actively studying the delayed neutron emission characteristics of the higher actinide isotopes for several years. Recently, a proton recoil detector system was designed, built, and characterized for use in measuring delayed neutron energy spectra following neutron-induced fission. The system has been used to measure aggregate delayed neutron energy spectra from neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np. These spectra have also been compared to that calculated using individual precursor P{sub n} values, yields, and spectra from the ENDF/B-VI file.

  9. Proton emission from cone-in-shell fast-ignition experiments at Omega N. Sinenian, W. Theobald, J. A. Frenje, C. Stoeckl, F. H. Sguin et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623, USA 3 General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186, USA of energetic protons from cone-in-shell fast-igniton implosions at Omega have been conducted ) of energetic protons (7.5 MeV max.), indicating the presence of strong electric fields. These energetic protons

  10. The proton microquasar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriela S. Vila; Gustavo E. Romero

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for high-energy emission in microquasars where the energy content of the jets is dominated by relativistic protons. We also include a primary leptonic component. Particles are accelerated up to relativistic energies in a compact region located near the base of the jet, where most of the emission is produced. We calculate the production spectrum due to proton and electron synchrotron radiation and photohadronic interactions. The target field for proton-photon collisions is provided by the synchrotron radiation in the acceleration region. In models with a significant leptonic component, strong internal photon-photon absorption can attenuate the emission spectrum at high energies. Depending on the values of the parameters, our model predicts luminosities in the range 10^34-10^37 erg s^-1 up to GeV energies, with a high-energy tail that can extend up to 10^16 eV. In some cases, however, absorption effects can completely suppress the emission above 10 GeV, giving rise to different spectral shapes. These results can be tested in the near future by observations with instruments like GLAST-Fermi, HESS II and MAGIC II.

  11. Measured Delayed Neutron Spectra from the Fission of U-235 and Np-237

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlton, W.S.; Comfort, C.; Parish, T.A.; Raman, S.

    1998-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas A&M University, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory / the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, have been actively studying the delayed neutron emission characteristics of the higher actinide isotopes for several years. 1-3 Recently, a proton recoil detector system was designed, built, and characterized for use in measuring delayed neutron energy spectra following neutron induced fission. The system has been used to measure aggregate delayed neutron energy spectra from neutron induced fission of U-235 and Np-237. These spectra have also been compared to that calculated using individual precursor P, values, yields, and spectra from the ENDF/B-VI file. A proton recoil detector array consisting of three LND Model 28305 high- -pressure proton recoil detectors has been constructed at the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center. The array was characterized using several neutron and gamma- ray sources to check for efficiency, gamma-ray response, and reliability of the unfolding techniques. Resultant measured proton recoil distributions were unfolded using a modified version of the spectrum unfolding code PSNS (the new code was renamed SAC). SAC used response functions calculated using MCNP 4A. This feature allowed the inclusion of several inches of lead between the detector and the source to decrease the detector's sensitivity to gamma-rays, while appropriately accounting for the effect on the transmitted neutron spectrum. Following proper calibration of the array, highly-purified sources of U-235 were irradiated in the Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) at a power of 1 MW for 200

  12. XMM-Newton Data Processing for Faint Diffuse Emission: Proton Flares, Exposure Maps and Report on EPIC MOS1 Bright CCDs Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pradas; J. Kerp

    2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the in-flight performance of the XMM-Newton EPIC MOS and pn detectors, with focus on the influence of proton flares and vignetting on the data. The very wide range in the conditions of our sample of observations, in terms of exposure length and background intensities, allows the detection of a wide range in the spectra of the proton flares, in contrast to the hard-spectrum flares proposed by Lumb et al.(2002) or Read et al.(2003) We also find an up to now unreported contamination in the low energy regime (Econtamination yields in "bright CCDs" in the observations. Its effect must be taken into account for the study of sources detected in the affected CCDs. With respect to vignetting, we present in-flight exposure maps and we propose a method to repeat this calculation for user-definable energy bands. All the results presented here, have the goal to enable the study of very faint extended sources with XMM-Newton, like nearby galactic X-ray halos or the soft X-ray background.

  13. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and R are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield for extending by 103 the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions. Sci. Instrum. 85, 063502 (2014); 10.1063/1.4880203 D 3 He -proton emission imaging for inertial

  14. Proton radioactivity half lives with Skyrme interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R. Routray; Abhishek Mishra; S. K. Tripathy; B. Behera; D. N. Basu

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential barrier impeding the spontaneous emission of protons in the proton radioactive nuclei is calculated as the sum of nuclear, Coulomb and centrifugal contributions. The nuclear part of the proton-nucleus interaction potential is obtained in the energy density formalism using Skyrme effective interaction that results into a simple algebraic expression. The half-lives of the proton emitters are calculated for the different Skyrme sets within the improved WKB framework. The results are found to be in reasonable agreement with the earlier results obtained for more complicated calculations involving finite range interactions.

  15. Delayed Neutron and Delayed Photon Characteristics from Photofission of Actinides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dore, D.; Berthoumieux, E.; Leprince, A.; Ridikas, D. [DSM/IRFUS/PhN, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, F-91191 (France); Ledoux, X. [CEA/DAM/DIF, Arpajon, F-91297 (France); Agelou, M.; Carrel, F.; Gmar, M. [CEA, LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette, F-91191 (France)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed neutron (DN) and delayed photon (DP) emissions from photofission reactions play an important role for applications involving nuclear material detection and characterization. To provide new, accurate, basic nuclear data for evaluations and data libraries, an experimental programme of DN and DP measurements has been undertaken for actinides with bremsstrahlung endpoint energy in the giant resonance region ({approx}15 MeV). In this paper, the experimental setup and the data analysis method will be described. Experimental results for DN and DP characteristics will be presented for {sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu. Finally, an example of an application to study the contents of nuclear waste packages will be briefly discussed.

  16. Proton core imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proton core imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion implosions J. L. De; published online 7 April 2006 A proton emission imaging system has been developed and used extensively the penetrating 14.7 MeV protons produced from D 3 He fusion reactions to produce emission images of the nuclear

  17. Reactivity impact of delayed neutron spectra on MCNP calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosteller, R.D.; Werner, C.J.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new features in MCNP4C, the latest version of the MCNP Monte Carlo code, include the capability to sample from delayed as well as prompt fission emission spectra. Previous versions of MCNP all have sampled exclusively from prompt spectra. Delayed neutrons typically account for <1% of all neutrons emitted from fission, but the emission spectra for delayed neutrons are somewhat softer than those for prompt neutrons. Because of the softer spectrum, delayed neutrons are less likely to leak from the system, and they also are less likely to cause fission in isotopes that have an effective threshold for fission (e.g., {sup 238}U and {sup 240}Pu). Consequently, the inclusion of delayed neutron spectra can have a small but significant effect on reactivity calculations. This study performs MCNP4C calculations for a series of established benchmarks and quantifies the reactivity impact of the delayed neutron spectra.

  18. Proton radioactivity within a generalized liquid drop model J. M. Dong,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proton radioactivity within a generalized liquid drop model J. M. Dong,1 H. F. Zhang,1 and G. Royer) The proton radioactivity half-lives of spherical proton emitters are investigated theoretically. The potential barriers preventing the emission of proton are determined in the quasimolecular shape path within

  19. Moving Protons with Pendant Amines: Proton Mobility in a Nickel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moving Protons with Pendant Amines: Proton Mobility in a Nickel Catalyst for Oxidation of Hydrogen. Moving Protons with Pendant Amines: Proton Mobility in a Nickel Catalyst for...

  20. Delayed neutron measurements from fast fission of actinide waste isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charlton, William S.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to determine the delayed neutron emission properties from fast fission of several actinide waste isotopes. The specific isotopes evaluated were U-235, Np-237, and Am-243. A calculational technique based on the microscopic...

  1. Micro-PIXE (proton-induced X-ray emission) study of the effects of fluoride on mineral distribution patterns in enamel and dentin in the developing hamster tooth germ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Tros, G.H.; Bronckers, A.L.; Woeltgens, J.H. (ACTA, Amsterdam (Netherland))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro-PIXE (proton-induced X-ray emission) analysis was performed on unfixed and anhydrously prepared sections from developing enamel and dentin from hamsters injected with a single dose of 20 mg NaF/kg body weight. Fluoride, apart from inducing the formation of the characteristic paired response in the enamel (i.e., a hyper- followed by a hypomineralized band in the secretory enamel), also induces the formation of sub-ameloblastic cystic lesions under the transitional and early secretory enamel accompanied by relatively intense hypermineralization of the underlying cystic enamel surface. These cystic lesions, however, were only found to be associated with certain isolated populations of these cells. In addition, these lesions were restricted to the smooth surfaces of the tooth germ only. Cystic lesions such as those seen under the transitional and early secretory ameloblasts were not observed under the fully secretory or maturation stage ameloblasts. Why fluoride induces the formation of cystic lesions in some ameloblast populations while other cells in the same stage of development apparently remain unaffected, is a matter which needs further investigation.

  2. Status of six-group delayed neutron data and relationships between delayed neutron parameters from the macroscopic and microscopic approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, T.A.; Charlton, W.S. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Shinohara, N.; Andoh, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Brady, M.C. [Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., Charlotte, NC (United States); Raman, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work performed in part for an American Nuclear Society Standards Committee Subgroup (ANS 19.9) to assess the status of delayed neutron data is summarized. Recent measurements of delayed neutron emission conducted at Texas A and M University are also described. During the last 10 yr, there have been advances in nuclear data libraries (e.g., improved fission product yields) that make it possible to quantitatively predict delayed neutron emission from basic data. The six-group delayed neutron data available in the literature from both macroscopic level experiments and microscopic level calculations for several actinide isotopes are compared. Results are also presented from recent experimental measurements of delayed neutron emission and delineates some of the relationships between these measurements and microscopic level predictions. For example, from the experimental measurements, Keepin`s delayed neutron group 1 is shown to correspond mainly to a single isotope. {sup 87}Br, as expected from microscopic level theory, and Keepin`s group 2 is shown to correspond to primarily two separate isotopes. {sup 137}I and {sup 88}Br. In the future, it may be useful to use properties of specific isotopes to replace Keepin`s delayed neutron groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 for prescribing delayed neutron data for actinides.

  3. Delayed neutron alignment in sup 117 I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, E.S.; Waring, M.P.; Clark, R.M.; Forbes, S.A.; Fossan, D.B.; Hughes, J.R.; LaFosse, D.R.; Liang, Y.; Ma, R.; Vaska, P.; Wadsworth, R. (Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom) Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States) Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO1 5DD (United Kingdom) Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rotational alignment of {ital h}{sub 11/2} neutrons is considerably delayed ({Delta}{h bar}{omega}{similar to}0.11 MeV) in the {pi}{ital h}{sub 11/2}(550)1/2{sup {minus}} intruder band in {sup 117}I when compared to bands built on normal-parity states. Comparison with cranked shell-model calculations suggests that this effect may indicate a larger quadrupole deformation for the intruder orbital. A strong neutron-proton interaction between the aligning {ital h}{sub 11/2} neutrons and the {ital h}{sub 11/2} proton intruder may also play a role. In addition, noncollective oblate states at {ital I}{sup {pi}}=39/2{sup {minus}},43/2{sup {minus}}, and 45/2{sup {minus}} compete energetically with rotational states of the intruder band which may also perturb the neutron alignment.

  4. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keppel, Cynthia (Hampton University Proton Therapy) [Hampton University Proton Therapy

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  5. Proton structure and tensor gluons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Savvidy

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a possibility that inside the proton and, more generally, inside the hadrons there are additional partons - tensor-gluons, which can carry a part of the proton momentum. The tensor-gluons have zero electric charge, like gluons, but have a larger spin. Inside the proton a nonzero density of the tensor-gluons can be generated by the emission of tensor-gluons by gluons. The last mechanism is typical for non-Abelian tensor gauge theories, in which there exists a gluon-tensor-tensor vertex of order g. Therefore the number of gluons changes not only because a quark may radiate a gluon or because a gluon may split into a quark-antiquark pair or into two gluons, but also because a gluon can split into two tensor-gluons. The process of gluon splitting suggests that part of the proton momentum which was carried by neutral partons is shared between vector and tensor gluons. We derive evolution equations for the parton distribution functions which take into account these new processes. The momentum sum rule allows to find the tensor-gluons contribution to the Callan-Simanzik beta function and to calculate the corresponding anomalous dimensions. This contribution changes the behavior of the structure functions, and the logarithmic correction to the Bjorken scaling becomes more mild. This also influences the unification scale at which the coupling constants of the Standard Model merge, shifting its value to lower energies of order of 40 TeV.

  6. Evaluation and application of delayed neutron precursor data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, M.C.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Up to 1300 nuclides are yielded in fission. Of these, 271 have been identified as precursors for delayed neutron emission. An extensive reference library of delayed neutron data has been compiled which contains fission yields and branchings, delay neutron emission probabilities and spectra for each of these 271 precursor nuclides. The emphasis of the present work has been in improving the spectral data. Experimental spectra from laboratories in the United States, Germany, and Sweden have been incorporated in this evaluation. The experimental spectra have been augmented with model calculations such that the spectra included in the final library extend over the full theoretical energy range for delayed neutron emission. Models were also used to predict spectra for nuclides with no measured data. The data compiled in the precursor library have been used to calculate the aggregate behavior of delayed neutrons for the 43 fissioning systems having evaluated fission yields. Delayed neutron activities predicted using the explicit precursor data have also been approximated by three, six, nine and twelve time-groups using least squares techniques. The fitted six group data, being the more conventional representation, were also used to predict a consistent set of six-group spectra. Comparisons with the University of Lowell's recently published measurements of /sup 235/U delay interval spectra were also made. Beta-effective calculations for a simple Godiva system were performed and were compared to the experimental value.

  7. Proton Angular Distribution for 90 Mev Neutron-proton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadley, James

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recoil protons in neutron -proton scattering at 90 Mev hasFOR 90 lWEV NEUTRON-PROTON SCATTERING James Hadley, Cecil E.

  8. Fine Structure Studies in Proton Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancing Opportunities for RenewableSeriesStructure

  9. Downhole delay assembly for blasting with series delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricketts, Thomas E. (Grand Junction, CO)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A downhole delay assembly is provided which can be placed into a blasthole for initiation of explosive in the blasthole. The downhole delay assembly includes at least two detonating time delay devices in series in order to effect a time delay of longer than about 200 milliseconds in a round of explosions. The downhole delay assembly provides a protective housing to prevent detonation of explosive in the blasthole in response to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device. There is further provided a connection between the first and second time delay devices. The connection is responsive to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device and initiates the second detonating time delay device. A plurality of such downhole delay assemblies are placed downhole in unfragmented formation and are initiated simultaneously for providing a round of explosive expansions. The explosive expansions can be used to form an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles.

  10. Modeling the observed proton aurora and ionospheric convection responses to changes in the IMF clock angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, Mike

    Modeling the observed proton aurora and ionospheric convection responses to changes in the IMF clock angle: 1. Persistence of cusp proton aurora K. Throp, M. Lockwood,1 B. S. Lanchester, and S. K employ a numerical model of cusp ion precipitation and proton aurora emission to fit variations

  11. Proton transport model in the ionosphere. 2. Inuence of magnetic mirroring and collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Proton transport model in the ionosphere. 2. In¯uence of magnetic mirroring and collisions on the angular redistribution in a proton beam M. Galand1 , J. Lilensten2 , W. Kofman2 , D. Lummerzheim3 1 High in a proton/hydrogen beam by using a transport code in comparison with observations. H-emission Doppler pro

  12. What's In a Proton?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  13. Particle production in proton-proton collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. T. Ghoneim; M. T. Hussein; F. H. Sawy

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present a study of particle production in proton-proton collisions using data that are collected from many experiments of relative wide range of reaction energies. These data include production of pions and heavier particles; like keons and lambda hyperons. Proton-proton collision is a simple system to investigate and to be considered a starting point that guides to more complicated processes of production in the proton-nucleus and the nucleus-nucleus collisions. In this paper, we are interested in the mechanisms that describe the process of particle production over a wide range of interaction energy, and how the physics of production changes with changing energy. Besides, this work may raise a question: are heavier particles than pions produced via the same mechanism(s) of producing pions, or these are created differently, being different in masses and other physical properties?

  14. Impact of delayed neutron precursor mobility in fissile solution systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiedrowski, B. C. [X-Computational Physics Div., Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS A143, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research version of the Monte Carlo software package MCNP6 is modified to incorporate advection and diffusion of delayed neutron precursors, resulting in the emission of delayed neutrons at locations different from the original fission sites. Results of two test problems, a pipe carrying flowing fissile solution and a sphere of fissile solution with precursor diffusion, show that the fission product mobility tends to perturb the fundamental mode, has a negative reactivity effect, and, perhaps most importantly, causes a decrease in the effective delayed neutron fraction. (authors)

  15. MCNP6 enhancements of delayed-particle production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, G. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS C921, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade, there has been an increased interest in the production of delayed-particle signatures from neutron and photon interactions with matter. To address this interest, various radiation transport codes have developed a wide range of delayed-particle physics packages. With the recent merger of the Monte Carlo transport codes MCNP5 and MCNPX, MCNP6 inherited the comprehensive model-based delayed-particle production capabilities developed in MCNPX over the last few years. An integral part of this capability consists of the depletion code CINDER90 which was incorporated into MCNPX in 2004. During this last year, significant improvements have been made to the MCNP6 physics and algorithms associated with delayed-particle production, including the development of a delayed-beta capability, an algorithm enhancement for the delayed-neutron treatment, and a database enhancement for delayed-gamma emission. The delayed-beta feature represents an important component in modeling background signals produced by active interrogation sources. Combined, these improvements provide MCNP6 with a flexible state-of-the-art physics package for generating high-fidelity signatures from fission and activation. This paper provides details of these enhancements and presents results for a variety of fission and activation examples. (authors)

  16. Broadband proton-decoupled proton spectra Andrew J. Pell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeler, James

    Broadband proton-decoupled proton spectra Andrew J. Pell , Richard A. E. Edden§ and James Keeler.ac.uk. #12;Abstract We present a new method for recording broadband proton-decoupled proton spectra with ab reduction in sensitivity when com- pared to a conventional proton spectrum. The method is demonstrated

  17. Congestion delays at hub airports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. George, Martin J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A deterministic model was developed to study the effects of inefficient scheduling on flight delays at hub airports. The model bases the delay calculation on published schedule data and on user-defined airport capacities. ...

  18. Electromagetic proton form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Y Hussein

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic form factors are crucial to our understanding of the proton internal structure, and thus provide a strong constraint of the distributions of the charge and magnetization current within the proton. We adopted the quark-parton model for calculating and understanding the charge structure of the proton interms of the electromagnetic form factors. A remarkable agreement with the available experimental evidence is found.

  19. Proton-Antiproton

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Dernière session du cours sur proton-antiproton du Cern Accelarator School. John Peoples, directeur de Fermilab fait un exposà suivi de questions.

  20. Deformed proton emitters.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, M. P.; Cizewski, J. A.; Davids, C. N.; Davinson, T.; Fotiades, N.; Henderson, D. J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Reiter, P.; Ressler, J. J.; Schwartz, J.; Seweryniak, D.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Uusitalok, J.; Walters, W. B.; Wiedenhover, I. L.; Woods, P. J.

    1999-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanisms of proton radioactivity from deformed rare earth nuclei are discussed and preliminary results on the fine structure decay of {sup 131}Eu are presented.

  1. Technique for the identification of dominant delayed neutron precursors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loaiza, D. J. (David J.); Haskin, E. (Eric)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for the identification of delayed neutron precursors has been developed based on the product of cumulative yield and probability of neutron emission. The motivation behind this work is to fix the decay constants of delayed neutrons to those of the dominant delayed neutron precursors. The desirability of identifying a single set of decay constants that would apply to all fissionable isotopes and be independent of the neutron energy spectrum has been addressed by several authors. The main advantages of a fixed-decay constant representation are simplifying the analysis of epithemal and fast reactors with multiple fissioning isotopes, and improving the fit to experimental data while preserving the inferred positive reactivity scale associated with the original six-group representation. It is well known that 27 1 delayed neutron precursors exist, but only a select number of those precursors contribute significantly to the decay of delayed neutron. Using data compiled by England and Rider, which lists fission yield and probability of neutron emission values for the 27 1 known delayed neutron precursors in 32 fissioning systems, thirteen precursors were identified that are consistently dominant for alI fissioning systems.

  2. Programmable Differential Delay Circuit With Fine Delay Adjustment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRyckere, John F. (Eau Claire, WI); Jenkins, Philip Nord (Eau Claire, WI); Cornett, Frank Nolan (Chippewa Falls, WI)

    2002-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Circuitry that provides additional delay to early arriving signals such that all data signals arrive at a receiving latch with same path delay. The delay of a forwarded clock reference is also controlled such that the capturing clock edge will be optimally positioned near quadrature (depending on latch setup/hold requirements). The circuitry continuously adapts to data and clock path delay changes and digital filtering of phase measurements reduce errors brought on by jittering data edges. The circuitry utilizes only the minimum amount of delay necessary to achieve objective thereby limiting any unintended jitter. Particularly, this programmable differential delay circuit with fine delay adjustment is designed to allow the skew between ASICS to be minimized. This includes skew between data bits, between data bits and clocks as well as minimizing the overall skew in a channel between ASICS.

  3. Proton Angular Distribution for 90 Mev Neutron-proton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadley, James

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3, 1947 The angular distribution of the recoil protons inneutron -proton scattering at 90 Mev has been measured forNO. W ..7405-Eng 48 PROTON .ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION FOR 90 lWEV

  4. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, William

    genetic circuits17­26 ; the infusion of delay dramatically enhances the stability of such circuits27

  5. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  6. Proton-Proton Scattering at 340 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chamberlain, Owen; Wiegand, Clyde

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Nuclear Physics. Basil. High yner gy Neutron- protonand Proton~proton Scattering 9 Helv. Phys. Acta (in press J a review

  7. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed.

  8. Proton radioactivity within a generalized liquid drop model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Dong; H. F. Zhang; G. Royer

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton radioactivity half-lives of spherical proton emitters are investigated theoretically. The potential barriers preventing the emission of protons are determined in the quasimolecular shape path within a generalized liquid drop model (GLDM) including the proximity effects between nuclei in a neck and the mass and charge asymmetry. The penetrability is calculated with the WKB approximation. The spectroscopic factor has been taken into account in half-life calculation, which is obtained by employing the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory combined with the BCS method with the force NL3. The half-lives within the GLDM are compared with the experimental data and other theoretical values. The GLDM works quite well for spherical proton emitters when the spectroscopic factors are considered, indicating the necessity of introducing the spectroscopic factor and the success of the GLDM for proton emission. Finally, we present two formulas for proton emission half-life calculation similar to the Viola-Seaborg formulas and Royer's formulas of alpha decay.

  9. Tensor gluons and proton structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Savvidy

    2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent article we were considering a possibility that inside a proton and, more generally, inside hadrons there could be additional partons - tensor-gluons, which carry a part of the proton momentum. Tensor-gluons have zero electric charge, like gluons, but have a larger spin. Therefore we call them tensor-gluons. The nonzero density of tensor-gluons can be generated by the emission of tensor-gluons by gluons. Tensor-gluons can further split into the pairs of tensor-gluons through a different channels. To describe all these processes one should know the general splitting probabilities for tensor-gluons. These probabilities should fulfill very general symmetry relations, which we were able to resolve by introducing a splitting index. This approach allows to find out the general form of the splitting functions, to derive corresponding DGLAP evolution equations and to calculate the one-loop Callan-Simanzik beta function for tensor-gluons of a given spin. Our results provide a nontrivial consistency check of the theory and of the Callan-Simanzik beta function calculations, because the theory has a unique coupling constant and its high energy behavior should be universal for all particles of the spectrum. We argue that the contribution of all spins into the beta function vanishes leading to a conformal invariant theory at very high energies.

  10. Proton Radius Puzzle 1 Muonic hydrogen and the proton radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Proton Radius Puzzle 1 Muonic hydrogen and the proton radius puzzle Randolf Pohl Max-681 Warsaw, Poland Key Words Laser Spectroscopy, Atomic Physics, Proton Structure, Exotic Atoms, Nuclear extraction of the proton radius by Pohl et al. from the mea- #12;Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 2013, Vol. 63

  11. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Ott, William [Department of Mathematics, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Bennett, Matthew R. [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77204, USA and Institute of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Josi?, Krešimir [Department of Mathematics, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay.

  12. Investigation of proton focusing and conversion efficiency for proton fast ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartal, Teresa Jean

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.2 Proton Acceleration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .plasma (LSP) simulations . . Proton Focusing and ConversionProton Focusing and Conversion Efficiency with Hemispherical

  13. Muon-proton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Borie

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent proposal to measure the proton form factor by means of muon-proton scattering will use muons which are not ultrarelativistic (and also not nonrelativistic). The usual equations describing the scattering cross section use the approximation that the scattered lepton (usually an electron) is ultrarelativistic, with v/c approximately equal to 1. Here the cross section is calculated for all values of the energy. It agrees with the standard result in the appropriate limit.

  14. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Johnnie E. (Grandview, MO); Jamieson, Donald R. (Merriam, KS)

    1984-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

  15. Cavity enhanced rephased amplified spontaneous emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis A Williamson; Jevon J Longdell

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Amplified spontaneous emission is usually treated as an incoherent noise process. Recent theoretical and experimental work using rephasing optical pulses has shown that rephased amplified spontaneous emission (RASE) is a potential source of wide bandwidth time-delayed entanglement. Due to poor echo efficiency the plain RASE protocol doesn't in theory achieve perfect entanglement. Experiments done to date show a very small amount of entanglement at best. Here we show that rephased amplified spontaneous emission can, in principle, produce perfect multimode time-delayed two mode squeezing when the active medium is placed inside a Q-switched cavity.

  16. Probabilities of delayed processes for nuclei involved in the r-process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panov, I. V., E-mail: Igor.Panov@itep.ru [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Korneev, I. Yu.; Lutostansky, Yu. S. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)] [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Thielemann, F.-K. [University of Basel, Institute of Physics (Switzerland)] [University of Basel, Institute of Physics (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed fission, along with induced and spontaneous fission, is responsible for the suppression of the production of superheavy elements both during the r-process and after its completion. Beta-decay strength functions are required for calculating delayed fission. In the present study, respective strength functions are calculated by relying on the theory of finite Fermi systems and by predominantly employing nuclear masses and fission barriers predicted by a generalized Thomas-Fermi model. The probabilities for delayed fission and for the emission of delayed neutrons are calculated for a number of isotopes. On the basis of calculations performed in order to determine the probabilities for delayed processes, it is shown that some of the delayed-fission probabilities calculated thus far were substantially overestimated. The application of these new results to calculating the r-process may change substantially both the r-process path and the yields of superheavy nuclei.

  17. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to

  18. Imaging Sources with Fast and Slow Emission Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Verde; D. A. Brown; P. Danielewicz; C. K. Gelbke; W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang

    2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate two-proton correlation functions for reactions in which fast dynamical and slow evaporative proton emission are both present. In such cases, the width of the correlation peak provides the most reliable information about the source size of the fast dynamical component. The maximum of the correlation function is sensitive to the relative yields from the slow and fast emission components. Numerically inverting the correlation function allows one to accurately disentangle fast dynamical from slow evaporative emission and extract details of the shape of the two-proton source.

  19. - and -delayed neutron- decay of neutron-rich copper isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Winger, J. A. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Ilyushkin, S. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Batchelder, J. C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Borzov, Ivan N [ORNL; Goodin, C. [Vanderbilt University; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Hamilton, Joseph H [ORNL; Krolas, W. [Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge; Liddick, S. N. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Mazzocchi, C. [University of Warsaw; Nelson, C. [Vanderbilt University; Nowacki, F. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Strasbourg, France; Padgett, Stephen [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Piechaczek, A. [Louisiana State University; Rajabali, M. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Sieja, K. [Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Germany; Zganjar, E. F. [Louisiana State University

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The {beta}-decay properties of neutron-rich Cu isotopes produced in proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U were studied at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The data were collected using high-resolution online mass separation, reacceleration, and digital {beta}-{gamma} spectroscopy methods. An improved decay scheme of N = 49 {sup 78}Cu and the first observation of N = 50 {sup 79}Cu {beta}-delayed neutron decay followed by a gamma transition are reported. Spin and parity (5{sup -}) are deduced for {sup 78gs}Cu. The {beta}-delayed neutron branching ratios (P{sub {beta}n}) for the {sup 77}Cu and {sup 79}Cu precursors are analyzed with the help of nuclear structure models.

  20. Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton exchange membrane, also known as polymer electrolyte membrane, fuel cells (PEMFCs) offer the promise of efficient conversion of chemical energy of fuel, such as hydrogen or methanol, into electricity with minimal pollution. Their widespread use to power zero-emission automobiles as part of a hydrogen economy can contribute to enhanced energy security and reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. However, the commercial viability of PEMFC technology is hindered by high cost associated with the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and poor membrane durability under prolonged operation at elevated temperature. Membranes for automotive fuel cell applications need to perform well over a period comparable to the life of an automotive engine and under heavy load cycling including start-stop cycling under sub-freezing conditions. The combination of elevated temperature, changes in humidity levels, physical stresses and harsh chemical environment contribute to membrane degradation. Perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA)-based membranes, such as Nafion®, have been the mainstay of PEMFC technology. Their limitations, in terms of cost and poor conductivity at low hydration, have led to continuing research into membranes that have good proton conductivity at elevated temperatures above 120 °C and under low humidity conditions. Such membranes have the potential to avoid catalyst poisoning, simplify fuel cell design and reduce the cost of fuel cells. Hydrocarbon-based membranes are being developed as alternatives to PFSA membranes, but concerns about chemical and mechanical stability and durability remain. Novel anhydrous membranes based on polymer gels infused with protic ionic liquids have also been recently proposed, but considerable fundamental research is needed to understand proton transport in novel membranes and evaluate durability under fuel cell operating conditions. In order to advance this promising technology, it is essential to rationally design the next generation of PEMs based on an understanding of chemistry, membrane morphology and proton transport obtained from experiment, theory and computer simulation.

  1. Torchestra : reducing interactive trac delays over Tor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopal, Deepika

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Torchestra : Reducing interactive traffic delays over Tor ATorchestra : Reducing interactive traffic delays over Tor byon the internet including interactive traffic as well as for

  2. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Luke W.; Hunt, Alan W.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is investigated as a non-destructive assay technique for the determination of plutonium mass in spent nuclear fuel. This approach exploits the unique isotope-specific signatures contained in the delayed gamma-ray emission spectra detected following active interrogation with an external neutron source. A high fidelity modeling approach is described that couples radiation transport, analytical decay/depletion, and a newly developed gamma-ray emission source reconstruction code. Initially simulated and analyzed was a “one-pass” delayed gamma-ray assay that focused on the long-lived signatures. Also presented are the results of an independent study that investigated “pulsed mode” measurements, to capture the more isotope-specific, short-lived signatures. Initial modeling results outlined in this paper suggest that delayed gamma-ray assay of spent nuclear fuel assemblies can be accomplished with a neutron generator of sufficient strength and currently available gamma-ray detectors.

  3. LAUNCH DELAY TEST A DISSERTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , called voltage droop. Voltage droop increases the delay of logic gates within the chip and can cause droop. Experimental results using Stanford's ELF13 test chips ­ 0.13 m copper process chips implementing

  4. On the Proton charge extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gluck

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the recent determination of the various proton charge extensions is compatible with Standard Model expectations.

  5. Analytical applications for delayed neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eccleston, G.W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical formulations that describe the time dependence of neutron populations in nuclear materials contain delayed-neutron dependent terms. These terms are important because the delayed neutrons, even though their yields in fission are small, permit control of the fission chain reaction process. Analytical applications that use delayed neutrons range from simple problems that can be solved with the point reactor kinetics equations to complex problems that can only be solved with large codes that couple fluid calculations with the neutron dynamics. Reactor safety codes, such as SIMMER, model transients of the entire reactor core using coupled space-time neutronics and comprehensive thermal-fluid dynamics. Nondestructive delayed-neutron assay instruments are designed and modeled using a three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code. Calculations on high-burnup spent fuels and other materials that contain a mix of uranium and plutonium isotopes require accurate and complete information on the delayed-neutron periods, yields, and energy spectra. A continuing need exists for delayed-neutron parameters for all the fissioning isotopes.

  6. Proton Transfer and Proton Concentrations in Protonated Nafion Fuel Cell Membranes D. B. Spry and M. D. Fayer*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Proton Transfer and Proton Concentrations in Protonated Nafion Fuel Cell Membranes D. B. Spry and M 21, 2009; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed: June 3, 2009 Proton transfer in protonated Nafion fuel cell membranes is studied using several pyrene derivative photoacids. Proton transfer in the center of the Nafion

  7. Delayed neutron emission measurements for U-235 and Pu-239

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    in the counting station. A set of highly purified actinide samples (U-235 and Pu-239) was irradiated in these experiments by using the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor. A fast pneumatic transfer system, an integrated computer control system...

  8. Fast Proton Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tianjun Li; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Joel W. Walker

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider proton decay in the testable flipped SU(5) X U(1)_X models with TeV-scale vector-like particles which can be realized in free fermionic string constructions and F-theory model building. We significantly improve upon the determination of light threshold effects from prior studies, and perform a fresh calculation of the second loop for the process p \\to e^+ \\pi^0 from the heavy gauge boson exchange. The cumulative result is comparatively fast proton decay, with a majority of the most plausible parameter space within reach of the future Hyper-Kamiokande and DUSEL experiments. Because the TeV-scale vector-like particles can be produced at the LHC, we predict a strong correlation between the most exciting particle physics experiments of the coming decade.

  9. The effect of. beta. -delayed fission on the production of r-process chronometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, W.M.; Meyer, B.S.

    1989-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear physics required for calculating the production ratios for the chronometric pairs {sup 235}U/{sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U/{sup 232}Th in the astrophysical r-process is considered in some detail. In particular, we calculate the nuclear structure of neutron-rich heavy elements to investigate the effects of beta-delayed fission and beta-delayed neutron emission during the beta decay from the r-process path to the actinide region. We find that previous estimates of the effects of beta-delayed fission on the production of these pairs has probably been overestimated. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Calculation of delayed-neutron energy spectra in a QRPA-Hauser-Feshbach model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moller, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical {beta}-delayed-neutron spectra are calculated based on the Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA) and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Neutron emissions from an excited daughter nucleus after {beta} decay to the granddaughter residual are more accurately calculated than in previous evaluations, including all the microscopic nuclear structure information, such as a Gamow-Teller strength distribution and discrete states in the granddaughter. The calculated delayed-neutron spectra agree reasonably well with those evaluations in the ENDF decay library, which are based on experimental data. The model was adopted to generate the delayed-neutron spectra for all 271 precursors.

  11. Smashing Protons to Smithereens

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Marc-André Pleier

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pleier discusses the extraordinary research taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ? the world?s newest, biggest, and highest energy particle accelerator located at CERN. Pleier is one of hundreds of researchers from around the world working on ATLAS, a seven-story particle detector positioned at a point where the LHC?s oppositely circulating beams of protons slam into one another head-on.

  12. UWB delay and multiply receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) delay and multiply receiver is formed of a receive antenna; a variable gain attenuator connected to the receive antenna; a signal splitter connected to the variable gain attenuator; a multiplier having one input connected to an undelayed signal from the signal splitter and another input connected to a delayed signal from the signal splitter, the delay between the splitter signals being equal to the spacing between pulses from a transmitter whose pulses are being received by the receive antenna; a peak detection circuit connected to the output of the multiplier and connected to the variable gain attenuator to control the variable gain attenuator to maintain a constant amplitude output from the multiplier; and a digital output circuit connected to the output of the multiplier.

  13. Electron-capture delayed fission properties of {sup 242}Es

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaughnessy, D. A. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemistry Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Adams, J. L. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Gregorich, K. E. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lane, M. R. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Laue, C. A. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lee, D. M. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); McGrath, C. A. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Patin, J. B. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Strellis, D. A. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Sylwester, E. R. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemistry Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] (and others)

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-capture delayed fission of {sup 242}Es produced via the {sup 233}U({sup 14}N,5n){sup 242}Es reaction at 87 MeV (on target) was observed to decay with a half-life of 11{+-}3 s, consistent with the reported {alpha}-decay half-life of {sup 242}Es of 16{sub -4}{sup +6} s. The mass-yield distribution of the fission fragments is highly asymmetric. The average pre-neutron emission total kinetic energy of the fragments was measured to be 183{+-}18 MeV. Based on the ratio of the measured number of fission events to the measured number of {alpha} decays from the electron-capture daughter {sup 242}Cf (100% {alpha} branch), the probability of delayed fission was determined to be 0.006{+-}0.002. This value for the delayed fission probability fits the experimental trend of increasing delayed fission probability with increasing Q value for electron capture. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Cataractogenic effects of proton radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyzar, James Ronald

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vulnerable organs, created an urgent need for investigation of proton radiation cataracto- genesis. In a statistical analysis of collected data on solar proton events taking into consideration possible shield- ing and mission duration, an investigator... energy group to a high of 74 for the 20 Mev proton energy group. As previously stated, the maximum possible numerical value was 400. The mean values for degree of lens opacities for the controls and the five dosage subgroups within the 10 Mev, 20 Mev...

  15. Proton radiography of a shock-compressed target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravasio, A.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Loupias, B.; Ozaki, N.; Vinci, T.; Koenig, M. [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605, CNRS-CEA-Universite Paris VI-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Romagnani, L.; Cecchetti, C.; Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 INN (United Kingdom); Le Pape, S.; Hicks, D.; MacKinnon, A.; Park, H. S.; Patel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Batani, D.; Dezulian, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza Della Scienze 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Boehly, T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Gremillet, L.; Henry, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon Cedex (France); Schiavi, A. [Department of Energetics, University of Rome 'La Sapienza' Rome (Italy)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report on the radiography of a shock-compressed target using laser produced proton beams. A low-density carbon foam target was shock compressed by long pulse high-energy laser beams. The shock front was transversally probed with a proton beam produced in the interaction of a high intensity laser beam with a gold foil. We show that from radiography data, the density profile in the shocked target can be deduced using Monte Carlo simulations. By changing the delay between long and short pulse beams, we could probe different plasma conditions and structures, demonstrating that the details of the steep density gradient can be resolved. This technique is validated as a diagnostic for the investigation of warm dense plasmas, allowing an in situ characterization of high-density contrasted plasmas.

  16. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 HgPromisingProtectingSciTechProton Dripping Tests

  17. PROTON BEAM REQUIREMENTS FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 1 summarizes the NF proton driver parameters obtainedboth facilities. Table 1. Proton driver requirements for arepetition frequency (Hz) Proton energy (GeV) Proton rms

  18. Proton slip in the ATP synthase of Rhodobacter capsulatus: induction, proton conduction, and nucleotide dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    Proton slip in the ATP synthase of Rhodobacter capsulatus: induction, proton conduction. Uncoupled proton leakage (slip) has only been observed in chloroplast enzyme at unphysiologically low nucleotide concentration. We investigated the properties of proton slip in chromatophores (sub

  19. Proton spectroscopy of 48Ni, 46Fe, and 44Cr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pomorski; M. Pfützner; W. Dominik; R. Grzywacz; A. Stolz; T. Baumann; J. S. Berryman; H. Czyrkowski; R. D?browski; A. Fija?kowska; T. Ginter; J. Johnson; G. Kami?ski; N. Larson; S. N. Liddick; M. Madurga; C. Mazzocchi; S. Mianowski; K. Miernik; D. Miller; S. Paulauskas; J. Pereira; K. P. Rykaczewski; S. Suchyta

    2014-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of decay spectroscopy on nuclei in vicinity of the doubly magic 48Ni are presented. The measurements were performed with a Time Projection Chamber with optical readout which records tracks of ions and protons in the gaseous volume. Six decays of 48Ni including four events of two-proton ground-state radioactivity were recorded. An advanced reconstruction procedure yielded the 2p decay energy for 48Ni of Q2p = 1.29(4) MeV. In addition, the energy spectra of \\b{eta}-delayed protons emitted in the decays of 44Cr and 46Fe, as well as half-lives and branching ratios were determined. The results were found to be consistent with the previous measurements made with Si detectors. A new proton line in the decay of 44Cr corresponding to the decay energy of 760 keV is reported. The first evidence for the \\b{eta}2p decay of 46 Fe, based on one clear event, is shown.

  20. Proton induced activation in mercury: Comparison of measurements and calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remec, Igor [ORNL; Glasgow, David C [ORNL; Haines, John R [ORNL; Johnson, Jeffrey O [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements and simulations of the proton beam interaction with the mercury target were performed to support Spallation Neutron Source design. Due to the abundance of isotopes produced in mercury, the long delay between the irradiation and the measurements, and the self-shielding of the mercury sample, the measurements were difficult to perform and the activities of several isotopes have large uncertainties. Calculations predicted the activities of the most reliably measured isotopes within 20%/40%; however, some large discrepancies were observed for some isotopes for which the measurements were considered less reliable. Predicted dose rates were in very good agreement with the measurements.

  1. Measurement of asymmetric component in proton-proton collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Bzdak

    2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that a standard measurement of multiplicities in proton-proton collisions is sufficient to construct a single nucleon fragmentation function. A proposed method is based on measurement of mean values of produced particles and pairs of particles in symmetric and asymmetric bins

  2. Elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering: analysis of complete set of helicity amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Okorokov; S. B. Nurushev

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The differential cross-sections are calculated for proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering using the phenomenological model based on the analytic parameterizations for global scattering parameters (total cross-section and $\\rho$ - parameter), crossing symmetry and derivative relations. We confront our model predictions with experimental data in wide range of energy and momentum transfer. The suggested method may be useful for PAX Program (GSI) as well as for high-energy experiments at RHIC and LHC.

  3. Treatment of the proton-proton Coulomb force in proton-deuteron breakup Faddeev calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Witala; R. Skibinski; J. Golak; W. Glockle

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend our approach to incorporate the proton-proton (pp) Coulomb force into the three-nucleon (3N) Faddeev calculations from elastic proton-deuteron (pd) scattering to the breakup process. The main new ingredient is a 3-dimensional screened pp Coulomb t-matrix obtained by a numerical solution of the 3-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger equation. We demonstrate numerically that the proton-deuteron breakup observables can be determined from the resulting on-shell 3N amplitudes increasing the screening radius. However, contrary to the pd elastic scattering, the screening limit exists only after renormalisation of the pp t-matrices.

  4. Proton-proton correlations observed in two-proton decay of $^{19}$Mg and $^{16}$Ne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Mukha; L. Grigorenko; K. Summerer; L. Acosta; M. A. G. Alvarez; E. Casarejos; A. Chatillon; D. Cortina-Gil; J. Espino; A. Fomichev; J. E. Garcia-Ramos; H. Geissel; J. Gomez-Camacho; J. Hofmann; O. Kiselev; A. Korsheninnikov; N. Kurz; Yu. Litvinov; I. Martel; C. Nociforo; W. Ott; M. Pfutzner; C. Rodriguez-Tajes; E. Roeckl; M. Stanoiu; H. Weick; P. J. Woods

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton-proton correlations were observed for the two-proton decays of the ground states of $^{19}$Mg and $^{16}$Ne. The trajectories of the respective decay products, $^{17}$Ne+p+p and $^{14}$O+p+p, were measured by using a tracking technique with microstrip detectors. These data were used to reconstruct the angular correlations of fragments projected on planes transverse to the precursor momenta. The measured three-particle correlations reflect a genuine three-body decay mechanism and allowed us to obtain spectroscopic information on the precursors with valence protons in the $sd$ shell.

  5. Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    11 Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam: Lessons for the NextFACT08NuFACT08 ­­ 4 July4 July S. ChildressS. Childress ­­ Proton BeamsProton Beams 22 Presentation OutlinePresentation Outline Key Proton Beam ConsiderationsKey Proton Beam Considerations The First

  6. The Structure of the Broad Line Region in AGN: I. Reconstructed Velocity-Delay Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, C J; Horne, Keith; Bentz, M C; Pogge, R W; Denney, K D; De Rosa, G; Martini, Paul; Kochanek, C S; Zu, Y; Shappee, B; Siverd, R; Beatty, T G; Sergeev, S G; Kaspi, S; Salvo, C Araya; Bird, J C; Bord, D J; Borman, G A; Che, X; Chen, C; Cohen, S A; Dietrich, M; Doroshenko, V T; Efimov, Yu S; Free, N; Ginsburg, I; Henderson, C B; King, A L; Mogren, K; Molina, M; Mosquera, A M; Nazarov, S V; Okhmat, D N; Pejcha, O; Rafter, S; Shields, J C; Skowron, J; Szczygiel, D M; Valluri, M; van Saders, J L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present velocity-resolved reverberation results for five active galactic nuclei. We recovered velocity-delay maps using the maximum-entropy method for four objects: Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, 3C120, and PG2130+099. For the fifth, Mrk 6, we were only able to measure mean time delays in different velocity bins of the H\\beta\\ emission line, but see tentative evidence of combined virial motion and infalling gas. The four velocity-delay maps show unique dynamical signatures for each object. For 3C120, the Balmer lines show kinematic signatures consistent with both an inclined disk and infalling gas, but the HeII 4686 emission line is suggestive only of inflow. The Balmer lines in Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, and PG 2130+099 show signs of infalling gas, but the HeII emission in Mrk 335 is consistent with an inclined disk. The maps for 3C120 and Mrk 335 are two of the most clearly defined velocity-delay maps to date. These maps constitute a large increase in the number of objects for which we have resolved velocity-delay maps and ...

  7. Proton Decay and the Planck Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL- 56556 PROTON DECAY AND THE PLANCK SCALE DANIEL T.ph/0410035v1 2 Oct 2004 PROTON DECAY AND THE PLANCK SCALE ?without grand uni?cation, proton decay can be a powerful

  8. Multistage Constructions of Linear Compressors, Non-overtaking Delay Lines, and Flexible Delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Cheng-Shang

    Multistage Constructions of Linear Compressors, Non-overtaking Delay Lines, and Flexible Delay: linear compressors, non-overtaking delay lines and flexible delay lines. These three types of queues for these three types of queues. Specifically, we develop a two-stage construction of a linear compressor

  9. PRESSURE OF THE PROTON PLASMA IN THE INNER HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Fuselier, S. A. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Funsten, H. O., E-mail: glivadiotis@swri.edu [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a physical model to study the pressure of the source proton plasma in the inner heliosheath based on the IBEX Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) spectra. A multiple linear regression technique is used to parameterize the proton distribution function, by connecting the observed ENA flux spectrum from IBEX-Hi with the power-law of the model proton distribution. We calculate the partial pressure over the measured energy range, using (1) a non-parametric method by integrating the observed ENA flux, and (2) a parametric method by integrating the modeled distribution of protons in the inner heliosheath. The two sky maps of the parametric and non-parametric partial pressures are nearly identical, owing to their power-law distributions at high energies; the kappa distribution is such a function that can be reduced to a power-law in the IBEX-Hi energy range. The slight differences between the two partial pressures may indicate protons that are not described by the kappa distribution, and instead, involve newer or 'immature' (spherical shell) pick-up proton distributions. Ultimately, however, these become incorporated with the solar wind into one single proton population described by a kappa distribution. Moreover, we derive analytically (1) the ENA flux spectra, which suggests that this flux maximizes at {approx}30 eV, and (2) the differential pressure, which provides estimates of the partial pressures outside of those measured by IBEX-Hi. Under the assumptions of the modeled ENA spectra, the Ribbon emissions appear to be primarily limited to the energy ranges of IBEX-Lo and IBEX-Hi.

  10. Advanced Materials for Proton Exchange Membranes | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Materials for Proton Exchange Membranes Advanced Materials for Proton Exchange Membranes A presentation to the High Temperature Membranes Working Group meeting, May 19,...

  11. Fault simulation and test generation for small delay faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Wangqi

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Delay faults are an increasingly important test challenge. Traditional delay fault models are incomplete in that they model only a subset of delay defect behaviors. To solve this problem, a more realistic delay fault model has been developed which...

  12. Controlling the Delay of Small Flows in Datacenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carra, Damiano

    and CAPEX and ignore designs which could help reduce delay of delay sensitive flows. The flow routing

  13. Pion mass effects on axion emission from neutron stars through NN bremsstrahlung processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Stoica; B. Pastrav; J. E. Horvath; M. P. Allen

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The rates of axion emission by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung are calculated with the inclusion of the full momentum contribution from a nuclear one pion exchange (OPE) potential. The contributions of the neutron-neutron (nn), proton-proton (pp) and neutron-proton (np) processes in both the nondegenerate and degenerate limits are explicitly given. We find that the finite momentum corrections to the emissivities are quantitatively significant for the non-degenerate regime and temperature-dependent, and should affect the existing axion mass bounds. The trend of these nuclear effects is to diminish the emissivities.

  14. Proton and Neutrino Extragalactic Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Lipari

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of extragalactic sources of high energy radiation via the direct measurement of the proton and neutrino fluxes that they are likely to emit is one of the main goals for the future observations of the recently developed air showers detectors and neutrino telescopes. In this work we discuss the relation between the inclusive proton and neutrino signals from the ensemble of all sources in the universe, and the resolved signals from the closest and brightest objects. We also compare the sensitivities of proton and neutrino telescopes and comment on the relation between these two new astronomies.

  15. Electron-capture delayed fission in {sup 246}Es

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaughnessy, D.A.; Gregorich, K.E.; Hendricks, M.B.; Lane, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have extended our systematic study of electron-capture delayed fission (ECDF) in neutron-deficient isotopes to {sup 246}Es. The {sup 246}Es was produced at the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory via the {sup 249}Cf(p,xn){sup 250-x}Es reaction with 37 MeV protons. There were 19 {sup 249}Cf targets used simultaneously in our light ion multiple (LIM) target system. Alpha particles and fission fragments were detected in our rotating wheel system. In some experiments, TTA extractions were performed to remove interfering activities. The chemically separated samples were positioned between a solid-state particle detector and two x-rays detectors. This configuration enabled us to look for fissions in coincidence with K x-rays following electron-capture. Our measured production cross section of 13 {+-} 5 {mu}b for {sup 246}Es was much lower than the cross section predicted by a neutron evaporation code. The probability of delayed fission was determined from the number of x-ray/fission coincidences measured.

  16. Time-Dependent Delayed Signatures From Energetic Photon Interrogations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. R. Norman; J. L. Jones; B. W. Blackburn; S. M. Watson; K. J. Haskell

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulsed photonuclear interrogation environment is rich with time-dependent, material specific, radiation signatures. Exploitation of these signatures in the delayed time regime (>1us after the photon flash) has been explored through various detection schemes to identify both shielded nuclear material and nitrogen-based explosives. Prompt emission may also be invaluable for these detection methods. Numerical and experimental results, which utilize specially modified neutron and HpGe detectors, are presented which illustrate the efficacy of utilizing these time-dependent signatures. Optimal selection of the appropriate delayed time window is essential to these pulsed inspection systems. For explosive (ANFO surrogate) detection, both numerical models and experimental results illustrate that nearly all 14N(n,y) reactions have occurred within l00 us after the flash. In contrast, however, gamma-ray and neutron signals for nuclear material detection require a delay of several milliseconds after the photon pulse. In this case, any data collected too close to the photon flash results in a spectrum dominated by high energy signals which make it difficult to discern signatures from nuclear material. Specifically, two short-lived, high-energy fission fragments (97Ag(T1/2=5.1 s) and 94Sr(T1/2=75.2 s)) were measured and identified as indicators of the presence of fissionable material. These developments demonstrate that a photon inspection environment can be exploited for time-dependent, material specific signatures through the proper operation of specially modified detectors.

  17. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid?base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron?proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ ?. Multiple-Site Electron?Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron?proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron?proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e{sup -}/2H{sup +} MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving force for long-range proton transfer in Photosysem II and through other biological membranes. In EPT, simultaneous transfer of electrons and protons occurs on time scales short compared to the periods of coupled vibrations and solvent modes. A theory for EPT has been developed which rationalizes rate constants and activation barriers, includes temperature- and driving force (?G)-dependences implicitly, and explains kinetic isotope effects. The distance-dependence of EPT is dominated by the short-range nature of proton transfer, with electron transfer being far less demanding.Changes in external pH do not affect an EPT elementary step. Solvent molecules or buffer components can act as proton donor acceptors, but individual H2O molecules are neither good bases (pK{sub a}(H{sub 3}O{sup +}) = ?1.74) nor good acids (pK{sub a}(H{sub 2}O) = 15.7). There are many examples of mechanisms in chemistry, in biology, on surfaces, and in the gas phase which utilize EPT. PCET and EPT play critical roles in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II and other biological reactions by decreasing driving force and avoiding high-energy intermediates.

  18. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karlsson, Niklas; /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; ,

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e{sup {+-}}, {nu}{sub e}, {bar {nu}}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the {Delta}(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c{sup 2}. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a pencil beam of protons varies drastically with viewing angle. A fanned proton jet with a Gaussian intensity profile impinging on surrounding material is given as a more realistic example. As the observer is moved off the jet axis, the peak of the spectrum is moved to lower energies.

  19. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The authors conclude that Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron is promising for proton therapy.

  20. Cross delay line sensor characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, Israel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Remelius, Dennis K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tiee, Joe J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Buck, Steven E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whittemore, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shirey, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a wealth of information in the scientific literature on the physical properties and device characterization procedures for complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS), charge coupled device (CCD) and avalanche photodiode (APD) format detectors. Numerous papers and books have also treated photocathode operation in the context of photomultiplier tube (PMT) operation for either non imaging applications or limited night vision capability. However, much less information has been reported in the literature about the characterization procedures and properties of photocathode detectors with novel cross delay line (XDL) anode structures. These allow one to detect single photons and create images by recording space and time coordinate (X, Y & T) information. In this paper, we report on the physical characteristics and performance of a cross delay line anode sensor with an enhanced near infrared wavelength response photocathode and high dynamic range micro channel plate (MCP) gain (> 10{sup 6}) multiplier stage. Measurement procedures and results including the device dark event rate (DER), pulse height distribution, quantum and electronic device efficiency (QE & DQE) and spatial resolution per effective pixel region in a 25 mm sensor array are presented. The overall knowledge and information obtained from XDL sensor characterization allow us to optimize device performance and assess capability. These device performance properties and capabilities make XDL detectors ideal for remote sensing field applications that require single photon detection, imaging, sub nano-second timing response, high spatial resolution (10's of microns) and large effective image format.

  1. Proton Solvation and Proton Mobility Department of Physical Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Research Center,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agmon, Noam

    Proton Solvation and Proton Mobility NOAM AGMON Department of Physical Chemistry and the Fritz for proton solvation and proton mobility is analyzed and the results are compared with recent simulations. Three factors con­ tribute to differences in proton solvation energies: hydrogen­bond cleavage, changes

  2. Propagation of UHE Protons through Magnetized Cosmic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santabrata Das; Hyesung Kang; Dongsu Ryu; Jungyeon Cho

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    If ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) originate from extragalactic sources, understanding the propagation of charged particles through the magnetized large scale structure (LSS) of the universe is crucial in the search for the astrophysical accelerators. Based on a novel model of the turbulence dynamo, we estimate the intergalactic magnetic fields (IGMFs) in cosmological simulations of the formation of the LSS. Under the premise that the sources of UHECRs are strongly associated with the LSS, we consider a model in which protons with E >10^{19} eV are injected by sources that represent active galactic nuclei located inside clusters of galaxies. With the model IGMFs, we then follow the trajectories of the protons, while taking into account the energy losses due to interactions with the cosmic background radiation. For observers located inside groups of galaxies like ours, about 70% and 35% of UHECR events above 60 EeV arrive within ~15 degree and ~5 degree, respectively, of the source position with time delays of less than ~10^7 yr. This implies that the arrival direction of super-GZK protons might exhibit a correlation with the distribution of cosmological sources on the sky. In this model, nearby sources (within 10 - 20 Mpc) should contribute significantly to the particle flux above ~10^{20} eV.

  3. Calculation of delayed-neutron energy spectra in a quasiparticle random-phase approximation-Hauser-Feshbach model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawano, T.; Moeller, P.; Wilson, W. B. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical {beta}-delayed-neutron spectra are calculated based on the Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA) and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Neutron emissions from an excited daughter nucleus after {beta} decay to the granddaughter residual are more accurately calculated than in previous evaluations, including all the microscopic nuclear structure information, such as a Gamow-Teller strength distribution and discrete states in the granddaughter. The calculated delayed-neutron spectra agree reasonably well with those evaluations in the ENDF decay library, which are based on experimental data. The model was adopted to generate the delayed-neutron spectra for all 271 precursors.

  4. Nonlinear Control of Delay and PDE Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bekiaris-Liberis, Nikolaos

    delay systems, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 56 (lag systems, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 31 (nonlinear systems, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control,

  5. Optimal power-delay trade-offs in fading channels -small delay asymptotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    1 Optimal power-delay trade-offs in fading channels - small delay asymptotics Randall A. Berry Dept, we study the behavior of the optimal power-delay trade-off for a single user in the regime@ece.northwestern.edu Abstract When transmitting stochastically arriving data over fading channels there is an inherent trade

  6. OPTIMAL POWER/DELAY TRADE-OFFS IN WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SMALL DELAY ASYMPTOTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    OPTIMAL POWER/DELAY TRADE-OFFS IN WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS ­ SMALL DELAY ASYMPTOTICS Randall A@ece.northwestern.edu ABSTRACT In this paper we consider the optimal trade-off between av- erage transmission power and average the behavior of this trade-off in the regime of asymptotically large power and small delay. Our focus

  7. Proton-proton Scattering Above 3 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Sibirtsev, J. Haidenbauer, H.-W. Hammer S. Krewald ,Ulf-G. Meissner

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model.

  8. Measurement of the Wolfenstein parameters for proton-proton and proton-neutron scattering at 500 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, J.A.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium targets respectively, forward angle (ten degrees to sixty degrees in the center of Mass) free proton-proton and quasielastic proton-proton and proton-neutron triple scattering data at 500 MeV have been obtained using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The data are in reasonable agreement with recent predictions from phase shift analyses, indicating that the proton-nucleon scattering amplitudes are fairly well determined at 500 MeV. 32 references.

  9. Proton irradiation effect on SCDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan-Ji Yang; Jing-Bin Lu; Yu-Sa Wang; Yong Chen; Yu-Peng Xu; Wei-Wei Cui; Wei Li; Zheng-Wei Li; Mao-Shun Li; Xiao-Yan Liu; Juan Wang; Da-Wei Han; Tian-Xiang Chen; Cheng-Kui Li; Jia Huo; Wei Hu; Yi Zhang; Bo Lu; Yue Zhu; Ke-Yan Ma; Di Wu; Yan Liu; Zi-Liang Zhang; Guo-He Yin; Yu Wang

    2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low Energy X-ray Telescope is a main payload on the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope satellite. The swept charge device is selected for the Low Energy X-ray Telescope. As swept charge devices are sensitive to proton irradiation, irradiation test was carried out on the HI-13 accelerator at the China Institute of Atomic Energy. The beam energy was measured to be 10 MeV at the SCD. The proton fluence delivered to the SCD was $3\\times10^{8}\\mathrm{protons}/\\mathrm{cm}^{2}$ over two hours. It is concluded that the proton irradiation affects both the dark current and the charge transfer inefficiency of the SCD through comparing the performance both before and after the irradiation. The energy resolution of the proton-irradiated SCD is 212 eV@5.9 keV at $-60\\,^{\\circ}\\mathrm{C}$, while it before irradiated is 134 eV. Moreover, better performance can be reached by lowering the operating temperature of the SCD on orbit.

  10. Proton-proton scattering without Coulomb force renormalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Skibinski; J. Golak; H. Witala; W. Glockle

    2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate numerically that proton-proton (pp) scattering observables can be determined directly by standard short range methods using a screened pp Coulomb force without renormalization. In examples the appropriate screening radii are given. We also numerically investigate solutions of the 3-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger (LS) equation for a screened Coulomb potential alone in the limit of large screening radii and confirm analytically predicted properties for off-shell, half-shell and on-shell Coulomb t-matrices. These 3-dimensional solutions will form a basis for a novel approach to include the pp Coulomb interaction into the 3N Faddeev framework.

  11. Proton-proton fusion in lattice effective field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gautam Rupak; Pranaam Ravi

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton-proton fusion rate is calculated at low energy in a lattice effective field theory (EFT) formulation. The strong and the Coulomb interactions are treated non-perturbatively at leading order in the EFT. The lattice results are shown to accurately describe the low energy cross section within the validity of the theory at energies relevant to solar physics. In prior work in the literature, Coulomb effects were generally not included in non-perturbative lattice calculations. Work presented here is of general interest in nuclear lattice EFT calculations that involve Coulomb effects at low energy. It complements recent developments of the adiabatic projection method for lattice calculations of nuclear reactions.

  12. Benchmark Results for Delayed Neutron Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marck, S.C. van der; Meulekamp, R. Klein; Hogenbirk, A.; Koning, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG, P.O. Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have calculated the effective delayed neutron fraction {beta}eff for 32 benchmark configurations for which measurements have been reported. We use these results to test the delayed neutron data of JEFF-3.0, ENDF/B-VI.8, and JENDL-3.3.

  13. Temperature Dependent Wire Delay Estimation in Floorplanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nannarelli, Alberto

    Temperature Dependent Wire Delay Estimation in Floorplanning Andreas Thor Winther, Wei Liu, Alberto, Arizona State University, Tempe, USA Abstract--Due to large variations in temperature in VLSI cir- cuits and the linear relationship between metal resistance and temperature, the delay through wires of the same length

  14. Picosecond buildup and relaxation of intense stimulated emission in GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ageeva, N. N.; Bronevoi, I. L., E-mail: bil@cplire.ru; Zabegaev, D. N.; Krivonosov, A. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotelnikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the idea developed previously based on circumstantial evidence, we have found that stimulated emission emerges in GaAs and its intensity increases with a picosecond delay relative to the front of powerful picosecond optical pumping that produced a dense electron-hole plasma. The emission intensity relaxes with decreasing pumping with a characteristic time of {approx}10 ps. We have derived the dependences of the delay time, the relaxation time, and the duration of the picosecond emission pulse on its photon energy. The estimates based on the fact that the relaxation of emission is determined by electron-hole plasma cooling correspond to the measured relaxation time.

  15. PROTON INDUCED SWELLING IN TYPE 316 STAINLESS STEEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, A.K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    McDonald, Void Formation in Proton- and Nicke1- Irradiatedowned rights. o -iii- PROTON INDUCED SWELLING IN TYPE 316I. II. Introduction Proton Damage Processes A. B.

  16. Measurements of delayed neutron parameters for U-235 and Np-237

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loaiza, D.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed neutrons are emitted by excited nuclei formed in beta decay of fission products called delayed neutron precursors. About 1% of the total neutrons released in fission are delayed neutrons; however, this small fraction plays an important role in nuclear reactor control. The delayed neutrons determine the time-dependent behavior of reactors, and knowledge of parameters used to predict neutron emission rate is essential for establishing reactivity worths. The delayed neutron yields, decay constants, and the absolute yield for the six-group delayed neutrons have been measured for U-235 and Np-237. This experiment has been called for in the forecast of experiments needed to support operations in the US. The bare U-235 metal assembly Godiva IV at the Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF) provided the source of neutrons. Godiva IV generated about 10{sup 7} total fissions in the samples for the infinite and instantaneous irradiation needed to accentuate the shorter and longer-lived groups of delayed neutrons. The detection system used in the experiment consisted of 20 He-3 tubes embedded in a polyethylene cylinder. The delayed neutron activity resulting from the fast neutron-induced fission has been measured. The measured absolute yield for U-235 was determined to be 0.0163 {+-} 0.009 neutrons/fission. This value compares very well with the well-established Keepin absolute yield of 0.0165 {+-} 0.0005. The newly measured absolute yield value for Np-237 was 0.0126 {+-} 0.0007, which compares well to the recently reported value of 0.0129 {+-} 0.0004 by Saleh and Parish. The measured values for U-235 are corroborated with period (e-folding time) versus reactivity calculations.

  17. Proton Mass Shift in Muonic Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiichi Iwazaki

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the value of the proton mass depends on each bound state of muonic or electronic hydrogen atom. The charged particle bound to the proton produces magnetic field inside the proton. This makes a change to the amount of chiral condensate inside the proton. The change gives rise to the shift in the value of the proton mass. Numerically, the shift in the $2S$ state of the muonic hydrogen atom can be of the order of $0.1$ meV. The effect may solve the puzzle of the proton radius.

  18. Optical emission in magnetically confined laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, X. K.; Lu, Y. F.; Gebre, T.; Ling, H.; Han, Y. X. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0511 (United States)

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetically confined laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was investigated by studying the optical emission from laser-induced plasma plumes expanding across an external transverse magnetic field. KrF excimer laser pulses with a pulse duration of 23 ns and a wavelength of 248 nm were used to produce plasmas from Al, Cu, and Co targets. Various optical emission lines obtained from Al and Cu targets show an obvious enhancement in the intensity of optical emission when a magnetic field of {approx}0.8 T is applied, while the optical emission lines from Co targets show a decrease in the optical emission intensity. The enhancement factors of optical emission lines were measured to be around 2 for the Al and Mn (impurity) lines from Al targets, and 6-8 for Cu lines from Cu targets. Temporal evolution of the optical emission lines from the Al samples shows a maximum enhancement in emission intensity at time delays of 8-20 {mu}s after the incident laser pulse, while from the Cu targets it shows a continuous enhancement at time delays of 3-20 {mu}s after the pulse. The enhancement in the optical emission from the Al and Cu plasmas was presumably due to the increase in the effective plasma density as a result of magnetic confinement. The decrease in the emission intensity from the Co plasmas was suggested to be due to the decrease of effective plasma density as a result of the magnetic force.

  19. The Beta-Delayed Proton and Gamma Decay of 27P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Ellen Nicole

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The first and one of the most well observed gamma-ray lines in the interstellar medium was that of 1.809 MeV that comes from the ?–decay of the ground state of ^(26)Al to excited states in its daughter (^(26)Mg), which then undergoes gamma decay...

  20. Neutron blocking and delayed proton pair alignment in superdeformed {sup 195}Pb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farris, L.P.; Henry, E.A.; Becker, J.A.; Brinkman, M.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Cederwall, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Cizewski, J.A. [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901 (United States)] [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901 (United States); Deleplanque, M.A.; Diamond, R.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Draper, J.E.; Duyar, C. [University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)] [University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Fallon, P. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Hughes, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kelly, W.H. [Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50010 (United States)] [Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50010 (United States); Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Rubel, E.C. [University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)] [University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Stephens, F.S. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Vo, D.T. [Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50010 (United States)] [Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50010 (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four new superdeformed bands have been observed in {sup 195}Pb, the first time superdeformation has been observed in an odd-{ital A} Pb nucleus. Two of the bands have a dynamic moment of inertia that is nearly constant as a function of {h_bar}{omega}. This is the first time that bands with such behavior have been observed in an odd-{ital A} nucleus in the {ital A}{approx}190 region and it is interpreted as the result of the blocking of the alignment of neutron pairs.

  1. Is GRB afterglow emission intrinsically anisotropic ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beloborodov, A M; Mochkovitch, R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The curvature of a relativistic blast wave implies that its emission arrives to observers with a spread in time. This effect is believed to wash out any fast variability in the lightcurves of GRB afterglows. We note that the spreading effect is reduced if emission is anisotropic in the rest-frame of the blast wave (i.e. if emission is limb-brightened or limb-darkened). In particular, synchrotron emission is almost certainly anisotropic, and may be strongly anisotropic, depending on details of electron acceleration in the blast wave. Anisotropic afterglows can display fast and strong variability at high frequencies (above the 'fast-cooling' frequency). This may explain the existence of bizarre features in the X-ray afterglows of GRBs, such as sudden drops and flares. We also note that a moderate anisotropy can significantly delay the 'jet break' in the lightcurve, which makes it harder to detect.

  2. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo-Liang Ma; Adam Bzdak

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton-parton cross-section of $\\sigma=1.5 - 3$ mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  3. Proton decay matrix elements from lattice QCD 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooney, Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the matrix elements relevant for proton decay in Grand Unified Theories (GUTs), using two methods. In the indirect method, we rely on an effective field theory description of proton decay, where ...

  4. Dynamics of low-energy antiproton annihilation in nuclei as inferred from inclusive proton and pion measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGaughey, P.L.; Bol, K.D.; Clover, M.R.; DeVries, R.M.; DiGiacomo, N.J.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Sondheim, W.E.; Smith, G.R.; Sunier, J.W.; Yariv, Y.

    1986-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross sections for the production of charged pions and protons from the annihilation of 608-MeV/c antiprotons on /sup 12/C, /sup 89/Y, and /sup 238/U are presented. The sources of pion and proton emission are inferrec from the rapidity distributions of the data. The results are compared to and seen to be in good agreement with intranuclear-cascade calculations.

  5. THE STRUCTURE OF THE BROAD-LINE REGION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. RECONSTRUCTED VELOCITY-DELAY MAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grier, C. J.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; De Rosa, G.; Martini, Paul; Kochanek, C. S.; Zu, Y.; Shappee, B.; Beatty, T. G.; Salvo, C. Araya; Bird, J. C. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Horne, Keith [SUPA Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, Fife, KY16 9SS Scotland (United Kingdom)] [SUPA Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, Fife, KY16 9SS Scotland (United Kingdom); Bentz, M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Astronomy Offices, One Park Place South SE, Suite 700, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Astronomy Offices, One Park Place South SE, Suite 700, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Denney, K. D. [Marie Curie Fellow at the Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Marie Curie Fellow at the Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Siverd, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 5301 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 5301 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Sergeev, S. G.; Borman, G. A. [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, P/O Nauchny Crimea 98409 (Ukraine)] [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, P/O Nauchny Crimea 98409 (Ukraine); Kaspi, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Bord, D. J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The University of Michigan - Dearborn, 4901 Evergreen Rd, Dearborn, MI 48128 (United States)] [Department of Natural Sciences, The University of Michigan - Dearborn, 4901 Evergreen Rd, Dearborn, MI 48128 (United States); Che, X. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 41809 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 41809 (United States); and others

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present velocity-resolved reverberation results for five active galactic nuclei. We recovered velocity-delay maps using the maximum entropy method for four objects: Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, 3C 120, and PG 2130+099. For the fifth, Mrk 6, we were only able to measure mean time delays in different velocity bins of the H{beta} emission line. The four velocity-delay maps show unique dynamical signatures for each object. For 3C 120, the Balmer lines show kinematic signatures consistent with both an inclined disk and infalling gas, but the He II {lambda}4686 emission line is suggestive only of inflow. The Balmer lines in Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, and PG 2130+099 show signs of infalling gas, but the He II emission in Mrk 335 is consistent with an inclined disk. We also see tentative evidence of combined virial motion and infalling gas from the velocity-binned analysis of Mrk 6. The maps for 3C 120 and Mrk 335 are two of the most clearly defined velocity-delay maps to date. These maps constitute a large increase in the number of objects for which we have resolved velocity-delay maps and provide evidence supporting the reliability of reverberation-based black hole mass measurements.

  6. Transition in the Temperature-Dependence of GFP Fluorescence: From Proton Wires to Proton Exit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agmon, Noam

    Transition in the Temperature-Dependence of GFP Fluorescence: From Proton Wires to Proton Exit protein, photo-excitation leads to excited-state proton transfer from its chromophore, leaving behind a strongly fluorescing anion, while the proton is commonly thought to migrate internally to Glu-222. X

  7. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

  8. Proton++: A Customizable Declarative Multitouch Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Proton++: A Customizable Declarative Multitouch Framework Kenrick Kin1,2 Bj¨orn Hartmann1 Tony DeRose2 Maneesh Agrawala1 1 University of California, Berkeley 2 Pixar Animation Studios ABSTRACT Proton- sions of touch event symbols. It builds on the Proton frame- work by allowing developers to incorporate

  9. Proton Absorber Feasibility Study Chris Rogers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Proton Absorber ­ Feasibility Study Chris Rogers, ASTeC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory 14 Sept 2010 #12;Overview We have a problem with secondary protons in the front end Deposit significant Need remote handling (ouch) One way to fix this is using a proton absorber Change in beam power

  10. Photoproduction at HERA with a Leading Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Photoproduction at HERA with a Leading Proton Hanna Mahlke­Kr¨uger H1 Collaboration, DESY Abstract. The total cross­section for the semi­inclusive photoproduction process with a leading proton in the final­sections refer to the kinematic range with transverse momenta of the scattered proton restricted to p T Ÿ 0:2 Ge

  11. Proton Hexality in Local Grand Unification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Forste; Hans Peter Nilles; Saul Ramos-Sanchez; Patrick K. S. Vaudrevange

    2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton hexality is a discrete symmetry that avoids the problem of too fast proton decay in the supersymmetric extension of the standard model. Unfortunately it is inconsistent with conventional grand unification. We show that proton hexality can be incorporated in the scheme of "Local Grand Unification" discussed in the framework of model building in (heterotic) string theory.

  12. Delayed Start or Cancellation of Business Hours | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is delayed The laboratory may delay the start of regular business hours because of weather conditions. Personnel who have been explicitly designated as essential by their line...

  13. Soft Pion Emission in Hard Exclusive Pion Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim V. Polyakov; Simone Stratmann

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate hard exclusive reactions on the nucleon with soft pion emission. A parametrization of corresponding hadronic matrix elements in terms of parton distributions for final pion-nucleon state is provided. These distributions are calculated in terms of nucleon and pion GPDs and the pion distribution amplitude via soft-pion theorems. Some observables for the process of hard charged pion production on the proton with soft pion emission are computed.

  14. A photon-pair source with controllable delay based on shaped inhomogeneous broadening of rare-earth doped solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavel Sekatski; Nicolas Sangouard; Nicolas Gisin; Hugues de Riedmatten; Mikael Afzelius

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Spontaneous Raman emission in atomic gases provides an attractive source of photon pairs with a controllable delay. We show how this technique can be implemented in solid state systems by appropriately shaping the inhomogeneous broadening. Our proposal is eminently feasible with current technology and provides a realistic solution to entangle remote rare-earth doped solids in a heralded way.

  15. Photon-pair source with controllable delay based on shaped inhomogeneous broadening of rare-earth-metal-doped solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekatski, Pavel; Sangouard, Nicolas; Gisin, Nicolas; Afzelius, Mikael [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Riedmatten, Hugues de [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); ICFO-Institute of Photonic Sciences, Mediterranean Technology Park, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, E-08015 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spontaneous Raman emission in atomic gases provides an attractive source of photon pairs with a controllable delay. We show how this technique can be implemented in solid state systems by appropriately shaping the inhomogeneous broadening. Our proposal is eminently feasible with current technology and provides a realistic solution to entangle remote rare-earth-metal-doped solids in a heralded way.

  16. The structure of the Gamow Teller giant resonance and interpretation of beta-delayed neutron spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H V

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the selective population of states in the neutron- emitter in beta -delayed neutron emission observed recently can be explained by a structure of the Gamow-Teller giant resonance not included in the 'gross theory' of beta -decay. Extrapolating the information on this structure available from the isovector M1 gamma - decay of isobaric analogue states in nuclei in the valley of beta - stability to neutron-rich nuclei can account qualitatively for the observed selectivity.

  17. Flares in GRB afterglows from delayed magnetic dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitrios Giannios

    2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most intriguing discoveries made by the Swift satellite is the flaring activity in about half of the afterglow lightcurves. Flares have been observed on both long and short duration GRBs and on time scales that range from minutes to ~1 day after the prompt emission. The rapid evolution of some flares led to the suggestion that they are caused by late central engine activity. Here, I propose an alternative explanation that does not need reviving of the central engine. Flares can be powered by delayed magnetic dissipation in strongly magnetized (i.e. with initial Poynting to kinetic flux ratio $\\simmore 1$) ejecta during its deceleration due to interaction with the external medium. A closer look at the length scales of the dissipation regions shows that magnetic dissipation can give rise to fast evolving and energetic flares. Multiple flares are also expected in the context of the model.

  18. Electron-capture delayed fission properties of [sup 228]Np

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreek, S.A.; Hall, H.L.; Gregorich, K.E.; Henderson, R.A.; Leyba, J.D.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Kadkhodayan, B.; Neu, M.P.; Kacher, C.D.; Hamilton, T.M.; Lane, M.R.; Sylwester, E.R.; Tuerler, A.; Lee, D.M.; Nurmia, M.J.; Hoffman, D.C. (Chemistry Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, MS-70A/3307 Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-capture delayed fission was positively identified for the first time in [sup 228]Np produced via the [sup 233]U(50-MeV [ital p],6[ital n])[sup 228]Np reaction. The half-life of the observed fission activity was measured to be 61.4[plus minus]1.4 s. The ECDF mode was verified by an x-ray--fission coincidence experiment. Only about 25% of the expected x-ray--fission coincidences were detected which indicates that [sup 228]U does not have a fission isomer populated by the electron-capture and that the overall lifetime of the high-energy states populated by the electron-capture is less than about 10[sup [minus]17] s. The fission activity was assigned to ECDF of [sup 228]Np based on chemical separation and observation of known progeny activities. The ratio of electron-capture to alpha decay is 1.5[plus minus]0.4 for [sup 228]Np. The production cross section for [sup 228]Np is 35[plus minus]10 [mu]b and the delayed fission probability is (2.0[plus minus]0.9)[times]10[sup [minus]4]. The kinetic energies of coincident fission fragments were measured and a pre-neutron emission, most probable total kinetic energy, of 169[plus minus]6 MeV was obtained. The mass-yield distribution was found to be predominantly asymmetric.

  19. Optima Dock Synchronization under Different Delay Assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Nancy

    Projects, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). Email: iryktvmhbitnet or anarCwatson. ibm by broadcast networks in which every message arrives to all processors at approximately the same time, message passing systems, networks, optimization, message delay assumptions, precision. Department

  20. Optically controlled delays for broadband pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Q. Q.; Rostovtsev, Y. V.; Dowling, J. P.; Scully, Marlan O.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a scheme that provides large controllable delays for broadband optical pulses. The system is based on the steep dispersion of a coherently driven medium, in which the narrow electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) band is overcome...

  1. $\\Lambda$(1520)-Produktion in Proton-Proton- und zentralen Blei-Blei-Reaktionen bei 158 GeV pro Nukleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markert, C

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $\\Lambda$(1520)-Produktion in Proton-Proton- und zentralen Blei-Blei-Reaktionen bei 158 GeV pro Nukleon

  2. Proton-Rich Nuclear Statistical Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. R. Seitenzahl; F. X. Timmes; A. Marin-Laflèche; E. Brown; G. Magkotsios; J. Truran

    2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton-rich material in a state of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) is one of the least studied regimes of nucleosynthesis. One reason for this is that after hydrogen burning, stellar evolution proceeds at conditions of equal number of neutrons and protons or at a slight degree of neutron-richness. Proton-rich nucleosynthesis in stars tends to occur only when hydrogen-rich material that accretes onto a white dwarf or neutron star explodes, or when neutrino interactions in the winds from a nascent proto-neutron star or collapsar-disk drive the matter proton-rich prior to or during the nucleosynthesis. In this paper we solve the NSE equations for a range of proton-rich thermodynamic conditions. We show that cold proton-rich NSE is qualitatively different from neutron-rich NSE. Instead of being dominated by the Fe-peak nuclei with the largest binding energy per nucleon that have a proton to nucleon ratio close to the prescribed electron fraction, NSE for proton-rich material near freeze-out temperature is mainly composed of Ni56 and free protons. Previous results of nuclear reaction network calculations rely on this non-intuitive high proton abundance, which this paper will explain. We show how the differences and especially the large fraction of free protons arises from the minimization of the free energy as a result of a delicate competition between the entropy and the nuclear binding energy.

  3. Polynomial fits and the proton radius puzzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kraus; K. E. Mesick; A. White; R. Gilman; S. Strauch

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proton Radius Puzzle refers to the ~7{\\sigma} discrepancy that exists between the proton charge radius determined from muonic hydrogen and that determined from electronic hydrogen spectroscopy and electron-proton scattering. One possible partial resolution to the puzzle includes errors in the extraction of the proton radius from ep elastic scattering data. This possibility is made plausible by certain fits which extract a smaller proton radius from the scattering data consistent with that determined from muonic hydrogen. The reliability of some of these fits that yield a smaller proton radius was studied. We found that fits of form factor data with a truncated polynomial fit are unreliable and systematically give values for the proton radius that are too small. Additionally, a polynomial fit with a \\chi^2_{reduced} ~ 1 is not a sufficient indication for a reliable result.

  4. Stable transport in proton driven Fast Ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bret, A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton beam transport in the context of proton driven Fast Ignition is usually assumed to be stable due to protons high inertia, but an analytical analysis of the process is still lacking. The stability of a charge and current neutralized proton beam passing through a plasma is therefore conducted here, for typical proton driven Fast Ignition parameters. In the cold regime, two fast growing Buneman-like modes are found, with an inverse growth-rate much smaller than the beam time-of-flight to the target core. The stability issue is thus not so obvious, and Kinetic effects are investigated. One unstable mode is found stabilized by the background plasma protons and electrons temperatures. The second mode is also damped, providing the proton beam thermal spread is larger than $\\sim$ 10 keV. In Fusion conditions, the beam propagation should therefore be stable.

  5. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPACT EMISSIONS HEV PHEV marginal power plant is a coalpower uses relatively little coal, but in other cases emissions

  6. Transport-theoretic model for the electron-proton-hydrogen atom auroa. II. Model results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, D.J. [Computational Physics, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Daniell, R.E. Jr. [Computational Physics, Inc., Newton, MA (United States); Basu, B. [Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)] [and others

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a companion paper, a self-consistent transport-theoretic model for the combined electron-proton-hydrogen atom aurora was described. In this paper, numberical results based on the model are presented. This is done for the pure electron aurora, the pure proton-hydrogen atom aurora, and finally for the combined aurora. Adopting commonly used types of energy distributions for the incident particle (electron and proton) fluxes, the authors give numerical solutions for the precipitating electron, proton, and hydrogen atom differential number fluxes. Results are also given for ionization yields and emission yields of the following features: N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative group (3914 {Angstrom}), N{sub 2} second positive group (3371 {Angstrom}), selected N{sub 2} Lyman-Birge-Hopfields bands (1325, 1354, 1383, 1493, and all bands between 1700 and 1800 {Angstrom}), O I (1356 {Angstrom}), L{sub {alpha}} (1216 {Angstrom}), H{sub {beta}} (4861 {Angstrom}), and H{sub {alpha}} (6563 {Angstrom}). The yield at 1493 {Angstrom} also contains a contribution from N I (1493 {Angstrom}), which in fact dominates LBH emission. A major new result of this study is that the secondary electron flux produced by the proton-hydrogen atom aurora is much softer than that produced by the electron aurora. This increased softness is due to the fact that (for energies of aurora interest) cross sections for secondary electron flux produced by the proton-hydrogen atom aurora is much softer than that produced by the electron aurora. This increased softness is due to the fact that (for energies of auroral interest) cross sections for secondary electron production by proton and hydrogen atom impact decrease exponentially with increasing secondary electron energy, whereas the cross sections for electron impact decrease as an inverse power law with increasing secondary energy.

  7. On the modeling of time-varying delays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Chirag Laxmikant

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is an effort to develop generalized dynamic models for systems with time-varying time delays. Unlike the simple time-delay model characterized by a transportation lag in the case of a fixed time delay, time-varying delays exhibit quite...

  8. Delay correlation analysis and representation for vital complaint VHDL models

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rich, Marvin J.; Misra, Ashutosh

    2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system unbind a rise/fall tuple of a VHDL generic variable and create rise time and fall time generics of each generic variable that are independent of each other. Then, according to a predetermined correlation policy, the method and system collect delay values in a VHDL standard delay file, sort the delay values, remove duplicate delay values, group the delay values into correlation sets, and output an analysis file. The correlation policy may include collecting all generic variables in a VHDL standard delay file, selecting each generic variable, and performing reductions on the set of delay values associated with each selected generic variable.

  9. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung: Consequences of different on-shell-point conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yi; Liou, M. K.; Schreiber, W. M.; Gibson, B. F. [College of Physics and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Department of Physics and Institute for Nuclear Theory, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States); Department of Physics, College of Staten Island of the City University of New York, Staten Island, New York 10314 (United States); Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Proton-proton bremsstrahlung (pp{gamma}) is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The pp{gamma} amplitudes can be classified according to the number and location of on-shell points at which they are evaluated. Quantitative understanding of the effect on the pp{gamma} cross section of using different on-shell-point conditions is lacking, but it is essential to identifying the photon emission mechanism governing the pp{gamma} process. Method: Four different pp{gamma} amplitudes, which include four-on-shell-point amplitudes and one-on-shell-point amplitude, are generated from a realistic one-boson-exchange (ROBE) model for pp scattering. These ROBE amplitudes are used to investigate the consequence of using different on-shell-point conditions in calculating the pp{gamma} cross sections. Purpose: We verify the validity of the ROBE pp{gamma} amplitudes. We explore similarities between the four-on-shell-point ROBE and two-u-two-t special (TuTts) soft-photon pp{gamma} amplitudes and important differences with the one-on-shell-point ROBE and Low pp{gamma} amplitudes. We demonstrate that the precision Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) data can only be described by the four-on-shell-point (ROBE or TuTts) amplitude. We use the ROBE four-on-shell-point amplitude and one-on-shell-point amplitude to investigate systematically the effect of using different on-shell-point conditions to calculate the pp{gamma} cross section. Furthermore, we identify a general principle that governs the process. This general principle is also applicable to other bremsstrahlung processes involving the scattering of two identical nucleons. Results: (i) The four-on-shell-point ROBE (or TuTts) amplitude describes the high-precision KVI data much better than does the one-on-shell-point ROBE (or Low) amplitude. Although the contribution from the anomalous magnetic moment of the proton is very significant, it does not completely dominate the KVI pp{gamma} cross sections. (ii) The four-on-shell-point ROBE (or TuTts) amplitude describes the TRIUMF data better than does the one-on-shell-point ROBE (or Low) amplitude. (iii) The effect on the pp{gamma} cross section of using different on-shell-point conditions is significant in the hard-photon region, i.e., for small proton scattering angles {theta} (={theta}{sub 3}={theta}{sub 4}, symmetric scattering angles) far from the elastic limit ({theta}{yields}45 deg.); in contrast, the effect becomes insignificant in the vicinity of the elastic limit. Near the limit as {theta} tends to 45 deg. (or as the photon energy K approaches zero), the four-on-shell-point and one-on-shell-point amplitudes approach one another, a general principle applicable to all bremsstrahlung processes because only kinematics is involved. Conclusion: The four-on-shell-point ROBE amplitude provides a quantitative description of pp{gamma} cross sections. The anomalous magnetic moment is an important component of the photon emission mechanism. The four-on-shell-point property of the full ROBE amplitude is essential to properly describing the complete range of the precision KVI data and the TRIUMF data, although the one-on-shell-point ROBE amplitude is adequate in the region near the elastic limit.

  10. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Guo -Liang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics; Bzdak, Adam [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Riken BNL Research Center

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton–parton cross-section of ?=1.5–3 mb?=1.5–3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  11. ONE- AND TWO-PROTON INCLUSIVE SPECTRA IN 800 MeV PROTON-NUCLEUS COLLISIONS AND THE MEAN FREE PATH OF PROTONS IN NUCLEI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanihata, I.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    path of 2. 5 fm si.ngle~proton data, absolute com~ parisonCAPT IONS Fig. 1. Single-proton inclusive spectra (a) andin (a) Arrows indicate the proton momenta Curves in (b) show

  12. Determination of Godiva`s effective delayed neutron fraction using newly calculated delayed neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spriggs, G.D.; Campbell, J.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Busch, R.D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When calculating the effective delayed neutron fraction {beta}{sub eff} for a given reactor system, the assumed delayed neutron group spectra and the assumed number of delayed neutrons born per fission {nu}{sub d} can have a major impact on the final value. Over the years, the recommended values for the delayed neutron spectra and for {nu}{sub d} have slowly changed. To ascertain whether or not these changes have increased the accuracy of {beta}{sub eff} calculations in fast {sup 235}U systems, the authors have reevaluated {beta}{sub eff} for the benchmark system Godiva-I using newly calculated delayed neutron spectra and Tuttle`s recommended values of {nu}{sub d} for both {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U.

  13. Time-delayed feedback control of delay-coupled neurosystems and lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Hövel; Markus A. Dahlem; Thomas Dahms; Gerald Hiller; Eckehard Schöll

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss applications of time-delayed feedback control to delay-coupled neural systems and lasers, in the framework of the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model and the Lang-Kobayashi laser model, respectively. In the context of neural systems, we will point out some complex scenarios of synchronized in-phase or antiphase oscillations, bursting patterns, or amplitude death, induced by delayed coupling in combination with delayed self-feedback in simple network motifs. For optical systems, we will show that multiple time-delayed feedback, realized by a Fabry-Perot resonator coupled to the laser, provides a valuable tool for the suppression of unwanted intensity pulsations, and leads to stable continuous-wave operation.

  14. Temporal dynamics of stimulated emission with applications in nuclear quantum optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Reichegger; Jörg Evers

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The temporal dynamics of stimulated emission is studied, with the particular emphasis on stimulated emission induced by x-ray pulses interacting with nuclei. In typical nuclear forward scattering experiments, the short incident x-ray pulse is accompanied by a huge number of off-resonant background photons. This prompts the question, if stimulated emission can be observed in the delayed nuclear scattering signal which is emitted after the incident pulse has passed. We find that the stimulated photons essentially overlap with the stimulating pulse. To overcome this problem, we identify the reduction of the delayed scattered light intensity as alternative signature for the stimulated emission. We further study a phase-sensitive variant of stimulated emission in the low-excitation regime, which provides convenient control parameters to facilitate the detection. Finally, we analyze the possibility to observe stimulated emission in nuclei driven by free electron lasers or synchrotron radiation sources.

  15. Solution to the Proton Radius Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Robson

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the electric form factors for the proton in the rest frame and in the Breit momentum frame is used to provide a value for the difference in the mean squared charge radius of the proton evaluated in the two frames. Associating the muonic-hydrogen data analysis for the proton charge radius of 0.84087 fm with the rest frame and associating the electron scattering with the Breit frame yields a prediction 0f 0.87944 fm for the proton radius in the relativistic frame. The most recent value deduced via electron scattering from the proton is 0.877(6)fm so that the frame dependence used here yields a plausible solution to the proton radius puzzle.

  16. Altamont gas pipeline project delayed 1 year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Altamont Gas Transmission Co. will delay laying a 30 in., 620 mile pipeline to deliver Canadian gas to California until markets become more responsive. This paper reports that the decision will delay until November 1994 completion of the proposed 719 MMcfd, $612 million line. The original schedule called for construction to begin in spring 1993 with an in-service date of late 1993. Altamont pipeline is to transport gas from the US-Canadian border at Port of Wild Horse, Mont., to Opal, Wyo., where it will interconnect with the Kern River Transmission Co. pipeline to California. Altamont has obtained all regulatory approvals for its project. Altamont the project sponsors Tenneco Gas, Amoco Corp., and Entech Inc. support the decision to delay the start of construction.

  17. Time-delayed quantum feedback control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arne L. Grimsmo

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A theory of time-delayed coherent quantum feedback is developed. More specifically, we consider a quantum system coupled to a bosonic reservoir creating a unidirectional feedback loop. It is shown that the dynamics can be mapped onto a fictitious quantum cascade, where the system is driven by past versions of itself. The derivation of this model relies on a tensor network representation of the system-reservoir time-propagator. For concreteness, this general theory is applied to a driven two-level atom scattering into a coherent feedback loop. We demonstrate how delay effects can qualitatively change the dynamics of the atom, and how quantum control can be implemented in the presence of time-delays. A realization with a superconducting qubit serving as an artificial atom is discussed.

  18. Neutron emission and fragment yield in high-energy fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grudzevich, O. T., E-mail: ogrudzevich@ippe.ru; Klinov, D. A. [Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)] [Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The KRIS special library of spectra and emission probabilities in the decays of 1500 nuclei excited up to energies between 150 and 250 MeV was developed for correctly taking into account the decay of highly excited nuclei appearing as fission fragments. The emission of neutrons, protons, and photons was taken into account. Neutron emission fromprimary fragments was found to have a substantial effect on the formation of yields of postneutron nuclei. The library was tested by comparing the calculated and measured yields of products originating from the fission of nuclei that was induced by high-energy protons. The method for calculating these yields was tested on the basis of experimental data on the thermal-neutroninduced fission of {sup 235}U nuclei.

  19. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  20. Mean transverse mass of hadrons in proton-proton reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Yu. Vovchenko; D. V. Anchishkin; M. I. Gorenstein

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy dependence of the mean transverse mass $\\langle m_T\\rangle$ at mid-rapidity in proton-proton ($p+p$) reactions is studied within the ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD). The UrQMD model predicts a nonmonotonous dependence of $\\langle m_T\\rangle$ on collision energy for several hadron species: for $\\pi^+$, $p$, $K^+$, and $\\Lambda$ the mean transverse mass has a maximum at the center of mass energy region $5\\le \\sqrt{s}\\le 8$ GeV. These results are a consequence of an interplay of two contributions: 1) excitations and decays of the baryonic resonances $N^*$ and $\\Delta$; 2) excitations and decays of the baryonic strings. The UrQMD results do not show any nonmonotonous dependence of $\\langle m_T\\rangle$ on $\\sqrt{s}$ for $\\pi^-$, $K^{-}$, and antiprotons. Whether a nonmonotonous dependence of $\\langle m_T\\rangle$ at mid-rapidity on the collision energy for $\\pi^+$, $p$, $K^+$, and $\\Lambda$ is relevant for real $p+p$ interactions will be soon checked experimentally by the NA61/SHINE Collaboration.

  1. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  2. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  3. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Redlands, CA); Olsen, Howard B. (Colton, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  4. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (San Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Longmeadow, MA); Olsen, Howard B. (Irvine, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  5. Real Compton Scattering from the Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan M. Nathan

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Real Compton Scattering on the proton in the hard scattering regime is investigated. Recent theoretical developments are reviewed. Plans for new experimental studies at Jefferson Laboratory are presented.

  6. World's Thinnest Proton Channel | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    show that experimental observations of unimpeded proton transfer throughsingle-layer graphene occur via a classic "bucket-line" mechanism first proposed in 1806. Graphene is a...

  7. Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the proton radiography team in this effort funded in part by the NNSA. Additional researchers include Fesseha Alamos National Security, LLC for the Department of Energy's NNSA #12;

  8. Controlling proton source speeds catalyst | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    speeds catalyst Controlling proton source speeds catalyst Released: April 29, 2013 Nickel-based catalyst three times faster with adjustments to key acid Research showing that...

  9. Determining the size of the proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. G. Kelkar; F. Garcia Daza; M. Nowakowski

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the Lamb shift of 49,881.88(76) GHz in muonic hydrogen in conjunction with theoretical estimates of the proton structure effects was recently used to deduce an accurate but rather small radius of the proton. Such an important shift in the understanding of fundamental values needs reconfirmation. Using a different approach with electromagnetic form factors of the proton, we obtain a new expression for the transition energy, $\\Delta = E_{2P_{{3}/{2}}}^{f=2} - E_{2S_{{1}/{2}}}^{f=1}$, in muonic hydrogen and deduce a proton radius, $r_p = 0.831$ fm.

  10. Low temperature proton conducting oxide devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Payzant, Edward A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Speakman, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Greenblatt, Martha (Highland Park, NJ)

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for conducting protons at a temperature below 550.degree. C. includes a LAMOX ceramic body characterized by an alpha crystalline structure.

  11. Call issued for Proton Radiography Facility proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into FY17. January 5, 2015 Amy Clarke and Seth Imhoff of Materials Technology-Metallurgy (MST-6) align a copper density calibration object for a proton radiography...

  12. Reconstruction for proton computed tomography by tracing proton trajectories: A Monte Carlo study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reconstruction for proton computed tomography by tracing proton trajectories: A Monte Carlo study 11 January 2006; published 22 February 2006 Proton computed tomography pCT has been explored computed tomography pCT has several potential ad- vantages in medical applications. Its favorable dose

  13. Measurement of proton and anti-proton intensities in the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Pordes et al.

    2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the techniques used to measure the intensities of the proton (p) and anti-proton ({bar p}) beams in the Tevatron collider. The systems provide simultaneous measurements of the intensity of the 36 proton and 36 antiproton bunches and their longitudinal profiles.

  14. A separation of electrons and protons in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonov, A A; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern with the following scientific goals: search for signatures of dark matter, investigation of gamma-ray point and extended sources, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the active Sun, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons, and nuclei up to the knee. The main components of cosmic rays are protons and helium nuclei, whereas the part of lepton component in the total flux is ~10E-3 for high energies. In present paper, the capability of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope to distinguish electrons and positrons from protons in cosmic rays is investigated. The individual contribution to the proton rejection is studied for each detector system of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray tel...

  15. Driving Down Diesel Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harley, Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turnover on Drayage Truck Emissions at the Port of Oakland,”actions to clean up port truck emissions in Oakland serve asTurnover on Drayage Truck Emissions at the Port of Oakland,”

  16. Cadmium Biosorption Rate in Protonated Sargassum Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Cadmium Biosorption Rate in Protonated Sargassum Biomass J I N B A I Y A N G A N D B O H U M I L V Sargassum fluitans biomass was accompanied by the release of hydrogen protons from the biomass. The uptake the overall biosorption rate of cadmium ions in flat seaweed biomass particles. The overall biosorption

  17. Reoptimising Front End with proton Chris Rogers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ;Optimisation Routine 1D Model RF Cavity model Energy gain is sine wave Standard transit time factor absorber time_energy_movie-100mm.avi #12;Optimisation Routine Performance in ICOOL Longitudinal emittance... Optimisation using a simple 1D model works when no proton absorber Introducing a proton absorber screws up

  18. Simulation of proton radiography terminal at IMP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Yan; Huang, Zhi-Wu; Wang, Jie; Yao, Ze-En; Wang, Jun-Run; Wei, Zheng; Yang, Jian-Cheng; Yuan, You-Jin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton radiography is used for advanced hydrotesting as a new type radiography technology due to its powerful penetration capability and high detection efficiency. A new proton radiography terminal will be developed to radiograph static samples at Institute of Modern Physics of Chinese Academy of Science (IMP-CAS). The proton beam with the maximum energy of 2.6 GeV will be produced by Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooling Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR). The proton radiography terminal consists of the matching magnetic lens and the Zumbro lens system. In this paper, the design scheme and all optic parameters of this beam terminal for 2.6GeV proton energy are presented by simulating the beam optics using WINAGILE code. My-BOC code is used to test the particle tracking of proton radiography beam line. Geant4 code and G4beamline code are used for simulating the proton radiography system. The results show that the transmission efficiency of proton without target is 100%, and the effect of secondary particles ca...

  19. PROTON AND DEUTERIUM NMR EXPERIMENTS IN ZERO FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, J.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Example of Isolated Proton Pair Practical Considerations TheJ J vi i A). B). C). IV. V. Proton Zero Field Spectra Effectcompared to that between protons, it can exert a profound

  20. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elangovan, S. (South Jordan, UT); Nair, Balakrishnan G. (Sandy, UT); Small, Troy (Midvale, UT); Heck, Brian (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  1. Proton radioactivity with a Yukawa effective interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R. Routray; S. K. Tripathy; B. B. Dash; B. Behera; D. N. Basu

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The half lives of proton radioactivity of proton emitters are investigated theoretically. Proton-nucleus interaction potentials are obtained by folding the densities of the daughter nuclei with a finite range effective nucleon-nucleon interaction having Yukawa form. The Wood-Saxon density distributions for the nuclei used in calculating the nuclear as well as the Coulomb interaction potentials are predictions of the interaction. The quantum mechanical tunneling probability is calculated within the WKB framework. These calculations provide reasonable estimates for the observed proton radioactivity lifetimes. The effects of neutron-proton effective mass splitting in neutron rich asymmetric matter as well as the nuclear matter incompressibility on the decay probability are investigated.

  2. Delayed Ultrafast X-ray Auger Probing (DUXAP) of Nucleobase Ultraviolet Photoprotection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, B K; Miyabe, S; Tarantelli, F; Aguilar, A; Berrah, N; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J; Bucksbaum, P H; Castagna, J C; Coffee, R; Cryan, J; Fang, L; Feifel, R; Gaffney, K; Glownia, J; Martinez, T; Mucke, M; Murphy, B; Natan, A; Osipov, T; Petrovic, V; Schorb, S; Schultz, Th; Spector, L; Swiggers, M; Tenney, I; Wang, S; White, W; White, J; Gühr, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new method for ultrafast spectroscopy of molecular photoexcited dynamics. The technique uses a pair of femtosecond pulses: a photoexcitation pulse initiating excited state dynamics followed by a soft x-ray (SXR) probe pulse that core ionizes certain atoms inside the molecule. We observe the Auger decay of the core hole as a function of delay between the photoexcitation and SXR pulses. The core hole decay is particularly sensitive to the local valence electrons near the core and shows new types of propensity rules, compared to dipole selection rules in SXR absorption or emission spectroscopy. We apply the delayed ultrafast x-ray Auger probing (DUXAP) method to the specific problem of nucleobase photoprotection to demonstrate its potential. The ultraviolet photoexcited \\pi\\pi* states of nucleobases are prone to chemical reactions with neighboring bases. To avoid this, the single molecules funnel the \\pi\\pi* population to lower lying electronic states on an ultrafast timescale under violation of the...

  3. Delays in Reducing Waterborne and Water-related Infectious Diseases in China under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, Maggie; Belle, Jessica; Carlton, Elizabeth; Liang, Song; Li, Huazhong; Luo, Wei; Freeman, Matthew C.; Liu, Yang; Gao, Yang; Hess, Jeremy; Remais, Justin V.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite China’s rapid progress improving water, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) infrastructure and access, in 2011, 471 million people lacked access to improved sanitation, and 401 million people lacked access to household piped water. Infectious diseases are sensitive to changes in climate, particularly temperature, and WSH conditions. To explore possible impacts of climate change on these diseases in China in 2020 and 2030, we coupled estimates of the temperature sensitivity of diarrheal disease and three vector-borne diseases, temperature projections from global climate models using four emissions pathways, WSH-infrastructure development scenarios and projected demographic changes. By 2030, the projected impacts would delay China’s historically rapid progress toward reducing the burden of WSH-attributable infectious disease by 8-85 months. This developmental delay provides a key summary measure of the impact of climate change in China, and in other societies undergoing rapid social, economic, and environmental change.

  4. A framework for delay emulation of large-scale internetworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkata, Shravan Rangaraju

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The framework models and dynamically adapts the test traffic according to the network delay characteristics observed on the Internet in real-time. The proposed framework consists of three main modules: Virtual Host Configuration Module, Delay Estimator...

  5. Delay Analysis of Graphene Field-Effect Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Han

    In this letter, we analyze the carrier transit delay in graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs).The extraction of the intrinsic delay provides a new way to directly estimate carrier velocity from the experimental data, ...

  6. Built-In Self Test (BIST) for Realistic Delay Defects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamilarasan, Karthik Prabhu

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing of delay defects is necessary in deep submicron (DSM) technologies. High coverage delay tests produced by automatic test pattern generation (ATPG) can be applied during wafer and package tests, but are difficult ...

  7. The effective delayed neutron fraction for bare-metal criticals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearlstein, S.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given sufficient material, a large number of actinides could be used to form bare-metal criticals. The effective delayed neutron fraction for a bare critical comprised of a fissile material is comparable with the absolute delayed neutron fraction. The effective delayed neutron fraction for a bare critical composed of a fissionable material is reduced by factors of 2 to 10 when compared with the absolute delayed neutron fraction. When the effective delayed neutron fraction is small, the difference between delayed and prompt criticality is small, and extreme caution must be used in critical assemblies of these materials. This study uses an approximate but realistic model to survey the actinide region to compare effective delayed neutron fractions with absolute delayed neutron fractions.

  8. Atomistic Simulation of Water Percolation and Proton Hopping...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Percolation and Proton Hopping in Nafion Fuel Cell Membrane. Atomistic Simulation of Water Percolation and Proton Hopping in Nafion Fuel Cell Membrane. Abstract: We have...

  9. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Proposed Proton Transport Pathways...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics Study of the Proposed Proton Transport Pathways in FeFe-Hydrogenase. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Proposed Proton Transport Pathways in FeFe-Hydrogenase. Abstract:...

  10. Conformational Dynamics and Proton Relay Positioning in Nickel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics and Proton Relay Positioning in Nickel Catalysts for Hydrogen Production and Oxidation. Conformational Dynamics and Proton Relay Positioning in Nickel Catalysts for...

  11. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board...

  12. Oct. 25 Lecture Highlights Treatment Technology of HU's Proton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oct. 25 Lecture Highlights Treatment Technology of HU's Proton Therapy Institute Cynthia Keppel Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute Scientific and Technical Director,...

  13. Computation of the Redox and Protonation Properties of Quinones...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computation of the Redox and Protonation Properties of Quinones: Towards the Prediction of Redox Cycling Natural Products. Computation of the Redox and Protonation Properties of...

  14. q-deformed logistic map with delay feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manish Dev Shrimali; Subhashish Banerjee

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The delay logistic map with two types of q-deformations: Tsallis and Quantum-group type are studied. The stability of the map and its bifurcation scheme is analyzed as a function of the deformation and delay feedback parameters. Chaos is suppressed in a certain region of deformation and feedback parameter space. The steady state obtained by delay feedback is maintained in one type of deformation while chaotic behavior is recovered in another type with increasing delay.

  15. Power and Delay Optimization in Multi-Hop Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    In this paper, we study the optimization problem of transmission power and delay in a multi-hop wireless network of transmission power and queueing delay in wireless networks has1 Power and Delay Optimization in Multi-Hop Wireless Networks Li Xia, Basem Shihada Abstract

  16. Maximizing Crosstalk-Induced Slowdown During Path Delay Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gope, Dibakar

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    in path delay for c5315 .................................................................... 57 Figure 11 Increase in path delay for c2670 .................................................................... 60 Figure 12 Increase in path delay for c... for critical paths considering single aggressor crosstalk effect with due consideration to the timing alignment and direction. This method has similar CPU efficiency to that of [17] and [18]. However, they did not take into account the possible impact...

  17. Multiwavelength Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

  18. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

    2004-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

  19. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

    2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

  20. SRS delayed neutron instruments for safeguards measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studley, R.V. [Westinghouse SRC, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Six analytical systems measuring delayed neutrons have been used for safeguards measurements at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A predecessor, the 252Cf Activation Analysis Facility installed at the Savannah River Technology Center (formally SR Laboratory) has been used since 1974 to analyze small samples, measuring both delayed neutrons and gammas. The six shufflers, plus one currently being fabricated, were developed, designed and fabricated by the LANL N-1 group. These shufflers have provided safeguards measurements of product (2 each), in-process scrap (2 each plus a conceptual replacement) and process waste (2 each plus one being fabricated). One shuffler for scrap assay was the first shuffler to be installed (1978) in a process. Another (waste) was the first installed in a process capable of assaying barrels. A third (waste) is the first pass-through model and a fourth (product) is the most precise ({+-}.12%) and accurate NDA instrument yet produced.

  1. Method for reducing ignition delay of fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppie, L.O.

    1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of reducing ignition delay /tau/, of fuels to negligible values and negligible differences is disclosed. Fuels conditioned to have such negligible values and differences are readily used in multiple fuel engines, such fuels self-ignite substantially instantaneously when injected into an oxidant, require substantially no heat transfer from the oxidant to effect the self-ignition, and the self-ignition is sufficient to sustain continued combustion.

  2. Attosecond neutron Compton scattering from protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Aris Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of "anomalous" scattering of neutrons and electrons from protons in the electron-volt energy-transfer range is considered, and related experimental results are mentioned. A recent independent confirmation of this effect with a new data analysis procedure is presented. Due to the very short characteristic scattering time, there is no well defined separation of time scales of electronic and protonic motions. An outline of a proposed theoretical interpretation is presented, which is based on the fact that scattering protons represent \\textit{open} quantum systems, thus being subject to decoherence.

  3. Calibration of the JET neutron yield monitors using the delayed neutron counting technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Belle, P.; Jarvis, O.N.; Sadler, G. (JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3EA (Great Britain)); de Leeuw, S.; D'Hondt, P. (C.E.N./S.C.K., B-2400 Mol (Belgium)); Pillon, M. (Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, CRE Frascati (Italy))

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time-resolved neutron yield is routinely measured on the JET tokamak using a set of fission chambers. At present, the preferred technique is to employ activation reactions to determine the neutron fluence at a well-chosen position and to relate the measured fluence to the total neutron emission by means of neutron transport calculations. The delayed neutron counting method is a particularly convenient method of performing the activation measurement and the fission cross sections are accurately known. This paper outlines the measurement technique as used on JET.

  4. Scaling of Lyapunov exponents in chaotic delay systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Jüngling; Wolfgang Kinzel

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The scaling behavior of the maximal Lyapunov exponent in chaotic systems with time-delayed feedback is investigated. For large delay times it has been shown that the delay-dependence of the exponent allows a distinction between strong and weak chaos, which are the analogy to strong and weak instability of periodic orbits in a delay system. We find significant differences between scaling of exponents in periodic or chaotic systems. We show that chaotic scaling is related to fluctuations in the linearized equations of motion. A linear delay system including multiplicative noise shows the same properties as the deterministic chaotic systems.

  5. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, William L. (900 N. Randolph St., Arlington, VA 22203); Vanheusden, Karel J. R. (8401 Spain Rd., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Fleetwood, Daniel M. (5513 Estrellita del Norte, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Devine, Roderick A. B. (12 Impasse de la Liberation, 38950 St. Martin le Vinoux, FR); Archer, Leo B. (3108 Vicky Ct., Garland, TX 75044); Brown, George A. (1512 Ridgeview Dr., Arlington, TX 76012-1940); Wallace, Robert M. (428 Park Bend Dr., Richardson, TX 75081)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An enhancement of an electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure during an anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. Device operation is enhanced by concluding this anneal step with a sudden cooling. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronics elements on the same silicon substrate.

  6. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, William L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vanheusden, Karel J. R. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleetwood, Daniel M. (Albuquerque, NM); Devine, Roderick A. B. (St. Martin le Vinoux, FR)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element.

  7. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, W.L.; Vanheusden, K.J.R.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Devine, R.A.B.

    1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically written memory element is disclosed utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element. 19 figs.

  8. Exclusive 0 electroproduction on transversely polarized protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exclusive 0 electroproduction on transversely polarized protons A. Airapetian,12, 15 N. Akopov,26 Z. Akopov,26 E.C. Aschenauer,6 W. Augustyniak,25 A. Avetissian,26 E. Avetisyan,5 B. Ball,15 N. Bianchi,10 H

  9. Resolution of the Proton Spin Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Myhrer; A. W. Thomas

    2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of lines of investigation into the structure of the nucleon have converged to the point where we believe that one has a consistent explanation of the well known proton spin crisis.

  10. Low energy neutron-proton interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daub, Brian (Brian Hollenberg)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been few measurements of cross sections for neutron-proton scattering and radiative capture below 1 MeV. Those measurements which do exist are at a small number of energies and are often inconsistent with ...

  11. Physics at a new Fermilab proton driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics, the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future. At the end of 2004 the APS ''Study on the Physics of Neutrinos'' concluded that the future US neutrino program should have, as one of its components, ''A proton driver in the megawatt class or above and neutrino superbeam with an appropriate very large detector capable of observing Cp violation and measuring the neutrino mass-squared differences and mixing parameters with high precision''. The presently proposed Fermilab Proton Driver is designed to accomplish these goals, and is based on, and would help develop, Linear Collider technology. In this paper the Proton Driver parameters are summarized, and the potential physics program is described.

  12. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, William L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vanheusden, Karel J. R. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleetwood, Daniel M. (Albuquerque, NM); Devine, Roderick A. B. (St. Martin le Vinoux, FR)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element.

  13. Proton Transfer in Nucleobases is Mediated by Water Kirill Khistyaev,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    Proton Transfer in Nucleobases is Mediated by Water Kirill Khistyaev, Amir Golan, Ksenia B. Bravaya, and facilitating efficient proton transport through ion channels and interfaces. This study investigates proton and tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation, we show that water shuts down ionization-induced proton

  14. PhysicsHighlight Proton radiography at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PhysicsHighlight Proton radiography at Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Radiography, invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory, employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials driven by high explosives. A series of proton radiographs of disks (left to right) aluminum

  15. Leading proton production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leading proton production in deep inelastic 1 scattering at HERA 2 ZEUS Collaboration 3 Draft, with a #28;nal-state proton carrying a large fraction of the incoming proton energy, x L > 0 photon virtualities Q 2 > 3 GeV 2 and mass of the photon-proton sys- tem 45

  16. Investigation of proton focusing and conversion efficiency for proton fast ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartal, Teresa Jean

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protons from Ultra-short Pulse Laser Irradiated Foils. PhDintense laser (? 10 19 Wcm ?2 [9]. The short ultra intense

  17. Investigation of proton focusing and conversion efficiency for proton fast ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartal, Teresa Jean

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After ignition, a thermonuclear burn wave spreads radiallythe shell to create the thermonuclear burn wave. At 10 keV,heating the plasma to thermonuclear temperatures. Protons

  18. Particle rapidity distribution in proton-nucleus collisions using the proton-contributor reference frame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gines Martinez-Garcia

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    I define the proton-contributor reference frame in proton nucleus (p--A) collisions as the center of mass of the system formed by the proton and the participant nucleons of the nucleus. Assuming that the rapidity distribution of produced particles is symmetric in the proton-contributor reference frame, several measurements in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 5.02 {\\rm TeV}$ can be described qualitatively. These include rapidity distributions of charged particles, $J/\\psi$ and Z bosons.

  19. Small angle elastic scattering of protons off of spinless nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, A.G.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elastic differential cross sections and analyzing powers for 800 MeV protons incident on /sup 12/C, /sup 40/Ca, and /sup 208/Pb in the momentum transfer range 20 MeV/c < q < 130 MeV/c have been measured. The data was taken with the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Special delay-line drift chambers with dead regions for the beam to pass through them were used to obtain the data. Through the interference of the Coulomb and nuclear contributions to the differential cross section in the small angle region, the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward nuclear amplitude ..cap alpha../sub n/(0) = Ref/sub n/(0)/Imf/sub n/(0) is extracted. The importance of knowing this quantity at lower energies in order to study the differences between relativistic and non-relativistic scattering theories is discussed. 130 refs., 60 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Statistical nature of cluster emission in nuclear liquid phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. G. Ma

    2002-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission of nuclear clusters is investigated within the framework of isospin dependent lattice gas model and classical molecular dynamics model. It is found that the emission of individual cluster which is heavier than proton is almost Poissonian except near the liquid gas phase transition point and the thermal scaling is observed by the linear Arrhenius plots which is made from the average multiplicity of each cluster versus the inverse of temperature in the nuclear liquid phase. It indicates of a statistical nature of such cluster emission in the models. The "emission barriers" which are the slopes of the Arrhenius plots are extracted as a function of the mass or charge number and fitted by the formula embodied with the contributions of the surface energy and Coulomb interaction. The possible influences of the source size, Coulomb interaction and "freeze-out" density and related physical implications are discussed.

  1. 200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner Tia.F.W. Sadrozinski, K. Schubert, R. Schulte, B. Schultze, D. Steinberg, M. Witt, A. Zatserklyaniy Abstract--Proton alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. The quality of the image, both

  2. BP's Perspective on Emissions Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BP's Perspective on Emissions Trading Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop April 30, 2010 Mark - Government policies can create a carbon price via three primary mechanisms: - Emissions trading (BP's strong

  3. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Volk Jr; Keith Wisecarver

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking. The following deliverables are scheduled from the two projects of the three-year JIP: (1) A novel method for enhancing liquid yields from delayed cokers and data that provide insight as to the optimum temperature to remove hydrogen sulfide from furnace gases. (2) An understanding of what causes foaming in c

  4. A TWO-YEAR TIME DELAY FOR THE LENSED QUASAR SDSS J1029+2623

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fohlmeister, Janine; Wambsganss, Joachim [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Falco, Emilio E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Oguri, Masamune [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)] [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Dai, Xinyu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 279 epochs of optical monitoring data spanning 5.4 years from 2007 January to 2012 June for the largest image separation (22.''6) gravitationally lensed quasar, SDSS J1029+2623. We find that image A leads the images B and C by {Delta} t {sub AB} = (744 {+-} 10) days (90% confidence); the uncertainty includes both statistical uncertainties and systematic differences due to the choice of models. With only a {approx}1% fractional error, the interpretation of the delay is limited primarily by cosmic variance due to fluctuations in the mean line-of-sight density. We cannot separate the fainter image C from image B, but since image C trails image B by only 2-3 days in all models, the estimate of the time delay between images A and B is little affected by combining the fluxes of images B and C. There is weak evidence for a low level of microlensing, perhaps created by the small galaxy responsible for the flux ratio anomaly in this system. Interpreting the delay depends on better constraining the shape of the gravitational potential using the lensed host galaxy, other lensed arcs, and the structure of the X-ray emission.

  5. Excess Emissions (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation establishes requirements for a source whose operation results in an excess emission and to establish criteria for a source whose operation results in an excess emission to claim an...

  6. Emissions Trading and Social Justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    David  M.  Driesen,  Does  Emissions  Trading  Encourage  Jason  Coburn,  Emissions  Trading   and   Environmental  Szambelan,  U.S.  Emissions  Trading  Markets  for  SO 2  

  7. Clustering phenomena from two-particle angular correlations in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results on two-particle angular correlations in proton-proton (/-s = 200 and 410 GeV) ,Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions (js = 200 GeV) are presented over a broad range of pseudorapidity ([eta]) and azimuthal angle ([phi]). The ...

  8. Proton-proton multiplicity distributions at LHC and the Pomeron intercept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Capella; E. G. Ferreiro

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the proton-proton multiplicity distributions at LHC energies in the framework of a multiple scattering model assuming a Poisson distribution for each inelastic collision. Multiple scattering is essential to broaden the multiplicity distribution. We obtain approximate KNO scaling for small pseudo-rapidity intervals ($|\\eta | < 0.5$) and sizable KNO scaling violations for larger ones, in agreement with experiment.

  9. $?$ and $?$ Production in Proton-Proton Collisions at E=13 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard S. Kisslinger; Debasish Das

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is an extension of our recent studies of $\\Psi$ and $\\Upsilon$ production cross sections in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with E=$\\sqrt{s}$=8.0 TeV to E=13 TeV

  10. $?$ and $?$ Production in Proton-Proton Collisions at E=13 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard S. Kisslinger; Debasish Das

    2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is an extension of our recent studies of $\\Psi$ and $\\Upsilon$ production cross sections in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with E=$\\sqrt{s}$=8.0 TeV to E=13 TeV

  11. Delayed neutron detection with an integrated differential die-away and delayed neutron instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanc, Pauline [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Taehoon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hu, Jianwei S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hendricks, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded a multilab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass and detect the diversion of pins from spent nuclear fuel. The first two years of this NGSI effort was focused on quantifying the capability of a range of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques with Monte Carlo (MCNPX) modeling and the second current phase involves measuring Spent Fuel. One of the techniques of interest in this paper involves measuring delayed neutrons. A delayed neutron instrument using 36 fission chambers and a 14 MeV neutron generator so called DT generator (Deuterium + Tritium) surrounding the fuel was previously studied as part of the NGSI effort. This paper will quantify the capability of a standalone delayed neutron instrument using 4 {sup 3}He gas filled tubes and a DT generator with significant spectrum tailoring, located far from the fuel. So that future research can assess how well a delayed neutron instrument will function as part of an integrated NDA system. A new design is going to be used to respond to the need of the techniques. This design has been modeled for a water media and is currently being optimized for borated water and air media as part of ongoing research. This new design was selected in order to minimize the fission of {sup 238}U, to use a more realistic neutron generator design in the model, to reduce cost and facilitate the integration of a delayed neutron (DN) with a differential die-away (DDA) instrument. Since this paper will focus on delayed neutron detection, the goal is to quantify the signal from {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu, which are the isotopes present in Spent Fuel that respond significantly to a neutron interrogation. This report will quantify the capability of this new delayed neutron design to measure the combined mass of {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu for 16 of the 64 assemblies of the NGSI Spent Fuel library in one of the three media, water.

  12. Experimental control of chaos by variable and distributed delay feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Jüngling; Aleksandar Gjurchinovski; Viktor Urumov

    2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a significant improvement of the classical time-delayed feedback control method for stabilization of unstable periodic orbits or steady states. In an electronic circuit experiment we were able to realize time-varying and distributed delays in the control force leading to successful control for large parameter sets including large time delays. The presented technique makes advanced use of the natural torsion of the orbits, which is also necessary for the original control method to work.

  13. Delay Induced Oscillations in a Fundamental Power System Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajesh G. Kavasseri

    2006-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the dynamics and stability of a fundamental power system model when a time delay is imposed on the excitation of the generator. It is observed that sustained oscillations can arise in an otherwise stable power system through a delay induced Andronov-Hopf bifurcation. Numerical simulations are conducted to explore the dynamics of the time delayed system after the bifurcation which indicate period doublings culminating in a strange attractor.

  14. Mean field approximation for noisy delay coupled excitable neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikola Buric; Dragana Rankovic; Kristina Todorovic; Nebojsa Vasovic

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Mean field approximation of a large collection of FitzHugh-Nagumo excitable neurons with noise and all-to-all coupling with explicit time-delays, modelled by $N\\gg 1$ stochastic delay-differential equations is derived. The resulting approximation contains only two deterministic delay-differential equations but provides excellent predictions concerning the stability and bifurcations of the averaged global variables of the exact large system.

  15. Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

  16. Effect of proton-proton Coulomb repulsion on soft dipole excitations of light proton-rich nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Oishi; K. Hagino; H. Sagawa

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform three-body model calculations for soft dipole excitations of the proton-rich Borromean nucleus $^{17}$Ne. To this end, we assume that $^{17}$Ne takes the $^{15}$O+p+p structure, in which the two valence protons are excited from the $0^+$ ground state configuration to $1^-$ continuum states. We employ a density-dependent contact force for the nuclear part of the pairing interaction, and discretize the continuum states with the box boundary condition. We show by explicitly including the Coulomb interaction between the valence protons that the Coulomb repulsion does not significantly alter the E1 strength distribution. We point out that the effect of the Coulomb repulsion in fact can be well simulated by renormalizing the nuclear pairing interaction.

  17. A few-group delayed neutron model based on a consistent set of decay constants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.M.; Spriggs, G.D.

    1998-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an international effort, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been asked to (1) determine if there is a set of dominant precursors that are common to all fissionable isotopes and all incident neutron energies, (2) expand the existing experimentally-measured few-group models commonly used in the nuclear industry into their 8-group equivalent using a consistent set of decay constants corresponding to these dominant precursors, and (3) formulate new group spectra for the equivalent 8-group model. In response to this request, LANL has calculated the theoretical delayed neutron yield for 14 different isotopes using three different incident neutron spectra (i.e., thermal, fast, and 14.1 MeV) using the current fission-yield and emission probability data found in ENDF-VI. An example of these results is shown in a figure in which the theoretical delayed neutron yields for the 271 precursors produced during thermal fission of {sup 235}U are plotted against the half-lives of the precursors. By comparing the results of all 14 isotopes, a preliminary set of precursors has been identified that are dominant within the various half-life regimes of the delayed neutron precursors. Also plotted on a figure are the group yields of the 8-group equivalent model of Keepin`s 6-group model. And finally, an example of the delayed neutron spectra for group 7 in the 8-group equivalent model is shown. A final report summarizing all results is expected to be released for review by the international steering committee by the summer of 1998.

  18. A Detector for Proton Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blazey, G.; et al.,

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation therapy is a widely recognized treatment for cancer. Energetic protons have distinct features that set them apart from photons and make them desirable for cancer therapy as well as medical imaging. The clinical interest in heavy ion therapy is due to the fact that ions deposit almost all of their energy in a sharp peak – the Bragg peak- at the very end of their path. Proton beams can be used to precisely localize a tumor and deliver an exact dose to the tumor with small doses to the surrounding tissue. Proton computed tomography (pCT) provides direct information on the location on the target tumor, and avoids position uncertainty caused by treatment planning based on imaging with X-ray CT. The pCT project goal is to measure and reconstruct the proton relative stopping power distribution directly in situ. To ensure the full advantage of cancer treatment with 200 MeV proton beams, pCT must be realized.

  19. Energy Production Demonstrator for Megawatt Proton Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pronskikh, Vitaly S; Novitski, Igor; Tyutyunnikov, Sergey I

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary study of the Energy Production Demonstrator (EPD) concept - a solid heavy metal target irradiated by GeV-range intense proton beams and producing more energy than consuming - is carried out. Neutron production, fission, energy deposition, energy gain, testing volume and helium production are simulated with the MARS15 code for tungsten, thorium, and natural uranium targets in the proton energy range 0.5 to 120 GeV. This study shows that the proton energy range of 2 to 4 GeV is optimal for both a natU EPD and the tungsten-based testing station that would be the most suitable for proton accelerator facilities. Conservative estimates, not including breeding and fission of plutonium, based on the simulations suggest that the proton beam current of 1 mA will be sufficient to produce 1 GW of thermal output power with the natU EPD while supplying < 8% of that power to operate the accelerator. The thermal analysis shows that the concept considered has a problem due to a possible core meltdown; however...

  20. Energy Production Demonstrator for Megawatt Proton Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitaly S. Pronskikh; Nikolai Mokhov; Igor Novitski; Sergey I. Tyutyunnikov

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary study of the Energy Production Demonstrator (EPD) concept - a solid heavy metal target irradiated by GeV-range intense proton beams and producing more energy than consuming - is carried out. Neutron production, fission, energy deposition, energy gain, testing volume and helium production are simulated with the MARS15 code for tungsten, thorium, and natural uranium targets in the proton energy range 0.5 to 120 GeV. This study shows that the proton energy range of 2 to 4 GeV is optimal for both a natU EPD and the tungsten-based testing station that would be the most suitable for proton accelerator facilities. Conservative estimates, not including breeding and fission of plutonium, based on the simulations suggest that the proton beam current of 1 mA will be sufficient to produce 1 GW of thermal output power with the natU EPD while supplying < 8% of that power to operate the accelerator. The thermal analysis shows that the concept considered has a problem due to a possible core meltdown; however, a number of approaches (a beam rastering, in first place) are suggested to mitigate the issue. The efficiency of the considered EPD as a Materials Test Station (MTS) is also evaluated in this study.

  1. Modelling proton transfer in water molecule chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artem Korzhimanov; Mattias Marklund; Tatiana Shutova; Goran Samuelsson

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of protons transport in molecular water chains is of fundamental interest for many biological systems. Although many features of such systems can be analyzed using large-scale computational modeling, other features are better understood in terms of simplified model problems. Here we have tested, analytically and numerically, a model describing the classical proton hopping process in molecular water chains. In order to capture the main features of the proton hopping process in such molecular chains, we use a simplified model for our analysis. In particular, our discrete model describes a 1D chain of water molecules situated in an external protein channel structure, and each water molecule is allowed to oscillate around its equilibrium point in this system, while the protons are allowed to move along the line of neighboring oxygen atoms. The occurrence and properties of nonlinear solitary transport structures, allowing for much faster proton transport, are discussed, and the possible implications of these findings for biological systems are emphasized.

  2. arabidopsis delays leaf: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mediated by delayed responses Katul, Gabriel 4 Chloroplast protein degradation during natural leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  3. LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE DUE TO INCLEAMENT WEATHER During the winter months, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may at times...

  4. Generalized definition of time delay in scattering theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Gerard; R. Tiedra de Aldecoa

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We advocate for the systematic use of a symmetrized definition of time delay in scattering theory. In two-body scattering processes, we show that the symmetrized time delay exists for arbitrary dilated spatial regions symmetric with respect to the origin. It is equal to the usual time delay plus a new contribution, which vanishes in the case of spherical spatial regions. We also prove that the symmetrized time delay is invariant under an appropriate mapping of time reversal. These results are also discussed in the context of classical scattering theory.

  5. Characteristic Lyapunov vectors in chaotic time-delayed systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Pazó; Juan M. López

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute Lyapunov vectors (LVs) corresponding to the largest Lyapunov exponents in delay-differential equations with large time delay. We find that characteristic LVs, and backward (Gram-Schmidt) LVs, exhibit long-range correlations, identical to those already observed in dissipative extended systems. In addition we give numerical and theoretical support to the hypothesis that the main LV belongs, under a suitable transformation, to the universality class of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation. These facts indicate that in the large delay limit (an important class of) delayed equations behave exactly as dissipative systems with spatiotemporal chaos.

  6. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  7. Polarization measurement of laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raab, Natascha; Engels, Ralf; Engin, Ilhan; Greven, Patrick; Holler, Astrid; Lehrach, Andreas; Maier, Rudolf [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)] [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Büscher, Markus, E-mail: m.buescher@fz-juelich.de [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany) [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-6), Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Institute for Laser- and Plasma Physics, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald [Institute for Laser- and Plasma Physics, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)] [Institute for Laser- and Plasma Physics, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)] [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the successful use of a laser-driven few-MeV proton source to measure the differential cross section of a hadronic scattering reaction as well as on the measurement and simulation study of polarization observables of the laser-accelerated charged particle beams. These investigations were carried out with thin foil targets, illuminated by 100 TW laser pulses at the Arcturus laser facility; the polarization measurement is based on the spin dependence of hadronic proton scattering off nuclei in a Silicon target. We find proton beam polarizations consistent with zero magnitude which indicates that for these particular laser-target parameters the particle spins are not aligned by the strong magnetic fields inside the laser-generated plasmas.

  8. Proton radius puzzle and large extra dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Bang Wang; Wei-Tou Ni

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a theoretical scenario to solve the proton radius puzzle which recently arises from the muonic hydrogen experiment. In this framework, 4 + n dimensional theory is incorporated with modified gravity. The extra gravitational interaction between the proton and muon at very short range provides an energy shift which accounts for the discrepancy between spectroscopic results from muonic and electronic hydrogen experiments. Assuming the modified gravity is a small perturbation to the existing electromagnetic interaction, we find the puzzle can be solved with stringent constraint on the range of the new force. Our result not only provides a possible solution to the proton radius puzzle but also suggest a direction to test new physics at very small length scale.

  9. Elastic and Proton Dynamics of the DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. L. Golo

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of this report is the dynamics of elastic system in conjunction with hydrogen bonds of the DNA. We draw attention to the draw-back of the familiar rod model of the DNA, and make a case of constructing models that could accommodate the intrinsic structure of the DNA. In this respect studying the interplay among the elastic system and the protons of the DNA, is of interest, for it could accommodate the inter-strand as well as the tunneling modes of protons. Following this direction, we come to the conclusion that the elastic-proton dynamics may have a bearing on biophysics of the DNA. The phenomenon of point mutations is discussed within this framework.

  10. Neutrino pair emission due to scattering of electrons off fluxoids in superfluid neutron star cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Kaminker; D. G. Yakovlev; P. Haensel

    1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the emission of neutrinos, resulting from the scattering of electrons off magnetic flux tubes (fluxoids) in the neutron star cores with superfluid (superconducting) protons. In the absence of proton superfluidity (T> T_{cp}), this process transforms into the well known electron synchrotron emission of neutrino pairs in a locally uniform magnetic field B, with the neutrino energy loss rate Q proportional to B^2 T^5. For temperatures T not much below T_{cp}, the synchrotron regime (Q \\propto T^5) persists and the emissivity Q can be amplified by several orders of magnitude due to the appearance of the fluxoids and associated enhancement of the field within them. For lower T, the synchrotron regime transforms into the bremsstrahlung regime (Q \\propto T^6) similar to the ordinary neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung of electrons which scatter off atomic nuclei. We calculate Q numerically and represent our results through a suitable analytic fit. In addition, we estimate the emissivities of two other neutrino-production mechanisms which are usually neglected -- neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung processes due to electron-proton and electron-electron collisions. We show that the electron-fluxoid and electron-electron scattering can provide the main neutrino production mechanisms in the neutron star cores with highly superfluid protons and neutrons at T scattering is significant if the initial, locally uniform magnetic field B > 10^{13} G.

  11. Non-thermal emission from Galaxy Clusters and future observations with the FERMI gamma-ray telescope and LOFAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Brunetti

    2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    FERMI (formely GLAST) and LOFAR will shortly provide crucial information on the non-thermal components (relativistic particles and magnetic field) in galaxy clusters. After discussing observational facts that already put constraints on the properties and origin of non-thermal components, I will report on the emission spectrum from galaxy clusters as expected in the context of general calculations in which relativistic particles (protons and secondary electrons due to proton-proton collisions) interact with MHD turbulence generated in the cluster volume during cluster-cluster mergers. In this scenario (known as re-acceleration scenario) diffuse cluster-scale radio emission is produced in massive clusters during merging events, while gamma ray emission, at some level, is expected to be common in clusters. Expectations of interest for LOFAR and FERMI are also briefly discussed.

  12. Delayed neutrons measurement at the MEGAPIE target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Panebianco; Pavel Bokov; Diane Dore; Xavier Ledoux; Alain Letourneau; Aurelien Prevost; Danas Ridikas

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the Neutronic and Nuclear Assessment Task Group of the MEGAPIE experiment we measured the delayed neutron (DN) flux at the top of the target. The measurement was proposed mainly for radioprotection purposes since the DN flux at the top of the target has been estimated to be of the same order of magnitude as the prompt neutron flux. Given the strong model-dependence of DN predictions, the measurement of DN contribution to the total neutron activity at the top of the target was thus desired. Moreover, this measurement is complementary to the DN experiments performed at PNPI (Gatchina) on solid lead and bismuth targets. The DN measurement at MEGAPIE was performed during the start-up phase of the target. In this paper we present a detailed description of the experimental setup and some preliminary results on decay spectra.

  13. Delayed neutrons measurement at the MEGAPIE target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panebianco, Stefano; Dore, Diane; Ledoux, Xavier; Letourneau, Alain; Prevost, Aurelien; Ridikas, Danas

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the Neutronic and Nuclear Assessment Task Group of the MEGAPIE experiment we measured the delayed neutron (DN) flux at the top of the target. The measurement was proposed mainly for radioprotection purposes since the DN flux at the top of the target has been estimated to be of the same order of magnitude as the prompt neutron flux. Given the strong model-dependence of DN predictions, the measurement of DN contribution to the total neutron activity at the top of the target was thus desired. Moreover, this measurement is complementary to the DN experiments performed at PNPI (Gatchina) on solid lead and bismuth targets. The DN measurement at MEGAPIE was performed during the start-up phase of the target. In this paper we present a detailed description of the experimental setup and some preliminary results on decay spectra.

  14. Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

  15. Removal of tropospheric path length variations in very long baseline interferometry with measurement of tropospheric emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bower, Geoffrey

    through the atmosphere by measuring the water vapor content through its emissivity. Two epochs of 3­mm Creek and Kitt Peak Observatories can be used to reduce the rms interferometer phase when liquid water components of the at­ mosphere [Bean and Dutton, 1966; Thompson et al., 1991]. Variability in this delay

  16. Photo-Production of Proton Antiproton Pairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Eugenio; Burnham Stokes

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are reported on the reaction gammap --> ppp-bar . A high statistic data set was obtained at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility utilizing the CLAS detector and a tagged photon beam of 4.8 to 5.2 GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The focus of this study was to search for possible intermediate resonances which decay to proton-antiproton. Both final state protons were detected in the CLAS apparatus whereas the antiproton was identified via missing mass. General features of the data are presented along with results on narrow and broad resonance studies.

  17. Photo-Production of Proton Antiproton Pairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eugenio, Paul; Stokes, Burnham [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are reported on the reaction {gamma}p {yields} ppp-bar. A high statistic data set was obtained at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility utilizing the CLAS detector and a tagged photon beam of 4.8 to 5.2 GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The focus of this study was to search for possible intermediate resonances which decay to proton-antiproton. Both final state protons were detected in the CLAS apparatus whereas the antiproton was identified via missing mass. General features of the data are presented along with results on narrow and broad resonance studies.

  18. Lorentz Coherence and the Proton Form Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dipole cutoff behavior for the proton form factor has been and still is one of the major issues in high-energy physics. It is shown that this dipole behavior comes from the coherence between the Lorentz contraction of the proton size and the decreasing wavelength of the incoming photon signal. The contraction rates are the same for both cases. This form of coherence is studied also in the momentum-energy space. The coherence effect in this space can be explained in terms of two overlapping wave functions.

  19. Lorentz Coherence and the Proton Form Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young S. Kim

    2015-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The dipole cutoff behavior for the proton form factor has been and still is one of the major issues in high-energy physics. It is shown that this dipole behavior comes from the coherence between the Lorentz contraction of the proton size and the decreasing wavelength of the incoming photon signal. The contraction rates are the same for both cases. This form of coherence is studied also in the momentum-energy space. The coherence effect in this space can be explained in terms of two overlapping wave functions.

  20. Quantum gravitational proton decay at high temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulf H. Danielsson

    2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important challenges of contemporary physics is to find experimental signatures of quantum gravity. It is expected that quantum gravitational effects lead to proton decay but on time scales way beyond what is of any relevance to experiments. At non-zero temperatures there are reasons to believe that the situation is much more favourable. We will argue that at the temperatures and densities reached at present and future fusion facilities there is a realistic possibility that proton decay could be detectable.

  1. Dynamical behaviours in time-delay systems with delayed feedback and digitized coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiranjit Mitra; G. Ambika; Soumitro Banerjee

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a network of delay dynamical systems connected in a ring via unidirectional positive feedback with constant delay in coupling. For the specific case of Mackey-Glass systems on the ring topology, we capture the phenomena of amplitude death, isochronous synchronization and phase-flip bifurcation as the relevant parameters are tuned. Using linear stability analysis and master stability function approach, we predict the region of amplitude death and synchronized states respectively in the parameter space and study the nature of transitions between the different states. For a large number of systems in the same dynamical configuration, we observe splay states, mixed splay states and phase locked clusters. We extend the study to the case of digitized coupling and observe that these emergent states still persist. However, the sampling and quantization reduce the regions of amplitude death and induce phase-flip bifurcation.

  2. Engineering mesoscale structures with distinct dynamical implications in networks of delay-coupled delay oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne-Ly Do; Johannes Höfener; Thilo Gross

    2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of networks of interacting systems depends intricately on the interaction topology. When the dynamics is explored, generally the whole topology has to be considered. However, we show that there are certain mesoscale subgraphs that have precise and distinct consequences for the system-level dynamics. In particular, if meso-scale symmetries are present then eigenvectors of the Jacobian localise on the symmetric subgraph and the corresponding eigenvalues become insensitive to the topology outside the subgraph. Hence, dynamical instabilities associated with these eigenvalues can be analyzed without considering the topology outside the subgraph. While such instabilities are thus generated entirely in small network subgraphs, they generally do not remain confined to the subgraph once the instability sets in and thus have system-level consequences. Here we illustrate the analytical investigation of such instabilities in an ecological meta-population model consisting of a network of delay-coupled delay oscillators.

  3. Single Spin Asymmetries in Proton-Proton and Proton-Neutron Scattering at 820 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf-Dieter Nowak

    1995-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics case is summarised for the investigation of high energy spin phenomena by placing an internal polarised target into HERA's unpolarised proton beam. The luminosity and experimental sensitivity are discussed. Estimating the physics reach of single spin asymmetries in different final states reveals a considerable physics potential in testing the spin sector of perturbative QCD.

  4. Comparison of Source Images for protons, $?^-$'s and $?$'s in 6 AGeV Au+Au collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Chung; N. N. Ajitanand; J. M. Alexander; M. Anderson; D. Best; F. P. Brady; T. Case; W. Caskey; D. Cebra; J. L. Chance; B. Cole; K. Crowe; A. C. Das; J. E. Draper; M. L. Gilkes; S. Gushue; M. Heffner; A. S. Hirsch; E. L. Hjort; L. Huo; M. Justice; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; J. C. Kintner; J. Klay; D. Krofcheck; R. A. Lacey; J. Lauret; M. A. Lisa; H. Liu; Y. M. Liu; R. McGrath; Z. Milosevich; G. Odyniec; D. L. Olson; S. Panitkin; N. T. Porile; G. Rai; H. G. Ritter; J. L. Romero; R. Scharenberg; B. Srivastava; N. T. B Stone; T. J. M. Symons; J. Whitfield; R. Witt; L. Wood; W. N. Zhang; D. Brown; S. Pratt; F. Wang; P. Danielewicz

    2003-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Source images are extracted from two-particle correlations constructed from strange and non-strange hadrons produced in 6 AGeV Au + Au collisions. Very different source images result from pp vs p$\\Lambda$ vs $\\pi^-\\pi^-$ correlations. These observations suggest important differences in the space-time emission histories for protons, pions and neutral strange baryons produced in the same events.

  5. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Westerly, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Mackie, Thomas [Medical Devices, Morgridge Institute for Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States)] [Medical Devices, Morgridge Institute for Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques.Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets.Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage. Overall, the sharp distal falloff of a proton depth-dose distribution was found to provide sufficient control over the dose distribution to meet objectives, even with coarse lateral resolution and channel widths as large as 2 cm. Treatment plans on both phantom and patient data show that dose conformity suffers when treatments are delivered from less than approximately ten angles. Treatment time for a sample prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 min, and neutron production is estimated to be comparable to that found for existing collimated systems.Conclusions: Fan beam proton therapy is a method of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy which may be employed as an alternative to magnetic scanning systems. A fan beam of protons can be created by a set of quadrupole magnets and modified by a dual-purpose range and intensity modulator. This can be used to deliver inversely planned treatments, with spot intensities optimized to meet user defined dose objectives. Additionally, the ability of a fan beam delivery system to effectively treat multiple beam spots simultaneously may provide advantages as compared to spot scanning deliveries.

  6. MISO Broadcast Channel with Delayed and Evolving CSIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    MISO Broadcast Channel with Delayed and Evolving CSIT Jinyuan Chen and Petros Elia Mobile--The work considers the two-user MISO broadcast channel with a gradual and delayed accumulation of channel-input single-output broadcast channel (MISO BC) with an M-transmit antenna (M 2) transmitter communicating

  7. Kalman filtering the delay-difference equation: practical approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalman filtering the delay-difference equation: practical approaches and simulations Daniel K.-Recently, J. J. Pella showed how the Kalman filter could be applied to production modeling to esti- mate apply these methods to the Deriso-Schnute delay-difference equation. The Kalman filter approach

  8. Mutually injecting semiconductor lasers: simulations for short and zero delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wünsche, Hans-Jürgen "Ede"

    Mutually injecting semiconductor lasers: simulations for short and zero delay Nikolay Korneyev a und Stochastik, Mohrenstr. 39, 10117 Berlin, Germany ABSTRACT Distant lasers with mutual optical the relaxation oscillation period. In order to illuminate the role of these short delays, the ultimate zero

  9. Task Assignment in a Server Farm with Switching Delays and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyytiä, Esa

    Task Assignment in a Server Farm with Switching Delays and General Energy-Aware Cost Structure Esa Servers Customers Basic problem E[T] k parallel queues Tasks arrive at rate (Poisson process) Objective;Switching Delays and Energy Model for Server Farm k parallel servers Size-aware setting Dispatcher Servers

  10. Robust Airline Schedule Planning: Minimizing Propagated Delay in ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    highly brittle, performing poorly in practice as delays propagate rapidly throughout the network. The. Bureau of .... In contrast to airline recovery, where the objective is to achieve the best ..... weather conditions, air traffic flow management, passenger delays, equipment failure, and so on. ...... Airport Handling Manual. 2010.

  11. ESTIMATION OF DELAY PROPAGATION IN AVIATION SYSTEM USING BAYESIAN NETWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    delays is a major long-term objective of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). As demand1 ESTIMATION OF DELAY PROPAGATION IN AVIATION SYSTEM USING BAYESIAN NETWORK Ning Xu, George Donohue problems in the current aviation system. Methods are needed to analyze the manner in which micro

  12. Built-In Self Test (BIST) for Realistic Delay Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamilarasan, Karthik Prabhu

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    with the insertion of test points, BIST is able to achieve high coverage of stuck-at and transition faults. The quality of BIST patterns on small delay defects is an open question. In this work we analyze the application of BIST to small delay defects using resistive...

  13. Jitter Regulation in an Internet Router with Delay Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imai, Hiroshi

    Jitter Regulation in an Internet Router with Delay Constraint Hisashi Koga Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd To playback multimedia data smoothly via the world­wide Internet, jitter, the variability of delay of individual packets, must be kept low. We examine on­line algorithms in a router to regulate jitter

  14. Jitter Regulation in an Internet Router with Delay Consideration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imai, Hiroshi

    Jitter Regulation in an Internet Router with Delay Consideration Hisashi Koga Fujitsu Laboratories, jitter, the variability of delay of individual packets, must be kept low. We examine on­line algorithms in a router to regulate jitter for a given multimedia stream by holding packets in an internal buffer

  15. Regenerative memory in time-delayed neuromorphic photonic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeira, B; Figueiredo, José M L; Barland, S; Javaloyes, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate a regenerative memory based upon a time-delayed neuromorphic photonic oscillator and discuss the link with temporal localized structures. Our experimental implementation is based upon a optoelectronic system composed of a nanoscale nonlinear resonant tunneling diode coupled to a laser that we link to the paradigm of neuronal activity, the FitzHugh-Nagumo model with delayed feedback.

  16. The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane October 11, 2012 | Tags: Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Chemistry, Franklin,...

  17. Small Business Innovation Research Award Success Story: Proton Energy Systems

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This success story describes Proton Energy Systems, a small business that designs and manufactures proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis sytems to produce hydrogen from water. The U.S. Departmen

  18. Minimal Proton Channel Enables H2 Oxidation and Production with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimal Proton Channel Enables H2 Oxidation and Production with a Water-Soluble Nickel-Based Catalyst. Minimal Proton Channel Enables H2 Oxidation and Production with a...

  19. AB Proton NMR Using Tensor Algebra Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    AB Proton NMR Using Tensor Algebra Frank Rioux Professor Emeritus of Chemistry CSB|SJU The purpose of this tutorial is to deviate from the usual matrix mechanics approach to the ABC proton nmr system in order

  20. amide proton resonances: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (IHRP funded by NHMFL) Citation: Da Wang, Kerim Gulyuz, Corey N 8 Exclusive ? production in proton-proton collisions in the resonance model Nuclear Theory (arXiv) Summary:...

  1. DYNAMIC MODELING PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    DYNAMIC MODELING PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELL OVERVIEW Current/Completed Plug Power to garner SCAQMD funding for fuel cell testing GenCore system is sensitive to diluents · As built design stream to compensate for removal of EGR · Functionality of the modified GenCore Fuel Cell system

  2. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsher, Richard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Seagraves, David T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  3. Proton Assisted Recoupling at High Spinning Frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Struppe, Jochem

    We demonstrate the successful application of [superscript 13]C?[superscript 13]C proton assisted recoupling (PAR) on [U?[superscript 13]C,[superscript 15]N] N-f-MLF-OH and [U?13C,15N] protein GB1 at high magic angle spinning ...

  4. PROTON RADIOGRAPHY FOR AN ADVANCED HYDROTEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. MORRIS

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of data from BNL experiment 933 is presented. Results demonstrate that proton radiography can meet many of the requirements for an Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF). Results for background, position resolution, metrology, quantitative radiography, material identification, and edge resolution are presented.

  5. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  6. Modeling Traffic Flow Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappiello, Alessandra

    2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The main topic of this thesis is the development of light-duty vehicle dynamic emission models and their integration with dynamic traffic models. Combined, these models

  7. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

  8. Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    mass, membrane effects, fundamentals on permeability * DOC Pd:Pt ratios allow optimization * Gasoline emission control is amazing - Zone coating - Lower PGM with better...

  9. Cross sections for pentaquark baryon production from protons in reactions induced by hadrons and photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, W.; Ko, Che Ming.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using hadronic Lagrangians that include the interaction of pentaquark Theta(+) baryon with K and N, we evaluate the cross sections for its production from meson-proton, proton-proton, and photon-proton reactions near threshold.,With empirical...

  10. Measurement of the analysing power in proton-proton elastic scattering at small angles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Bagdasarian; D. Chiladze; S. Dymov; A. Kacharava; G. Macharashvili; S. Barsov; R. Gebel; B. Gou; M. Hartmann; I. Keshelashvili; A. Khoukaz; P. Kulessa; A. Kulikov; A. Lehrach; N. Lomidze; B. Lorentz; R. Maier; D. Mchedlishvili; S. Merzliakov; S. Mikirtychyants; M. Nioradze; H. Ohm; M. Papenbrock; D. Prasuhn; F. Rathmann; V. Serdyuk; V. Shmakova; R. Stassen; H. Stockhorst; I. I. Strakovsky; H. Ströher; M. Tabidze; A. Täschner; S. Trusov; D. Tsirkov; Yu. Uzikov; Yu. Valdau; C. Wilkin; R. L. Workman

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton analysing power in $\\vec{p}p$ elastic scattering has been measured at small angles at COSY-ANKE at 796 MeV and five other beam energies between 1.6 and 2.4 GeV using a polarised proton beam. The asymmetries obtained by detecting the fast proton in the ANKE forward detector or the slow recoil proton in a silicon tracking telescope are completely consistent. Although the analysing power results agree well with the many published data at 796 MeV, and also with the most recent partial wave solution at this energy, the ANKE data at the higher energies lie well above the predictions of this solution at small angles. An updated phase shift analysis that uses the ANKE results together with the World data leads to a much better description of these new measurements.

  11. Jet measurements in proton-proton collisions with the ALICE experiment at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Vajzer

    2013-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of jets, collimated sprays of particles associated with hard partons, is an important tool in testing perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD) and probing hot and dense nuclear matter created in high energy heavy-ion collisions. Jets enable the study of hard scatterings, fragmentation and hadronisation and their modification in the presence of a nuclear medium with respect to baseline vacuum measurements, which is acquired from jet measurements in proton-proton collisions. We have analysed data from proton-proton collisions at s= \\sqrt{s} = 7 TeV measured by the ALICE experiment at the LHC and reconstructed the inclusive spectra of charged particle jets at mid- rapidity using anti-kT clustering algorithm. We present the jet spectra corrected for detector effects using several unfolding methods. Furthermore, we examine various properties of jets, such as their charged particle multiplicity and jet shapes.

  12. Investigation of proton focusing and conversion efficiency for proton fast ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartal, Teresa Jean

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protons from Ultra-short Pulse Laser Irradiated Foils. PhD2 [9]. The short ultra intense laser will generate particleswith a short (1- 10 ps) ultra intense laser (? 10 19 Wcm ?

  13. anti-proton proton annihilation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Anti-proton and positron Cosmic Rays from Dark Matter annihilation around Intermediate Mass Black Holes Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary:...

  14. Shields et al. Predictive Control for Time-Delayed ... Predictive Control for Time-Delayed Switching Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is proposed for the control of switching systems characterized by linear system dynamics with a time delay that will take the system closest to the desired future state. The resulting control action is sub-optimal by linear dynamics with a time-delayed input. A switching control system (as defined herein) is one

  15. Car-to-car radio channel measurements at 5 GHz: Pathloss, power-delay profile, and delay-Doppler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zemen, Thomas

    Car-to-car radio channel measurements at 5 GHz: Pathloss, power-delay profile, and delay Telekommunikation Wien (ftw.), Vienna, Austria 3mobilkom austria AG, Vienna, Austria 4Department of Electrical and Information Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden 5Mitsubishi Electric Research Labs, Cambridge, USA

  16. SU-E-T-264: Preliminary Results On New Optically Stimulated Luminescent Materials for Proton Therapy Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doull, B [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Zheng, Y [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Yukihara, E

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to test the premise that luminescence materials with less under-response to proton beams can be identified by testing their dose response to low-LET radiation. The goal is to develop new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) materials with improved response for proton therapy dosimetry. Methods: We first measured the dose response of new OSL materials, synthesized in our laboratory, to low-LET radiation (beta rays from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source) and selected two materials having different OSL saturation characteristics and good dosimetric properties, namely MgB4O7:Ce,Li and MgO:Li. Commercial Al2O3:C was also used for comparison. These materials were then irradiated at several depths along a pristine proton beam. The luminescence responses of the materials, relative to the entrance response, were compared with the depth dose profile measured by a multiple-layer ion chamber. Results: The OSL signals of MgB4O7:Ce,Li and MgO:Li were characterized for signal stability, dose response, and response to a clinical proton beam. The materials were also compared with the commercial Al2O3:C. The signals from both MgB4O7:Ce,Li and MgO:Li were relatively stable after a one day delay following irradiation. The low-LET dose response of the materials showed that, over the dose range investigated (up to ?800 Gy), MgB4O7:Ce,Li did not saturate, whereas MgO:Li and Al2O3:C saturated at doses of ?100 Gy. MgB4O7:Ce,Li showed less underresponse to proton beams than MgO:Li and Al2O3:C. Conclusion: In general the material with the highest saturation doses for low-LET radiation (MgB4O7:Ce,Li) showed the least under-response to proton beams, which suggests that it may be possible to develop better OSL materials for proton dosimetry if the dose response can be controlled during synthesis. Nevertheless, the degree in which the response to proton beams can be controlled remains to be determined. The research is funded by the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST), project number HR12-055.

  17. Observation of O++++ 4 lines in proton aurora over Svalbard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Observation of O++++ 4 P-4 D0 lines in proton aurora over Svalbard N. Ivchenko,1,2 M. Galand,3 B. S March 2004; accepted 26 March 2004; published 29 May 2004. [1] Spectra of a proton aurora event show electron aurora. Conjugate satellite particle measurements are used as input to electron and proton

  18. Spectral imaging of proton aurora and twilight at Troms, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Spectral imaging of proton aurora and twilight at Tromsø, Norway M. Galand,1 J. Baumgardner,1 D, which offers a unique opportunity to investigate the Ha to Hb Balmer decrement in proton aurora locations (Tromsø, Poker Flat, Svalbard) in proton aurora is presented. Lummerzheim and Galand [2001] find

  19. Electron and proton aurora observed spectroscopically in the far ultraviolet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Electron and proton aurora observed spectroscopically in the far ultraviolet M. Galand,1 D the location of the electron and proton aurorae is discussed. The estimation of the particle characteristics aurora. Because protons and electrons do not interact in the same way with the atmosphere, our study

  20. Investigation of Transient Phenomena of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Investigation of Transient Phenomena of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells by Roongrojana of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells by Roongrojana Songprakorp BSc, Prince of Songkhla University to the modeling and under- standing of the dynamic behavior of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs

  1. Proton Transfer and Hydrogen Bonding in Chemical and Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amrhein, Valentin

    Proton Transfer and Hydrogen Bonding in Chemical and Biological Systems: A Force Field Approach and support. i #12;ii #12;Abstract Proton transfer and hydrogen bonds are fundamental for the function be regarded as incipient proton transfer reactions, so theoretically they can be de- scribed in unitary way

  2. AB3 Proton NMR Using Tensor Algebra Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    AB3 Proton NMR Using Tensor Algebra Frank Rioux Professor Emeritus of Chemistry CSB|SJU The purpose of this tutorial is to calculate the NMR spectrum of a four proton AB3 system in Hz) are for the AB3 proton system 1,1dichloroethane at 60 MHz. A 350.0 B 120.0 Jab 10.00 Hamiltonian

  3. Proton corebeam system in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Proton corebeam system in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid simulations Petr Hellinger1,2 and Pavel 9 November 2011. [1] Results of a twodimensional hybrid expanding box simulation of a proton to a decrease of the ratio between the proton perpendicular and parallel temperatures as well as to an increase

  4. Tertiary proton diagnostics in future inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tertiary proton diagnostics in future inertial confinement fusion experiments S. Cremera) and C. P energetic up to 31 MeV tertiary protons produced during the final stage of inertial confinement fusion the elastic scattering of 14.1 MeV neutrons, is a source of very energetic protons capable of escaping from

  5. Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods A. G. Yahnin,1 T. A are generated because of a cyclotron instability of the anisotropic distribution of ring current ions. Proton precipitation produced by the cyclotron instability can be responsible for proton aurora. Indeed

  6. PROTON: A Prolog Reasoner for Temporal ONtologies Nikos Papadakis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrakis, Euripides G.M.

    PROTON: A Prolog Reasoner for Temporal ONtologies in OWL Nikos Papadakis1 ,Kostas Stravoskoufos2, University of Crete, dp@csd.uoc.gr Abstract We present PROTON, a reasoner for managing temporal information. PROTON is implemented using this extension. Key words: Ramification problem; Temporal Ontologies

  7. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRELIMINARY TRACKING STUDIES FOR PROTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ PRELIMINARY TRACKING STUDIES FOR PROTON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY Acknowledgments xi 1 Introduction 1 1.1 The Need for Proton Computed Tomography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.4 Treatment Planning: Proton CT vs. X-ray CT

  8. Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buratto, Steve

    Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells David A area of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is investigated using conductive probe atomic particle at its end. This is due to the formation of protons, at the carbon cloth side of the cell

  9. Proton Computed Tomography and Constructing Tracker Boards Gatlin Bredeson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belanger, David P.

    1 ABSTRACT Proton Computed Tomography and Constructing Tracker Boards By Gatlin Bredeson Scientists tomography (xCT) with proton computed tomography (pCT). During a CT scan, protons pass through a phantom University to build tracker boards to assist in creating a system that seeks to replace X-ray computed

  10. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Struminsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV {\\gamma}-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these {\\gamma}-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and {\\pi}0-decay {\\gamma}-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X-ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard {\\gamma}-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated du...

  11. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  12. Exclusive photoproduction of J/psi and psi(2S) states in proton-proton collisions at the CERN LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Gay Ducati; M. T. Griep; M. V. T. Machado

    2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we investigate the exclusive photoproduction of J/psi and the radially excited psi(2S) state off nucleon in proton-proton collisions. The theoretical framework considered in the analysis is the light-cone dipole formalism and predictions are done for proton-proton collisions at the CERN-LHC energy of 7 TeV. The theoretical uncertainties are investigated and comparison is done to the recent LHCb Collaboration data for the exclusive charmonium production.

  13. Red or blue? A potential kilonova imprint of the delay until black hole formation following a neutron star merger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian D. Metzger; Rodrigo Fernández

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Mergers of binary neutron stars (NSs) usually result in the formation of a hypermassive neutron star (HMNS). Whether- and when this remnant collapses to a black hole (BH) depends primarily on the equation of state and on angular momentum transport processes, both of which are uncertain. Here we show that the lifetime of the merger remnant may be directly imprinted in the radioactively powered kilonova emission following the merger. We employ axisymmetric, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of remnant accretion disks orbiting a HMNS of variable lifetime, and characterize the effect of this delay to BH formation on the disk wind ejecta. When BH formation is relatively prompt (~ 100 ms), outflows from the disk are sufficiently neutron rich to form heavy r-process elements, resulting in ~ week-long emission with a spectral peak in the near-infrared (NIR), similar to that produced by the dynamical ejecta. In contrast, delayed BH formation allows neutrinos from the HMNS to raise the electron fraction in the polar direction to values such that potentially Lanthanide-free outflows are generated. The lower opacity would produce a brighter, bluer, and shorter-lived ~ day-long emission (a `blue bump') prior to the late NIR peak from the dynamical ejecta and equatorial wind. This new diagnostic of BH formation should be useful for events with a signal to noise lower than that required for direct detection of gravitational waveform signatures.

  14. Adaptive control of time delay systems and applications to automotive control problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Yildiray

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is about the adaptive control of time delay systems with applications to automotive control problems. The stabilization of systems involving time delays is a difficult problem since the existence of a delay may ...

  15. Delayed feedback control of fractional-order chaotic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandar Gjurchinovski; Trifce Sandev; Viktor Urumov

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the possibility to stabilize unstable steady states and unstable periodic orbits in chaotic fractional-order dynamical systems by the time-delayed feedback method. By performing a linear stability analysis, we establish the parameter ranges for successful stabilization of unstable equilibria in the plane parametrizad by the feedback gain and the time delay. An insight into the control mechanism is gained by analyzing the characteristic equation of the controlled system, showing that the control scheme fails to control unstable equilibria having an odd number of positive real eigenvalues. We demonstrate that the method can also stabilize unstable periodic orbits for a suitable choice of the feedback gain, providing that the time delay is chosen to coincide with the period of the target orbit. In addition, it is shown numerically that delayed feedback control with a sinusoidally modulated time delay significantly enlarges the stability region of the steady states in comparison to the classical time-delayed feedback scheme with a constant delay.

  16. Development of a statistically based access delay timeline methodology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, W. Gary; Robinson, David Gerald; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The charter for adversarial delay is to hinder access to critical resources through the use of physical systems increasing an adversary's task time. The traditional method for characterizing access delay has been a simple model focused on accumulating times required to complete each task with little regard to uncertainty, complexity, or decreased efficiency associated with multiple sequential tasks or stress. The delay associated with any given barrier or path is further discounted to worst-case, and often unrealistic, times based on a high-level adversary, resulting in a highly conservative calculation of total delay. This leads to delay systems that require significant funding and personnel resources in order to defend against the assumed threat, which for many sites and applications becomes cost prohibitive. A new methodology has been developed that considers the uncertainties inherent in the problem to develop a realistic timeline distribution for a given adversary path. This new methodology incorporates advanced Bayesian statistical theory and methodologies, taking into account small sample size, expert judgment, human factors and threat uncertainty. The result is an algorithm that can calculate a probability distribution function of delay times directly related to system risk. Through further analysis, the access delay analyst or end user can use the results in making informed decisions while weighing benefits against risks, ultimately resulting in greater system effectiveness with lower cost.

  17. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S., E-mail: shishirk@gmail.com; Raghavan, S. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Duesberg, G. S. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) and School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, D2 (Ireland); Pratap, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ?10?nA ?m{sup ?1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  18. Leading proton production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ZEUS Collaboration

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The semi-inclusive reaction e+ p -> e+ X p was studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 12.8 pb-1. The final-state proton, which was detected with the ZEUS leading proton spectrometer, carried a large fraction of the incoming proton energy, xL>0.32, and its transverse momentum squared satisfied pT^2proton system was 45proton production cross section and rates are presented as a function of xL, pT^2, Q^2 and the Bjorken scaling variable, x.

  19. Recoil proton distribution in high energy photoproduction processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bartos; E. A. Kuraev; Yu. P. Peresunko; E. A. Vinokurov

    2006-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    For high energy linearly polarized photon--proton scattering we have calculated the azimuthal and polar angle distributions in inclusive on recoil proton experimental setup. We have taken into account the production of lepton and pseudoscalar meson charged pairs. The typical values of cross sections are of order of hundreds of picobarn. The size of polarization effects are of order of several percents. The results are generalized for the case of electroproduction processes on the proton at rest and for high energy proton production process on resting proton.

  20. Kinetics of proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatoly Yu. Smirnov; Lev G. Mourokh; Franco Nori

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple model of cytochrome c oxidase, including four redox centers and four protonable sites, to study the time evolution of electrostatically coupled electron and proton transfers initiated by the injection of a single electron into the enzyme. We derive a system of master equations for electron and proton state probabilities and show that an efficient pumping of protons across the membrane can be obtained for a reasonable set of parameters. All four experimentally observed kinetic phases appear naturally from our model. We also calculate the dependence of the pumping efficiency on the transmembrane voltage at different temperatures and discuss a possible mechanism of the redox-driven proton translocation.

  1. The quest for cosmic ray protons in galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Pfrommer; Torsten A. Ensslin

    2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been many speculations about the presence of cosmic ray protons (CRps) in galaxy clusters over the past two decades. However, no direct evidence such as the characteristic gamma-ray signature of decaying pions has been found so far. These pions would be a direct tracer of hadronic CRp interactions with the ambient thermal gas also yielding observable synchrotron and inverse Compton emission by additionally produced secondary electrons. The obvious question concerns the type of galaxy clusters most likely to yield a signal: Particularly suited sites should be cluster cooling cores due to their high gas and magnetic energy densities. We studied a nearby sample of clusters evincing cooling cores in order to place stringent limits on the cluster CRp population by using non-detections of EGRET. In this context, we examined the possibility of a hadronic origin of Coma-sized radio halos as well as radio mini-halos. Especially for mini-halos, strong clues are provided by the very plausible small amount of required CRp energy density and a matching radio profile. Introducing the hadronic minimum energy criterion, we show that the energetically favored CRp energy density is constrained to 2% +/- 1% of the thermal energy density in Perseus. We also studied the CRp population within the cooling core region of Virgo using the TeV gamma-ray detection of M 87 by HEGRA. Both the expected radial gamma-ray profile and the required amount of CRp support this hadronic scenario.

  2. Dosimetric characteristics of a single use MOSFET dosimeter for in vivo dosimetry in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Chee-Wai; Wolanski, Mark; Zhao, Q.; Fanelli, Leia; Gautam, Archana; Pack, Daniel; Das, Indra J. [Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Entrance dose (or skin dose) is an important part of patient quality assurance in external beam radiation therapy. However, entrance dose verification in proton beam is not routinely performed. In this study, the OneDose single use MOSFET detector system for in vivo dosimetry measurement in proton therapy is investigated. Methods: Using a solid water phantom, several fundamental dosimetric characteristics of the OneDose system are studied with a proton beam: The reproducibility (consistency) of the dosimeter, the linearity with dose and dose rate, energy dependence, directional dependence, LET dependence, and fading (delay readout with time) is studied. Results: OneDose detectors show dose and dose rate linearity but exhibit pronounced energy dependence at depth and a large variation in dose response with LET. On the other hand, the detector response remain relatively constant (within 3%) at surface over a wide range of energies. There is also a slight angular dependence (about 2%) up to 60 deg. angle of incidence. However, detector orientation such that incidence along the long axis of the detector should be avoided as the proton beam will have to traverse a large amount of the copper backing. Since most in vivo dosimetry involves entrance dose measurement, the OneDose at surface appears to be well suited for such application. OneDose exhibits small intrabatch variation ({<=}2% at one SD) indicating that it is only necessary to calibration a few detectors from each batch. The interbatch variation is generally within 3%. Conclusions: The small detector size and its relatively flexible design of OneDose allow dose measurement to be performed on a curved surface or in small cavities that is otherwise difficult with the conventional diode detectors. The slight drawback in its angular dependence can be easily handled by angular dependence table. However, since OneDose is a single use detector, the intrabatch consistency must be verified before the remaining detectors from the same batch could be used for in vivo dosimetry. It is advisable that the detectors from the same batch be taken for the same application to reduce the dosimetric uncertainty. For detectors from different batches, interbatch consistency should also be verified to obtain reliable results. OneDose provides an opportunity to measure in vivo dose with proton beam within acceptable clinical criterion of {+-}(5.0%-6.5%).

  3. Electronic Implementation of the Mackey-Glass Delayed Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Amil; Cecilia Cabeza; Arturo C. Martí

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The celebrated Mackey-Glass model describes the dynamics of physiological \\textit{delayed} systems in which the actual evolution depends on the values of the variables at some \\textit{previous} times. This kind of systems are usually expressed by delayed differential equations which turn out to be infinite-dimensional. In this contribution, an electronic implementation mimicking the Mackey-Glass model is proposed. New approaches for both the nonlinear function and the delay block are made. Explicit equations for the actual evolution of the implementation are derived. Simulations of the original equation, the circuit equation, and experimental data show great concordance.

  4. Time Delay Predictions in a Modified Gravity Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time delay effect for planets and spacecraft is obtained from a fully relativistic modified gravity theory including a fifth force skew symmetric field by fitting to the Pioneer 10/11 anomalous acceleration data. A possible detection of the predicted time delay corrections to general relativity for the outer planets and future spacecraft missions is considered. The time delay correction to GR predicted by the modified gravity is consistent with the observational limit of the Doppler tracking measurement reported by the Cassini spacecraft on its way to Saturn, and the correction increases to a value that could be measured for a spacecraft approaching Neptune and Pluto.

  5. Shuttle-mediated proton pumping across the inner mitochondrial membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shuttle-assisted charge transfer is pivotal for the efficient energy transduction from the food-stuff electrons to protons in the respiratory chain of animal cells and bacteria. The respiratory chain consists of four metalloprotein Complexes (I-IV) embedded in the inner membrane of a mitochondrion. Three of these complexes pump protons across the membrane, fuelled by the energy of food-stuff electrons. Despite extensive biochemical and biophysical studies, the physical mechanism of this proton pumping is still not well understood. Here we present a nanoelectromechanical model of the electron-driven proton pump related to the second loop of the respiratory chain, where a lipid-soluble ubiquinone molecule shuttles between the Complex I and Complex III, carrying two electrons and two protons. We show that the energy of electrons can be converted to the transmembrane proton potential gradient via the electrostatic interaction between electrons and protons on the shuttle. We find that the system can operate either...

  6. Forster mechanism of electron-driven proton pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatoly Yu. Smirnov; Lev G. Mourokh; Franco Nori

    2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine a simple model of proton pumping through the inner membrane of mitochondria in the living cell. We demonstrate that the pumping process can be described using approaches of condensed matter physics. In the framework of this model, we show that the resonant F\\"orster-type energy exchange due to electron-proton Coulomb interaction can provide an unidirectional flow of protons against an electrochemical proton gradient, thereby accomplishing proton pumping. The dependence of this effect on temperature as well as electron and proton voltage build-ups are obtained taking into account electrostatic forces and noise in the environment. We find that the proton pump works with maximum efficiency in the range of temperatures and transmembrane electrochemical potentials which correspond to the parameters of living cells.

  7. Properties of solar energetic particle events inferred from their associated radio emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouloumvakos, A; Valtonen, E; Alissandrakis, C E; Malandraki, O; Tsitsipis, P; Kontogeorgos, A; Moussas, X; Hillaris, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study selected properties of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events as inferred from their associated radio emissions. We used a catalogue of 115 SEP events that consists of entries of proton intensity enhancements at one AU, with complete coverage over solar cycle 23, based on high-energy (~68 MeV) protons from SOHO/ERNE and we calculated the proton release time at the Sun using velocity dispersion analysis (VDA). After an initial rejection of cases with unrealistic VDA path lengths, we assembled composite radio spectra for the remaining events using data from ground-based and space-borne radio-spectrographs. For every event we registered the associated radio emissions and we divided the events in groups according to their associated radio emissions. The proton release was found to be most often accompanied by both type III and II radio bursts, but a good association percentage was also registered in cases accompanied by type IIIs only. The worst association was found for the cases with type II only associ...

  8. Spontaneous Emission Rate Enhancement Using Optical Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Nikhil

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of  Spontaneous  Emission  in  a  Semiconductor  nanoLED,”  emission  rate  enhancement  using  the  Fluorescent  Emission  by  Lattice   Resonances  in  

  9. EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN POSITRON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gullberg, G.T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Resolution Computed Tomography of Positron Emitters,"of Dynamic Emission Computed Tomography," J. Nucl. Med. ~:IN POSITRON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY RECEIVED lAWRENCE

  10. Contraction & Convergence: UK carbon emissions and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    the EU's emissions trading scheme will do little to mitigate carbon emissions 4) Aviation growth must emissions. Keywords Contraction & Convergence; aviation; emissions trading; passengers; carbon dioxide #12

  11. Beta-delayed two-neutron decay studies for 96-99Rb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeder, P L; Gill, R L; Liou, H; Shmid, M; Stelts, M L; Warner, R A; Yeh, T R

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beta-delayed two-neutron emission from /sup 96-99/Tb has been studied by use of the neutron-neutron time correlation technique. Time interval distributions for neutron pulses from a polyethylene moderated neutron counter are measured for mass-separated sources. Coincident neutrons are identified in the time interval distribution by a component having the characteristic residence time of 35 mu s for this counter. At mass 98 a coincidence rate well above the correlated background results in a P/sub 2n/ for /sup 98/Rb of (0.060+or-0.009)%. Upper limits (2 sigma ) for P/sub 2n/ of 0.004, 0.008, and 0.024% are reported for /sup 96/Rb, /sup 97/Rb, and /sup 99/Rb, respectively. (10 refs).

  12. Parity Violation in gamma proton Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo F. Bedaque; Martin J. Savage

    1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of parity-violating spin-dependent gamma proton Compton scattering will provide a theoretically clean determination of the parity-violating pion-nucleon coupling constant $h_{\\pi NN}^{(1)}$. We calculate the leading parity-violating amplitude arising from one-loop pion graphs in chiral perturbation theory. An asymmetry of ~5 10^{-8} is estimated for Compton scattering of 100 MeV photons.

  13. Method of synthesis of proton conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando Henry; Einsla, Melinda Lou; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing a proton conducting material, comprising adding a pyrophosphate salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved pyrophosphate salt; adding an inorganic acid salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved inorganic acid salt; adding the dissolved inorganic acid salt to the dissolved pyrophosphate salt to produce a mixture; substantially evaporating the solvent from the mixture to produce a precipitate; and calcining the precipitate at a temperature of from about 400.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C.

  14. Formulation and solution of the delayed gamma dose rate problem using the concept of effective delayed gamma production cross section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With appropriate approximations, the delayed gamma dose rate problem can be formulated in terms of the effective delayed gamma production cross section. The coupled neutron-delayed-gamma transport equations then take the same form as the coupled neutron-prompt-gamma transport equations and they can, therefore, be solved directly in the same manner. This eliminates the need for the tedious and error prone flux coupling step in conventional calculations. Mathematical formulation and solution algorithms are derived. The advantages of this method are illustrated by an example of its application in the solution of a practical design problem. 62 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Beta-delayed gamma spectroscopy of neutron rich 27,28,29Na

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, V.; Tabor, S.L.; Hoffman, C.R.; Wiedeking, M.; Volya,A.; Mantica, P.F.; Davies, A.D.; Liddick, S.N.; Mueller, W.F.; Stolz, A.; Tomlin, B.E.

    2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-energy level structure of the exotic Na isotopes {sup 27,28,29}Na has been investigated through {beta}-delayed {gamma} spectroscopy. Detailed level structure of {sup 28,29}Na has been obtained through {beta}{gamma} and {beta}{gamma}{gamma} coincidence measurements. The low-lying levels populated in {sup 27}Na by {beta} decay were found to corroborate well with the in-beam data from the literature. Half-lives of the parent nuclides, {sup 27,28,29}Ne, were measured using {beta} fragment as well as fragment {beta}{gamma} coincidences and compared to previous measurements. The {beta}-delayed one- and two-neutron emission branching probabilities have been obtained from the {gamma} activities of the grand daughter nuclei. A comparison of the level schemes and the {beta}-decay branching ratios is made with shell-model predictions, both with and without intruder configurations, to understand the transition from normal-dominant to intruder-dominant excitations in these neutron-rich nuclei approaching the island of inversion.

  16. Dominant delayed neutron precursors to model reactivity predictions for multiple fissioning nuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loaiza, D.J.; Haskin, F.E.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The product of cumulative yield and probability of neutron emission is used to assess the relative importance of known delayed neutron precursors. Thirteen precursors are consistently dominant. Nonlinear fits to experimental delayed neutron decay data distinguish the decay constants of the three longest-lived dominant precursors: {sup 87}Br, {sup 137}I, and {sup 88}Br. Sensitivity calculations based on a six-to seven-group transformation lead to a proposed seven-group formulation in which the group decay constants are those of dominant precursors: {sup 87}Br, {sup 137}I, {sup 88}Br, {sup 93}Rb, {sup 139}I, {sup 91}Br, and {sup 96}Rb. An alternative six-group formulation is obtained by using the mean of the {sup 137}I and {sup 88}Br decay constants for group 2. The use of the suggested dominant precursor decay constants improves the goodness of fit to experimental data compared to that obtained from nonlinear least squares in which both group yields and decay constants are determined empirically. Reactivity worth and transient analyses confirm that the positive reactivity scale is preserved in the transformation. A known bias in the negative reactivity scale is eliminated by forcing the half-life of the longest-lived group to be the 55.9-s half-life of {sup 87}Br. The proposed use of dominant precursor decay constants offers significant simplifications in data analysis and the analysis of fast, epithermal, and thermal reactors with multiple fissioning nuclides.

  17. Electron-capture delayed fission properties of neutron-deficient einsteinium nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaughnessy, Dawn A.

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-capture delayed fission (ECDF) properties of neutron-deficient einsteinium isotopes were investigated using a combination of chemical separations and on-line radiation detection methods. {sup 242}Es was produced via the {sup 233}U({sup 14}N,5n){sup 242}Es reaction at a beam energy of 87 MeV (on target) in the lab system, and was found to decay with a half-life of 11 {+-} 3 seconds. The ECDF of {sup 242}Es showed a highly asymmetric mass distribution with an average pre-neutron emission total kinetic energy (TKE) of 183 {+-} 18 MeV. The probability of delayed fission (P{sub DF}) was measured to be 0.006 {+-} 0.002. In conjunction with this experiment, the excitation functions of the {sup 233}U({sup 14}N,xn){sup 247{minus}x}Es and {sup 233}U({sup 15}N,xn){sup 248{minus}x}Es reactions were measured for {sup 243}Es, {sup 244}Es and {sup 245}Es at projectile energies between 80 MeV and 100 MeV.

  18. {beta}-delayed {gamma} spectroscopy of neutron rich {sup 27,28,29}Na

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, Vandana; Tabor, S.L.; Hoffman, C.R.; Wiedeking, M.; Volya, A.; Otsuka, T.; Utsuno, Y. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States); Department of Physics and Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan) and RIKEN, Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Centre, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Mantica, P.F.; Liddick, S.N.; Tomlin, B.E. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Davies, A.D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Mueller, W.F.; Stolz, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-energy level structure of the exotic Na isotopes {sup 27,28,29}Na has been investigated through {beta}-delayed {gamma} spectroscopy. Detailed level structure of {sup 28,29}Na has been obtained through {beta}{gamma} and {beta}{gamma}{gamma} coincidence measurements. The low-lying levels populated in {sup 27}Na by {beta} decay were found to corroborate well with the in-beam data from the literature. Half-lives of the parent nuclides, {sup 27,28,29}Ne, were measured using {beta} fragment as well as fragment {beta}{gamma} coincidences and compared to previous measurements. The {beta}-delayed one- and two-neutron emission branching probabilities have been obtained from the {gamma} activities of the grand daughter nuclei. A comparison of the level schemes and the {beta}-decay branching ratios is made with shell-model predictions, both with and without intruder configurations, to understand the transition from normal-dominant to intruder-dominant excitations in these neutron-rich nuclei approaching the island of inversion.

  19. On physical interpretation of two dimensional time-correlations regarding time delay velocities and eddy shaping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorczak, N. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Manz, P. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut feur Plasmaphysik, Association Euratom-IPP, 85748Garching (Germany); Thakur, S. C.; Xu, M.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Time delay estimation (TDE) techniques are frequently used to estimate the flow velocity from fluctuating measurements. Tilted structures carried by the flow lead to misinterpretation of the time delays in terms of velocity direction and amplitude. It affects TDE measurements from probes, and is also intrinsically important for beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging measurements. Local eddy shapes estimated from 2D fluctuating field are necessary to gain a more accurate flow estimate from TDE, as illustrated by Langmuir probe array measurements. A least square regression approach is proposed to estimate both flow field and shaping parameters. The technique is applied to a test case built from numerical simulation of interchange fluctuations. The local eddy shape does not only provide corrections for the velocity field but also quantitative information about the statistical interaction mechanisms between local eddies and E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear. The technique is then tested on gaz puff imaging data collected at the edge of EAST tokamak plasmas. It is shown that poloidal asymmetries of the fluctuation fields-velocity and eddy shape-are consistent at least qualitatively with a ballooning type of turbulence immersed in a radially sheared equilibrium flow.

  20. Pion-proton correlations and asymmetry measurement in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ $GeV$ data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Zawisza; for the STAR Collaboration

    2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlations between non-identical particles at small relative velocity probe asymmetries in the average space-time emission points at freeze-out. The origin of such asymmetries may be from long-lived resonances, bulk collective effects, or differences in the freeze-out scenario for the different particle species. STAR has extracted pion-proton correlation functions from a dataset of Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ $GeV$. We present correlation functions in the spherical harmonic decomposition representation, for different centralities and for different combinations of pions and (anti-)protons.

  1. Inter-sensor propagation delay estimation using sources of opportunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Rémy; Michel, Olivier; Lacoume, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagation delays are intensively used for Structural Health Monitoring or Sensor Network Localization. In this paper, we study the performances of acoustic propagation delay estimation between two sensors, using sources of opportunity only. Such sources are defined as being uncontrolled by the user (activation time, location, spectral content in time and space), thus preventing the direct estimation with classical active approaches, such as TDOA, RSSI and AOA. Observation models are extended from the literature to account for the spectral characteristics of the sources in this passive context and we show how time-filtered sources of opportunity impact the retrieval of the propagation delay between two sensors. A geometrical analogy is then proposed that leads to a lower bound on the variance of the propagation delay estimation that accounts for both the temporal and the spatial properties of the sources field.

  2. Robust crew pairing : delays analysis and implementation of optimization approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leroyer, Pierre, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With increasing delays and airport congestion that disturb airline operations, the development of robust schedules is becoming crucial. Increased traffic and poor weather are a few of the causes of airport congestion, ...

  3. Chimera and globally clustered chimera: Impact of time delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheeba, Jane H; Lakshmanan, M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a short report of our preliminary results [Phys. Rev. E 79, 055203(R) (2009)], we present a more detailed study of the effects of coupling delay in diffusively coupled phase oscillator populations. We find that coupling delay induces chimera and globally clustered chimera (GCC) states in delay coupled populations. We show the existence of multi-clustered states that act as link between the chimera and the GCC states. A stable GCC state goes through a variety of GCC states, namely periodic, aperiodic, long-- and short--period breathers and becomes unstable GCC leading to global synchronization in the system, on increasing time delay. We provide numerical evidence and theoretical explanations for the above results and discuss possible applications of the observed phenomena.

  4. Evaluating passenger delays in the US domestic air transportation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umang, Nitish

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental component of any National Airspace System (NAS) performance evaluation is the cost impact of air traffic delays, and more generally capacity limitations, on the traveling passengers. In previous research it ...

  5. Opportunities for Process Monitoring Techniques at Delayed Access Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Johnson, Shirley J.; Schanfein, Mark; Toomey, Christopher

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Except for specific cases where the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) maintains a continuous presence at a facility (such as the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant), there is always a period of time or delay between the moment a State is notified or aware of an upcoming inspection, and the time the inspector actually enters the material balance area or facility. Termed by the authors as “delayed access,” this period of time between inspection notice and inspector entrance to a facility poses a concern. Delayed access also has the potential to reduce the effectiveness of measures applied as part of the Safeguards Approach for a facility (such as short-notice inspections). This report investigates the feasibility of using process monitoring to address safeguards challenges posed by delayed access at a subset of facility types.

  6. Anti-Synchronization in Multiple Time Delay Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. M. Shahverdiev

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate chaos antisynchronization between two uni-directionally coupled multiple time delay power systems.The results are of certain importance to prevent power black-out in the entire power grid.

  7. Generalization of neuron network model with delay feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjeet Maisnam; R. K. Brojen Singh

    2015-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present generalized delayed neural network (DNN) model with positive delay feedback and neuron history. The local stability analysis around trivial local equilibria of delayed neural networks has applied and determine the conditions for the existence of zero root. We develop few innovative delayed neural network models in different dimensions through transformation and extension of some existing models. We found that zero root can have multiplicity two under certain conditions. We further show how the characteristic equation can have zero root and its multiplicity is dependent on the conditions undertaken. Finally, we generalize the neural network of $N$ neurons through which we determine the general form of Jacobian of the linear form and corresponding characteristic equation of the system.

  8. Time-delayed directional beam phased array antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fund, Douglas Eugene; Cable, John William; Cecil, Tony Myron

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An antenna comprising a phased array of quadrifilar helix or other multifilar antenna elements and a time-delaying feed network adapted to feed the elements. The feed network can employ a plurality of coaxial cables that physically bridge a microstrip feed circuitry to feed power signals to the elements. The cables provide an incremental time delay which is related to their physical lengths, such that replacing cables having a first set of lengths with cables having a second set of lengths functions to change the time delay and shift or steer the antenna's main beam. Alternatively, the coaxial cables may be replaced with a programmable signal processor unit adapted to introduce the time delay using signal processing techniques applied to the power signals.

  9. additional delayed regional: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results for five active galactic nuclei. We recovered velocity-delay maps using the maximum-entropy method for four objects: Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, 3C120, and PG2130+099. For the...

  10. Proton Irradiation Study of GFR Candidate Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Gan; Yong Yang; Clayton Dickson; Todd Allen

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigated the microstructural response of ZrC, ZrN, TiN, and SiC irradiated with 2.6 MeV protons at 800ºC to a single dose in the range of 1.5 to 3.0 displacement per atom (dpa), depending on the material. The change of lattice constant evaluated using HOLZ patterns is not observed and is small when measured using XRD for the irradiated samples up to 1.5 dpa for 6H-SiC, and up to 3.0 dpa for ZrC and ZrN. In comparison to Kr ion irradiation at 800ºC to 10 dpa from the previous studies, the proton-irradiated ceramics at 3.0 dpa show less irradiation damage to the lattice structure. The irradiated ZrC exhibits faulted loops which are not observed in the Kr ion irradiated sample. The irradiated ZrN shows the least microstructural change from proton irradiation. The microstructure of 6H-SiC irradiated to 3.0 dpa consists of a black dot defect type at high density.

  11. FFAG ACCELERATOR PROTON DRIVER FOR NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUGGIERO, A.

    2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the summary of a conceptual study of a Proton Driver for Neutrino Factory based on the use of a Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) Accelerator. The required proton energy range for an optimum neutrino production is 5 to 12 GeV. This can be accomplished with a group of three concentric rings each with 807 m circumference [1]. FFAG Accelerators [2] have the capability to accelerate charged particles over a large momentum range ({+-}30-50%) and the feature of constant bending and focusing fields. Particles can be accelerated very fast at the rate given by the accelerating field of RF cavities placed in proper locations between magnets. The performance of FFAG accelerators is to be placed between that of Super-Conducting Linear Accelerators (SCL), with which they share the fast acceleration rate, and Rapid-Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS), as they allow the beam to re-circulate over fewer revolutions. Brookhaven National Laboratory is involved in the study of feasibility of FFAG Accelerators to accelerate intense beams of protons in the GeV energy range for a variety of applications the most important of which is the Upgrade of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) with a new FFAG injector [3] accelerating from 400 MeV to 1.5 GeV. The ring would be housed in the AGS tunnel and has henceforth a circumference of 807 m.

  12. Emission Abatement System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  13. Generalized z-scaling in proton-proton collisions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Zborovsky; M. Tokarev

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    New generalization of z-scaling in inclusive particle production is proposed. The scaling variable z is fractal measure which depends on kinematical characteristics of the underlying sub-process expressed in terms of the momentum fractions x1 and x2 of the incoming protons. In the generalized approach, the x1 and x2 are functions of the momentum fractions ya and yb of the scattered and recoil constituents carried out by the inclusive particle and recoil object, respectively. The scaling function psi(z) for charged and identified hadrons produced in proton-proton collisions is constructed. The fractal dimensions and heat capacity of the produced medium entering definition of the z are established to obtain energy, angular and multiplicity independence of the psi(z). The scheme allows unique description of data on inclusive cross sections of charged particles, pions, kaons, antiprotons and lambdas at high energies. The obtained results are of interest to use z-scaling as a tool for searching for new physics phenomena of particle production in high transverse momentum and high multiplicity region at proton-proton colliders RHIC and LHC.

  14. Reconstruction for proton computed tomography by tracing proton trajectories: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Tianfang; Liang Zhengrong; Singanallur, Jayalakshmi V.; Satogata, Todd J.; Williams, David C.; Schulte, Reinhard W. [Departments of Radiology, Computer Science, and Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Department of Physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) has been explored in the past decades because of its unique imaging characteristics, low radiation dose, and its possible use for treatment planning and on-line target localization in proton therapy. However, reconstruction of pCT images is challenging because the proton path within the object to be imaged is statistically affected by multiple Coulomb scattering. In this paper, we employ GEANT4-based Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional pCT reconstruction of an elliptical phantom to investigate the possible use of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) with three different path-estimation methods for pCT reconstruction. The first method assumes a straight-line path (SLP) connecting the proton entry and exit positions, the second method adapts the most-likely path (MLP) theoretically determined for a uniform medium, and the third method employs a cubic spline path (CSP). The ART reconstructions showed progressive improvement of spatial resolution when going from the SLP [2 line pairs (lp) cm{sup -1}] to the curved CSP and MLP path estimates (5 lp cm{sup -1}). The MLP-based ART algorithm had the fastest convergence and smallest residual error of all three estimates. This work demonstrates the advantage of tracking curved proton paths in conjunction with the ART algorithm and curved path estimates.

  15. Modeling the Production of Beta-Delayed Gamma Rays for the Detection of Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, J M; Pruet, J A; Brown, D A; Descalle, M; Hedstrom, G W; Prussin, S G

    2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this LDRD project was to develop one or more models for the production of {beta}-delayed {gamma} rays following neutron-induced fission of a special nuclear material (SNM) and to define a standardized formatting scheme which will allow them to be incorporated into some of the modern, general-purpose Monte Carlo transport codes currently being used to simulate inspection techniques proposed for detecting fissionable material hidden in sea-going cargo containers. In this report, we will describe a Monte Carlo model for {beta}-delayed {gamma}-ray emission following the fission of SNM that can accommodate arbitrary time-dependent fission rates and photon collection histories. The model involves direct sampling of the independent fission yield distributions of the system, the branching ratios for decay of individual fission products and spectral distributions representing photon emission from each fission product and for each decay mode. While computationally intensive, it will be shown that this model can provide reasonably detailed estimates of the spectra that would be recorded by an arbitrary spectrometer and may prove quite useful in assessing the quality of evaluated data libraries and identifying gaps in the libraries. The accuracy of the model will be illustrated by comparing calculated and experimental spectra from the decay of short-lived fission products following the reactions {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) and {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th}, f). For general-purpose transport calculations, where a detailed consideration of the large number of individual {gamma}-ray transitions in a spectrum may not be necessary, it will be shown that a simple parameterization of the {gamma}-ray source function can be defined which provides high-quality average spectral distributions that should suffice for calculations describing photons being transported through thick attenuating media. Finally, a proposal for ENDF-compatible formats that describe each of the models and allow for their straightforward use in Monte Carlo codes will be presented.

  16. Accurate evolutions of inspiralling neutron-star binaries: prompt and delayed collapse to black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Baiotti; Bruno Giacomazzo; Luciano Rezzolla

    2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Binary neutron-star (BNS) systems represent primary sources for the gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. We present a systematic investigation in full GR of the dynamics and GW emission from BNS which inspiral and merge, producing a black hole (BH) surrounded by a torus. Our results represent the state of the art from several points of view: (i) We use HRSC methods for the hydrodynamics equations and high-order finite-differencing techniques for the Einstein equations; (ii) We employ AMR techniques with "moving boxes"; (iii) We use as initial data BNSs in irrotational quasi-circular orbits; (iv) We exploit the isolated-horizon formalism to measure the properties of the BHs produced in the merger; (v) Finally, we use two approaches, based either on gauge-invariant perturbations or on Weyl scalars, to calculate the GWs. These techniques allow us to perform accurate evolutions on timescales never reported before (ie ~30 ms) and to provide the first complete description of the inspiral and merger of a BNS leading to the prompt or delayed formation of a BH and to its ringdown. We consider either a polytropic or an ideal fluid EOS and show that already with this idealized EOSs a very interesting phenomenology emerges. In particular, we show that while high-mass binaries lead to the prompt formation of a rapidly rotating BH surrounded by a dense torus, lower-mass binaries give rise to a differentially rotating NS, which undergoes large oscillations and emits large amounts of GWs. Eventually, also the NS collapses to a rotating BH surrounded by a torus. Finally, we also show that the use of a non-isentropic EOS leads to significantly different evolutions, giving rise to a delayed collapse also with high-mass binaries, as well as to a more intense emission of GWs and to a geometrically thicker torus.

  17. On the Approximation of Distributed-Delay Control Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirkin, Leonid

    -dimensional internal feedback of the form P -P e-sh (here P is the delay-free plant and h is the loop delay) that aims can be replaced with . = Pa -P e-sh (modified/generalized Smith predictor), where Pa is a rational e-Agh (sI - Ag)-1 Bg. The finite impulse response (FIR) com- pletion h{G e-sh } of G e-sh is defined

  18. Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

  19. Delayed-fission properties of neutron-deficient americium nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, H.L. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of the delayed-fission decay mode in light americium nuclei have been investigated. Measurements on the unknown isotopes {sup 230}Am and {sup 236}Am were attempted, and upper limits on the delayed-fission branches of these nuclei were determined. Evidence of the existence of {sup 236}Am was observed in radiochemical separations. Total kinetic energy and mass-yield distributions of the electron-capture delayed-fission mode were measured for {sup 232}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 1.31 {plus minus} 0.04 min) and for {sup 234}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 2.32 {plus minus} 0.08 min), and delayed-fission probabilities of 6.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} and 6.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}, respectively, were determined. The total kinetic energy and the asymmetric mass-yield distributions are typical of fission of mid-range actinides. No discernible influence of the anomalous triple-peaked mass division characteristic of the thorium-radium region was detected. Measurements of the time correlation between the electron-capture x-rays and the subsequent fission conform that the observed fissions arise from the electron-capture delayed-fission mechanism. Delayed fission has provided a unique opportunity to extend the range of low-energy fission studies to previously inaccessible regions. 71 refs., 44 figs., 13 tabs.

  20. Measurement of Transverse Single Spin Asymmetries for $\\pi^{0}$ and Jets at Large $x_{F}$ in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 500 GeV Polarized Proton Collisions at STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Yuxi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .as a polarized proton collider . . . . . . . . . . . . .Proton (p) as in the Baryon-Octet

  1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute sets goals for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions by at least 15 percent by 2015, 30 percent by 2025, and 80 percent by 2050, calculated relative to 2005 levels. These...

  2. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  3. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  4. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted mixture of gases and aerosols. Primary emissions include sig- nificant amounts of CH4 and aerosol (organic

  5. Nuclear like effects in proton-proton collisions at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Cunqueiro; J. Dias de Deus; C. Pajares

    2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that several effects considered nuclear effects are not nuclear in the sense that they do not only occur in nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus collisions but, as well, they are present in hadron-hadron (proton-proton) collisions. The matter creation mechanism in hh, hA and AA collisions is always the same. The pT suppression of particles produced in large multiplicity events compared to low multiplicity events, the elliptic flow and the Cronin effect are predicted to occur in pp collisions at LHC energies as a consequence of the obtained high density partonic medium.

  6. Comprehensive description of J/? production in proton-proton collisions at collider energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Yan-Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Venugopalan, Raju [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ a small x Color Glass Condensate (CGC)+ Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) formalism to compute J/ production at low p? in proton-proton collisions at collider energies. Very good agreement is obtained for total cross-sections, rapidity distributions and low momentum p? distributions. Similar agreement is obtained for production. We observe an overlap region in p? where our results match smoothly to those obtained in a next-to-leading order (NLO) collinearly factorized NRQCD formalism. The relative contribution of color singlet and color octet contributions can be quantified in the CGC+NRQCD framework, with the former contributing approximately 10% of the total cross-section.

  7. The Dependence of the Proton-Triton Nuclear Reaction Rate on the Temperature and Energy Content of the High-Energy Proton Distribution Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Dependence of the Proton-Triton Nuclear Reaction Rate on the Temperature and Energy Content of the High-Energy Proton Distribution Function

  8. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A.?M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V.?M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E.?A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Kim, T.?J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G.?P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A.?P.?R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A.?A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G.?G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J.?M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G.?H.; Aldá Júnior, W.?L.; Alves, G.?A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Pol, M.?E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E.?M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W.?L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E.?J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C.?A.; Dias, F.?A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T.?R.; Gregores, E.?M.; Mercadante, P.?G.; Novaes, S.?F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J.?G.; Chen, G.?M.; Chen, H.?S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C.?H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S.?J.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L.?F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J.?P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J.?C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P.?A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahmoud, M.?A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M.?J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J.?L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I.?N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J.?B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E.?C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C.?A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J.?D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented.

  9. Green Fluorescent Protein Variants as Ratiometric Dual Emission pH Sensors. 2. Excited-State Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boxer, Steven G.

    of the high-energy absorption band centered at 398 nm and assigned to the neutral form of the chromophore-resolved emission dynamics and isotope effect appear to be very different from those of wild-type GFP [Chattoraj, M energy neutral chromophore to the lower energy intermediate anionic chromophore is achieved by proton

  10. The Impact of Near-term Climate Policy Choices on Technology and Emissions Transition Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Edmonds, James A.; Krey, Volker; Johnson, Nils; Longden, Thomas; Luderer, Gunnar; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores the implications of delays associated with currently formulated climate policies (compared to optimal policies) for long-term transition pathways to limit climate forcing to 450ppm CO2e on the basis of the AMPERE Work Package 2 model comparison study. The paper highlights the critical importance of the 2030-2050 period for ambitious mitigation strategies. In this period, the most rapid shift to non-greenhouse gas emitting technology occurs. In the delayed response emissions mitigation scenarios, an even faster transition rate in this period is required to compensate for the additional emissions before 2030. Our physical deployment measures indicate that, without CCS, technology deployment rates in the 2030-2050 period would become considerably high. Yet the presence of CCS greatly alleviates the challenges to the transition particularly after the delayed climate policies. The results also highlight the critical role that bioenergy and CO2 capture and storage (BECCS) could play. If this technology is available, transition pathways exceed the emissions budget in the mid-term, removing the excess with BECCS in the long term. Excluding either BE or CCS from the technology portfolio implies that emission reductions need to take place much earlier.

  11. Dissociative ionization of H{sub 2} in an attosecond pulse train and delayed laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Feng; Thumm, Uwe [James R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2604 (United States)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionization of H{sub 2} in a single attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulse generates a nuclear wave packet in H{sub 2}{sup +}, which is entangled with the emitted photoelectron wave packet. The nuclear wave-packet dynamics can be observed by dissociating H{sub 2}{sup +} in a delayed IR laser pulse. If H{sub 2} is ionized by a sequence of XUV pulses of an attosecond pulse train, whether or not the corresponding sequence of nuclear wave packets in H{sub 2}{sup +} is detected as a coherent or incoherent superposition depends on whether and how the photoelectrons are observed. We simulate the nuclear dynamics in this XUV-pump-IR-probe scenario and analyze our numerical results for both single attosecond pump pulses and pump-pulse trains of different lengths and temporal spacings between individual XUV pulses. By superimposing nuclear wave packets in H{sub 2}{sup +} generated by individual pulses in the pump-pulse train incoherently, we calculate proton kinetic energy release spectra that are in good qualitative agreement with the recent experiment of Kelkensberg et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 123005 (2009)].

  12. Delayed Nickel Decay in Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. C. McLaughlin; R. A. M. J. Wijers

    2002-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently observed emission lines in the X-ray afterglow of gamma ray bursts suggest that iron group elements are either produced in the gamma ray burst, or are present nearby. If this material is the product of a thermonuclear burn, then such material would be expected to be rich in Nickel-56. If the nickel remains partially ionized, this prevents the electron capture reaction normally associated with the decay of Nickel-56, dramatically increasing the decay timescale. Here we examine the consequences of rapid ejection of a fraction of a solar mass of iron group material from the center of a collapsar/hypernova. The exact rate of decay then depends on the details of the ionization and therefore the ejection process. Future observations of iron, nickel and cobalt lines can be used to diagnose the origin of these elements and to better understand the astrophysical site of gamma ray bursts. In this model, the X-ray lines of these iron-group elements could be detected in suspected hypernovae that did not produce an observable gamma ray burst due to beaming.

  13. Cost-Delay Trade Off of Network Coding in Asymmetric Two-Way Relay Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cost-Delay Trade Off of Network Coding in Asymmetric Two-Way Relay Networks Lianghui Ding, Feng.wu@angstrom.uu.se Abstract--In this paper, we analyze and evaluate the cost- delay trade off of opportunistic network coding the average power cost and delay, formulate the optimal power-delay trade off, and propose a heuristic

  14. Assessing the Costs Attributed to Project Delay Curtis Beaty, P.E.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Commercial Value of Time Change in Highway Cost Index Total Month of Delay Estimated Return on Investment Cost Index (HCI) (during Delay) 11% 29% 3% Travel-Related Variables Length of Project 2.7 2.6 1 Impacts 8.0% 8.0% 8.0% Examples of Cost of Construction Delay #12;Monthly Cost of Project Delay Small

  15. Managing the Effect of Delay Jitter on the Display of Live Continuous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitton, Mary C.

    Managing the Effect of Delay Jitter on the Display of Live Continuous Media Donald L. Stone of Delay Jitter on the Display of Live Continuous Media (under the direction of Kevin Jeffay). ABSTRACT latency in the presence of delay jitter, where delay jitter is defined as variation in processing

  16. Anti-Proton Evolution in Little Bangs and Big Bang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Schade; B. Kampfer

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The abundances of anti-protons and protons are considered within momentum-integrated Boltzmann equations describing Little Bangs, i.e., fireballs created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Despite of a large anti-proton annihilation cross section we find a small drop of the ratio of anti-protons to protons from 170 MeV (chemical freeze-out temperature) till 100 MeV (kinetic freeze-out temperature) for CERN-SPS and BNL-RHIC energies thus corroborating the solution of the previously exposed "ani-proton puzzle". In contrast, the Big Bang evolves so slowly that the anti-baryons are kept for a long time in equilibrium resulting in an exceedingly small fraction. The adiabatic path of cosmic matter in the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter is mapped out.

  17. Antiproton-Proton Channels in J/psi Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Loiseau; S. Wycech

    2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent measurements by the BES Collaboration of J/psi decays into a photon and a proton-antiproton pair indicate a strong enhancement at the proton-antiproton threshold not observed in the decays into a neutral pion and a proton-antiproton pair. Is this enhancement due to a proton-antiproton quasi-bound state or a baryonium? A natural explanation follows from a traditional model of proton-antiproton interactions based on G-parity transformation. The observed proton-antiproton structure is due to a strong attraction in the 1S0 state, and possibly to a near-threshold quasi-bound state in the 11S0 wave.

  18. Beta-delayed neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy of 17C utilizing spin-polarized 17B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ueno; H. Miyatake; Y. Yamamoto; S. Tanimoto; T. Shimoda; N. Aoi; K. Asahi; E. Ideguchi; M. Ishihara; H. Izumi; T. Kishida; T. Kubo; S. Mitsuoka; Y. Mizoi; M. Notani; H. Ogawa; A. Ozawa; M. Sasaki; T. Shirakura; N. Takahashi; K. Yoneda

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Excited states in 17C were investigated through the measurement of beta?-delayed neutrons and gamma rays emitted in the ? decay of 17B. In the measurement, three negative-parity states and two inconclusive states, were identified in 17C above the neutron threshold energy, and seven gamma-lines were identified in a beta?-delayed multiple neutron emission of the 17B ? decay. From these transitions, the beta?-decay scheme of 17B was determined. In the present work, the ?beta-NMR technique is combined with the ?-delayed particle measurements using a fragmentation-induced spin-polarized 17B beam. This new scheme allows us to determine the spin parity of beta?-decay feeding excited states based on the difference in the discrete ?beta-decay asymmetry parameters, provided the states are connected through the Gamow-Teller transition. In this work, 1/2-, 3/2-, and (5/2-) are assigned to the observed states at Ex = 2.71(2), 3.93(2), and 4.05(2) MeV in 17C, respectively.

  19. Beta-delayed neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy of 17C utilizing spin-polarized 17B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueno, H; Yamamoto, Y; Tanimoto, S; Shimoda, T; Aoi, N; Asahi, K; Ideguchi, E; Ishihara, M; Izumi, H; Kishida, T; Kubo, T; Mitsuoka, S; Mizoi, Y; Notani, M; Ogawa, H; Ozawa, A; Sasaki, M; Shirakura, T; Takahashi, N; Yoneda, K

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excited states in 17C were investigated through the measurement of beta?-delayed neutrons and gamma rays emitted in the ? decay of 17B. In the measurement, three negative-parity states and two inconclusive states, were identified in 17C above the neutron threshold energy, and seven gamma-lines were identified in a beta?-delayed multiple neutron emission of the 17B ? decay. From these transitions, the beta?-decay scheme of 17B was determined. In the present work, the ?beta-NMR technique is combined with the ?-delayed particle measurements using a fragmentation-induced spin-polarized 17B beam. This new scheme allows us to determine the spin parity of beta?-decay feeding excited states based on the difference in the discrete ?beta-decay asymmetry parameters, provided the states are connected through the Gamow-Teller transition. In this work, 1/2-, 3/2-, and (5/2-) are assigned to the observed states at Ex = 2.71(2), 3.93(2), and 4.05(2) MeV in 17C, respectively.

  20. A study of microstrip delay lines on high dielectric constant substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashour, Thomas Joseph

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . , 27 . 30 IILG. Conclusions. 45 IV DELAY LINES ON MCT SUBSTRATES . . 46 IV. A. Introduction. IV. B. Preliminary Design. . . . 46 IV. C. Delay Line Design IV. D, Testing Procedure IV. E. Iteradve Design Process. . IV. F. Delay Line Results... lines. . . . . . . . . 41 17 The (a) insertion loss and (b) time delay characteristics for a 1186 ps delay line over temperature . 42 18 274 ps delay lines on (a) MCT20 and (b) MCT40. . . . . . . 47 19 Delay lines with tuning chips on (a) MCT20...

  1. Plans for a proton driver at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kephart, R.D.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last several years, stunning experimental results have established that neutrinos have nonzero masses and substantial mixing. The Standard Model must be extended to accommodate neutrino mass terms. The observation that neutrino masses and mass splittings are all many orders of magnitude smaller than those of any of the other fundamental fermions suggests radically new physics, perhaps originating at the GUT or Planck Scale, or perhaps the existence of new spatial dimensions. In some sense we know that the Standard Model is broken, but we don't know how it is broken. Whatever the origin of the observed neutrino masses and mixing, it is likely to require a profound extension to our picture of the physical world. The first steps in understanding this revolutionary new physics are to pin down the measurable parameters and to address the next round of basic questions: (1) Are there only three neutrino flavors, or do light, sterile neutrinos exist? (2) If there are only three generations, there is one angle ({theta}{sub 13}) in the mixing matrix that is unmeasured. How large is it? (3) Which of the two possible orderings of the neutrino mass eigenstates applies? (4) If {theta}{sub 13} is large enough one it may be possible to measure the quantum-mechanical phase {delta}. If {theta}{sub 13} and {delta} are non-zero there will be CP violation in the lepton sector. These questions can be addressed by accelerator based neutrino oscillation experiments. The answers will guide our understanding of what lies beyond the Standard Model, and whether the new physics provides an explanation for the baryon asymmetry of the Universe (via leptogenesis), or provides deep insight into the connection between quark and lepton properties (via Grand Unified Theories), or perhaps leads to an understanding of one of the most profound questions in physics: Why are there three generations of quarks and leptons? The answers may well further challenge our picture of the physical world, and will certainly have important implications for our understanding of cosmology and the evolution of the early Universe. The current Fermilab Program is an important part of the world-wide accelerator based effort to explore and understand the physics of neutrino oscillations. By early 2005, with both MINOS and MiniBooNE taking data, Fermilab will be able to answer some of the most pressing first-round questions raised by the discovery that neutrinos have mass. Fermilab's high-intensity neutrino beams are derived from 8- and 120-GeV proton beams. MiniBooNE is currently taking data using 8 GeV Protons from the Booster. The 120 GeV NuMI beam will start to operate in early 2005 using a 0.25 MW proton beam power from the Main Injector. Future neutrino programs will build on these existing facilities. New short and long baseline experiments have been proposed. There are proposals to increase the available number of protons at 8 and 120 GeV with the goal of addressing the full range of questions presented by neutrino oscillations. Key to that vision is a new intense proton source that usually is referred to as the Proton Driver.

  2. Neutron-Proton Radii in N \\approx Z Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Auerbach

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple formula is derived that describes how the Coulomb interaction affects the proton radius in nuclei. It determines the difference between neutron and proton radii in nuclei with N approx Z. It also provides an estimate for the difference between the radii of the Z core neutrons and the protons in nuclei with a large neutron excess. The results obtained from the derived formula are compared with radii calculated in a Skyrme Hartree-Fock calculation.

  3. COMPACT ACCELERATOR CONCEPT FOR PROTON THERAPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash x-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  4. Radiative proton capture on $^6$He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Sauvan; F. M. Marqués; H. W. Wilschut; N. A. Orr

    2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative capture of protons is investigated as a probe of clustering in nuclei far from stability. The first such measurement on a halo nucleus is reported here for the reaction $^6$He(p,$\\gamma$) at 40 MeV. Capture into $^7$Li is observed as the strongest channel. In addition, events have been recorded that may be described by quasi-free capture on a halo neutron, the $\\alpha$ core and $^5$He. The possibility of describing such events by capture into the continuum of $^7$Li is also discussed.

  5. Proton Energy Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod Jump to:This propertyVolume JumpProtean PowerProton Energy

  6. Probing the Proton's Weak Side | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br BromineProbing the Proton's Weak Side

  7. Protons Pair Up With Neutrons | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 HgPromisingProtectingSciTechProtonEmbargoed: Not for

  8. Dynamical effects in proton breakup from exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonaccorso, Angela; Kumar, Ravinder [INFN, Sez. di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sez. di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa and Department of Physics, Deenbandhu Chhoturam University of Science and Technology, Murthal, Sonepat, Haryana, 131039 (India)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution discusses dynamical effects in proton breakup from a weakly bound state in an exotic nucleus on a heavy target. The Coulomb interactions between the proton and the core and the proton and the target are treated to all orders, including also the full multipole expansion of the Coulomb potential. The dynamics of proton Coulomb breakup is compared to that of an equivalent neutron of larger binding energy in order to elucidate the differences with the well understood neutron breakup mechanism. A number of experimentally measurable observables such as parallel momentum distributions, proton angular distributions and total breakup cross sections can be calculated. With respect to nuclear breakup it is found that a proton behaves exactly as a neutron of larger binding energy. The extra 'effective energy' is due to the combined core-target Coulomb barrier. In Coulomb breakup we distinguish the effect of the core-target Coulomb potential (called recoil effect), with respect to which the proton behaves again as a more bound neutron, from the direct proton-target Coulomb potential. The latter gives cross sections about an order of magnitude larger than the recoil term. The two effects give rise to complicated interferences in the parallel momentum distributions. They are instead easily separable in the proton angular distributions which are therefore suggested as a very useful observable for future experimental studies.

  9. advanced protonic conductor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FTIR and IINS of the protons and for the related vibrational modes. Inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (IINS) spectra Schuck, Gtz 3 Lead Nanopowder as Advanced...

  10. alamos proton storage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blalock 2012-06-07 2 PhysicsHighlight Proton radiography at Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Science Websites Summary: ), where the extreme pressures have induced a...

  11. Comment on 'New Insights in the Electrocatalytic Proton Reduction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    investigation of the mechanism of oxidation of H2 proton reduction using a model nickel complex for nickel-based electrocatalysts with cyclic phosphorous ligands...

  12. The contribution of strange quarks to the proton magnetic moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Dillon; G. Morpurgo

    2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with how to extract the s-s(bar) contribution to the proton magnetic moment from the experiments

  13. The proton gyromagnetic g-factor: an electromagnetic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sardin

    2009-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    So far, the Standard Model of Elementary Particles has not succeeded getting a trustworthy account of the proton spin, which remains an enigma. This hindrance is known as the proton spin crisis, owing to the experimental evidence already from 1988 suggesting that little or none of the proton spin would come from the spin of the quarks. This prompted theorists to a flood of guessworks about the proton spin. Since it remains unsolved, in the framework of new physics an exploratory approach based on a novel paradigm is proposed, which brings a renewed access to this challenge, through its reciprocal relationship with the g-factor.

  14. Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic...

  15. affecting proton exchange: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stress applied to the electrode area of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is known to significantly affect power output. In practice, electrode stress arises...

  16. annealed proton exchanged: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characterized and integrated in Membrane-Electrodes Assembly to be tested in fuel cell operating conditions, mobile or stationary), Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells...

  17. Physics Highlight Proton radiography at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to enhance the signal from selected materials. Using the proton beam from a particle accelerator allows for multiple images taken at a wide range of intervals, capturing a...

  18. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-3119 Unlimited Release Printed May 2011 Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes Joseph W. Pratt,...

  19. Shuttle-mediated proton pumping across the inner mitochondrial membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatoly Yu. Smirnov; Sergey E. Savel'ev; Franco Nori

    2008-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Shuttle-assisted charge transfer is pivotal for the efficient energy transduction from the food-stuff electrons to protons in the respiratory chain of animal cells and bacteria. The respiratory chain consists of four metalloprotein Complexes (I-IV) embedded in the inner membrane of a mitochondrion. Three of these complexes pump protons across the membrane, fuelled by the energy of food-stuff electrons. Despite extensive biochemical and biophysical studies, the physical mechanism of this proton pumping is still not well understood. Here we present a nanoelectromechanical model of the electron-driven proton pump related to the second loop of the respiratory chain, where a lipid-soluble ubiquinone molecule shuttles between the Complex I and Complex III, carrying two electrons and two protons. We show that the energy of electrons can be converted to the transmembrane proton potential gradient via the electrostatic interaction between electrons and protons on the shuttle. We find that the system can operate either as a proton pump, or, in the reverse regime, as an electron pump. For membranes with various viscosities, we demonstrate that the uphill proton current peaks near the body temperature $T \\approx 37 ^{\\circ}$C.

  20. Fast timing detectors for forward protons at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrow, Michael; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author discusses the development of high precision timing detectors for high momentum protons at the LHC, and their application in studying exclusive Higgs boson production.