National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for delayed proton emission

  1. Beta-delayed proton emission from $^{21}$Mg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, M V; Briz, J A; Cederkäll, J; Fynbo, H O U; Jensen, J H; Jonson, B; Laursen, K L; Nilsson, T; Perea, A; Pesudo, V; Riisager, K; Tengblad, O

    2015-01-01

    Beta-delayed proton emission from $^{21}$Mg has been measured at ISOLDE, CERN, with a detection setup including particle identification capabilities. $\\beta$-delayed protons with center of mass energies between 0.39$\\,$MeV and 7.2$\\,$MeV were measured and used to determine the half life of $^{21}$Mg as $118.6\\pm 0.5\\,$ms. From a line shape fit of the $\\beta p$ branches we extract spectroscopic information about the resonances of $^{21}$Na. Finally an improved interpretation of the decay scheme in accordance with the results obtained in reaction studies is presented.

  2. Observation of Doppler broadening in $?$-delayed proton-$?$ decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. B. Schwartz; C. Wrede; M. B. Bennett; S. N. Liddick; D. Perez-Loureiro; A. Bowe; A. A. Chen; K. A. Chipps; N. Cooper; D. Irvine; E. McNeice; F. Montes; F. Naqvi; R. Ortez; S. D. Pain; J. Pereira; C. Prokop; J. Quaglia; S. J. Quinn; J. Sakstrup; M. Santia; S. Shanab; A. Simon; A. Spyrou; E. Thiagalingam

    2015-10-26

    Background: The Doppler broadening of $\\gamma$-ray peaks due to nuclear recoil from $\\beta$-delayed nucleon emission can be used to measure the energies of the nucleons. This method has never been tested using $\\beta$-delayed proton emission or applied to a recoil heavier than $A=10$. Purpose: To test and apply this Doppler broadening method using $\\gamma$-ray peaks from the $^{26}$P($\\beta p\\gamma$)$^{25}$Al decay sequence. Methods: A fast beam of $^{26}$P was implanted into a planar Ge detector, which was used as a $^{26}$P $\\beta$-decay trigger. The SeGA array of high-purity Ge detectors was used to detect $\\gamma$ rays from the $^{26}$P($\\beta p\\gamma$)$^{25}$Al decay sequence. Results: Radiative Doppler broadening in $\\beta$-delayed proton-$\\gamma$ decay was observed for the first time. The Doppler broadening analysis method was verified using the 1613 keV $\\gamma$-ray line for which the proton energies were previously known. The 1776 keV $\\gamma$ ray de-exciting the 2720 keV $^{25}$Al level was observed in $^{26}$P($\\beta p\\gamma$)$^{25}$Al decay for the first time and used to determine that the center-of-mass energy of the proton emission feeding the 2720-keV level is 5.1 $\\pm$ 1.0 (stat.) $\\pm$ 0.6 (syst.) MeV, corresponding to a $^{26}$Si excitation energy of 13.3 $\\pm$ 1.0 (stat.) $\\pm$ 0.6 (syst.) MeV for the proton-emitting level. Conclusions: The Doppler broadening method has been demonstrated to provide practical measurements of the energies for $\\beta$-delayed nucleon emissions populating excited states of nuclear recoils at least as heavy as $A=25$.

  3. Systematics of proton emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Delion; R. J. Liotta; R. Wyss

    2006-01-24

    A very simple formula is presented that relates the logarithm of the half-life, corrected by the centrifugal barrier, with the Coulomb parameter in proton decay processes. The corresponding experimental data lie on two straight lines which appear as a result of a sudden change in the nuclear shape marking two regions of deformation independently of the angular momentum of the outgoing proton. This feature provides a powerful tool to assign experimentally quantum numbers in proton emitters.

  4. Proton emission induced by polarized photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Anguiano; G. Co'; A. M. Lallena

    2006-08-29

    The proton emission induced by polarized photons is studied in the energy range above the giant resonance region and below the pion emission threshold. Results for the 12C, 16O and 40Ca nuclei are presented. The sensitivity of various observables to final state interaction, meson exchange currents and short range correlations is analyzed. We found relevant effects due to the virtual excitation of the $\\Delta$ resonance.

  5. Study of the beta delayed particle emission from 48Mn and its relevance for explosive nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martel, I

    2015-01-01

    Study of the beta delayed particle emission from 48Mn and its relevance for explosive nucleosynthesis

  6. Systematic trends in beta-delayed particle emitting nuclei: The case of beta-p-alpha emission from 21Mg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. V. Lund; M. J. G. Borge; J. A. Briz; J. Cederkäll; H. O. U. Fynbo; J. H. Jensen; B. Jonson; K. L. Laursen; T. Nilsson; A. Perea; V. Pesudo; K. Riisager; O. Tengblad

    2015-06-12

    We have observed beta+-delayed alpha and p-alpha emission from the proton-rich nucleus 21Mg produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. The assignments were cross-checked with a time distribution analysis. This is the third identified case of beta-p-alpha emission. We discuss the systematic of beta-delayed particle emission decays, show that our observed decays fit naturally into the existing pattern, and argue that the patterns are to a large extent caused by odd-even effects.

  7. Experimental study of beta-delayed proton decay of (23)Al for nucleosynthesis in novae 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saastamoinen, A.; Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Bentley, M. A.; Davinson, T.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Simmons, E.; Tabacaru, G.; Tribble, Robert E.; Woods, P. J.; Aysto, J.

    2011-01-01

    The beta-delayed gamma and proton decay of (23)Al has been studied with an alternative detector setup at the focal plane of the momentum achromat recoil separator MARS at Texas AandM University. We could detect protons down to an energy of 200 ke...

  8. ß-delayed ?-proton Decay in 56Zn: Analysis of the Charged-particle Spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Orrigo, S.E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Gelletly, W.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Cáceres, L.; et al

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = -2 nucleus 56Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focussing on the charged particle spectrum.

  9. ß-delayed ?-proton decay in ??Zn: Analysis of the charged-particle spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Orrigo, S. E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Gelletly, W.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Cáceres, L.; et al

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = –2 nucleus ??Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focusing on the charged particle spectrum.

  10. Proton Emission Times in Spectator Fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Schwarz; for the ALADIN collaboration

    2000-09-05

    Proton-proton correlations from spectator decays following Au + Au collisions at 1000 AMeV have been measured with an highly efficient detector hodoscope. The constructed correlation functions indicate a moderate expansion and low breakup densities similar to assumptions made in statistical multifragmentation models. In agreement with a volume breakup rather short time scales were deduced employing directional cuts in proton-proton correlations.

  11. Delayed neutron emission measurements for U-235 and Pu-239 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong

    2009-05-15

    The delayed neutron emission rates of U-235 and Pu-239 samples were measured accurately from a thermal fission reaction. A Monte Carlo calculation using the Geant4 code was used to demonstrate the neutron energy independence of the detector used...

  12. ß-delayed ?-proton decay in ??Zn: Analysis of the charged-particle spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrigo, S. E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Cáceres, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Fujita, H.; Ganio?lu, E.; Gerbaux, M.; Kozer, H. C.; Kucuk, L.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Popescu, L.; Rogers, A. M.; Susoy, G.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thomas, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = –2 nucleus ??Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focusing on the charged particle spectrum.

  13. Light meson emission in (anti)proton induced reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Kuraev; E. S. Kokoulina; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2015-03-07

    Reactions induced by high energy antiprotons on proton on nuclei are accompanied with large probability by the emission of a few mesons. Interesting phenomena can be observed and QCD tests can be performed, through the detection of one or more mesons. The collinear emission from high energy (anti)proton beams of a hard pion or vector meson, can be calculated similarly to the emission of a hard photon from an electron \\cite{Kuraev:2013izz}. This is a well known process in QED, and it is called the "Quasi-Real Electron method", where the incident particle is an electron and a hard photon is emitted leaving an 'almost on shell' electron impinging on the target \\cite{Baier:1973ms}. Such process is well known as Initial State Emission (ISR) method of scanning over incident energy, and can be used, in the hadron case, to produce different kind of particles in similar kinematical conditions. In case of emission of a charged light meson, $\\pi$ or $\\rho$-meson, in proton-proton(anti-proton) collisions, the meson can be deviated in a magnetic field and detected. The collinear emission (along the beam direction) of a charged meson may be used to produce high energy (anti)neutron beams. This can be very useful to measure the difference of the cross sections of (anti)proton and (anti)neutron scattering from the target and may open the way for checking sum rules with antiparticles. Hard meson emission allows also to enhance the cross section when the energy loss from one of the incident particles lowers the total energy up to the mass of a resonance. The cross section can be calculated, on the basis of factorized formulas, where the probability of emission of the light mesons multiplies the cross section of the sub-process. Multiplicity distributions for neutral and charged meson production are also given.

  14. He-proton emission imaging for inertial-confinement-fusion experiments (invited)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D3 He-proton emission imaging for inertial-confinement-fusion experiments (invited) F. H. Séguin, Livermore, California 94550 (Presented on 19 April 2004; published 5 October 2004) Proton emission imaging cameras, in combination with proton spectrometers and a proton temporal diagnostic, provide a great deal

  15. On Distributions of Emission Sources and Speed of Sound in Proton-proton (Proton-antiproton) Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Li-Na

    2015-01-01

    We review a few types of distributions of emission sources in high energy collisions. These different distributions are described by different models such as the three-fireball model, the three-source relativistic diffusion model, the multisource thermal model, the model with two Tsallis (or Boltzmann-Gibbs) clusters of fireballs, and the revised Landau hydrodynamic model. From rapidity or pseudorapidity distribution, we cannot give a judgment for these types of distributions and models. Particularly, the simple revised Landau hydrodynamic model is used in this paper to study the pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles produced in proton-proton and proton-antiproton collisions at high energies. In the calculation, the rapidity and pseudorapidity distributions can be obtained respectively. This treatment avoids the errors caused by an unapt conversion or non-division. The values of square speed of sound parameter in different collisions are then extracted from the widths of rapidity distributions.

  16. Experimental study of the beta-delayed proton precursors /sup 33/Ar and /sup 49/Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU Xiao-ji; GUO Jun-sheng; GUO Ying-xiang; ZHAO Zhi-zheng; LUO Yi-xiao

    1985-01-01

    Beta-delayed proton precursors /sup 33/Ar and /sup 49/Fe have been produced via the (/sup 12/C,3n) reaction in 65-MeV carbon bombardments of /sup 24/Mg and /sup 40/Ca, respectively. The major proton peaks are at 3.28 +- 0.07 MeV for /sup 33/Ar and 1.98 +- 0.04 MeV for /sup 49/Fe. The corresponding cross section for /sup 33/Ar is 0.40 +- 0.08 ..mu..b, and for /sup 49/Fe 0.70 +- 0.14 ..mu..b. The half-life of /sup 33/Ar was determined to be 167 +- 24 ms.

  17. DELAYED ONSET OF HIGH-ENERGY EMISSIONS IN LEPTONIC AND HADRONIC MODELS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asano, Katsuaki [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Meszaros, Peter, E-mail: asano@phys.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: nnp@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The temporal-spectral evolution of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts is simulated numerically for both leptonic and hadronic models. For weak enough magnetic fields, leptonic models can reproduce the few seconds delay of the onset of GeV photon emission observed by Fermi-LAT, due to the slow growth of the target photon field for inverse Compton scattering. For stronger magnetic fields, the GeV delay can be explained with hadronic models, due to the long acceleration timescale of protons and the continuous photopion production after the end of the particle injection. While the FWHMs of the MeV and GeV light curves are almost the same in one-zone leptonic models, the FWHMs of the 1-30 GeV light curves in hadronic models are significantly wider than those of the 0.1-1 MeV light curves. The amount of the GeV delay depends on the importance of the Klein-Nishina effect in both the leptonic and hadronic models. In our examples of hadronic models the energies of the escaped neutrons are comparable to the gamma-ray energy, although their contribution to the ultra high-energy cosmic rays is still subdominant. The resulting neutrino spectra are hard enough to avoid the flux limit constraint from IceCube. The delay of the neutrino emission onset is up to several times longer than the corresponding delay of the GeV photon emission onset. The quantitative differences in the light curves for various models may be further tested with future atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes whose effective area is larger than that of Fermi-LAT, such as CTA.

  18. High gas prices. Road construction. Plane delays. Traffic jams. Fuel emission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    1 High gas prices. Road construction. Plane delays. Traffic jams. Fuel emission. Millions of people interdisciplin- ary nature--focusing on economics, engineering and public policy--presents real-life situations

  19. Biomedical applications of proton induced X-ray emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vis, R.D.

    1988-06-01

    Apart from studies on aerosols, the majority of applications of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) with a normal beam or a microprobe (micro-PIXE) is found in biology and medicine. Two aspects of broad beam PIXE are often decisive for the choice of this analytical technique. Compared to other techniques capable of analysis down beyond the ppm level, PIXE can be carried out with a very small amount of material and minute fractions of the composite samples, even in the scale of micrometers and quite often with minimal sample preparation, which are important requirements for biomedical investigations. Secondly, the speed of the total analysis opens the possibility to analyze large numbers of samples in a reasonable time, which is often necessary in biomedical studies in order to obtain sufficiently significant correlations between trace element concentrations and biomedical phenomena. Few, if any, techniques can compete with micro-PIXE; quantitative trace element analysis on a micrometer scale still represent a challenging problem. The electron microprobe normally lacks the sensitivity while the laser induced techniques suffer as yet from quantification problems. This paper describes recent developments especially in micro-PIXE in biomedical research.

  20. Transport properties and neutrino emissivity of dense neutron-star matter with localized protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Baiko; P. Haensel

    1999-06-18

    As pointed out by Kutschera and W{\\'o}jcik, very low concentration of protons combined with a specific density dependence of effective neutron-proton interaction could lead to a localization of ``proton impurities'' in neutron medium at densities exceeding four times normal nuclear matter density. We study consequences of the localization of protons for transport processes in dense neutron star cores, assuming random distribution of proton impurities. Kinetic equations, relevant for the transport of charge, heat and momentum, are solved using variational method. Localization of protons removes a T^{-2} factor from the transport coefficients, which leads, at lower temperatures, to a strong decrease of thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and shear viscosity of neutron star matter, as compared to the standard case, where protons form a Fermi liquid. Due to the localization of protons a number of conventional neutrino emission processes (including modified URCA process) become inoperative in neutron star cores. On the other hand, the energy loss rate from neutrino-antineutrino pair bremsstrahlung due to electron and neutron scattering off (localized) protons, will have a specific T^6 dependence, which could modify the cooling of the neutron star core, as compared to the standard case. Possible astrophysical implications of the localization of protons for neutron star evolution and dynamics are discussed.

  1. Decarbonization and the time-delay between peak CO2 emissions and concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshadri, Ashwin K

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-dioxide (CO2) is the main contributor to anthropogenic global warming, and the timing of its peak concentration in the atmosphere is likely to govern the timing of maximum radiative forcing. While dynamics of atmospheric CO2 is governed by multiple time-constants, we idealize this by a single time-constant to consider some of the factors describing the time-delay between peaks in CO2 emissions and concentrations. This time-delay can be understood as the time required to bring CO2 emissions down from its peak to a small value, and is governed by the rate of decarbonizaton of economic activity. This decarbonization rate affects how rapidly emissions decline after having achieved their peak, and a rapid decline in emissions is essential for limiting peak radiative forcing. Long-term mitigation goals for CO2 should therefore consider not only the timing of peak emissions, but also the rate of decarbonization. We discuss implications for mitigation of the fact that the emissions peak corresponds to small bu...

  2. Time delay anisotropy in photoelectron emission from the isotropic ground state of helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heuser, Sebastian; Cirelli, Claudio; Sabbar, Mazyar; Boge, Robert; Lucchini, Matteo; Gallmann, Lukas; Ivanov, Igor; Kheifets, Anatoli S; Dahlström, J Marcus; Lindroth, Eva; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando; Keller, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Time delays of electrons emitted from an isotropic initial state and leaving behind an isotropic ion are assumed to be angle-independent. Using an interferometric method involving XUV attosecond pulse trains and an IR probe field in combination with a detection scheme, which allows for full 3D momentum resolution, we show that time delays between electrons liberated from the $1s^{2}$ spherically symmetric ground state of He depend on the emission direction of the electrons with respect to the linear polarization axis of the ionizing XUV light. Such time delays can exhibit values as large as 60 attoseconds. With the help of refined theoretical models we can attribute the observed anisotropy to the interplay between different final quantum states, which arise naturally when two photons are involved in the photoionization process. Since most measurement techniques tracing attosecond electron dynamics have involved at least two photons so far, this is a general, significant, and initially unexpected effect that m...

  3. The neutron long counter NERO for studies of beta-delayed neutron emission in the r-process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pereira; P. Hosmer; G. Lorusso; P. Santi; A. Couture; J. Daly; M. Del Santo; T. Elliot; J. Goerres; C. Herlitzius; K. -L. Kratz; L. O. Lamm; H. Y. Lee; F. Montes; M. Ouellette; E. Pellegrini; P. Reeder; H. Schatz; F. Schertz; L. Schnorrenberger; K. Smith; E. Stech; E. Strandberg; C. Ugalde; M. Wiescher; A. Woehr

    2010-07-28

    The neutron long counter NERO was built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, for measuring beta-delayed neutron-emission probabilities. The detector was designed to work in conjunction with a beta-decay implantation station, so that beta decays and beta-delayed neutrons emitted from implanted nuclei can be measured simultaneously. The high efficiency of about 40%, for the range of energies of interest, along with the small background, are crucial for measuring beta-delayed neutron emission branchings for neutron-rich r-process nuclei produced as low intensity fragmentation beams in in-flight separator facilities.

  4. Description of true and delayed ternary nuclear fission accompanied by the emission of various third particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@vsu.ru; Kadmensky, S. S.; Lyubashevsky, D. E. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-15

    The mechanisms and the features of the main types of nuclear ternary fission (that is, true ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted before the rupture of the fissioning nucleus into fragments, and delayed ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted from fission fragments going apart) are investigated within quantum-mechanical fission theory. The features of T-odd asymmetry in true ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are investigated for the cases where alpha particles, prescission neutrons, and photons appear as third particles emitted by fissioning nuclei, the Coriolis interaction of the spin of the polarized fissioning nucleus with the spin of the third particle and the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances excited in the fissioning nucleus in the case of projectile-neutron capture being taken into account. For the cases where third particles emitted by fission fragments are evaporated neutrons or photons, T-odd asymmetries in delayed ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are analyzed with allowance for the mechanism of pumping of large fission-fragment spins oriented orthogonally to the fragment-emission direction and with allowance for the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances.

  5. Proton-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProtein Dynamics Hit theProton Channel OrientationProton-

  6. Recent activities for ?-decay half-lives and ?-delayed neutron emission of very neutron-rich isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillmann, Iris; Abriola, Daniel; Singh, Balraj

    2014-05-02

    Beta-delayed neutron (?n) emitters play an important, two-fold role in the stellar nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in the 'rapid neutron-capture process' (r process). On one hand they lead to a detour of the material ?-decaying back to stability. On the other hand, the released neutrons increase the neutron-to-seed ratio, and are re-captured during the freeze-out phase and thus influence the final solar r-abundance curve. A large fraction of the isotopes inside the r-process reaction path are not yet experimentally accessible and are located in the (experimental) 'Terra Incognita'. With the next generation of fragmentation and ISOL facilities presently being built or already in operation, one of the main motivation of all projects is the investigation of these very neutron-rich isotopes. A short overview of one of the planned programs to measure ?n-emitters at the limits of the presently know isotopes, the BRIKEN campaign (Beta delayed neutron emission measurements at RIKEN) will be given. Presently, about 600 ?-delayed one-neutron emitters are accessible, but only for a third of them experimental data are available. Reaching more neutron-rich isotopes means also that multiple neutron-emission becomes the dominant decay mechanism. About 460 ?-delayed two-, three-or four-neutron emitters are identified up to now but for only 30 of them experimental data about the neutron branching ratios are available, most of them in the light mass region below A=30. The International Atomic and Energy Agency (IAEA) has identified the urgency and picked up this topic recently in a 'Coordinated Research Project' on a 'Reference Database for Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Data'. This project will review, compile, and evaluate the existing data for neutron-branching ratios and half-lives of ?-delayed neutron emitters and help to ensure a reliable database for the future discoveries of new isotopes and help to constrain astrophysical and theoretical models.

  7. Investigating fusion plasma instabilities in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak using mega electron volt proton emissions (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, R. V., E-mail: rvale006@fiu.edu; Boeglin, W. U.; Angulo, A.; Avila, P.; Leon, O.; Lopez, C. [Department of Physics, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8 ST, CP204, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, James Forrestal Campus, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Cecconello, M.; Klimek, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-751 20 (Sweden); Allan, S. Y.; Akers, R. J.; Keeling, D. L.; McClements, K. G.; Scannell, R.; Conway, N. J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Turnyanskiy, M. [ITER Physics Department, EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Jones, O. M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Michael, C. A. [Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-11-15

    The proton detector (PD) measures 3 MeV proton yield distributions from deuterium-deuterium fusion reactions within the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). The PD’s compact four-channel system of collimated and individually oriented silicon detectors probes different regions of the plasma, detecting protons (with gyro radii large enough to be unconfined) leaving the plasma on curved trajectories during neutral beam injection. From first PD data obtained during plasma operation in 2013, proton production rates (up to several hundred kHz and 1 ms time resolution) during sawtooth events were compared to the corresponding MAST neutron camera data. Fitted proton emission profiles in the poloidal plane demonstrate the capabilities of this new system.

  8. PROMPT HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM PROTON-DOMINATED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    'proton-dominated' GRBs in the internal shock scenario through Monte Carlo simulations, accounting for various processes related to high-energy electrons and protons. Besides...

  9. CHIANTI - an Atomic Database for Emission Lines. Paper VI: Proton Rates and Other Improvements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Young; G. Del Zanna; E. Landi; K. P. Dere; H. E. Mason; M. Landini

    2002-09-24

    The CHIANTI atomic database contains atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities and electron excitation data for a large number of ions of astrophysical interest. Version 4 has been released, and proton excitation data is now included, principally for ground configuration levels that are close in energy. The fitting procedure for excitation data, both electrons and protons, has been extended to allow 9 point spline fits in addition to the previous 5 point spline fits. This allows higher quality fits to data from close-coupling calculations where resonances can lead to significant structure in the Maxwellian-averaged collision strengths. The effects of photoexcitation and stimulated emission by a blackbody radiation field in a spherical geometry on the level balance equations of the CHIANTI ions can now be studied following modifications to the CHIANTI software. With the addition of H I, He I and N I, the first neutral species have been added to CHIANTI. Many updates to existing ion data-sets are described, while several new ions have been added to the database, including Ar IV, Fe VI and Ni XXI. The two-photon continuum is now included in the spectral synthesis routines, and a new code for calculating the relativistic free-free continuum has been added. The treatment of the free-bound continuum has also been updated.

  10. Impurities in extruded cables: A proton-induced x-ray emission diagnostic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crine, J.P.; Hinrichsen, P.F.; Houdayer, A. (Institut de Recherche d'Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, PQ (Canada))

    1990-06-01

    The impurity contents and distributions in electrical trees grown in various field-aged XLPE distribution cables were measured by micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). The objectives pursued in this preliminary study were the following. Determination of any possible correlation between electrical tree initiation and the nature of some specific impurities. Evaluation of micro-PIXE as a reliable analytical technique to measure impurities in localized defects, such as small trees. For that purpose we used the micro-PIXE facility of the Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire at University of Montreal where proton beams of {approx}20 microns can be focused on small samples. From the emitted x-rays, it is possible to determine the nature and content of most impurities (whose content is above {approx}1 ppM). Cable samples with electrical trees grown either from insulation shield or from water trees were analyzed. A few field-aged cable samples containing breakdown channels of various sizes were also analyzed. The aim here was to determine whether impurities could still be detected after breakdown. The observations made can be summarized as follows: the electrical trees studied were heavily contaminated by a wide variety of impurities; electrical trees contain the same impurities as the connecting water trees and the amounts are about the same in both types of trees; provided that the energy released during breakdown is not too high, that is as long as breakdown channels remain small; the minimum level of contamination leading to tree growth is difficult to ascertain; no clear correlation can be established between the nature of impurities and electrical tree initiation; it cannot be determined whether contamination leads to tree initiation or whether contamination follows tree growth; and micro-PIXE is well suited to study impurities in electrical (and water) trees. 20 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Assessment of the use of prompt gamma emission for proton therapy range verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Styczynski, John R

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Prompt gamma rays emitted from proton-nucleus interactions in tissue present a promising non-invasive, in situ means of monitoring proton beam based radiotherapy. This study investigates the fluence and energy ...

  12. Single and double proton emissions from the O-14+He-4 interaction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Changbo; Goldberg, V. Z.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Chubarian, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Skorodumov, B.; McCleskey, M.; Zhai, Y.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    of states in Ne-18. The observed states in Ne-18 decay by protons mainly to proton unstable states in F-17. It was found that the decay of a state in Ne-18 at E-ex=8.45 MeV demonstrates the features of a decay by a correlated proton pair. The observed...

  13. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, W.S.; Li, X.L.; Wan, T.M.; Liu, J.F.; Zhang, G.L.; Li, Y. [Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics

    2006-06-15

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM10 were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPS collected from various pollution Sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM10 is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM10 are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra.

  14. Measurements of nuclear $?$-ray line emission in interactions of protons and $?$ particles with N, O, Ne and Si

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Benhabiles-Mezhoud; J. Kiener; J. -P. Thibaud; V. Tatischeff; I. Deloncle; A. Coc; J. Duprat; C. Hamadache; A. Lefebvre-Schuhl; J. -C. Dalouzy; F. De Grancey; F. De Oliveira; F. Dayras; N. De Séréville; M. -G. Pellegriti; L. Lamia; S. Ouichaoui

    2010-11-11

    $\\gamma$-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne and Si and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong $\\gamma$-ray lines of $^{16}$O produced in proton and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O and Ne and a thick foil was used for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and 39 MeV for $\\alpha$-particles have been delivered by the IPN-Orsay tandem accelerator. The $\\gamma$ rays have been detected with four HP-Ge detectors in the angular range 30$^{\\circ}$ to 135$^{\\circ}$. We extracted 36 cross section excitation functions for proton reactions and 14 for $\\alpha$-particle reactions. For the majority of the excitation functions no other data exist to our knowledge. Where comparison with existing data was possible usually a very good agreement was found. It is shown that these data are very interesting for constraining nuclear reaction models. In particular the agreement of cross section calculations in the nuclear reaction code TALYS with the measured data could be improved by adjusting the coupling schemes of collective levels in the target nuclei $^{14}$N, $^{20,22}$Ne and $^{28}$Si. The importance of these results for the modeling of nuclear $\\gamma$-ray line emission in astrophysical sites is discussed.

  15. Plastic damping of Alfv\\'en waves in magnetar flares and delayed afterglow emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinyu

    2015-01-01

    Magnetar flares generate Alfv\\'en waves bouncing in the closed magnetosphere with energy up to $\\sim 10^{46}$ erg. We show that on a 10-ms timescale the waves are transmitted into the star and form a compressed packet of high energy density. This packet strongly shears the stellar crust and initiates a plastic flow, heating the crust and melting it hundreds of meters below the surface. A fraction of the deposited plastic heat is eventually conducted to the stellar surface, contributing to the surface afterglow months to years after the flare. A large fraction of heat is lost to neutrino emission or conducted into the core of the neutron star.

  16. Proton emission imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCiantis, Joseph Loreto

    2005-01-01

    A proton core imaging system has been developed and extensively used for measuring the nuclear burn regions of inertial confinement fusion implosions. These imaging cameras, mounted to the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility, use ...

  17. SU-E-J-121: Measuring Prompt Gamma Emission Profiles with a Multi-Stage Compton Camera During Proton Beam Irradiation: Initial Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polf, J; McCleskey, M [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Brown, S; Mann, J; He, Z [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mackin, D; Beddar, S [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have suggested that the characteristics of prompt gammas (PG) emitted during proton beam irradiation are advantageous for determining beam range during treatment delivery. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of determining the proton beam range from PG data measured with a prototype Compton camera (CC) during proton beam irradiation. Methods: Using a prototype multi-stage CC the PG emission from a water phantom was measured during irradiation with clinical proton therapy beams. The measured PG emission data was used to reconstruct an image of the PG emission using a backprojection reconstruction algorithm. One dimensional (1D) profiles extracted from the PG images were compared to: 1) PG emission data measured at fixed depths using collimated high purity Germanium and Lanthanum Bromide detectors, and 2) the measured depth dose profiles of the proton beams. Results: Comparisons showed that the PG emission profiles reconstructed from CC measurements agreed very well with the measurements of PG emission as a function of depth made with the collimated detectors. The distal falloff of the measured PG profile was between 1 mm to 4 mm proximal to the distal edge of the Bragg peak for proton beam ranges from 4 cm to 16 cm in water. Doses of at least 5 Gy were needed for the CC to measure sufficient data to image the PG profile and localize the distal PG falloff. Conclusion: Initial tests of a prototype CC for imaging PG emission during proton beam irradiation indicated that measurement and reconstruction of the PG profile was possible. However, due to limitations of the operational parameters (energy range and count rate) of the current CC prototype, doses of greater than a typical treatment dose (?2 Gy) were needed to measure adequate PG signal to reconstruct viable images. Funding support for this project provided by a grant from DoD.

  18. Evidence of delayed light emission of TetraPhenyl Butadiene excited by liquid Argon scintillation light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ettore Segreto

    2015-03-29

    TetraPhenyl Butadiene is the wavelength shifter most widely used in combination with liquid Argon. The latter emits scintillation photons with a wavelength of 127 nm that need to be downshifted to be detected by photomultipliers with glass or quartz windows. TetraPhenyl Butadiene has been demonstrated to have an extremely high conversion efficiency, possibly higher than 100 % for 127 nm photons, while there is no precise information about the time dependence of its emission. It is usually assumed to be exponentially decaying with a characteristic time of the order of one ns, as an extrapolation from measurements with exciting radiation in the near UV. This work shows that TetraPhenyl Butadiene, when excited by 127 nm photons, reemits photons not only with a very short decay time, but also with slower ones due to triplet states de-excitations. This fact can strongly contribute to clarify the anomalies in liquid Argon scintillation light reported in literature since seventies, namely the inconsistency in the measured values of the long decay time constant and the appearance of an intermediate component. Similar effects should be also expected when the TPB is used in combination with Helium and Neon, that emit scintillation photons with wavelengths shorter than 127 nm.

  19. Evidence of delayed light emission of TetraPhenyl Butadiene excited by liquid Argon scintillation light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segreto, Ettore

    2014-01-01

    TetraPhenyl Butadiene is the wavelength shifter most widely used in combination with liquid Argon. The latter emits scintillation photons with a wavelength of 127 nm that need to be downshifted to be detected by photomultipliers with glass or quartz windows. TetraPhenyl Butadiene has been demonstrated to have an extremely high conversion efficiency, possibly higher than 100% for 127 nm photons, while there is no precise information about the time dependence of its emission. It is usually assumed to be exponentially decaying with a characteristic time of the order of one ns, as an extrapolation from measurements with exciting radiation in the near UV. This work shows that TetraPhenyl Butadiene, when excited by 127 nm photons, reemits photons not only with a very short decay time, but also with slower ones due to triplet states de-excitations. This fact can strongly contribute to clarify the anomalies of liquid Argon scintillation light reported in literature since seventies, namely the inconsistency in the mea...

  20. SU-E-J-247: A Simulation of X-Ray Emission with Gold Nanoparticle Irradiated by Energetic Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newpower, M; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the proton induced X-ray emissions in gold-water mixture materials. Methods: In this study a Monte Carlo simulation was created using the GEANT4 toolkit (version 4.9.6). The geometry in this setup includes a 2 cm × 2 cm × 2 cm target, a scoring sphere (radius = 10 cm) and a 65 MeV planar proton source (2 cm × 2 cm). Four concentrations of a gold-water solution were irradiated with 5×10{sup 5} incident protons at a distance of 0.5 cm perpendicular to the surface of the target. The solutions of gold-water mixture had 10%, 5%, 1% and 0.5% of gold by mass, respectively. The number of photon emitting for the target was counted in the scoring sphere for the energy range of 0-86.0 keV in 0.1 keV bins. For this study the reference physics list PhysListEmStandard was used together with the x-ray fluorescence, Auger electron and PIXE (particle induced xray emission) options enabled. The range cuts for photons and electrons were set at 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm, respectively. Results: In the energy spectra of emitting X-ray fluorescence, peaks from gold K shell characteristic x-rays (68.8 and 66.9 keV) were observed. The number of counts under the peaks of Ka1 and Ka2 was found to increase with the increasing of the gold concentrations in the mixture materials. The X-ray yields (for both Ka1 and Ka2) when fitted with least-square method as a function of gold concentration demonstrate a linear dependency with R{sup 2} > 0.96. The Ka1yield per incident proton was found to be 0.0016 for 10% gold-water mixture solutions. Conclusion: This preliminary study with PIXE technique with gold nanoparticle has demonstrated potentials for its utilization in the development of range and dose verification methodology that is currently of great interest in the field of proton radiation therapy.

  1. Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project. III. Optical Continuum Emission and Broad-Band Time Delays in NGC 5548

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fausnaugh, M M; Barth, A J; Bentz, M C; Bottorff, M C; Carini, M T; Croxall, K V; De Rosa, G; Goad, M R; Horne, Keith; Joner, M D; Kaspi, S; Kim, M; Klimanov, S A; Kochanek, C S; Leonard, D C; Netzer, H; Peterson, B M; Schnulle, K; Sergeev, S G; Vestergaard, M; Zheng, W -K; Anderson, M D; Arevalo, P; Bazhaw, C; Borman, G A; Boroson, T A; Brandt, W N; Breeveld, A A; Brewer, B J; Cackett, E M; Crenshaw, D M; Bonta, E Dalla; De Lorenzo-Caceres, A; Dietrich, M; Edelson, R; Efimova, N V; Ely, J; Evans, P A; Filippenko, A V; Flatland, K; Gehrels, N; Geier, S; Gelbord, J M; Gonzalez, L; Gorjian, V; Grier, C J; Grupe, D; Hall, P B; Hicks, S; Horenstein, D; Hutchison, T; Im, M; Jensen, J J; Jones, J; Kaastra, J; Kelly, B C; Kennea, J A; Kim, S C; Korista, K T; Kriss, G A; Larionov, V M; Lee, J C; Lira, P; MacInnis, F; Manne-Nicholas, E R; Mathur, S; McHardy, I M; Montouri, C; Musso, R; Nazarov, S V; Norris, R P; Nousek, J A; Okhmat, D N; Pancoast, A; Papadakis, I; Parks, J R; Pei, L; Pogge, R W; Pott, J -U; Rafter, S E; Rix, H -W; Saylor, D A; Schimoia, J S; Siegel, M; Spencer, M; Starkey, D; Sung, H -I; Teems, K G; Treu, T; Turner, C S; Uttley, P; Villforth, C; Weiss, Y; Woo, J -H; Yan, H; Young, S; Zu, Y

    2015-01-01

    We present ground-based optical photometric monitoring data for NGC 5548, part of an extended multi-wavelength reverberation mapping campaign. The light curves have nearly daily cadence from 2014 January to July in nine filters ($BVRI$ and $ugriz$). Combined with UV data from the $Hubble$ $Space$ $Telescope$ and $Swift$, we confirm significant time delays between the continuum bands as a function of wavelength, extending the wavelength coverage from $1158\\,{\\rm \\AA}$ to the $z$-band ($\\sim\\! 9160\\,{\\rm \\AA}$). We find that the lags at wavelengths longer than the $V$ band are equal to or greater than the lags of high ionization-state emission lines (such as HeII$\\lambda 1640$ and $\\lambda 4686$), suggesting that the continuum emitting source is of a physical size comparable to the inner broad line region. The trend of lag with wavelength is broadly consistent with the prediction for continuum reprocessing by an accretion disk with $\\tau \\propto \\lambda^{4/3}$. However, the lags also imply a disk radius that is...

  2. New Proton Radioactivity Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    New Proton Radioactivity Measurements Richard J. Irvine Thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor to search for examples of proton emission from ground and low­lying states in odd­Z nuclei at the proton into a double­sided silicon strip detector system, where their subsequent particle decays (proton or alpha) were

  3. New Proton radioactivity measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irvine, Richard J

    1998-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out at Argonne National Laboratory to search for examples of proton emission from ground and low­lying states in odd­Z nuclei at the proton drip­line. Recoils from fusion evaporation ...

  4. {beta}-decay half-lives and {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities of nuclei in the region A < or approx. 110, relevant for the r process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, J.; Galaviz, D.; Matos, M.; Montes, F. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Hennrich, S.; Kessler, R.; Schertz, F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Virtuelles Institut fuer Struktur der Kerne and Nuklearer Astrophysik, Mainz (Germany); Aprahamian, A.; Quinn, M.; Woehr, A. [Institute of Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana (United States); Arndt, O.; Pfeiffer, B. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Virtuelles Institut fuer Struktur der Kerne and Nuklearer Astrophysik, Mainz (Germany); Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Estrade, A.; Lorusso, G.; Schatz, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Kratz, K.-L. [Virtuelles Institut fuer Struktur der Kerne and Nuklearer Astrophysik, Mainz (Germany); Max Planck Institut fuer Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, Mainz (Germany); Mantica, P. F. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Moeller, P. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico (United States)] (and others)

    2009-03-15

    Measurements of {beta}-decay properties of A < or approx. 110 r-process nuclei have been completed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. {beta}-decay half-lives for {sup 105}Y, {sup 106,107}Zr, and {sup 111}Mo, along with {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities of {sup 104}Y, {sup 109,110}Mo and upper limits for {sup 105}Y, {sup 103-107}Zr, and {sup 108,111}Mo have been measured for the first time. Studies on the basis of the quasi-random-phase approximation are used to analyze the ground-state deformation of these nuclei.

  5. Semiclassical Distorted Wave Model Analysis of Backward Proton Emission from $(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ Reactions at Intermediate Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. K. Gaidarov; Y. Watanabe; K. Ogata; M. Kohno; M. Kawai; A. N. Antonov

    2003-07-28

    A semiclassical distorted wave (SCDW) model with Wigner transform of one-body density matrix is presented for multistep direct $(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ reactions to the continuum. The model uses Wigner distribution functions obtained in methods which include nucleon-nucleon correlations to a different extent, as well as Woods-Saxon (WS) single-particle wave function. The higher momentum components of target nucleons that play a crucial role in reproducing the high-energy part of the backward proton spectra are properly taken into account. This SCDW model is applied to analyses of multistep direct processes in $^{12}$C$(p,p^{\\prime}x)$, $^{40}$Ca$(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ and $^{90}$Zr$(p,p^{\\prime}x)$ in the incident energy range of 150--392 MeV. The double differential cross sections are calculated up to three-step processes. The calculated angular distributions are in good agreement with the experimental data, in particular at backward angles where the previous SCDW calculations with the WS single-particle wave function showed large underestimation. It is found that the result with the Wigner distribution function based on the coherent density fluctuation model provides overall better agreement with the experimental data over the whole emission energies.

  6. Neutron and Proton Transverse Emission Ratio Measurements and the Density Dependence of the Asymmetry Term of the Nuclear Equation of State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Famiano; T. Liu; W. G. Lynch; M. Mocko; A. M. Rogers; M. B. Tsang; M. S. Wallace; R. J. Charity; S. Komarov; D. G. Sarantites; L. G. Sobotka; G. Verde

    2006-08-04

    Recent measurements of pre-equilibrium neutron and proton transverse emission from (112,124)Sn+(112,124)Sn reactions at 50 MeV/A have been completed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. Free nucleon transverse emission ratios are compared to those of A=3 mirror nuclei. Comparisons are made to BUU transport calculations and conclusions concerning the density dependence of the asymmetry term of the nuclear equation-of-state at sub-nuclear densities are made. The double-ratio of neutron-proton ratios between two reactions is employed as a means of reducing first-order Coulomb effects and detector efficiency effects. Comparison to BUU model predictions indicate a density dependence of the asymmetry energy that is closer to a form in which the asymmety energy increases as the square root of the density for the density region studied. A coalescent-invariant analysis is introduced as a means of reducing suggested difficulties with cluster emission in total nucleon emission. Future experimentation is presented.

  7. Non-thermal gamma-ray emission from delayed pair breakdown in a magnetized and photon-rich outflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, Ramandeep; Thompson, Christopher, E-mail: rgill@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    We consider delayed, volumetric heating in a magnetized outflow that has broken out of a confining medium and expanded to a high Lorentz factor (? ? 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}) and low optical depth to scattering (? {sub T} ? 10{sup –3}-10{sup –2}). The energy flux at breakout is dominated by the magnetic field, with a modest contribution from quasi-thermal gamma rays whose spectrum was calculated in Paper I. We focus on the case of extreme baryon depletion in the magnetized material, but allow for a separate baryonic component that is entrained from a confining medium. Dissipation is driven by relativistic motion between these two components, which develops once the photon compactness drops below 4 × 10{sup 3}(Y{sub e} /0.5){sup –1}. We first calculate the acceleration of the magnetized component following breakout, showing that embedded MHD turbulence provides significant inertia, the neglect of which leads to unrealistically high estimates of flow Lorentz factor. After reheating begins, the pair and photon distributions are evolved self-consistently using a one-zone kinetic code that incorporates an exact treatment of Compton scattering, pair production and annihilation, and Coulomb scattering. Heating leads to a surge in pair creation, and the scattering depth saturates at ? {sub T} ? 1-4. The plasma maintains a very low ratio of particle to magnetic pressure, and can support strong anisotropy in the charged particle distribution, with cooling dominated by Compton scattering. High-energy power-law spectra with photon indices in the range observed in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; –3 < ? < –3/2) are obtained by varying the ratio of heat input to the seed energy in quasi-thermal photons. We contrast our results with those for continuous heating across an expanding photosphere, and show that the latter model produces soft-to-hard evolution that is inconsistent with observations of GRBs.

  8. Research on anisotropy of fusion-produced protons and neutrons emission from high-current plasma-focus discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowski, K. Sadowski, M. J.; Szydlowski, A.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Czaus, K.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Zaloga, D.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.

    2015-01-15

    The paper concerns fast protons and neutrons from D-D fusion reactions in a Plasma-Focus-1000U facility. Measurements were performed with nuclear-track detectors arranged in “sandwiches” of an Al-foil and two PM-355 detectors separated by a polyethylene-plate. The Al-foil eliminated all primary deuterons, but was penetrable for fast fusion protons. The foil and first PM-355 detector were penetrable for fast neutrons, which were converted into recoil-protons in the polyethylene and recorded in the second PM-355 detector. The “sandwiches” were irradiated by discharges of comparable neutron-yields. Analyses of etched tracks and computer simulations of the fusion-products behavior in the detectors were performed.

  9. Delayed neutron energy spectrum measurements of actinide waste isotopes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comfort, Christopher M.

    1998-01-01

    was irradiated using the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). Three proton recoil detectors, operating individually, in conjunction with MCNP calculated response functions, were used to measure the delayed neutron energy spectra of each isotope...

  10. Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.Emilio Segrè About the LabEmission

  11. The proton microquasar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriela S. Vila; Gustavo E. Romero

    2008-10-06

    We present a model for high-energy emission in microquasars where the energy content of the jets is dominated by relativistic protons. We also include a primary leptonic component. Particles are accelerated up to relativistic energies in a compact region located near the base of the jet, where most of the emission is produced. We calculate the production spectrum due to proton and electron synchrotron radiation and photohadronic interactions. The target field for proton-photon collisions is provided by the synchrotron radiation in the acceleration region. In models with a significant leptonic component, strong internal photon-photon absorption can attenuate the emission spectrum at high energies. Depending on the values of the parameters, our model predicts luminosities in the range 10^34-10^37 erg s^-1 up to GeV energies, with a high-energy tail that can extend up to 10^16 eV. In some cases, however, absorption effects can completely suppress the emission above 10 GeV, giving rise to different spectral shapes. These results can be tested in the near future by observations with instruments like GLAST-Fermi, HESS II and MAGIC II.

  12. Decay of C-10 excited states above the 2p+2 alpha threshold and the contribution from "democratic" two-proton emission 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charity, R. J.; Mercurio, K.; Sobotka, L. G.; Elson, J. M.; Famiano, M.; Banu, A.; Fu, C.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    The decay of C-10 excited states to the 2p+2 alpha exit channel has been studied using an E/A=10.7 MeV C-10 beam inelastically scattered from a Be-9 target. Levels associated with two-proton decay to the ground state of Be-8 have been observed...

  13. Proton radioactivity half lives with Skyrme interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R. Routray; Abhishek Mishra; S. K. Tripathy; B. Behera; D. N. Basu

    2012-05-31

    The potential barrier impeding the spontaneous emission of protons in the proton radioactive nuclei is calculated as the sum of nuclear, Coulomb and centrifugal contributions. The nuclear part of the proton-nucleus interaction potential is obtained in the energy density formalism using Skyrme effective interaction that results into a simple algebraic expression. The half-lives of the proton emitters are calculated for the different Skyrme sets within the improved WKB framework. The results are found to be in reasonable agreement with the earlier results obtained for more complicated calculations involving finite range interactions.

  14. Proton core imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proton core imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion implosions J. L. De; published online 7 April 2006 A proton emission imaging system has been developed and used extensively the penetrating 14.7 MeV protons produced from D 3 He fusion reactions to produce emission images of the nuclear

  15. Proton radioactivity within a generalized liquid drop model J. M. Dong,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proton radioactivity within a generalized liquid drop model J. M. Dong,1 H. F. Zhang,1 and G. Royer) The proton radioactivity half-lives of spherical proton emitters are investigated theoretically. The potential barriers preventing the emission of proton are determined in the quasimolecular shape path within

  16. Proton Radiography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton Delivery and Removal in [Ni(P R 2 N R' 2 ) 2 ]

  17. Digital time delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  18. Micro-PIXE (proton-induced X-ray emission) study of the effects of fluoride on mineral distribution patterns in enamel and dentin in the developing hamster tooth germ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Tros, G.H.; Bronckers, A.L.; Woeltgens, J.H. (ACTA, Amsterdam (Netherland))

    1990-06-01

    Micro-PIXE (proton-induced X-ray emission) analysis was performed on unfixed and anhydrously prepared sections from developing enamel and dentin from hamsters injected with a single dose of 20 mg NaF/kg body weight. Fluoride, apart from inducing the formation of the characteristic paired response in the enamel (i.e., a hyper- followed by a hypomineralized band in the secretory enamel), also induces the formation of sub-ameloblastic cystic lesions under the transitional and early secretory enamel accompanied by relatively intense hypermineralization of the underlying cystic enamel surface. These cystic lesions, however, were only found to be associated with certain isolated populations of these cells. In addition, these lesions were restricted to the smooth surfaces of the tooth germ only. Cystic lesions such as those seen under the transitional and early secretory ameloblasts were not observed under the fully secretory or maturation stage ameloblasts. Why fluoride induces the formation of cystic lesions in some ameloblast populations while other cells in the same stage of development apparently remain unaffected, is a matter which needs further investigation.

  19. Beta-Delayed Proton Decay of C-9 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esterl, J. E.; Allred, D.; Cerny, J.; Sextro, R. G.; Hardy, John C.

    1972-01-01

    &M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Chair of Committee, Markus J. Peterson Committee Members, Nova J. Silvy William E. Grant Fred E. Smeins Head of Department, Michael P. Masser May... DEDICATION For all my family, back to the beginning. For Texas, her lands and people. Díky Boh? za zem? zaslíbené—Texas. v ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank my committee chair, Dr. Markus J. Peterson, and my committee members Drs. Nova J...

  20. Downhole delay assembly for blasting with series delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricketts, Thomas E. (Grand Junction, CO)

    1982-01-01

    A downhole delay assembly is provided which can be placed into a blasthole for initiation of explosive in the blasthole. The downhole delay assembly includes at least two detonating time delay devices in series in order to effect a time delay of longer than about 200 milliseconds in a round of explosions. The downhole delay assembly provides a protective housing to prevent detonation of explosive in the blasthole in response to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device. There is further provided a connection between the first and second time delay devices. The connection is responsive to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device and initiates the second detonating time delay device. A plurality of such downhole delay assemblies are placed downhole in unfragmented formation and are initiated simultaneously for providing a round of explosive expansions. The explosive expansions can be used to form an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles.

  1. Proton Angular Distribution for 90 Mev Neutron-proton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadley, James

    2010-01-01

    recoil protons in neutron -proton scattering at 90 Mev hasFOR 90 lWEV NEUTRON-PROTON SCATTERING James Hadley, Cecil E.

  2. Proton structure and tensor gluons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Savvidy

    2014-07-31

    We consider a possibility that inside the proton and, more generally, inside the hadrons there are additional partons - tensor-gluons, which can carry a part of the proton momentum. The tensor-gluons have zero electric charge, like gluons, but have a larger spin. Inside the proton a nonzero density of the tensor-gluons can be generated by the emission of tensor-gluons by gluons. The last mechanism is typical for non-Abelian tensor gauge theories, in which there exists a gluon-tensor-tensor vertex of order g. Therefore the number of gluons changes not only because a quark may radiate a gluon or because a gluon may split into a quark-antiquark pair or into two gluons, but also because a gluon can split into two tensor-gluons. The process of gluon splitting suggests that part of the proton momentum which was carried by neutral partons is shared between vector and tensor gluons. We derive evolution equations for the parton distribution functions which take into account these new processes. The momentum sum rule allows to find the tensor-gluons contribution to the Callan-Simanzik beta function and to calculate the corresponding anomalous dimensions. This contribution changes the behavior of the structure functions, and the logarithmic correction to the Bjorken scaling becomes more mild. This also influences the unification scale at which the coupling constants of the Standard Model merge, shifting its value to lower energies of order of 40 TeV.

  3. What's In a Proton?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  4. Fine Structure Studies in Proton Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |Final Reportthe Growing American Auto

  5. Particle production in proton-proton collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. T. Ghoneim; M. T. Hussein; F. H. Sawy

    2014-10-27

    In this work, we present a study of particle production in proton-proton collisions using data that are collected from many experiments of relative wide range of reaction energies. These data include production of pions and heavier particles; like keons and lambda hyperons. Proton-proton collision is a simple system to investigate and to be considered a starting point that guides to more complicated processes of production in the proton-nucleus and the nucleus-nucleus collisions. In this paper, we are interested in the mechanisms that describe the process of particle production over a wide range of interaction energy, and how the physics of production changes with changing energy. Besides, this work may raise a question: are heavier particles than pions produced via the same mechanism(s) of producing pions, or these are created differently, being different in masses and other physical properties?

  6. Proton transport model in the ionosphere. 2. Inuence of magnetic mirroring and collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Proton transport model in the ionosphere. 2. In¯uence of magnetic mirroring and collisions on the angular redistribution in a proton beam M. Galand1 , J. Lilensten2 , W. Kofman2 , D. Lummerzheim3 1 High in a proton/hydrogen beam by using a transport code in comparison with observations. H-emission Doppler pro

  7. Congestion delays at hub airports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. George, Martin J.

    1986-01-01

    A deterministic model was developed to study the effects of inefficient scheduling on flight delays at hub airports. The model bases the delay calculation on published schedule data and on user-defined airport capacities. ...

  8. Programmable Differential Delay Circuit With Fine Delay Adjustment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRyckere, John F. (Eau Claire, WI); Jenkins, Philip Nord (Eau Claire, WI); Cornett, Frank Nolan (Chippewa Falls, WI)

    2002-07-09

    Circuitry that provides additional delay to early arriving signals such that all data signals arrive at a receiving latch with same path delay. The delay of a forwarded clock reference is also controlled such that the capturing clock edge will be optimally positioned near quadrature (depending on latch setup/hold requirements). The circuitry continuously adapts to data and clock path delay changes and digital filtering of phase measurements reduce errors brought on by jittering data edges. The circuitry utilizes only the minimum amount of delay necessary to achieve objective thereby limiting any unintended jitter. Particularly, this programmable differential delay circuit with fine delay adjustment is designed to allow the skew between ASICS to be minimized. This includes skew between data bits, between data bits and clocks as well as minimizing the overall skew in a channel between ASICS.

  9. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  10. Broadband proton-decoupled proton spectra Andrew J. Pell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeler, James

    Broadband proton-decoupled proton spectra Andrew J. Pell , Richard A. E. Edden§ and James Keeler.ac.uk. #12;Abstract We present a new method for recording broadband proton-decoupled proton spectra with ab reduction in sensitivity when com- pared to a conventional proton spectrum. The method is demonstrated

  11. Electromagetic proton form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Y Hussein

    2006-10-31

    The electromagnetic form factors are crucial to our understanding of the proton internal structure, and thus provide a strong constraint of the distributions of the charge and magnetization current within the proton. We adopted the quark-parton model for calculating and understanding the charge structure of the proton interms of the electromagnetic form factors. A remarkable agreement with the available experimental evidence is found.

  12. Proton-Antiproton

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Dernière session du cours sur proton-antiproton du Cern Accelarator School. John Peoples, directeur de Fermilab fait un exposà suivi de questions.

  13. Proton Angular Distribution for 90 Mev Neutron-proton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadley, James

    2010-01-01

    3, 1947 The angular distribution of the recoil protons inneutron -proton scattering at 90 Mev has been measured forNO. W ..7405-Eng 48 PROTON .ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION FOR 90 lWEV

  14. Proton-Proton Scattering at 340 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chamberlain, Owen; Wiegand, Clyde

    2008-01-01

    on Nuclear Physics. Basil. High yner gy Neutron- protonand Proton~proton Scattering 9 Helv. Phys. Acta (in press J a review

  15. Soviet delays raise prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, I.

    1992-01-15

    The breakup of the Soviet Union is causing massive disruptions to methanol exports. The changeover to a Commonwealth of independent States has created logistical problems which have led some shipments of Russian methanol to be cancelled and delayed other deliveries by up to two weeks. In recent years the Soviet Union has exported 700,000 m.t./year-900,000 m.t./year of methanol, mainly to Western Europe. The product is made at 750,000-m.t./year plants at Tomsk and Gubakha in Russia and transported by rail for shipment from the ports of Ventspils, Latvia, on the Baltic Sea and Yuzhnyy in Ukraine, on the Black Sea. The exports were handled by state export agency Soyuzagrochim, mainly under contract to West European traders and consumers in areas like Scandinavia and France.

  16. A system for the measurement of delayed neutrons and gammas from special nuclear materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Andrews, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Goorley, J. T.; Kelly, D. G.

    2014-11-27

    The delayed neutron counting (DNC) system at the Royal Military College of Canada has been upgraded to accommodate concurrent delayed neutron and gamma measurements. This delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) system uses a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor to irradiate fissile materials before their transfer to a counting arrangement consisting of six ³He and one HPGe detector. The application of this system is demonstrated in an example where delayed neutron and gamma emissions are used in complement to examine ²³³U content and determine fissile mass with an average relative error and accuracy of -2.2 and 1.5 %, respectively.

  17. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Albert D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  18. Proton radioactivity within a generalized liquid drop model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Dong; H. F. Zhang; G. Royer

    2009-06-02

    The proton radioactivity half-lives of spherical proton emitters are investigated theoretically. The potential barriers preventing the emission of protons are determined in the quasimolecular shape path within a generalized liquid drop model (GLDM) including the proximity effects between nuclei in a neck and the mass and charge asymmetry. The penetrability is calculated with the WKB approximation. The spectroscopic factor has been taken into account in half-life calculation, which is obtained by employing the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory combined with the BCS method with the force NL3. The half-lives within the GLDM are compared with the experimental data and other theoretical values. The GLDM works quite well for spherical proton emitters when the spectroscopic factors are considered, indicating the necessity of introducing the spectroscopic factor and the success of the GLDM for proton emission. Finally, we present two formulas for proton emission half-life calculation similar to the Viola-Seaborg formulas and Royer's formulas of alpha decay.

  19. Tensor gluons and proton structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Savvidy

    2014-12-14

    In a recent article we were considering a possibility that inside a proton and, more generally, inside hadrons there could be additional partons - tensor-gluons, which carry a part of the proton momentum. Tensor-gluons have zero electric charge, like gluons, but have a larger spin. Therefore we call them tensor-gluons. The nonzero density of tensor-gluons can be generated by the emission of tensor-gluons by gluons. Tensor-gluons can further split into the pairs of tensor-gluons through a different channels. To describe all these processes one should know the general splitting probabilities for tensor-gluons. These probabilities should fulfill very general symmetry relations, which we were able to resolve by introducing a splitting index. This approach allows to find out the general form of the splitting functions, to derive corresponding DGLAP evolution equations and to calculate the one-loop Callan-Simanzik beta function for tensor-gluons of a given spin. Our results provide a nontrivial consistency check of the theory and of the Callan-Simanzik beta function calculations, because the theory has a unique coupling constant and its high energy behavior should be universal for all particles of the spectrum. We argue that the contribution of all spins into the beta function vanishes leading to a conformal invariant theory at very high energies.

  20. Proton Radius Puzzle 1 Muonic hydrogen and the proton radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Proton Radius Puzzle 1 Muonic hydrogen and the proton radius puzzle Randolf Pohl Max-681 Warsaw, Poland Key Words Laser Spectroscopy, Atomic Physics, Proton Structure, Exotic Atoms, Nuclear extraction of the proton radius by Pohl et al. from the mea- #12;Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 2013, Vol. 63

  1. Investigation of proton focusing and conversion efficiency for proton fast ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartal, Teresa Jean

    2012-01-01

    2.2 Proton Acceleration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .plasma (LSP) simulations . . Proton Focusing and ConversionProton Focusing and Conversion Efficiency with Hemispherical

  2. Pseudofunctional Delay Tests For High Quality Small Delay Defect Testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lahiri, Shayak

    2012-02-14

    Testing integrated circuits to verify their operating frequency, known as delay testing, is essential to achieve acceptable product quality. The high cost of functional testing has driven the industry to automatically-generated ...

  3. Muon-proton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Borie

    2013-02-05

    A recent proposal to measure the proton form factor by means of muon-proton scattering will use muons which are not ultrarelativistic (and also not nonrelativistic). The usual equations describing the scattering cross section use the approximation that the scattered lepton (usually an electron) is ultrarelativistic, with v/c approximately equal to 1. Here the cross section is calculated for all values of the energy. It agrees with the standard result in the appropriate limit.

  4. Polarized Proton Nucleus Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Z. Kopeliovich; T. L. Trueman

    2001-05-28

    We show that, to a very good approximation, the ratio of the spin-flip to the non-flip parts of the elastic proton-nucleus amplitude is the same as for proton-nucleon scattering at very high energy. The result is used to do a realistic calculation of the analyzing power A_N for pC scattering in the Coulomb-nuclear interference (CNI) region of momentum transfer.

  5. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  6. Analytical applications for delayed neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eccleston, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical formulations that describe the time dependence of neutron populations in nuclear materials contain delayed-neutron dependent terms. These terms are important because the delayed neutrons, even though their yields in fission are small, permit control of the fission chain reaction process. Analytical applications that use delayed neutrons range from simple problems that can be solved with the point reactor kinetics equations to complex problems that can only be solved with large codes that couple fluid calculations with the neutron dynamics. Reactor safety codes, such as SIMMER, model transients of the entire reactor core using coupled space-time neutronics and comprehensive thermal-fluid dynamics. Nondestructive delayed-neutron assay instruments are designed and modeled using a three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code. Calculations on high-burnup spent fuels and other materials that contain a mix of uranium and plutonium isotopes require accurate and complete information on the delayed-neutron periods, yields, and energy spectra. A continuing need exists for delayed-neutron parameters for all the fissioning isotopes.

  7. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to

  8. Analysis of incident-energy dependence of delayed neutron yields in actinides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasir, Mohamad Nasrun bin Mohd Metorima, Kouhei Ohsawa, Takaaki Hashimoto, Kengo

    2015-04-29

    The changes of delayed neutron yields (?{sub d}) of Actinides have been analyzed for incident energy up to 20MeV using realized data of precursor after prompt neutron emission, from semi-empirical model, and delayed neutron emission probability data (P{sub n}) to carry out a summation method. The evaluated nuclear data of the delayed neutron yields of actinide nuclides are still uncertain at the present and the cause of the energy dependence has not been fully understood. In this study, the fission yields of precursor were calculated considering the change of the fission fragment mass yield based on the superposition of fives Gaussian distribution; and the change of the prompt neutrons number associated with the incident energy dependence. Thus, the incident energy dependent behavior of delayed neutron was analyzed.The total number of delayed neutron is expressed as ?{sub d}=?Y{sub i} • P{sub ni} in the summation method, where Y{sub i} is the mass yields of precursor i and P{sub ni} is the delayed neutron emission probability of precursor i. The value of Y{sub i} is derived from calculation of post neutron emission mass distribution using 5 Gaussian equations with the consideration of large distribution of the fission fragments. The prompt neutron emission ?{sub p} increases at higher incident-energy but there are two different models; one model says that the fission fragment mass dependence that prompt neutron emission increases uniformly regardless of the fission fragments mass; and the other says that the major increases occur at heavy fission fragments area. In this study, the changes of delayed neutron yields by the two models have been investigated.

  9. High resolution 20 GHz wideband delay generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    High resolution 20 GHz wideband delay generator S.L. Morton, K. Elliott and M. Rodwell A digitally resolution beamsteering applications, a delay generator is required to have a resolution better than 0.25 ps for a signal of 1.8 GHz. In 1989, Otsuji and Narumi [3] fabricated delay lines for delay generation, using

  10. Linear rotary optical delay lines Maksim Skorobogatiy*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    Linear rotary optical delay lines Maksim Skorobogatiy* Department of Engineering Physics, École of analytical and semi-analytical solutions for the design of high-speed rotary optical delay lines that use of optical delay. Finally, two prototypes of rotary delay lines were fabricated using CNC machining

  11. Cavity enhanced rephased amplified spontaneous emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis A Williamson; Jevon J Longdell

    2014-05-20

    Amplified spontaneous emission is usually treated as an incoherent noise process. Recent theoretical and experimental work using rephasing optical pulses has shown that rephased amplified spontaneous emission (RASE) is a potential source of wide bandwidth time-delayed entanglement. Due to poor echo efficiency the plain RASE protocol doesn't in theory achieve perfect entanglement. Experiments done to date show a very small amount of entanglement at best. Here we show that rephased amplified spontaneous emission can, in principle, produce perfect multimode time-delayed two mode squeezing when the active medium is placed inside a Q-switched cavity.

  12. Proton Bunching Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.B.

    2009-10-19

    Muon Colliders need intense, very short, proton bunches. The requirements are presented and a number of possible bunching systems discussed. The best solution uses a small super-conducting buncher ring with 6 bunches that are taken though separate transports and combined on the target.

  13. On the Proton charge extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gluck

    2015-02-03

    It is shown that the recent determination of the various proton charge extensions is compatible with Standard Model expectations.

  14. Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proton therapy. March 25, 2013 Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head. Proton radiography,...

  15. Fast Proton Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tianjun Li; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Joel W. Walker

    2010-09-10

    We consider proton decay in the testable flipped SU(5) X U(1)_X models with TeV-scale vector-like particles which can be realized in free fermionic string constructions and F-theory model building. We significantly improve upon the determination of light threshold effects from prior studies, and perform a fresh calculation of the second loop for the process p \\to e^+ \\pi^0 from the heavy gauge boson exchange. The cumulative result is comparatively fast proton decay, with a majority of the most plausible parameter space within reach of the future Hyper-Kamiokande and DUSEL experiments. Because the TeV-scale vector-like particles can be produced at the LHC, we predict a strong correlation between the most exciting particle physics experiments of the coming decade.

  16. Smashing Protons to Smithereens

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Marc-André Pleier

    2010-09-01

    Pleier discusses the extraordinary research taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ? the world?s newest, biggest, and highest energy particle accelerator located at CERN. Pleier is one of hundreds of researchers from around the world working on ATLAS, a seven-story particle detector positioned at a point where the LHC?s oppositely circulating beams of protons slam into one another head-on.

  17. High Quality Compact Delay Test Generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zheng

    2011-08-08

    Delay testing is used to detect timing defects and ensure that a circuit meets its timing specifications. The growing need for delay testing is a result of the advances in deep submicron (DSM) semiconductor technology and the increase in clock...

  18. Uncertainty evaluation of delayed neutron decay parameters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jinkai

    2009-05-15

    In a nuclear reactor, delayed neutrons play a critical role in sustaining a controllable chain reaction. Delayed neutron’s relative yields and decay constants are very important for modeling reactivity control and have been studied for decades...

  19. A Fast Algorithm for Nonstationary Delay Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Hing-Cheung

    to the explicit time delay estimator (ETDE) algorithm 4] but it is more computationally e cient and provides more

  20. Dynamical Systems with Delays Benefits and Detriments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to what the system has exhibited in the past, and current information signals actually are not available Geographical Location 1 Production DELAY Headquarters Ordering Information Exchanging Decision Making DELAY1 Dynamical Systems with Delays Benefits and Detriments I. INTRODUCTION A feedback control system

  1. Dynamical Systems with Delays Benefits and Detriments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    delays arise Manufacturer Geographical Location 1 Production DELAY Headquarters Ordering Information1 Dynamical Systems with Delays Benefits and Detriments I. INTRODUCTION A feedback control system is composed of a process to be controlled, a set of sensors with access to information signals from the plant

  2. SPONTANEOUS AND EXPLICIT ESTIMATION OF TIME DELAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Hing-Cheung

    , called the explicit time delay estimator (ETDE), is rst developed to nd the di erential delay of a signal through only one propagation path. Basically, the ETDE is an adaptive FIR lter whose coe cients it can provide direct delay measurements on a sample-by-sample basis. The ETDE performance surface

  3. HYDROXYCARBENE (HCOH) AND PROTONATED FORMALDEHYDE: TWO POTENTIALLY OBSERVABLE INTERSTELLAR MOLECULES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer III., Henry F.

    2012-01-01

    HCOH) AND PROTONATED FORMALDEHYDE: TWO POTENTIALLYHCOH) and Protonated Formaldehyde: Two Potentiallyisomer of protonated formaldehyde H ""- c -0 _-H_ H. /

  4. New Type of Asymmetric Fission in Proton-Rich Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Elseviers, J.; Huyse, M.; Van Duppen, P.; Bree, N.; Cocolios, T. E.; Diriken, J.; Ivanov, O.; Van den Bergh, P.; Antalic, S.; Barzakh, A.; Fedorov, D.; Comas, V. F.; Heredia, J. A.; Fedosseev, V.; Marsh, B. A.; Van De Walle, J.; Franchoo, S.; Nishio, K.

    2010-12-17

    A very exotic process of {beta}-delayed fission of {sup 180}Tl is studied in detail by using resonant laser ionization with subsequent mass separation at ISOLDE (CERN). In contrast to common expectations, the fission-fragment mass distribution of the post-{beta}-decay daughter nucleus {sup 180}Hg (N/Z=1.25) is asymmetric. This asymmetry is more surprising since a mass-symmetric split of this extremely neutron-deficient nucleus would lead to two {sup 90}Zr fragments, with magic N=50 and semimagic Z=40. This is a new type of asymmetric fission, not caused by large shell effects related to fragment magic proton and neutron numbers, as observed in the actinide region. The newly measured branching ratio for {beta}-delayed fission of {sup 180}Tl is 3.6(7)x10{sup -3}%, approximately 2 orders of magnitude larger than in an earlier study.

  5. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProtein Dynamics Hit theProton Channel Orientation

  6. Fault simulation and test generation for small delay faults 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Wangqi

    2007-04-25

    Delay faults are an increasingly important test challenge. Traditional delay fault models are incomplete in that they model only a subset of delay defect behaviors. To solve this problem, a more realistic delay fault model has been developed which...

  7. PROTON BEAM REQUIREMENTS FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Table 1 summarizes the NF proton driver parameters obtainedboth facilities. Table 1. Proton driver requirements for arepetition frequency (Hz) Proton energy (GeV) Proton rms

  8. Two-Pion Production in Proton-Proton Collisions with Polarized Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Abd El-Bary; S. Abd El-Samad; R. Bilger; K. -Th. Brinkmann; H. Clement; M. Dietrich; E. Doroshkevich; S. Dshemuchadse; A. Erhardt; W. Eyrich; A. Filippi; H. Freiesleben; M. Fritsch; R. Geyer; A. Gillitzer; C. Hanhart; J. Hauffe; K. Haug; D. Hesselbarth; R. Jaekel; B. Jakob; L. Karsch; K. Kilian; H. Koch; J. Kress; E. Kuhlmann; S. Marcello; S. Marwinski; R. Meier; K. Moeller; H. P. Morsch; L. Naumann; J. Ritman; E. Roderburg; P. Schoenmeier; M. Schulte-Wissermann; W. Schroeder; M. Steinke; F. Stinzing; G. Y. Sun; J. Waechter; G. J. Wagner; M. Wagner; U. Weidlich; A. Wilms; P. Wintz; S. Wirth; G. Zhang; P. Zupranski

    2008-06-24

    The two-pion production reaction $\\vec{p}p\\to pp\\pi^+\\pi^-$ was measured with a polarized proton beam at $T_p \\approx$ 750 and 800 MeV using the short version of the COSY-TOF spectrometer. The implementation of a delayed pulse technique for Quirl and central calorimeter provided positive $\\pi^+$ identification in addition to the standard particle identification, energy determination as well as time-of-flight and angle measurements. Thus all four-momenta of the emerging particles could be determined with 1-4 overconstraints. Total and differential cross sections as well as angular distributions of the vector analyzing power have been obtained. They are compared to previous data and theoretical calculations. In contrast to predictions we find significant analyzing power values up to $A_y$ = 0.3.

  9. Proton slip in the ATP synthase of Rhodobacter capsulatus: induction, proton conduction, and nucleotide dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    Proton slip in the ATP synthase of Rhodobacter capsulatus: induction, proton conduction. Uncoupled proton leakage (slip) has only been observed in chloroplast enzyme at unphysiologically low nucleotide concentration. We investigated the properties of proton slip in chromatophores (sub

  10. A signature of EeV protons of Galactic origin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinyakov, P G; Ivanov, D; Thomson, G B; Tirone, A H

    2015-01-01

    We investigate signatures that would be produced in the spectrum and sky distribution of UHECR by a population of the Galactic sources of high-energy protons in the energy range around 1 EeV, i.e., around the diffusive-to-ballistic transition. In this regime, the CR flux has to be calculated numerically. We employ the approach that consists in backtracking anti-protons from Earth through the Galaxy and integrating the source emissivity along the trajectory. This approach makes evident two generic features of the transition region: sharp increase of the total flux as the energy decreases across the transition region, and its strong anisotropy (appearance of a bright compact spot) all the way until the onset of the diffusive regime. We then discuss and compare several methods to experimentally detect or constrain these features. We find that a few percent admixture of the Galactic protons can in principle be detected by the current UHECR experiments.

  11. Controlling the Delay of Small Flows in Datacenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carra, Damiano

    and CAPEX and ignore designs which could help reduce delay of delay sensitive flows. The flow routing

  12. Testing the Delayed Gamma Capability in MCNP6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weldon, Robert A.; Fensin, Michael L.; Mckinney, Gregg W.

    2014-01-01

    The mission of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office is to quickly and reliably detect unauthorized attempts to import or transport special nuclear material for use against the United States. Developing detection equipment to meet this objective requires accurate simulation of both the detectable signature and detection mechanism. A delayed particle capability was initially added to MCNPX 2.6.A in 2005 to sample the radioactive fission product parents and emit decay particles resulting from the decay chain. To meet the objectives of detection scenario modelling, the capability was designed to sample a particular time for emitting particular multiplicity of a particular energy. Because the sampling process of selecting both time and energy is interdependent, to linearize the time and emission sampling, atom densities are computed at several discrete time steps, and the time integrated production is computed by multiplying the atom density by the decay constant and time step size to produce a cumulative distribution function for sampling the emission time, energy and multiplicity. The delayed particle capability was initially given a time bin structure to help reasonably reproduce, from a qualitative sense, a fission benchmark by D. Beddingfield, which examined the delayed gamma emission. This original benchmark was only qualitative and did not contain the magnitudes of the actual measured data, but did contain relative graphical representation of the spectra. A better benchmark with measured data was later provided by A. W.Hunt, Vladimir Mozin, E.T.E. Reedy, H.A. Selpel and Steve Tobin at the Idaho Accelerator Center; however, due to the complexity of the benchmark setup, sizable systematic errors were expected in the modeling, and initial results compared to MCNPX 2.7.0 showed errors outside of statistical fluctuation. Presented here is a more simplified approach to benchmarking, utilizing closed form analytic solutions to the granddaughter equations for 2 particular sets of decay systems. We examine five different decay chains (two stage decay to stable), and show the predictability of the MCNP6 delayed gamma feature. Results do show that while the default delayed gamma calculations available in the MCNP6 1.0 release can give accurate results for some isotopes (e.g. Ba-137), the percent differences between the closed form analytic solutions and the MCNP6 calculations were often greater than 40% (Mg-28, Al-28, K- 42, Ca-47, Sc-47, Co-60). With the MNCP6 1.1 Beta release, the 10th entry on the DBCN card allows improved calculation within less than 5% as compared to the closed form analytic solutions for immediate parent emissions and transient equilibrium systems. While the 10th entry on the DBCN card for MCNP6 1.1 gives much better results for transient equilibrium systems and parent emissions in general, it did little to improve daughter emissions of secular equilibrium systems. Hypotheses were presented as to why daughter emissions of secular equilibrium systems might be mispredicted in some cases and not in others.

  13. Elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering: analysis of complete set of helicity amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Okorokov; S. B. Nurushev

    2007-11-14

    The differential cross-sections are calculated for proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering using the phenomenological model based on the analytic parameterizations for global scattering parameters (total cross-section and $\\rho$ - parameter), crossing symmetry and derivative relations. We confront our model predictions with experimental data in wide range of energy and momentum transfer. The suggested method may be useful for PAX Program (GSI) as well as for high-energy experiments at RHIC and LHC.

  14. Treatment of the proton-proton Coulomb force in proton-deuteron breakup Faddeev calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Witala; R. Skibinski; J. Golak; W. Glockle

    2009-06-17

    We extend our approach to incorporate the proton-proton (pp) Coulomb force into the three-nucleon (3N) Faddeev calculations from elastic proton-deuteron (pd) scattering to the breakup process. The main new ingredient is a 3-dimensional screened pp Coulomb t-matrix obtained by a numerical solution of the 3-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger equation. We demonstrate numerically that the proton-deuteron breakup observables can be determined from the resulting on-shell 3N amplitudes increasing the screening radius. However, contrary to the pd elastic scattering, the screening limit exists only after renormalisation of the pp t-matrices.

  15. Proton-proton correlations observed in two-proton decay of $^{19}$Mg and $^{16}$Ne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Mukha; L. Grigorenko; K. Summerer; L. Acosta; M. A. G. Alvarez; E. Casarejos; A. Chatillon; D. Cortina-Gil; J. Espino; A. Fomichev; J. E. Garcia-Ramos; H. Geissel; J. Gomez-Camacho; J. Hofmann; O. Kiselev; A. Korsheninnikov; N. Kurz; Yu. Litvinov; I. Martel; C. Nociforo; W. Ott; M. Pfutzner; C. Rodriguez-Tajes; E. Roeckl; M. Stanoiu; H. Weick; P. J. Woods

    2008-02-28

    Proton-proton correlations were observed for the two-proton decays of the ground states of $^{19}$Mg and $^{16}$Ne. The trajectories of the respective decay products, $^{17}$Ne+p+p and $^{14}$O+p+p, were measured by using a tracking technique with microstrip detectors. These data were used to reconstruct the angular correlations of fragments projected on planes transverse to the precursor momenta. The measured three-particle correlations reflect a genuine three-body decay mechanism and allowed us to obtain spectroscopic information on the precursors with valence protons in the $sd$ shell.

  16. Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    11 Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam: Lessons for the NextFACT08NuFACT08 ­­ 4 July4 July S. ChildressS. Childress ­­ Proton BeamsProton Beams 22 Presentation OutlinePresentation Outline Key Proton Beam ConsiderationsKey Proton Beam Considerations The First

  17. Delayed feedback control of unstable steady states with high-frequency modulation of the delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandar Gjurchinovski; Thomas Jüngling; Viktor Urumov; Eckehard Schöll

    2013-08-21

    We analyze the stabilization of unstable steady states by delayed feedback control with a periodic time-varying delay in the regime of a high-frequency modulation of the delay. The average effect of the delayed feedback term in the control force is equivalent to a distributed delay in the interval of the modulation, and the obtained distribution depends on the type of the modulation. In our analysis we use a simple generic normal form of an unstable focus, and investigate the effects of phase-dependent coupling and the influence of the control loop latency on the controllability. In addition, we have explored the influence of the modulation of the delays in multiple delay feedback schemes consisting of two independent delay lines of Pyragas type. A main advantage of the variable delay is the considerably larger domain of stabilization in parameter space.

  18. Proton Decay and the Planck Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    LBNL- 56556 PROTON DECAY AND THE PLANCK SCALE DANIEL T.ph/0410035v1 2 Oct 2004 PROTON DECAY AND THE PLANCK SCALE ?without grand uni?cation, proton decay can be a powerful

  19. Deficiency in Homologous Recombination Renders Mammalian Cells More Sensitive to Proton Versus Photon Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosse, Nicole; Fontana, Andrea O. [Laboratory for Molecular Radiobiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Hug, Eugen B.; Lomax, Antony; Coray, Adolf [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Augsburger, Marc [Laboratory for Molecular Radiobiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sartori, Alessandro A. [Institute of Molecular Cancer Research, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Pruschy, Martin, E-mail: martin.pruschy@usz.ch [Laboratory for Molecular Radiobiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of the 2 major DNA repair machineries on cellular survival in response to irradiation with the 2 types of ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: The DNA repair and cell survival endpoints in wild-type, homologous recombination (HR)-deficient, and nonhomologous end-joining-deficient cells were analyzed after irradiation with clinically relevant, low-linear energy transfer (LET) protons and 200-keV photons. Results: All cell lines were more sensitive to proton irradiation compared with photon irradiation, despite no differences in the induction of DNA breaks. Interestingly, HR-deficient cells and wild-type cells with small interfering RNA-down-regulated Rad51 were markedly hypersensitive to proton irradiation, resulting in an increased relative biological effectiveness in comparison with the relative biological effectiveness determined in wild-type cells. In contrast, lack of nonhomologous end-joining did not result in hypersensitivity toward proton irradiation. Repair kinetics of DNA damage in wild-type cells were equal after both types of irradiation, although proton irradiation resulted in more lethal chromosomal aberrations. Finally, repair kinetics in HR-deficient cells were significantly delayed after proton irradiation, with elevated amounts of residual ?H2AX foci after irradiation. Conclusion: Our data indicate a differential quality of DNA damage by proton versus photon irradiation, with a specific requirement for homologous recombination for DNA repair and enhanced cell survival. This has potential relevance for clinical stratification of patients carrying mutations in the DNA damage response pathways.

  20. Cosmic Ray Protons Illuminate Dark Matter Axions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Tam; Q. Yang

    2011-08-16

    Cosmic ray protons propagating in a spatially-homogeneous but time-dependent field of axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) emit photons in a way that is reminiscent of Cherenkov radiation by charged particles in a preferred background. We compute the emission rate and energy spectrum of the photons, and discuss the possibility of their detection using the Square Kilometre Array which is currently under construction. In the case of a non-detection, constraints can be placed on the parameter space of ALPs whose mass lie between $10^{-7}$eV and $10^{-5}$ eV under the assumption that they are the primary constituent of dark matter.

  1. Proton and Neutrino Extragalactic Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Lipari

    2008-08-04

    The study of extragalactic sources of high energy radiation via the direct measurement of the proton and neutrino fluxes that they are likely to emit is one of the main goals for the future observations of the recently developed air showers detectors and neutrino telescopes. In this work we discuss the relation between the inclusive proton and neutrino signals from the ensemble of all sources in the universe, and the resolved signals from the closest and brightest objects. We also compare the sensitivities of proton and neutrino telescopes and comment on the relation between these two new astronomies.

  2. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above injection, the polarized hydrogen jet target runs for every fill with both beams. Based on the known analyzing power, there is very little polarization loss between injection and 100 GeV. An alternative way is to measure the asymmetry at 100 GeV followed by ramping up to 250 GeV and back down to 100 GeV and then to measure the asymmetry again at 100 GeV. If the asymmetry after the down ramp is similar to the measurement before the up ramp, polarization was also preserved during the ramp to 250 GeV. The analyzing power at storage energy can then be extracted from the asymmetries measured at 100 GeV and 250 GeV. The tune and orbit feedbacks are essential for the down ramp to be possible. The polarized proton operation is still going on. We will push bunch intensity higher until reaching the beam-beam limit. The even higher intensity will have to wait for the electron lenses to compensate the beam-beam effect. To understand the details of spin dynamics in RHIC with two snakes, spin simulation with the real magnet fields have been developed recently. The study will provide guidance for possible polarization loss schemes. Further polarization gain will requires a polarized source upgrade; more careful setup jump quads in the AGS to get full benefit; and control emittance in the whole accelerator chain.

  3. OPTIMAL POWER/DELAY TRADE-OFFS IN WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SMALL DELAY ASYMPTOTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Randall

    OPTIMAL POWER/DELAY TRADE-OFFS IN WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS ­ SMALL DELAY ASYMPTOTICS Randall A@ece.northwestern.edu ABSTRACT In this paper we consider the optimal trade-off between av- erage transmission power and average the behavior of this trade-off in the regime of asymptotically large power and small delay. Our focus

  4. Optimal power-delay trade-offs in fading channels -small delay asymptotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Randall

    1 Optimal power-delay trade-offs in fading channels - small delay asymptotics Randall A. Berry Dept, we study the behavior of the optimal power-delay trade-off for a single user in the regime@ece.northwestern.edu Abstract When transmitting stochastically arriving data over fading channels there is an inherent trade

  5. Isochronal synchronization of delay-coupled systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ira B. Schwartz; Leah B. Shaw

    2007-02-25

    We consider small network models for mutually delay-coupled systems which typically do not exhibit stable isochronally synchronized solutions. We show that for certain coupling architectures which involve delayed self feedback to the nodes, the oscillators become isochronally synchronized. Applications are shown for both incoherent pump coupled lasers and spatio-temporal coupled fiber ring lasers.

  6. MODEL DG535 Digital Delay / Pulse Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    MODEL DG535 Digital Delay / Pulse Generator 1290-D Reamwood Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089 U.S.A. Phone/2000 #12;i DG535 DIGITAL DELAY / PULSE GENERATOR OPERATION AND SERVICE MANUAL Table of Contents CONDENSED Sequence Sheet #4 Rate Generators Sheet #5 Power Supply and Dropout Detection Sheet #6 System Connectors

  7. DELAY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS IN SINGLE SPECIES DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, Shigui

    dynamics. Let x(t) denote the population size at time t; let b and d denote the birth rate and death rate Equations 10. Periodicity 11. State Dependent Delays 12. Diffusive Models with Delay References O. Arino et rate of the population. The solution of equation (1.1) with an initial population x(0) = x0 is given

  8. Mining Train Delays Boris Cule1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antwerpen, Universiteit

    Mining Train Delays Boris Cule1 , Bart Goethals1 , Sven Tassenoy2 , and Sabine Verboven2,1 1, Belgium 2 INFRABEL - Network, Department of Innovation, Barastraat 110, 1070 Brussels, Belgium Keywords Pattern Mining, Data Analysis, Train Delays Abstract The Belgian railway network has a high traffic

  9. Proton Solvation and Proton Mobility Department of Physical Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Research Center,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agmon, Noam

    Proton Solvation and Proton Mobility NOAM AGMON Department of Physical Chemistry and the Fritz for proton solvation and proton mobility is analyzed and the results are compared with recent simulations. Three factors con­ tribute to differences in proton solvation energies: hydrogen­bond cleavage, changes

  10. Proton form factors and two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proton form factors and two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering A. V Perspectives of High Energy Physics" Alexander Gramolin (Budker INP) Proton form factors and 2-exchange. . . September 4, 2010 1 / 18 #12;Proton electromagnetic form factors The proton's electric GE (Q2 ) and magnetic

  11. One proton, two proton, and alpha emission from 14o+alpha resonance interactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Changbo

    2009-05-15

    provides a new way to measure astrophysically important reactions which involve radioactive nuclei and a particles. By analyzing elastic scattering of 14O and 14C on 4He, a-cluster states in 18Ne* and 18O* were found. Some a-cluster states in 18Ne* were...

  12. Tarmac delay policies : a passenger-centric analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderboll, Allison Elizabeth (Allison Sunny Elizabeth)

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the effectiveness of the 2010 Tarmac Delay Rule from a passenger-centric point of view. The Tarmac Delay Rule aims to protect enplaned passengers on commercial aircraft from excessively long delays ...

  13. The Beta-Delayed Proton and Gamma Decay of 27P 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Ellen Nicole

    2013-12-06

    branching ratio was estimated (0.155(3)% – 0.163(3)%). There was, however, a noticeable ’bulge’ in the energy region around 300–400 keV, suggesting that there is potentially valuable information yet to be properly identified. This will require a detector...

  14. On the proton charge extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesse R. Stryker; Gerald A. Miller

    2015-08-26

    We examine how corrections to $S$-state energy levels, $ E_{nS}$, in hydrogenic atoms due to the finite proton size are affected by moments of the proton charge distribution. The corrections to $E_{nS}$ are computed moment by moment. The results demonstrate that the next-to-leading order term in the expansion is of order $r_p / a_B $ times the size of the leading order $ \\langle r_p^2 \\rangle $ term. Our analysis thus dispels any concern that the larger relative size of this term for muonic hydrogen versus electronic hydrogen might account for the outstanding discrepancy of proton radius measurements extracted from the two systems. Furthermore, the next-to-leading order term in powers of $r_p / a_B $ that we derive from a dipole proton form factor is proportional to $\\langle r_p^3 \\rangle $, rather than $\\langle r_p^4 \\rangle$ as would be expected from the scalar nature of the form factor. The dependence of the finite-size correction on $\\langle r_p^3 \\rangle $ and higher odd-power moments is shown to be a general result for any spherically symmetric proton charge distribution. A method for computing the moment expansion of the finite-size correction to arbitrary order is introduced and the results are tabulated for principal quantum numbers up to $n=7$.

  15. Proton irradiation effect on SCDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan-Ji Yang; Jing-Bin Lu; Yu-Sa Wang; Yong Chen; Yu-Peng Xu; Wei-Wei Cui; Wei Li; Zheng-Wei Li; Mao-Shun Li; Xiao-Yan Liu; Juan Wang; Da-Wei Han; Tian-Xiang Chen; Cheng-Kui Li; Jia Huo; Wei Hu; Yi Zhang; Bo Lu; Yue Zhu; Ke-Yan Ma; Di Wu; Yan Liu; Zi-Liang Zhang; Guo-He Yin; Yu Wang

    2014-04-19

    The Low Energy X-ray Telescope is a main payload on the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope satellite. The swept charge device is selected for the Low Energy X-ray Telescope. As swept charge devices are sensitive to proton irradiation, irradiation test was carried out on the HI-13 accelerator at the China Institute of Atomic Energy. The beam energy was measured to be 10 MeV at the SCD. The proton fluence delivered to the SCD was $3\\times10^{8}\\mathrm{protons}/\\mathrm{cm}^{2}$ over two hours. It is concluded that the proton irradiation affects both the dark current and the charge transfer inefficiency of the SCD through comparing the performance both before and after the irradiation. The energy resolution of the proton-irradiated SCD is 212 eV@5.9 keV at $-60\\,^{\\circ}\\mathrm{C}$, while it before irradiated is 134 eV. Moreover, better performance can be reached by lowering the operating temperature of the SCD on orbit.

  16. Proton irradiation effect on SCDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yan-Ji; Wang, Yu-Sa; Chen, Yong; Xu, Yu-Peng; Cui, Wei-Wei; Li, Wei; Li, Zheng-Wei; Li, Mao-Shun; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Juan; Han, Da-Wei; Chen, Tian-Xiang; Li, Cheng-Kui; Huo, Jia; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Lu, Bo; Zhu, Yue; Ma, Ke-Yan; Wu, Di; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zi-Liang; Yin, Guo-He; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The Low Energy X-ray Telescope is a main payload on the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope satellite. The swept charge device is selected for the Low Energy X-ray Telescope. As swept charge devices are sensitive to proton irradiation, irradiation test was carried out on the HI-13 accelerator at the China Institute of Atomic Energy. The beam energy was measured to be 10 MeV at the SCD. The proton fluence delivered to the SCD was $3\\times10^{8}\\mathrm{protons}/\\mathrm{cm}^{2}$ over two hours. It is concluded that the proton irradiation affects both the dark current and the charge transfer inefficiency of the SCD through comparing the performance both before and after the irradiation. The energy resolution of the proton-irradiated SCD is 212 eV@5.9 keV at $-60\\,^{\\circ}\\mathrm{C}$, while it before irradiated is 134 eV. Moreover, better performance can be reached by lowering the operating temperature of the SCD on orbit.

  17. Proton-proton scattering without Coulomb force renormalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Skibinski; J. Golak; H. Witala; W. Glockle

    2009-03-06

    We demonstrate numerically that proton-proton (pp) scattering observables can be determined directly by standard short range methods using a screened pp Coulomb force without renormalization. In examples the appropriate screening radii are given. We also numerically investigate solutions of the 3-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger (LS) equation for a screened Coulomb potential alone in the limit of large screening radii and confirm analytically predicted properties for off-shell, half-shell and on-shell Coulomb t-matrices. These 3-dimensional solutions will form a basis for a novel approach to include the pp Coulomb interaction into the 3N Faddeev framework.

  18. Proton-proton fusion in lattice effective field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gautam Rupak; Pranaam Ravi

    2014-11-10

    The proton-proton fusion rate is calculated at low energy in a lattice effective field theory (EFT) formulation. The strong and the Coulomb interactions are treated non-perturbatively at leading order in the EFT. The lattice results are shown to accurately describe the low energy cross section within the validity of the theory at energies relevant to solar physics. In prior work in the literature, Coulomb effects were generally not included in non-perturbative lattice calculations. Work presented here is of general interest in nuclear lattice EFT calculations that involve Coulomb effects at low energy. It complements recent developments of the adiabatic projection method for lattice calculations of nuclear reactions.

  19. Multi-particle emission in the decay of 31Ar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. T. Koldste; B. Blank; M. J. G. Borge; J. A. Briz; M. Carmona-Gallardo; L. M. Fraile; H. O. U. Fynbo; J. Giovinazzo; B. D. Grann; J. G. Johansen; A. Jokinen; B. Jonson; T. Kurturkian-Nieto; J. H. Kusk; T. Nilsson; A. Perea; V. Pesudo; E. Picado; K. Riisager; A. Saastamoinen; O. Tengblad; J. -C. Thomas; J. Van de Walle

    2014-02-19

    A multi-hit capacity setup was used to study the decay of the dripline nucleus 31Ar, produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. A spectroscopic analysis of the beta-delayed three-proton decay of 31Ar is presented for the first time together with a quantitative analysis of the beta-delayed two-proton-gamma-decay. A new method for determination of the spin of low-lying levels in the beta-proton-daughter 30S using proton-proton angular correlations is presented and used for the level at 5.2 MeV, which is found to be either a 3+ or 4+ level, with the data pointing towards the 3+. The half-life of 31Ar is found to be 15.1(3) ms. An improved analysis of the Fermi beta-strength gives a total measured branching for the beta-3p-decay of 3.60(44) %, which is lower than the theoretical value found to be 4.24(43) %. Finally the strongest gamma-transitions in the decay of 33Ar are shown including a line at 4734(3) keV associated to the decay of the IAS, which has not previously been identified.

  20. Optically controlled delays for broadband pulses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Q. Q.; Rostovtsev, Y. V.; Dowling, J. P.; Scully, Marlan O.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2005-01-01

    We propose a scheme that provides large controllable delays for broadband optical pulses. The system is based on the steep dispersion of a coherently driven medium, in which the narrow electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) band is overcome...

  1. Optimal bandwidth allocation in a delay channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehsan, Navid; Liu, Mingyan

    2006-01-01

    following cost function: latest allocation will not make anyslot allocation problem, if the cost , then: function 1) forALLOCATION IN A DELAY CHANNEL If represents the value function

  2. Quarks Pair Up in Protons (and Neutrons) | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for how the different kinds of quarks behave inside protons and neutrons. In the proton, the down quark contributes surprisingly little to electron-proton interaction. Also,...

  3. PROTON INDUCED SWELLING IN TYPE 316 STAINLESS STEEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    McDonald, Void Formation in Proton- and Nicke1- Irradiatedowned rights. o -iii- PROTON INDUCED SWELLING IN TYPE 316I. II. Introduction Proton Damage Processes A. B.

  4. Mechanism of a proton pump analyzed with computer simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Smith, Jeremy C.; Elstner, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    ARTICLE Mechanism of a proton pump analyzed with computerhow bacteriorhodopsin pumps protons. We emphasize the1 Introduction Proton pumps are remarkable proteins that

  5. Proton Mass Shift in Muonic Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiichi Iwazaki

    2014-08-11

    We show that the value of the proton mass depends on each bound state of muonic or electronic hydrogen atom. The charged particle bound to the proton produces magnetic field inside the proton. This makes a change to the amount of chiral condensate inside the proton. The change gives rise to the shift in the value of the proton mass. Numerically, the shift in the $2S$ state of the muonic hydrogen atom can be of the order of $0.1$ meV. The effect may solve the puzzle of the proton radius.

  6. A multi beam proton accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolya, S N

    2015-01-01

    The article considers a proton accelerator containing seven independent beams arranged on the accelerator radius. The current in each beam is one hundred milliamps. The initial part of the accelerator consists of shielded spiral waveguides assembled in the common screen. The frequency of the acceleration: three hundred megahertz, high-frequency power twenty-five megawatts, the length of the accelerator six meters. After reaching the proton energy of six megaelektronvolts the protons using lenses with the azimuthal magnetic field are collected in one beam. Further beam acceleration is performed in the array of superconducting cavities tuned to the frequency one and three tenths gigahertz. The acceleration rate is equal to twenty megavolt per meter, the high-frequency power consumption fifteen megawatts per meter.

  7. Delayed luminescence induced by complex domains in water and in aqueous solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Colleoni; S. Esposito; R. Grasso; M. Gulino; F. Musumeci; D. Romeli; G. Rosace; G. Salesi; A. Scordino

    2014-11-09

    Many recent studies on water have conjectured a complex structure composed of hydrogen bonded low- and high-density domains. In this work the structure of pure water and aqueous solutions of silica gel (TEOS) has been investigated by using delayed luminescence, which previously have showed significant increase in aqueous salt solutions where low-density domain formation is expected. Photon emission shows an Arrhenius trend with an activation energy in water-TEOS solutions larger than in pure water and salt-water solutions. Moreover, delayed photon emission decay shows an intrinsic lifetime of about 5 microseconds both in solutions and in pure water that, along with secondary lifetimes induced by the presence of TEOS, could be related to the formation of different domains.

  8. Synchronization of time delay systems using variable delay with reset for enhanced security in communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Ambika; R. E. Amritkar

    2010-07-01

    We have introduced a mechanism for synchronizing chaotic systems by one way coupling with a variable delay that is reset at finite intervals. Here we extend this method to time delay systems and suggest a new cryptosystem based on this. We present the stability analysis as applied to time delay systems and supplement this by numerical simulations in a standard time delay system like Mackey Glass system. We extend the theory to multi- delay systems and propose a bi channel scheme for the implementation of the scheme for communication with enhanced security. We show that since the synchronizing channel carries information from transmitter only at intervals of reset time, it is not susceptible to reconstruction. The message channel being separate can be made complex by linear combination of transmitter variable at different delay times using mutiple delay systems. This method has the additional advantage that it can be adjusted to be delay or anticipatory in synchronization and these provide two additional basic keys that are independent of system delay.

  9. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    In this study, we show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton–parton cross-section of ? = 1.5 – 3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  10. First measurement of several $?$-delayed neutron emitting isotopes beyond N=126

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Caballero-Folch; C. Domingo-Pardo; J. Agramunt; A. Algora; F. Ameil; A. Arcones; Y. Ayyad; J. Benlliure; I. N. Borzov; M. Bowry; F. Calvino; D. Cano-Ott; G. Cortés; T. Davinson; I. Dillmann; A. Estrade; A. Evdokimov; T. Faestermann; F. Farinon; D. Galaviz; A. R. García; H. Geissel; W. Gelletly; R. Gernhäuser; M. B. Gómez-Hornillos; C. Guerrero; M. Heil; C. Hinke; R. Knöbel; I. Kojouharov; J. Kurcewicz; N. Kurz; Y. Litvinov; L. Maier; J. Marganiec; T. Marketin; M. Marta; T. Martínez; G. Martínez-Pinedo; F. Montes; I. Mukha; D. R. Napoli; C. Nociforo; C. Paradela; S. Pietri; Zs. Podolyák; A. Prochazka; S. Rice; A. Riego; B. Rubio; H. Schaffner; Ch. Scheidenberger; K. Smith; E. Sokol; K. Steiger; B. Sun; J. L. Taín; M. Takechi; D. Testov; H. Weick; E. Wilson; J. S. Winfield; R. Wood; P. Woods; A. Yeremin

    2015-11-04

    The $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission probabilities of neutron rich Hg and Tl nuclei have been measured together with $\\beta$-decay half-lives for 20 isotopes of Au, Hg, Tl, Pb and Bi in the mass region N$\\gtrsim$126. These are the heaviest species where neutron emission has been observed so far. These measurements provide key information to evaluate the performance of nuclear microscopic and phenomenological models in reproducing the high-energy part of the $\\beta$-decay strength distribution. In doing so, it provides important constraints to global theoretical models currently used in $r$-process nucleosynthesis.

  11. Proton decay matrix elements from lattice QCD 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooney, Paul

    2010-01-01

    We present results for the matrix elements relevant for proton decay in Grand Unified Theories (GUTs), using two methods. In the indirect method, we rely on an effective field theory description of proton decay, where ...

  12. Photon-pair source with controllable delay based on shaped inhomogeneous broadening of rare-earth-metal-doped solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekatski, Pavel; Sangouard, Nicolas; Gisin, Nicolas; Afzelius, Mikael [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Riedmatten, Hugues de [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); ICFO-Institute of Photonic Sciences, Mediterranean Technology Park, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, E-08015 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-05-15

    Spontaneous Raman emission in atomic gases provides an attractive source of photon pairs with a controllable delay. We show how this technique can be implemented in solid state systems by appropriately shaping the inhomogeneous broadening. Our proposal is eminently feasible with current technology and provides a realistic solution to entangle remote rare-earth-metal-doped solids in a heralded way.

  13. On the modeling of time-varying delays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Chirag Laxmikant

    2004-09-30

    This thesis is an effort to develop generalized dynamic models for systems with time-varying time delays. Unlike the simple time-delay model characterized by a transportation lag in the case of a fixed time delay, time-varying delays exhibit quite...

  14. Transition in the Temperature-Dependence of GFP Fluorescence: From Proton Wires to Proton Exit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agmon, Noam

    Transition in the Temperature-Dependence of GFP Fluorescence: From Proton Wires to Proton Exit protein, photo-excitation leads to excited-state proton transfer from its chromophore, leaving behind a strongly fluorescing anion, while the proton is commonly thought to migrate internally to Glu-222. X

  15. Proton++: A Customizable Declarative Multitouch Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Proton++: A Customizable Declarative Multitouch Framework Kenrick Kin1,2 Bj¨orn Hartmann1 Tony DeRose2 Maneesh Agrawala1 1 University of California, Berkeley 2 Pixar Animation Studios ABSTRACT Proton- sions of touch event symbols. It builds on the Proton frame- work by allowing developers to incorporate

  16. Proton Absorber Feasibility Study Chris Rogers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Proton Absorber ­ Feasibility Study Chris Rogers, ASTeC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory 14 Sept 2010 #12;Overview We have a problem with secondary protons in the front end Deposit significant Need remote handling (ouch) One way to fix this is using a proton absorber Change in beam power

  17. Photoproduction at HERA with a Leading Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Photoproduction at HERA with a Leading Proton Hanna Mahlke­Kr¨uger H1 Collaboration, DESY Abstract. The total cross­section for the semi­inclusive photoproduction process with a leading proton in the final­sections refer to the kinematic range with transverse momenta of the scattered proton restricted to p T Ÿ 0:2 Ge

  18. Proton Hexality in Local Grand Unification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Forste; Hans Peter Nilles; Saul Ramos-Sanchez; Patrick K. S. Vaudrevange

    2010-09-03

    Proton hexality is a discrete symmetry that avoids the problem of too fast proton decay in the supersymmetric extension of the standard model. Unfortunately it is inconsistent with conventional grand unification. We show that proton hexality can be incorporated in the scheme of "Local Grand Unification" discussed in the framework of model building in (heterotic) string theory.

  19. Delay correlation analysis and representation for vital complaint VHDL models

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rich, Marvin J.; Misra, Ashutosh

    2004-11-09

    A method and system unbind a rise/fall tuple of a VHDL generic variable and create rise time and fall time generics of each generic variable that are independent of each other. Then, according to a predetermined correlation policy, the method and system collect delay values in a VHDL standard delay file, sort the delay values, remove duplicate delay values, group the delay values into correlation sets, and output an analysis file. The correlation policy may include collecting all generic variables in a VHDL standard delay file, selecting each generic variable, and performing reductions on the set of delay values associated with each selected generic variable.

  20. Time-delayed feedback control of delay-coupled neurosystems and lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Hövel; Markus A. Dahlem; Thomas Dahms; Gerald Hiller; Eckehard Schöll

    2009-12-17

    We discuss applications of time-delayed feedback control to delay-coupled neural systems and lasers, in the framework of the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model and the Lang-Kobayashi laser model, respectively. In the context of neural systems, we will point out some complex scenarios of synchronized in-phase or antiphase oscillations, bursting patterns, or amplitude death, induced by delayed coupling in combination with delayed self-feedback in simple network motifs. For optical systems, we will show that multiple time-delayed feedback, realized by a Fabry-Perot resonator coupled to the laser, provides a valuable tool for the suppression of unwanted intensity pulsations, and leads to stable continuous-wave operation.

  1. Constraints on proton-proton fusion from helioseismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. I. T. Brown; M. N. Butler; D. B. Guenther

    2002-07-03

    The proton-proton ($pp$) fusion cross-section found at the heart of solar models is unconstrained experimentally and relies solely on theoretical calculations. Effective field theory provides an opportunity to constrain the $pp$ cross-section experimentally, however, this method is complicated by the appearance of two-nucleon effects in the form of an unknown parameter $L_{1,A}$. We present a method to constrain $L_{1,A}$ using the Standard Solar Model and helioseismology. Using this method, we determine a value of $L_{1,A}$ = 7.0 fm$^{3}$ with a range of 1.6 to 12.4 fm$^{3}$. These results are consistent with theoretical estimates of $L_{1,A} \\approx$ 6 fm$^{3}$.

  2. Near Threshold Proton-Proton Fusion in Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiunn-Wei Chen; C. -P. Liu; Shen-Hsi Yu

    2012-11-21

    The astrophysical S-factor for proton-proton fusion, S_11(E), is obtained with the nuclear matrix element analytically calculated in pionless effective field theory. To the third order, the zero-energy result S_11(0) and the first energy derivative S'_11(0) are found to be (3.99 \\pm 0.14)* 10^-25 MeV b and S_11(0)*(11.3 \\pm 0.1) MeV^-1, respectively; both consistent with the current adopted values. The second energy derivative is also calculated for the first time, and the result S"_11(0) = S_11(0)*(170 \\pm 2) MeV^-2 contributes at the level of 0.5% to the fusion rate at the solar center, which is smaller than 1% as previously estimated.

  3. An investigation of the spin structure of the proton in deep inelastic scattering of polarised muons on polarised protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashman, John Gavin; Baum, G; Beaufays, J; Bee, C P; Benchouk, C; Bird, I G; Brown, S C; Caputo, M C; Cheung, H W K; Chima, J S; Cibarowski, J; Clifft, R W; Coignet, G; Combley, F; Court, G R; D'Agostini, Giulio; Drees, J; Düren, M; Dyce, N; Edwards, A W; Edwards, M; Ernst, T; Ferrero, M I; Francis, D; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Gibson, V; Gillies, James D; Grafström, P; Hamacher, K; Von Harrach, D; Hayman, P J; Holt, J R; Hughes, V W; Jacholkowska, A; Jones, T; Kabuss, E M; Korzen, B; Krüner, U; Kullander, Sven; Landgraf, U; Lanske, D; Lattenstrom, F; Lindqvist, T; Loken, J G; Matthews, N; Mizuno, Y; Mönig, K; Montanet, François; Nagy, E; Nassalski, J P; Niinikoski, T O; Norton, P R; Oakham, F G; Oppenheim, R F; Osborne, A M; Papavassiliou, V; Pavel, N; Peroni, C; Peschel, H; Piegaia, R; Pietrzyk, B; Pietrzyk, U; Povh, B; Renton, P B; Rieubland, Jean Michel; Rijllart, A; Rith, K; Rondio, Ewa; Ropelewski, Leszek; Salmon, D P; Sandacz, A; Schröder, T B; Schüler, K P; Schultze, K; Shibata, T A; Sloan, Terence; Staiano, A; Stier, H E; Stock, J T; Taylor, G N; Thompson, J C; Walcher, T; Tóth, J; Urbàn, L; Wallucks, W; Wheeler, S; Williams, D A; Williams, W S C; Wimpenny, S J; Windmolders, R; Womersley, W J; Ziemons, K

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the spin structure of the proton in deep inelastic scattering of polarised muons on polarised protons

  4. Delayed switching applied to memristor neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Frank Z.; Yang Xiao; Lim Guan [Future Computing Group, School of Computing, University of Kent, Canterbury (United Kingdom); Helian Na [School of Computer Science, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield (United Kingdom); Wu Sining [Xyratex, Havant (United Kingdom); Guo Yike [Department of Computing, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Rashid, Md Mamunur [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic flux and electric charge are linked in a memristor. We reported recently that a memristor has a peculiar effect in which the switching takes place with a time delay because a memristor possesses a certain inertia. This effect was named the ''delayed switching effect.'' In this work, we elaborate on the importance of delayed switching in a brain-like computer using memristor neural networks. The effect is used to control the switching of a memristor synapse between two neurons that fire together (the Hebbian rule). A theoretical formula is found, and the design is verified by a simulation. We have also built an experimental setup consisting of electronic memristive synapses and electronic neurons.

  5. Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

    2012-05-02

    The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

  6. Proton-Rich Nuclear Statistical Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. R. Seitenzahl; F. X. Timmes; A. Marin-Laflèche; E. Brown; G. Magkotsios; J. Truran

    2008-08-14

    Proton-rich material in a state of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) is one of the least studied regimes of nucleosynthesis. One reason for this is that after hydrogen burning, stellar evolution proceeds at conditions of equal number of neutrons and protons or at a slight degree of neutron-richness. Proton-rich nucleosynthesis in stars tends to occur only when hydrogen-rich material that accretes onto a white dwarf or neutron star explodes, or when neutrino interactions in the winds from a nascent proto-neutron star or collapsar-disk drive the matter proton-rich prior to or during the nucleosynthesis. In this paper we solve the NSE equations for a range of proton-rich thermodynamic conditions. We show that cold proton-rich NSE is qualitatively different from neutron-rich NSE. Instead of being dominated by the Fe-peak nuclei with the largest binding energy per nucleon that have a proton to nucleon ratio close to the prescribed electron fraction, NSE for proton-rich material near freeze-out temperature is mainly composed of Ni56 and free protons. Previous results of nuclear reaction network calculations rely on this non-intuitive high proton abundance, which this paper will explain. We show how the differences and especially the large fraction of free protons arises from the minimization of the free energy as a result of a delicate competition between the entropy and the nuclear binding energy.

  7. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  8. Accelerating Polarized Protons to High Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, M.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I. G.; Alessi, J.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bravar, A.; Brennan, J. M.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Butler, J.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Delong, J.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.

    2007-06-13

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  9. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  10. At-Speed Path Delay Test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Swati

    2015-04-27

    This research describes an approach to test metastability of flip-flops with help of multiple at-speed capture cycles during delay test. K longest paths per flip-flop test patterns are generated, such that a long path on one clock cycle feeds a long...

  11. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    We show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton–parton cross-section of ?=1.5–3 mb?=1.5–3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  12. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-12-01

    We show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton–parton cross-section of ?=1.5–3 mb?=1.5–3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  13. ONE- AND TWO-PROTON INCLUSIVE SPECTRA IN 800 MeV PROTON-NUCLEUS COLLISIONS AND THE MEAN FREE PATH OF PROTONS IN NUCLEI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanihata, I.

    2013-01-01

    path of 2. 5 fm si.ngle~proton data, absolute com~ parisonCAPT IONS Fig. 1. Single-proton inclusive spectra (a) andin (a) Arrows indicate the proton momenta Curves in (b) show

  14. Solution to the Proton Radius Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Robson

    2015-01-27

    The relationship between the electric form factors for the proton in the rest frame and in the Breit momentum frame is used to provide a value for the difference in the mean squared charge radius of the proton evaluated in the two frames. Associating the muonic-hydrogen data analysis for the proton charge radius of 0.84087 fm with the rest frame and associating the electron scattering with the Breit frame yields a prediction 0f 0.87944 fm for the proton radius in the relativistic frame. The most recent value deduced via electron scattering from the proton is 0.877(6)fm so that the frame dependence used here yields a plausible solution to the proton radius puzzle.

  15. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

  16. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  17. Built-In Self Test (BIST) for Realistic Delay Defects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamilarasan, Karthik Prabhu

    2012-02-14

    Testing of delay defects is necessary in deep submicron (DSM) technologies. High coverage delay tests produced by automatic test pattern generation (ATPG) can be applied during wafer and package tests, but are difficult ...

  18. Adapting a delay-based protocol to heterogeneous environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotla, Kiran

    2008-10-10

    We investigate the issues in making a delay-based protocol adaptive to heterogeneous environments. We assess and address the problems a delay-based protocol faces when competing with a loss-based protocol such as TCP. We ...

  19. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (San Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Longmeadow, MA); Olsen, Howard B. (Irvine, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

    2010-09-21

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  20. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-06-25

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  1. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-12-03

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  2. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Redlands, CA); Olsen, Howard B. (Colton, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  3. Oorja Protonics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:InformationInformationOorja Protonics Jump to: navigation,

  4. Determining the size of the proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. G. Kelkar; F. Garcia Daza; M. Nowakowski

    2012-08-02

    A measurement of the Lamb shift of 49,881.88(76) GHz in muonic hydrogen in conjunction with theoretical estimates of the proton structure effects was recently used to deduce an accurate but rather small radius of the proton. Such an important shift in the understanding of fundamental values needs reconfirmation. Using a different approach with electromagnetic form factors of the proton, we obtain a new expression for the transition energy, $\\Delta = E_{2P_{{3}/{2}}}^{f=2} - E_{2S_{{1}/{2}}}^{f=1}$, in muonic hydrogen and deduce a proton radius, $r_p = 0.831$ fm.

  5. Low temperature proton conducting oxide devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Payzant, Edward A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Speakman, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Greenblatt, Martha (Highland Park, NJ)

    2008-08-19

    A device for conducting protons at a temperature below 550.degree. C. includes a LAMOX ceramic body characterized by an alpha crystalline structure.

  6. Recent Development in Proton Spin Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Development in Proton Spin Physics Feng YUAN [8] H. Jackson,investigations. These important physics, together with otherthat the transverse spin physics is playing a very important

  7. World's Thinnest Proton Channel | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    show that experimental observations of unimpeded proton transfer throughsingle-layer graphene occur via a classic "bucket-line" mechanism first proposed in 1806. Graphene is a...

  8. Analysis of AIMD protocols over paths with variable delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The distribution of delays for these systems is de- scribed in [13]. HDR is a Qualcomm proposed CDMA air interface

  9. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

    2004-09-26

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

  10. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible bymore »simply extending the data acquisition time.« less

  11. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

    2003-09-26

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

  12. Synchronization phenomena for coupled delay-line oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chicone, Carmen

    F@missouri.edu. 1 #12;1 Introduction Delay equation models for surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay-line devices-built surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay-line oscillators is examined. A bifurcation analysis reveals, averaging, Hopf bifurca- tion, Surface acoustic waves. AMS Classification: 34K60 Corresponding author

  13. Power and Delay Optimization in Multi-Hop Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    In this paper, we study the optimization problem of transmission power and delay in a multi-hop wireless network of transmission power and queueing delay in wireless networks has1 Power and Delay Optimization in Multi-Hop Wireless Networks Li Xia, Basem Shihada Abstract

  14. Measurement of proton and anti-proton intensities in the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Pordes et al.

    2003-06-04

    This paper describes the techniques used to measure the intensities of the proton (p) and anti-proton ({bar p}) beams in the Tevatron collider. The systems provide simultaneous measurements of the intensity of the 36 proton and 36 antiproton bunches and their longitudinal profiles.

  15. Water Alignment, Dipolar Interactions, and Multiple Proton Occupancy during Water-Wire Proton Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Alex J.

    Water Alignment, Dipolar Interactions, and Multiple Proton Occupancy during Water-Wire Proton Angeles, California ABSTRACT A discrete multistate kinetic model for water-wire proton transport is constructed and analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations. In the model, each water molecule can be in one

  16. Delays in Reducing Waterborne and Water-related Infectious Diseases in China under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, Maggie; Belle, Jessica; Carlton, Elizabeth; Liang, Song; Li, Huazhong; Luo, Wei; Freeman, Matthew C.; Liu, Yang; Gao, Yang; Hess, Jeremy; Remais, Justin V.

    2014-12-01

    Despite China’s rapid progress improving water, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) infrastructure and access, in 2011, 471 million people lacked access to improved sanitation, and 401 million people lacked access to household piped water. Infectious diseases are sensitive to changes in climate, particularly temperature, and WSH conditions. To explore possible impacts of climate change on these diseases in China in 2020 and 2030, we coupled estimates of the temperature sensitivity of diarrheal disease and three vector-borne diseases, temperature projections from global climate models using four emissions pathways, WSH-infrastructure development scenarios and projected demographic changes. By 2030, the projected impacts would delay China’s historically rapid progress toward reducing the burden of WSH-attributable infectious disease by 8-85 months. This developmental delay provides a key summary measure of the impact of climate change in China, and in other societies undergoing rapid social, economic, and environmental change.

  17. Fault modeling, delay evaluation and path selection for delay test under process variation in nano-scale VLSI circuits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiang

    2006-04-12

    Delay test in nano-scale VLSI circuits becomes more difficult with shrinking technology feature sizes and rising clock frequencies. In this dissertation, we study three challenging issues in delay test: fault modeling, ...

  18. Photoinduced processes in protonated tryptamine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, H.; Jouvet, C.; Dedonder-Lardeux, C.; Martrenchard, S.; Charriere, C.; Gregoire, G.; Desfrancois, C.; Schermann, J.P.; Barat, M.; Fayeton, J.A.

    2005-02-22

    The electronic excited state dynamics of protonated tryptamine ions generated by an electrospray source have been studied by means of photoinduced dissociation technique on the femtosecond time scale. The result is that the initially excited state decays very quickly within 250 fs. The photoinduced dissociation channels observed can be sorted in two groups of fragments coming from two competing primary processes on the singlet electronic surface. The first one corresponds to a hydrogen-atom loss channel that creates a tryptamine radical cation. The radical cation subsequently fragments to smaller ions. The second process is internal conversion due to the H-atom recombination on the electronic ground state. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations show that an excited {pi}{sigma}* state dissociative along the protonated amino N-H stretch crosses both the locally excited {pi}{pi}* state and the electronic ground state S{sub 0} and thus triggers the photofragmentation reactions. The two processes have equivalent quantum yields, {approx_equal}50% of the fragments coming from the H-atom loss reaction. The two primary reaction paths can clearly be distinguished by their femtosecond pump/probe dynamics recorded on the different fragmentation channels.

  19. Scaling of Lyapunov exponents in chaotic delay systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Jüngling; Wolfgang Kinzel

    2012-10-12

    The scaling behavior of the maximal Lyapunov exponent in chaotic systems with time-delayed feedback is investigated. For large delay times it has been shown that the delay-dependence of the exponent allows a distinction between strong and weak chaos, which are the analogy to strong and weak instability of periodic orbits in a delay system. We find significant differences between scaling of exponents in periodic or chaotic systems. We show that chaotic scaling is related to fluctuations in the linearized equations of motion. A linear delay system including multiplicative noise shows the same properties as the deterministic chaotic systems.

  20. Cadmium Biosorption Rate in Protonated Sargassum Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Cadmium Biosorption Rate in Protonated Sargassum Biomass J I N B A I Y A N G A N D B O H U M I L V Sargassum fluitans biomass was accompanied by the release of hydrogen protons from the biomass. The uptake the overall biosorption rate of cadmium ions in flat seaweed biomass particles. The overall biosorption

  1. PROTON AND DEUTERIUM NMR EXPERIMENTS IN ZERO FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Example of Isolated Proton Pair Practical Considerations TheJ J vi i A). B). C). IV. V. Proton Zero Field Spectra Effectcompared to that between protons, it can exert a profound

  2. Proton radioactivity with a Yukawa effective interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R. Routray; S. K. Tripathy; B. B. Dash; B. Behera; D. N. Basu

    2011-04-26

    The half lives of proton radioactivity of proton emitters are investigated theoretically. Proton-nucleus interaction potentials are obtained by folding the densities of the daughter nuclei with a finite range effective nucleon-nucleon interaction having Yukawa form. The Wood-Saxon density distributions for the nuclei used in calculating the nuclear as well as the Coulomb interaction potentials are predictions of the interaction. The quantum mechanical tunneling probability is calculated within the WKB framework. These calculations provide reasonable estimates for the observed proton radioactivity lifetimes. The effects of neutron-proton effective mass splitting in neutron rich asymmetric matter as well as the nuclear matter incompressibility on the decay probability are investigated.

  3. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elangovan, S. (South Jordan, UT); Nair, Balakrishnan G. (Sandy, UT); Small, Troy (Midvale, UT); Heck, Brian (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2011-09-06

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  4. A Feedback-based Adaptive Broadcast Coding Scheme for Reducing In-order Delivery Delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medard, Muriel

    We propose a new feedback-based adaptive coding scheme for a packet erasure broadcast channel. The main performance metric of interest is the delay. We consider two types of delay - decoding delay and delivery delay. ...

  5. Oct. 25 Lecture Highlights Treatment Technology of HU's Proton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oct. 25 Lecture Highlights Treatment Technology of HU's Proton Therapy Institute Cynthia Keppel Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute Scientific and Technical Director,...

  6. Proton Research Earns 2008 JSA Thesis Prize | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Research Earns 2008 JSA Thesis Prize groundbreaking Guy Ron NEWPORT NEWS, VA, April 15, 2009 - An experiment probing the internal structure of the proton has earned Israeli...

  7. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board...

  8. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-09

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  9. Delayed Fission Gamma-ray Characteristics of Th-232 U-233 U-235 U-238 and Pu-239

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Taylor; Parma, Edward J.

    2015-08-01

    Delayed fission gamma-rays play an important role in determining the time dependent ioniz- ing dose for experiments in the central irradiation cavity of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Delayed gamma-rays are produced from both fission product decay and from acti- vation of materials in the core, such as cladding and support structures. Knowing both the delayed gamma-ray emission rate and the time-dependent gamma-ray energy spectrum is nec- essary in order to properly determine the dose contributions from delayed fission gamma-rays. This information is especially important when attempting to deconvolute the time-dependent neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray contribution to the response of a diamond photo-conducting diode (PCD) or fission chamber in time frames of milliseconds to seconds following a reactor pulse. This work focused on investigating delayed gamma-ray character- istics produced from fission products from thermal, fast, and high energy fission of Th-232, U-233, U-235, U-238, and Pu-239. This work uses a modified version of CINDER2008, a transmutation code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, to model time and energy dependent photon characteristics due to fission. This modified code adds the capability to track photon-induced transmutations, photo-fission, and the subsequent radiation caused by fission products due to photo-fission. The data is compared against previous work done with SNL- modified CINDER2008 [ 1 ] and experimental data [ 2 , 3 ] and other published literature, includ- ing ENDF/B-VII.1 [ 4 ]. The ability to produce a high-fidelity (7,428 group) energy-dependent photon fluence at various times post-fission can improve the delayed photon characterization for radiation effects tests at research reactors, as well as other applications.

  10. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Volk Jr; Keith Wisecarver

    2005-10-01

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking. The following deliverables are scheduled from the two projects of the three-year JIP: (1) A novel method for enhancing liquid yields from delayed cokers and data that provide insight as to the optimum temperature to remove hydrogen sulfide from furnace gases. (2) An understanding of what causes foaming in c

  11. Attosecond neutron Compton scattering from protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Aris Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann

    2007-02-01

    The effect of "anomalous" scattering of neutrons and electrons from protons in the electron-volt energy-transfer range is considered, and related experimental results are mentioned. A recent independent confirmation of this effect with a new data analysis procedure is presented. Due to the very short characteristic scattering time, there is no well defined separation of time scales of electronic and protonic motions. An outline of a proposed theoretical interpretation is presented, which is based on the fact that scattering protons represent \\textit{open} quantum systems, thus being subject to decoherence.

  12. Proton Radiography: Its uses and Resolution Scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariam, Fesseha G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-09

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has used high energy protons as a probe in flash radiography for over a decade. In this time the proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons, provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose over five-hundred dynamic experiments in support of stockpile stewardship programs as well as basic materials science. Through this effort significant experience has been gained in using charged particles as direct radiographic probes to diagnose transient systems. The results of this experience will be discussed through the presentation of data from experiments recently performed at the LANL pRad.

  13. Synchronization and time shifts of dynamical patterns for mutually delay-coupled fiber ring lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. B. Shaw; I. B. Schwartz; E. A. Rogers; R. Roy

    2006-03-27

    A pair of coupled erbium doped fiber ring lasers is used to explore the dynamics of coupled spatiotemporal systems. The lasers are mutually coupled with a coupling delay less than the cavity round-trip time. We study synchronization between the two lasers in the experiment and in a delay differential equation model of the system. Because the lasers are internally perturbed by spontaneous emission, we include a noise source in the model to obtain stochastic realizations of the deterministic equations. Both amplitude synchronization and phase synchronization are considered. We use the Hilbert transform to define the phase variable and compute phase synchronization. We find that synchronization increases with coupling strength in the experiment and the model. When the time series from two lasers are time-shifted in either direction by the delay time, approximately equal synchronization is frequently observed, so that a clear leader and follower cannot be identified. We define an algorithm to determine which laser leads the other when the synchronization is sufficiently different with one direction of time shift, and statistics of switches in leader and follower are studied. The frequency of switching between leader and follower increases with coupling strength, as might be expected since the lasers mutually influence each other more effectively with stronger coupling.

  14. A TWO-YEAR TIME DELAY FOR THE LENSED QUASAR SDSS J1029+2623

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fohlmeister, Janine; Wambsganss, Joachim [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Falco, Emilio E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Oguri, Masamune [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)] [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Dai, Xinyu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    We present 279 epochs of optical monitoring data spanning 5.4 years from 2007 January to 2012 June for the largest image separation (22.''6) gravitationally lensed quasar, SDSS J1029+2623. We find that image A leads the images B and C by {Delta} t {sub AB} = (744 {+-} 10) days (90% confidence); the uncertainty includes both statistical uncertainties and systematic differences due to the choice of models. With only a {approx}1% fractional error, the interpretation of the delay is limited primarily by cosmic variance due to fluctuations in the mean line-of-sight density. We cannot separate the fainter image C from image B, but since image C trails image B by only 2-3 days in all models, the estimate of the time delay between images A and B is little affected by combining the fluxes of images B and C. There is weak evidence for a low level of microlensing, perhaps created by the small galaxy responsible for the flux ratio anomaly in this system. Interpreting the delay depends on better constraining the shape of the gravitational potential using the lensed host galaxy, other lensed arcs, and the structure of the X-ray emission.

  15. Mechanism of Proton Transport in Proton Exchange Membranes: Insights from Computer Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory A. Voth

    2010-11-30

    The solvation and transport of hydrated protons in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) such as NafionTM will be described using a novel multi-state reactive molecular dynamics (MD) approach, combined with large scale MD simulation to help probe various PEM morphological models. The multi-state MD methodology allows for the treatment of explicit (Grotthuss) proton shuttling and charge defect delocalization which, in turn, can strongly influence the properties of the hydrated protons in various aqueous and complex environments. A significant extension of the methodology to treat highly acidic (low pH) environments such as the hydrophilic domains of a PEM will be presented. Recent results for proton solvation and transport in NafionTM will be described which reveal the significant role of Grotthuss shuttling and charge defect delocalization on the excess proton solvation structures and transport properties. The role of PEM hydration level and morphology on these properties will also be described.

  16. Time delay in photoemission by attosecond laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Kozlowski

    2013-02-15

    Recently the time delay in the attosecond photoemission was observed (Science,2010). In this paper we propose the description of that time delay in the framework of hyperbolic heat transport equation. We argue that the observed time delay 20 as is of the order of the thermal relaxation time for hyperbolic quantum heat transport. As the generalization of the standard quantum mechanics we propose new local Schroedinger equation with c=finite

  17. Mean field approximation for noisy delay coupled excitable neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikola Buric; Dragana Rankovic; Kristina Todorovic; Nebojsa Vasovic

    2010-03-26

    Mean field approximation of a large collection of FitzHugh-Nagumo excitable neurons with noise and all-to-all coupling with explicit time-delays, modelled by $N\\gg 1$ stochastic delay-differential equations is derived. The resulting approximation contains only two deterministic delay-differential equations but provides excellent predictions concerning the stability and bifurcations of the averaged global variables of the exact large system.

  18. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of U.S. methane emissions are energy production, distribution, and use; agriculture; and waste management (Figure 17). U.S. methane emissions in 2009 totaled 731 MMTCO2e, 0.9...

  19. Probing the Proton's Weak Side | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    force. The weak force acts on subatomic particles, such as the protons, neutrons and electrons that make up atoms. These particles carry a weak charge, a measure of the influence...

  20. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, W.L.; Vanheusden, K.J.R.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Devine, R.A.B.

    1998-11-03

    An electrically written memory element is disclosed utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element. 19 figs.

  1. Resolution of the Proton Spin Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Myhrer; A. W. Thomas

    2007-09-24

    A number of lines of investigation into the structure of the nucleon have converged to the point where we believe that one has a consistent explanation of the well known proton spin crisis.

  2. Call issued for Proton Radiography Facility proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2015 Amy Clarke and Seth Imhoff of Materials Technology-Metallurgy (MST-6) align a copper density calibration object for a proton radiography experiment. Amy Clarke and Seth...

  3. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, William L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vanheusden, Karel J. R. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleetwood, Daniel M. (Albuquerque, NM); Devine, Roderick A. B. (St. Martin le Vinoux, FR)

    1998-01-01

    An electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element.

  4. Low energy neutron-proton interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daub, Brian (Brian Hollenberg)

    2012-01-01

    There have been few measurements of cross sections for neutron-proton scattering and radiative capture below 1 MeV. Those measurements which do exist are at a small number of energies and are often inconsistent with ...

  5. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, William L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vanheusden, Karel J. R. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleetwood, Daniel M. (Albuquerque, NM); Devine, Roderick A. B. (St. Martin le Vinoux, FR)

    2000-01-01

    An electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element.

  6. Proton storage ring: man/machine interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lander, R.F.; Clout, P.N.

    1985-01-01

    The human interface of the Proton Storage Ring Control System at Los Alamos is described in some detail, together with the software environment in which operator interaction programs are written. Some examples of operator interaction programs are given.

  7. Range corrections in Proton Halo Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryberg, Emil; Hammer, H -W; Platter, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the effects of finite-range corrections in halo effective field theory for S-wave proton halo nuclei. We calculate the charge radius to next-to-leading order and the astrophysical S-factor for low-energy proton capture to fifth order in the low-energy expansion. As an application, we confront our results with experimental data for the S-factor for proton capture on Oxygen-16 into the excited $1/2^+$ state of Fluorine-17. Our low-energy theory is characterized by a systematic low-energy expansion, which can be used to quantify an energy-dependent model error to be utilized in data fitting. Finally, we show that the existence of proton halos is suppressed by the need for two fine tunings in the underlying theory.

  8. NEUTRON EMISSION IN RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Figure Captions Figure l. Neutron-to-proton ratio at 30° labapparent anomalies in the neutron-to-proton fragment ratio.3 proton data. Figure 2. Neutron-to-proton ratio R 1 , Solid

  9. Small angle elastic scattering of protons off of spinless nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, A.G.

    1988-07-01

    Elastic differential cross sections and analyzing powers for 800 MeV protons incident on /sup 12/C, /sup 40/Ca, and /sup 208/Pb in the momentum transfer range 20 MeV/c < q < 130 MeV/c have been measured. The data was taken with the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Special delay-line drift chambers with dead regions for the beam to pass through them were used to obtain the data. Through the interference of the Coulomb and nuclear contributions to the differential cross section in the small angle region, the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward nuclear amplitude ..cap alpha../sub n/(0) = Ref/sub n/(0)/Imf/sub n/(0) is extracted. The importance of knowing this quantity at lower energies in order to study the differences between relativistic and non-relativistic scattering theories is discussed. 130 refs., 60 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Proton Transfer in Nucleobases is Mediated by Water Kirill Khistyaev,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    Proton Transfer in Nucleobases is Mediated by Water Kirill Khistyaev, Amir Golan, Ksenia B. Bravaya, and facilitating efficient proton transport through ion channels and interfaces. This study investigates proton and tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation, we show that water shuts down ionization-induced proton

  11. PhysicsHighlight Proton radiography at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PhysicsHighlight Proton radiography at Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Radiography, invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory, employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials driven by high explosives. A series of proton radiographs of disks (left to right) aluminum

  12. Leading proton production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leading proton production in deep inelastic 1 scattering at HERA 2 ZEUS Collaboration 3 Draft, with a #28;nal-state proton carrying a large fraction of the incoming proton energy, x L > 0 photon virtualities Q 2 > 3 GeV 2 and mass of the photon-proton sys- tem 45

  13. Fault-induced delayed voltage recovery in a long inhomogeneous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article: Fault-induced delayed voltage recovery in a long inhomogeneous power-distribution feeder Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly...

  14. Delay-induced driven patterns in coupled Cayley tree networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aradhana Singh; Sarika Jalan

    2013-04-04

    We study effects of delay in diffusively coupled logistic maps on the Cayley tree networks. We find that smaller coupling values exhibits sensitiveness for value of delay, and leads to different cluster patterns of self-organized and driven types. Whereas larger coupling strengths are very robust against change in delay values, and leads to stable driven clusters comprising only nodes from last generation of the Calaye tree. Furthermore, introduction of delay exhibits suppression as well as enhancement of synchronization depending upon coupling strength values, hence demonstrating richness of the model. To the end we relate the results with social conflicts and cooperation observed in families.

  15. Characteristic Lyapunov vectors in chaotic time-delayed systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Pazó; Juan M. López

    2011-01-14

    We compute Lyapunov vectors (LVs) corresponding to the largest Lyapunov exponents in delay-differential equations with large time delay. We find that characteristic LVs, and backward (Gram-Schmidt) LVs, exhibit long-range correlations, identical to those already observed in dissipative extended systems. In addition we give numerical and theoretical support to the hypothesis that the main LV belongs, under a suitable transformation, to the universality class of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation. These facts indicate that in the large delay limit (an important class of) delayed equations behave exactly as dissipative systems with spatiotemporal chaos.

  16. LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE DUE TO INCLEAMENT WEATHER During the winter months, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may at times...

  17. Particle rapidity distribution in proton-nucleus collisions using the proton-contributor reference frame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gines Martinez-Garcia

    2014-08-14

    I define the proton-contributor reference frame in proton nucleus (p--A) collisions as the center of mass of the system formed by the proton and the participant nucleons of the nucleus. Assuming that the rapidity distribution of produced particles is symmetric in the proton-contributor reference frame, several measurements in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 5.02 {\\rm TeV}$ can be described qualitatively. These include rapidity distributions of charged particles, $J/\\psi$ and Z bosons.

  18. Investigation of proton focusing and conversion efficiency for proton fast ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartal, Teresa Jean

    2012-01-01

    After ignition, a thermonuclear burn wave spreads radiallythe shell to create the thermonuclear burn wave. At 10 keV,heating the plasma to thermonuclear temperatures. Protons

  19. AGS polarized proton operation in run 8.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang,H.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.A.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Lin, F.; Luccio, A.U.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.

    2008-06-23

    Dual partial snake scheme has been used for the Brookhaven AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) polarized proton operation for several years. It has provided polarized proton beams with 1.5 x 10{sup 11} intensity and 65% polarization for RHIC spin program. There is still residual polarization loss. Several schemes such as putting horizontal tune into the spin tune gap, and injection-on-the-fly were tested in the AGS to mitigate the loss. This paper presents the experiment results and analysis.

  20. Low Temperature Proton Conductivity | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S.Leadership onProton Conductivity Low Temperature Proton

  1. First Measurement of Bose-Einstein Correlations in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=0.9$ and 2.36 TeV at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Er, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Vienna, OAW /CERN /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /Antwerp U., WISINF /Vrije U., Brussels /Brussels U. /Gent U. /Louvain U. /UMH, Mons /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /CHEP, Taegu /Chonnam Natl. U. /Korea U. /UCLA /CERN /UC, Riverside /Budapest, RMKI /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Caltech /Carnegie Mellon U. /Colorado U. /Cornell U. /Fairfield U.

    2010-05-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations have been measured using samples of proton-proton collisions at 0.9 and 2.36 TeV center-of-mass energies, recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The signal is observed in the form of an enhancement of pairs of same-sign charged particles with small relative four-momentum. The size of the correlated particle emission region is seen to increase significantly with the particle multiplicity of the event.

  2. Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-06

    How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

  3. El Nino and the Delayed Action Oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutle, I; Römer, R A; Boutle, Ian; Taylor, Richard H. S.; Roemer, Rudolf A.

    2006-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the El Nino phenomenon using the mathematical model of delayed-action oscillator (DAO). Topics such as the influence of the annual cycle, global warming, stochastic influences due to weather conditions and even off-equatorial heat-sinks can all be discussed using only modest analytical and numerical resources. Thus the DAO allows for a pedagogical introduction to the science of El Nino and La Nina while at the same time avoiding the need for large-scale computing resources normally associated with much more sophisticated coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models. It is an approach which is ideally suited for student projects both at high school and undergraduate level.

  4. Engineering mesoscale structures with distinct dynamical implications in networks of delay-coupled delay oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne-Ly Do; Johannes Höfener; Thilo Gross

    2012-07-05

    The dynamics of networks of interacting systems depends intricately on the interaction topology. When the dynamics is explored, generally the whole topology has to be considered. However, we show that there are certain mesoscale subgraphs that have precise and distinct consequences for the system-level dynamics. In particular, if meso-scale symmetries are present then eigenvectors of the Jacobian localise on the symmetric subgraph and the corresponding eigenvalues become insensitive to the topology outside the subgraph. Hence, dynamical instabilities associated with these eigenvalues can be analyzed without considering the topology outside the subgraph. While such instabilities are thus generated entirely in small network subgraphs, they generally do not remain confined to the subgraph once the instability sets in and thus have system-level consequences. Here we illustrate the analytical investigation of such instabilities in an ecological meta-population model consisting of a network of delay-coupled delay oscillators.

  5. Current Theoretical Challenges in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Electron Proton Nonadiabaticity, Proton Relays, and Ultrafast Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological and chemical processes. The motions of the electrons, transferring protons, solute nuclei, and solvent nuclei occur on a wide range of time scales and are often strongly coupled. As a result, the theoretical description of these processes requires a combination of quantum and classical methods. This Perspective discusses three of the current theoretical challenges in the field of PCET. The first challenge is the calculation of electron proton nonadiabatic effects, which are significant for these reactions because the hydrogen tunneling is often faster than the electronic transition. The second challenge is the modeling of electron transfer coupled to proton transport along hydrogen-bonded networks. The third challenge is the simulation of the ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium photoinduced PCET reactions in solution. Insights provided by theoretical studies may assist in the design of more effective catalysts for energy conversion processes. The proton relay portion of this review is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  6. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced air plasma by femtosecond double-pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Anmin [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China) [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Li, Suyu; Li, Shuchang; Jiang, Yuanfei; Ding, Dajun [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)] [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng [State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Huang, Xuri [Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)] [Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Jin, Mingxing [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China) [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)

    2013-10-15

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, a femtosecond double-pulse laser was used to induce air plasma. The plasma spectroscopy was observed to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to femtosecond single-pulse laser. In particular, the optical emission intensity can be optimized by adjusting the delay time of femtosecond double-pulse. An appropriate pulse-to-pulse delay was selected, that was typically about 50 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, plasma channel, and so on.

  7. Delay Optimal Event Detection on Ad Hoc Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anurag

    , Bangalore, INDIA email: kprem@ece.iisc.ernet.in, prasanthi.m@gmail.com, anurag@ece.iisc.ernet.in We consider causal order. In this case, the decision statistic depends on the network delays as well, whereas in the network­oblivious case, the decision statistic does not depend on the network delays. This yields

  8. A Structural Result for Delayed Sharing Information Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Aditya

    A Structural Result for Delayed Sharing Information Structures Ashutosh Nayyar Department of EECS@eecs.umich.edu Abstract--The n-step delayed sharing information structure is investigated. This information structure is a link between the classical information structure, where information is shared perfectly between

  9. THE INHERENT QUEUING DELAY OF PARALLEL PACKET SWITCHES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attiya, Hagit

    THE INHERENT QUEUING DELAY OF PARALLEL PACKET SWITCHES (Extended Abstract) Hagit Attiya and David {hagit,hdavid}@cs.technion.ac.il Abstract The parallel packet switch (PPS) is extensively used as the core of con- temporary commercial switches. This paper investigates the inherent queuing delay

  10. The Inherent Queuing Delay of Parallel Packet Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hay, David

    The Inherent Queuing Delay of Parallel Packet Switches Hagit Attiya and David Hay Abstract--The parallel packet switch (PPS) extends the inverse multiplexing architecture and is widely used as the core of contemporary commercial switches. This paper investigates the inherent queuing delay introduced by the PPS

  11. Understanding Network Delay Changes Caused by Routing Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Zhuoqing Morley

    such as voice over IP and time-critical financial transactions. This importance is illustrated by past work on understanding the delay constancy of Internet paths and recent work on predicting network delays using virtual- mance metrics of Internet paths. Our work is the first to address this shortcoming by systematically

  12. Delay Constrained Minimum Energy Broadcast in Cooperative Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    Delay Constrained Minimum Energy Broadcast in Cooperative Wireless Networks Marjan Baghaie--We formulate the problem of delay constrained energy-efficient broadcast in cooperative multihop wireless net algorithm that combines dynamic programming and linear programming to yield the min- imum energy broadcast

  13. Perceptual Media Compression for Multiple Viewers with Feedback Delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg, Komogortsev - Department of Computer Science, Texas State University

    into the impact that such a method can have on transmission bandwidth and computational burden reduction ­ computer conferencing, teleconferencing, and videoconferencing; J.5 [Computers in Other Systems]: Social Perceptual media adaptation, multi-viewer setup. 1. IMPACT OF THE FEEDBACK DELAY Feedback delay is the period

  14. Utility Maximization for Delay Constrained QoS in Wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utility Maximization for Delay Constrained QoS in Wireless I-Hong Hou CSL and Department of CS of utility maxi- mization for clients with delay based QoS requirements in wireless networks. We adopt that the utility of a client is a function of the timely throughput it obtains. We treat the timely throughput

  15. HOPF CALCULATIONS IN DELAYED CAR-FOLLOWING MODELS Gabor Stepan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    HOPF CALCULATIONS IN DELAYED CAR-FOLLOWING MODELS G´abor St´ep´an and G´abor Orosz Department: A nonlinear car-following model that includes the reaction-time delay of drivers is considered. When, bistability 1. INTRODUCTION There are two important goals of traffic manage- ment when cars follow each other

  16. Optimal Forwarding in Delay Tolerant Networks with Multiple Destinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anurag

    -Antipolis, 06902 Sophia Antipolis Cedex, France Email: eitan.altman@sophia.inria.fr Abstract--We study the trade-off between delivery delay and energy consumption in a delay tolerant network in which a message (or a file chain and derive the optimal closed loop control (i.e., forwarding policy). However, in practice

  17. An Efficient Method for Random Delay Generation in Embedded Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    An Efficient Method for Random Delay Generation in Embedded Software Jean-S´ebastien Coron and Ilya Process Interrupts (rpi) as well as in software by placing "dummy" cy- cles at some points of the program. We give preliminary information on software random delays in Sect. 2. Related work. First detailed

  18. COMPUTATIONAL DELAY IN VEHICLES AND ITS EFFECT ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    MAY 2012 ABHINNA JAIN B.E., SATHYABAMA UNIVERSITY, INDIA M.S.E.C.E., UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS is in the feedback loop of control systems and contributes to feedback delay in addition to already existing delays cause system to underperform in its intended physical behavior and impose a cost in terms of fuel

  19. Water Desalination ReporT Ashdod tender Delayed again

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Desalination ReporT Israel Ashdod tender Delayed again Last Sunday, Mekorot Development & Enterprise (MD&E) delayed the tender date for the 274,000 m3 /d (72.4 MGD) Ashdod Desalination Project to compete in the international desalination market. Would the technical know-how gleaned from the proposals

  20. Regenerative memory in time-delayed neuromorphic photonic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeira, B; Figueiredo, José M L; Barland, S; Javaloyes, J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a regenerative memory based upon a time-delayed neuromorphic photonic oscillator and discuss the link with temporal localized structures. Our experimental implementation is based upon a optoelectronic system composed of a nanoscale nonlinear resonant tunneling diode coupled to a laser that we link to the paradigm of neuronal activity, the FitzHugh-Nagumo model with delayed feedback.

  1. Electron emission of stripping foil and collimation system for CSNS/RCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ming-Yang; Wang, Na; Wang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    For the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS/RCS), the electron emission plays an important role in the accelerator limitation. The interactions between the proton beam and the stripping foil were studied, and the electron scattering processes were simulated by the ORBIT and FLUKA codes. Then, the electron energy distribution and the electron yielding rate can be given. Furthermore, the interactions between the proton beam and the collimation system were studied, and the electron scattering processes were simulated. Then, the energy distribution of the primary electron emission can be given and the yielding rate of the primary electron can be obtained.

  2. Proton-proton multiplicity distributions at LHC and the Pomeron intercept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Capella; E. G. Ferreiro

    2013-01-15

    We compute the proton-proton multiplicity distributions at LHC energies in the framework of a multiple scattering model assuming a Poisson distribution for each inelastic collision. Multiple scattering is essential to broaden the multiplicity distribution. We obtain approximate KNO scaling for small pseudo-rapidity intervals ($|\\eta | < 0.5$) and sizable KNO scaling violations for larger ones, in agreement with experiment.

  3. $?$ and $?$ Production in Proton-Proton Collisions at E=13 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard S. Kisslinger; Debasish Das

    2015-05-27

    This article is an extension of our recent studies of $\\Psi$ and $\\Upsilon$ production cross sections in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with E=$\\sqrt{s}$=8.0 TeV to E=13 TeV

  4. Clustering phenomena from two-particle angular correlations in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    Results on two-particle angular correlations in proton-proton (/-s = 200 and 410 GeV) ,Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions (js = 200 GeV) are presented over a broad range of pseudorapidity ([eta]) and azimuthal angle ([phi]). The ...

  5. Capture reactions into borromean two-proton systems at rp-waiting points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Hove; A. S. Jensen; H. O. U. Fynbo; N. T. Zinner; D. V. Fedorov; E. Garrido

    2015-07-07

    We investigate even-even two-proton borromean systems at prominent intermediate heavy waiting points for the rapid proton capture process. The most likely single-particle levels are used to calculate three-body energy and structure as a function of proton-core resonance energy. We establish a linear dependence between two- and three-body energies with the same slope, but the absolute value slightly dependent on partial wave structure. Using these relations we predict low-lying excited states in the isotones following the critical waiting points. The capture rate for producing a borromean bound state is described both based on a full three-body calculation and on a very simple analytic rate expression for temperatures about $1-5$~GK. This rate is valid for both direct and sequential capture paths, and it only depends on the three-body resonance energy. As a result the relevant path of the radiative capture reactions can be determined. We present numerical results for $E1$ and $E2$ photon emission, and discuss occurrence preferences in general as well as relative sizes of these most likely processes. Finally, we present narrow estimated intervals for the proton capture rates relevant for the critical waiting points.

  6. Vehicle Emissions Review- 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews vehicle emission control highlighting representative studies that illustrate the state-of-the-art

  7. Multiwavelength Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

  8. Diesel Emission Control Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and technology approaches for diesel emission control for heavy and light duty applications

  9. Effect of proton-proton Coulomb repulsion on soft dipole excitations of light proton-rich nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Oishi; K. Hagino; H. Sagawa

    2011-09-14

    We perform three-body model calculations for soft dipole excitations of the proton-rich Borromean nucleus $^{17}$Ne. To this end, we assume that $^{17}$Ne takes the $^{15}$O+p+p structure, in which the two valence protons are excited from the $0^+$ ground state configuration to $1^-$ continuum states. We employ a density-dependent contact force for the nuclear part of the pairing interaction, and discretize the continuum states with the box boundary condition. We show by explicitly including the Coulomb interaction between the valence protons that the Coulomb repulsion does not significantly alter the E1 strength distribution. We point out that the effect of the Coulomb repulsion in fact can be well simulated by renormalizing the nuclear pairing interaction.

  10. Modelling proton transfer in water molecule chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artem Korzhimanov; Mattias Marklund; Tatiana Shutova; Goran Samuelsson

    2011-08-22

    The process of protons transport in molecular water chains is of fundamental interest for many biological systems. Although many features of such systems can be analyzed using large-scale computational modeling, other features are better understood in terms of simplified model problems. Here we have tested, analytically and numerically, a model describing the classical proton hopping process in molecular water chains. In order to capture the main features of the proton hopping process in such molecular chains, we use a simplified model for our analysis. In particular, our discrete model describes a 1D chain of water molecules situated in an external protein channel structure, and each water molecule is allowed to oscillate around its equilibrium point in this system, while the protons are allowed to move along the line of neighboring oxygen atoms. The occurrence and properties of nonlinear solitary transport structures, allowing for much faster proton transport, are discussed, and the possible implications of these findings for biological systems are emphasized.

  11. A Detector for Proton Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blazey, G.; et al.,

    2013-12-06

    Radiation therapy is a widely recognized treatment for cancer. Energetic protons have distinct features that set them apart from photons and make them desirable for cancer therapy as well as medical imaging. The clinical interest in heavy ion therapy is due to the fact that ions deposit almost all of their energy in a sharp peak – the Bragg peak- at the very end of their path. Proton beams can be used to precisely localize a tumor and deliver an exact dose to the tumor with small doses to the surrounding tissue. Proton computed tomography (pCT) provides direct information on the location on the target tumor, and avoids position uncertainty caused by treatment planning based on imaging with X-ray CT. The pCT project goal is to measure and reconstruct the proton relative stopping power distribution directly in situ. To ensure the full advantage of cancer treatment with 200 MeV proton beams, pCT must be realized.

  12. Car-to-car radio channel measurements at 5 GHz: Pathloss, power-delay profile, and delay-Doppler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zemen, Thomas

    Car-to-car radio channel measurements at 5 GHz: Pathloss, power-delay profile, and delay Contact: apaier@nt.tuwien.ac.at Abstract-- We carried out a car­to­infrastructure (C2I) and car­to­car (C2­Doppler spectra in a C2C highway scenario, where both cars were traveling in opposite directions. A pathloss

  13. Proton radius puzzle and large extra dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Bang Wang; Wei-Tou Ni

    2013-05-23

    We propose a theoretical scenario to solve the proton radius puzzle which recently arises from the muonic hydrogen experiment. In this framework, 4 + n dimensional theory is incorporated with modified gravity. The extra gravitational interaction between the proton and muon at very short range provides an energy shift which accounts for the discrepancy between spectroscopic results from muonic and electronic hydrogen experiments. Assuming the modified gravity is a small perturbation to the existing electromagnetic interaction, we find the puzzle can be solved with stringent constraint on the range of the new force. Our result not only provides a possible solution to the proton radius puzzle but also suggest a direction to test new physics at very small length scale.

  14. Elastic and Proton Dynamics of the DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. L. Golo

    2008-03-28

    The subject of this report is the dynamics of elastic system in conjunction with hydrogen bonds of the DNA. We draw attention to the draw-back of the familiar rod model of the DNA, and make a case of constructing models that could accommodate the intrinsic structure of the DNA. In this respect studying the interplay among the elastic system and the protons of the DNA, is of interest, for it could accommodate the inter-strand as well as the tunneling modes of protons. Following this direction, we come to the conclusion that the elastic-proton dynamics may have a bearing on biophysics of the DNA. The phenomenon of point mutations is discussed within this framework.

  15. Polarization measurement of laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raab, Natascha; Engels, Ralf; Engin, Ilhan; Greven, Patrick; Holler, Astrid; Lehrach, Andreas; Maier, Rudolf [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)] [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Büscher, Markus, E-mail: m.buescher@fz-juelich.de [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany) [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-6), Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Institute for Laser- and Plasma Physics, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald [Institute for Laser- and Plasma Physics, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)] [Institute for Laser- and Plasma Physics, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)] [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    We report on the successful use of a laser-driven few-MeV proton source to measure the differential cross section of a hadronic scattering reaction as well as on the measurement and simulation study of polarization observables of the laser-accelerated charged particle beams. These investigations were carried out with thin foil targets, illuminated by 100 TW laser pulses at the Arcturus laser facility; the polarization measurement is based on the spin dependence of hadronic proton scattering off nuclei in a Silicon target. We find proton beam polarizations consistent with zero magnitude which indicates that for these particular laser-target parameters the particle spins are not aligned by the strong magnetic fields inside the laser-generated plasmas.

  16. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the...

  17. Statistical nature of cluster emission in nuclear liquid phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. G. Ma

    2002-03-23

    The emission of nuclear clusters is investigated within the framework of isospin dependent lattice gas model and classical molecular dynamics model. It is found that the emission of individual cluster which is heavier than proton is almost Poissonian except near the liquid gas phase transition point and the thermal scaling is observed by the linear Arrhenius plots which is made from the average multiplicity of each cluster versus the inverse of temperature in the nuclear liquid phase. It indicates of a statistical nature of such cluster emission in the models. The "emission barriers" which are the slopes of the Arrhenius plots are extracted as a function of the mass or charge number and fitted by the formula embodied with the contributions of the surface energy and Coulomb interaction. The possible influences of the source size, Coulomb interaction and "freeze-out" density and related physical implications are discussed.

  18. Prompt and Delayed HighEnergy Emission from Cosmological GammaRay Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boettcher, Markus

    ­wave frame energy densities u 0 SL and u 0 sy of starlight and synchrotron photons, respectively. Knowledge of the peak energy of the seed photon spec­ trum, which determines whether Compton scattering is suppressed

  19. Development of a statistically based access delay timeline methodology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, W. Gary; Robinson, David Gerald; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2013-02-01

    The charter for adversarial delay is to hinder access to critical resources through the use of physical systems increasing an adversary's task time. The traditional method for characterizing access delay has been a simple model focused on accumulating times required to complete each task with little regard to uncertainty, complexity, or decreased efficiency associated with multiple sequential tasks or stress. The delay associated with any given barrier or path is further discounted to worst-case, and often unrealistic, times based on a high-level adversary, resulting in a highly conservative calculation of total delay. This leads to delay systems that require significant funding and personnel resources in order to defend against the assumed threat, which for many sites and applications becomes cost prohibitive. A new methodology has been developed that considers the uncertainties inherent in the problem to develop a realistic timeline distribution for a given adversary path. This new methodology incorporates advanced Bayesian statistical theory and methodologies, taking into account small sample size, expert judgment, human factors and threat uncertainty. The result is an algorithm that can calculate a probability distribution function of delay times directly related to system risk. Through further analysis, the access delay analyst or end user can use the results in making informed decisions while weighing benefits against risks, ultimately resulting in greater system effectiveness with lower cost.

  20. Delayed feedback control of fractional-order chaotic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandar Gjurchinovski; Trifce Sandev; Viktor Urumov

    2011-07-06

    We study the possibility to stabilize unstable steady states and unstable periodic orbits in chaotic fractional-order dynamical systems by the time-delayed feedback method. By performing a linear stability analysis, we establish the parameter ranges for successful stabilization of unstable equilibria in the plane parametrizad by the feedback gain and the time delay. An insight into the control mechanism is gained by analyzing the characteristic equation of the controlled system, showing that the control scheme fails to control unstable equilibria having an odd number of positive real eigenvalues. We demonstrate that the method can also stabilize unstable periodic orbits for a suitable choice of the feedback gain, providing that the time delay is chosen to coincide with the period of the target orbit. In addition, it is shown numerically that delayed feedback control with a sinusoidally modulated time delay significantly enlarges the stability region of the steady states in comparison to the classical time-delayed feedback scheme with a constant delay.

  1. Lorentz Coherence and the Proton Form Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young S. Kim

    2015-02-28

    The dipole cutoff behavior for the proton form factor has been and still is one of the major issues in high-energy physics. It is shown that this dipole behavior comes from the coherence between the Lorentz contraction of the proton size and the decreasing wavelength of the incoming photon signal. The contraction rates are the same for both cases. This form of coherence is studied also in the momentum-energy space. The coherence effect in this space can be explained in terms of two overlapping wave functions.

  2. Adaptive control of time delay systems and applications to automotive control problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Yildiray

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is about the adaptive control of time delay systems with applications to automotive control problems. The stabilization of systems involving time delays is a difficult problem since the existence of a delay may ...

  3. Synchronization of networks of oscillators with distributed delay coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. N. Kyrychko; K. B. Blyuss; E. Schoell

    2014-10-27

    This paper studies the stability of synchronized states in networks where couplings between nodes are characterized by some distributed time delay, and develops a generalized master stability function approach. Using a generic example of Stuart-Landau oscillators, it is shown how the stability of synchronized solutions in networks with distributed delay coupling can be determined through a semi-analytic computation of Floquet exponents. The analysis of stability of fully synchronized and of cluster or splay states is illustrated for several practically important choices of delay distributions and network topologies.

  4. Design of coupling for synchronization in time-delayed systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibakar Ghosh; Ioan Grosu; Syamal Kumar Dana

    2012-07-03

    We report a design of delay coupling for targeting desired synchronization in delay dynamical systems. We target synchronization, antisynchronization, lag-, antilag- synchronization, amplitude death (or oscillation death) and generalized synchronization in mismatched oscillators. A scaling of the size of an attractor is made possible in different synchronization regimes. We realize a type of mixed synchronization where synchronization, antisynchronization coexist in different pairs of state variables of the coupled system. We establish the stability condition of synchronization using the Krasovskii-Lyapunov function theory and the Hurwitz matrix criterion. We present numerical examples using the Mackey-Glass system and a delay R\\"{o}ssler system.

  5. Electronic Implementation of the Mackey-Glass Delayed Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Amil; Cecilia Cabeza; Arturo C. Martí

    2014-08-21

    The celebrated Mackey-Glass model describes the dynamics of physiological \\textit{delayed} systems in which the actual evolution depends on the values of the variables at some \\textit{previous} times. This kind of systems are usually expressed by delayed differential equations which turn out to be infinite-dimensional. In this contribution, an electronic implementation mimicking the Mackey-Glass model is proposed. New approaches for both the nonlinear function and the delay block are made. Explicit equations for the actual evolution of the implementation are derived. Simulations of the original equation, the circuit equation, and experimental data show great concordance.

  6. Recent Results in Polarized Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering at STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leszek Adamczyk

    2015-01-05

    RHIC is the only spin-polarized proton collider ever built. With a special optics run of $\\beta^\\star \\approx 22$ m STAR detector system is suitable for an investigation of the spin dependence of elastic proton-proton scattering. This is a brief summary of measurements of spin asymmetries at the center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV and in the four-momentum transfer squared $-t$ range $0.003 < -t < 0.035$ GeV$^2$ by the STAR experiment at RHIC.

  7. Syneresis and delayed detachment in agar plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibaut Divoux; Bosi Mao; Patrick Snabre

    2015-02-20

    Biogels made of crosslinked polymers such as proteins or polysaccharides behave as porous soft solids and store large amount of solvent. These gels undergo spontaneous aging, called syneresis that consists in the shrinkage of the gel matrix and the progressive expulsion of the solvent. As a result, a biogel originally casted in a container often lose contact with the container sidewalls, and the detachment time is a priori difficult to anticipate since it may occur over variable time spans (from hours to days). Here we report on the syneresis phenomena in agar plates that consist in Petri dishes filled with a gel mainly composed of agar. Direct observations and speckle pattern correlation analysis allow us to rationalize the delayed detachment of the gel from the sidewall of the Petri dish. The detachment time $t^*$ is surprisingly not controlled by the mass loss as one would intuitively expect. Instead, $t^*$ is strongly correlated to the gel minimum thickness $e_{min}$ measured along the sidewall of the plate, and increases as a robust function of $e_{min}$ independently of the prior mass-loss history. Time-resolved correlation spectroscopy atypically applied to such weakly diffusive media gives access to the local thinning rate of the gel. This technique also allows us to detect the gel micro-displacements that are triggered by the water evaporation prior to the detachment, and even to anticipate the latter from a few hours. Our work provides observables to predict the detachment time of agar gels in dishes, and highlights the relevance of speckle pattern correlation analysis for the quantitative investigation of the syneresis dynamics in biopolymer gels.

  8. BP's Perspective on Emissions Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BP's Perspective on Emissions Trading Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop April 30, 2010 Mark - Government policies can create a carbon price via three primary mechanisms: - Emissions trading (BP's strong

  9. AB Proton NMR Using Tensor Algebra Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    AB Proton NMR Using Tensor Algebra Frank Rioux Professor Emeritus of Chemistry CSB|SJU The purpose of this tutorial is to deviate from the usual matrix mechanics approach to the ABC proton nmr system in order

  10. Small Business Innovation Research Award Success Story: Proton Energy Systems

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This success story describes Proton Energy Systems, a small business that designs and manufactures proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis sytems to produce hydrogen from water. The U.S. Departmen

  11. A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Wednesday, 25 July 2012 00:00 Hydrogen bonds are...

  12. Proton transfer in nucleobases is mediated by water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khistyaev, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    Protons migrate along interfacial water without significantKwon and O.F. Mohammed, Water-wire catalysis in photoinducedCatalytic action of a single water molecule in a proton-

  13. The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane October 11, 2012 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 Ram.jpg The cover...

  14. Red or blue? A potential kilonova imprint of the delay until black hole formation following a neutron star merger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian D. Metzger; Rodrigo Fernández

    2014-05-02

    Mergers of binary neutron stars (NSs) usually result in the formation of a hypermassive neutron star (HMNS). Whether- and when this remnant collapses to a black hole (BH) depends primarily on the equation of state and on angular momentum transport processes, both of which are uncertain. Here we show that the lifetime of the merger remnant may be directly imprinted in the radioactively powered kilonova emission following the merger. We employ axisymmetric, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of remnant accretion disks orbiting a HMNS of variable lifetime, and characterize the effect of this delay to BH formation on the disk wind ejecta. When BH formation is relatively prompt (~ 100 ms), outflows from the disk are sufficiently neutron rich to form heavy r-process elements, resulting in ~ week-long emission with a spectral peak in the near-infrared (NIR), similar to that produced by the dynamical ejecta. In contrast, delayed BH formation allows neutrinos from the HMNS to raise the electron fraction in the polar direction to values such that potentially Lanthanide-free outflows are generated. The lower opacity would produce a brighter, bluer, and shorter-lived ~ day-long emission (a `blue bump') prior to the late NIR peak from the dynamical ejecta and equatorial wind. This new diagnostic of BH formation should be useful for events with a signal to noise lower than that required for direct detection of gravitational waveform signatures.

  15. Proton Assisted Recoupling at High Spinning Frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Struppe, Jochem

    We demonstrate the successful application of [superscript 13]C?[superscript 13]C proton assisted recoupling (PAR) on [U?[superscript 13]C,[superscript 15]N] N-f-MLF-OH and [U?13C,15N] protein GB1 at high magic angle spinning ...

  16. DYNAMIC MODELING PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    DYNAMIC MODELING PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELL OVERVIEW Current/Completed Plug Power to garner SCAQMD funding for fuel cell testing GenCore system is sensitive to diluents · As built design stream to compensate for removal of EGR · Functionality of the modified GenCore Fuel Cell system

  17. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsher, Richard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Seagraves, David T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  18. Chaos anti-synchronization in multiple time delay power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elman Shahverdiev

    2015-09-20

    We elucidate conditions for chaos anti-synchronization between two uni-directionally coupled multiple time delay power systems. The results are of some importance to prevent power black-out in the entire power grid.

  19. Time delay for dispersive systems in quantum scattering theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael Tiedra de Aldecoa

    2008-10-06

    We consider time delay and symmetrised time delay (defined in terms of sojourn times) for quantum scattering pairs $\\{H_0=h(P),H\\}$, where $h(P)$ a dispersive operator of hypoelliptic-type. For instance $h(P)$ can be one of the usual elliptic operators such as the Schr\\"odinger operator $h(P)=P^2$ or the square-root Klein-Gordon operator $h(P)=\\sqrt{1+P^2}$. We show under general conditions that the symmetrised time delay exists for all smooth even localization functions. It is equal to the Eisenbud-Wigner time delay plus a contribution due to the non-radial component of the localization function. If the scattering operator $S$ commutes with some function of the velocity operator $\

  20. A structural approach to delay optimization in combinational circuits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munshi, Avinash

    1999-01-01

    A major problem in circuit design is achieving the maximum performance for a given technology. In the context of logic synthesis and optimization, maximizing performance means reducing the maximum propagation delay from circuit inputs to outputs...

  1. Delay-sensitive communication over wireless multihop channels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Omar Ahmed

    2009-05-15

    Wireless systems of today face the dual challenge of both supporting large traffic flows and providing reliable quality of service to different delay-sensitive applications. For such applications, it is essential to derive meaningful performance...

  2. On delay-sensitive communication over wireless systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lingjia

    2009-05-15

    This dissertation addresses some of the most important issues in delay-sensitive communication over wireless systems and networks. Traditionally, the design of communication networks adopts a layered framework where each layer serves as a “black box...

  3. Inter-sensor propagation delay estimation using sources of opportunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Rémy; Michel, Olivier; Lacoume, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Propagation delays are intensively used for Structural Health Monitoring or Sensor Network Localization. In this paper, we study the performances of acoustic propagation delay estimation between two sensors, using sources of opportunity only. Such sources are defined as being uncontrolled by the user (activation time, location, spectral content in time and space), thus preventing the direct estimation with classical active approaches, such as TDOA, RSSI and AOA. Observation models are extended from the literature to account for the spectral characteristics of the sources in this passive context and we show how time-filtered sources of opportunity impact the retrieval of the propagation delay between two sensors. A geometrical analogy is then proposed that leads to a lower bound on the variance of the propagation delay estimation that accounts for both the temporal and the spatial properties of the sources field.

  4. Complete chaotic synchronization in mutually coupled time-delay systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandra S. Landsman; Ira B. Schwartz

    2007-10-25

    Complete chaotic synchronization of end lasers has been observed in a line of mutually coupled, time-delayed system of three lasers, with no direct communication between the end lasers. The present paper uses ideas from generalized synchronization to explain the complete synchronization in the presence of long coupling delays, applied to a model of mutually coupled semiconductor lasers in a line. These ideas significantly simplify the analysis by casting the stability in terms of the local dynamics of each laser. The variational equations near the synchronization manifold are analyzed, and used to derive the synchronization condition that is a function of the parameters. The results explain and predict the dependence of synchronization on various parameters, such as time-delays, strength of coupling and dissipation. The ideas can be applied to understand complete synchronization in other chaotic systems with coupling delays and no direct communication between synchronized sub-systems.

  5. Opportunities for Process Monitoring Techniques at Delayed Access Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Johnson, Shirley J.; Schanfein, Mark; Toomey, Christopher

    2013-09-20

    Except for specific cases where the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) maintains a continuous presence at a facility (such as the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant), there is always a period of time or delay between the moment a State is notified or aware of an upcoming inspection, and the time the inspector actually enters the material balance area or facility. Termed by the authors as “delayed access,” this period of time between inspection notice and inspector entrance to a facility poses a concern. Delayed access also has the potential to reduce the effectiveness of measures applied as part of the Safeguards Approach for a facility (such as short-notice inspections). This report investigates the feasibility of using process monitoring to address safeguards challenges posed by delayed access at a subset of facility types.

  6. Effect of resolved branches on the performance of delayed branching 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramabhadran, Anurekha

    1995-01-01

    The impact of resolved branch instructions on the performance of the delayed branching scheme is studied for a two-instruction-issue superscalar pipelined RISC processor. Two processor models are created in Verilog HDL, ...

  7. Time-delayed directional beam phased array antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fund, Douglas Eugene; Cable, John William; Cecil, Tony Myron

    2004-10-19

    An antenna comprising a phased array of quadrifilar helix or other multifilar antenna elements and a time-delaying feed network adapted to feed the elements. The feed network can employ a plurality of coaxial cables that physically bridge a microstrip feed circuitry to feed power signals to the elements. The cables provide an incremental time delay which is related to their physical lengths, such that replacing cables having a first set of lengths with cables having a second set of lengths functions to change the time delay and shift or steer the antenna's main beam. Alternatively, the coaxial cables may be replaced with a programmable signal processor unit adapted to introduce the time delay using signal processing techniques applied to the power signals.

  8. Proportional Differentiated Services: Delay Differentiation and Packet Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dovrolis, Constantinos

    Proportional Differentiated Services: Delay Differentiation and Packet Scheduling Constantinos propose the proportional differ­ entiation model as a way to refine and quantify this basic premise of relative differentiated services. The proportional differentiation model aims to provide the network

  9. Generalization of neuron network model with delay feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjeet Maisnam; R. K. Brojen Singh

    2015-07-16

    We present generalized delayed neural network (DNN) model with positive delay feedback and neuron history. The local stability analysis around trivial local equilibria of delayed neural networks has applied and determine the conditions for the existence of zero root. We develop few innovative delayed neural network models in different dimensions through transformation and extension of some existing models. We found that zero root can have multiplicity two under certain conditions. We further show how the characteristic equation can have zero root and its multiplicity is dependent on the conditions undertaken. Finally, we generalize the neural network of $N$ neurons through which we determine the general form of Jacobian of the linear form and corresponding characteristic equation of the system.

  10. Department of Energy and USEC Announce Decision to Delay USEC...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to delay a final review on the company's loan guarantee application for the American Centrifuge Plant in Piketon, OH. The Department plans to defer review of the application until...

  11. Cross sections for pentaquark baryon production from protons in reactions induced by hadrons and photons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, W.; Ko, Che Ming.

    2003-01-01

    Using hadronic Lagrangians that include the interaction of pentaquark Theta(+) baryon with K and N, we evaluate the cross sections for its production from meson-proton, proton-proton, and photon-proton reactions near threshold.,With empirical...

  12. Measurement of the analysing power in proton-proton elastic scattering at small angles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Bagdasarian; D. Chiladze; S. Dymov; A. Kacharava; G. Macharashvili; S. Barsov; R. Gebel; B. Gou; M. Hartmann; I. Keshelashvili; A. Khoukaz; P. Kulessa; A. Kulikov; A. Lehrach; N. Lomidze; B. Lorentz; R. Maier; D. Mchedlishvili; S. Merzliakov; S. Mikirtychyants; M. Nioradze; H. Ohm; M. Papenbrock; D. Prasuhn; F. Rathmann; V. Serdyuk; V. Shmakova; R. Stassen; H. Stockhorst; I. I. Strakovsky; H. Ströher; M. Tabidze; A. Täschner; S. Trusov; D. Tsirkov; Yu. Uzikov; Yu. Valdau; C. Wilkin; R. L. Workman

    2014-10-28

    The proton analysing power in $\\vec{p}p$ elastic scattering has been measured at small angles at COSY-ANKE at 796 MeV and five other beam energies between 1.6 and 2.4 GeV using a polarised proton beam. The asymmetries obtained by detecting the fast proton in the ANKE forward detector or the slow recoil proton in a silicon tracking telescope are completely consistent. Although the analysing power results agree well with the many published data at 796 MeV, and also with the most recent partial wave solution at this energy, the ANKE data at the higher energies lie well above the predictions of this solution at small angles. An updated phase shift analysis that uses the ANKE results together with the World data leads to a much better description of these new measurements.

  13. Measuring centrality with slow protons in proton-nucleus collisions at 18 GeV/c 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemakin, I.; Cianciolo, V.; Cole, BA; Fernow, R.; Frawley, A.; Gilkes, M.; Gushue, S.; Hartouni, EP; Hiejima, H.; Justice, M.; Kang, JH; Kirk, H.; Maeda, N.; McGrath, R. L.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Morrison, D.; Moulson, M.; Namboodiri, M. N.; Rai, G.; Read, K.; Remsberg, L.; Rosati, M.; Shin, Y.; Soltz, RA; Sorensen, S.; Thomas, J.; Torun, Y.; Winter, D.; Yang, X.; Zajc, WA; Zhang, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Using a multiphase transport model (AMPT), which includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions, we study the rapidity distributions of charged particles such as protons, antiprotons, pions, and kaons in ...

  14. SU-E-T-264: Preliminary Results On New Optically Stimulated Luminescent Materials for Proton Therapy Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doull, B; Zheng, Y; Yukihara, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to test the premise that luminescence materials with less under-response to proton beams can be identified by testing their dose response to low-LET radiation. The goal is to develop new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) materials with improved response for proton therapy dosimetry. Methods: We first measured the dose response of new OSL materials, synthesized in our laboratory, to low-LET radiation (beta rays from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source) and selected two materials having different OSL saturation characteristics and good dosimetric properties, namely MgB4O7:Ce,Li and MgO:Li. Commercial Al2O3:C was also used for comparison. These materials were then irradiated at several depths along a pristine proton beam. The luminescence responses of the materials, relative to the entrance response, were compared with the depth dose profile measured by a multiple-layer ion chamber. Results: The OSL signals of MgB4O7:Ce,Li and MgO:Li were characterized for signal stability, dose response, and response to a clinical proton beam. The materials were also compared with the commercial Al2O3:C. The signals from both MgB4O7:Ce,Li and MgO:Li were relatively stable after a one day delay following irradiation. The low-LET dose response of the materials showed that, over the dose range investigated (up to ?800 Gy), MgB4O7:Ce,Li did not saturate, whereas MgO:Li and Al2O3:C saturated at doses of ?100 Gy. MgB4O7:Ce,Li showed less underresponse to proton beams than MgO:Li and Al2O3:C. Conclusion: In general the material with the highest saturation doses for low-LET radiation (MgB4O7:Ce,Li) showed the least under-response to proton beams, which suggests that it may be possible to develop better OSL materials for proton dosimetry if the dose response can be controlled during synthesis. Nevertheless, the degree in which the response to proton beams can be controlled remains to be determined. The research is funded by the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST), project number HR12-055.

  15. Emissions Trading and Social Justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    David  M.  Driesen,  Does  Emissions  Trading  Encourage  Jason  Coburn,  Emissions  Trading   and   Environmental  Szambelan,  U.S.  Emissions  Trading  Markets  for  SO 2  

  16. Time delay for an abstract quantum scattering process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Richard

    2011-03-20

    In this short review paper, we discuss the concept of time delay for an abstract quantum scattering system. Its definition in terms of sojourn times is explained as well as its identity with the so-called Eisenbud-Wigner time delay. Necessary and natural conditions for such a construction are introduced and thoroughly discussed. Assumptions and statements are precisely formulated but proofs are contained in two companion papers written in collaboration with R. Tiedra de Aldecoa.

  17. J/Psi and Psi' Polarizations in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at the RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouranga C. Nayak; J. Smith

    2005-12-07

    We study inclusive heavy quarkonium production with definite polarizations in polarized proton-proton collisions using the non-relativistic QCD color-octet mechanism. We present results for rapidity distributions of cross sections and spin asymmetries for the production of J/psi and psi' with specific polarizations in polarized p-p collisions at \\sqrt s = 200 GeV and 500 GeV at the RHIC within the PHENIX detector acceptance range.

  18. Proton Transfer and Hydrogen Bonding in Chemical and Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amrhein, Valentin

    Proton Transfer and Hydrogen Bonding in Chemical and Biological Systems: A Force Field Approach and support. i #12;ii #12;Abstract Proton transfer and hydrogen bonds are fundamental for the function be regarded as incipient proton transfer reactions, so theoretically they can be de- scribed in unitary way

  19. AB3 Proton NMR Using Tensor Algebra Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    AB3 Proton NMR Using Tensor Algebra Frank Rioux Professor Emeritus of Chemistry CSB|SJU The purpose of this tutorial is to calculate the NMR spectrum of a four proton AB3 system in Hz) are for the AB3 proton system 1,1dichloroethane at 60 MHz. A 350.0 B 120.0 Jab 10.00 Hamiltonian

  20. Proton corebeam system in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Proton corebeam system in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid simulations Petr Hellinger1,2 and Pavel 9 November 2011. [1] Results of a twodimensional hybrid expanding box simulation of a proton to a decrease of the ratio between the proton perpendicular and parallel temperatures as well as to an increase

  1. Tertiary proton diagnostics in future inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tertiary proton diagnostics in future inertial confinement fusion experiments S. Cremera) and C. P energetic up to 31 MeV tertiary protons produced during the final stage of inertial confinement fusion the elastic scattering of 14.1 MeV neutrons, is a source of very energetic protons capable of escaping from

  2. Proton Diffusion in Nickel Hydroxide Prediction of Active Material Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    Proton Diffusion in Nickel Hydroxide Prediction of Active Material Utilization Sathya Motupally of the active material is controlled by the diffusion rate of protons through the film. This hypothesis- tion by including the effect of proton diffusion through the active material of the nickel electrode.6

  3. Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods A. G. Yahnin,1 T. A are generated because of a cyclotron instability of the anisotropic distribution of ring current ions. Proton precipitation produced by the cyclotron instability can be responsible for proton aurora. Indeed

  4. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRELIMINARY TRACKING STUDIES FOR PROTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ PRELIMINARY TRACKING STUDIES FOR PROTON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY Acknowledgments xi 1 Introduction 1 1.1 The Need for Proton Computed Tomography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.4 Treatment Planning: Proton CT vs. X-ray CT

  5. Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buratto, Steve

    Nanoscale Current Imaging of the Conducting Channels in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells David A area of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is investigated using conductive probe atomic particle at its end. This is due to the formation of protons, at the carbon cloth side of the cell

  6. Investigation of Transient Phenomena of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Investigation of Transient Phenomena of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells by Roongrojana of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells by Roongrojana Songprakorp BSc, Prince of Songkhla University to the modeling and under- standing of the dynamic behavior of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs

  7. Delayed-fission properties of neutron-deficient americium nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, H.L. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-10-23

    Characteristics of the delayed-fission decay mode in light americium nuclei have been investigated. Measurements on the unknown isotopes {sup 230}Am and {sup 236}Am were attempted, and upper limits on the delayed-fission branches of these nuclei were determined. Evidence of the existence of {sup 236}Am was observed in radiochemical separations. Total kinetic energy and mass-yield distributions of the electron-capture delayed-fission mode were measured for {sup 232}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 1.31 {plus minus} 0.04 min) and for {sup 234}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 2.32 {plus minus} 0.08 min), and delayed-fission probabilities of 6.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} and 6.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}, respectively, were determined. The total kinetic energy and the asymmetric mass-yield distributions are typical of fission of mid-range actinides. No discernible influence of the anomalous triple-peaked mass division characteristic of the thorium-radium region was detected. Measurements of the time correlation between the electron-capture x-rays and the subsequent fission conform that the observed fissions arise from the electron-capture delayed-fission mechanism. Delayed fission has provided a unique opportunity to extend the range of low-energy fission studies to previously inaccessible regions. 71 refs., 44 figs., 13 tabs.

  8. SU-E-T-329: Tissue-Equivalent Phantom Materials for Neutron Dosimetry in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halg, R; Lomax, A; Clarke, S; Wieger, B; Pryser, E; Arghal, R; Pozzi, S; Bashkirov, V; Schulte, R; Schneider, U

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize tissue equivalence of phantom materials in terms of secondary neutron production and dose deposition from neutrons produced in radiation therapy phantom materials in the context of proton therapy using Monte Carlo simulations and measurements. Methods: In order to study the influence of material choice on neutron production in therapeutic proton beams, Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 and MCNPX-PoliMi transport codes were performed to generate the neutron fields produced by protons of 155 and 200 MeV. A simple irradiation geometry was used to investigate the effect of different materials. The proton beams were stopped in slab phantoms to study the production of secondary neutrons. The investigated materials were water, Lucite, and tissue-equivalent phantom materials (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA). Neutron energy spectra and absorbed dose by neutrons and their secondary particles were scored. In addition, simulations were performed for reference tissues (ICRP/ICRU) to assess tissue equivalence with respect to neutron generation and transport. In order to benchmark the simulation results, measurements were performed with a system developed at the University of Michigan; organic liquid scintillators were used to detect the neutron emissions from the irradiation of tissue-equivalent materials. Additionally, the MPPost code was used to calculate the scintillator response from the MCNPX-PoliMi output. Results: The simulated energy spectra and depth dose curves of the neutrons produced in different phantom materials showed similar shape. The differences of spectra and fluences between all studied materials and reference tissues were well within the achievable precision of neutron dosimetry. The shape of the simulated detector response of the liquid scintillators agreed well with measurements on the proton beamline. Conclusion: Based on Geant4 and MCNPX-PoliMi simulations, the investigated materials appear to be suitable to study the production of neutrons in proton therapy. MC simulations were verified with neutron measurements in therapeutic proton beams. This work was funded in part by the ANDANTE grant of the European Commission in the 7th Framework Program.

  9. Modification for complex-particle emission probability in the pre-equilibrium exciton model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao Ron-zhi; Wu Guo-hua; Zheng Wei-han; Liu Jian-ye; Yu Chao-fan; Yu Xie

    1986-04-01

    Starting from a state density formula that distinguishes between neutrons and protons, we have derived corrections for the emission probability W/sub alphabeta/ for complex particles and the purely combinatorial probability R/sub alphabeta/. The calculated results agree well with experimental data and show clear improvement over previous calculations.

  10. Neutrino pair emission due to scattering of electrons off fluxoids in superfluid neutron star cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Kaminker; D. G. Yakovlev; P. Haensel

    1997-02-18

    We study the emission of neutrinos, resulting from the scattering of electrons off magnetic flux tubes (fluxoids) in the neutron star cores with superfluid (superconducting) protons. In the absence of proton superfluidity (T> T_{cp}), this process transforms into the well known electron synchrotron emission of neutrino pairs in a locally uniform magnetic field B, with the neutrino energy loss rate Q proportional to B^2 T^5. For temperatures T not much below T_{cp}, the synchrotron regime (Q \\propto T^5) persists and the emissivity Q can be amplified by several orders of magnitude due to the appearance of the fluxoids and associated enhancement of the field within them. For lower T, the synchrotron regime transforms into the bremsstrahlung regime (Q \\propto T^6) similar to the ordinary neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung of electrons which scatter off atomic nuclei. We calculate Q numerically and represent our results through a suitable analytic fit. In addition, we estimate the emissivities of two other neutrino-production mechanisms which are usually neglected -- neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung processes due to electron-proton and electron-electron collisions. We show that the electron-fluxoid and electron-electron scattering can provide the main neutrino production mechanisms in the neutron star cores with highly superfluid protons and neutrons at T scattering is significant if the initial, locally uniform magnetic field B > 10^{13} G.

  11. On physical interpretation of two dimensional time-correlations regarding time delay velocities and eddy shaping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorczak, N. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Manz, P. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut feur Plasmaphysik, Association Euratom-IPP, 85748Garching (Germany); Thakur, S. C.; Xu, M.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Time delay estimation (TDE) techniques are frequently used to estimate the flow velocity from fluctuating measurements. Tilted structures carried by the flow lead to misinterpretation of the time delays in terms of velocity direction and amplitude. It affects TDE measurements from probes, and is also intrinsically important for beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging measurements. Local eddy shapes estimated from 2D fluctuating field are necessary to gain a more accurate flow estimate from TDE, as illustrated by Langmuir probe array measurements. A least square regression approach is proposed to estimate both flow field and shaping parameters. The technique is applied to a test case built from numerical simulation of interchange fluctuations. The local eddy shape does not only provide corrections for the velocity field but also quantitative information about the statistical interaction mechanisms between local eddies and E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear. The technique is then tested on gaz puff imaging data collected at the edge of EAST tokamak plasmas. It is shown that poloidal asymmetries of the fluctuation fields-velocity and eddy shape-are consistent at least qualitatively with a ballooning type of turbulence immersed in a radially sheared equilibrium flow.

  12. Detectability of Gravitational Radiation from Prompt and Delayed Star Collapse to a Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristiano Palomba

    2001-01-31

    We consider the emission of gravitational waves in the two proposed models for the collapse of a massive star to a black hole: the prompt collapse, in which nearly all the star collapses to a black hole in a dynamical time scale, and the delayed collapse, in which a light black hole, or a neutron star, which subsequently accretes matter, forms due to the fall-back achieving, in the neutron star case, the critical mass for black hole formation. Recent simulations strongly support this last scenario. We show that, due to the slowness of fall-back, in the delayed collapse the main burst of gravitational radiation is emitted depending on the parameters, mass and angular momentum, of the initial, light, black hole. We estimate, under different assumptions, the detectability of the emitted gravitational waves showing that such kind of collapse is not particularly suited for detection by forthcoming interferometric detectors. Detectors with high sensitivity at frequencies greater than ~4-5 kHz would be well suited for this kind of sources. We calculate also the final mass distribution function of single black holes.

  13. Electron-capture delayed fission properties of neutron-deficient einsteinium nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaughnessy, Dawn A.

    2000-01-05

    Electron-capture delayed fission (ECDF) properties of neutron-deficient einsteinium isotopes were investigated using a combination of chemical separations and on-line radiation detection methods. {sup 242}Es was produced via the {sup 233}U({sup 14}N,5n){sup 242}Es reaction at a beam energy of 87 MeV (on target) in the lab system, and was found to decay with a half-life of 11 {+-} 3 seconds. The ECDF of {sup 242}Es showed a highly asymmetric mass distribution with an average pre-neutron emission total kinetic energy (TKE) of 183 {+-} 18 MeV. The probability of delayed fission (P{sub DF}) was measured to be 0.006 {+-} 0.002. In conjunction with this experiment, the excitation functions of the {sup 233}U({sup 14}N,xn){sup 247{minus}x}Es and {sup 233}U({sup 15}N,xn){sup 248{minus}x}Es reactions were measured for {sup 243}Es, {sup 244}Es and {sup 245}Es at projectile energies between 80 MeV and 100 MeV.

  14. Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

  15. Abstract--Proton computed tomography (pCT) has the potential to improve the accuracy of dose calculations for proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Klaus

    Abstract--Proton computed tomography (pCT) has the potential to improve the accuracy of dose calculations for proton treatment planning, and will also be useful for pretreatment verification of patient positioning relative to the proton beam. A design study was performed to define the optimal approach to a p

  16. Low Energy Barrier Proton Transfer in Protonated Benzene-Water Complex Eugene S. Kryachko and Minh Tho Nguyen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Minh Tho

    Low Energy Barrier Proton Transfer in Protonated Benzene-Water Complex Eugene S. Kryachko and Minh-proton transfer from the benzenium-water complex occurred through the low-energy barrier. The latter is associated-bonded benzene-water complex is studied at the MP2/6-31+G(d,p) computational level. It is shown that, contrary

  17. Leading proton production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ZEUS Collaboration

    2008-12-12

    The semi-inclusive reaction e+ p -> e+ X p was studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 12.8 pb-1. The final-state proton, which was detected with the ZEUS leading proton spectrometer, carried a large fraction of the incoming proton energy, xL>0.32, and its transverse momentum squared satisfied pT^2proton system was 45proton production cross section and rates are presented as a function of xL, pT^2, Q^2 and the Bjorken scaling variable, x.

  18. Recoil proton distribution in high energy photoproduction processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bartos; E. A. Kuraev; Yu. P. Peresunko; E. A. Vinokurov

    2006-11-22

    For high energy linearly polarized photon--proton scattering we have calculated the azimuthal and polar angle distributions in inclusive on recoil proton experimental setup. We have taken into account the production of lepton and pseudoscalar meson charged pairs. The typical values of cross sections are of order of hundreds of picobarn. The size of polarization effects are of order of several percents. The results are generalized for the case of electroproduction processes on the proton at rest and for high energy proton production process on resting proton.

  19. Production of $K^-$-mesons in proton-proton and proton-nucleus interactions at various energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Efremov; E. Ya. Paryev

    1995-07-17

    The experimental data on the production of $K^-$-mesons in pp-collisions are analyzed and a method of the unified description of these data in a broad energy range for primary protons is proposed. The $K^-$-mesons production in pA-collisions is considered. The simple formulas for inclusive cross sections of the $K^-$ production in these collisions are given. The results of the calculations by these formulas are compared with the available experimental data.

  20. A clinically feasible method for the detection of potential collision in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou Wei; Lin Haibo; Plastaras, John P.; Wang Huanshu; Bui, Viet; Vapiwala, Neha; McDonough, James; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Potential collision between the patient/couch and the gantry could delay the start of the treatment and reduce clinical efficiency. The ability to accurately detect possible collisions during the treatment planning phase is desired. Such collision detection should account for the specific proton gantry design, the treatment beam configuration, couch orientation, and the patient specific geometry. In this paper the authors developed an approach to detect possible patient-machine collisions using patient treatment plan data. Methods: The geometry of the machine and the patient was reconstructed relative to the isocenter of the proton treatment room. The surface contour of the gantry was first captured from the proton computer aided design and reconstructed to account for specific gantry rotation, snout position, collimator rotation, and range compensator dimensions based on the patient treatment plan data. The patient body and couch contours were captured from the patient's CT DICOM structure file. They were reconstructed relative to the isocenter taking into account treatment couch rotation. For potential collision that occurs at body portions where no CT images exist, scout images are used to construct the body contour. A software program was developed using a ray casting algorithm that was applied to detect collisions by determining if any of the patient and couch contour points fall into the spatial polygons formed by the proton gantry surfaces. Results: Twenty-four patient plans with or without potential collisions were retrospectively identified and analyzed using the collision detection software. In addition, five collision cases were artificially generated using an anthropomorphic phantom. The program successfully detected the collisions in all cases. The calculation time for each case was within 20 s. The software program was implemented in the authors' clinic to detect patient-gantry or gantry-couch collisions in the treatment planning phase. Conclusions: The authors developed a fast and clinically feasible patient-specific collision detection program for proton therapy based on a ray casting algorithm. If incorporated during the treatment planning phase it may lead to improved clinical efficiency. This methodology could also be applied to patient collision detection in photon therapy.

  1. Delayed Nickel Decay in Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. C. McLaughlin; R. A. M. J. Wijers

    2002-05-19

    Recently observed emission lines in the X-ray afterglow of gamma ray bursts suggest that iron group elements are either produced in the gamma ray burst, or are present nearby. If this material is the product of a thermonuclear burn, then such material would be expected to be rich in Nickel-56. If the nickel remains partially ionized, this prevents the electron capture reaction normally associated with the decay of Nickel-56, dramatically increasing the decay timescale. Here we examine the consequences of rapid ejection of a fraction of a solar mass of iron group material from the center of a collapsar/hypernova. The exact rate of decay then depends on the details of the ionization and therefore the ejection process. Future observations of iron, nickel and cobalt lines can be used to diagnose the origin of these elements and to better understand the astrophysical site of gamma ray bursts. In this model, the X-ray lines of these iron-group elements could be detected in suspected hypernovae that did not produce an observable gamma ray burst due to beaming.

  2. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    carbon-intensive fossil fuel, increased by 4.8 percent. 2.8. Carbon dioxide emissions and carbon sequestration from nonfuel uses of energy inputs Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels (for...

  3. Forster mechanism of electron-driven proton pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatoly Yu. Smirnov; Lev G. Mourokh; Franco Nori

    2007-11-08

    We examine a simple model of proton pumping through the inner membrane of mitochondria in the living cell. We demonstrate that the pumping process can be described using approaches of condensed matter physics. In the framework of this model, we show that the resonant F\\"orster-type energy exchange due to electron-proton Coulomb interaction can provide an unidirectional flow of protons against an electrochemical proton gradient, thereby accomplishing proton pumping. The dependence of this effect on temperature as well as electron and proton voltage build-ups are obtained taking into account electrostatic forces and noise in the environment. We find that the proton pump works with maximum efficiency in the range of temperatures and transmembrane electrochemical potentials which correspond to the parameters of living cells.

  4. Assessing the Costs Attributed to Project Delay Curtis Beaty, P.E.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Commercial Value of Time Change in Highway Cost Index Total Month of Delay Estimated Return on Investment Cost Index (HCI) (during Delay) 11% 29% 3% Travel-Related Variables Length of Project 2.7 2.6 1 Impacts 8.0% 8.0% 8.0% Examples of Cost of Construction Delay #12;Monthly Cost of Project Delay Small

  5. Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-05-27

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

  6. Dissociative ionization of H{sub 2} in an attosecond pulse train and delayed laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Feng; Thumm, Uwe [James R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2604 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The ionization of H{sub 2} in a single attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulse generates a nuclear wave packet in H{sub 2}{sup +}, which is entangled with the emitted photoelectron wave packet. The nuclear wave-packet dynamics can be observed by dissociating H{sub 2}{sup +} in a delayed IR laser pulse. If H{sub 2} is ionized by a sequence of XUV pulses of an attosecond pulse train, whether or not the corresponding sequence of nuclear wave packets in H{sub 2}{sup +} is detected as a coherent or incoherent superposition depends on whether and how the photoelectrons are observed. We simulate the nuclear dynamics in this XUV-pump-IR-probe scenario and analyze our numerical results for both single attosecond pump pulses and pump-pulse trains of different lengths and temporal spacings between individual XUV pulses. By superimposing nuclear wave packets in H{sub 2}{sup +} generated by individual pulses in the pump-pulse train incoherently, we calculate proton kinetic energy release spectra that are in good qualitative agreement with the recent experiment of Kelkensberg et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 123005 (2009)].

  7. The Cause of Photospheric and Helioseismic Responses to Solar Flares: High-Energy Electrons or Protons?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Kosovichev

    2007-10-03

    Analysis of the hydrodynamic and helioseismic effects in the photosphere during the solar flare of July 23, 2002, observed by Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on SOHO, and high-energy images from RHESSI shows that these effects are closely associated with sources of the hard X-ray emission, and that there are no such effects in the centroid region of the flare gamma-ray emission. These results demonstrate that contrary to expectations the hydrodynamic and helioseismic responses (''sunquakes") are more likely to be caused by accelerated electrons than by high-energy protons. A series of multiple impulses of high-energy electrons forms a hydrodynamic source moving in the photosphere with a supersonic speed. The moving source plays a critical role in the formation of the anisotropic wave front of sunquakes.

  8. Semiclassical study on Proton and Neutron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Grossu; C. Besliu; Al. Jipa; D. Felea; C. C. Bordeianu

    2010-02-09

    Starting from the existing semiclassical studies on hydrogenoid atoms, we propose a similar intuitive exercise for the three-body quark systems corresponding to protons and neutrons. In the frame of this toy model we try to explain both the stabilities of proton and neutron with respect to the nuclear interaction, and the spectrum of nucleonic resonances with J=1/2. Our choice is motivated also by a good agreement obtained for the up and down quark rest masses report. Taking into account the deterministic chaotic behavior of many-body systems, the discussed exercise could be understood as an interesting particular case of a quantum three-body problem which admits a semiclassical treatment.

  9. Optimization parameter design for proton irradiation accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Wen An; Hong-Fei Ji; Sheng Wang; Shou-Yan Xu

    2014-11-20

    The proton irradiation accelerator is widely founded for industry application, and should be designed as compact, reliable, and easy operate. A 10 MeV proton beam is designed to be injected into the slow circulation ring with the repetition rate of 0.5 Hz for accumulation and acceleration, and then the beam with the energy of 300MeV will be slowly extracted by third order resonance method. For getting a higher intensity and more uniform beam, the height of the injection bump is carefully optimised during the injection period. Besides, in order to make the extracted beam with a more uniform distribution, a RF Knock-out method is adopted, and the RF kicker's amplitude is well optimised.

  10. Method of synthesis of proton conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando Henry; Einsla, Melinda Lou; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2010-06-15

    A method of producing a proton conducting material, comprising adding a pyrophosphate salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved pyrophosphate salt; adding an inorganic acid salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved inorganic acid salt; adding the dissolved inorganic acid salt to the dissolved pyrophosphate salt to produce a mixture; substantially evaporating the solvent from the mixture to produce a precipitate; and calcining the precipitate at a temperature of from about 400.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C.

  11. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-10-06

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  12. Proton form factor effects in hydrogenic atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daza, F. Garcia; Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.

    2011-10-21

    The proton structure corrections to the hyperfine splittings in electronic and muonic hydrogen are evaluated using the Breit potential with electromagnetic form factors. In contrast to other methods, the Breit equation with q{sup 2} dependent form factors is just an extension of the standard Breit equation which gives the hyperfine splitting Hamiltonian. Precise QED corrections are comparable to the structure corrections which therefore need to be evaluated ab initio.

  13. Performance specifications for proton medical facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, W.T.; Staples, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Renner, T.R.; Singh, R.P.; Nyman, M.A.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.K.; Petti, P.L.; Alonso, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kubo, H.; Verhey, L.J. [University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine; Castro, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1993-03-01

    Performance specifications of technical components of a modern proton radiotherapy facility are presented. The technical items specified include: the accelerator; the beam transport system including rotating gantry; the treatment beamline systems including beam scattering, beam scanning, and dosimetric instrumentation; and an integrated treatment and accelerator control system. Also included are treatment ancillary facilities such as diagnostic tools, patient positioning and alignment devices, and treatment planning systems. The facility specified will accommodate beam scanning enabling the three-dimensional conformal therapy deliver .

  14. Capture reactions into borromean two-proton systems at rp-waiting points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hove, D; Fynbo, H O U; Zinner, N T; Fedorov, D V; Garrido, E

    2015-01-01

    We investigate even-even two-proton borromean systems at prominent intermediate heavy waiting points for the rapid proton capture process. The most likely single-particle levels are used to calculate three-body energy and structure as a function of proton-core resonance energy. We establish a linear dependence between two- and three-body energies with the same slope, but the absolute value slightly dependent on partial wave structure. Using these relations we predict low-lying excited states in the isotones following the critical waiting points. The capture rate for producing a borromean bound state is described both based on a full three-body calculation and on a very simple analytic rate expression for temperatures about $1-5$~GK. This rate is valid for both direct and sequential capture paths, and it only depends on the three-body resonance energy. As a result the relevant path of the radiative capture reactions can be determined. We present numerical results for $E1$ and $E2$ photon emission, and discuss ...

  15. FFAG ACCELERATOR PROTON DRIVER FOR NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUGGIERO, A.

    2005-06-21

    This paper is the summary of a conceptual study of a Proton Driver for Neutrino Factory based on the use of a Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) Accelerator. The required proton energy range for an optimum neutrino production is 5 to 12 GeV. This can be accomplished with a group of three concentric rings each with 807 m circumference [1]. FFAG Accelerators [2] have the capability to accelerate charged particles over a large momentum range ({+-}30-50%) and the feature of constant bending and focusing fields. Particles can be accelerated very fast at the rate given by the accelerating field of RF cavities placed in proper locations between magnets. The performance of FFAG accelerators is to be placed between that of Super-Conducting Linear Accelerators (SCL), with which they share the fast acceleration rate, and Rapid-Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS), as they allow the beam to re-circulate over fewer revolutions. Brookhaven National Laboratory is involved in the study of feasibility of FFAG Accelerators to accelerate intense beams of protons in the GeV energy range for a variety of applications the most important of which is the Upgrade of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) with a new FFAG injector [3] accelerating from 400 MeV to 1.5 GeV. The ring would be housed in the AGS tunnel and has henceforth a circumference of 807 m.

  16. Generalized z-scaling in proton-proton collisions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Zborovsky; M. Tokarev

    2006-03-28

    New generalization of z-scaling in inclusive particle production is proposed. The scaling variable z is fractal measure which depends on kinematical characteristics of the underlying sub-process expressed in terms of the momentum fractions x1 and x2 of the incoming protons. In the generalized approach, the x1 and x2 are functions of the momentum fractions ya and yb of the scattered and recoil constituents carried out by the inclusive particle and recoil object, respectively. The scaling function psi(z) for charged and identified hadrons produced in proton-proton collisions is constructed. The fractal dimensions and heat capacity of the produced medium entering definition of the z are established to obtain energy, angular and multiplicity independence of the psi(z). The scheme allows unique description of data on inclusive cross sections of charged particles, pions, kaons, antiprotons and lambdas at high energies. The obtained results are of interest to use z-scaling as a tool for searching for new physics phenomena of particle production in high transverse momentum and high multiplicity region at proton-proton colliders RHIC and LHC.

  17. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Struminsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV {\\gamma}-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these {\\gamma}-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and {\\pi}0-decay {\\gamma}-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X-ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard {\\gamma}-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated du...

  18. In-Jet Tracking Efficiency Analysis for the STAR Time Projection Chamber in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt(s) = 200GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huo, Liaoyuan

    2012-07-16

    in polarized proton-proton collision experiments. TPC's in-jet tracking efficiency represents the largest systematic uncertainty on jet energy scale at high transverse momentum, whose measurement contributes to the understanding of the spin structure of protons...

  19. Pion-proton correlations and asymmetry measurement in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ $GeV$ data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Zawisza; for the STAR Collaboration

    2010-12-30

    Correlations between non-identical particles at small relative velocity probe asymmetries in the average space-time emission points at freeze-out. The origin of such asymmetries may be from long-lived resonances, bulk collective effects, or differences in the freeze-out scenario for the different particle species. STAR has extracted pion-proton correlation functions from a dataset of Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ $GeV$. We present correlation functions in the spherical harmonic decomposition representation, for different centralities and for different combinations of pions and (anti-)protons.

  20. Measurement of Transverse Single Spin Asymmetries for $\\pi^{0}$ and Jets at Large $x_{F}$ in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 500 GeV Polarized Proton Collisions at STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Yuxi

    2015-01-01

    Proton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .as a polarized proton collider . . . . . . . . . . . . .Proton (p) as in the Baryon-Octet

  1. Vehicle Emissions Review- 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and general technology approaches for heavy- and light-duty vehicle emissions control - filter technology, new catalysts, NOx control, diesel oxidation catalysts, gasoline particulate filters

  2. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  3. Modeling Traffic Flow Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappiello, Alessandra

    2002-09-17

    The main topic of this thesis is the development of light-duty vehicle dynamic emission models and their integration with dynamic traffic models. Combined, these models

  4. Biological Air Emissions Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Air quality standards are becoming more stringent for the U.S. wood products industry. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (including methanol,...

  5. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

  6. Neutrino emission in the jet propagation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, D.; Dai, Z. G.

    2014-07-20

    Relativistic jets are universal in long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) models. Before breaking out, they must propagate in the progenitor envelope along with a forward shock and a reverse shock forming at the jet head. Both electrons and protons will be accelerated by the shocks. High-energy neutrinos could be produced by these protons interacting with stellar materials and electron-radiating photons. The jet will probably be collimated, which may have a strong effect on the final neutrino flux. Under the assumption of a power-law stellar-envelope density profile ??r {sup –?} with index ?, we calculate the neutrino emission flux by these shocks for low-luminosity GRBs (LL-GRBs) and ultra-long GRBs (UL-GRBs) in different collimation regimes, using the jet propagation framework developed by Bromberg et al. We find that LL-GRBs and UL-GRBs are capable of producing detectable high-energy neutrinos up to ?PeV, from which the final neutrino spectrum can be obtained. Further, we conclude that a larger ? corresponds to greater neutrino flux at the high-energy end (?PeV) and to higher maximum neutrino energy as well. However, such differences are so small that it is not promising for us to be able to distinguish these in observations, given the energy resolution we have now.

  7. Kernel regression estimates of time delays between gravitationally lensed fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otaibi, Sultanah AL; Cuevas-Tello, Juan C; Mandel, Ilya; Raychaudhury, Somak

    2015-01-01

    Strongly lensed variable quasars can serve as precise cosmological probes, provided that time delays between the image fluxes can be accurately measured. A number of methods have been proposed to address this problem. In this paper, we explore in detail a new approach based on kernel regression estimates, which is able to estimate a single time delay given several datasets for the same quasar. We develop realistic artificial data sets in order to carry out controlled experiments to test of performance of this new approach. We also test our method on real data from strongly lensed quasar Q0957+561 and compare our estimates against existing results.

  8. Before Mapping After Mapping Area Power Area Delay Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    32 Exam- ples Before Mapping After Mapping Area Power Area Delay Power 5xp1 0.93 0.98 0.86 0.82 0 1.01 1.01 1.02 1.07 0.99 duke2 1.01 1.01 0.99 1.13 0.97 e64 1.00 0.51 0.83 1.16 0.50 ex5 0.99 0.89 0.99 0.92 0.96 1.05 0.90 Table 2: Area, delay and power statistics for power script (normalized

  9. Triple Higgs boson production at a 100 TeV proton-proton collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papaefstathiou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We consider triple Higgs boson production at a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider. We perform a survey of viable final states and compare and contrast triple production to Higgs boson pair production. Focussing on the $hhh \\rightarrow (b\\bar{b}) (b\\bar{b}) (\\gamma \\gamma)$ final state, we construct a baseline analysis for the Standard Model scenario and simple deformations, demonstrating that the process merits investigation in the high-luminosity phase of the future collider as a new probe of the self-coupling sector of the Higgs boson.

  10. Triple Higgs boson production at a 100 TeV proton-proton collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Papaefstathiou; Kazuki Sakurai

    2015-08-26

    We consider triple Higgs boson production at a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider. We perform a survey of viable final states and compare and contrast triple production to Higgs boson pair production. Focussing on the $hhh \\rightarrow (b\\bar{b}) (b\\bar{b}) (\\gamma \\gamma)$ final state, we construct a baseline analysis for the Standard Model scenario and simple deformations, demonstrating that the process merits investigation in the high-luminosity phase of the future collider as a new probe of the self-coupling sector of the Higgs boson.

  11. Comprehensive description of J/? production in proton-proton collisions at collider energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Yan-Qing; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-11-04

    We employ a small x Color Glass Condensate (CGC)+ Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) formalism to compute J/ production at low p? in proton-proton collisions at collider energies. Very good agreement is obtained for total cross-sections, rapidity distributions and low momentum p? distributions. Similar agreement is obtained for production. We observe an overlap region in p? where our results match smoothly to those obtained in a next-to-leading order (NLO) collinearly factorized NRQCD formalism. The relative contribution of color singlet and color octet contributions can be quantified in the CGC+NRQCD framework, with the former contributing approximately 10% of the total cross-section.

  12. Comprehensive description of J/? production in proton-proton collisions at collider energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Yan -Qing; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-11-04

    We employ a small x Color Glass Condensate + Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) formalism to compute J/? production at low p? in proton-proton collisions at collider energies. Very good agreement is obtained for total cross-sections, rapidity distributions and low momentum p? distributions. Similar agreement is obtained for ?' production. We observe an overlap region in p? where our results match smoothly to those obtained in a next-to-leading order (NLO) collinearly factorized NRQCD formalism. The relative contribution of color singlet and color octet contributions can be quantified in the CGC+NRQCD framework, with the former contributing approximately 10% of the total cross-section.

  13. Physics Opportunities of a 100 TeV Proton-Proton Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Mangano, Michelangelo; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC exposes some of the most profound mysteries fundamental physics has encountered in decades, opening the door to the next phase of experimental exploration. More than ever, this will necessitate new machines to push us deeper into the energy frontier. In this article, we discuss the physics motivation and present the physics potential of a proton-proton collider running at an energy significantly beyond that of the LHC and a luminosity comparable to that of the LHC. 100 TeV is used as a benchmark of the center of mass energy, with integrated luminosities from 3 inverse ab to 30 inverse ab.

  14. Nuclear like effects in proton-proton collisions at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Cunqueiro; J. Dias de Deus; C. Pajares

    2009-09-17

    We show that several effects considered nuclear effects are not nuclear in the sense that they do not only occur in nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus collisions but, as well, they are present in hadron-hadron (proton-proton) collisions. The matter creation mechanism in hh, hA and AA collisions is always the same. The pT suppression of particles produced in large multiplicity events compared to low multiplicity events, the elliptic flow and the Cronin effect are predicted to occur in pp collisions at LHC energies as a consequence of the obtained high density partonic medium.

  15. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A.?M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; et al

    2015-05-22

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented.

  16. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A.?M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V.?M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E.?A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Kim, T.?J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G.?P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A.?P.?R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A.?A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G.?G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J.?M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G.?H.; Aldá Júnior, W.?L.; Alves, G.?A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Pol, M.?E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E.?M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W.?L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E.?J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C.?A.; Dias, F.?A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T.?R.; Gregores, E.?M.; Mercadante, P.?G.; Novaes, S.?F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J.?G.; Chen, G.?M.; Chen, H.?S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C.?H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S.?J.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L.?F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J.?P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J.?C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P.?A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahmoud, M.?A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M.?J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J.?L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I.?N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J.?B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E.?C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C.?A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J.?D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.

    2015-05-01

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented.

  17. The Dependence of the Proton-Triton Nuclear Reaction Rate on the Temperature and Energy Content of the High-Energy Proton Distribution Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Dependence of the Proton-Triton Nuclear Reaction Rate on the Temperature and Energy Content of the High-Energy Proton Distribution Function

  18. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  19. Properties of solar energetic particle events inferred from their associated radio emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouloumvakos, A; Valtonen, E; Alissandrakis, C E; Malandraki, O; Tsitsipis, P; Kontogeorgos, A; Moussas, X; Hillaris, A

    2015-01-01

    We study selected properties of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events as inferred from their associated radio emissions. We used a catalogue of 115 SEP events that consists of entries of proton intensity enhancements at one AU, with complete coverage over solar cycle 23, based on high-energy (~68 MeV) protons from SOHO/ERNE and we calculated the proton release time at the Sun using velocity dispersion analysis (VDA). After an initial rejection of cases with unrealistic VDA path lengths, we assembled composite radio spectra for the remaining events using data from ground-based and space-borne radio-spectrographs. For every event we registered the associated radio emissions and we divided the events in groups according to their associated radio emissions. The proton release was found to be most often accompanied by both type III and II radio bursts, but a good association percentage was also registered in cases accompanied by type IIIs only. The worst association was found for the cases with type II only associ...

  20. Anti-Proton Evolution in Little Bangs and Big Bang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Schade; B. Kampfer

    2009-03-30

    The abundances of anti-protons and protons are considered within momentum-integrated Boltzmann equations describing Little Bangs, i.e., fireballs created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Despite of a large anti-proton annihilation cross section we find a small drop of the ratio of anti-protons to protons from 170 MeV (chemical freeze-out temperature) till 100 MeV (kinetic freeze-out temperature) for CERN-SPS and BNL-RHIC energies thus corroborating the solution of the previously exposed "ani-proton puzzle". In contrast, the Big Bang evolves so slowly that the anti-baryons are kept for a long time in equilibrium resulting in an exceedingly small fraction. The adiabatic path of cosmic matter in the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter is mapped out.

  1. Antiproton-Proton Channels in J/psi Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Loiseau; S. Wycech

    2005-12-16

    The recent measurements by the BES Collaboration of J/psi decays into a photon and a proton-antiproton pair indicate a strong enhancement at the proton-antiproton threshold not observed in the decays into a neutral pion and a proton-antiproton pair. Is this enhancement due to a proton-antiproton quasi-bound state or a baryonium? A natural explanation follows from a traditional model of proton-antiproton interactions based on G-parity transformation. The observed proton-antiproton structure is due to a strong attraction in the 1S0 state, and possibly to a near-threshold quasi-bound state in the 11S0 wave.

  2. Neutron-Proton Radii in N \\approx Z Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Auerbach

    2010-06-10

    A simple formula is derived that describes how the Coulomb interaction affects the proton radius in nuclei. It determines the difference between neutron and proton radii in nuclei with N approx Z. It also provides an estimate for the difference between the radii of the Z core neutrons and the protons in nuclei with a large neutron excess. The results obtained from the derived formula are compared with radii calculated in a Skyrme Hartree-Fock calculation.

  3. Proton adsorption onto alumina: extension of multisite complexation (MUSIC) theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagashima, K.; Blum, F.D.

    1999-09-01

    The adsorption isotherm of protons onto a commercial {gamma}-alumina sample was determined in aqueous nitric acid with sodium nitrate as a background electrolyte. Three discrete regions could be discerned in the log-log plots of the proton isotherm determined at the solution pH 5 to 2. The multisite complexation (MUSIC) model was modified to analyze the simultaneous adsorption of protons onto various kinds of surface species.

  4. Mass Evaluation for Proton Rich Nuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Xu, X.; Pfeiffer, B.; Kondev, F. G.

    2011-11-30

    The Atomic mass evaluation (AME) provides the reliable resource for the values related to atomic masses. Since the publication of the latest version of AME in 2003, many developments for atomic mass determination have been done and important results changed significantly our knowledge. A preliminary version of AME was released in April 2011, and an official version is foreseen to be published in early 2013. The general status of AME is presented and some specific features of AME for proton-rich nuclides are discussed.

  5. SuperProtonic | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model for theSunLanSuperDrive Inc Jump to:SuperProtonic Jump

  6. Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| StanfordOffice ofTorus Experiment |Scientist in theProton

  7. A hadronic-leptonic model for the Fermi bubbles: Cosmic-rays in the galactic halo and radio emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2014-07-01

    We investigate non-thermal emission from the Fermi bubbles in a hadronic model. Cosmic-ray (CR) protons are accelerated at the forward shock of the bubbles. They interact with the background gas in the Galactic halo and create ?{sup 0}-decay gamma-rays and secondary electrons through proton-proton interaction. We follow the evolution of the CR protons and electrons by calculating their distribution functions. We find that the spectrum and the intensity profiles of ?{sup 0}-decay gamma-rays are consistent with observations. We predict that the shock front is located far ahead of the gamma-ray boundary of the Fermi bubbles. This naturally explains the fact that a clear temperature jump of thermal gas was not discovered at the gamma-ray boundary in recent Suzaku observations. We also consider re-acceleration of the background CRs in the Galactic halo at the shock front. We find that it can significantly affect the gamma-rays from the Fermi bubbles, unless the density of the background CRs is ? 10% of that in the Galactic disk. We indicate that secondary electrons alone cannot produce the observed radio emission from the Fermi bubbles. However, the radio emission from the outermost region of the bubbles can be explained if electrons are directly accelerated at the shock front with an efficiency of ?0.1% of that of protons.

  8. The proton gyromagnetic g-factor: an electromagnetic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sardin

    2009-12-25

    So far, the Standard Model of Elementary Particles has not succeeded getting a trustworthy account of the proton spin, which remains an enigma. This hindrance is known as the proton spin crisis, owing to the experimental evidence already from 1988 suggesting that little or none of the proton spin would come from the spin of the quarks. This prompted theorists to a flood of guessworks about the proton spin. Since it remains unsolved, in the framework of new physics an exploratory approach based on a novel paradigm is proposed, which brings a renewed access to this challenge, through its reciprocal relationship with the g-factor.

  9. Simulation Shuffles Protons and Electrons | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more electrons, and produce more energy-storing carbohydrates, using less of the solar energy that drives the process. This trick is known as proton-coupled electron...

  10. Reactive Molecular Simulations of Protonation of Water Clusters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reactive Molecular Simulations of Protonation of Water Clusters and Depletion of Acidity in H-ZSM-5 Zeolite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reactive Molecular...

  11. Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ring at Fermilab. The proposed method of non-resonant slow extraction of protons by bent crystals in combination with orbit fast deflectors shows great promise in...

  12. The shape of the proton at high energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlichting, Soren [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schenke, Bjorn [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present first calculations of the fluctuating gluon distribution in a proton as a function of impact parameter and rapidity employing the functional Langevin form of the JIMWLK renormalization group equation. We demonstrate that when including effects of confinement by screening the long range Coulomb field of the color charges, the evolution is unitary. The large-x structure of the proton, characterized by the position of three valence quarks, retains an effect on the proton shape down to very small values of x. We determine the dipole scattering amplitude as a function of impact parameter and dipole size and extract the rapidity evolution of the saturation scale and the proton radius.

  13. Proton transfer in nucleobases is mediated by water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khistyaev, Kirill; Golan, Amir; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Orms, Natalie; Krylov, Anna I.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-29

    Water plays a central role in chemistry and biology by mediating the interactions between molecules, altering energy levels of solvated species, modifying potential energy proles along reaction coordinates, and facilitating ecient proton transport through ion channels and interfaces. This study investigates proton transfer in a model system comprising dry and microhydrated clusters of nucleobases. With mass spectrometry and tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation, we show that water shuts down ionization-induced proton transfer between nucleobases, which is very ecient in dry clusters. Instead, a new pathway opens up in which protonated nucleo bases are generated by proton transfer from the ionized water molecule and elimination of a hydroxyl radical. Electronic structure calculations reveal that the shape of the potential energy prole along the proton transfer coordinate depends strongly on the character of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed, i.e., the proton transfer from water to nucleobases is barrierless when an ionized state localized on water is accessed. The computed energetics of proton transfer is in excellent agreement with the experimental appearance energies. Possible adiabatic passage on the ground electronic state of the ionized system, while energetically accessible at lower energies, is not ecient. Thus, proton transfer is controlled electronically, by the character of the ionized state, rather than statistically, by simple energy considerations.

  14. Fast timing detectors for forward protons at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrow, Michael; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01

    The author discusses the development of high precision timing detectors for high momentum protons at the LHC, and their application in studying exclusive Higgs boson production.

  15. Shuttle-mediated proton pumping across the inner mitochondrial membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatoly Yu. Smirnov; Sergey E. Savel'ev; Franco Nori

    2008-06-19

    Shuttle-assisted charge transfer is pivotal for the efficient energy transduction from the food-stuff electrons to protons in the respiratory chain of animal cells and bacteria. The respiratory chain consists of four metalloprotein Complexes (I-IV) embedded in the inner membrane of a mitochondrion. Three of these complexes pump protons across the membrane, fuelled by the energy of food-stuff electrons. Despite extensive biochemical and biophysical studies, the physical mechanism of this proton pumping is still not well understood. Here we present a nanoelectromechanical model of the electron-driven proton pump related to the second loop of the respiratory chain, where a lipid-soluble ubiquinone molecule shuttles between the Complex I and Complex III, carrying two electrons and two protons. We show that the energy of electrons can be converted to the transmembrane proton potential gradient via the electrostatic interaction between electrons and protons on the shuttle. We find that the system can operate either as a proton pump, or, in the reverse regime, as an electron pump. For membranes with various viscosities, we demonstrate that the uphill proton current peaks near the body temperature $T \\approx 37 ^{\\circ}$C.

  16. Model independent extraction of the proton magnetic radius from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on October 20, 2015 Title: Model independent extraction of the proton magnetic radius from electron...

  17. High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of...

  18. Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors Hannah.phosphate glasses and glass-ceramics were investigated. Therare earth phosphate ceramics, glasses, and glass-ceramics

  19. Dynamical effects in proton breakup from exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonaccorso, Angela; Kumar, Ravinder

    2012-10-20

    This contribution discusses dynamical effects in proton breakup from a weakly bound state in an exotic nucleus on a heavy target. The Coulomb interactions between the proton and the core and the proton and the target are treated to all orders, including also the full multipole expansion of the Coulomb potential. The dynamics of proton Coulomb breakup is compared to that of an equivalent neutron of larger binding energy in order to elucidate the differences with the well understood neutron breakup mechanism. A number of experimentally measurable observables such as parallel momentum distributions, proton angular distributions and total breakup cross sections can be calculated. With respect to nuclear breakup it is found that a proton behaves exactly as a neutron of larger binding energy. The extra 'effective energy' is due to the combined core-target Coulomb barrier. In Coulomb breakup we distinguish the effect of the core-target Coulomb potential (called recoil effect), with respect to which the proton behaves again as a more bound neutron, from the direct proton-target Coulomb potential. The latter gives cross sections about an order of magnitude larger than the recoil term. The two effects give rise to complicated interferences in the parallel momentum distributions. They are instead easily separable in the proton angular distributions which are therefore suggested as a very useful observable for future experimental studies.

  20. Delay Analysis of Combined Input-Crosspoint Queueing Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamdi, Mounir

    Delay Analysis of Combined Input-Crosspoint Queueing Switches Ge Nong, Ning Situ and Mounir Hamdi Abstract-- The switch architecture with the combined input- crosspoint queueing (CICQ) scheme has been recognized as a practical promising solution for building cost-effective high- performance switches. In an N

  1. Time Delay Plot for Pion-Nucleon Elastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed E. Kelabi

    2012-01-14

    We evaluated the time delay plot in the established region of the Delta(1232) resonance through the use of elastic scattering phase shift analysis of the partial wave amplitude P33. The pole position and width of the Delta(1232) resonance were obtained and found in agreement with earlier calculations.

  2. Delayed Development of Pneumothorax After Pulmonary Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clasen, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.clasen@med.uni-tuebingen.d [Eberhard-Karls-University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Kettenbach, Joachim [Medical University of Vienna, Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (Austria); Kosan, Bora; Aebert, Hermann [Eberhard-Karls-University of Tuebingen, Department of Thoracic, Cardiac and Vascular Surgery (Germany); Schernthaner, Melanie [Medical University of Vienna, Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (Austria); Kroeber, Stefan-Martin [Eberhard-Karls-University of Tuebingen, Institute of Pathology (Germany); Boemches, Andrea [Eberhard-Karls-University of Tuebingen, Department of Thoracic, Cardiac and Vascular Surgery (Germany); Claussen, Claus D.; Pereira, Philippe L. [Eberhard-Karls-University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    Acute pneumothorax is a frequent complication after percutaneous pulmonary radiofrequency (RF) ablation. In this study we present three cases showing delayed development of pneumothorax after pulmonary RF ablation in 34 patients. Our purpose is to draw attention to this delayed complication and to propose a possible approach to avoid this major complication. These three cases occurred subsequent to 44 CT-guided pulmonary RF ablation procedures (6.8%) using either internally cooled or multitined expandable RF electrodes. In two patients, the pneumothorax, being initially absent at the end of the intervention, developed without symptoms. One of these patients required chest drain placement 32 h after RF ablation, and in the second patient therapy remained conservative. In the third patient, a slight pneumothorax at the end of the intervention gradually increased and led into tension pneumothorax 5 days after ablation procedure. Underlying bronchopleural fistula along the coagulated former electrode track was diagnosed in two patients. In conclusion, delayed development of pneumothorax after pulmonary RF ablation can occur and is probably due to underlying bronchopleural fistula, potentially leading to tension pneumothorax. Patients and interventionalists should be prepared for delayed onset of this complication, and extensive track ablation following pulmonary RF ablation should be avoided.

  3. Efficient Path Delay Test Generation with Boolean Satisfiability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bian, Kun

    2013-12-10

    This dissertation focuses on improving the accuracy and efficiency of path delay test generation using a Boolean satisfiability (SAT) solver. As part of this research, one of the most commonly used SAT solvers, MiniSat, was integrated into the path...

  4. Delayed energy injection model for gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, J. J.; Huang, Y. F.; Yu, Y. B. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, X. F., E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-12-10

    The shallow decay phase and flares in the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are widely believed to be associated with the later activation of the central engine. Some models of energy injection involve a continuous energy flow since the GRB trigger time, such as the magnetic dipole radiation from a magnetar. However, in the scenario involving a black hole accretion system, the energy flow from the fall-back accretion may be delayed for a fall-back time ?t {sub fb}. Thus, we propose a delayed energy injection model. The delayed energy would cause a notable rise to the Lorentz factor of the external shock, which will 'generate' a bump in the multiple band afterglows. If the delayed time is very short, our model degenerates to the previous models. Our model can explain the significant re-brightening in the optical and infrared light curves of GRB 081029 and GRB 100621A. A considerable fall-back mass is needed to provide the later energy; this indicates that GRBs accompanied with fall-back material may be associated with a low energy supernova so that the fraction of the envelope can survive during eruption. The fall-back time can give meaningful information on the properties of GRB progenitor stars.

  5. Predictive Control for Time-Delayed Switching Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Eric J.

    Predictive Control for Time-Delayed Switching Control Systems Bobby L. Shields Eric J. Barth A methodology is proposed for the control of switching systems characterized by linear system dynamics period determines the effect that the next control input will have on the future output of the system

  6. BIFURCATIONS IN A CAR-FOLLOWING MODEL WITH DELAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    BIFURCATIONS IN A CAR-FOLLOWING MODEL WITH DELAY G´abor Orosz , R. Eddie Wilson , Bernd Krauskopf of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR, United Kingdom Abstract: A simple car-following model that includes the reaction time of drivers is analyzed by numerical continuation techniques for the case of five cars on a ring

  7. Admission Control Framework to Provide Guaranteed Delay in Errorprone Wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Saswati

    1 Admission Control Framework to Provide Guaranteed Delay in Error­prone Wireless Channel Prasanna Chaporkar and Saswati Sarkar Abstract We consider a wireless system in which sessions traverse different­prone wireless system. By ``general'' we mean that the scheduling policies from a large class can be plugged

  8. Fast amplitude and delay measurement for characterization of optical devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael Thomas

    2006-10-30

    of the measured magnitude response of an Acetylene gas cell and comparing it to the integral of the measured group delay. The average deviation between the two methods is 0.1 radians. An Acetylene gas cell, fiber Bragg grating, and chirped Bragg grating are tested...

  9. Delay Optimal Scheduling for Energy Harvesting Based Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Huaiyu

    1 Delay Optimal Scheduling for Energy Harvesting Based Communications Juan Liu, Huaiyu Dai, Senior research interest recently. Equipped with a rechargeable battery, a source node can harvest energy from ambient environments and rely on this free and regenerative energy supply to transmit packets. Due

  10. Delay Fast Packets (DFP): Prevention of DNS Cache Poisoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolev, Danny

    Delay Fast Packets (DFP): Prevention of DNS Cache Poisoning Shimrit Tzur-David Kiril Lashchiver, or any other network resource. This paper presents a solution for the cache poisoning attack in which the attacker inserts incorrect data into the DNS cache. In order to successfully poison the cache, the attacker

  11. Minimum Delay Communication in Energy Harvesting Systems over Fading Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laneman, J. Nicholas

    by the data where the average is taken over all the random processes in our system, i.e, data arrival, energyMinimum Delay Communication in Energy Harvesting Systems over Fading Channels Mostafa Khoshnevisan, Indiana 46556 Email:{mkhoshne, jnl}@nd.edu Abstract--We consider an energy harvesting wireless system

  12. On Churn and Communication Delays in Social Overlays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montresor, Alberto

    On Churn and Communication Delays in Social Overlays Giuliano Mega, Alberto Montresor, and Gian. Yet, the churn induced by the availability of users raises the question--still unanswered--of whether the overlay in the presence of churn. This paper puts forth two contributions. First, we show through

  13. GLOBAL STABILITY IN CHEMOSTAT-TYPE EQUATIONS WITH DISTRIBUTED DELAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, Shigui

    recycled after the death of the biomass by bacterial decomposition, and the second delay indicates process, thus neglecting the time required to regenerate the nutrient from the dead biomass by bacterial chemostat ex- periments with microalgae Chlamidomonas Reinhardii even when the limiting nutrient

  14. Delayed Afterglow Onset Interpreted as Baryon-Poor Viewing Angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Eichler

    2005-03-24

    We have suggested previously that baryons in GRB fireballs infiltrate from the surrounding walls that collimate the fireball. The efficiency $\\epsilon_b$ for generating blast energy can then be angle dependent. Delayed onset of afterglow can be interpreted as being due to a baryon-poor viewing angle.

  15. Delayed neutron measurements from fast fission of actinide waste isotopes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charlton, William S.

    1997-01-01

    quick pneumatic transfer system, an integrated computer control and counting system, and a specially designed in-core irradiation device. The values for the total delayed neutron yield (per 100 fissions) from fast-neutron induced fission of U-235, Np237...

  16. Modeling a Snap-Action, Variable-Delay Switch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, 2, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America When exposed to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or TNFModeling a Snap-Action, Variable-Delay Switch Controlling Extrinsic Cell Death John G. Albeck1

  17. Reconstruction for proton computed tomography by tracing proton trajectories: A Monte Carlo study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the past decades because of its unique imaging characteristics, low radiation dose, and its possible use and precision. This may be exploited for dose-efficient image reconstruction.3 For proton radiation treatment three-dimensional 3D conformal radiation therapy, which has the potential to deliver the optimal dose

  18. Proton in the well and through the desolvation barrier Armen Y. Mulkidjanian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    Review Proton in the well and through the desolvation barrier Armen Y. Mulkidjanian A.N. Belozersky proton well was suggested by Peter Mitchell to account for the energetic equivalence of the chemical (pH) and electrical () components of the proton-motive force. The proton well was defined as a proton

  19. Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  20. Spontaneous Emission Rate Enhancement Using Optical Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    of  Spontaneous  Emission  in  a  Semiconductor  nanoLED,”  emission  rate  enhancement  using  the  Fluorescent  Emission  by  Lattice   Resonances  in  

  1. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawate, T. [Kwasan and Hida Observatory, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nishizuka, N. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Oi, A. [College of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Ohyama, M. [Faculty of Education, Shiga University, 2-5-1 Hiratsu, Otsu, Shiga 1-1, Baba Hikone city, Siga 522-8522 (Japan); Nakajima, H., E-mail: kawate@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory, NAOJ, Nobeyama, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan)

    2012-03-10

    We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

  2. The impact of proton-pump inhibitors on intraperitoneal sepsis: a word of caution for transgastric NOTES procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    B, Tahboub RM (2002) Proton pump inhibitors: an update. Amation between proton pump inhibitor use and bacterialThe impact of proton-pump inhibitors on intraperitoneal

  3. Ion/proton-conducting apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yates, Matthew; Xue, Wei

    2014-12-23

    A c-axis-oriented HAP thin film synthesized by seeded growth on a palladium hydrogen membrane substrate. An exemplary synthetic process includes electrochemical seeding on the substrate, and secondary and tertiary hydrothermal treatments under conditions that favor growth along c-axes and a-axes in sequence. By adjusting corresponding synthetic conditions, an HAP this film can be grown to a controllable thickness with a dense coverage on the underlying substrate. The thin films have relatively high proton conductivity under hydrogen atmosphere and high temperature conditions. The c-axis oriented films may be integrated into fuel cells for application in the intermediate temperature range of 200-600.degree. C. The electrochemical-hydrothermal deposition technique may be applied to create other oriented crystal materials having optimized properties, useful for separations and catalysis as well as electronic and electrochemical applications, electrochemical membrane reactors, and in chemical sensors. Additional high-density and gas-tight HAP film compositions may be deposited using a two-step deposition method that includes an electrochemical deposition method followed by a hydrothermal deposition method. The two-step method uses a single hydrothermal deposition solution composition. The method may be used to deposit HAP films including but not limited to at least doped HAP films, and more particularly including carbonated HAP films. In addition, the high-density and gas-tight HAP films may be used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  4. Event Generator Benchmarking for Proton Radiography Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepan G. Mashnik; Richard E. Prael; Arnold J. Sierk; Konstantin K. Gudima; Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-03-18

    We have benchmarked the QGSM code and event generators of the MARS and LAHET3 codes as potential candidates for high-energy programs to be used in simulations for the Proton Radiography (PRad) Project. We have compiled from the literature experimental data on spectra of particles emitted from proton-induced reactions at incident energies from 30 GeV to 70 GeV on different nuclei and have performed calculations for all reactions for which we found data with these three codes without any modifications and using only default parameters and standard inputs. Our results (514 plots) show that all three codes describe reasonably most of the studied reactions, though all of them should be further improved before becoming reliable tools for PRad. We present here our conclusions concerning the relative roles of different reaction mechanisms in the production of specific secondary particles. We comment on the strengths and weaknesses of QGSM, MARS, and LAHET3 and suggest further improvements to these codes and to other models.

  5. Contraction & Convergence: UK carbon emissions and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    the EU's emissions trading scheme will do little to mitigate carbon emissions 4) Aviation growth must emissions. Keywords Contraction & Convergence; aviation; emissions trading; passengers; carbon dioxide #12

  6. Inhalation of Vehicle Emissions in Urban Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Julian David

    2005-01-01

    distances between vehicles, and emissions from neighboringgasoline on motor vehicle emissions. 2. 6 Volatile organicgasoline on motor vehicle emissions. 1. Mass emission rates.

  7. Rapid Disease Progression With Delay in Treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Kestin, Larry Llyn, E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Grills, Inga Siiner; Battu, Madhu; Fitch, Dwight Lamar [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Wong, Ching-yee Oliver [Department of Nuclear Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Margolis, Jeffrey Harold [Department of Medical Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Chmielewski, Gary William; Welsh, Robert James [Department of Thoracic Surgery, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To assess rate of disease progression from diagnosis to initiation of treatment for Stage I-IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Forty patients with NSCLC underwent at least two sets of computed tomography (CT) and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) scans at various time intervals before treatment. Progression was defined as development of any new lymph node involvement, site of disease, or stage change. Results: Median time interval between first and second CT scans was 13.4 weeks, and between first and second PET scans was 9.0 weeks. Median initial primary maximum tumor dimension (MTD) was 3.5 cm (0.6-8.5 cm) with a median standardized uptake value (SUV) of 13.0 (1.7-38.5). The median MTD increased by a median of 1.0 cm (mean, 1.6 cm) between scans for a median relative MTD increase of 35% (mean, 59%). Nineteen patients (48%) progressed between scans. Rate of any progression was 13%, 31%, and 46% at 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. Upstaging occurred in 3%, 13%, and 21% at these intervals. Distant metastasis became evident in 3%, 13%, and 13% after 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. T and N stage were associated with progression, whereas histology, grade, sex, age, and maximum SUV were not. At 3 years, overall survival for Stage III patients with vs. without progression was 18% vs. 67%, p = 0.05. Conclusions: With NSCLC, treatment delay can lead to disease progression. Diagnosis, staging, and treatment initiation should be expedited. After 4-8 weeks of delay, complete restaging should be strongly considered.

  8. The Impact of Near-term Climate Policy Choices on Technology and Emissions Transition Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Edmonds, James A.; Krey, Volker; Johnson, Nils; Longden, Thomas; Luderer, Gunnar; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the implications of delays associated with currently formulated climate policies (compared to optimal policies) for long-term transition pathways to limit climate forcing to 450ppm CO2e on the basis of the AMPERE Work Package 2 model comparison study. The paper highlights the critical importance of the 2030-2050 period for ambitious mitigation strategies. In this period, the most rapid shift to non-greenhouse gas emitting technology occurs. In the delayed response emissions mitigation scenarios, an even faster transition rate in this period is required to compensate for the additional emissions before 2030. Our physical deployment measures indicate that, without CCS, technology deployment rates in the 2030-2050 period would become considerably high. Yet the presence of CCS greatly alleviates the challenges to the transition particularly after the delayed climate policies. The results also highlight the critical role that bioenergy and CO2 capture and storage (BECCS) could play. If this technology is available, transition pathways exceed the emissions budget in the mid-term, removing the excess with BECCS in the long term. Excluding either BE or CCS from the technology portfolio implies that emission reductions need to take place much earlier.

  9. Emission Abatement System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

    2003-05-13

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  10. Energy deposition spectra of simultaneous electron emissions from low energy protons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePriest, Kendall Russell

    1998-01-01

    -sections are difficult to measure, and the available data suggests only that they are significant. In order to evaluate their potential biological consequences, a Monte Carlo track structure simulation was performed utilizing values that may be representative...

  11. PROMPT HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM PROTON-DOMINATED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding access to(Conference) |ofPDVGLENELG IN GALE CRATERGALAXIESArticle) |

  12. Proton Radiography Studies for Proton CT M. Petterson, N. Blumenkrantz, J. Feldt, J. Heimann, D. Lucia, A. Seiden, D. C. Williams, H. F.-W. Sadrozinski,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Proton Radiography Studies for Proton CT M. Petterson, N. Blumenkrantz, J. Feldt, J. Heimann, D. Randazzo, V. Sipala Abstract­We report the results of a beam experiment to develop proton Computed of a phantom to predict the path of the proton within the phantom and of a crystal calorimeter to measure

  13. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    non-marketed natural gas. g Includes methane emissions related to energy, agriculture, waste management, and industrial processes. h Includes nitrous oxide emissions related...

  14. EPA Emissions | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EPA Emissions ORNL research informs new EPA emissions standards July 11, 2014 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a streamlined method for determining vehicle...

  15. Computational Modeling and Optimization of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Computational Modeling and Optimization of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells by Marc Secanell and Optimization of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells by Marc Secanell Gallart Bachelor in Engineering cells. In this thesis, a computational framework for fuel cell analysis and optimization is presented

  16. Hadron Spectroscopy and the Structure of the Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that hadrons are solid-phase and shell- structured, indicates that the proton and the neutron are made of three scattering d /dt also relies on a three-layered proton. #12;In atomic physics, the understanding remains mysterious, and structural information about (a few) particles is provided by scattering

  17. Correlated two-proton decay from (10)C 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercurio, K.; Charity, R. J.; Shane, R.; Sobotka, L. G.; Elson, J. M.; Famiano, M.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Banu, A.; Fu, C.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    and for a newly found level at E* = 8.4 MeV. A state at E* = 6.57 MeV is shown to undergo two-proton decay to (8)Be(g.s.) with strong p-p correlations consistent with the (1)S phase shift. Based on the lack of such correlations for other two-proton decays...

  18. Meson Production at Low Proton Beam Energy X. Ding, UCLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Meson Production at Low Proton Beam Energy (Update) X. Ding, UCLA Target Studies May 9, 2013 15; · Meson Production at low proton beam energy (below 4 GeV) seems higher for Ga than Hg from our kinetic energy · EM: The hadron threshold energy (Default: 0.0145 GeV) · EPSTAM: The star production

  19. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Carol J. (Warrenville, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

  20. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnstone, C.J.

    1998-06-02

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H{sup {minus}} beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H{sup {minus}} beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H{sup {minus}} beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H{sup {minus}} beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H{sup {minus}} beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H{sup {minus}} beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser. 9 figs.

  1. Mass Determination of Two-Proton Radioactive Nuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miernik, Krzysztof A

    2012-01-01

    The masses of heavy two-proton emitters (45Fe, 48Ni and 54Zn) are calculated, basing on experimentally measured two-proton decay energies. The results are compared with theoretical predictions and extrapolations.

  2. Meson production decreases with increasing proton beam emittance, but

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Meson production decreases with increasing proton beam emittance, but careful optimization keeps production a Ga-jet target is then about 88% of that for a Hg-jet target. INFLUENCE OF PROTON BEAM EMITTANCES ON PARTICLE PRODUCTION OFF A MUON COLLIDER TARGET (IPAC13, TUPFI069) The geometric parameters of a free Hg

  3. ULF Waves Associated with Enhanced Subauroral Proton Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ULF Waves Associated with Enhanced Subauroral Proton Precipitation Thomas J. Immel, S. B. Mende, H Abstract. Several types of sub-auroral proton precipitation events have been identified using and solar wind conditions and the mechanism driving the precipitation has often been assumed

  4. Low energy proton storage ring with longitudinal magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low energy proton storage ring with longitudinal magnetic field and electron cooling M.I. Bryzgunov energy protons. In this particular case it is reaction for production of resonant gamma-quant (9.17 Me Electron cooling: compensates heating effects on internal target compensates energy losses on target

  5. Epoxy-crosslinked sulfonated poly (phenylene) copolymer proton exchange membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hibbs, Michael (Albuquerque, NM); Fujimoto, Cy H. (Albuquerque, NM); Norman, Kirsten (Albuquerque, NM); Hickner, Michael A. (State College, PA)

    2010-10-19

    An epoxy-crosslinked sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer composition used as proton exchange membranes, methods of making the same, and their use as proton exchange membranes (PEM) in hydrogen fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cell, in electrode casting solutions and electrodes, and in sulfur dioxide electrolyzers. These improved membranes are tougher, have higher temperature capability, and lower SO.sub.2 crossover rates.

  6. Analysis of atmospheric delays and asymmetric positioning errors in the global positioning system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materna, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Errors in modeling atmospheric delays are one of the limiting factors in the accuracy of GPS position determination. In regions with uneven topography, atmospheric delay phenomena can be especially complicated. ...

  7. Investigation of the "summation" method for predicting group dependent delayed neutron data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angers, Laetitia Genevieve

    1998-01-01

    of the average delayed neutron lifetime by 15% for U-235 thermal fission, which agrees more closely with Keepin's results. The modified delayed neutron data set also improves the calculated reactor period (relative to the reactor period calculated using Keepin...

  8. Measurements of neutron dose equivalent for a proton therapy center using uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Liu Yaxi; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Andries Niek; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); INTEGRIS Cancer Insititute, 5911 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Neutron exposure is of concern in proton therapy, and varies with beam delivery technique, nozzle design, and treatment conditions. Uniform scanning is an emerging treatment technique in proton therapy, but neutron exposure for this technique has not been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, under various treatment conditions for uniform scanning beams employed at our proton therapy center. Methods: Using a wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, ThermoScientific, MA), the authors measured H/D at 50 cm lateral to the isocenter as a function of proton range, modulation width, beam scanning area, collimated field size, and snout position. They also studied the influence of other factors on neutron dose equivalent, such as aperture material, the presence of a compensator, and measurement locations. They measured H/D for various treatment sites using patient-specific treatment parameters. Finally, they compared H/D values for various beam delivery techniques at various facilities under similar conditions. Results: H/D increased rapidly with proton range and modulation width, varying from about 0.2 mSv/Gy for a 5 cm range and 2 cm modulation width beam to 2.7 mSv/Gy for a 30 cm range and 30 cm modulation width beam when 18 Multiplication-Sign 18 cm{sup 2} uniform scanning beams were used. H/D increased linearly with the beam scanning area, and decreased slowly with aperture size and snout retraction. The presence of a compensator reduced the H/D slightly compared with that without a compensator present. Aperture material and compensator material also have an influence on neutron dose equivalent, but the influence is relatively small. H/D varied from about 0.5 mSv/Gy for a brain tumor treatment to about 3.5 mSv/Gy for a pelvic case. Conclusions: This study presents H/D as a function of various treatment parameters for uniform scanning proton beams. For similar treatment conditions, the H/D value per uncollimated beam size for uniform scanning beams was slightly lower than that from a passive scattering beam and higher than that from a pencil beam scanning beam, within a factor of 2. Minimizing beam scanning area could effectively reduce neutron dose equivalent for uniform scanning beams, down to the level close to pencil beam scanning.

  9. Generalized Parton Distributions for the Proton in AdS/QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dipankar Chakrabarti; Chandan Mondal

    2013-10-22

    We present a study of proton GPDs in both momentum and position spaces using proton wavefunction obtained from AdS/ QCD. Here we consider the soft wall model. The results are compared with a phenomenological model of proton GPDs.

  10. Generalized Parton Distributions for the Proton in AdS/QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarti, Dipankar

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of proton GPDs in both momentum and position spaces using proton wavefunction obtained from AdS/ QCD. Here we consider the soft wall model. The results are compared with a phenomenological model of proton GPDs.

  11. CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    ........................................................................................ 21 2.3.5 Pulp and paper industry Technologies and Measures in Pulp and Paper IndustryCARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION TECHNOLOGIES AND MEASURES IN US INDUSTRIAL SECTOR FINAL REPORT

  12. Gas Turbine Emissions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack...

  13. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  14. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  15. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-04-26

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  16. Polarization diagnostics of proton beams in solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiri Stepan

    2007-02-02

    We review the problem of proton beam bombardment of solar chromosphere considering the self-consistent NLTE polarized radiation transfer in hydrogen lines. Several observations indicate a linear polarization of the H-alpha line of the order of 5% or higher and preferentially in radial direction. This polarization is often explained as anisotropic collisional excitation of the n=3 level by vertical proton beams. Our calculations indicate that deceleration of the proton beam with initial power-law energy distribution together with increased electron and proton densities in the H-alpha forming layers lead to a negligible line polarization. Thus the proton beams seem not to be a good candidate for explanation of the observed polarization degree. On the other hand, the effect of electric return currents could perhaps provide a better explanation of the observed linear polarization. We report the new calculations of this effect.

  17. Allocation of emission rights Economic incentives for emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allocation of emission rights Economic incentives for emission reductions of CO2 in developing of Physical Resource Theory #12;CO2 per capita emissions in 1999 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Population PercapitaCO2emissions(tonC/cap/yr) AFRICA CPA FAR EAST MEA OCEANIA WEU NAM FSU/ EEU WORLD AVERAGE LAM Department

  18. A HISTORY OF ON-ROAD EMISSIONS AND EMISSIONS DETERIORATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    emissions relative to the newer. · Why? IM240 is registration based, every old car is supposed to be testedA HISTORY OF ON-ROAD EMISSIONS AND EMISSIONS DETERIORATION www.feat.biochem.du.edu www of Denver 2101 E. Wesley Ave. Denver, CO 80208 303 871-2580.. FAX 2587 dstedman@du.edu #12;Emissions

  19. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted mixture of gases and aerosols. Primary emissions include sig- nificant amounts of CH4 and aerosol (organic

  20. Search for disappearing tracks in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-19

    A search is presented for long-lived charged particles that decay within the CMS detector and produce the signature of a disappearing track. Disappearing tracks are identified as those with little or no associated calorimeter energy deposits and with missing hits in the outer layers of the tracker. The search uses proton-proton collision data recorded at ?s = 8 TeV that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. The results of the search are interpreted in the context of the anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) model. The number of observed events is in agreement with the background expectation, and limits aremore »set on the cross section of direct electroweak chargino production in terms of the chargino mass and mean proper lifetime. At 95% confidence level, AMSB models with a chargino mass less than 260 GeV, corresponding to a mean proper lifetime of 0.2 ns, are excluded.« less

  1. Energy dependence of the ridge in high multiplicity proton-proton collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dusling, Kevin; Venugopalan, Raju

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the recent measurement of azimuthally collimated, long range rapidity ("ridge") correlations in $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV proton-proton (p+p) collisions by the ATLAS collaboration at the LHC are in agreement with expectations from the color glass condensate effective theory of high energy QCD. The observation that the integrated near side yield as a function of multiplicity is independent of collision energy is a natural consequence of the fact that multiparticle production is driven by a single semi-hard saturation scale in the color glass condensate framework. We argue further that the azimuthal structure of these recent ATLAS ridge measurements strongly constrain hydrodynamic interpretations of such correlations in high multiplicity p+p collisions.

  2. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton-proton elastic scattering at small angles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Mchedlishvili; D. Chiladze; S. Dymov; Z. Bagdasarian; S. Barsov; R. Gebel; B. Gou; M. Hartmann; A. Kacharava; I. Keshelashvili; A. Khoukaz; P. Kulessa; A. Kulikov; A. Lehrach; N. Lomidze; B. Lorentz; R. Maier; G. Macharashvili; S. Merzliakov; S. Mikirtychyants; M. Nioradze; H. Ohm; D. Prasuhn; F. Rathmann; V. Serdyuk; D. Schroer; V. Shmakova; R. Stassen; H. J. Stein; H. Stockhorst; I. I. Strakovsky; H. Ströher; M. Tabidze; A. Täschner; S. Trusov; D. Tsirkov; Yu. Uzikov; Yu. Valdau; C. Wilkin; R. L. Workman; P. Wüstner

    2015-10-21

    The differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12-16 degrees to 25-30 degrees, depending on the energy. Absolute normalisations of typically 3% were achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon a partial wave analysis. After extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.

  3. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton-proton elastic scattering at small angles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mchedlishvili, D; Dymov, S; Bagdasarian, Z; Barsov, S; Gebel, R; Gou, B; Hartmann, M; Kacharava, A; Keshelashvili, I; Khoukaz, A; Kulessa, P; Kulikov, A; Lehrach, A; Lomidze, N; Lorentz, B; Maier, R; Macharashvili, G; Merzliakov, S; Mikirtychyants, S; Nioradze, M; Ohm, H; Prasuhn, D; Rathmann, F; Serdyuk, V; Schroer, D; Shmakova, V; Stassen, R; Stein, H J; Stockhorst, H; Strakovsky, I I; Ströher, H; Tabidze, M; Täschner, A; Trusov, S; Tsirkov, D; Uzikov, Yu; Valdau, Yu; Wilkin, C; Workman, R L; Wüstner, P

    2015-01-01

    The differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12-16 degrees to 25-30 degrees, depending on the energy. Absolute normalisations of typically 3% were achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon a partial wave analysis. After extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.

  4. Strange Electric Form Factor of the Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Leinweber; S. Boinepalli; A. W. Thomas; P. Wang; A. G. Williams; R. D. Young; J. M. Zanotti; J. B. Zhang

    2006-07-18

    By combining the constraints of charge symmetry with new chiral extrapolation techniques and recent low-mass quenched lattice QCD simulations of the individual quark contributions to the electric charge radii of the baryon octet, we obtain an accurate determination of the strange electric charge radius of the proton. While this analysis provides a value for G_E^s(Q^2=0.1 GeV^2) in agreement with the best current data, the theoretical error is comparable with that expected from future HAPPEx results from JLab. Together with the earlier determination of G_M^s, this result considerably constrains the role of hidden flavor in the structure of the nucleon.

  5. Ion-/proton-conducting apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, Matthew; Liu, Dongxia

    2011-05-17

    A c-axis-oriented HAP thin film synthesized by seeded growth on a palladium hydrogen membrane substrate. An exemplary synthetic process includes electrochemical seeding on the substrate, and secondary and tertiary hydrothermal treatments under conditions that favor growth along c-axes and a-axes in sequence. By adjusting corresponding synthetic conditions, an HAP this film can be grown to a controllable thickness with a dense coverage on the underlying substrate. The thin films have relatively high proton conductivity under hydrogen atmosphere and high temperature conditions. The c-axis oriented films may be integrated into fuel cells for application in the intermediate temperature range of 200-600.degree. C. The electrochemical-hydrothermal deposition technique may be applied to create other oriented crystal materials having optimized properties, useful for separations and catalysis as well as electronic and electrochemical applications, electrochemical membrane reactors, and in chemical sensors.

  6. Nanostructured polymer membranes for proton conduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Park, Moon Jeong

    2013-06-18

    Polymers having an improved ability to entrain water are characterized, in some embodiments, by unusual humidity-induced phase transitions. The described polymers (e.g., hydrophilically functionalized block copolymers) have a disordered state and one or more ordered states (e.g., a lamellar state, a gyroid state, etc.). In one aspect, the polymers are capable of undergoing a disorder-to-order transition while the polymer is exposed to an increasing temperature at a constant relative humidity. In some aspects the polymer includes a plurality of portions, wherein a first portion forms proton-conductive channels within the membrane and wherein the channels have a width of less than about 6 nm. The described polymers are capable of entraining and preserving water at high temperature and low humidity. Surprisingly, in some embodiments, the polymers are capable of entraining greater amounts of water with the increase of temperature. The polymers can be used in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes in fuel cells.

  7. Buffer Sizing for Minimum Energy-Delay Product by Using an Approximating Polynomial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Buffer Sizing for Minimum Energy-Delay Product by Using an Approximating Polynomial Chang Woo Kang to derive sizing rules for buffered chains, which optimize the overall energy-delay product. Categories result in a poor solution in terms of the energy-delay product. The focus of this work is on multi

  8. On the Energy-Delay Trade-off of a Two-Way Relay Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    1 On the Energy-Delay Trade-off of a Two-Way Relay Network Xiang He Aylin Yener Wireless relay. The bi-directional nature of the traffic, in this setting, poses a new energy delay trade, queuing, energy-delay trade-off I. INTRODUCTION The two-way relay network considered in this work consists

  9. Wide-Bandwidth, Tunable, Multiple-Pulse-Width Optical Delays Using Slow Light in Cesium Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Robert W.

    Wide-Bandwidth, Tunable, Multiple-Pulse-Width Optical Delays Using Slow Light in Cesium Vapor Ryan) We demonstrate an all-optical delay line in hot cesium vapor that tunably delays 275 ps input pulses to 80 pulse widths by making use of a double absorption reso- nance in cesium. Furthermore, we show

  10. On Secrecy Outage Capacity of Fading Channels Under Relaxed Delay Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koksal, Can Emre

    On Secrecy Outage Capacity of Fading Channels Under Relaxed Delay Constraints Onur Gungor, Can Emre delay constraints. More specif- ically, we extend the definition of outage secrecy capacity for single, we provide bounds on secrecy outage capacity with k + 1 block delay constraint. We show

  11. Synchronization and Communication with Chaotic Time-Delay Electronic Circuit Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Synchronization and Communication with Chaotic Time-Delay Electronic Circuit Systems David T simulation. Circuit implementation of Mackey- Glass delayed system. #12;)( )(1 )()( tbx tx tax dt tdx n - -+ - = 2.0=a 1.0=b 10=n The Mackey-Glass System The Mackey-Glass mathematical model1: a delay differential

  12. Improved Power-Delay Trade-off in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Using Opportunistic Routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yong Hoon

    Improved Power-Delay Trade-off in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Using Opportunistic Routing Won power- delay trade-off than the conventional routing while providing up to a logarithmic boost that the power can be reduced at the expense of increased delay for both scenarios, but better trade-off can

  13. Power and Delay Trade-offs in Fading Channels Randall A. Berry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Randall

    Power and Delay Trade-offs in Fading Channels by Randall A. Berry S.M., Massachusetts Institute by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arthur C. Smith Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Students #12;#12;Power and Delay Trade of higher transmission power. The trade-offs between the required power and various notions of delay

  14. Power-Optimal Scheduling for a Green Base Station with Delay Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vinod

    Power-Optimal Scheduling for a Green Base Station with Delay Constraints Anusha Lalitha, Santanu with average delay constraint on the downlink of a Green Base- station. A Green Base-station is powered by both Terms--Power-optimal, Green Base station, Delay con- straint, multi-user. I. INTRODUCTION The main

  15. Transistor Sizing of Energy-DelayEfficient Circuits Paul I. Penzes, Mika Nystrom, Alain J. Martin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transistor Sizing of Energy-Delay­Efficient Circuits Paul I. P´enzes, Mika Nystr¨om, Alain J optimized for energy-delay efficiency, i.e., for optimal ¢¤£¦¥ where ¢ is the energy consumption-off between energy and delay. We propose a set of analytical formulas that closely ap- proximate the optimal

  16. Has Internet Delay Gotten Better or Worse? DK Lee, Kenjiro Cho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Sue B.

    Has Internet Delay Gotten Better or Worse? DK Lee, Kenjiro Cho , Gianluca Iannaccone , and Sue@iijlab.net, gianluca.iannaccone@intel.com ABSTRACT Delay is a key Internet performance metric and its stability, vari the Internet-wide delay distribution. In order to build a representative sample set for the Internet-wide de

  17. DEAR: Delay-bounded Energy-constrained Adaptive Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Jian "Neil"

    DEAR: Delay-bounded Energy-constrained Adaptive Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks Shi Bai¶, Weiyi in wireless sensor networks. In this work, we study Delay-bounded Energy-constrained Adaptive Routing (DEAR) problem with reli- ability, differential delay, and transmission energy consumption constraints

  18. The vacuum inside the proton Dissociation of virtual photons in events with a leading proton at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The vacuum inside the proton Dissociation of virtual photons in events with a leading proton general with the so­called ``vacuum quantum numbers''), which only carries energy and momentum. Its and the object with the vacuum quantum numbers. Di#ractive ep events are thus sensitive to the density of objects

  19. Measurement of B[+ over c] Production in Proton-Proton Collisions at ?s = 8??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaij, R.

    Production of B[+ over c] mesons in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV is studied with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.0??fb[superscript -1] recorded by the LHCb experiment. ...

  20. Observation of long-range, near-side angular correlations in proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, Burak Han

    Results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles emitted in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 0.9, 2.36, and 7 TeV are presented, using data collected with the CMS detector over a ...

  1. Assessing the Value of Delay to Truckers and Carriers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Qing

    2011-02-22

    /tractor trailer trucks, and 31 percent are light/delivery truck drivers. This number will keep increasing in the future since the number of truck drivers is below actual demand. Regardless of the type of truck services are being used, the freight delay... trucks climbed 56 percent. In 2007, the light trucks accounted for about 36% of highway vehicles miles traveled, and the commercial trucks contributed to an additional 8%. 5 Apart from the imbalance between growth rate of all road facilities...

  2. Stochastic dynamics of a delayed bistable system with multiplicative noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dung, Nguyen Tien E-mail: dungnt@fpt.edu.vn

    2014-05-15

    In this paper we investigate the properties of a delayed bistable system under the effect of multiplicative noise. We first prove the existence and uniqueness of the positive solution and show that its moments are uniformly bounded. Then, we study stochastic dynamics of the solution in long time, the lower and upper bounds for the paths and an estimate for the average value are provided.

  3. Time delayed processes in physics, biophysics and archaeology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdalena Anna Pelc

    2007-05-31

    The motion of particles, where the particles: electrons, ions in microtubules or migrated peoples can be described as the superposition of diffusion and ordered waves. In this paper it is shown that the master equation for transport processes can be formulated as the time delayed hyperbolic partial equation. The equation describes the processes with memory. For characteristic times shorter than the relaxation time the master equation is the generalized Klein - Gordon equation. Key words: hyperbolic transport, microtubules, heat waves, Neolithic migration

  4. Complex network synchronization of chaotic systems with delay coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theesar, S. Jeeva Sathya, E-mail: sjstheesar@gmail.com; Ratnavelu, K., E-mail: sjstheesar@gmail.com [Network Science Research Group, Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05

    The study of complex networks enables us to understand the collective behavior of the interconnected elements and provides vast real time applications from biology to laser dynamics. In this paper, synchronization of complex network of chaotic systems has been studied. Every identical node in the complex network is assumed to be in Lur’e system form. In particular, delayed coupling has been assumed along with identical sector bounded nonlinear systems which are interconnected over network topology.

  5. Proton-proton correlation function for the pp -> pp + eta and pp -> pp + pions reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Klaja; P. Moskal

    2010-08-30

    For the very first time, the correlation femtoscopy method is applied to a kinematically complete measurement of meson production in the collisions of hadrons. The shape of the two-proton correlation function derived for the pp -> ppeta reaction differs from that for the pp -> pp(pions) and both do not show a peak structure opposite to results determined for inclusive measurements of heavy ion collisions.

  6. TWO-PROTON CORRELATION MEASUREMENTS IN 800- AND 400- MeV/NUCLEON HEAVY-ION REACTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanihata, I.

    2013-01-01

    of California. Two-Proton Correlation Measurements in 800-angular correlations of two protons in collisions of C +c. Cc.m. indicates the free proton-proton elastic scattering

  7. Negative Time Delay in Strongly Naked Singularity Lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin P. DeAndrea; Kevin Alexander

    2014-05-12

    We model the supermassive galactic center of the Milky Way galaxy as a strongly naked singularity lens described by the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric. This metric has an ordinary mass and massless scalar charge parameters. For very accurate results, we use the Virbhadra-Ellis lens equation for computations. The galactic center serving as gravitational lens gives rise to 4 images: 2 images on the same side as the source and 2 images on the opposite side of the source from the optic axis. We compute positions and time delays of these images for many values of the angular source position. The time delays of primary images decrease with an increase in angular source position and are always negative. The time delays of the other 3 images are negative for small angular source position; however, they increase with an increase in angular source position. Such observations would support strongly naked singularity interpretation of the galactic center and, if ever observed, would disprove the cosmic censorship hypothesis proposed by Roger Penrose as well as a weaker version by Virbhadra that allows existence of weakly, but not marginally and strongly naked singularities.

  8. Time-delay Cosmography: Increased Leverage with Angular Diameter Distances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jee, Inh; Suyu, Sherry H; Huterer, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Strong lensing time-delay systems constrain cosmological parameters via the so-called time-delay distance and the angular diameter distance to the lens. In previous studies, only the former information was used. In this paper, we show that the cosmological constraints improve significantly when the latter information is also included. Specifically, the angular diameter distance plays a crucial role in breaking the degeneracy between the curvature of the Universe and the time-varying equation of state of dark energy. Using a mock sample of 55 bright quadruple lens systems based on expectations for ongoing/future imaging surveys, we find that adding the angular diameter distance information to the time-delay distance information and the cosmic microwave background data of Planck improves the constraint on the constant equation of state by 30%, on the time variation in the equation of state by a factor of two, and on the Hubble constant in the flat $\\Lambda$CDM model by a factor of two. Therefore, previous forec...

  9. Bifurcation structure of two coupled FHN neurons with delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niloofar Farajzadeh Tehrani; MohammadReza Razvan

    2015-04-28

    This paper presents an investigation of the dynamics of two coupled non-identical FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons with delayed synaptic connection. We consider coupling strength and time delay as bifurcation parameters, and try to classify all possible dynamics which is fairly rich. The neural system exhibits a unique rest point or three ones for the different values of coupling strength by employing the pitchfork bifurcation of non-trivial rest point. The asymptotic stability and possible Hopf bifurcations of the trivial rest point are studied by analyzing the corresponding characteristic equation. Homoclinic, fold, and pitchfork bifurcations of limit cycles are found. The delay-dependent stability regions are illustrated in the parameter plane, through which the double-Hopf bifurcation points can be obtained from the intersection points of two branches of Hopf bifurcation. The dynamical behavior of the system may exhibit one, two, or three different periodic solutions due to pitchfork cycle and torus (Neimark-Sacker) bifurcations. In addition, Hopf, double-Hopf, and torus bifurcations of the non trivial rest points are found. Bifurcation diagrams are obtained numerically or analytically from the mathematical model and the parameter regions of different behaviors are clarified.

  10. Generalized z-scaling in proton-proton collisions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zborovský, I

    2006-01-01

    New generalization of z-scaling in inclusive particle production is proposed. The scaling variable z is fractal measure which depends on kinematical characteristics of the underlying sub-process expressed in terms of the momentum fractions x1 and x2 of the incoming protons. In the generalized approach, the x1 and x2 are functions of the momentum fractions ya and yb of the scattered and recoil constituents carried out by the inclusive particle and recoil object, respectively. The scaling function psi(z) for charged and identified hadrons produced in proton-proton collisions is constructed. The fractal dimensions and heat capacity of the produced medium entering definition of the z are established to obtain energy, angular and multiplicity independence of the psi(z). The scheme allows unique description of data on inclusive cross sections of charged particles, pions, kaons, antiprotons and lambdas at high energies. The obtained results are of interest to use z-scaling as a tool for searching for new physics phe...

  11. GRB 131231A: IMPLICATIONS OF THE GeV EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Bin; Chen, Wei; Liang, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Bei; He, Hao-Ning; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming [Key laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Shao, Lang, E-mail: liangyf@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: beizhou@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2014-05-20

    GRB 131231A was detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Space Gamma-ray Telescope. The high-energy gamma-ray (>100 MeV) afterglow emission spectrum is F {sub ?}??{sup –0.54} {sup ±} {sup 0.15} in the first ?1300 s after the trigger and the most energetic photon has an energy of ?62 GeV, arriving at t ? 520 s. With reasonable parameters of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow as well as the density of the circum-burst medium, the synchrotron radiation of electrons or protons accelerated at an external forward shock have difficulty accounting for the data. Rather, the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of the forward shock-accelerated electrons can account for both the spectrum and temporal behavior of the GeV afterglow emission. We also show that the prospect for detecting GRB 131231A-like GRBs with the Cherenkov Telescope Array is promising.

  12. Continuum Radio Emission and Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    Continuum Radio Emission and Diagnostics The Sun is a strong radio source (one of the first objects discusses incoher­ ent emission from thermal plasma in the non­flaring so­ lar atmosphere; other relevant material may be found in Coherent Plasma Emission and in Solar Flares: Radio Bursts. Emission mechanisms

  13. Role of Water States on Water Uptake and Proton Transport in Nafion using Molecular Simulations and Bimodal Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Gi Suk

    2013-01-01

    proton conductors for fuel-cell applications: Simulations,proton con- ductors for fuel-cell applications: Simulations,

  14. Progress Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Emission Reduction Specialists

  15. Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions of Protons in Host Metals at Picometre Distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinrich Hora; George H. Miley; Jak C. Kelly

    2000-11-12

    A review is given for the explanation of the measurements of Miley et al. of a fully reproducible generation of nuclei of the whole periodic table by protons in host metals during a several-weeks reaction. Similar low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) were observed by other groups. The fact that the heavy nuclides are not due to pollution can be seen from the fact that such very rare elements as thulium and terbium were detected by unique K-shell X-ray spectra. The nuclear reaction energy goes into the heavy nuclei as measured from much bigger traces in CR39 than from alphas. The fact that any reaction of the protons results in stable daughter nuclei is confirmed by the fact that the highest energy gain is resulting with stable reaction products. This has been explained in Ref. 2, and the energy gain for the heavy element generation by a compound reaction was discussed. The explanation is based on the model of the authors from 1989 to assume free motion of the protons contrary to localized crystalline states. A relation of the reaction time U on distance d of the reacting nuclei by a power law with an exponent 34.8 was derived. Based on few reproducible D-D reactions, a reaction time near the range of megaseconds and a reaction distance of nanometers was concluded. A splendid confirmation of the picometre-megasecond reactions was achieved by Li et al. from his direct quantum mechanical calculations of the hot fusion D-T reactions based on a one-step selective resonance tunneling model. Li et al. were able for the first time to derive the cross sections of the hot fusion. Li's application to picometre distance showed megasecond reaction times with no neutron or gamma emission. Because of the imaginary part in the Schroedinger potential, the problem of the level width is reduced by damping.

  16. Studying the Proton "Radius" Puzzle with ?p Elastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Gilman; E. J. Downie; G. Ron; A. Afanasev; J. Arrington; O. Ates; F. Benmokhtar; J. Bernauer; E. Brash; W. J. Briscoe; K. Deiters; J. Diefenbach; C. Djalali; B. Dongwi; L. El Fassi; S. Gilad; K. Gnanvo; R. Gothe; D. Higinbotham; R. Holt; Y. Ilieva; H. Jiang; M. Kohl; G. Kumbartzki; J. Lichtenstadt; A. Liyanage; N. Liyanage; M. Meziane; Z. -E. Meziani; D. G. Middleton; P. Monaghan; K. E. Myers; C. Perdrisat; E. Piasetzsky; V. Punjabi; R. Ransome; D. Reggiani; P. Reimer; A. Richter; A. Sarty; E. Schulte; Y. Shamai; N. Sparveris; S. Strauch; V. Sulkosky; A. S. Tadepalli; M. Taragin; L. Weinstein

    2013-07-29

    The Proton Radius Puzzle is the inconsistency between the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen and the proton radius determined from atomic hydrogen level transitions and ep elastic scattering. No generally accepted resolution to the Puzzle has been found. Possible solutions generally fall into one of three categories: the two radii are different due to novel beyond-standard-model physics, the two radii are different due to novel aspects of nucleon structure, and the two radii are the same, but there are underestimated uncertainties or other issues in the ep experiments. The MUon proton Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at the Paul Scherrer Institut is a simultaneous measurement of \\mu^+ p and e^+ p elastic scattering, as well as \\mu^- p and e^- p elastic scattering, which will allow a determination of the consistency of the \\mu p and the ep interactions. The differences between + and - charge scattering are sensitive to two-photon exchange effects, higher-order corrections to the scattering process. The slopes of the cross sections as Q^2 -> 0 determine the proton "radius". We plan to measure relative cross sections at a typical level of a few tenths of a percent, which should allow the proton radius to be determined at the level of ~0.01 fm, similar to previous ep measurements. The measurements will test several possible explanations of the proton radius puzzle, including some models of beyond-standard-model physics, some models of novel hadronic physics, and some issues in the radius extraction from scattering data.

  17. Proton radii of Be, B, and C isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshiko Kanada-En'yo

    2014-11-04

    We investigate the neutron number $(N)$ dependence of root mean square radii of point proton distribution (proton radii) of Be, B, and C isotopes with the theoretical method of variation after spin-parity projection in the framework of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). The proton radii in Be and B isotopes changes rapidly as $N$ increases, reflecting the cluster structure change along the isotope chains, whereas, those in C isotopes show a weak $N$ dependence because of the stable proton structure in nuclei with $Z=6$. In neutron-rich Be and B isotopes, the proton radii are remarkably increased by the enhancement of the two-center cluster structure in the prolately deformed neutron structure. We compare the $N$ dependence of the calculated proton radii with the experimental ones reduced from the charge radii determined by isotope shift and those deduced from the charge changing interaction cross section. It is found that the $N$ dependence of proton radii can be a probe to clarify enhancement and weakening of cluster structures.

  18. Is the proton radius puzzle an evidence of extra dimensions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Dahia; A. S. Lemos

    2015-09-29

    The proton charge radius inferred from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy is not compatible with the previous value given by CODATA-2010, which, on its turn, essentially relies on measurements of the electron-proton interaction. The proton's new size was extracted from the 2S-2P Lamb shift in the muonic hydrogen, which showed an energy excess of 0.3 meV in comparison to the theoretical prediction, evaluated with the CODATA radius. Higher-dimensional gravity is a candidate to explain this discrepancy, since the muon-proton gravitational interaction is stronger than the electron-proton interaction and, in the context of braneworld models, the gravitational potential can be hugely amplified in short distances when compared to the Newtonian potential. Motivated by these ideas, we study a muonic hydrogen confined in a thick brane. We show that the muon-proton gravitational interaction modified by extra dimensions can provide the additional separation of 0.3 meV between 2S and 2P states. In this scenario, the gravitational energy depends on the higher-dimensional Planck mass and indirectly on the brane thickness. Studying the behavior of the gravitational energy with respect to the brane thickness in a realistic range, we find constraints for the fundamental Planck mass that solve the proton radius puzzle and are consistent with previous experimental bounds.

  19. Proton transport and torque generation in rotary biomotors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yu. Smirnov; S. Savel'ev; L. G. Mourokh; Franco Nori

    2008-05-29

    We analyze the dynamics of rotary biomotors within a simple nano-electromechanical model, consisting of a stator part and a ring-shaped rotor having twelve proton-binding sites. This model is closely related to the membrane-embedded F$_0$ motor of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase, which converts the energy of the transmembrane electrochemical gradient of protons into mechanical motion of the rotor. It is shown that the Coulomb coupling between the negative charge of the empty rotor site and the positive stator charge, located near the periplasmic proton-conducting channel (proton source), plays a dominant role in the torque-generating process. When approaching the source outlet, the rotor site has a proton energy level higher than the energy level of the site, located near the cytoplasmic channel (proton drain). In the first stage of this torque-generating process, the energy of the electrochemical potential is converted into potential energy of the proton-binding sites on the rotor. Afterwards, the tangential component of the Coulomb force produces a mechanical torque. We demonstrate that, at low temperatures, the loaded motor works in the shuttling regime where the energy of the electrochemical potential is consumed without producing any unidirectional rotation. The motor switches to the torque-generating regime at high temperatures, when the Brownian ratchet mechanism turns on. In the presence of a significant external torque, created by ATP hydrolysis, the system operates as a proton pump, which translocates protons against the transmembrane potential gradient. Here we focus on the F$_0$ motor, even though our analysis is applicable to the bacterial flagellar motor.

  20. Commissioning of output factors for uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Ramirez, Eric; Mascia, Anthony; Ding Xiaoning; Okoth, Benny; Zeidan, Omar; Hsi Wen; Harris, Ben; Schreuder, Andries N.; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Current commercial treatment planning systems are not able to accurately predict output factors and calculate monitor units for proton fields. Patient-specific field output factors are thus determined by either measurements or empirical modeling based on commissioning data. The objective of this study is to commission output factors for uniform scanning beams utilized at the ProCure proton therapy centers. Methods: Using water phantoms and a plane parallel ionization chamber, the authors first measured output factors with a fixed 10 cm diameter aperture as a function of proton range and modulation width for clinically available proton beams with ranges between 4 and 31.5 cm and modulation widths between 2 and 15 cm. The authors then measured the output factor as a function of collimated field size at various calibration depths for proton beams of various ranges and modulation widths. The authors further examined the dependence of the output factor on the scanning area (i.e., uncollimated proton field), snout position, and phantom material. An empirical model was developed to calculate the output factor for patient-specific fields and the model-predicted output factors were compared to measurements. Results: The output factor increased with proton range and field size, and decreased with modulation width. The scanning area and snout position have a small but non-negligible effect on the output factors. The predicted output factors based on the empirical modeling agreed within 2% of measurements for all prostate treatment fields and within 3% for 98.5% of all treatment fields. Conclusions: Comprehensive measurements at a large subset of available beam conditions are needed to commission output factors for proton therapy beams. The empirical modeling agrees well with the measured output factor data. This investigation indicates that it is possible to accurately predict output factors and thus eliminate or reduce time-consuming patient-specific output measurements for proton treatments.