Sample records for del bio bio

  1. Bio-Gel HT Bio-Gel HTP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Bio-Gel® HT Bio-Gel HTP DNA Grade Bio-Gel HTP Hydroxyapatite Instruction Manual #12;Table of Contents Section 1 Properties of Bio-Gel HT, HTP, and DNA Grade HTP Hydroxyapatite......... 1 1.1 Bio-Gel HT Fully Hydrated Hydroxyapatite .... 3 1.2 Bio-Gel HTP Powder

  2. BioInformatics BioInformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamir, Ron

    BigRoc The BioInformatics and Genome Research Open Club The BioInformatics and Genome Research Open Bioinformatics group, Utrecht University, the Netherlands Patterns in genome and regulome evolution: insights information is coded in the genome and how this information is transformed into traits on which selection

  3. Scientific Bio

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principalfuel cells"03,ScientificScientific

  4. BioFuels Atlas Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kristi Moriarity's presentation on NREL's BioFuels Atlas from the May 12, 2011, Clean Cities and Biomass Program State webinar.

  5. Bio-threat microparticle simulants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A bio-threat simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the bio-threat simulant.

  6. Bio-threat microparticle simulants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A bio-threat simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the bio-threat simulant.

  7. Tribal Leader Energy Education Initiative - Speakers Bios | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Speakers Bios Tribal Leader Energy Education Initiative - Speakers Bios Speaker Bios.pdf More Documents & Publications OIENRELbios10-20-11 RETECH Pre-Conference Workshop...

  8. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  9. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2007 Spring 2007 Biology 111 Take Home Exam #3 BioEnergetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Spring 2007 1 Spring 2007 Biology 111 Take Home Exam #3 ­ BioEnergetics

  10. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2008 Spring 2008 Biology 111 Take Home Exam #3 BioEnergetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Spring 2008 1 Spring 2008 Biology 111 Take Home Exam #3 ­ BioEnergetics

  11. Chapter 22. Nanofluidic BioMEMS Research Nano/Microfluidic BioMEMS Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 22. Nanofluidic BioMEMS Research 22-1 Nano/Microfluidic BioMEMS Research RLE Group Micro / Nanofluidic BioMEMS Group Academic and Research Staff Professor Jongyoon Han Research Affiliates Dr. Yong 10, Sophomore) Overview of group Nanofluidic BioMEMS group in RLE (Han group) is exploring various

  12. Retrofitting analysis of integrated bio-refineries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cormier, Benjamin R.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    the economic performance of fossil-based facilities can be enhanced by retrofitting and incorporation of bio-mass feedstocks. These systems can be regarded as bio-refineries or integrated fossilbio- refineries. This work presents a retrofitting analysis...

  13. Object-Oriented Perl Object-Oriented PERL & BioPerl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    Object Model Input/Output Graphic Rendering Single sequence Bio::Seq Bio::SeqIO Bio::Graphics Aligned sequences Bio::SimpleAlign Bio::AlignIO Bio::Align::Graphics Homology search Bio::Search Bio::SearchIO Bio::Graphics perldoc /data/yoda/b/bio425/bioperl-live/Bio/Seq.pm perldoc Bio::SeqIO # if in a standard location

  14. BioTherapeutics Engineering Laboratory (BioTEL) Small molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    Tissues and organs Physiological functions cmcm PI: Young Jik Kwon, kwonyj@uci.edu, 949-824-8714, http NH2l n HN HN O m H3O+HN O H N O HN OH OH O Nucleic acid H2N Dissociated nucleic acid H2N PI: YoungTherapeutics Engineering Laboratory (BioTEL) NIH 3T3 Cells RAW309 CR.1 Nanoparticles Naked DNANIH 3T3 Cells (Fibroblast

  15. ENGINEERING MECHANICS SEMINARSENGINEERING MECHANICS SEMINARS BIO COMPOSITES FOR AVIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    carbon composite general aviation aircraft); and Manager of Materials and Structures Research at Sikorsky temperature and bio material composite programs. In bio composite material programs Ron frequently worksENGINEERING MECHANICS SEMINARSENGINEERING MECHANICS SEMINARS BIO COMPOSITES FOR AVIATION Ron

  16. Workshop on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bio-Oils Workshop on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oils Introduction presentation report-out at the CTAB webinar on bio-oils. ctabwebinarbiooilsintro.pdf...

  17. The minimum information for a qualified BioBrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Mubing

    2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the information of many existing BioBricks is incomplete, thus the usage of the BioBricks will be affected. It is necessary to standardize the minimum information required for a qualified BioBrick. Furthermore this ...

  18. Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R. J.; Czernik, S.; French, R.; Ratcliff, M.; Marda, J.; Dean, A. M.

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation by Bob Evans at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's distributed bio-oil reforming efforts.

  19. BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Alternate Energy Systems, Inc. Natural Gas Air Blenders for BioGas Installations BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities Federal Utility Partnership...

  20. BILIWG Meeting: High Pressure Steam Reforming of Bio-Derived...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Pressure Steam Reforming of Bio-Derived Liquids (Presentation) BILIWG Meeting: High Pressure Steam Reforming of Bio-Derived Liquids (Presentation) Presented at the 2007...

  1. Development of a Bio-Based, Inexpensive, Noncorrosive, Nonflammable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development of a Bio-Based, Inexpensive, Noncorrosive, Nonflammable Phenolic Foam for Building Insulation Development of a Bio-Based, Inexpensive, Noncorrosive, Nonflammable...

  2. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Upgrading...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Oil Upgrading Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Upgrading PNNL report-out at the CTAB webinar on Bio-Oil Upgrading. ctabwebinarbiooilsupgrading.pdf More...

  3. BioFuels and BioEnergy - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries Batteries An errorA Mostbio BioFuels and

  4. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2008 Spring 2008 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #3 BioEnergetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Spring 2008 1 Spring 2008 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #3 ­ BioEnergetics

  5. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2007 Spring 2007 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #3 BioEnergetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Spring 2007 1 Spring 2007 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #3 ­ BioEnergetics

  6. Bio Algene | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |BigBigLake Wind FarmBio

  7. BIO DZL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon CaptureAtria PowerAxeonBCHP Screening ToolBIC JumpBIO

  8. Bio Oleo | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof Alternative Sources ofBeyondPV CoSandy,Bio

  9. General Safety Guidelines for Bio-Hazardous Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    General Safety Guidelines for Bio-Hazardous Waste Disposal · Determine if you have a Bio-Hazardous, cell cultures, Petri dishes, and etc. NOT fitting the category 1 description. · ALL BIO-HAZARDOUS WASTE OF CATEGORY 1 NEEDS TO BE TREATED BY AUTOCLAVE OR WITH HIV/HBV KILLING AGENT BEFORE PICK-UP · Bio-hazardous

  10. BioCarbon Fund (BioCF T3) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof Alternative Sources ofBeyondPV CoSandy,BioBioBioBioCF

  11. Bio-Inspired Computing Toward Novel Computational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Bio-Inspired Computing Systems Toward Novel Computational Architectures Daniel Mange and Marco circumstances of the environment. Arti cial evolution has been rec- ognized as a powerful methodology to develop

  12. Retrofitting analysis of integrated bio-refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cormier, Benjamin R.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    to integrated bio-refineries. Focus is given to the problem of process modification to an existing plant by considering capacity expansion and material substitution with biomass feedstocks. Process integration studies were conducted to determine cost...

  13. Documentation of BioBrick parts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slomp, Arend

    2010-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose of this RFC is to improve the information supplied by BioBrick part vendors. Reason to have this RFC is that there would be much more information available which can help improve the search time of the user. ...

  14. Savannah River BioEnergy Integration Center Savannah River BioEnergy Integration Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principal Investigators PostdoctoralSasha BioEnergy

  15. Whither `nano' or `bio'? | Rob Ritchie So what's all this hype about `nano' and `bio'?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    OPINION Whither `nano' or `bio'? | Rob Ritchie So what's all this hype about `nano' and `bio of these words. Indeed, I've heard numerous people glibly state that, unless the title of your proposal has `nano! The nano revolution has certainly taken our field by storm. One constantly hears of the new paradigm ­ we

  16. Montana State University ME 455 Bio-Inspired Engineering1 ME 455: BIO-INSPIRED ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    problem solutions. Structure, thermal, and fluid concepts in nature applied to engineering. Advanced. 2) Perform basic structural, thermal, and fluid analyses in biological and engineering systems. 3Montana State University ME 455 Bio-Inspired Engineering1 ME 455: BIO-INSPIRED ENGINEERING CATALOG

  17. BioDiesel Content On-board monitoring

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2008 - all rights reserved 1 (tm) BioDiesel Content On-board monitoring BioDiesel Content On-board monitoring August 6th, 2008 Copyright SP3H 2007 -- all rights reserved 2 Biofuel...

  18. MEMS for Bio Applications Ian Papautsky, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudoin, Geneviève

    to as BioMEMS or BioMicrosystems. In addition to many microfluidic devices, such as pumps, mixers, valves have been developed. Microfluidic devices and LOCs have generated interest in many application fields the SPIE Microfluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems Conference and served on the organizing committee

  19. Fuel Cells on Bio-Gas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remick, R. J.

    2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Fuel cells operating on bio-gas offer a pathway to renewable electricity generation; (2) With federal incentives of $3,500/kW or 30% of the project costs, reasonable payback periods of less than five years can be achieved; (3) Tri-generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen offers an alternative route to solving the H{sub 2} infrastructure problem facing fuel cell vehicle deployment; and (4) DOE will be promoting bio-gas fuel cells in the future under its Market Transformation Programs.

  20. BioWatch in a Box

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, M T; Dzentis, J M; Meyer, R M

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BioWatch, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) environmental monitoring program, has been successfully operating in many of the nation's urban centers since early 2003. This early warning environmental monitoring system can detect trace amounts of biological materials in the air, and has been used to provide information to assist public health experts determine whether detected materials are due to an intentional release (bioterrorism incident) or due to minute quantities that occur naturally in the environment. BioWatch information enables federal, state, and local officials to more quickly determine appropriate emergency response, medical care and consequence management.

  1. BioSolar Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenanceBioFuelBioSolar Inc Jump

  2. Bio Pure Maryland LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark, Arizona:JumpRenov veisBio FuelBio-Pure

  3. Bio Processing Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof Alternative Sources ofBeyondPV CoSandy,BioBio

  4. BIO-OPTICAL PRESENTATIONS YEARS 2000 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    BIO-OPTICAL PRESENTATIONS YEARS 2000 ­ 2004 YEAR 00-01 Armstrong, R.A., F. Gilbes, R. Guerrero. Lopez, and F. Gilbes, 2000, "Apparent Optical Properties at the Caribbean Time Station", Ocean Optics XV, Monaco. Gilbes, F., and R.A. Armstrong, 2000, "Inherent Optical Properties at the Caribbean Time Series

  5. Project BioLex Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Author: Jonas Dahl Maiken Brřchner Andersen FORCE Technology Project partners DONG energy (Former Elsam Engineering A/S and Energi E2 A/S) Jan 2007 #12;Final report BioLex FU3229 ORDRE-104804 2 Table of contents 1 ............................................................................................4 4 The BIOLEX database

  6. BIO: Milton H. Marquis Professor of Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Philip L.

    BIO: Milton H. Marquis Professor of Economics Bellamy Building Department of Economics Florida received a Mas- ter of Arts degree in Economics in 1982 and a Ph.D. in Economics in 1985 from Indiana University. He has taught economics and finance at St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN and at Florida State

  7. INVITATION: PRAKTISK TEMADAG OM INDHENTNING AF BIO-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INVITATION: PRAKTISK TEMADAG OM INDHENTNING AF BIO- MASSE FRA LAVBUNDSOMRĹDE TIL BIOGAS 24 lavbundsomrĺdet til biogas vćret stigende de senere ĺr. Der sker en spćndende teknologisk udvikling indenfor som har draget erfaringer med hřst og anvendelse af enggrćs til biogas, og se udstyr til slĺning af

  8. Biofuels and bio-products derived from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    NEED Biofuels and bio- products derived from lignocellulosic biomass (plant materials) are part improve the energy and carbon efficiencies of biofuels production from a barrel of biomass using chemical and thermal catalytic mechanisms. The Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels IMPACT

  9. Epi Bio 305 Data Management and Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    is to prepare students for computer-based data management, statistical data processing, and programming using SAS systems. There will also be a brief introduction to other statistical packages including R (whichEpi Bio 305 Data Management and Programming 1.0 Credit Fall 2011 (September 20-December 06, 2011

  10. BioElectrochemically Assisted Microbial Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    BioElectrochemically Assisted Microbial Reactor (BEAMR) The BEAMR reactor uses only >0.2 V needed of combustion) >85% based on energy in electricity + acetate, at a rate of 1 m3 -H2 /m3 -reactor volume/d (100 A

  11. Bio-based Greases: Environmental concerns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    are causing a resurgence for these plant-based lubricants. 36 • MAY 2014 TRIBOLOGY & LUBRICATION TECHNOLOGY WWW.STLE.ORGAFTER A 150-YEAR HIATUS, lubricating greases made from agricultural products are making a comeback. For some 4,000 years, animal fats, olive oil and other biobased materials kept wheels and gears moving along smoothly. The shift toward petroleum-based lubricants came about only in the latter half of the 19th century. 1 Now uncertainties in petroleum prices and supply sources, coupled with an emerging awareness of environmental factors, are turning a small segment of the market back to lubricants made from renewable resources—mainly plants. Back to the Future Can bio-based lubricants compete in a world of high-capacity generators, jet aircraft engines and 18-wheel trucks? This question is particularly challenging when the lubricants are greases, which require thickeners and additives and must perform under heavy loads and in hostile environments. WHY BIO?

  12. BioSAR Airborne Biomass Sensing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Johnson, P.

    2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This CRADA was developed to enable ORNL to assist American Electronics, Inc. test a new technology--BioSAR. BioSAR is a an airborne, low frequency (80-120 MHz {approx} FM radio frequencies) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology which was designed and built for NASA by ZAI-Amelex under Patrick Johnson's direction. At these frequencies, leaves and small branches are nearly transparent and the majority of the energy reflected from the forest and returned to the radar is from the tree trunks. By measuring the magnitude of the back scatter, the volume of the tree trunk and therefore the biomass of the trunks can be inferred. The instrument was successfully tested on tropical rain forests in Panama. Patrick Johnson, with American Electronics, Inc received a Phase II SBIR grant from DOE Office of Climate Change to further test and refine the instrument. Mr Johnson sought ORNL expertise in measuring forest biomass in order for him to further validate his instrument. ORNL provided ground truth measurements of forest biomass at three locations--the Oak Ridge Reservation, Weyerhaeuser Co. commercial pine plantations in North Carolina, and American Energy and Power (AEP) Co. hardwood forests in southern Ohio, and facilitated flights over these forests. After Mr. Johnson processed the signal data from BioSAR instrument, the processed data were given to ORNL and we attempted to derive empirical relationships between the radar signals and the ground truth forest biomass measurements using standard statistical techniques. We were unsuccessful in deriving such relationships. Shortly before the CRADA ended, Mr Johnson discovered that FM signal from local radio station broadcasts had interfered with the back scatter measurements such that the bulk of the signal received by the BioSAR instrument was not backscatter from the radar but rather was local radio station signals.

  13. Microstructure Bio-Material for Behavioral Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samarasinghe, Punsiri

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Center for their support. I would like to thank Dr Yeh (Bio-medical Engineering) for giving me the opportunity to use his open access tissue culture facility to grow our MCF 7 and MDA 231 cells. I appreciate the help given by Dr Roula Mouneimne... and Dr Sungmin Hong for sharing their valuable experiences. vi NOMENCLATURE MCF Michigan Cancer Foundation MDA M D Anderson DMEM Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium LOC Lab On a Chip PDMS Polydimethylsiloxane ECM Extra Cellular Matrix RPM...

  14. Bio-Terrorism Threat and Casualty Prevention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NOEL,WILLIAM P.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bio-terrorism threat has become the ''poor man's'' nuclear weapon. The ease of manufacture and dissemination has allowed an organization with only rudimentary skills and equipment to pose a significant threat with high consequences. This report will analyze some of the most likely agents that would be used, the ease of manufacture, the ease of dissemination and what characteristics of the public health response that are particularly important to the successful characterization of a high consequence event to prevent excessive causalities.

  15. BIOMASS TO BIO-OIL BY LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Huamin; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant efforts have been devoted to develop processes for the conversion of biomass, an abundant and sustainable source of energy, to liquid fuels and chemicals, in order to replace diminishing fossil fuels and mitigate global warming. Thermochemical and biochemical methods have attracted the most attention. Among the thermochemical processes, pyrolysis and liquefaction are the two major technologies for the direct conversion of biomass to produce a liquid product, often called bio-oil. This chapter focuses on the liquefaction, a medium-temperature and high-pressure thermochemical process for the conversion of biomass to bio-oil. Water has been most commonly used as a solvent and the process is known as hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). Fundamentals of HTL process, key factors determining HTL behavior, role of catalyst in HTL, properties of produced bio-oil, and the current status of the technology are summarized. The liquefaction of biomass by using organic solvents, a process called solvolysis, is also discussed. A wide range of biomass feedstocks have been tested for liquefaction including wood, crop residues, algae, food processing waste, and animal manure.

  16. Method to upgrade bio-oils to fuel and bio-crude

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steele, Philip H; Pittman, Jr., Charles U; Ingram, Jr., Leonard L; Gajjela, Sanjeev; Zhang, Zhijun; Bhattacharya, Priyanka

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method and device to produce esterified, olefinated/esterified, or thermochemolytic reacted bio-oils as fuels. The olefinated/esterified product may be utilized as a biocrude for input to a refinery, either alone or in combination with petroleum crude oils. The bio-oil esterification reaction is catalyzed by addition of alcohol and acid catalyst. The olefination/esterification reaction is catalyzed by addition of resin acid or other heterogeneous catalyst to catalyze olefins added to previously etherified bio-oil; the olefins and alcohol may also be simultaneously combined and catalyzed by addition of resin acid or other heterogeneous catalyst to produce the olefinated/esterified product.

  17. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Targets...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Development Manager, U.S. DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen...

  18. BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Media News and Awards Supporting Organizations Redefining The Frontiers of Bioenergy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Facilities and Centers | BioEnergy...

  19. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working Group (BILIWG), Hydrogen Separation and Purification Working Group (PURIWG) & Hydrogen Production Technical Team Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming...

  20. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reforming, Darlene Steward, National Renewable Energy Laboratory High-Pressure Steam Ethanol Reforming, Romesh Kumar, Argonne National Laboratory Investigation of Bio-Ethanol...

  1. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Laboratory Investigation of Reaction Networks and Active Sites in Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt Based Catalysts, Umit Ozkan, Ohio State University Hydrogen...

  2. Next Generation Bio-Based & Sustainable Chemicals Summit | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Louisiana, from February 3-5. The event will bring together bio-based tech start-ups, specialty and custom chemical manufacturers, chemical majors, feedstock providers,...

  3. Conversion Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors, Distributed Models, and Refinery Co-Processing July 30, 2014 Bryna Berendzen Technology Manager BETO Conversion...

  4. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Production...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    International report-out at the CTAB webinar on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Production. ctabwebinarbiooilsproduction.pdf More Documents &...

  5. Sandia Energy - "Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results Pave the Way for Closed-Loop Biofuel Refineries Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels Facilities...

  6. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Arlene Anderson at the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting.

  7. Investigation of Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt-based...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt-based Catalysts (Presentation) Investigation of Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt-based Catalysts (Presentation) Presented at the 2007...

  8. BIOTECH JOBS AND INTERNSHIPS Bio Online: Life on the Net www.bio.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Web Biotechnology Career Center ­ www.biocareer.com/index.cfm US Interns ­ www.usinterns.com COMPANIES TO RESEARCH://www.lilly.com/careers/index.html Environmental Protection Agency - www.epa.gov/careers/stuopp.html Food and Drug Administration - www & ENGINEERING TEMP AGENCIES BioSource Technical Service (Biotech/Environmental) ­ www.biosource-tech.com/ Kelly

  9. SysBioMed Canary Islands Cancer Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timmer, Jens

    SysBioMed Canary Islands Cancer Research Institute Winter School on Systems Biology for Medical Applications 27th February ­ 2nd March 2007 Puerto de la Cruz, Tenerife (Canary Islands) Supported by the European Commission (FP6 projects COSBICS and SysBioMed) and the Canary Islands Institute for Cancer

  10. Towards Optimal Placement of Bio-Weapon Chris Kiekintveld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    . Vice versa, our objective is to minimize the potential effect of a bio-weapon attack. CommentTowards Optimal Placement of Bio-Weapon Detectors Chris Kiekintveld Department of Computer Science, USA Email: lolerma@episd.edu Abstract--Biological weapons are difficult and expensive to detect

  11. Life-Cycle Assessment of Pyrolysis Bio-Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, Philp; Puettmann, Maureen E.; Penmetsa, Venkata Kanthi; Cooper, Jerome E.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part ofthe Consortium for Research on Renewable Industrial Materials' Phase I life-cycle assessments ofbiofuels, lifecycle inventory burdens from the production of bio-oil were developed and compared with measures for residual fuel oil. Bio-oil feedstock was produced using whole southern pine (Pinus taeda) trees, chipped, and converted into bio-oil by fast pyrolysis. Input parameters and mass and energy balances were derived with Aspen. Mass and energy balances were input to SimaPro to determine the environmental performance of bio-oil compared with residual fuel oil as a heating fuel. Equivalent functional units of 1 MJ were used for demonstrating environmental preference in impact categories, such as fossil fuel use and global warming potential. Results showed near carbon neutrality of the bio-oil. Substituting bio-oil for residual fuel oil, based on the relative carbon emissions of the two fuels, estimated a reduction in CO2 emissions by 0.075 kg CO2 per MJ of fuel combustion or a 70 percent reduction in emission over residual fuel oil. The bio-oil production life-cycle stage consumed 92 percent of the total cradle-to-grave energy requirements, while feedstock collection, preparation, and transportation consumed 4 percent each. This model provides a framework to better understand the major factors affecting greenhouse gas emissions related to bio-oil production and conversion to boiler fuel during fast pyrolysis.

  12. ShaRE - Staff Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund scholarships Employees' ScholarshipAlbina

  13. ShaRE - Staff Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund scholarships Employees' ScholarshipAlbinaChad

  14. ShaRE - Staff Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund scholarships Employees'

  15. ShaRE - Staff Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund scholarships Employees'Juan Idrobo Juan Idrobo

  16. ShaRE - Staff Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund scholarships Employees'Juan Idrobo Juan

  17. ShaRE - Staff Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund scholarships Employees'Juan Idrobo JuanKathy

  18. ShaRE - Staff Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund scholarships Employees'Juan Idrobo

  19. ShaRE - Staff Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund scholarships Employees'Juan IdroboMiaofang Chi

  20. ShaRE - Staff Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund scholarships Employees'Juan IdroboMiaofang

  1. ShaRE - Staff Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund scholarships Employees'Juan IdroboMiaofangD.

  2. ShaRE - Staff Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund scholarships Employees'Juan

  3. Complex biological and bio-inspired systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The understanding and characterization ofthe fundamental processes of the function of biological systems underpins many of the important challenges facing American society, from the pathology of infectious disease and the efficacy ofvaccines, to the development of materials that mimic biological functionality and deliver exceptional and novel structural and dynamic properties. These problems are fundamentally complex, involving many interacting components and poorly understood bio-chemical kinetics. We use the basic science of statistical physics, kinetic theory, cellular bio-chemistry, soft-matter physics, and information science to develop cell level models and explore the use ofbiomimetic materials. This project seeks to determine how cell level processes, such as response to mechanical stresses, chemical constituents and related gradients, and other cell signaling mechanisms, integrate and combine to create a functioning organism. The research focuses on the basic physical processes that take place at different levels ofthe biological organism: the basic role of molecular and chemical interactions are investigated, the dynamics of the DNA-molecule and its phylogenetic role are examined and the regulatory networks of complex biochemical processes are modeled. These efforts may lead to early warning algorithms ofpathogen outbreaks, new bio-sensors to detect hazards from pathomic viruses to chemical contaminants. Other potential applications include the development of efficient bio-fuel alternative-energy processes and the exploration ofnovel materials for energy usages. Finally, we use the notion of 'coarse-graining,' which is a method for averaging over less important degrees of freedom to develop computational models to predict cell function and systems-level response to disease, chemical stress, or biological pathomic agents. This project supports Energy Security, Threat Reduction, and the missions of the DOE Office of Science through its efforts to accurately model biological systems at the molecular and cellular level. The project's impact encompasses applications to biofuels, to novel sensors and to materials with broad use for energy or threat reduction. The broad, interdisciplinary approach of CNLS offers the unparalleled strength of combining science backgrounds and expertise -a unique and important asset in attacking the complex science of biological organisms. This approach also allows crossfertilization, with concepts and techniques transferring across field boundaries.

  4. Emergence BioEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to: navigation,ElectrosolarElmhurst MutualEmergence BioEnergy

  5. Flying F Bio Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy Park atFisiaFlorida: EnergyFlying F Bio

  6. Speaker Bios: Daniel Cohen | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepositoryManagement |Solar EnergySouthDaniel Cohen Speaker Bios:

  7. Patriot BioFuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompanyPCN TechnologyFrance) Jump to: Name: PassiveBioFuels

  8. Point Bio Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: EnergyPiratini Energia S6665°,Jump to: navigation,PoihipiBio

  9. Presenter Bio - Tasios Melis, Professor, UC Berkeley

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+ Report Presentation: Hubs+ Report A briefingPresenter Bio - Tasios

  10. Phoenix Bio Industries LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergy International LimitedPhoenix Bio Industries LLC Jump to:

  11. Solarvest BioEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingapore JumpSolarezo JumpSolarvest BioEnergy Jump to:

  12. Southern Iowa Bio Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,Southeast Colorado Power Assn Jump to:SouthernBio-Energy Place:

  13. Bio Oils Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |BigBigLake WindBio Oils

  14. Bio Solutions Manufacturing Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |BigBigLake WindBio

  15. BioCatalytics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |BigBigLakeBioCatalytics

  16. BioFuel Oasis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenanceBioFuel Energy Corp

  17. World Bio Markets | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric VehicleCenters |-- 9:00 AM Opening PlenaryNaturalDepartment ofWorld Bio

  18. Alcotra Bio Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin SeikiandAlcopar Jump to: navigation,Alcotra Bio

  19. Natura Bio Fuels Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergy InformationNatura Bio Fuels Ltd Jump to:

  20. BioEnergy Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | Department of Energy BigNews » BioEnergy

  1. Bio Fuel Systems BFS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark, Arizona:JumpRenov veisBio Fuel Systems

  2. Bio Gas Technologies LTd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark, Arizona:JumpRenov veisBio Fuel

  3. Bio Renewables Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark, Arizona:JumpRenov veisBio

  4. BioJet Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark,BioJet Corporation Jump to: navigation,

  5. BioProcess Algae | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark,BioJet Corporation Jump to:Systems

  6. BioXchange Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark,BioJet Corporation Jump

  7. Fuel Bio One LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604° ShowCounty, California:Frontier,FryeBio One LLC

  8. Bio Clean Fuels Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof Alternative Sources ofBeyondPV CoSandy,Bio Clean Fuels

  9. Brasil Bio Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotinsBoston College JumpBrady HotBrancoBrasil Bio

  10. Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A., E-mail: aidabenhassen@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Kraiem, T. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Naoui, S. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Belayouni, H. [Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Produced bio-fuels (bio-oil and bio-char) from some animal fatty wastes. • Investigated the effects of main parameters on pyrolysis products distribution. • Determined the suitable conditions for the production of the maximum of bio-oil. • Characterized bio-oils and bio-chars obtained from several animal fatty wastes. - Abstract: Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC–MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds…etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,…etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy.

  11. Bio Oelwerk Magdeburg GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof Alternative Sources ofBeyondPV CoSandy,Bio CleanBioBio

  12. Bio Yankuang Hong Kong Listed | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof Alternative Sources ofBeyondPV CoSandy,BioBioBio

  13. BioMed Central Page 1 of 21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned-Miller, Erik

    ://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any m-Miller - elm@cs.umass.edu; R Thomas Zoeller - tzoeller@bio.umass.edu; David Kulp - dkulp

  14. BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

  15. Integrating NABC bio-oil intermediates into the petroleum refinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–D: Working Together: Conventional Refineries and Bio-Oil R&D Technologies Thomas Foust, Director, National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  16. USDA BioPreferred Program Public Meeting for Stakeholders

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) BioPreferred® program will host a public meeting for interested stakeholders to discuss the issue of incorporating previously excluded mature market...

  17. BIOS 3010: ECOLOGY Fall 2013 Dr Stephen Malcolm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malcolm, Stephen

    BIOS 3010: ECOLOGY ­ Fall 2013 Dr Stephen Malcolm BONUS POINT OPPORTUNITY 1: For up to 5 bonus: For credit, this bonus opportunity (title and summary paragraph) is due by September 16. #12;

  18. Past, Present, and Future Production of Bio-oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, Philip; Yu, Fei; Gajjela, Sanjeev

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bio-oil is a liquid product produced by fast pyrol-ysis of biomass. The fast pyrolysis is performed by heating the biomass rapidly (2 sec) at temperatures ranging from 350 to 650 oC. The vapors produced by this rapid heating are then condensed to produce a dark brown water-based emulsion composed of frag-ments of the original hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin molecules contained in the biomass. Yields range from 60 to 75% based on the feedstock type and the pyrolysis reactor employed. The bio-oil pro-duced by this process has a number of negative prop-erties that are produced mainly by the high oxygen content (40 to 50%) contributed by that contained in water (25 to 30% of total mass) and oxygenated compounds. Each bio-oil contains hundreds of chemi-cal compounds. The chemical composition of bio-oil renders it a very recalcitrant chemical compound. To date, the difficulties in utilizing bio-oil have limited its commercial development to the production of liq-uid smoke as food flavoring. Practitioners have at-tempted to utilize raw bio-oil as a fuel; they have also applied many techniques to upgrade bio-oil to a fuel. Attempts to utilize raw bio-oil as a combustion engine fuel have resulted in engine or turbine dam-age; however, Stirling engines have been shown to successfully combust raw bio-oil without damage. Utilization of raw bio-oil as a boiler fuel has met with more success and an ASTM standard has recently been released describing bio-oil characteristics in relation to assigned fuel grades. However, commercialization has been slow to follow and no reports of distribution of these bio-oil boiler fuels have been reported. Co-feeding raw bio-oil with coal has been successfully performed but no current power generation facilities are following this practice. Upgrading of bio-oils to hydrocarbons via hydroprocessing is being performed by several organizations. Currently, limited catalyst life is the obstacle to commercialization of this tech-nology. Researchers have developed means to increase the anhydrosugars content of bio-oil above the usual 3% produced during normal pyrolysis by mild acid pretreatment of the biomass feedstock. Mississippi State University has developed a proprietary method to produce an aqueous fraction containing more than 50% of anhydrosugars content. These anhydrosugars can be catalyzed to hydrogen or hydrocarbons; alter-nately, the aqueous fraction can be hydrolyzed to pro-duce a high-glucose content. The hydrolyzed product can then be filtered to remove microbial inhibitor compounds followed by production of alcohols by fer-mentation. Production of bio-oil is now considered a major candidate as a technology promising production of drop-in transportation and boiler fuels.

  19. BioEnergy Research ISSN 1939-1234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 23 BioEnergy Research ISSN 1939-1234 Volume 5 Number 2 Bioenerg. Res. (2012) 5:341-362 DOI 10, the EROI was adjusted using quality factors that were calculated according to the price of each input

  20. BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof Alternative Sources ofBeyondPVBioCleanBioPowerAtlas

  1. A New Standard to Connect BioBrick Parts for Precise Extraction of an Enzyme Digestion Product

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uekusa, Kousuke

    2010-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This BioBricks Foundation Request for Comments (BBF RFC) introduces a new standard to connect BioBrick parts using BglI site.

  2. Reasoning about the ERK signal transduction pathway using BioSigNetRR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shankland, Carron

    Reasoning about the ERK signal transduction pathway using BioSigNet­RR Carron Shankland a , Nam network (the ERK pathway of [CSK + 03]) using the declarative language of the tool BioSigNet­RR [BCT + 04

  3. Direct Conversion of Bio-ethanol to Isobutene on Nanosized ZnxZryOz...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversion of Bio-ethanol to Isobutene on Nanosized ZnxZryOz Mixed Oxides with Balanced Acid–Base Sites. Direct Conversion of Bio-ethanol to Isobutene on Nanosized ZnxZryOz...

  4. Investigation of Bio-Diesel Fueled Engines under Low-Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bio-Diesel Fueled Engines under Low-Temperature Combustion Strategies Investigation of Bio-Diesel Fueled Engines under Low-Temperature Combustion Strategies ftp01lee.pdf More...

  5. OpenMSI: A Science Gateway to Sort Through Bio-Imaging's Big...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OpenMSI: A Science Gateway to Sort Through Bio-Imaging's Big Datasets OpenMSI: A Science Gateway to Sort Through Bio-Imaging's Big Datasets August 27, 2013 | Tags: Basic Energy...

  6. DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise Plenary I: Progress in Advanced...

  7. E85/b20 for I-65 AND BEYOND: Putting BioFuels in Your Vehicles...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    I-65 AND BEYOND: Putting BioFuels in Your Vehicles from Lake Michigan to the Gulf of Mexico E85b20 for I-65 AND BEYOND: Putting BioFuels in Your Vehicles from Lake Michigan to...

  8. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Bio-Oil for Chemicals and Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of work includes optimizing processing conditions and demonstrating catalyst lifetime for catalyst formulations that are readily scaleable to commercial operations. We use a bench-scale, continuous-flow, packed-bed, catalytic, tubular reactor, which can be operated in the range of 100-400 mL/hr., from 50-400 C and up to 20MPa (see Figure 1). With this unit we produce upgraded bio-oil from whole bio-oil or useful bio-oil fractions, specifically pyrolytic lignin. The product oils are fractionated, for example by distillation, for recovery of chemical product streams. Other products from our tests have been used in further testing in petroleum refining technology at UOP and fractionation for product recovery in our own lab. Further scale-up of the technology is envisioned and we will carry out or support process design efforts with industrial partners, such as UOP.

  9. Hydroprocessing Bio-oil and Products Separation for Coke Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass can be used to produce a raw bio-oil product, which can be upgraded by catalytic hydroprocessing to hydrocarbon liquid products. In this study the upgraded products were distilled to recover light naphtha and oils and to produce a distillation resid with useful properties for coker processing and production of renewable, low-sulfur electrode carbon. For this hydroprocessing work, phase separation of the bio-oil was applied as a preparatory step to concentrate the heavier, more phenolic components thus generating a more amenable feedstock for resid production. Low residual oxygen content products were produced by continuous-flow, catalytic hydroprocessing of the phase separated bio-oil.

  10. BioSystems xxx (2006) xxxxxx Qualitative analysis of the relation between DNA microarray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radulescu, Ovidiu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BioSystems xxx (2006) xxx­xxx Qualitative analysis of the relation between DNA microarray data:10.1016/j.biosystems.2005.10.006 BIO-2511; No. of Pages 22 #12;2 A. Siegel et al. / BioSystems xxx (2006) xxx­xxx tinuous and discrete models is made by piecewise linear differential models (de Jong et

  11. TASK 40: Sustainable International Bio Energy Trade: securing supply Overview of the task

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 TASK 40: Sustainable International Bio Energy Trade: securing supply and demand Overview of the task The objective of Task 40 is to investigate what is needed to create a "commodity market" for bio-energy's, the task will contribute to the development of sustainable bio-energy markets on short and on long term

  12. A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1 *, Chantal Gondran2 , Fabien Giroud2 powerful ones, Glucose BioFuel Cells (GBFCs), are based on enzymes electrically wired by redox mediators applications. Citation: Cinquin P, Gondran C, Giroud F, Mazabrard S, Pellissier A, et al. (2010) A Glucose BioFuel

  13. BIO-OPTICAL PROFILING FLOATS AS NEW OBSERVATIONAL TOOLS FOR BIOGEOCHEMICAL AND ECOSYSTEM STUDIES: POTENTIAL SYNERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In parallel with their emergence, the field of miniature, low power bio-optical and biogeochemical sensors from the increase in observational capacities by developing profiling floats that allow the measurement measurements by bio-optical profiling floats would permit the elaboration of unique 3D / 4D bio

  14. BioGold Fuels Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenanceBioFuel EnergyBioGold Fuels

  15. Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark, Arizona:JumpRenov veisBioBio-Gas

  16. Bio Octane Energias Renov veis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof Alternative Sources ofBeyondPV CoSandy,Bio CleanBio

  17. Plant variability and bio-fuel properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agblevor, F.A.; Besler-Guran, S.; Wiselogel, A.E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermochemically converting biomass feedstocks to fuels is one of the major thrusts of renewable energy research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Among several thermochemical routes is the fast pyrolysis process which produces liquid fuels from woody and herbaceous biomass feedstocks. Because of the large variability in the composition of biomass feedstocks due to plant variety and environmental factors, it is important to assess how these variabilities affect the properties of thermochemical liquid fuels (bio-oils) produced from these resources. Similar varieties of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) that were grown at three different locations and three hybrid poplar clones that were grown at one location were used in these studies. The feedstocks were pyrolyzed in a fluidized bed reactor at 500{degrees}C. The gas products were analyzed on-line and the liquid products were analyzed for elemental composition and higher heating values. Apart from small difference in the yield of char/ash, the yields of pyrolysis oils and gases were similar for switchgrass feedstocks grown at all three locations. The char/ash yields ranged from 21.1 to 22.9%; total liquids (organic liquids + water) yields ranged from 59%-60.5%; and the gas yields ranged from 11%-12% (wt). The higher heating values (HHVs) of the oils were similar (24.3-24.6 MJ/kg). For the hybrid poplar feedstocks, total liquids (65%-69%), char/ash (10%-11%), and gas yields (15.6%-17%) were similar for all three poplar clones; however, the elemental composition and the HHVs of the pyrolysis oils had statistically significant differences. The NC5260 pyrolysis oils had lower HHV (22.0{+-}0.5 MG/kg) compared to the DN clones (23.2{+-}0.3 MJ/kg). The yields of total liquids and organics for the three clones were higher than those for the switchgrass feedstocks. The gas yields for the hybrid poplar clones were higher than for the switchgrass, but had compositions similar to those of the switchgrass feedstocks.

  18. BioMed Central Page 1 of 14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BioMed Central Page 1 of 14 (page number not for citation purposes) BMC Genomics Open AccessResearch article P elements and MITE relatives in the whole genome sequence of Anopheles gambiae Hadi Quesneville1Bioinformatics and Genomics Lab, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS, Universités P.M. Curie and D. Diderot 2, Place

  19. BioMed Central Page 1 of 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BioMed Central Page 1 of 11 (page number not for citation purposes) Nuclear Receptor Open Access translocation, form fusion proteins. Our observations therefore define a novel mechanism by which RARs activity , and (RXRs) are encoded by three different genes and are members of the nuclear receptor super- family

  20. An Implantable Bio-Micro-system for Drug Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    An Implantable Bio-Micro-system for Drug Monitoring Sara Ghoreishizadeh, Enver G. Kilinc, Camilla of the implantable monitoring system for long- term duration has many challenges. First, a multi-target biosen- sor coil; (ii) A power manage- ment IC dealing with the energy source of the implantable microsystem

  1. BioMed Central Page 1 of 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BioMed Central Page 1 of 8 (page number not for citation purposes) Environmental Health Open Access and Workshop Birmingham, UK. 24-25 February 2009 Published: 21 December 2009 Environmental Health 2009, 8(Suppl), The Wellcome Trust, Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC), Biotechnology and Biological

  2. BioMed Central Page 1 of 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    BioMed Central Page 1 of 4 (page number not for citation purposes) Biotechnology for Biofuels Open AccessEditorial Welcome to Biotechnology for Biofuels Bärbel Hahn-Hägerdal*1, Michael E Himmel2, Chris Calvin Laboratory, MC 5230, Berkeley CA 94720-5230, USA and 4Center for Environmental Research

  3. BioMed Central Page 1 of 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for locomotive engineers in natural sleep settings Gregory D Roach*1, Kathryn J Reid2, Sally Ferguson1 and Drew Email: Gregory D Roach* - greg.roach@unisa.edu.au; Kathryn J Reid - k-reid@northwestern.edu; Sally/1/8 © 2006 Roach et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under

  4. Engineering for sustainable development for bio-diesel production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, Divya

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    on their performance. The SD indicator priority score and each individual alternative’s performance score together are used to determine the most sustainable alternative. The proposed methodology for ESD is applied for bio-diesel production in this thesis. The results...

  5. European Market Study for BioOil (Pyrolysis Oil)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilns 6.2. Sawmill Dry Kilns 6.3. District Heating 6.4. Power Plants- Co-firing and Alternative Fuels 6-distance transportation advantages over raw biomass and wood pellets is BioOil from fast pyrolysis, or Pyrolysis Oil and district heating applications, and in the long-term as a clean burning fuel to replace diesel in industrial

  6. BioMed Central Page 1 of 14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BioMed Central Page 1 of 14 (page number not for citation purposes) BMC Medical Genomics Open December 2008 BMC Medical Genomics 2008, 1:63 doi:10.1186/1755-8794-1-63 Received: 29 September 2008 is properly cited. #12;BMC Medical Genomics 2008, 1:63 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1755-8794/1/63 Page 2

  7. Digital Morphology: The Smithsonian's BioVisualization Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberger, Alfred H.

    cap- ture meaningful information and pro- duce novel images of scientific speci- mens. The Smithsonian BioVisualization Lab was established to produce re- search-quality digital (virtual) speci- mens- coupled device (CCD) sensors to en- able triangulation of the height measurement (z coordinate value

  8. BioMed Central Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsumoto, Katsumi

    sequestration by direct injection into the deep ocean can store carbon for centuries. Even after injected carbon in the context of direct injection of carbon into the deep ocean, a form of sequestration Published: 13 July 2006BioMed Central Page 1 of 2 (page number not for citation purposes) Carbon Balance and Management

  9. BioMed Central Page 1 of 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -induced lung injury Karmene Ahamed1, Ralph Epaud1, Martin Holzenberger2, Monique Bonora1, Jean-François Flejou3 of Pathology, Hospital Saint-Antoine, 75012 Paris, France Email: Karmene Ahamed - ahamed://respiratory-research.com/content/6/1/31 © 2005 Ahamed et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed

  10. BioMed Central Page 1 of 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BioMed Central Page 1 of 7 (page number not for citation purposes) Substance Abuse Treatment that staff need to maintain a constant level of care throughout the treatment process. Published: 01 February 2006 Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy 2006, 1:5 doi:10.1186/1747-597X-1- 5 Received

  11. BioMed Central Page 1 of 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    in mammalian cellular networks. from NIPS workshop on New Problems and Methods in Computational Biology.1186/1471-2105-7-S1-S7 NIPS workshop on New Problems and Methods in Computational BiologyBioMed Central Page 1 of 15 (page number not for citation purposes) BMC Bioinformatics Open Access

  12. BioMed Central Page 1 of 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of bioinformatics and computational biology. The participants came from 21 nations and regions including (in, development and applications of Bio- informatics and Computational Biology. The Seventh Asia Pacific series had a tradition of emphasis on rigorous algorithm topics in bioinformatics and computation

  13. BioMed Central Page 1 of 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    of Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, U.S.A and 2Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, U.S.A Email: Feng Gao - fg2037BioMed Central Page 1 of 10 (page number not for citation purposes) BMC Bioinformatics Open Access

  14. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Spring 2008 Spring 2008 Biology 111 In-Class Exam #3 BioEnergetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    the colors if you don't have them) with the highest energy of light being on the far right side of your weight. 1. Environmental: energy is lost along each link in food web; or waste methane gas 2. Fat: meat's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Spring 2008 2 Lab Question: 4 pts. 1) How does Chlamydomonas get energy to regrow its

  15. Bio-Inspired Motion Control of the Musculoskeletal BioBiped1 Robot Based on a Learned Inverse Dynamics Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryk, Oskar von

    --Based on the central hypothesis that a humanoid robot with human-like walking and running performance re- quires a bio, running, and hopping appear as natural and quite easy tasks for humans, yet for today's humanoid robots uneven ground or slip. The quest for a robot that implements human-like locomo- tion does not only

  16. Energias Renovables del Bio Bio ERBB | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest,EnergySerranopolis Jump to: navigation, search

  17. Production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, and chemicals from catalytic processing of bio-oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, George W; Vispute, Tushar P; Routray, Kamalakanta

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a method of generating hydrogen from a bio-oil, comprising hydrogenating a water-soluble fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst, and reforming the water-soluble fraction by aqueous-phase reforming in the presence of a reforming catalyst, wherein hydrogen is generated by the reforming, and the amount of hydrogen generated is greater than that consumed by the hydrogenating. The method can further comprise hydrocracking or hydrotreating a lignin fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrocracking catalyst wherein the lignin fraction of bio-oil is obtained as a water-insoluble fraction from aqueous extraction of bio-oil. The hydrogen used in the hydrogenating and in the hydrocracking or hydrotreating can be generated by reforming the water-soluble fraction of bio-oil.

  18. BioMed Central Page 1 of 19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Michael I.

    for genes related to life span DM Blei*1, K Franks2, MI Jordan*3,4 and IS Mian*2 Address: 1Computer Science Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA Email: DM Blei* - blei@cs.princeton.edu; K Franks - KFranks://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2105/7/250 © 2006 Blei et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article

  19. A Bio-Based Fuel Cell for Distributed Energy Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony Terrinoni; Sean Gifford

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology we propose consists primarily of an improved design for increasing the energy density of a certain class of bio-fuel cell (BFC). The BFCs we consider are those which harvest electrons produced by microorganisms during their metabolism of organic substrates (e.g. glucose, acetate). We estimate that our technology will significantly enhance power production (per unit volume) of these BFCs, to the point where they could be employed as stand-alone systems for distributed energy generation.

  20. New York Nano-Bio Molecular Information Technology (NYNBIT) Incubator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Digendra K

    2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This project presents the outcome of an effort made by a consortium of six universities in the State of New York to develop a Center for Advanced technology (CAT) in the emerging field of Nano-Bio-Molecular Information Technology. The effort consists of activities such as organization of the NYNBIT incubator, collaborative research projects, development of courses, an educational program for high schools, and commercial start-up programs.

  1. AB SCIEX-Advion BioSystems Commercialize ORNL Tech | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at ORNL. AB SCIEX partnered with Advion BioSystems, Inc., a frontrunner in microfluidic systems, which recently launched a liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) sample...

  2. Sandia Energy - Joint BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured on the Cover of ACS Chemical Biology Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels Facilities Capabilities JBEI News News...

  3. Meeting Action Items and Highlights from the Bio-Derived Liquids...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from the Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) & Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review Meeting Action Items and Highlights...

  4. Miscible, multi-component, diesel fuels and methods of bio-oil transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Thomas (Athens, GA); Garcia, Manuel (Quebec, CA); Geller, Dan (Athens, GA); Goodrum, John W. (Athens, GA); Pendergrass, Joshua T. (Jefferson, GA)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Briefly described, embodiments of this disclosure include methods of recovering bio-oil products, fuels, diesel fuels, and the like are disclosed.

  5. Review of the pyrolysis platform for coproducing bio-oil and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    robust thermochemical technology for transforming biomass into bio-oil, biochar, and syngas. The robust nature of the pyrolysis technology, which allows considerable flexibility...

  6. T-598: Apache Tomcat HTTP BIO Connector Error Discloses Information From Different Requests to Remote Users

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When using HTTP pipelining, the system may return information from a different request to a remote user. The vulnerability resides in the HTTP BIO connector.

  7. Marine Bio-Nanotechnology: High-Performance Materials from Sponge Silicatein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morse, Daniel E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title: Marine Bio-Nanotechnology: High-Performance MaterialsChemical Biology (2005); Nanotechnology Review (2005, 2006);Marine biotechnology; nanotechnology; sponge; silica;

  8. Effect of Acid, Alkali, and Steam Explosion Pretreatments on Characteristics of Bio-Oil Produced from Pinewood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hui; Srinivasan, Radhakrishnan; Yu, Fei; Steele, Philip; Li, Qi; Mitchell, Brian

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Bio-oil produced from pinewood by fast pyrolysis has the potential to be a valuable substitute for fossil fuels. Pretreatment prior to the fast pyrolysis process has been shown to alter the structure and chemical composition of biomass. To determine the influence of biomass pretreatments on bio-oil produced during fast pyrolysis, we tested three pretreatment methods: dilute acid, dilute alkali, and steam explosion. Bio-oils were produced from untreated and pretreated pinewood feedstocks in an auger reactor at 450 C. The bio-oils�¢���� physical properties including pH, water content, acid value, density, viscosity, and heating value were measured. Chemical characteristics of the bio-oils were determined by gas chromatographymass spectrometry. Results showed that bio-oil yield and composition were influenced by biomass pretreatment. Of the three pretreatment methods, 1%H2SO4 pretreatment resulted in the highest bio-oil yield and best bio-oil quality.

  9. capacity and the market for bio-fuels, a num-ber of breakthroughs are required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    . "The world is on the verge of a catastrophe due to global warming." With those words in November 2007capacity and the market for bio-fuels, a num- ber of breakthroughs are required: ·Technical Fundraiser 011-36 31 28 tommy.hoglund@liu.se www.liu.se/expanding_excellence Bio-fuels and energy

  10. MSU BioEconomy Network COLLABORATE. Link Michigan State University's internal assets and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MSU BioEconomy Network COLLABORATE. DISCOVER. INNOVATE. Mission Link Michigan State University's internal assets and external partners to establish a premier innovation ecosystem for the bioeconomy. The MSU BioEconomy Network (MBEN) was cre- ated to coordinate the increasingly diverse range of bioeconomy

  11. Optimal adaptive control of (bio)chemical reactors: past, present and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    Optimal adaptive control of (bio)chemical reactors: past, present and future Ilse Y. Smets Abstract In this paper an overview of optimal adaptive control of (bio)chemical reactors is presentedTeC­­Bioprocess Technology and Control, Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, W. de Croylaan 46

  12. Bio-optical properties of oceanic waters: A reappraisal Andre Morel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Bio-optical properties of oceanic waters: A reappraisal Andre´ Morel Laboratoire de Physique et, California Abstract. The apparent optical properties (AOPs) of oceanic case 1 waters were previously analyzed describing the trophic conditions of water bodies. From these empirical relationships a bio-optical model

  13. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group & Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Oil Reforming, NREL, Darlene Steward o High Pressure Steam Ethanol Reforming, ANL, Romesh Kumar 12:00 - 12:30 Lunch 12:30 Research Review Continued o Investigation of Bio-ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt basedBio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) & Hydrogen Production

  14. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ReviewReport. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 12:30ResearchReviewContinued Investigation of Bio-ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt based Ethanol Reforming,ANL,RomeshKumar ..................23 MeritBio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG), Hydrogen

  15. Sneak peek at electrofuels: Geobacter team aims for bio-based solution to solar energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Sneak peek at electrofuels: Geobacter team aims for bio-based solution to solar energy storage a hybrid of solar and bio-power and also solve the most perplexing problem facing solar energy: energy compounds, and oxygen is released as a byproduct," Lovley explains. Solar energy powers the microbes

  16. Preparation and Properties of Bio-based Polyurethane Made from Natural Rubber and Poly( -caprolactone)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    i Preparation and Properties of Bio-based Polyurethane Made from Natural Rubber and Poly;ii Thesis Title Preparation and Properties of Bio-based Polyurethane Made from Natural Rubber Made from Natural Rubber and Poly( -caprolactone) Author Miss Wannarat Panwiriyarat Major Program

  17. Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    be used to synthesise petrol or diesel via Fischer-Tropsch reactions, or produce hydrogen via water gas shift reactions. Alternatively, the bio-oil product of fast pyrolysis may be upgraded to produce petrol that the minimum cost of petrol and diesel production is 0.86 $ litre-1 when a bio-oil feedstock is upgraded

  18. Bio-Char Soil Management on Highly Weathered Soils in the Humid Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    therefore have to be applied each year to sustain soil productivity. Management of black carbon (C36 Bio-Char Soil Management on Highly Weathered Soils in the Humid Tropics Johannes Lehmann1), ColombiaQ1 CONTENTS 36.1 Bio-Char Management and Soil Nutrient Availability

  19. The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System Ajay Ummat, Constantinos and warn the astronaut of probable biological damage. A basic framework for radiation detection system which utilizes bio-nano machines is discussed. This radiation detection system is termed as "radiation

  20. BioSystems xxx (2005) xxxxxx A network model of early events in epidermal growth factor receptor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blinov, Michael L.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BioSystems xxx (2005) xxx­xxx A network model of early events in epidermal growth factor receptor.06.014 BIO-2484; No. of Pages 16 #12;2 M.L. Blinov et al. / BioSystems xxx (2005) xxx­xxx lent character

  1. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Rapidly Renewable Materials Soy and Bio-Diesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials ­ Soy and Bio-Diesel Navin Abeysundara Brian Lee Aramazd Gharapetian University of British RENEWABLE MATERIALS ­ SOY AND BIO-DIESEL SUBMITTED TO Florence Luo By: Navin Abeysundara Brian Lee Aramazd based spray foam and bio-diesel furnaces. Soy based spray foam and biodiesel furnaces were considered

  2. Bio-Oil Deployment in the Home Heating Market

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-Oil Deployment in the Home Heating

  3. Carbon Green BioEnergy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermitsGreen BioEnergy LLC Jump to: navigation, search

  4. Sada Bio Energia e Agricultura | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBY Solutions JumpFacility | OpenSacketsSada Bio Energia e

  5. File:NREL-BioMap.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,SizeEthiopiametstak.pdfMFSA06-2012 (1).pdfBioMap.pdf Jump

  6. REG Bio power UK Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,Jump to: navigation, search ToolREFUREG Bio

  7. Iroquois Bio Energy Co LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar Energy JumpIrem Geothermal PowerBio Energy Co LLC Jump

  8. Jyothi Bio Energies Ltd JBEL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa: Energy Resources JumpJudson,InternationalJyothi Bio

  9. Refining Bio-Oil alongside Petroleum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.JuneAs part of itsRefining Bio-Oil

  10. E3 BioFuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South, NewDyer County, Tennessee:Moli EnergyE3 BioFuels

  11. BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc. - Product Pipeline Review - 2014

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |BigBigLakeBioCatalyticsBy

  12. BioFuel Energy Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenanceBioFuel Energy Corp Place:

  13. BioFuelBox Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenanceBioFuel Energy

  14. BioLogical Capital BLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenanceBioFuel

  15. Coulee Region Bio Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis AtSystemsInformationCoulee Region Bio

  16. Bios | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC)PrincipalStaffTheofanisApplication1BiogeochemicalBios High

  17. Magnolia BioPower LLC MBP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to:Macquarie Energy LLCMagnolia BioPower LLC MBP

  18. Sri Vel Bio Diesel Energy Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern IL Elec Coop,Lanka-DLR Cooperation Jump to:Vel Bio Diesel

  19. Amrit Bio Energy Industries Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan BlanchAmite County,Amrit Bio Energy Industries Ltd

  20. BioEnergy of America Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark, Arizona:JumpRenovOne,BioEnergy of

  1. BioEnergy of America | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark, Arizona:JumpRenovOne,BioEnergy of17

  2. BioFuels Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark, Arizona:JumpRenovOne,BioEnergy of17LLC

  3. BioGas Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark, Arizona:JumpRenovOne,BioEnergy

  4. BioPartners ApS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark,BioJet Corporation Jump to:

  5. BioPower Systems Pty Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark,BioJet Corporation Jump to:Systems Pty

  6. Western BioEnergy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraphWellton-Mohawk IrrWestWestNewWestern BioEnergy

  7. Green Lion Bio Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <GlacialGoldenarticle isinEnergy, LLCLion Bio

  8. Hubei Xinda Bio oil Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open EnergyInformationHorizonEnergyHubei Xinda Bio oil Technology

  9. Bio Energy Biogas GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof Alternative Sources ofBeyondPV CoSandy,Bio Clean

  10. BioEnergy of Colorado LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof Alternative Sources ofBeyondPVBioClean EnergyBioEnergy

  11. BioPower Application (United States) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof Alternative Sources ofBeyondPVBioCleanBioPower

  12. Bio-oil Quality Improvement and Catalytic Hydrotreating of Bio-oils Presentation for BETO 2015 Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-Oil Deployment in the Home Heating

  13. Study of the Neutralization and Stabilization of a Mixed Hardwood Bio-Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moens, L.; Black, S. K.; Myers, M. D.; Czernik, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast-pyrolysis bio-oil that is currently produced from lignocellulosic biomass in demonstration and semicommercial plants requires significant modification to become an acceptable transportation fuel. The high acidity and chemical instability of bio-oils render them incompatible with existing petroleum refinery processes that produce gasoline and diesel fuels. To facilitate the use of bio-oil as a feedstock in a traditional refinery infrastructure, there is considerable interest in upgrading bio-oils through chemical pathways that include converting the carboxylic acids and reactive carbonyl compounds into esters and acetals using low-cost alcohols. In this article, we discuss our observations with different approaches to esterification and etherification chemistry using a crude bio-oil derived from mixed hardwoods. The high water content in crude bio-oils (ca. 20?30%) creates equilibrium limitations in the condensation reactions that hamper the upgrading process in that the neutralization and stabilization steps cannot easily be driven to completion. The lowest acid number that we were able to obtain without causing serious degradation of the flow properties of the bio-oil had a total acid number of about 20, a value that is still too high for use in a traditional petroleum refinery.

  14. Bio-Engineering High Performance Microbial Strains for MEOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiangdong Fang; Qinghong Wang; Patrick Shuler

    2007-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this three-year research project are: (1) to employ the latest advances in genetics and bioengineering, especially Directed Protein Evolution technology, to improve the effectiveness of the microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) process. (2) to improve the surfactant activity and the thermal stability of bio-surfactant systems for MEOR; and (3) to develop improved laboratory methods and tools that screen quickly candidate bio-systems for EOR. Biosurfactants have been receiving increasing attention as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) agents because of their unique properties (i.e., mild production conditions, lower toxicity, and higher biodegradability) compared to their synthetic chemical counterparts. Rhamnolipid as a potent natural biosurfactant has a wide range of potential applications, including EOR and bioremediation. During the three-year of the project period, we have successfully cloned the genes involved in the rhamnolipid bio-synthesis. And by using the Transposon containing Rhamnosyltransferase gene rhlAB, we engineered the new mutant strains P. aeruginosa PEER02 and E. coli TnERAB so they can produce rhamnolipid biosurfactans. We were able to produce rhamnolipds in both P. aeroginosa PAO1-RhlA- strain and P. fluorescens ATCC15453 strain, with the increase of 55 to 175 fold in rhamnolipid production comparing with wild type bacteria strain. We have also completed the first round direct evolution studies using Error-prone PCR technique and have constructed the library of RhlAB-containing Transposon to express mutant gene in heterologous hosts. Several methods, such as colorimetric agar plate assay, colorimetric spectrophotometer assay, bioactive assay and oil spreading assay have been established to detect and screen rhamnolipid production. Our engineered P. aeruginosa PEER02 strain can produce rhamnolipids with different carbon sources as substrate. Interfacial tension analysis (IFT) showed that different rhamnolipids from different substrates gave different performance. Those rhamnolipids with plant oil as substrate showed as low an IFT as 0.05mN/m in the buffer solution with pH5.0 and 2% NaCl. Core flooding tests showed that rhamnolipids produced by our engineered bacteria are effective agents for EOR. At 250ppm rhamnolipid concentration from P. aeruginosa PEER02, 42% of the remaining oil after waterflood was recovered. These results were therefore significant towards considering the exploration of the studied rhamnolipids as EOR agents.

  15. A Bio-Polymer Transistor: Electrical Amplification by Microtubules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avner Priel; Arnolt J. Ramos; Jack A. Tuszynski; Horacio F. Cantiello

    2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Microtubules (MTs) are important cytoskeletal structures, engaged in a number of specific cellular activities, including vesicular traffic, cell cyto-architecture and motility, cell division, and information processing within neuronal processes. MTs have also been implicated in higher neuronal functions, including memory, and the emergence of "consciousness". How MTs handle and process electrical information, however, is heretofore unknown. Here we show new electrodynamic properties of MTs. Isolated, taxol-stabilized microtubules behave as bio-molecular transistors capable of amplifying electrical information. Electrical amplification by MTs can lead to the enhancement of dynamic information, and processivity in neurons can be conceptualized as an "ionic-based" transistor, which may impact among other known functions, neuronal computational capabilities.

  16. Photothermal nano-cavities for ultra-sensitive chem-bio detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Juejun

    Nano-cavity photothermal spectroscopy is a novel technique for ultra-sensitive chem-bio detection. We illustrate that through simultaneous localization of optical and thermal interactions in a planar nano-cavity, detection ...

  17. Design optimization for bioMEMS studies of enzyme-controlled metabolic pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    . Rubloff # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008 Abstract Biological microelectromechanical systems maintaining its catalytic activity. While promising as a methodology to replicate metabolic pathways in bioMEMS Microfluidic devices and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography fabrication have reduced

  18. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Background Paper

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paper by Arlene Anderson and Tracy Carole presented at the Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group, with a focus on key drivers, purpose, and scope.

  19. Energy management techniques for ultra-small bio-medical implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, William R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trends in the medical industry have created a growing demand for implantable medical devices. In particular, the need to provide medical professionals a means to continuously monitor bio-markers over long time scales with ...

  20. Reasoning about the ERK signal transduction pathway using BioSigNet-RR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baral, Chitta

    Reasoning about the ERK signal transduction pathway using BioSigNet-RR Carron Shanklanda , Nam. In this paper we present a preliminary report on describing a a simple network (the ERK pathway of [4]) using

  1. Energy 2050: Bio-inspired Renewable Non-Fossil Liquid Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Shoumen

    We propose an intelligent Energy Transparency model and a bio-inspired hypothetical mechanical mitochondria to optimize energy efficiency. iET seeks learning algorithms to build intelligence in order to pursue carbon-based ...

  2. A Systems Approach to Bio-Oil Stabilization - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Robert C; Meyer, Terrence; Fox, Rodney; Submramaniam, Shankar; Shanks, Brent; Smith, Ryan G

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop practical, cost effective methods for stabilizing biomass-derived fast pyrolysis oil for at least six months of storage under ambient conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy has targeted three strategies for stabilizing bio-oils: (1) reducing the oxygen content of the organic compounds comprising pyrolysis oil; (2) removal of carboxylic acid groups such that the total acid number (TAN) of the pyrolysis oil is dramatically reduced; and (3) reducing the charcoal content, which contains alkali metals known to catalyze reactions that increase the viscosity of bio-oil. Alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEM), are known to catalyze decomposition reactions of biomass carbohydrates to produce light oxygenates that destabilize the resulting bio-oil. Methods envisioned to prevent the AAEM from reaction with the biomass carbohydrates include washing the AAEM out of the biomass with water or dilute acid or infusing an acid catalyst to passivate the AAEM. Infusion of acids into the feedstock to convert all of the AAEM to salts which are stable at pyrolysis temperatures proved to be a much more economically feasible process. Our results from pyrolyzing acid infused biomass showed increases in the yield of anhydrosugars by greater than 300% while greatly reducing the yield of light oxygenates that are known to destabilize bio-oil. Particulate matter can interfere with combustion or catalytic processing of either syngas or bio-oil. It also is thought to catalyze the polymerization of bio-oil, which increases the viscosity of bio-oil over time. High temperature bag houses, ceramic candle filters, and moving bed granular filters have been variously suggested for syngas cleaning at elevated temperatures. High temperature filtration of bio-oil vapors has also been suggested by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory although there remain technical challenges to this approach. The fast pyrolysis of biomass yields three main organic products: condensable vapors, non-condensable gases, and liquid aerosols. Traditionally these are recovered by a spray quencher or a conventional shell and tube condenser. The spray quencher or condenser is typically followed by an electrostatic precipitator to yield 1 or 2 distinct fractions of bio-oil. The pyrolyzer system developed at Iowa State University incorporates a proprietary fractionating condenser train. The system collects the bio-oil into five unique fractions. For conditions typical of fluidized bed pyrolyzers, stage fractions have been collected that are carbohydrate-rich (anhydrosugars), lignin-rich, and an aqueous solution of carboxylic acids and aldehydes. One important feature is that most of the water normally found in bio-oil appears in the last stage fraction along with several water-soluble components that are thought to be responsible for bio-oil aging (low molecular weight carboxylic acids and aldehydes). Research work on laser diagnostics for hot-vapor filtration and bio-oil recovery centered on development of analytical techniques for in situ measurements during fast pyrolysis, hot-vapor filtration, and fractionation relative to bio-oil stabilization. The methods developed in this work include laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser-induced incandescence (LII), and laser scattering for elemental analysis (N, O, H, C), detection of particulates, and detection of aerosols, respectively. These techniques were utilized in simulated pyrolysis environments and applied to a small-scale pyrolysis unit. Stability of Bio-oils is adversely affected by the presence of particulates that are formed as a consequence of thermal pyrolysis, improving the CFD simulations of moving bed granular filter (MBGF) is useful for improving the design of MBGF for bio-oil production. The current work uses fully resolved direct numerical simulation (where the flow past each granule is accurately represented) to calculate the filter efficiency that is used in the CFD model at all flow speeds. This study shows that fully-resolved direct numerical simulation (DNS

  3. Liquid-phase Processing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil using Pt/HZSM-5 Catalyst 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Bjorn Sanchez

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments in converting biomass to bio-chemicals and liquid fuels provide a promising sight to an emerging biofuels industry. Biomass can be converted to energy via thermochemical and biochemical pathways. Thermal degradation processes...

  4. Optimizing Feedstock Logistics and Assessment of Hydrologic Impacts for Sustainable Bio-Energy Production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Mi-Ae 1979-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    effective system to convert biomass from agricultural feedstocks to bio-crude oil. Mobile pyrolysis units could be moved to the feedstock production fields thereby greatly simplifying feedstock logistics. In the North Central (NC) region of the U...

  5. DuPont’s Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary I: Progress in Advanced Biofuels DuPont’s Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise William Provine, Director–Science and Technology External Affairs, DuPont

  6. CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Planting Recommendations for Dry Edible Beans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIP TO CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Home Bean Info Beet Info Directions History InfoVideos Links Planting Recommendations for Dry Edible Beans Market Class Variety Maturity Plants/Seeds/ Seeds

  7. CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Michigan Dry Bean Crop Protection Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIP TO CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Home Bean Info Beet Info Directions History InfoVideos Links Michigan Dry Bean Crop Protection Products Common Chemical Name Brand Name Company Crop Use Seed

  8. Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) in micro / nanofluidics for novel BioMEMS platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Hongchul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this thesis was to exploit the versatility of the polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) to fabricate a novel micro/nanofluidic device for patterning bacteria in BioMEMS. Nanofluidic channels offer new ...

  9. The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is pleased of Ethanol on Fuel Price Behavior and the Viability of Cellulosic Biofuels" presented by Jacob La

  10. Development of a mechanical counter pressure Bio-Suit System for planetary exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Zhe Liang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) is critical for human spaceflight and particularly for human planetary exploration. The MIT Man Vehicle Laboratory is developing a Bio-Suit EVA System, based on mechanical counterpressure ...

  11. The PM/S module and the BIO/TSR requirements comparison report summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PEERY, B.Q.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the comparison between the Preventive Maintenance/Surveillance System (PM/S) database and the requirements identified in the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001); the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR's) (HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006); The Tank Farms Administrative Controls Manual, (HNF-IP-1266); and The TWRS Facility Safety Equipment List, (HNF-SD-WM-SEL-0404). Corrective actions identified are completed or in process.

  12. Kinetics of dissolution and bio-availability of iron in amorphous siliceous iron oxides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaman, John C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KINETICS OF DISSOLUTION AND BIO-AVAILABILITY OF IRON IN AMORPHOUS SILICEOUS IRON OXIDES A Thesis By John C. Seaman Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Soil Science KINETICS OF DISSOLUTION AND BIO-AVAILABILITY OF IRON IN AMORPHOUS SILICEOUS IRON OXIDES A Thesis By John C. Seaman Approved as to style and content by: Richard H. Loeppert (Chair of Committee...

  13. Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhancing tomato plant growth and productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sortino, Orazio [Dipartimento di Scienze Agronomiche Agrochimiche e delle Produzioni Animali, Universita degli Studi di Catania, Via Valdisavoia 5, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipasquale, Mauro [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Montoneri, Enzo, E-mail: enzo.montoneri@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Tomasso, Lorenzo; Perrone, Daniele G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Vindrola, Daniela; Negre, Michele; Piccone, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Valorizzazione e Protezione delle Risorse Agroforestali, Universita di Torino, Via L. da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Municipal bio-wastes are a sustainable source of bio-based products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refuse derived soluble bio-organics promote chlorophyll synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhance plant growth and fruit ripening rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainable chemistry exploiting urban refuse allows sustainable development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemistry, agriculture and the environment benefit from biowaste technology. - Abstract: Municipal bio-refuse (CVD), containing kitchen wastes, home gardening residues and public park trimmings, was treated with alkali to yield a soluble bio-organic fraction (SBO) and an insoluble residue. These materials were characterized using elemental analysis, potentiometric titration, and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and then applied as organic fertilizers to soil for tomato greenhouse cultivation. Their performance was compared with a commercial product obtained from animal residues. Plant growth, fruit yield and quality, and soil and leaf chemical composition were the selected performance indicators. The SBO exhibited the best performance by enhancing leaf chlorophyll content, improving plant growth and fruit ripening rate and yield. No product performance-chemical composition relationship could be assessed. Solubility could be one reason for the superior performance of SBO as a tomato growth promoter. The enhancement of leaf chlorophyll content is discussed to identify a possible link with the SBO photosensitizing properties that have been demonstrated in other work, and thus with photosynthetic performance.

  14. Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Michael McKellar

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier.

  15. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Fall 2013 Biology 113 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #3 Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    to complete? #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Fall 2013 2 Lab Questions: 6 pts. 1) For your brine shrimp

  16. Poppy: a New Bio-Inspired Humanoid Robot Platform for Biped Locomotion and Physical Human-Robot Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    was made possible by the use of 3D printing techniques (all limbs were 3D printed). Poppy uses the bio

  17. 446 | Mol. BioSyst., 2014, 10, 446--453 This journal is The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014 Cite this: Mol. BioSyst., 2014,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    and serve as a powerful tool for genome engineering. Site-specific DNA cleavage can be made this: Mol. BioSyst., 2014, 10, 446 A single-chain TALEN architecture for genome engineering Ning Suna) nucleases (TALENs) have been widely used for genome editing or engineering in various organisms during

  18. Forest Biomass Supply for BioForest Biomass Supply for Bio--productionproduction in the Southeastern United Statesin the Southeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Bio--production and biomass utilizationsproduction and biomass utilizations Industrial sector: for heat and steam Utility Fermentation Gasification Pyrolysis Heat, steam, electricity Ethanol Methanol, ethanol, diesel, syngas for biofuel producers and retailers · Energy Security Act of 1980: insured loans to small ethanol plants

  19. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders. BioOne provides a sustainable online platform for over 170 journals and books published by nonprofit

  20. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Kick-Off Meeting Proceedings Hilton Garden Inn-BWI,Baltimore, MD October 24, 2006

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proceedings from the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting.

  1. Urban Wood-Based Bio-Energy Systems in Seattle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stan Gent, Seattle Steam Company

    2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Seattle Steam Company provides thermal energy service (steam) to the majority of buildings and facilities in downtown Seattle, including major hospitals (Swedish and Virginia Mason) and The Northwest (Level I) Regional Trauma Center. Seattle Steam has been heating downtown businesses for 117 years, with an average length of service to its customers of 40 years. In 2008 and 2009 Seattle Steam developed a biomass-fueled renewable energy (bio-energy) system to replace one of its gas-fired boilers that will reduce greenhouse gases, pollutants and the amount of waste sent to landfills. This work in this sub-project included several distinct tasks associated with the biomass project development as follows: a. Engineering and Architecture: Engineering focused on development of system control strategies, development of manuals for start up and commissioning. b. Training: The project developer will train its current operating staff to operate equipment and facilities. c. Flue Gas Clean-Up Equipment Concept Design: The concept development of acid gas emissions control system strategies associated with the supply wood to the project. d. Fuel Supply Management Plan: Development of plans and specifications for the supply of wood. It will include potential fuel sampling analysis and development of contracts for delivery and management of fuel suppliers and handlers. e. Integrated Fuel Management System Development: Seattle Steam requires a biomass Fuel Management System to track and manage the delivery, testing, processing and invoicing of delivered fuel. This application will be web-based and accessed from a password-protected URL, restricting data access and privileges by user-level.

  2. Ag:TiN NANOCOMPOSITE THIN FILMS FOR DRY EEG BIO-ELECTRODES P. Pedrosa1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Ag:TiN NANOCOMPOSITE THIN FILMS FOR DRY EEG BIO-ELECTRODES P. Pedrosa1,2,3 , C. Lopes3 , D their potential application as EEG bio-electrodes. The coatings were characterized regarding their composition to the common used gel pastes [3] and the risk of short-circuiting adjacent electrodes due to gel running can be

  3. Sustainable Management of Biogeochemical Cycles in Soils Amended with Bio-Resources from Livestock, Bioenergy, and Urban Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnell, Ronnie Wayne

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    ). In addition to the residual solids remaining after anaerobic digestion, byproducts of pyrolysis of manure and biomass feedstocks are a potential bioresource for carbon and 5 5 nutrients. The bio-char byproduct of bio-oil and syngas production through...

  4. A review of the chemical and physical mechanisms of the storage stability of fast pyrolysis bio-oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diebold, J.P.

    1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the fundamental chemical and physical aging mechanisms is necessary to learn how to produce a bio-oil that is more stable during shipping and storage. This review provides a basis for this understanding and identifies possible future research paths to produce bio-oils with better storage stability.

  5. What's wrong with the field of bio-neutron scattering? 1) Not enough professional science and not enough professional scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doster, Wolfgang

    What's wrong with the field of bio-neutron scattering? 1) Not enough professional science a paper in this field. Anybody can do it! The most detailed analysis of bio-neutron scattering data up independent moment analysis of the neutron scattering spectrum. Up to today nobody, not even MD people, picked

  6. Guidelines for Transportation, Handling, and Use of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil. Part 1. Flammability and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oasmaa, Anja; Kalli, Anssi; Lindfors, Christian; Elliott, Douglas C.; Springer, David L.; Peacocke, Cordner; Chiaramonti, David

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternative sustainable fuel, biomass-derived fast pyrolysis oil or 'bio-oil', is coming into the market. Fast pyrolysis pilot and demonstration plants for fuel applications producing tonnes of bio-oil are in operation, and commercial plants are under design. There will be increasingly larger amounts of bio-oil transportation on water and by land, leading to a need for specifications and supporting documentation. Bio-oil is different from conventional liquid fuels, and therefore must overcome both technical and marketing hurdles for its acceptability in the fuels market. A comprehensive Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is required, backed with independent testing and certification. In order to standardise bio-oil quality specifications are needed. The first bio-oil burner fuel standard in ASTM (D7544) was approved in 2009. CEN standardisation has been initiated in Europe. In the EU a new chemical regulation system, REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals) is being applied. Registration under REACH has to be made if bio-oil is produced or imported to the EU. In the USA and Canada, bio-oil has to be filed under TOSCA (US Toxic Substances Control Act). In this paper the state of the art on standardisation is discussed, and new data for the transportation guidelines is presented. The focus is on flammability and toxicity.

  7. Sustainable Management of Biogeochemical Cycles in Soils Amended with Bio-Resources from Livestock, Bioenergy, and Urban Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnell, Ronnie Wayne

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    ). In addition to the residual solids remaining after anaerobic digestion, byproducts of pyrolysis of manure and biomass feedstocks are a potential bioresource for carbon and 5 5 nutrients. The bio-char byproduct of bio-oil and syngas production through...

  8. BioPig: Developing Cloud Computing Applications for Next-Generation Sequence Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatia, Karan; Wang, Zhong

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Next Generation sequencing is producing ever larger data sizes with a growth rate outpacing Moore's Law. The data deluge has made many of the current sequenceanalysis tools obsolete because they do not scale with data. Here we present BioPig, a collection of cloud computing tools to scale data analysis and management. Pig is aflexible data scripting language that uses Apache's Hadoop data structure and map reduce framework to process very large data files in parallel and combine the results.BioPig extends Pig with capability with sequence analysis. We will show the performance of BioPig on a variety of bioinformatics tasks, including screeningsequence contaminants, Illumina QA/QC, and gene discovery from metagenome data sets using the Rumen metagenome as an example.

  9. Bio-Oil Separation and Stabilization by Supercritical Fluid Fractionation – 2014 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster Agblevor; Lucia Petkovic; Edward Bennion; Jason Quinn; John Moses; Deborah Newby; Daniel Ginosar

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to use supercritical fluids to separate and fractionate algal-based bio-oils into stable products that can be subsequently upgraded to produce drop-in renewable fuels. To accomplish this objective, algae was grown and thermochemically converted to bio-oils using hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), pyrolysis, and catalytic pyrolysis. The bio-oils were separated into an extract and a raffinate using near-critical propane or carbon dioxide. The fractions were then subjected to thermal aging studies to determine if the extraction process had stabilized the products. It was found that the propane extract fraction was twice as stable as the parent catalytic pyrolysis bio-oils as measured by the change in viscosity after two weeks of accelerated aging at 80°C. Further, in-situ NMR aging studies found that the propane extract was chemically more stable than the parent bio-oil. Thus the milestone of stabilizing the product was met. A preliminary design of the extraction plant was prepared. The design was based on a depot scale plant processing 20,000,000 gallons per year of bio-oil. It was estimated that the capital costs for such a plant would be $8,700,000 with an operating cost of $3,500,000 per year. On a per gallon of product cost and a 10% annual rate of return, capital costs would represent $0.06 per gallon and operating costs would amount to $0.20 per gallon. Further, it was found that the energy required to run the process represented 6.2% of the energy available in the bio-oil, meeting the milestone of less than 20%. Life cycle analysis and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission analysis found that the energy for running the critical fluid separation process and the GHG emissions were minor compared to all the inputs to the overall well to pump system. For the well to pump system boundary, energetics in biofuel conversion are typically dominated by energy demands in the growth, dewater, and thermochemical process. Bio-oil stabilization by near critical propane extraction had minimal impact in the overall energetics of the process with NER contributions of 0.03. Based on the LCA, the overall conversion pathways were found to be energy intensive with a NER of about 2.3 and 1.2 for catalytic pyrolysis and HTL, respectively. GHG emissions for the catalytic pyrolysis process were greater than that of petroleum diesel at 210 g CO2 eq compared to 18.9 g CO2 eq. Microalgae bio-oil based diesel with thermochemical conversion through HTL meets renewable fuel standards with favorable emission reductions of -10.8 g CO2 eq. The importance of the outcomes is that the critical fluid extraction and stabilization process improved product stability and did so with minimal energy inputs and processing costs. The LCA and GHG emission calculations point toward the HTL pathway as the more favorable thermochemical route towards upgrading algae to bio-fuels. Since the quality of the HTL oil was significantly lower than that of the catalytic pyrolysis bio-oil, the next steps point toward improving the quality of the HTL oils from algae biomass and focusing the critical fluid stabilization on that bio-oil product.

  10. The Knowledge Based Bio-Economy at work: from large scale experiences to instruments for rural and local development G. Henry and E.J. Trigo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Knowledge Based Bio-Economy at work: from large scale experiences to instruments for rural BIO-ECONOMY AT WORK: FROM LARGE SCALE EXPERIENCES TO INSTRUMENTS FOR RURAL AND LOCAL DEVELOPMENT Guy Email: ejtrigo@gmail.com Abstract - The new bio-economy is increasingly seen as a workable alternative

  11. Bio-Optical Variability in Mayaguez Bay during the Rainy Season Joel A. Quiones Rivera, ja23_degrees@hotmail.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Bio-Optical Variability in Mayaguez Bay during the Rainy Season Joel A. Quińones Rivera, ja23 by suspending particles in the water that affects light penetration. This is critical for the bio-optical from different stations collected with an bio-optical rosette along the Mayagüez Bay and considering

  12. Integrating Heterogeneous Healthcare Datasets and Visual Analytics for Disease Bio-surveillance and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL] [ORNL; Pullum, Laura L [ORNL] [ORNL; Steed, Chad A [ORNL] [ORNL; Quinn, Shannon [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA] [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA; Chennubhotla, Chakra [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA] [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA; Parker, Tara L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    n this paper, we present an overview of the big data chal- lenges in disease bio-surveillance and then discuss the use of visual analytics for integrating data and turning it into knowl- edge. We will explore two integration scenarios: (1) combining text and multimedia sources to improve situational awareness and (2) enhancing disease spread model data with real-time bio-surveillance data. Together, the proposed integration methodologies can improve awareness about when, where and how emerging diseases can affect wide geographic regions.

  13. Failure by fracture and fatigue in 'NANO' and 'BIO'materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, R.O.; Muhlstein, C.L.; Nalla, R.K.

    2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of nanostructured materials/small-volumestructures and biologi-cal/bio-implantable materials, so-called "nano"and "bio" materials, is currently much in vogue in materials science. Oneaspect of this field, which to date has received only limited attention,is their fracture and fatigue properties. In this paper, we examine twotopics in this area, namely the premature fatigue failure ofsilicon-based micron-scale structures for microelectromechanical systems(MEMS), and the fracture properties of mineralized tissue, specificallyhuman bone.

  14. Production of higher quality bio-oils by in-line esterification of pyrolysis vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilten, Roger Norris; Das, Keshav; Kastner, James R; Bibens, Brian P

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure encompasses in-line reactive condensation processes via vapor phase esterification of bio-oil to decease reactive species concentration and water content in the oily phase of a two-phase oil, thereby increasing storage stability and heating value. Esterification of the bio-oil vapor occurs via the vapor phase contact and subsequent reaction of organic acids with ethanol during condensation results in the production of water and esters. The pyrolysis oil product can have an increased ester content and an increased stability when compared to a condensed pyrolysis oil product not treated with an atomized alcohol.

  15. BioInvent International AB - Product Pipeline Review - 2014 According To

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenanceBioFuel EnergyBioGold

  16. Pyrolysis of Woody Residue Feedstocks: Upgrading of Bio-Oils from Mountain-Pine-Beetle-Killed Trees and Hog Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacher, Alan H.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Preto, Fernando; Iisa, Kristiina

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid transportation fuel blend-stocks were produced by pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of woody residue biomass. Mountain pine beetle killed wood and hog fuel from a saw mill were pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed reactor and subsequently upgraded to hydrocarbons in a continuous fixed bed hydrotreater. Upgrading was performed by catalytic hydrotreatment in a two-stage bed at 170°C and 405°C with a per bed LHSV between 0.17 and 0.19. The overall yields from biomass to upgraded fuel were similar for both feeds: 24-25% despite the differences in bio-oil (intermediate) mass yield. Pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was 61% from MPBK wood, and subsequent upgrading of the bio-oil gave an average mass yield of 41% to liquid fuel blend stocks. Hydrogen was consumed at an average of 0.042g/g of bio-oil fed, with final oxygen content in the product fuel ranging from 0.31% to 1.58% over the course of the test. Comparatively for hog fuel, pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was lower at 54% due to inorganics in the biomass, but subsequent upgrading of that bio-oil had an average mass yield of 45% to liquid fuel, resulting in a similar final mass yield to fuel compared to the cleaner MPBK wood. Hydrogen consumption for the hog fuel upgrading averaged 0.041 g/g of bio-oil fed, and the final oxygen content of the product fuel ranged from 0.09% to 2.4% over the run. While it was confirmed that inorganic laded biomass yields less bio-oil, this work demonstrated that the resultant bio-oil can be upgraded to hydrocarbons at a higher yield than bio-oil from clean wood. Thus the final hydrocarbon yield from clean or residue biomass pyrolysis/upgrading was similar.

  17. Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George W. Huber, Aniruddha A Upadhye, David M. Ford, Surita R. Bhatia, Phillip C. Badger

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This University of Massachusetts, Amherst project, "Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils" started on 1st February 2009 and finished on August 31st 2011. The project consisted following tasks: Task 1.0: Char Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The presence of char particles in the bio-oil causes problems in storage and end-use. Currently there is no well-established technology to remove char particles less than 10 micron in size. This study focused on the application of a liquid-phase microfiltration process to remove char particles from bio-oil down to slightly sub-micron levels. Tubular ceramic membranes of nominal pore sizes 0.5 and 0.8 ���µm were employed to carry out the microfiltration, which was conducted in the cross-flow mode at temperatures ranging from 38 to 45 C and at three different trans-membrane pressures varying from 1 to 3 bars. The results demonstrated the removal of the major quantity of char particles with a significant reduction in overall ash content of the bio-oil. The results clearly showed that the cake formation mechanism of fouling is predominant in this process. Task 2.0 Acid Removal by Membrane Separation Technology The feasibility of removing small organic acids from the aqueous fraction of fast pyrolysis bio-oils using nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was studied. Experiments were carried out with a single solute solutions of acetic acid and glucose, binary solute solutions containing both acetic acid and glucose, and a model aqueous fraction of bio-oil (AFBO). Retention factors above 90% for glucose and below 0% for acetic acid were observed at feed pressures near 40 bar for single and binary solutions, so that their separation in the model AFBO was expected to be feasible. However, all of the membranes were irreversibly damaged when experiments were conducted with the model AFBO due to the presence of guaiacol in the feed solution. Experiments with model AFBO excluding guaiacol were also conducted. NF membranes showed retention factors of glucose greater than 80% and of acetic acid less than 15% when operated at transmembrane pressures near 60 bar. Task 3.0 Acid Removal by Catalytic Processing It was found that the TAN reduction in bio-oil was very difficult using low temperature hydrogenation in flow and batch reactors. Acetic acid is very resilient to hydrogenation and we could only achieve about 16% conversion for acetic acid. Although it was observed that acetic acid was not responsible for instability of aqueous fraction of bio-oil during ageing studies (described in task 5). The bimetallic catalyst PtRe/ceria-zirconia was found to be best catalyst because its ability to convert the acid functionality with low conversion to gas phase carbon. Hydrogenation of the whole bio-oil was carried out at 125���°C, 1450 psi over Ru/C catalyst in a flow reactor. Again, negligible acetic acid conversion was obtained in low temperature hydrogenation. Hydrogenation experiments with whole bio-oil were difficult to perform because of difficulty to pumping the high viscosity oil and reactor clogging. Task 4.0 Acid Removal using Ion Exchange Resins DOWEX M43 resin was used to carry out the neutralization of bio-oil using a packed bed column. The pH of the bio-oil increased from 2.43 to 3.7. The GC analysis of the samples showed that acetic acid was removed from the bio-oil during the neutralization and recovered in the methanol washing. But it was concluded that process would not be economical at large scale as it is extremely difficult to regenerate the resin once the bio-oil is passed over it. Task 5.0 Characterization of Upgraded Bio-oils We investigated the viscosity, microstructure, and chemical composition of bio-oils prepared by a fast pyrolysis approach, upon aging these fuels at 90���ºC for periods of several days. Our results suggest that the viscosity increase is not correlated with the acids or char present in the bio-oils. The

  18. Proceedings of the 8th Pacific Rim Bio-Based Composites Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of the 8th Pacific Rim Bio-Based Composites Symposium 200 The Application of 3-D X-Ray Tomography with Finite Element Analysis for Engineering Properties of Strand-Based Composites Qinglin Wu1 Strand-based composites are formed by arranging wood strands in a mat and bonding them together

  19. Coupled Effects of Mechanics, Geometry, and Chemistry on Bio-membrane Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    build and analyze complete models to understand the behavior of multi-component membranes. We proposeCoupled Effects of Mechanics, Geometry, and Chemistry on Bio-membrane Behavior Thesis by Ha Giang, and encouragement. #12;iv Abstract Lipid bilayer membranes are models for cell membranes­the structure that helps

  20. BioSystems 71 (2003) 8192 Clustering huge data sets for parametric PET imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    BioSystems 71 (2003) 81­92 Clustering huge data sets for parametric PET imaging Hongbin Guoa University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1804, USA b Good Samaritan PET Center, Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center preprocessing clustering technique for quantification of kinetic PET data is presented. A two-stage clustering

  1. Concorso Tesi di Laurea e Concorso Tesi di Dottorato di Ricerca BioEnergy Italy 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    Concorso Tesi di Laurea e Concorso Tesi di Dottorato di Ricerca BioEnergy Italy 2014 Bioenergie, Chimica Verde e Agricoltura Destinato ai laureati di qualsiasi FacoltĂ  che hanno dell'uso delle bioenergie o della chimica verde in agricoltura I Concorsi - promossi da Cremona

  2. Towards a Conceptual Model of a Bio-Robotic AUV: Pectoral Fin Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Rajat

    of these technological problems whereas the FY03 ONR MURI program (Integrated Artificial Mus- cle, High-Lift Bio of marine mammals systems (MMS), specifically dolphins. The key technological advances required in order to reach this goal are: 1) An engineered sonar system that matches the perfor- mance of MMS. 2) An AUV

  3. Why the Economic Conception of Human Behaviour Might Lack a Bio-logical Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Why the Economic Conception of Human Behaviour Might Lack a Bio- logical Basis Jack J. VROMEN of economic behavior" (Robson 2001a) and several other re- lated papers (Robson 1996, 2001b, 2002) Arthur J to show is that economic behaviour is genetically determined to a considerable degree. Or, alternati- vely

  4. anion exchanger bio-rad: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Cat Product Name Quantity VIROCLEAR ToRCH 00118 Single LevelDropper Bottle Rodriguez, Carlos 49 Bio-Rad Laboratories I n f e c t I o u s D I s e a s e c o n t r...

  5. accelerating bio-molecular dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accelerating bio-molecular dynamics First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Charge transport...

  6. Optimal Simultaneous Production of Bio-i-butene and Bioethanol from Switchgrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Optimal Simultaneous Production of Bio-i- butene and Bioethanol from Switchgrass Mariano Martín1a bioethanol. The problem is formulated as an MINLP with simultaneous optimization and heat integration-butene alone or the simultaneous production of i-butene and ethanol depends on the prices for bioethanol

  7. 2007 DOE Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Investigation of Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt-based Catalysts Hua Song Lingzhi Zhang Umit S heatheat heatheat heatheat COCO--freefree BioethanolBioethanol steamsteam Reforming reactor is $0.08/kWh; "OSU" catalyst is used for bioethanol steam reforming with 3,000h-1 GHSV and 1,000h

  8. Working with Communities to Improve Dignity: The Case of Improved Bio-Centres in Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Working with Communities to Improve Dignity: The Case of Improved Bio-Centres in Kenya George, to redress the attendant problems. Introduction As is the case in many developing nations, Kenya's urban for in article 184 (Government of Kenya [GOK], 2010) that has enabled subsequent legislation through an Act

  9. November 2000 / Vol. 50 No. 11 BioScience 947 Soil as an Endangered Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    November 2000 / Vol. 50 No. 11 BioScience 947 Soil as an Endangered Ecosystem More than 99% of food worldwide comes from the soil ecosystem. Rapid ero- sion of soil is reducing food production--and causing ecosystem. --DAVID PIMENTAL College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Cornell University Soil and biological

  10. ROMS-BioBUS in the Benguela forced by IPSL ouputs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ROMS-BioBUS in the Benguela forced by IPSL ouputs. Tests on a statistical downscaling of the wind ­ present downscaled wind · Comparison IPSL ­ present versus Control · Conclusion and achievement #12 : Mortality of phytoplankton 4 : Grazing by zooplankton 5 : Production of faecal pellets 6: Mortality

  11. BioCONCUR 2004 Preliminary Version Modelling the influence of RKIP on the ERK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calder, Muffy

    Bio­CONCUR 2004 Preliminary Version Modelling the influence of RKIP on the ERK signalling pathway Protein (RKIP) on the Extracellular signal Regulated Kinase (ERK) signalling pathway [1] through modelling stochastic durations and probabilistic choices. The system which we consider is the Ras/Raf­1/MEK/ERK

  12. Grafting odorant binding proteins on diamond bio-MEMS R. Manai a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Beside, cantilevers based on polycrystalline diamond surfaces are very promising as chemical transducers. Here two methods were investigated for chemically grafting porcine OBPs onto polycrystalline diamond1 Grafting odorant binding proteins on diamond bio-MEMS R. Manai a, *, E. Scorsone a , L. Rousseau

  13. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Enhanced nitrogen removal in bio-electrochemical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerenberg, Robert

    .V. 2009 Abstract Microbial fuel cells can be designed to remove nitrogenous compounds out of wastewater systems. Keywords Bio-catalyzed cathode Á Energy recovery Á Microbial electrolysis cell Á Microbial fuel, the term microbial fuel cell (MFC) is used, whereas the term microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is used when

  14. Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait Region Burton H.boss@maine.edu ABSTRACT The optical structure and variability of the Lombok Straits region is poorly understood, but available remotely sensed ocean color indicates that there is a strong optical response and signal

  15. In search of an alternative fuel: Bio-Solar Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    In search of an alternative fuel: Bio-Solar Hydrogen Production from Arthrospira maxima Dariya Comparison of Potential Corn, Cellulose, and Aquatic Microbial Fuel Production Assuming demonstrated biomass production by ­ Sodium substitution ­ Nitrate elimination ­ Hypotonic stress · Conclusions Overview #12;b a

  16. LIGHT AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN THE SEA, SPRING 2010 Instructor: Dr. Michael Durako BIO 495 009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durako, Michael J.

    LIGHT AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN THE SEA, SPRING 2010 Instructor: Dr. Michael Durako BIO 495 009 Class/14 Photosynthesis vs Light Dr. Durako 3 1/21 Utilization of Light in Aquatic Systems Dr. Durako 4 1/28* Carbon of Light Attenuation in Aquatic Systems - TSS, CDOM, Water Photosynthesis versus Irradiance Measurement

  17. A bio-inspired agent-based system for controlling robot behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    of fields. For example, agent-based models have been used to simulate the electric power market designed. We use agent-based modeling (ABM) to simulate a bio-inspired system based on the artificial genome modeling (IBM), is a relatively new approach to mod- eling systems comprised of autonomous, interacting

  18. A bio-inspired limb controller for avatar animation AL. Cruz Ruiza,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the limb position with the objective to enhance virtual avatar animation. 2. Methods Let us considerA bio-inspired limb controller for avatar animation AL. Cruz Ruiza,b *, C. Pontonniera,c and G-Cyr Coëtquidan, Guer, France Keywords: motor control; musculoskeletal modeling; human motion synthesis

  19. REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE by Sukon of percolate from constructed wetland (CW) treating septage in agricultural application with the specific focus CW treating septage could exhibit positive responses of the plant growth which increase seed yield

  20. E. coli for Energy: Ginkgo BioWorks and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ginkgo BioWorks, a small business founded by five PhDs from MIT, who are working to re-engineer organisms like E. coli into something else. In this case, they want to use the bacteria to turn carbon dioxide into a liquid transportation fuel.

  1. Algorithms for the Analysis and Synthesis of a Bio-inspired Swarm Robotic System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Stephen

    Algorithms for the Analysis and Synthesis of a Bio-inspired Swarm Robotic System Spring Berman1-and-rescue tasks. One multi-agent paradigm is a swarm robotic system, which consists of many anonymous agents, the group can collectively achieve complex tasks at the macroscopic level. In this sense, robot swarm

  2. Letter to the editor The bio-fuel debate and fossil energy use in palm oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letter to the editor The bio-fuel debate and fossil energy use in palm oil production: a critique-fuels based on palm oil to re- duce greenhouse gas emissions, due account should be taken of carbon emissions fuel use in palm oil pro- duction, making a number of assumptions that I believe to be incorrect

  3. Passive liquid dispensing in capillary-based bio-adhesion Research teams Microfluidics Lab, GRASP (ULg)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolper, Pierre

    Passive liquid dispensing in capillary-based bio-adhesion Research teams Microfluidics Lab, GRASP-81 (2010) #12;Coalescence strategies in droplet microfluidic systems Research team Microfluidics Lab, GRASP, mechanics) Droplet microfluidics is a new technology that aims at miniaturizing assays in life science (Lab

  4. Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil from Pine Sawdust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.; Solantausta, Yrjo

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic hydroprocessing has been applied to the fast pyrolysis liquid product (bio-oil) from softwood biomass in a bench-scale continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor system. The intent of the research was to develop process technology to convert the bio-oil into a petroleum refinery feedstock to supplement fossil energy resources and to displace imported feedstock. This paper is focused on the process experimentation and product analysis. The paper describes the experimental methods used and relates the results of the product analyses. A range of operating parameters including temperature, and flow-rate were tested with bio-oil derived from pine wood as recovered and pyrolyzed in the pilot pyrolyzer of Metso Power in Tampere, Finland. Effects of time on stream and catalyst activity were assessed. Details of the process results were presented included product yields and hydrogen consumption. Detailed analysis of the products were provided including elemental composition and product descriptors such as density, viscosity and Total Acid Number (TAN). In summation, the paper provides an initial understanding of the efficacy of hydroprocessing as applied to the Finnish pine bio-oil.

  5. CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch 1999 DRY BEAN VARIETY CANNING TRIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIP TO CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Home Bean Info Beet Info Directions History InfoVideos Links 1999 DRY BEAN VARIETY CANNING TRIALS MICHIGAN DRY BEAN PRODUCTION RESEARCH ADVISORY BOARD Rating 1=poor, 2=fair, 3=good, 4=above average, 5=excellent NAVY LIGHT RED KIDNEY BEANS VARIETY GRATIOT HURON 10

  6. CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch 2000 DRY BEAN VARIETY CANNING TRIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIP TO CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Home Bean Info Beet Info Directions History InfoVideos Links 2000 DRY BEAN VARIETY CANNING TRIALS MICHIGAN DRY BEAN PRODUCTION RESEARCH ADVISORY BOARD Rating 1=poor, 2=fair, 3=good, 4=above average, 5=excellent NAVY LIGHT RED KIDNEY BEANS VARIETY GRATIOT HURON 10

  7. Simulation of Lung Behaviour with Finite Elements : Inuence of Bio-Mechanical Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Simulation of Lung Behaviour with Finite Elements : Inuence of Bio-Mechanical Parameters Pierre by medical needs, we propose to simu- late lung deformation and motion during respiration to track tumours. This paper presents a model of lung behaviour based on a continuous media mechan- ics model and solved

  8. Agricultural Bio-Fueled Generation of Electricity and Development of Durable and Efficent NOx Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Rodney

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to define the scope and cost of a technology research and development program that will demonstrate the feasibility of using an off-the-shelf, unmodified, large bore diesel powered generator in a grid-connected application, utilizing various blends of BioDiesel as fuel. Furthermore, the objective of project was to develop an emissions control device that uses a catalytic process and BioDiesel (without the presence of Ammonia or Urea)to reduce NOx and other pollutants present in a reciprocating engine exhaust stream with the goal of redefining the highest emission reduction efficiencies possible for a diesel reciprocating generator. Process: Caterpillar Power Generation adapted an off-the-shelf Diesel Generator to run on BioDiesel and various Petroleum Diesel/BioDiesel blends. EmeraChem developed and installed an exhaust gas cleanup system to reduce NOx, SOx, volatile organics, and particulates. The system design and function was optimized for emissions reduction with results in the 90-95% range;

  9. A RESTful API for Supporting Automated BioBrick Model Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steyn, J S

    2010-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Constructing simulatable models for BioBricks by hand is a complex and time-consuming task. The time taken could be reduced by using Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools to aid in designing models, but these tools need to be ...

  10. Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil to Produce Hydrocarbon Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic hydroprocessing has been applied to biomass fast pyrolysis liquid product (bio-oil) in a bench-scale continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor system. The intent of the research was to develop process technology to convert the bio-oil into a petroleum refinery feedstock to supplement fossil energy resources and to displace imported feedstock. The project was a cooperative research and development agreement among UOP LLC, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This paper is focused on the process experimentation and product analysis undertaken at PNNL. The paper describes the experimental methods used and relates the results of the product analyses. A range of catalyst formulations were tested over a range of operating parameters including temperature, pressure, and flow-rate with bio-oil derived from several different biomass feedstocks. Effects of liquid hourly space velocity and catalyst bed temperature were assessed. Details of the process results were presented including mass and elemental balances. Detailed analysis of the products were provided including elemental composition, chemical functional type determined by mass spectrometry, and product descriptors such as density, viscosity and Total Acid Number (TAN). In summation, the paper provides an understanding of the efficacy of hydroprocessing as applied to bio-oil.

  11. Recent advances in hydrotreating of pyrolysis bio-oil and its oxygen-containing model compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Huamin; Male, Jonathan L.; Wang, Yong

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is considerable world-wide interest in discovering renewable sources of energy that can substitute for fossil fuels. Lignocellulosic biomass, which is the most abundant and inexpensive renewable feedstock on the planet, has a great potential for sustainable production of fuels, chemicals, and carbon-based materials. Fast pyrolysis integrated with hydrotreating is one of the simplest, most cost-effective and most efficient processes to convert lignocellulosic biomass to liquid hydrocarbon fuels for transportation, which has attracted significant attention in recent decades. However, effective hydrotreating of pyrolysis bio-oil presents a daunting challenge to the commercialization of biomass conversion via pyrolysis-hydrotreating. Specifically, development of active, selective, and stable hydrotreating catalysts is the bottleneck due to the poor quality of pyrolysis bio-oil feedstock (high oxygen content, molecular complexity, coking propensity, and corrosiveness). Significant research has been conducted to address the practical issues and provide the fundamental understanding of the hydrotreating/hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of bio-oils and their oxygen-containing model compounds, including phenolics, furans, and carboxylic acids. A wide range of catalysts have been studied, including conventional Mo-based sulfide catalysts and noble metal catalysts, with the latter being the primary focus of the recent research because of their excellent catalytic performances and no requirement of environmentally unfriendly sulfur. The reaction mechanisms of HDO of model compounds on noble metal catalysts as well as their efficacy for hydrotreating or stabilization of bio-oil have been recently reported. This review provides a survey of the relevant literatures of recent 10 years about the advances in the understanding of the HDO chemistry of bio-oils and their model compounds mainly on noble metal catalysts.

  12. Systematic modulation and enhancement of CO{sub 2} : N{sub 2} selectivity and water stability in an isoreticular series of bio-MOF-11 analogues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Tao; Chen, De-Li; Sullivan, Jeanne E.; Kozlowski, Mark T.; Johnson, J. Karl; Rosi, Nathaniel L.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An isoreticular series of cobalt-adeninate bio-MOFs (bio-MOFs 11-14) is reported. The pores of bio-MOFs 11-14 are decorated with acetate, propionate, butyrate, and valerate, respectively. The nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) adsorption properties of these materials are studied and compared. The isosteric heats of adsorption for CO{sub 2} are calculated, and the CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} selectivities for each material are 10 determined. As the lengths of the aliphatic chains decorating the pores in bio-MOFs 11-14 increase, the BET surface areas decrease from 1148 m{sup 2}/g to 17 m{sup 2}/g while the CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} selectivities predicted from ideal adsorbed solution theory at 1 bar and 273 K for a 10:90 CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} mixture range from 73:1 for bio-MOF-11 to 123:1 for bio-MOF-12 and finally to 107:1 for bio-MOF-13. At 298 K, the selectivities are 43:1 for bio-MOF-11, 52:1 for bio-MOF-12, and 40:1 for bio-MOF-13. Additionally, it is shown that 15 bio-MOF-14 exhibits a unique molecular sieving property that allows it to adsorb CO{sub 2} but not N{sub 2} at 273 and 298 K. Finally, the water stability of bio-MOFs 11-14 increases with increasing aliphatic chain length. Bio-MOF-14 exhibits no loss of crystallinity or porosity after soaking in water for one month.

  13. U-152: OpenSSL "asn1_d2i_read_bio()" DER Format Data Processing Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The vulnerability is caused due to a type casting error in the "asn1_d2i_read_bio()" function when processing DER format data and can be exploited to cause a heap-based buffer overflow.

  14. High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Athavale, Ajay [Monsanto

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Ajay Athavale (Monsanto) presents "High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  15. Chemical/Bio Engineering Computer Engineering Computer Science/IT Mechanical Engineering Aspen Technology abi HUB abi HUB Adecco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Chemical/Bio Engineering Computer Engineering Computer Science/IT Mechanical Engineering Aspen Continental Biomass Industries Navy Recruiting District New England Aspen Technology ARC Technology Solutions Electric Boat Triumvirate Environmental Fidelity Investments Aspen Technology GOSS International America

  16. Investigation of Reaction Networks and Active Sites In Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming Over Co-Based Catalysts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paper by Umit S. Ozkan, Hua Song, and Lingzhi Zhang (Ohio State University) on the fundamental understanding of reaction networks, active sites of deactivation mechanisms of potential bio-ethanol steam reforming catalysts.

  17. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 Fall 2010 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #1 Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 ­ Fall 2010 1 Biology 111 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #1 ­ Information long did this exam take you to complete? #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 ­ Fall 2010 2 Lab Questions a stock solution of 350 mM NaCl. 2.5 µL of 350 mM stock plus 32.5 µL water = 25 mM NaCl. b) Make 175 m

  18. Liquid-phase Processing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil using Pt/HZSM-5 Catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Bjorn Sanchez

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Page A.1 Fluidization experiments on -30 +40 US Mesh size refractory sand at actual operating temperatures ........................................................ 124 B.1 Schematic diagram of the fluidized bed reactor... .................................................................................... 99 25 Some of the properties of the high-boiling fraction (HBF) of the crude bio-oil and upgraded HBF?s subjected to different treatments ........ 101 A.1 Observed minimum fluidization of refractory sand in fluidized-bed reactor...

  19. Bio-Inspired Ideas for Sustainable Technology University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodić, Aleksandar

    8, 2014 ­ Koerner Hall, Royal Conservatory of Music, 273 Bloor Street West 8 : 0 0 a m - 8 : 3 0 a m: Towards Bio-Inspired Synthetic Methods for Organic Solar Cells 10:35 am ­ 10:55 am Coffee break: Koerner Hall Lobby 10:55 am ­ 11:30 am Alán Aspuru-Guzik: Lessons learned from the light-harvesting antenna

  20. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 Fall 2001 Fall 2001 Biology 111 Exam #1 -Cellular Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    this exam take you to complete (excluding typing)? #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 ­ Fall 2001 2 Lab/v IDH if your stock solutions are 28.8 mM NADP+ , 500 mM isocistrate and 100 mM IDH (to be considered 100% IDH stock solution). 10 mL NADP stock + 20 mL isocitrate + 14 mL IDH + water to a final volume

  1. Evaluation of syngas production unit cost of bio-gasification facility using regression analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Yangyang; Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of economic feasibility of a bio-gasification facility needs understanding of its unit cost under different production capacities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the unit cost of syngas production at capacities from 60 through 1800Nm 3/h using an economic model with three regression analysis techniques (simple regression, reciprocal regression, and log-log regression). The preliminary result of this study showed that reciprocal regression analysis technique had the best fit curve between per unit cost and production capacity, with sum of error squares (SES) lower than 0.001 and coefficient of determination of (R 2) 0.996. The regression analysis techniques determined the minimum unit cost of syngas production for micro-scale bio-gasification facilities of $0.052/Nm 3, under the capacity of 2,880 Nm 3/h. The results of this study suggest that to reduce cost, facilities should run at a high production capacity. In addition, the contribution of this technique could be the new categorical criterion to evaluate micro-scale bio-gasification facility from the perspective of economic analysis.

  2. Quantifying the implicit process flow abstraction in SBGN-PD diagrams with Bio-PEPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loewe, Laurence; Hillston, Jane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a long time biologists have used visual representations of biochemical networks to gain a quick overview of important structural properties. Recently SBGN, the Systems Biology Graphical Notation, has been developed to standardise the way in which such graphical maps are drawn in order to facilitate the exchange of information. Its qualitative Process Diagrams (SBGN-PD) are based on an implicit Process Flow Abstraction (PFA) that can also be used to construct quantitative representations, which can be used for automated analyses of the system. Here we explicitly describe the PFA that underpins SBGN-PD and define attributes for SBGN-PD glyphs that make it possible to capture the quantitative details of a biochemical reaction network. We implemented SBGNtext2BioPEPA, a tool that demonstrates how such quantitative details can be used to automatically generate working Bio-PEPA code from a textual representation of SBGN-PD that we developed. Bio-PEPA is a process algebra that was designed for implementing quant...

  3. L'objectif de ce sminaire autour des moyens d'exploration, des bio marqueurs et de la thrapeutique cible est

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingrand, François

    ronde animée par Bernard Gout, Vice-Président de Bio Médical Alliance : Jean-Jacques Romatet (CHU

  4. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders

  5. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Gretchen A.

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the biological, ecological, and environmental sciences. BioOne provides a sustainable online platform for over

  6. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the biological, ecological, and environmental sciences. BioOne provides a sustainable online platform for over

  7. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders. BioOne provides a sustainable online platform for over 170 journals and books published by nonprofit

  8. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders, ecological, and environmental sciences. BioOne provides a sustainable online platform for over 170 journals

  9. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borsdorf, Axel

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders research in the biological, ecological, and environmental sciences. BioOne provides a sustainable online

  10. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders. BioOne provides a sustainable online platform for over 170 journals and books published by nonprofit

  11. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders research in the biological, ecological, and environmental sciences. BioOne provides a sustainable online

  12. Ocean Optics XVI Conference, Santa Fe, New Mexico, November 18-22, 2002 BIO-OPTICAL EVIDENCE OF LAND-SEA INTERACTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Ocean Optics XVI Conference, Santa Fe, New Mexico, November 18-22, 2002 BIO-OPTICAL EVIDENCE Rico. However, the complexity of the bay's optical properties and certain limitations of the technology, allowing a better understanding of such bio-optical variability. A new sampling design with twenty

  13. Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood This article has been Contact us My IOPscience #12;Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood K to recover energy from biomass. The Syngas produced from biomass can be used to power internal combustion

  14. | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires mayYuan T.ExternalscriptEnv LANLFebruary 12, 2015prev

  15. | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires mayYuan T.ExternalscriptEnv LANLFebruary 12, 2015prevAZ

  16. | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires mayYuan T.ExternalscriptEnv LANLFebruary 12,

  17. Sandip Shinde | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principal Investigators Postdoctoral Fellows Center

  18. Shibom Basu | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund scholarshipsShedding Light onSheldonUngerSheng

  19. Xixi Wei | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute moredetection scoreAlex Volosin Anindya

  20. Yan Liu | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contributeSecuritysupports neighbors's/UTAna Moore

  1. Yuichi Terazono | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires mayYuan T. Lee's Crossed Molecular Beam Experiment Home

  2. Zhao Zhao | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires mayYuan T. Lee's Crossed MolecularZerklePrincipal

  3. Souvik Roy | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology|Solar windMarch 26,

  4. Sudhanshu Sharma | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...Success Stories Touching The Lives Of Billions

  5. Thomas Moore | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis ofwas published inFebruaryHome

  6. Facile creation of bio-inspired superhydrophobic Ce-based metallic glass surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Kesong; Li Zhou [Key Laboratory of Bio-Inspired Smart Interfacial Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang Weihua [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Jiang Lei [Key Laboratory of Bio-Inspired Smart Interfacial Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A bio-inspired synthesis strategy was conducted to fabricate superhydrophobic Ce-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) surfaces with self-cleaning properties. Micro-nanoscale hierarchical structures were first constructed on BMG surfaces and then modified with the low surface energy coating. Surface structures, surface chemical compositions, and wettability were characterized by combining scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements. Research indicated that both surface multiscale structures and the low surface free energy coating result in the final formation of superhydrophobicity.

  7. Microarray Transcriptomics Data from the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) is a multi-institutional (18 partner), multidisciplinary research (biological, chemical, physical and computational sciences, mathematics and engineering) organization focused on the fundamental understanding and elimination of biomass recalcitrance. BESC's approach to improve accessibility to the sugars within biomass involves 1) designing plant cell walls for rapid deconstruction and 2) developing multitalented microbes for converting plant biomass into biofuels in a single step (consolidated bioprocessing). Addressing the roadblock of biomass recalcitrance will require a multiscale understanding of plant cell walls from biosynthesis to deconstruction pathways. This integrated understanding would generate models, theories and finally processes that will be used to understand and overcome biomass recalcitrance.

  8. Proceedings of the Bio-Energy '80 world congress and exposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many countries are moving with increasing urgency to obtain larger fractions of their energy from biomass. Over 1800 leading experts from 70 countries met on April 21 to 24 in Atlanta to conduct a World Congress and Exposition on Bio-Energy. This summary presents highlights of the Congress and thoughts stimulated by the occasion. Topics addressed include a comparison of international programs, world and country regionalism in the development of energy supplies, fuel versus food or forest products, production of ethyl alcohol, possibilities for expanded production of terrestrial vegetation and marine flora, and valuable chemicals from biomass. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 164 papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  9. Bio-oil Upgrading with Novel Low Cost Catalysts Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-Oil Deployment in the Home Heating is

  10. BioDiesel Content On-board monitoring | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-Oil Deployment in the Home Heating

  11. New Technology for Hydroprocessing Bio-oils to Fuels Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEngines |New Technology for Hydroprocessing Bio- oils

  12. Bio-based Deicing/Anti-Icing Fluids - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More Like This Return to Search Bio-based

  13. Synthetic & Bio-Based Lubricants Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By FaultSunpodsSweetwater 4aSynthetic & Bio-Based

  14. Center for Bio-Inspired Energy Science (CBES) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National Laboratory Laboratory Policy (LP)(SC) Bio-Inspired

  15. HIGH-DENSITY, BIO-COMPATIBLE, AND HERMETIC ELECTRICAL FEEDTHROUGHS USING EXTRUDED METAL VIAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tooker, A; Shah, K; Tolosa, V; Sheth, H; Felix, S; Delima, T; Pannu, S

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Implanted medical devices such as pacemakers and neural prosthetics require that the electronic components that power these devices are protected from the harsh chemical and biological environment of the body. Typically, the electronics are hermetically sealed inside a bio-compatible package containing feedthroughs that transmit electrical signals, while being impermeable to particles or moisture. We present a novel approach for fabricating one of the highest densities of biocompatible hermetic feedthroughs in alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Alumina substrates with laser machined vias of 200 {mu}m pitch were conformally metallized and lithographically patterned. Hermetic electrical feedthroughs were formed by extruding metal studbumps partially through the vias. Hermeticity testing showed leak rates better than 9x10{sup -10} torr-l/s. Based on our preliminary results and process optimization, this extruded metal via approach is a high-density, low temperature, cost-effective, and robust method of miniaturizing electrical feedthroughs for a wide range of implantable bio-medical device applications.

  16. HIGH-DENSITY, BIO-COMPATIBLE, AND HERMETIC ELECTRICAL FEEDTHROUGHS USING EXTRUDED METAL VIAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, K G; Delima, T; Felix, S; Sheth, H; Tolosa, V; Tooker, A; Pannu, S S

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Implanted medical devices such as pacemakers and neural prosthetics require that the electronic components that power these devices are protected from the harsh chemical and biological environment of the body. Typically, the electronics are hermetically sealed inside a bio-compatible package containing feedthroughs that transmit electrical signals, while being impermeable to particles or moisture. We present a novel approach for fabricating one of the highest densities of biocompatible hermetic feedthroughs in alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Alumina substrates with laser machined vias of 200 {micro}m pitch were conformally metallized and lithographically patterned. Hermetic electrical feedthroughs were formed by extruding metal stud-bumps partially through the vias. Hermeticity testing showed leak rates better than 9 x 10{sup -10} torr-l/s. Based on our preliminary results and process optimization, this extruded metal via approach is a high-density, low temperature, cost-effective, and robust method of miniaturizing electrical feedthroughs for a wide range of implantable bio-medical device applications.

  17. Mississippi State University Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mago, Pedro; Newell, LeLe

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.

  18. Statistical characterisation of bio-aerosol background in an urban environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milan Jamriska; Timothy C. DuBois; Alex Skvortsov

    2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we statistically characterise the bio-aerosol background in an urban environment. To do this we measure concentration levels of naturally occurring microbiological material in the atmosphere over a two month period. Naturally occurring bioaerosols can be considered as noise, as they mask the presence of signals coming from biological material of interest (such as an intentionally released biological agent). Analysis of this 'biobackground' was undertaken in the 1-10 um size range and a 3-9% contribution was found to be biological in origin - values which are in good agreement with other studies reported in the literature. A model based on the physics of turbulent mixing and dispersion was developed and validated against this analysis. The Gamma distribution (the basis of our model) is shown to comply with the scaling laws of the concentration moments of our data, which enables us to universally characterise both biological and non-biological material in the atmosphere. An application of this model is proposed to build a framework for the development of novel algorithms for bio-aerosol detection and rapid characterisation.

  19. Can bio-inspired information processing steps be realized as synthetic biochemical processes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Privman; Evgeny Katz

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider possible designs and experimental realiza-tions in synthesized rather than naturally occurring bio-chemical systems of a selection of basic bio-inspired information processing steps. These include feed-forward loops, which have been identified as the most common information processing motifs in many natural pathways in cellular functioning, and memory-involving processes, specifically, associative memory. Such systems should not be designed to literally mimic nature. Rather, we can be guided by nature's mechanisms for experimenting with new information/signal processing steps which are based on coupled biochemical reactions, but are vastly simpler than natural processes, and which will provide tools for the long-term goal of understanding and harnessing nature's information processing paradigm. Our biochemical processes of choice are enzymatic cascades because of their compatibility with physiological processes in vivo and with electronics (e.g., electrodes) in vitro allowing for networking and interfacing of enzyme-catalyzed processes with other chemical and biochemical reactions. In addition to designing and realizing feed-forward loops and other processes, one has to develop approaches to probe their response to external control of the time-dependence of the input(s), by measuring the resulting time-dependence of the output. The goal will be to demonstrate the expected features, for example, the delayed response and stabilizing effect of the feed-forward loops.

  20. Final Report for Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Glenn A.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report records the work and contributions of the NITRD-funded Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies project performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory under the technical guidance of the National Security Agency’s R6 division. The project has incorporated a number of bio-inspired cyber defensive technologies within an elastic framework provided by the Digital Ants. This project has created the first scalable, real-world prototype of the Digital Ants Framework (DAF)[11] and integrated five technologies into this flexible, decentralized framework: (1) Ant-Based Cyber Defense (ABCD), (2) Behavioral Indicators, (3) Bioinformatic Clas- sification, (4) Moving-Target Reconfiguration, and (5) Ambient Collaboration. The DAF can be used operationally to decentralize many such data intensive applications that normally rely on collection of large amounts of data in a central repository. In this work, we have shown how these component applications may be decentralized and may perform analysis at the edge. Operationally, this will enable analytics to scale far beyond current limitations while not suffering from the bandwidth or computational limitations of centralized analysis. This effort has advanced the R6 Cyber Security research program to secure digital infrastructures by developing a dynamic means to adaptively defend complex cyber systems. We hope that this work will benefit both our client’s efforts in system behavior modeling and cyber security to the overall benefit of the nation.

  1. Eco-Bio-Social Determinants for House Infestation by Non-domiciliated Triatoma dimidiata in the Yucatan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Eco-Bio-Social Determinants for House Infestation by Non-domiciliated Triatoma dimidiata limited to vector control. Integrated interventions targeting ecological, biological and social/principal findings: We investigated key factors associated with transient house infestation by T. dimidiata in rural

  2. Abstract An application of gas sensors for rapid bio-analysis is presented. An array of temperature-modulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

    Abstract An application of gas sensors for rapid bio- analysis is presented. An array by a chemical compound. This finding suggests the possibility of using cross-selective gas-sensor arrays conditions of the cells. Electronic nose systems, which rely on a combination of cross-selective gas sensors

  3. Report No. PA 14 of 2008 Compliance to rules governing municipal solid, bio-medical and plastic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    -medical and plastic waste Objective 5: Whether effective compliance to rules/laws regulating municipal solid waste, bio-medical waste and plastic waste was taking place in the state. The United Nations Conference of 2008 54 · The Recycled Plastics Manufacture and Usage Rules were notified in 1999 with an amendment

  4. System Name: System Type Room Location E.164 Alias BPB 130 Tandberg C40 Bio Physics Building 130 130

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    Point Marine Science Bldg 4059067 Avery Point Director's office Sony PCS-TL33 Avery Point Campus 4059000 Avery Point Marine Science Sony PCS-TL33 Avery Point Campus 4059152 Bio Physics Tandberg MXP 3000 BPB Director's office Sony PCS-TL33 Greater Hartford Campus 5709214 ITL portable system Sony PCS-TL33 Storrs

  5. August 2002 / Vol. 52 No. 8 BioScience 659 Dams are structures designed by humans to capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    August 2002 / Vol. 52 No. 8 BioScience 659 Articles Dams are structures designed by humans to capture water and modify the magnitude and timing of its movement downstream. The damming of streams, dams have reduced flood hazard and allowed humans to settle and farm pro- ductive alluvial soils

  6. Bio for Esther Duflo Esther Duflo has distinguished herself through definitive contributions to the field of Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Nilanjan

    , and education. She has written extensively on India, but has also studied Indonesia, Cote d'Ivoire, South Africa1 Bio for Esther Duflo Esther Duflo has distinguished herself through definitive contributions coauthors study the impact of female political leadership on local government spending and attitudes toward

  7. Micromorphological and (bio)chemical organic matter changes in a formerly cutover peat bog : Le Russey, Jura Mountains, France.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Micromorphological and (bio)chemical organic matter changes in a formerly cutover peat bog : Le. In order to moniter peat reaccumulation and hence long-term carbon sequestration in peatlands which have ([1]). Among these indicators, it has previously been shown that physico-chemical properties of peat

  8. CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch One Hundred Years of Bean Breeding at Michigan State University: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIP TO CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Home Bean Info Beet Info Directions History InfoVideos Links One Hundred Years of Bean Breeding at Michigan State University: A Chronology by James D. Kelly it would be interesting to summarize the milestones achieved in bean breeding over the last century. All

  9. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production from Biomass via Hot-Vapor-Filtered Fast Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydroprocessing of the Bio-oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Wang, Huamin; French, Richard; Deutch, Steve; Iisa, Kristiina

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot-vapor filtered bio-oils were produced from two different biomass feedstocks, oak and switchgrass, and the oils were evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. Hot-vapor filtering reduced bio-oil yields and increased gas yields. The yields of fuel carbon as bio-oil were reduced by ten percentage points by hot-vapor filtering for both feedstocks. The unfiltered bio-oils were evaluated alongside the filtered bio-oils using a fixed bed catalytic hydrotreating test. These tests showed good processing results using a two-stage catalytic hydroprocessing strategy. Equal-sized catalyst beds, a sulfided Ru on carbon catalyst bed operated at 220°C and a sulfided CoMo on alumina catalyst bed operated at 400°C were used with the entire reactor at 100 atm operating pressure. The products from the four tests were similar. The light oil phase product was fully hydrotreated so that nitrogen and sulfur were below the level of detection, while the residual oxygen ranged from 0.3 to 2.0%. The density of the products varied from 0.80 g/ml up to 0.86 g/ml over the period of the test with a correlated change of the hydrogen to carbon atomic ratio from 1.79 down to 1.57, suggesting some loss of catalyst activity through the test. These tests provided the data needed to assess the suite of liquid fuel products from the process and the activity of the catalyst in relationship to the existing catalyst lifetime barrier for the technology.

  10. In vitro bio-functionality of gallium nitride sensors for radiation biophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofstetter, Markus [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)] [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Howgate, John [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schmid, Martin [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)] [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Schoell, Sebastian; Sachsenhauser, Matthias [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Adiguezel, Denis [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)] [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Stutzmann, Martin; Sharp, Ian D. [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Thalhammer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)] [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gallium nitride based sensors show promising characteristics to monitor cellular parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell growth experiments reveal excellent biocompatibiltiy of the host GaN material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a biofunctionality assay using ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA repair is utilized to evaluate material induced alterations in the cellular behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GaN shows no bio-functional influence on the cellular environment. -- Abstract: There is an increasing interest in the integration of hybrid bio-semiconductor systems for the non-invasive evaluation of physiological parameters. High quality gallium nitride and its alloys show promising characteristics to monitor cellular parameters. Nevertheless, such applications not only request appropriate sensing capabilities but also the biocompatibility and especially the biofunctionality of materials. Here we show extensive biocompatibility studies of gallium nitride and, for the first time, a biofunctionality assay using ionizing radiation. Analytical sensor devices are used in medical settings, as well as for cell- and tissue engineering. Within these fields, semiconductor devices have increasingly been applied for online biosensing on a cellular and tissue level. Integration of advanced materials such as gallium nitride into these systems has the potential to increase the range of applicability for a multitude of test devices and greatly enhance sensitivity and functionality. However, for such applications it is necessary to optimize cell-surface interactions and to verify the biocompatibility of the semiconductor. In this work, we present studies of mouse fibroblast cell activity grown on gallium nitride surfaces after applying external noxa. Cell-semiconductor hybrids were irradiated with X-rays at air kerma doses up to 250 mGy and the DNA repair dynamics, cell proliferation, and cell growth dynamics of adherent cells were compared to control samples. The impact of ionizing radiation on DNA, along with the associated cellular repair mechanisms, is well characterized and serves as a reference tool for evaluation of substrate effects. The results indicate that gallium nitride does not require specific surface treatments to ensure biocompatibility and suggest that cell signaling is not affected by micro-environmental alterations arising from gallium nitride-cell interactions. The observation that gallium nitride provides no bio-functional influence on the cellular environment confirms that this material is well suited for future biosensing applications without the need for additional chemical surface modification.

  11. Economic Assessment of a Conceptual Biomass to Liquids Bio-Syntrolysis Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. M. Plum; G. L. Hawkes

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of assessments evaluated the economic efficiency of integrating a nuclear electric power plant with a biomass to SynFuel plant under three market scenarios. Results strongly suggest that a nuclear assisted-BioSyntrolysis Process would be as cost competitive as other carbon feedstock to liquid fuels concepts while having significant advantages regarding CO2 greenhouse gas production. This concept may also be competitive for those energy markets where energy dense, fossil fuels are scarce while wind, hydroelectric, or other renewable energy sources can be produced at a relatively low cost. At this time, a realistic vision of this technology’s deployment of a biomass to synfuel plants powered by a nuclear 1100 MWe reactor. Accompanying an area of 25 miles by 25 miles, this integrated Enterprise could produce 24,000 BBLs of SynFuel daily; or 0.2% of the U.S.’s imported oil.

  12. Analysis of a ceramic filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habib Ullah, M. [Institute of Space Science (ANGKASA), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi Selangor 43600 (Malaysia) [Institute of Space Science (ANGKASA), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi Selangor 43600 (Malaysia); Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600 (Malaysia); Islam, M. T. [Institute of Space Science (ANGKASA), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi Selangor 43600 (Malaysia)] [Institute of Space Science (ANGKASA), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi Selangor 43600 (Malaysia)

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Design and analysis of a ceramic-filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure is presented. This proposed high-dielectric structure is used as a substrate for patch antennas. A meandered-strip line-fed fractal-shape patch antenna is designed and fabricated on a copper-laminated sandwich-structured substrate. Measurement results of this antenna show 44% and 20% of bandwidths with maximum gains of 3.45 dBi and 5.87 dBi for the lower and upper bands, respectively. The half-power beam widths of 104° and 78° have been observed from the measured radiation pattern at the two resonance frequencies 0.9 GHz and 2.5?GHz.

  13. The SYRMEP Beamline of Elettra: Clinical Mammography and Bio-medical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tromba, G.; Abrami, A.; Casarin, K.; Chenda, V.; Dreossi, D.; Mancini, L.; Menk, R. H.; Quai, E.; Sodini, N.; Vascotto, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park, S.S. 14 km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Longo, R.; Arfelli, F.; Castelli, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Area Science Park Padriciano 99, 34149, Trieste (Italy); Astolfo, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127, Trieste (Italy); Bregant, P. [Struttura Complessa Fisica Sanitaria, Az. Ospedaliero Universitaria, Via Pieta' 19, 34129 Trieste (Italy); Brun, F. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park, S.S. 14 km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Trieste-Dipartimento di Elettrotecnica, Elettronica ed Informatica, via Valerio 10, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Hola, M. [Department of Chemistry, Masaryk University, Kamenice 4, 62500 Brno (Czech Republic); Kaiser, J. [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mech. Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2896/2, 61669 Brno (Czech Republic); Quaia, E.; Tonutti, M. [Dipartimento Universitario Clinico di Scienze Cliniche, Morfologiche e Tecnologiche, Universita' di Trieste, Osp. di Cattinara, Strada di Fiume 447, 34139 Trieste (Italy)

    2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    At the SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beamline of Elettra Synchrotron Light Laboratory in Trieste (Italy), an extensive research program in bio-medical imaging has been developed since 1997. The core program carried out by the SYRMEP collaboration concerns the use of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) for clinical mammography with the aim of improving the diagnostic performance of the conventional technique. The first protocol with patients, started in 2006 has been completed at the end of 2009 and the data analysis is now in progress.Regarding applications different from clinical imaging, synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (micro-CT) is the most used technique, both in absorption and phase contrast. A new software tool, Pore3D, has been developed to perform a quantitative morphological analysis on the reconstructed slices and to access textural information of the sample under study.

  14. Demonstration of the BioBaler harvesting system for collection of small-diameter woody biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Caffrey, Kevin R [ORNL; Barnett, Elliott J [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Brummette, Mark W [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a project to investigate sustainable forest management practices for producing wood chips on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the ORNL steam plant, the BioBaler was tested in various Oak Ridge locations in August of 2011. The purpose of these tests and the subsequent economic analysis was to determine the potential of this novel woody biomass harvesting method for collection of small-diameter, low value woody biomass. Results suggest that opportunities may exist for economical harvest of low-value and liability or negative-cost biomass. (e.g., invasives). This could provide the ORR and area land managers with a tool to produce feedstock while improving forest health, controlling problem vegetation, and generating local employment.

  15. Method of increasing anhydrosugars, pyroligneous fractions and esterified bio-oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steele, Philip H; Yu, Fei; Li, Qi; Mitchell, Brian

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The device and method are provided to increase anhydrosugars yield during pyrolysis of biomass. This increase is achieved by injection of a liquid or gas into the vapor stream of any pyrolysis reactor prior to the reactor condensers. A second feature of our technology is the utilization of sonication, microwave excitation, or shear mixing of the biomass to increase the acid catalyst rate for demineralization or removal of hemicellulose prior to pyrolysis. The increased reactivity of these treatments reduces reaction time as well as the required amount of catalyst to less than half of that otherwise required. A fractional condensation system employed by our pyrolysis reactor is another feature of our technology. This system condenses bio-oil pyrolysis vapors to various desired fractions by differential temperature manipulation of individual condensers comprising a condenser chain.

  16. Multi-layer micro/nanofluid devices with bio-nanovalves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Hao; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Auciello, Orlando H.; Firestone, Millicent A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A user-friendly multi-layer micro/nanofluidic flow device and micro/nano fabrication process are provided for numerous uses. The multi-layer micro/nanofluidic flow device can comprise: a substrate, such as indium tin oxide coated glass (ITO glass); a conductive layer of ferroelectric material, preferably comprising a PZT layer of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) positioned on the substrate; electrodes connected to the conductive layer; a nanofluidics layer positioned on the conductive layer and defining nanochannels; a microfluidics layer positioned upon the nanofluidics layer and defining microchannels; and biomolecular nanovalves providing bio-nanovalves which are moveable from a closed position to an open position to control fluid flow at a nanoscale.

  17. ISPyB for BioSAXS, the gateway to user autonomy in solution scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Maria Antolinos, Alejandro; Pernot, Petra; Brennich, Martha E.; Kieffer, Jérôme [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 40220, 38042 Grenoble (France); Bowler, Matthew W. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes–EMBL–CNRS, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Delageniere, Solange; Ohlsson, Staffan; Malbet Monaco, Stephanie [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 40220, 38042 Grenoble (France); Ashton, Alun [DLS, Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Fermi Avenue, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Franke, Daniel; Svergun, Dmitri [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Hamburg Outstation, c/o DESY, Building 25A, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); McSweeney, Sean; Gordon, Elspeth [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 40220, 38042 Grenoble (France); Round, Adam, E-mail: around@embl.fr [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes–EMBL–CNRS, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 40220, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ISPyB information-management system for crystallography has been adapted to include data from small-angle X-ray scattering of macromolecules in solution experiments. Logging experiments with the laboratory-information management system ISPyB (Information System for Protein crystallography Beamlines) enhances the automation of small-angle X-ray scattering of biological macromolecules in solution (BioSAXS) experiments. The ISPyB interface provides immediate user-oriented online feedback and enables data cross-checking and downstream analysis. To optimize data quality and completeness, ISPyBB (ISPyB for BioSAXS) makes it simple for users to compare the results from new measurements with previous acquisitions from the same day or earlier experiments in order to maximize the ability to collect all data required in a single synchrotron visit. The graphical user interface (GUI) of ISPyBB has been designed to guide users in the preparation of an experiment. The input of sample information and the ability to outline the experimental aims in advance provides feedback on the number of measurements required, calculation of expected sample volumes and time needed to collect the data: all of this information aids the users to better prepare for their trip to the synchrotron. A prototype version of the ISPyBB database is now available at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) beamline BM29 and is already greatly appreciated by academic users and industrial clients. It will soon be available at the PETRA III beamline P12 and the Diamond Light Source beamlines I22 and B21.

  18. Scaling analysis of bio-molecular dynamics derived from elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doster, W. [Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Nakagawa, H. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at MLZ, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85747 Garching (Germany) [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at MLZ, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Appavou, M. S. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at MLZ, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)] [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at MLZ, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous neutron scattering studies of bio-molecular dynamics employ a qualitative analysis of elastic scattering data and atomic mean square displacements. We provide a new quantitative approach showing that the intensity at zero energy exchange can be a rich source of information of bio-structural fluctuations on a pico- to nano-second time scale. Elastic intensity scans performed either as a function of the temperature (back-scattering) and/or by varying the instrumental resolution (time of flight spectroscopy) yield the activation parameters of molecular motions and the approximate structural correlation function in the time domain. The two methods are unified by a scaling function, which depends on the ratio of correlation time and instrumental resolution time. The elastic scattering concept is illustrated with a dynamic characterization of alanine-dipeptide, protein hydration water, and water-coupled protein motions of lysozyme, per-deuterated c-phycocyanin (CPC) and hydrated myoglobin. The complete elastic scattering function versus temperature, momentum exchange, and instrumental resolution is analyzed instead of focusing on a single cross-over temperature of mean square displacements at the apparent onset temperature of an-harmonic motions. Our method predicts the protein dynamical transition (PDT) at T{sub d} from the collective (?) structural relaxation rates of the solvation shell as input. By contrast, the secondary (?) relaxation enhances the amplitude of fast local motions in the vicinity of the glass temperature T{sub g}. The PDT is specified by step function in the elastic intensity leading from elastic to viscoelastic dynamic behavior at a transition temperature T{sub d}.

  19. In situ Microbial Community Control of the Stability of Bio-Reduced Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Phillip E.; McKinley, James P.; White, David C.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In aerobic aquifers typical of many Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites, uranium is present in the oxidized U(VI) form which is soluble and thus mobile compared to U(IV). Previous work at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site demonstrated that biostimulation by acetate injection promoted growth of Geobacteraceae and stimulated the microbial reduction of U(VI) to less soluble U(IV) (1, 4). Despite the potential for oxidative dissolution of bio-reduced U(IV), field experiments at the Old Rifle site show that although the rate of U(VI) reduction decreases following the on-set of sulfate reduction, U(VI) reduction continues even following the cessation of acetate injection (1, 4). However, U(VI) reduction is reversible and the basis for the observed maintenance of U(VI) reduction post-stimulation is a critical but as yet unresolved issue for the application of biostimulation as a treatment technology. The continued U(VI) reduction and the maintenance of reduced U(IV) may result from many factors including U(VI) reduction by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), generation of H2S or FeS0.9 which serves as an oxygen sink, or the preferential sorption of U(VI) by microbial cells or biopolymers. The overall goal of the project is to develop an understanding of the mechanisms for the maintenance of bio-reduced uranium in an aerobic aquifer under field conditions following the cessation of electron donor addition.

  20. Bio-energy feedstock yields and their water quality benefits in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic and agricultural bio-energy crops can, under careful management, be harvested as feedstock for bio-fuels production and provide environmental benefits. However, it is required to quantify their relative advantages in feedstock production and water quality. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate potential feedstock yield and water quality benefit scenarios of bioenergy crops: Miscanthus (Miscanthus-giganteus), Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Soybean {Glycine max (L.) Merr.}, and Corn (Lea mays) in the Upper Pearl River watershed (UPRW), Mississippi using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated (January 1981 to December 1994) and validated (January 1995 to September 2008) using monthly measured stream flow data. The calibrated and validated model determined good to very good performance for stream flow prediction (R2 and E from 0.60 to 0.86). The RMSE values (from 14 m3 s-1 to 37 m3 s-1) were estimated at similar levels of errors during model calibration and validation. The long-term average annual potential feedstock yield as an alternative energy source was determined the greatest when growing Miscanthus grass (373,849 Mg) as followed by Alfalfa (206,077 Mg), Switchgrass (132,077 Mg), Johnsongrass (47,576 Mg), Soybean (37,814 Mg), and Corn (22,069 Mg) in the pastureland and cropland of the watershed. Model results determined that average annual sediment yield from the Miscanthus grass scenario determined the least (1.16 Mg/ha) and corn scenario the greatest (12.04 Mg/ha). The SWAT model simulated results suggested that growing Miscanthus grass in the UPRW would have the greatest potential feedstock yield and water quality benefits.

  1. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    indicates your acceptance of BioOne's Terms of Use, available at www.bioone.org/page/terms_of_use. Usage, including the evolution of endemism, the role of ecological productivity and plant competition, and even

  2. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research fundersOne provides a sustainable online platform for over 170 journals and books published by nonprofit societies

  3. arXiv:0810.3042v1[physics.bio-ph]16Oct2008 Single-domain protein folding: a multi-faceted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritort, Felix

    arXiv:0810.3042v1[physics.bio-ph]16Oct2008 Single-domain protein folding: a multi-faceted problem protein-like models can help to understand many controversial issues. Keywords: Protein folding, energy

  4. Consistent quantification of climate impacts due to biogenic carbon storage across a range of bio-product systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guest, Geoffrey, E-mail: geoffrey.guest@ntnu.no; Bright, Ryan M., E-mail: ryan.m.bright@ntnu.no; Cherubini, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.cherubini@ntnu.no; Strřmman, Anders H., E-mail: anders.hammer.stromman@ntnu.no

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Temporary and permanent carbon storage from biogenic sources is seen as a way to mitigate climate change. The aim of this work is to illustrate the need to harmonize the quantification of such mitigation across all possible storage pools in the bio- and anthroposphere. We investigate nine alternative storage cases and a wide array of bio-resource pools: from annual crops, short rotation woody crops, medium rotation temperate forests, and long rotation boreal forests. For each feedstock type and biogenic carbon storage pool, we quantify the carbon cycle climate impact due to the skewed time distribution between emission and sequestration fluxes in the bio- and anthroposphere. Additional consideration of the climate impact from albedo changes in forests is also illustrated for the boreal forest case. When characterizing climate impact with global warming potentials (GWP), we find a large variance in results which is attributed to different combinations of biomass storage and feedstock systems. The storage of biogenic carbon in any storage pool does not always confer climate benefits: even when biogenic carbon is stored long-term in durable product pools, the climate outcome may still be undesirable when the carbon is sourced from slow-growing biomass feedstock. For example, when biogenic carbon from Norway Spruce from Norway is stored in furniture with a mean life time of 43 years, a climate change impact of 0.08 kg CO{sub 2}eq per kg CO{sub 2} stored (100 year time horizon (TH)) would result. It was also found that when biogenic carbon is stored in a pool with negligible leakage to the atmosphere, the resulting GWP factor is not necessarily ? 1 CO{sub 2}eq per kg CO{sub 2} stored. As an example, when biogenic CO{sub 2} from Norway Spruce biomass is stored in geological reservoirs with no leakage, we estimate a GWP of ? 0.56 kg CO{sub 2}eq per kg CO{sub 2} stored (100 year TH) when albedo effects are also included. The large variance in GWPs across the range of resource and carbon storage options considered indicates that more accurate accounting will require case-specific factors derived following the methodological guidelines provided in this and recent manuscripts. -- Highlights: • Climate impacts of stored biogenic carbon (bio-C) are consistently quantified. • Temporary storage of bio-C does not always equate to a climate cooling impact. • 1 unit of bio-C stored over a time horizon does not always equate to ? 1 unit CO{sub 2}eq. • Discrepancies of climate change impact quantification in literature are clarified.

  5. Results of the IEA Round Robin on Viscosity and Aging of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oils: Long-Term Tests and Repeatability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Oasmaa, Anja; Meier, Dietrich; Preto, Fernando; Bridgwater, Anthony V.

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An international round robin study of the viscosity and aging of fast pyrolysis bio-oil has been undertaken recently and this work is an outgrowth from that effort. Two bio-oil samples were distributed to the laboratories for aging tests and extended viscosity studies. The accelerated aging test was defined as the change in viscosity of a sealed sample of bio-oil held for 24 h at 80 °C. The test was repeated 10 times over consecutive days to determine the repeatability of the method. Other bio-oil samples were placed in storage at three temperatures, 21 °C, 4 °C and -17 °C for a period up to a year to evaluate the change in viscosity. The variation in the results of the aging test was shown to be low within a given laboratory. Storage of bio-oil under refrigeration can minimize the amount of change in viscosity. The accelerated aging test gives a measure of change similar to that of 6-12 months of storage at room temperature. These results can be helpful in setting standards for use of bio-oil, which is just coming into the marketplace.

  6. Charge transport through bio-molecular wires in a solvent: Bridging molecular dynamics and model Hamiltonian approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Gutierrez; R. Caetano; P. B. Woiczikowski; T. Kubar; M. Elstner; G. Cuniberti

    2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a hybrid method based on a combination of quantum/classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a mod el Hamiltonian approach to describe charge transport through bio-molecular wires with variable lengths in presence o f a solvent. The core of our approach consists in a mapping of the bio-molecular electronic structure, as obtained f rom density-functional based tight-binding calculations of molecular structures along MD trajectories, onto a low di mensional model Hamiltonian including the coupling to a dissipative bosonic environment. The latter encodes fluctuat ion effects arising from the solvent and from the molecular conformational dynamics. We apply this approach to the c ase of pG-pC and pA-pT DNA oligomers as paradigmatic cases and show that the DNA conformational fluctuations are essential in determining and supporting charge transport.

  7. Bio-compatibility, surface and chemical characterization of glow discharge plasma modified ZnO nanocomposite polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagra, Bhawna, E-mail: bhawnacct@gmail.com; Pimpliskar, Prashant, E-mail: bhawnacct@gmail.com [Centre for Converging Technologies, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur-302004 (India); Agrawal, Narendra Kumar [Department of Physics, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur-302004 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Bio compatibility is an important issue for synthesis of biomedical devices, which can be tested by bioadoptability and creations of active site to enhance the bacterial/cell growth in biomedical devices. Hence a systematic study was carried out to characterize the effects of Nitrogen ion plasma for creations of active site in nano composite polymer membrane. Nano particles of ZnO are synthesized by chemical root, using solution casting nano composite polymeric membranes were prepared and treated with Nitrogen ion plasma. These membranes were characterized by different technique such as optical microscopy, SEM- Scanning electron microscope, optical transmittance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Then biocompatibility for membranes was tested by testing of bio-adoptability of membrane.

  8. Implementation of an Innovative Bio Inspired GA and PSO Algorithm for Controller design considering Steam GT Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shivakumar, R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Application of Bio Inspired Algorithms to complicated Power System Stability Problems has recently attracted the researchers in the field of Artificial Intelligence. Low frequency oscillations after a disturbance in a Power system, if not sufficiently damped, can drive the system unstable. This paper provides a systematic procedure to damp the low frequency oscillations based on Bio Inspired Genetic (GA) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithms. The proposed controller design is based on formulating a System Damping ratio enhancement based Optimization criterion to compute the optimal controller parameters for better stability. The Novel and contrasting feature of this work is the mathematical modeling and simulation of the Synchronous generator model including the Steam Governor Turbine (GT) dynamics. To show the robustness of the proposed controller, Non linear Time domain simulations have been carried out under various system operating conditions. Also, a detailed Comparative study has been don...

  9. Characterization of the Neutron Detector Upgrade to the GP-SANS and BIO-SANS Instruments at HFIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Kevin D [ORNL; Bailey, Katherine M [ORNL; Beal, Justin D [ORNL; Diawara, Yacouba [ORNL; Funk, Loren L [ORNL; Hicks, J Steve [ORNL; Jones, Amy Black [ORNL; Littrell, Ken [ORNL; Summers, Randy [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Vandergriff, David H [ORNL; Johnson, Nathan [GE Energy Services; Bradley, Brandon [GE Energy Services

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past year, new 1 m x 1 m neutron detectors have been installed at both the General Purpose SANS (GP-SANS) and the Bio-SANS instruments at HFIR, each intended as an upgrade to provide improved high rate capability. This paper presents the results of characterization studies performed in the detector test laboratory, including position resolution, linearity and background, as well as a preliminary look at high count rate performance.

  10. Interlayer Water Regulates the Bio-nano Interface of a \\b{eta}-sheet Protein stacking on Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenping Lv; Guiju Xu; Hongyan Zhang; Xin Li; Shengju Liu; Huan Niu; Dongsheng Xu; Renan Wu

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated an integrated bio-nano interface consisting of a \\b{eta}-sheet protein stacked onto graphene. We found that the stacking assembly of the model protein on graphene could be controlled by water molecules. The interlayer water filled within interstices of the bio-nano interface could suppress the molecular vibration of surface groups on protein, and could impair the CH...{\\pi} interaction driving the attraction of the protein and graphene. The intermolecular coupling of interlayer water would be relaxed by the relative motion of protein upon graphene due to the interaction between water and protein surface. This effect reduced the hindrance of the interlayer water against the assembly of protein on graphene, resulting an appropriate adsorption status of protein on graphene with a deep free energy trap. Thereby, the confinement and the relative sliding between protein and graphene, the coupling of protein and water, and the interaction between graphene and water all have involved in the modulation of behaviors of water molecules within the bio-nano interface, governing the hindrance of interlayer water against the protein assembly on hydrophobic graphene. These results provide a deep insight into the fundamental mechanism of protein adsorption onto graphene surface in water.

  11. LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

  12. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders

  13. The effect of clay catalyst on the chemical composition of bio-oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solak, Agnieszka; Rutkowski, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.rutkowski@pwr.wroc.pl

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Non-catalytic and catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene blend was carried out in a laboratory scale reactor. • Optimization of process temperature was done. • Optimization of clay catalyst type and amount for co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene was done. • The product yields and the chemical composition of bio-oil was investigated. - Abstract: Cellulose/polyethylene (CPE) mixture 3:1, w/w with and without three clay catalysts (K10 – montmorillonite K10, KSF – montmorillonite KSF, B – Bentonite) addition were subjected to pyrolysis at temperatures 400, 450 and 500 °C with heating rate of 100 °C/s to produce bio-oil with high yield. The pyrolytic oil yield was in the range of 41.3–79.5 wt% depending on the temperature, the type and the amount of catalyst. The non-catalytic fast pyrolysis at 500 °C gives the highest yield of bio-oil (79.5 wt%). The higher temperature of catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene mixture the higher yield of bio-oil is. Contrarily, increasing amount of montmorillonite results in significant, almost linear decrease in bio-oil yield followed by a significant increase of gas yield. The addition of clay catalysts to CPE mixture has a various influence on the distribution of bio-oil components. The addition of montmorillonite K10 to cellulose/polyethylene mixture promotes the deepest conversion of polyethylene and cellulose. Additionally, more saturated than unsaturated hydrocarbons are present in resultant bio-oils. The proportion of liquid hydrocarbons is the highest when a montmorillonite K10 is acting as a catalyst.

  14. Small Scale SOFC Demonstration Using Bio-Based and Fossil Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Petrik; Robert Ruhl

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Management, Inc. (TMI) of Cleveland, Ohio, has completed the project entitled â??Small Scale SOFC Demonstration using Bio-based and Fossil Fuels.â?ť Under this program, two 1-kW systems were engineered as technology demonstrators of an advanced technology that can operate on either traditional hydrocarbon fuels or renewable biofuels. The systems were demonstrated at Patterson's Fruit Farm of Chesterland, OH and were open to the public during the first quarter of 2012. As a result of the demonstration, TMI received quantitative feedback on operation of the systems as well as qualitative assessments from customers. Based on the test results, TMI believes that > 30% net electrical efficiency at 1 kW on both traditional and renewable fuels with a reasonable entry price is obtainable. The demonstration and analysis provide the confidence that a 1 kW entry-level system offers a viable value proposition, but additional modifications are warranted to reduce sound and increase reliability before full commercial acceptance.

  15. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deo, Vincent [Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Zhang, Yao [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Soghomonian, Victoria [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Heremans, Jean J. [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biological functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.

  16. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J.

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biologicalmore »functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.« less

  17. Nano/bio treatment of polychlorinated biphenyls with evaluation of comparative toxicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Le, Thao Thanh; Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Nguyen, Hoang Khanh; Jeon, Jong -Rok; Chang, Yoon -Seok

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The persistence of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) Aroclor 1248 in soils and sediments is a major concern because of its toxicity and presence at high concentrations. In this study, we developed an integrated remediation system for PCBs using chemical catalysis and biodegradation. The dechlorination of Aroclor 1248 was achieved by treatment with bimetallic nanoparticles Pd/nFe under anoxic conditions. Among the 32 PCB congeners of Aroclor 1248 examined, our process dechlorinated 99%, 92%, 84%, and 28% of tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexachlorinated biphenyls, respectively. The resulting biphenyl was biodegraded rapidly by Burkholderia xenovorans LB400. Benzoic acid was detected as an intermediate during the biodegradation process. The toxicity of the residual PCBs after nano-bio treatment was evaluated in terms of toxic equivalent values which decreased from 33.8 × 10-5 ?g g-1 to 9.5 × 10-5 ?g g-1. The residual PCBs also had low cytotoxicity toward Escherichia coli as demonstrated by lower reactive oxygen species levels, lower glutathione peroxidase activity, and a reduced number of dead bacteria.

  18. Thickness controlled sol-gel silica films for plasmonic bio-sensing devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figus, Cristiana, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Quochi, Francesco, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Artizzu, Flavia, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Saba, Michele, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Marongiu, Daniela, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Fisica - University of Cagliari, S.P. Km 0.7, I-09042 Monserrato (Canada) (Italy); Floris, Francesco; Marabelli, Franco; Patrini, Maddalena; Fornasari, Lucia [Dipartimento di Fisica - University of Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (PV) (Italy); Pellacani, Paola; Valsesia, Andrea [Plasmore S.r.l. -Via Grazia Deledda 4, I-21020 Ranco (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmonics has recently received considerable interest due to its potentiality in many fields as well as in nanobio-technology applications. In this regard, various strategies are required for modifying the surfaces of plasmonic nanostructures and to control their optical properties in view of interesting application such as bio-sensing, We report a simple method for depositing silica layers of controlled thickness on planar plasmonic structures. Tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) was used as silica precursor. The control of the silica layer thickness was obtained by optimizing the sol-gel method and dip-coating technique, in particular by properly tuning different parameters such as pH, solvent concentration, and withdrawal speed. The resulting films were characterized via atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier-transform (FT) spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Furthermore, by performing the analysis of surface plasmon resonances before and after the coating of the nanostructures, it was observed that the position of the resonance structures could be properly shifted by finely controlling the silica layer thickness. The effect of silica coating was assessed also in view of sensing applications, due to important advantages, such as surface protection of the plasmonic structure.

  19. A Review and Perspective of Recent Bio-Oil Hydrotreating Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacher, Alan H.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The pathway for catalytic hydrodeoxygenation of biomass derived fast pyrolysis oil represents a compelling route for production of liquid transportation fuels. There has been continued progress and advancements in both the public and private research areas towards driving this technology to completion. Published research and patent literature have demonstrated that continued development of HDO as a part of a processes for production liquid transportation using biomass is being advanced for both fuel blend stocks and for refinery intermediates for co-processing. Much of the research has still focused on “quality” metrics around single or groups of unit operations generating partially treated bio-oil streams without assessing upstream and downstream implications. However, there is an encouraging amount of research that is now being targeted and assessed with attempts to understand the impact on the final fuel product, regardless of the route. Much of the most important research is moving towards continuous, industrially relevant processes where data can be generated to adequately inform process and economic modeling. As the technology for producing liquid transportation fuels from pyrolysis/HDO/coprocessing is driving towards commercialization, further research should be prioritized on the basis of impact to a techno-economic analyses.

  20. Nano/bio treatment of polychlorinated biphenyls with evaluation of comparative toxicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Le, Thao Thanh; Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Nguyen, Hoang Khanh; Jeon, Jong -Rok; Chang, Yoon -Seok

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The persistence of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) Aroclor 1248 in soils and sediments is a major concern because of its toxicity and presence at high concentrations. In this study, we developed an integrated remediation system for PCBs using chemical catalysis and biodegradation. The dechlorination of Aroclor 1248 was achieved by treatment with bimetallic nanoparticles Pd/nFe under anoxic conditions. Among the 32 PCB congeners of Aroclor 1248 examined, our process dechlorinated 99%, 92%, 84%, and 28% of tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexachlorinated biphenyls, respectively. The resulting biphenyl was biodegraded rapidly by Burkholderia xenovorans LB400. Benzoic acid was detected as an intermediate duringmore »the biodegradation process. The toxicity of the residual PCBs after nano-bio treatment was evaluated in terms of toxic equivalent values which decreased from 33.8 × 10-5 ?g g-1 to 9.5 × 10-5 ?g g-1. The residual PCBs also had low cytotoxicity toward Escherichia coli as demonstrated by lower reactive oxygen species levels, lower glutathione peroxidase activity, and a reduced number of dead bacteria.« less

  1. Iridium abundance measurements across bio-event horizons in the fossil record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orth, C.J.; Attrep, M. Jr.; Quintana, L.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemical measurements have been performed on thousands of rock samples collected across bio-event horizons using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) for about 40 common and trace elements and radiochemical isolation procedures for Ir. On selected samples, Os, Pt and Au were also radiochemically determined. These studies have encompassed the time interval from the Precambrian-Cambrian transition to the Late Eocene impact (microspherule) horizons. Our early work strengthened the Alvarez impact hypothesis by finding the Ir (PGE) anomaly at the K-T boundary in continental sedimentary sequences. In collaborations with paleontologists, weak to moderately string Ir anomalies have been discovered at the Frasnian-Famennian boundary in Australia, in the Early Mississippian of Oklahoma, at the Mississipian-Pennsylvanian boundary of Oklahoma and Texas, and in the Late Cenomanian throughout the western interior of North America and on the south coast of England to date. We have found no compelling evidence for an impact related cause for these anomalies although PGE impact signatures in the two Late Cenomanian anomalies could be masked by the strong terrestrial mafic to ultramafic overprint. Thus far, our evidence for extinction events older than the terminal Cretaceous does not support recent hypotheses which suggest that impacts from cyclic swarms of comets in the inner Solar system were responsible for the periodic mass extinctions. 50 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) end state basis for interim operation (BIO) for surveillance and maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DODD, E.N.

    1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) was developed for the PUREX end state condition following completion of the deactivation project. The deactivation project has removed or stabilized the hazardous materials within the facility structure and equipment to reduce the hazards posed by the facility during the surveillance and maintenance (S and M) period, and to reduce the costs associated with the S and M. This document serves as the authorization basis for the PUREX facility, excluding the storage tunnels, railroad cut, and associated tracks, for the deactivated end state condition during the S and M period. The storage tunnels, and associated systems and areas, are addressed in WHC-SD-HS-SAR-001, Rev. 1, PUREX Final Safety Analysis Report. During S and M, the mission of the facility is to maintain the conditions and equipment in a manner that ensures the safety of the workers, environment, and the public. The S and M phase will continue until the final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project and activities are begun. Based on the methodology of DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazards Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, the final facility hazards category is identified as hazards category This considers the remaining material inventories, form and distribution of the material, and the energies present to initiate events of concern. Given the current facility configuration, conditions, and authorized S and M activities, there are no operational events identified resulting in significant hazard to any of the target receptor groups (e.g., workers, public, environment). The only accident scenarios identified with consequences to the onsite co-located workers were based on external natural phenomena, specifically an earthquake. The dose consequences of these events are within the current risk evaluation guidelines and are consistent with the expectations for a hazards category 2 facility.

  3. In Situ Microbial Community Control of the Stability of Bio-reduced Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, Brett, R.; Peacock, Aaron, D.; Resch, Charles, T.; Arntzen, Evan; Smithgall, Amanda, N.; Pfiffner, Susan; Gan, M.; McKinley, James, P.; Long, Philip, E.; White, David, C.

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In aerobic aquifers typical of many Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites, uranium is present in the oxidized U(VI) form which is more soluble and thus more mobile. Field experiments at the Old Rifle UMTRA site have demonstrated that biostimulation by electron donor addition (acetate) promotes biological U(VI) reduction (2). However, U(VI) reduction is reversible and oxidative dissolution of precipitated U(IV) after the cessation of electron donor addition remains a critical issue for the application of biostimulation as a treatment technology. Despite the potential for oxidative dissolution, field experiments at the Old Rifle site have shown that rapid reoxidation of bio-reduced uranium does not occur and U(VI) concentrations can remain at approximately 20% of background levels for more than one year. The extent of post-amendment U(VI) removal and the maintenance of bioreduced uranium may result from many factors including U(VI) sorption to iron-containing mineral phases, generation of H2S or FeS0.9, or the preferential sorption of U(VI) by microbial cells or biopolymers, but the processes controlling the reduction and in situ reoxidation rates are not known. To investigate the role of microbial community composition in the maintenance of bioreduced uranium, in-well sediment incubators (ISIs) were developed allowing field deployment of amended and native sediments during on-going experiments at the site. Field deployment of the ISIs allows expedient interrogation of microbial community response to field environmental perturbations and varying geochemical conditions.

  4. High pressure dynamics of hydrated protein in bio-protective trehalose environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. O. Diallo; Q. Zhang; H. O'Neill; E. Mamontov

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a pressure dependence study of the dynamics of lysozyme protein powder immersed in deuterated $\\alpha$,$\\alpha$-trehalose environment via quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). The goal is to assess the baro-protective benefits of trehalose on bio-molecules by comparing the findings with those of a trehalose-free reference study. While the mean-square displacement of the trehalose-free protein (hydrated to $d_{D_2O}\\simeq$40 w\\%) as a whole, is reduced by increasing pressure, the actual observable relaxation dynamics in the pico-(ps) to nano-seconds (ns) time range remains largely unaffected by pressure - up to the maximum investigated pressure of 2.78(2) Kbar. Our observation is independent of whether or not the protein is mixed with the deuterated sugar. This suggests that the hydrated protein's conformational states at atmospheric pressure remain unaltered by hydrostatic pressures, below 2.78 Kbar. We also found the QENS response to be totally recoverable after ambient pressure conditions are restored. Circular dichroism and neutron diffraction measurements confirm that the protein structural integrity is conserved and remains intact, after pressure is released. We observe however a clear narrowing of the quasi-elastic neutron (QENS) response as the temperature is decreased from 290 K to 230 K in both cases, which we parametrize using the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) stretched exponential model. Only the fraction of protons that are immobile on the accessible time window of the instrument, referred to as the elastic incoherent structure factor or (EISF) is observably sensitive to pressure, increasing only marginally but systematically with increasing pressure.

  5. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, John I.

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting, ecological, and environmental sciences. BioOne provides a sustainable online platform for over 170 journals changes associated with parasitism. The species studied span the trophic spectrum from free-living

  6. The Impact of Emerging Technologies: Proteins' Baby Pictures -Techno... http://www.technologyreview.com/BioTech-Genomics/wtr_16635,312,p... 1 of 2 3/30/2006 9:06 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    The Impact of Emerging Technologies: Proteins' Baby Pictures - Techno... http://www.technologyreview.com/BioTech-Genomics in looking at low-activity genes. Much of the genome, however, is not highly active. In his experiments, Xie Technologies: Proteins' Baby Pictures - Techno... http://www.technologyreview.com/BioTech-Genomics/wtr_16635

  7. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    #12;BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the biological, ecological, and environmental sciences. BioOne provides a sustainable online platform for over

  8. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xing-Wang

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders, and environmental sciences. BioOne provides a sustainable online platform for over 170 journals and books published

  9. 4.2.4 TARGET DNA DETECTION USING THE BCA AMPLIFICATION METHOD J.-M. Nam, S. Stoeva, C. A. Mirkin; "Bio-Barcode-Based DNA Detection with PCR-like Sensitivity,"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    4.2.4 TARGET DNA DETECTION USING THE BCA AMPLIFICATION METHOD J.-M. Nam, S. Stoeva, C. A. Mirkin; "Bio-Barcode-Based DNA Detection with PCR-like Sensitivity," J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2004, 126, 5932-5933. Techniques have been developed to detect low concentrations of DNA. This bio-barcode amplification (BCA

  10. Catalytic Upgrading of bio-oil using 1-octene and 1-butanol over sulfonic acid resin catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Wang, Qingwen; Tripathi, Prabhat; Pittman, Charles U.

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Raw bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass must be refined before it can be used as a transporation fuel, a petroleum refinery feed or for many other fuel uses. Raw bio-oil was upgraded with the neat model olefin, 1-octene, and with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures over sulfonic acid resin catalysts frin 80 to 150 degrees celisus in order to simultaneously lower water content and acidity and to increase hydrophobicity and heating value. Phase separation and coke formation were key factors limiting the reaction rate during upgrading with neat 1-octene although octanols were formed by 1-octene hydration along with small amounts of octyl acetates and ethers. GC-MS analysis confirmed that olefin hydration, carboxylic acid esterification, acetal formation from aldehydes and ketones and O- and C-alkylations of phenolic compounds occurred simultaneously during upgrading with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures. Addition of 1-butanol increased olefin conversion dramatically be reducing mass transfer restraints and serving as a cosolvent or emulsifying agent. It also reacted with carboxylic acids and aldehydes/ketones to form esters, and acetals, respectively, while also serving to stabilize bio-oil during heating. 1-Butanol addition also protected the catalysts, increasing catalyst lifetime and reducing or eliminationg coking. Upgrading sharply increased ester content and decreased the amounts of levoglucosan, polyhydric alcohols and organic acids. Upgrading lowered acidity (pH value rise from 2.5 to >3.0), removed the uppleasant ordor and increased hydrocarbon solubility. Water content decreased from 37.2% to < 7.5% dramatically and calorific value increased from 12.6 MJ kg to about 30.0 MJ kg.

  11. High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

  12. The reaction of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio Holthuis (1952), to phenol in bio-assay and behavioral tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Geoffrey A

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fcr their l. ind and he1pfu1 assistance in planning, guiding and criticizing my research and writing. I wish to thank also Dr. San~my ~il. Ray, i~lr. Wayne Cotter, and ~liss Anita Si. evens for their assis tancc at the Te ca: A R; ~I IJnivcrsity.... 1945. The Chemical Cons 1itcients of . P t. & . R ' I ~ 6&~p. , Sai la, Saul B. 19, &3. Bio-assay procedures . for the evaluation of fish toxicants with particular ref- erence to rotenone. Trans. Acner. Fish. Soc. , 83: 104-114. Sicvcrs& Anita M. Tn...

  13. BIO-MONITORING FOR URANIUM USING STREAM-SIDE TERRESTRIAL PLANTS AND MACROPHYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, E.; Duff, M.; Hicks, T.; Coughlin, D.; Hicks, R.; Dixon, E.

    2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluated the abilities of various plant species to act as bio-monitors for environmental uranium (U) contamination. Vegetation and soil samples were collected from a U processing facility. The water-way fed from facility storm and processing effluents was the focal sample site as it represented a primary U transport mechanism. Soils and sediments from areas exposed to contamination possessed U concentrations that averaged 630 mg U kg{sup -1}. Aquatic mosses proved to be exceptional accumulators of U with dry weight (dw) concentrations measuring as high as 12500 mg U kg{sup -1} (approximately 1% of the dw mass was attributable to U). The macrophytes (Phragmites communis, Scripus fontinalis and Sagittaria latifolia) were also effective accumulators of U. In general, plant roots possessed higher concentrations of U than associated upper portions of plants. For terrestrial plants, the roots of Impatiens capensis had the highest observed levels of U accumulation (1030 mg kg{sup -1}), followed by the roots of Cyperus esculentus and Solidago speciosa. The concentration ratio (CR) characterized dry weight (dw) vegetative U levels relative to that in associated dw soil. The plant species that accumulated U at levels in excess of that found in the soil were: P. communis root (CR, 17.4), I. capensis root (CR, 3.1) and S. fontinalis whole plant (CR, 1.4). Seven of the highest ten CR values were found in the roots. Correlations with concentrations of other metals with U were performed, which revealed that U concentrations in the plant were strongly correlated with nickel (Ni) concentrations (correlation: 0.992; r-squared: 0.984). Uranium in plant tissue was also strongly correlated with strontium (Sr) (correlation: 0.948; r-squared: 0.899). Strontium is chemically and physically similar to calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), which were also positively-correlated with U. The correlation with U and these plant nutrient minerals, including iron (Fe), suggests that active uptake mechanisms may influence plant U accumulation.

  14. Uranium Immobilization through Fe(II) bio-oxidation: A Column study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coates, John D.

    2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Current research on the bioremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides is focused on the ability of reducing organisms to use these metals as alternative electron acceptors in the absence of oxygen and thus precipitate them out of solution. However, many aspects of this proposed scheme need to be resolved, not the least of which is the time frame of the treatment process. Once treatment is complete and the electron donor addition is halted, the system will ultimately revert back to an oxic state and potentially result in the abiotic reoxidation and remobilization of the immobilized metals. In addition, the possibility exists that the presence of more electropositive electron acceptors such as nitrate or oxygen will also stimulate the biological oxidation and remobilization of these contaminants. The selective nitrate-dependent biooxidation of added Fe(II) may offer an effective means of “capping off” and completing the attenuation of these contaminants in a reducing environment making the contaminants less accessible to abiotic and biotic reactions and allowing the system to naturally revert to an oxic state. Our previous DOE-NABIR funded studies demonstrated that radionuclides such as uranium and cobalt are rapidly removed from solution during the biogenic formation of Fe(III)-oxides. In the case of uranium, X-ray spectroscopy analysis indicated that the uranium was in the hexavalent form (normally soluble) and was bound to the precipitated Fe(III)-oxides thus demonstrating the bioremediative potential of this process. We also demonstrated that nitrate-dependent Fe(II)- oxidizing bacteria are prevalent in the sediment and groundwater samples collected from sites 1 and 2 and the background site of the NABIR FRC in Oakridge, TN. However, all of these studies were performed in batch experiments in the laboratory with pure cultures and although a significant amount was learned about the microbiology of nitrate-dependent bio-oxidation of Fe(II), the effects of complex processes (such as advective flow) present in the natural environment are unknown. The objective of the current studies was to address some of these short-comings in an attempt to develop this bioremediative strategy into a robust, field applicable technology. This objective was approached by both pure culture studies investigating the mechanism of Fe(II) oxidation by nitrate reducing bacteria and examining the flow dynamics and microbial processes in advective flow columns amended with Fe(II) and nitrate over an extended period.

  15. Monthly Highlights from Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station November 2009 Finding Conservation and Using Bio-Energy on Urban Fringe Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    methods for conducting on-farm energy audits. While utility companies and consultants have tools little about monitoring energy use on farms. While conservation is where farmers and the university make Conservation and Using Bio-Energy on Urban Fringe Farms Zane Helsel, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Agriculture

  16. Bio-inspired Electronics for Interfacing Artificial Implants to Living Systems Imagine a world in which damaged parts of the body -an arm, or an eye, or even

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Richard

    1 Bio-inspired Electronics for Interfacing Artificial Implants to Living Systems Imagine a world, today's implants are limited severely by the interface between the artificial and biological systems by artificial implants capable of restoring or even enhancing human performance. The associated improvements

  17. arXiv:1205.6074v1[physics.bio-ph]28May2012 Mesoscale symmetries explain dynamical equivalence of food webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    arXiv:1205.6074v1[physics.bio-ph]28May2012 Mesoscale symmetries explain dynamical equivalence is to identify mesoscale structures that have distinct dynamical implications. In this paper we present show that this equivalence is rooted in mesoscale symmetries that exist in these webs. Certain

  18. Reference: Dittrich, P., P. Speroni di Fenizio (2005), Chemical Organization Theory, arXiv:q-bio.MN/0501016 Chemical organization theory: Towards a theory of con-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittrich, Peter

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reference: Dittrich, P., P. Speroni di Fenizio (2005), Chemical Organization Theory, arXiv:q-bio.MN/0501016 Chemical organization theory: Towards a theory of con- structive dynamical systems Peter Dittrich. The theory consists of two parts. The first part introduces the concept of a chemical organization

  19. * Paper submitted in partial fulfillment of credit in Bio 399-Biology Internship at The College of New Jersey Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovett, Gary M.

    * Paper submitted in partial fulfillment of credit in Bio 399-Biology Internship at The College in regulating gypsy moth populations at low densities, this study examined the resting spore load in the soil management solutions include augmenting the spore load in the soil, introducing sterile egg masses

  20. Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanch, Harvey; Adams, Paul; Andrews-Cramer, Katherine; Frommer, Wolf; Simmons, Blake; Keasling, Jay

    2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, carbon-rich fossil fuels, primarily oil, coal, and natural gas, provide 85% of the energy consumed in the U.S. As world demand increases, oil reserves may become rapidly depleted. Fossil fuel use increases CO{sub 2} emissions and raises the risk of global warming. The high energy content of liquid hydrocarbon fuels makes them the preferred energy source for all modes of transportation. In the U.S. alone, transportation consumes >13.8 million barrels of oil per day and generates 0.5 gigatons of carbon per year. This release of greenhouse gases has spurred research into alternative, nonfossil energy sources. Among the options (nuclear, concentrated solar thermal, geothermal, hydroelectric, wind, solar, and biomass), only biomass has the potential to provide a high-energy-content transportation fuel. Biomass is a renewable resource that can be converted into carbon-neutral transporation fuels. Currently, biofuels such as ethanol are produced largely from grains, but there is a large, untapped resource (estimated at more than a billion tons per year) of plant biomass that could be utilized as a renewable, domestic source of liquid fuels. Well-established processes convert the starch content of the grain into sugars that can be fermented to ethanol. The energy efficiency of starch-based biofuels is however not optimal, while plant cell walls (lignocellulose) represent a huge untapped source of energy. Plant-derived biomass contains cellulose, which is more difficult to convert to sugars; hemicellulose, which contains a diversity of carbohydrates that have to be efficiently degraded by microorganisms to fuels; and lignin, which is recalcitrant to degradation and prevents cost-effective fermentation. The development of cost-effective and energy-efficient processes to transform lignocellulosic biomass into fuels is hampered by significant roadblocks, including the lack of specifically developed energy crops, the difficulty in separating biomass components, low activity of enzymes used to deconstruct biomass, and the inhibitory effect of fuels and processing byproducts on organisms responsible for producing fuels from biomass monomers. The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center that will address these roadblocks in biofuels production. JBEI draws on the expertise and capabilities of three national laboratories (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)), two leading U.S. universities (University of California campuses at Berkeley (UCB) and Davis (UCD)), and a foundation (Carnegie Institute for Science, Stanford) to develop the scientific and technological base needed to convert the energy stored in lignocellulose into transportation fuels and commodity chemicals. Established scientists from the participating organizations are leading teams of researchers to solve the key scientific problems and develop the tools and infrastructure that will enable other researchers and companies to rapidly develop new biofuels and scale production to meet U.S. transportation needs and to develop and rapidly transition new technologies to the commercial sector. JBEI's biomass-to-biofuels research approach is based in three interrelated scientific divisions and a technologies division. The Feedstocks Division will develop improved plant energy crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels. The Deconstruction Division will investigate the conversion of this lignocellulosic plant material to sugar and aromatics. The Fuels Synthesis Division will create microbes that can efficiently convert sugar and aromatics into ethanol and other biofuels. JBEI's cross-cutting Technologies Division will develop and optimize a set of enabling technologies including high-throughput, chipbased, and omics platforms; tools for synthetic biology; multi-scale imaging facilities; and integrated data analysis to support and integrate JBEI's scientific program.

  1. MvirDB: Microbial Database of Protein Toxins, Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Resistance Genes for Bio-Defense Applications

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zhou, C. E.; Smith, J.; Lam, M.; Zemla, M. D.; Slezak, T.

    MvirDB is a cenntralized resource (data warehouse) comprising all publicly accessible, organized sequence data for protein toxins, virulence factors, and antibiotic resistance genes. Protein entries in MvirDB are annotated using a high-throughput, fully automated computational annotation system; annotations are updated periodically to ensure that results are derived using current public database and open-source tool releases. Tools provided for using MvirDB include a web-based browser tool and BLAST interfaces. MvirDB serves researchers in the bio-defense and medical fields. (taken from page 3 of PI's paper of same title published in Nucleic Acids Research, 2007, Vol.35, Database Issue (Open Source)

  2. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borsdorf, Axel

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research fundersOne provides a sustainable online platform for over 170 journals and books published by nonprofit societies

  3. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    #12;BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders a sustainable online platform for over 170 journals and books published by nonprofit societies, associations

  4. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wysocki, Vicki H.

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders a sustainable online platform for over 170 journals and books published by nonprofit societies, associations

  5. Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon-neutral source of fuels. Microalgae may be especiallyand fuel infrastructure-compatible metabolites to photosynthesis, using land plants, eukaryotic microalgaemicroalgae grow faster, have higher photosynthetic productivity [1,5], and accumulate bio- fuel

  6. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    research in the biological, ecological, and environmental sciences. BioOne provides a sustainable online in atmospher- ic CO2 concentration through enhanced terrestrial carbon storage may help slow or reverse

  7. NCBI Handout Series | BioProject | Last Update August 19, 2013 Contact: info@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Biological studies in the post-genome era often produce large volumes of complex and high-throughput

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    Project. Registering a project requires credentials from an MyNCBI, NIH or eRA login. Searching with "Chinchilla [orgn of Health · Department of Health and Human Services B A C E D Chinchilla [organism] #12;The Bio

  8. Required Fields in Bold and Underlined. *Definitions & values in Definitions section of the CVS Field Guide. EntryTool 2.3 2012 Carolina Vegetation Survey. cvs.bio.unc.edu Form PLT45, ver 8.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peet, Robert K.

    Field Guide. EntryTool 2.3 ©2012 Carolina Vegetation Survey. cvs.bio.unc.edu Plot X-Axis Bearing: _____ş in the template below (2+ modules) or one on the right (1 module plot), using the key below. Edit shape if neededTool 2.3 ©2012 Carolina Vegetation Survey. cvs.bio.unc.edu WATER page 2 of 2 Form PLT45, ver 8.3 Project

  9. arXiv:1007.3122v2[q-bio.NC]30Jan2013 Robust Short-Term Memory without Synaptic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Samuel

    been stored in samuel.johnson@imperial.ac.uk 1 #12;our brains previously (not very credible). Here wearXiv:1007.3122v2[q-bio.NC]30Jan2013 Robust Short-Term Memory without Synaptic Learning Samuel Johnson1,2, , J. Marro3 , and Joaqu´in J. Torres3 1 Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, SW

  10. Bio390 Study Questions for S-N Ch. 2 --Blood 1. Know S-N's list of 10 general functions/properties of blood.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prestwich, Ken

    effects of temperature, pH, CO2, PO4 2-, and ionic strength on the ability of hemoglobin to bind oxygenBio390 Study Questions for S-N Ch. 2 -- Blood Spring '01 1. Know S-N's list of 10 general functions/properties tends to decrease as body size increases. How does a relatively high P50 serve as an adaptation in small

  11. BioCoComb -- Gasification of biomass and co-combustion of the gas in a pulverized-coal-boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderl, H.; Zotter, T.; Mory, A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a demonstration project supported by an European Community Thermie Fund a biomass gasifier for bark, wood chips, saw dust, etc. has been installed by Austrian Energy and Environment at the 137 MW{sub el} pulverized-coal fired power station in Zeltweg, Austria. The project title BioCoComb is an abbreviation for Preparation of Biofuel for Co-Combustion, where co-combustion means combustion together with coal in existing power plants. According to the thermal capacity of 10 MW the produced gas substitutes approx. 3% of the coal fired in the boiler. Only the coarse fraction of the biomass has to pass a shredder and is then fed together with the fine fraction without any further pretreatment into the gasifier. In the gasification process the biomass will combust in a substoichiometric atmosphere, create the necessary temperature of 820 C and partly gasify due to the lack of oxygen in the combustion chamber (autothermal operation). The gasifier uses circulating fluidized bed technology, which guarantees even relatively low temperatures in all parts of the gasifier to prevent slagging. The intense motion of the bed material also favors attrition of the biomass particles. Via a hot gas duct the produced low calorific value (LCV) gas is directly led into the furnace of the existing pulverized coal fired boiler for combustion. The gas also contains fine wood char particles, that can pass the retention cyclone and burn out in the furnace of the coal boiler. The main advantages of the BioCoComb concept are: low gas quality sufficient for co-firing; no gas cleaning or cooling; no predrying of the biomass; relatively low temperatures in the gasifier to prevent slagging; favorable effects on power plant emissions (CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}); no severe modifications of the existing coal fired boiler; and high flexibility in arranging and integrating the main components into existing plants. The plant started its trial run in November 1997 and has been in successful commercial operation since January 1998.

  12. Environmental assessment of the atlas bio-energy waste wood fluidized bed gasification power plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzman, M.I.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atlas Bio-Energy Corporation is proposing to develop and operate a 3 MW power plant in Brooklyn, New York that will produce electricity by gasification of waste wood and combustion of the produced low-Btu gas in a conventional package steam boiler coupled to a steam-electric generator. The objectives of this project were to assist Atlas in addressing the environmental permit requirements for the proposed power plant and to evaluate the environmental and economic impacts of the project compared to more conventional small power plants. The project`s goal was to help promote the commercialization of biomass gasification as an environmentally acceptable and economically attractive alternative to conventional wood combustion. The specific components of this research included: (1) Development of a permitting strategy plan; (2) Characterization of New York City waste wood; (3) Characterization of fluidized bed gasifier/boiler emissions; (4) Performance of an environmental impact analysis; (5) Preparation of an economic evaluation; and (6) Discussion of operational and maintenance concerns. The project is being performed in two phases. Phase I, which is the subject of this report, involves the environmental permitting and environmental/economic assessment of the project. Pending NYSERDA participation, Phase II will include development and implementation of a demonstration program to evaluate the environmental and economic impacts of the full-scale gasification project.

  13. AB SCIEX-Advion BioSystems Commercialize ORNL Tech | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the Energy Level79AJ01)8AJ01)TablesAAAS

  14. Subtask 2: Water oxidation complex | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... StrengtheningLabSubmittingProduction 2: Water

  15. Subtask 3: Fuel production complex | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... StrengtheningLabSubmittingProduction 2:

  16. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cortright, Randy D.; Dumesic, James A.

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  17. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cortright, Randy D. (Madison, WI); Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  18. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cortright, Randy D. (Madison, WI); Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  19. future science group 5ISSN 1759-726910.4155/BFS.12.76 2013 Future Science Ltd Special FocuS: advanced FeedStockS For advanced bioFuelS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S: advanced FeedStockS For advanced bioFuelS An overview of lignocellulosic biomass feedstock harvest, processing and supply for biofuel production editorial Biofuels (2013) 4(1), 5­8 "The questions here petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030 [1­3]. This goal implies that the demand for cellulosic feed

  20. The FIA BioSum model was used to simulate three fire-hazard-reduction policies in an area comprising northern California. southwestern Oregon. and the east slopes of the Cascade Mountains in Oregon. The policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    The FIA BioSum model was used to simulate three fire-hazard-reduction policies in an area. The policy scenarios. all subject to a stand-scale fire-hazard-reduction effectiveness constraint. included merchantable timber removal (Min Merch). Differences in the area treated under each scenario were considerable

  1. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnarsson, Ingi

    in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research. Darwin's bark spider: giant prey in giant orb webs societies, associations, museums, institutions, and presses. Your use of this PDF, the BioOne Web site holder. #12;Darwin's bark spider: giant prey in giant orb webs (Caerostris darwini, Araneae: Araneidae

  2. BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders for Global Change Science to Contribute to a Sustainable Future Author(s): Ruth S. DeFries, Erle C. Ellis, F

  3. Bio-Rad Laboratories Q C D ATA M A N A G E M E N T S O L U T I O N S Westgard AdvisorTM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    and automatically apply best QC rules with patented technology · Easy step-by-step automatic rule selection.S. 1-800-2BIO-RAD Australia 61-2-9914-2800 Austria 43-1-877-8901 Belgium 32-9-385-5511 Brazil 5521

  4. How to Use the Index & Grid Maps Each BioBlitz Zone has a map packet. The packets contain an index map and several grid (aerial) maps. In addition to identifying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    How to Use the Index & Grid Maps Each BioBlitz Zone has a map packet. The packets contain an index map and several grid (aerial) maps. In addition to identifying species in the park, this year we would of the zone. This map shows which areas are covered by the grid maps. The black squares show the edge of each

  5. Biomass Feedstocks for Renewable Fuel Production: A review of the impacts of feedstock and pretreatment on the yield and product distribution of fast pyrolysis bio-oils and vapors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Carpenter; Stefan Czernik; Whitney Jablonski; Tyler L. Westover

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable transportation fuels from biomass have the potential to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions and diversify global fuel supplies. Thermal conversion by fast pyrolysis converts up to 75% of the starting plant material (and its energy content) to a bio-oil intermediate suitable for upgrading to motor fuel. Woody biomass, by far the most widely-used and researched material, is generally preferred in thermochemical processes due to its low ash content and high quality bio-oil produced. However, the availability and cost of biomass resources, e.g. forest residues, agricultural residues, or dedicated energy crops, vary greatly by region and will be key determinates in the overall economic feasibility of a pyrolysis-to-fuel process. Formulation or blending of various feedstocks, combined with thermal and/or chemical pretreatment, could facilitate a consistent, high-volume, lower-cost biomass supply to an emerging biofuels industry. However, the impact of biomass type and pretreatment conditions on bio-oil yield and quality, and the potential process implications, are not well understood. This literature review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the effect of feedstock and pretreatments on the yield, product distribution, and upgradability of bio-oil.

  6. This new system will allow researchers to much more rapidly screen large numbers of samples and identify the most promising biomass feedstocks for higher efficiency and lower cost bio-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of samples and identify the most promising biomass feedstocks for higher efficiency and lower cost bio- fuels conversion processes. NREL will be screening thousands of variants of different biomass feedstocks to link to develop the next generation of low-cost, easily convert- ible biomass feedstocks. To identify superior

  7. Bio-Oxo Technology

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    resources that is environmentally friendly with a reduced carbon footprint and at a cost competitive price will benefit all. 6 Easel commercialization approach Transition...

  8. Bio-CAT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Z. Zhong, L.D. Chapman, R. Fischetti, C.U. Segre, B.A. Bunker, and G.B. Bunker Harmonic selection by a bent Laue crystal C. Karanfil, L.D. Chapman, G.B. Bunker, C.U. Segre,...

  9. new Global Bio Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy97,1996Micro-XCTFast pandemic detection tool

  10. Bio2Nano

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More Like This Return to Searchfeedstock on

  11. Bio-Oxo Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The Big Green Bus rolled into Washington,Almost allEasel

  12. BioEnergy Blog

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | Department of Energy Big

  13. canon-bio.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ . :, ,. ., ,.,Measured9canfield

  14. Scientist Ambassadors Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearch BriefsTenney,ScienceScientificScientific

  15. MN Center for Renewable Energy: Cellulosic Ethanol, Optimization of Bio-fuels in Internal Combustion Engines, & Course Development for Technicians in These Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Frey

    2009-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report for Grant #DE-FG02-06ER64241, MN Center for Renewable Energy, will address the shared institutional work done by Minnesota State University, Mankato and Minnesota West Community and Technical College during the time period of July 1, 2006 to December 30, 2008. There was a no-cost extension request approved for the purpose of finalizing some of the work. The grant objectives broadly stated were to 1) develop educational curriculum to train technicians in wind and ethanol renewable energy, 2) determine the value of cattails as a biomass crop for production of cellulosic ethanol, and 3) research in Optimization of Bio-Fuels in Internal Combustion Engines. The funding for the MN Center for Renewable Energy was spent on specific projects related to the work of the Center.

  16. Required Fields in Bold and Underlined. *Definitions & values in Definitions section of the CVS Field Guide. EntryTool2.2.6 2008 Carolina Vegetation Survey. cvs.bio.unc.edu Form PLT45, ver 8.3 Plot Data: CVS Levels 4 & 5 page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peet, Robert K.

    Field Guide. EntryTool2.2.6 ©2008 Carolina Vegetation Survey. cvs.bio.unc.edu Form PLT45, ver 8.3 Plot of permanent posts Plot origin (0,0) point 2-10 module plot: PLOT DIAGRAM Fill in the template below (2Tool2.2.6 ©2008 Carolina Vegetation Survey. cvs.bio.unc.edu WATER page 2 of 2 Form PLT45, ver 8

  17. PLANTS AS BIO-MONITORS FOR 137CS, 238PU, 239, 240PU AND 40K AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, E.; Duff, M.; Ferguson, C.

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear fuel cycle generates a considerable amount of radioactive waste, which often includes nuclear fission products, such as strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) and cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), and actinides such as uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu). When released into the environment, large quantities of these radionuclides can present considerable problems to man and biota due to their radioactive nature and, in some cases as with the actinides, their chemical toxicity. Radionuclides are expected to decay at a known rate. Yet, research has shown the rate of elimination from an ecosystem to differ from the decay rate due to physical, chemical and biological processes that remove the contaminant or reduce its biological availability. Knowledge regarding the rate by which a contaminant is eliminated from an ecosystem (ecological half-life) is important for evaluating the duration and potential severity of risk. To better understand a contaminants impact on an environment, consideration should be given to plants. As primary producers, they represent an important mode of contamination transfer from sediments and soils into the food chain. Contaminants that are chemically and/or physically sequestered in a media are less likely to be bio-available to plants and therefore an ecosystem.

  18. RoundtableRoundtable www.biosciencemag.org December 2010 / Vol. 60 No. 11 BioScience 923

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarvis, Erich D.

    ARAh Cohen, ChARles F. delWiChe, ViCki Funk, hoPi e. hoekstRA, eRiCh d. JARVis, loRettA Johnson, MARk Q

  19. BioSAXS Sample Changer: a robotic sample changer for rapid and reliable high-throughput X-ray solution scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Round, Adam, E-mail: around@embl.fr; Felisaz, Franck [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes–EMBL–CNRS, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Fodinger, Lukas; Gobbo, Alexandre [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Huet, Julien [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes–EMBL–CNRS, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Villard, Cyril [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Blanchet, Clement E., E-mail: around@embl.fr [EMBL c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Pernot, Petra; McSweeney, Sean [ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); Roessle, Manfred; Svergun, Dmitri I. [EMBL c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Cipriani, Florent, E-mail: around@embl.fr [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes–EMBL–CNRS, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic sample changer for solution X-ray scattering experiments optimized for speed and to use the minimum amount of material has been developed. This system is now in routine use at three high-brilliance European synchrotron sites, each capable of several hundred measurements per day. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of macromolecules in solution is in increasing demand by an ever more diverse research community, both academic and industrial. To better serve user needs, and to allow automated and high-throughput operation, a sample changer (BioSAXS Sample Changer) that is able to perform unattended measurements of up to several hundred samples per day has been developed. The Sample Changer is able to handle and expose sample volumes of down to 5 µl with a measurement/cleaning cycle of under 1 min. The samples are stored in standard 96-well plates and the data are collected in a vacuum-mounted capillary with automated positioning of the solution in the X-ray beam. Fast and efficient capillary cleaning avoids cross-contamination and ensures reproducibility of the measurements. Independent temperature control for the well storage and for the measurement capillary allows the samples to be kept cool while still collecting data at physiological temperatures. The Sample Changer has been installed at three major third-generation synchrotrons: on the BM29 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the P12 beamline at the PETRA-III synchrotron (EMBL@PETRA-III) and the I22/B21 beamlines at Diamond Light Source, with the latter being the first commercial unit supplied by Bruker ASC.

  20. Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Molnár, István; Lopez, David; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Hackett, Jeremiah D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microalgae hold promise for yielding a biofuel feedstock that is sustainable, carbon-neutral, distributed, and only minimally disruptive for the production of food and feed by traditional agriculture. Amongst oleaginous eukaryotic algae, the B race of Botryococcus braunii is unique in that it produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons of terpenoid origin. These are comparable to fossil crude oil, and are sequestered outside the cells in a communal extracellular polymeric matrix material. Biosynthetic engineering of terpenoid bio-crude production requires identification of genes and reconstruction of metabolic pathways responsible for production of both hydrocarbons and other metabolites of the alga that competemore »for photosynthetic carbon and energy.« less

  1. Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Molnár, István [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Natural Products Center and Bio5 Institute; Lopez, David [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology; Wisecaver, Jennifer H. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Devarenne, Timothy P. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics; Weiss, Taylor L. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics; Pellegrini, Matteo [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology; Hackett, Jeremiah D. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Bio5 Institute and Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microalgae hold promise for yielding a biofuel feedstock that is sustainable, carbon-neutral, distributed, and only minimally disruptive for the production of food and feed by traditional agriculture. Amongst oleaginous eukaryotic algae, the B race of Botryococcus braunii is unique in that it produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons of terpenoid origin. These are comparable to fossil crude oil, and are sequestered outside the cells in a communal extracellular polymeric matrix material. Biosynthetic engineering of terpenoid bio-crude production requires identification of genes and reconstruction of metabolic pathways responsible for production of both hydrocarbons and other metabolites of the alga that compete for photosynthetic carbon and energy.

  2. Comments on: BioFuels and BioEnergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2Climate,CobaltColdin679April

  3. Hybrid bio-templated catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neltner, Brian (Brian Thomas)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For decades, ethanol has been in use as a fuel for the storage of solar energy in an energy-dense,liquid form. Over the last decade the ability to reform ethanol into hydrogen gas suitable for fuel cell use has drawn ...

  4. Bio-inspired fluid locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Brian, 1980-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed several novel methods of locomotion at low Reynolds number, for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids: Robosnails 1 and 2, which operate on a lubrication layer, and the three-link swimmer which moves ...

  5. Integrative Biosurveillance at Bio Symposium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    been conducting research for nearly nine months using data from Siaya, a small town in Kenya. This data is collected by a team of researchers led by Dr. Douglas J. Perkins,...

  6. Bio-inspired optical components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walish, Joseph John

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guiding electro-magnetic radiation is fundamental to optics. Lenses, mirrors, and photonic crystals all accomplish this task by different routes. Understanding the interaction of light with materials is fundamental to ...

  7. BioEnergy Supply Chain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec eget tincidunt massa, sed sagittis nisl. Nullam feugiat vehicula dignissim. Donec id diam eu justo aliquet luctus vitae id nulla....

  8. Bio-Inspired Energy Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Shoumen

    2010-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy policies based on empirical assumptions without a foundation in granular real-time data may be limited in scope. It may sputter ineffectively in its role as the engine of energy economics. For energy efficiency and ...

  9. Mill Designed Bio bleaching Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A key finding of this research program was that Laccase Mediator Systems (LMS) treatments on high-kappa kraft could be successfully accomplished providing substantial delignification (i.e., > 50%) without detrimental impact on viscosity and significantly improved yield properties. The efficiency of the LMS was evident since most of the lignin from the pulp was removed in less than one hour at 45 degrees C. Of the mediators investigated, violuric acid was the most effective vis-a-vis delignification. A comparative study between oxygen delignification and violuric acid revealed that under relatively mild conditions, a single or a double LMS{sub VA} treatment is comparable to a single or a double O stage. Of great notability was the retention of end viscosity of LMS{sub VA} treated pulps with respect to the end viscosity of oxygen treated pulps. These pulps could then be bleached to full brightness values employing conventional ECF bleaching technologies and the final pulp physical properties were equal and/or better than those bleached in a conventional ECF manner employing an aggressively O or OO stage initially. Spectral analyses of residual lignins isolated after LMS treated high-kappa kraft pulps revealed that similar to HBT, VA and NHA preferentially attack phenolic lignin moieties. In addition, a substantial decrease in aliphatic hydroxyl groups was also noted, suggesting side chain oxidation. In all cases, an increase in carboxylic acid was observed. Of notable importance was the different selectivity of NHA, VA and HBT towards lignin functional groups, despite the common N-OH moiety. C-5 condensed phenolic lignin groups were overall resistant to an LMS{sub NHA, HBT} treatments but to a lesser extent to an LMS{sub VA}. The inactiveness of these condensed lignin moieties was not observed when low-kappa kraft pulps were biobleached, suggesting that the LMS chemistry is influenced by the extent of delignification. We have also demonstrated that the current generation of laccase has a broad spectrum of operating parameters. Nonetheless, the development of future genetically engineered laccases with enhanced temperature, pH and redox potentials will dramatically improve the overall process. A second challenge for LMS bleaching technologies is the need to develop effective, catalytic mediators. From the literature we already know this is feasible since ABTS and some inorganic mediators are catalytic. Unfortunately, the mediators that exhibit catalytic properties do not exhibit significant delignification properties and this is a challenge for future research studies. Potential short-term mill application of laccase has been recently reported by Felby132 and Chandra133 as they have demonstrated that the physical properties of linerboard can be improved when exposed to laccase without a chemical mediator. In addition, xxx has shown that the addition of laccase to the whitewater of the paper machine has several benefits for the removal of colloidal materials. Finally, this research program has presented important features on the delignification chemistry of LMS{sub NHA} and LMS{sub VA} that, in the opinion of the author, are momentous contributions to the overall LMS chemistry/biochemistry knowledge base which will continue to have future benefits.

  10. BioFuels Atlas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation for biennial merit review of Biofuels Atlas, a first-pass visualization tool that allows users to explore the potential of biomass-to-biofuels conversions at various locations and scales.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Contacts & Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels Biofuels Publications Biochemical Conversion Program Lignocellulosic Biomass Microalgae Thermochemical Conversion Sign up for our E-Newsletter Required.gif?3.21 Email...

  12. bio | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind GeneratingZhongshengZiboZongshenask queries HomeRFPs

  13. ARM - User Executive Committee Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisalaAlaskaInstrumentsEnvironmental ImpactsPastTreeARMUser

  14. OpenEI Community - bio

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff thedrivingGiven

  15. INEOS Bio | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9MoatEnergyElectricityUSING REMOTEINEOS

  16. Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T ADRAFT

  17. Tecmed Bio | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern ILSunseekerTallahatchie

  18. Integrative Biosurveillance at Bio Symposium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other NewsSpin andInterim DataCoolingscientist discusses

  19. BioChem Cover story

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterial Science |Materials Center atLSU

  20. BioConstructs : methods for bio-inspired and bio-fabricated design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zolotovsky, Katia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents experimentation with design and fabrication methods, using biological systems either indirectly (as a source of inspiration and information for design) or directly (as a material production for fabrication). ...

  1. Plant-based Food and Feed Protein Structure Changes Induced by Gene-transformation heating and bio-ethanol processing: A Synchrotron-based Molecular Structure and Nutrition Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P Yu

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike traditional 'wet' analytical methods which during processing for analysis often result in destruction or alteration of the intrinsic protein structures, advanced synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy has been developed as a rapid and nondestructive and bioanalytical technique. This cutting-edge synchrotron-based bioanalytical technology, taking advantages of synchrotron light brightness (million times brighter than sun), is capable of exploring the molecular chemistry or structure of a biological tissue without destruction inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions. In this article, a novel approach is introduced to show the potential of the advanced synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to study plant-based food or feed protein molecular structure in relation to nutrient utilization and availability. Recent progress was reported on using synchrotron-based bioanalytical technique synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and diffused reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy to detect the effects of gene-transformation (Application 1), autoclaving (Application 2), and bio-ethanol processing (Application 3) on plant-based food and feed protein structure changes on a molecular basis. The synchrotron-based technology provides a new approach for plant-based protein structure research at ultra-spatial resolutions at cellular and molecular levels.

  2. Green Energy: Advancing Bio-Hydrogen (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alber, D.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a model of metabolism linked to H2 production in green algae. Develop tools for parameter discovery and optimization at organism level and advance knowledge of hydrogen-producting photosynthetic organisms.

  3. National Bio-fuel Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jezierski, Kelly

    2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Biofuel Energy Laboratory or NBEL was a consortia consisting of non-profits, universities, industry, and OEM’s. NextEnergy Center (NEC) in Detroit, Michigan was the prime with Wayne State University as the primary subcontractor. Other partners included: Art Van Furniture; Biodiesel Industries Inc. (BDI); Bosch; Clean Emission Fluids (CEF); Delphi; Oakland University; U.S. TARDEC (The Army); and later Cummins Bridgeway. The program was awarded to NextEnergy by U.S. DOE-NREL on July 1, 2005. The period of performance was about five (5) years, ending June 30, 2010. This program was executed in two phases: 1.Phase I focused on bench-scale R&D and performance-property-relationships. 2.Phase II expanded those efforts into further engine testing, emissions testing, and on-road fleet testing of biodiesel using additional types of feedstock (i.e., corn, and choice white grease based). NextEnergy – a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization based in Detroit was originally awarded a $1.9 million grant from the U.S. Dept. of Energy for Phase I of the NBEL program. A few years later, NextEnergy and its partners received an additional $1.9MM in DOE funding to complete Phase II. The NBEL funding was completely exhausted by the program end date of June 30, 2010 and the cost share commitment of 20% minimum has been exceeded nearly two times over. As a result of the work performed by the NBEL consortia, the following successes were realized: 1.Over one hundred publications and presentations have been delivered by the NBEL consortia, including but not limited to: R&D efforts on algae-based biodiesel, novel heterogeneous catalysis, biodiesel properties from a vast array of feedstock blends, cold flow properties, engine testing results (several Society of Automotive Engineers [SAE] papers have been published on this research), emissions testing results, and market quality survey results. 2.One new spinoff company (NextCAT) was formed by two WSU Chemical Engineering professors and another co-founder, based on a novel heterogeneous catalyst that may be retrofitted into idled biodiesel manufacturing facilities to restart production at a greatly reduced cost. 3.Three patents have been filed by WSU and granted based on the NextCAT focus. 4.The next-generation advanced biodiesel dispensing unit (CEF F.A.S.T. unit version 2) was developed by Clean Emission Fluids (CEF). 5.NBEL aided in the preparing a sound technical basis for setting an ASTM B20 standard: ASTM Standard D7467-08 was passed in June of 2008 and officially published on October of 2008. 6.NBEL has helped to understand composition-property-performance relationships, from not only a laboratory and field testing scale, for biodiesel blends from a spectrum of feedstocks. 7.NBEL helped propel the development of biodiesel with improved performance, cetane numbers, cold flow properties, and oxidative stability. 8.Data for over 30,000 miles has been logged for the fleet testing that select members of the consortia participated in. There were five vehicles that participated in the fleet testing. Art Van provided two vehicles, one that remained idle for most of the time and one that was used often for commercial furniture deliveries, Oakland University provided one vehicle, NEC provided one vehicle, and The Night Move provided one vehicle. These vehicles were light to medium duty (2.0 to 6.6 L displacement), used B5 or B20 blends from multiple sources of feedstock (corn-, choice white grease-, and soybean-based blends) and sources (NextDiesel, BDI, or Wacker Oil), experienced a broad range in ambient temperatures (from -9 °F in Michigan winters to 93 °F in the summertime), and both city and highway driving conditions.

  4. BMC Medicine BioMed Central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William Hamilton; Robert Lancashire; Debbie Sharp; Tim J Peters; Tom Marshall

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research article The risk of colorectal cancer with symptoms at different ages and between the sexes: a case-control study

  5. BioMed Central Open Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (LCL) gene expression in subjects with schizophrenia compared to non-psychotic relatives. Methods: LCLs of five genes found to be altered by diagnosis and glucose deprivation in LCLs and found a significant in LCLs (p = 0.0001), DLPFC (p = 0.007), and anterior cingulate cortex (p = 0.002). Conclusion

  6. Challenges in Bio-Inspired Membranes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Jun Lin (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PNNL) for the Membrane Technology Workshop held July 24, 2012

  7. Developing the New Bio-economy Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Daniel Cassidy, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, presents on developing the new bioeconomy workforce for the Biomass/Clean Cities States Webinar.

  8. Tough, bio-inspired hybrid materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munch, Etienne

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties comparable with that of metallic aluminum alloys.comparable to aluminum alloys. These model materials can beof engineering (metallic) aluminum alloys (Fig. 6B) and

  9. BioCat 2.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Courtney D.; Noonan, Christine F.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Franklin, Trisha L.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Lancaster, Mary J.; Madison, Michael C.; Piatt, Andrew W.

    2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) National Biosurveillance Integration Center (NBIC) was established in 2008 with a primary mission to “(1) enhance the capability of the Federal Government to (A) rapidly identify, characterize, localize, and track a biological event of national concern by integrating and analyzing data relating to human health, animal, plant, food, and environmental monitoring systems (both national and international); and (B) disseminate alerts and other information to Member Agencies and, in coordination with (and where possible through) Member Agencies, to agencies of State, local, and tribal governments, as appropriate, to enhance the ability of such agencies to respond to a biological event of national concern; and (2) oversee development and operation of the National Biosurveillance Integration System (NBIS).” Inherent in its mission then and the broader NBIS, NBIC is concerned with the identification, understanding, and use of a variety of biosurveillance models and systems. The goal of this project is to characterize, evaluate, classify, and catalog existing disease forecast and prediction models that could provide operational decision support for recognizing a biological event having a potentially significant impact. Additionally, gaps should be identified and recommendations made on using disease models in an operational environment to support real-time decision making.

  10. PVD Instructions BioMEMS Laboratory Cleanroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahn, Jeffrey

    for pressures less than ~1x10-5 Torr. The filament ion gauge is NEVER to be turned on when the chamber Engineering * Chamber should be under vacuum, with turbo and roughing pumps OFF, when not in use 1. Turn in the room to re-pressurize the chamber (>800 Torr) 4. Take out platen and load substrates onto it. Place

  11. BioEnergy Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department's Bioenergy Technologies Office engages with the U.S. Department of Agriculture on many projects, including guidance on the proper removal of corn stover...

  12. Tough, bio-inspired hybrid materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munch, Etienne

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Magonov, B. Ozturk, Nature Materials 2, 413 (Jun, L. J.Ager, R. O. Ritchie, Nature Materials 7, 672 (Aug, 2008). A.Guiden, Journal of Composite Materials D. R. Johnson, X. F.

  13. Three Essays on Bio-security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Qi

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    to determine the polynomial de- gree r. Table 2 summarizes the estimation results for that parameter and shows fits obtained via AICc and BIC for r values from 1 to 3. Table 2 shows that r = 3 with minimum AICc, and BIC exhibits significantly better fit than... to determine the polynomial de- gree r. Table 3 summarizes the estimation results for that parameter and shows fits obtained via AICc and BIC for r values from 1 to 3. Table 3 shows that r = 3 with minimum AICc, and that BIC exhibits significantly better fit...

  14. 4, 15851631, 2007 Bio-optical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to study the ocean's biogeochemistry, but most of these models use simple formulations to describe light penetration and spectral quality. Given that processes such as photosynthesis and photo-oxidation are uniquely important for biogeochemical processes in the upper ocean, it is necessary to5 model light distribution

  15. Think Outside the Bio-Box

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiley, H. S.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After listening to my friends for many years (and reading numerous online comments in The Scientist), I was surprised that being a biologist was considered a low stress job with a bright future. Grousing about our jobs has always been a favorite pastime for biologists, but I suspect that in our hearts, we know how good we really have it. Even though research funding is tight and faculty positions are scarce, biologists still have one of the most interesting and exciting jobs around. I certainly don’t think that our current situation is worse than in the past. The real reason why the job outlook in biology seems dim is that research professors are training students to be university research scientists instead of preparing them for the broader job market. The result is that many new PhDs are frustrated to find that the specific positions they are trained for either don’t exist or have 300 applicants.

  16. Tough, bio-inspired hybrid materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munch, Etienne

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hybrid materials are an order of magnitude higher than standard hot-pressed homogeneous nanocomposites

  17. Human Behaviour BIO3176 -University of Ottawa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    vs Resources 0 1 2 Men Women beauty resources 37 cultures Buss 1989 Behav Brain Sci 12: 1-49 Beauty Kenrick et al 1990 J Perso 58: 97-116 17 Sexual Differences Buss & Schimdt 1993 Psych Rev 100: 204-232 18 #12;Sexual Differences Buss & Schimdt 1993 Psych Rev 100: 204-232 19 Bridewealth Father will receive

  18. Bio-Heating Oil Tax Credit (Personal)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maryland allows individuals and corporations to take an income tax credit of $0.03/gallon for purchases of biodiesel used for space heating or water heating. The maximum credit is $500 per year. It...

  19. Short Bio Nora Noffke Professional Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noffke, Nora

    . Geology & Paleontology Area: Paleontology, Sedimentology, Geobiology Inclusive Data: 1998 ­ 1999, Biology, Sedimentology Inclusive Data: 2000-2001 Appointments 2009 - present Visiting Scholar, Carnegie

  20. Microsoft Word - Glaubach-bio.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC:8CO6 Figure Fuel3S FINAL8 1Biograp Uwe

  1. Microsoft Word - Lazerson abstract-bio.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE LMI-EFRC Kick-Off Meeting

  2. EcoBio Carbon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrictInformationEau ClaireEcoEco

  3. Gem BioFuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFifeGEXAGarnet VRX sro JumpGayatri SugarsGeermuGehraGem

  4. HIA ZERH Judge Bios | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopmentHEADQUARTERS MEDIATION PROGRAMForm 4220.2HI'sMeet

  5. Speaker Bios: Carol Battershell | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepositoryManagement |Solar EnergySouth

  6. Wattman_bio.pdf | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  7. Speaker Bios: Carol Battershell | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  8. Agra Bio Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Microsoft Word - panel members bios.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the National 93-4 AcquisitionO 231.1B Chg 1CAROL BATTERSHELL

  10. Microsoft Word - panel members bios.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  11. Microsoft Word - panel members bios.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the National 93-4 AcquisitionO 231.1B Chg 1CAROLMATTHEW

  12. Prime BioSolutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. Speaker Bios: Lachlan Seward | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  14. Kent BioEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  15. Huangchuan Hongqiao Bio Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  16. Bio-Benefits Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  17. BioEnergy Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  18. Challenges in Bio-Inspired Membranes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof EnergyAdministration-Desertof Energy0 ChairsDepartmentCHALLENGES IN

  19. HR BioPetroleum | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open EnergyGuntersville ElectricControlon State -HDOT FormsHMDCHR

  20. Southeast BioDiesel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,