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Sample records for degas blu ff

  1. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 20082008707 1OAK GROVE C OAL D

  2. DEGAS 2 Verification Test with Fluid Neutral Momentum Transport Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budny, Robert

    DEGAS 2 Verification Test with Fluid Neutral Momentum Transport Reference Problem D. P. Stotler, PPPL 1 Background The "Fluid Neutral Momentum Transport Reference Problem" [1] was used to verify the original DEGAS [2] Monte Carlo neutral transport code. The resulting benchmark was subsequently employed

  3. Systematic characterization of degas-driven flow for poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, David Y. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States) Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center; Tentori, Augusto M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States) Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center; Dimov, Ivan K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States) Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center; Univ. de Valapariso, Valapariso (Chile); Lee, Luke P. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States) Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center

    2011-01-01

    Degas-driven flow is a novel phenomenon used to propel fluids in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices without requiring any external power. This method takes advantage of the inherently high porosity and air solubility of PDMS by removing air molecules from the bulk PDMS before initiating the flow. The dynamics of degas-driven flow are dependent on the channel and device geometries and are highly sensitive to temporal parameters. These dependencies have not been fully characterized, hindering broad use of degas-driven flow as a microfluidic pumping mechanism. Here, we characterize, for the first time, the effect of various parameters on the dynamics of degas-driven flow, including channel geometry, PDMS thickness, PDMS exposure area, vacuum degassing time, and idle time at atmospheric pressure before loading. We investigate the effect of these parameters on flow velocity as well as channel fill time for the degas-driven flow process. Using our devices, we achieved reproducible flow with a standard deviation of less than 8% for flow velocity, as well as maximum flow rates of up to 3 nL/s and mean flow rates of approximately 1-1.5 nL/s. Parameters such as channel surface area and PDMS chip exposure area were found to have negligible impact on degas-driven flow dynamics, whereas channel cross-sectional area, degas time, PDMS thickness, and idle time were found to have a larger impact. In addition, we develop a physical model that can predict mean flow velocities within 6% of experimental values and can be used as a tool for future design of PDMS-based microfluidic devices that utilize degas-driven flow.

  4. Systematic characterization of degas-driven flow for poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Luke P.; Liang, David Y.; Tentori, Augusto M.; Dimov, Ivan K. [Universidad de Valparaiso (Chile)

    2011-06-02

    Degas-driven flow is a novel phenomenon used to propel fluids in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices without requiring any external power. This method takes advantage of the inherently high porosity and air solubility of PDMS by removing air molecules from the bulk PDMS before initiating the flow. The dynamics of degas-driven flow are dependent on the channel and device geometries and are highly sensitive to temporal parameters. These dependencies have not been fully characterized, hindering broad use of degas-driven flow as a microfluidic pumping mechanism. Here, we characterize, for the first time, the effect of various parameters on the dynamics of degas-driven flow, including channel geometry, PDMS thickness, PDMS exposure area, vacuum degassing time, and idle time at atmospheric pressure before loading. We investigate the effect of these parameters on flow velocity as well as channel fill time for the degas-driven flow process. Using our devices, we achieved reproducible flow with a standard deviation of less than 8% for flow velocity, as well as maximum flow rates of up to 3 nL/s and mean flow rates of approximately 1-1.5 nL/s. Parameters such as channel surface area and PDMS chip exposure area were found to have negligible impact on degas-driven flow dynamics, whereas channel cross-sectional area, degas time, PDMS thickness, and idle time were found to have a larger impact. In addition, we develop a physical model that can predict mean flow velocities within 6% of experimental values and can be used as a tool for future design of PDMS-based microfluidic devices that utilize degas-driven flow.

  5. Systematic characterization of degas-driven flow for poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, David Y.; Tentori, Augusto M.; Dimov, Ivan K.; Lee, Luke P.

    2011-01-01

    Degas-driven flow is a novel phenomenon used to propel fluids in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices without requiring any external power. This method takes advantage of the inherently high porosity and air solubility of PDMS by removing air molecules from the bulk PDMS before initiating the flow. The dynamics of degas-driven flow are dependent on the channel and device geometries and are highly sensitive to temporal parameters. These dependencies have not been fully characterized, hindering broad use of degas-driven flow as a microfluidic pumping mechanism. Here, we characterize, for the first time, the effect of various parameters on the dynamics ofmore »degas-driven flow, including channel geometry, PDMS thickness, PDMS exposure area, vacuum degassing time, and idle time at atmospheric pressure before loading. We investigate the effect of these parameters on flow velocity as well as channel fill time for the degas-driven flow process. Using our devices, we achieved reproducible flow with a standard deviation of less than 8% for flow velocity, as well as maximum flow rates of up to 3 nL/s and mean flow rates of approximately 1-1.5 nL/s. Parameters such as channel surface area and PDMS chip exposure area were found to have negligible impact on degas-driven flow dynamics, whereas channel cross-sectional area, degas time, PDMS thickness, and idle time were found to have a larger impact. In addition, we develop a physical model that can predict mean flow velocities within 6% of experimental values and can be used as a tool for future design of PDMS-based microfluidic devices that utilize degas-driven flow.« less

  6. ANL-FF-262i

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    , v-W&, ANL-FF-262i This document consists of 1 page, No.>f 7 copies. SeriesA. -,-- 22 February 1952 TO; B. Blumenthal Metallurgy From: H, Luetzow Metallurgy Re: HIGH PURITY...

  7. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, B.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Leblanc, B.

    2012-10-27

    Gas-Puff-Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge D? light emission from a neutral D2 gas puff nears the outer mid-plane of NSTX. DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and atomic physics in tokamak plasmas. In this paper we compare measurements of the D? light emission obtained by GPI on NSTX with DEGAS 2 simulations of D? light emission for specific experiments. Both the simulated spatial distribution and absolute intensity of the D? light emission agree well with the experimental data obtained between ELMs in H-mode.

  8. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, B.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Leblanc, B.

    2012-11-08

    Gas-Puff-Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge D? light emission from a neutral D2 gas puff nears the outer mid-plane of NSTX. DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and atomic physics in tokamak plasmas. In this paper we compare measurements of the D? light emission obtained by GPI on NSTX with DEGAS 2 simulations of D? light emission for specific experiments. Both the simulated spatial distribution and absolute intensity of the D? light emission agree well with the experimental data obtained between ELMs in H-mode. __________________________________________________

  9. DEGAS 2 Daren Stotler and Charles Karney | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost Ground8 Gas Hydrate12/21/2012 Ref:DEGAS 2 Daren

  10. Summary of Degas II performance at the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudeen, David K.; Lord, David L.

    2007-10-01

    Crude oil stored at the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) requires mitigation procedures to maintain oil vapor pressure within program delivery standards. Crude oil degasification is one effective method for lowering crude oil vapor pressure, and was implemented at the Big Hill SPR site from 2004-2006. Performance monitoring during and after degasification revealed a range of outcomes for caverns that had similar inventory and geometry. This report analyzed data from SPR degasification and developed a simple degas mixing (SDM) model to assist in the analysis. Cavern-scale oil mixing during degassing and existing oil heterogeneity in the caverns were identified as likely causes for the range of behaviors seen. Apparent cavern mixing patterns ranged from near complete mixing to near plug flow, with more mixing leading to less efficient degassing due to degassed oil re-entering the plant before 100% of the cavern oil volume was processed. The report suggests that the new cavern bubble point and vapor pressure regain rate after degassing be based on direct in-cavern measurements after degassing as opposed to using the plant outlet stream properties as a starting point, which understates starting bubble point and overstates vapor pressure regain. Several means to estimate the cavern bubble point after degas in the absence of direct measurement are presented and discussed.

  11. RANDOM REALS AND !1 ! (!1, (ff : ff))2 J. TATCH MOORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Justin Tatch

    Abstract. The purpose of this note will be to extend the results of J. Barnett and S. Todor. 1. Introduction The focus of this note is to extend J. Barnett's result in [2] that !1 ! (!1 to a model of MA @1. Also, in [1] Barnett has shown that the stronger partition relation !1 ! (!1, (ff : !1

  12. @h|i* _i A iLhi _ 5}?@* Vi?_hi_ e @h* 2ff c f ff2 ff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    @h|i* _i A iLhi _ 5}?@* Vi?_hi_ e @h* 2ff#12;c f ff2 ff @h|i* t@?t _LU 4i?|t EN?i ui **i e hi| it| *hi _ Thi4ih Lh_hi _i uL?U|L? _i |h@?tuih| MEs ' @n2Zs E@iU @ : f @||@^ i T@h ? t}?@* %E| ' rE| n KE|c L KE| it| ? Mh | M*@?U t|@|L??@hi

  13. @h|i* _i A iLhi _ 5}?@* Vi?_hi_ 22 4@ht 2ff2c f ff2 ff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    @h|i* _i A iLhi _ 5}?@* Vi?_hi_ 22 4@ht 2ff2c f ff2 ff @h|i* t@?t _LU 4i?|t EN?i ui **i e hiU|L ihtL it| @ |Lhtii , ihUUi 5L| fE| ? Mh | M*@?U t|@|L??@hi _i _i?t|i tTiU|h@*i rfEs ' Çf 2 @||@^ @?| *i t; ,? t TTLt@?| sf :: {s i| i? hi4@h^ @?| ^ i t EA @ *@ uLh4i _

  14. Mesquite Solar Plan - build out next to existing FF plants Solar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mesquite Solar Plan - build out next to existing FF plants Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Mesquite Solar Plan - build out next to existing FF plants Solar Power...

  15. ff & Depart ff Advances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    of t should be Two ledge where cu budget ho The line m sent to the receive yo The adva will contac mental Cas

  16. Chapter Summary: Thin Liquid Wall Concepts and the CLiFF Design The idea behind CLiFF, the Convective Liquid Flow First-Wall concept, is to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    . Design Description The majority of the work reported here was carried out for the tokamak. Specifically in Figure 7-1, is conceptually simple in its implementation. A thin fast liquid layer is injected near7-1 Chapter Summary: Thin Liquid Wall Concepts and the CLiFF Design The idea behind CLi

  17. Summary of remedial investigations at the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches (316-3), 300-FF-2 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulstrom, L.C.

    1994-06-30

    Remedial investigations at the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches (316-3) in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site were conducted as part of the 300-FF-1 operable unit Phase 1 remedial investigation (RI) in accordance with the approved RI work plan. During the RI, the southwestern boundary of the 300-FF-1 operable unit was modified by all signatories to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, which shifted the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches to the 300-FF-3 operable unit. As a consequence, the RI results from these waste management units were not included in the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation Report for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. As a results of recent Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the 300-FF-2 operable unit now consists of the remaining 300 Area operable units within the 300 Area National Priorities List (NPL), which includes the former 300-FF-3 operable unit. Therefore, this document summarizes the RI results from the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches in the 300-FF-2 operable unit. Analysis and evaluation of these results well be included in the 300-FF-2 RI report.

  18. Adaptive Accelerated ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics with Validation from Simulating Hydrogen Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Adaptive Accelerated ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics with Validation from Simulating Hydrogen Combustion concept (BB), which we validate here for describing hydrogen combustion. The bond order, undercoordination determined the detailed sequence of reactions for hydrogen combustion with and without the BB. We validate

  19. Was SN1997ff at z~1.7 magnified by gravitational lensing?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geraint F. Lewis; Rodrigo A. Ibata

    2001-04-25

    The quest for the cosmological parameters has come to fruition with the identification of a number of supernovae at a redshift of $z\\sim1$. Analyses of the brightness of these standard candles reveal that the Universe is dominated by a large cosmological constant. The recent identification of the $z\\sim1.7$ SN1997ff in the northern Hubble Deep Field has provided further evidence for this cosmology. Here we examine the case for gravitational lensing of SN1997ff due to the presence of galaxies lying along our line of sight. We find that, while the alignment of SN1997ff with foreground masses was not favorable for it to be multiply imaged and strongly magnified, two galaxies did lie close enough to result in significant magnification: $\\mu\\sim1.4$ for the case where these elliptical galaxies have velocity dispersion $200 {\\rm km/s}$. Given the small difference between supernova brightnesses in different cosmologies, detailed modeling of the gravitational lensing properties of the intervening matter is therefore required before the true cosmological significance of SN1997ff can be deduced.

  20. ReaxFF: A Reactive Force Field for Hydrocarbons Adri C. T. van Duin,,| Siddharth Dasgupta, Francois Lorant, and William A. Goddard III*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    ReaxFF: A Reactive Force Field for Hydrocarbons Adri C. T. van Duin,,| Siddharth Dasgupta, Francois constant as Rij f 0. We report here the ReaxFF for hydrocarbons. The parameters were derived from quantum and geometry data for a number of stable hydrocarbon compounds. We find that the ReaxFF provides a good

  1. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. D. Ludowise; K. L. Vialetti

    2008-05-12

    This report provides the final hazard categorization for the remediation of six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Burial Grounds, the 618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 sites.

  2. The shortest time and/or the shortest path strategies in a CA FF pedestrian dynamics model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekaterina Kirik; Tat'yana Yurgel'yan; Dmitriy Krouglov

    2009-06-23

    This paper deals with a mathematical model of a pedestrian movement. A stochastic cellular automata (CA) approach is used here. The Floor Field (FF) model is a basis model. FF models imply that virtual people follow the shortest path strategy. But people are followed by a strategy of the shortest time as well. This paper is focused on how to mathematically formalize and implement to a model these features of the pedestrian movement. Some results of a simulation are presented.

  3. Phase 1 and 2 feasibility study report for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The 300-FF-1 Operable Unit (OU) feasibility study (FS) presented in this document completes the FS process only through the first two study phases: Phase I, Remedial Alternatives Development, and Phase II, Remedial Alternatives Screening in accordance with CERCIA guidance for performing Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies (RI/FS) (EPA 1988a). This Phase I/II study provides a generalized view of workable remedial technologies as applied to the site contamination problems as a whole. Phase III, Detailed Analysis of Alternatives, will be performed at a later date to further evaluate screened alternatives based on the nine criteria in the CERCLA RI/FS guidance. The purpose of this Phase I/II FS is to develop and screen a range of alternatives for remediation of contamination present in the vadose zone of the 300-FF-1 OU. The scope of work for this Phase I/II FS includes five primary tasks: 1. Review existing documents and their associated data from relevant investigations and studies; 2. Establish remedial action objectives (RAO) and general response actions (GRA); 3. Identify applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARS) pertinent to all general response actions (including waste disposal); 4. Develop remedial alternatives (Phase I) applicable to the 300-FF-1 OU including identification and screening of technologies and process options, and assembly of remedial alternatives from representative technology types; 5. Screen alternatives (Phase II) developed in Phase I for implementability, effectiveness, and cost to identify those alternatives which warrant advancement to the detailed analysis phase (Phase III) of the FS.

  4. The Early Universe $f^{2}FF$ Model of Primordial Magnetic Field in Natural Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AlMuhammad, Anwar S

    2015-01-01

    We study the simple gauge invariant model ${f^2}FF$ as a way to generate primordial magnetic fields (PMF) in Natural Inflation (NI). We compute both magnetic and electric spectra generated by the ${f^2}FF$ model in NI for different values of model parameters and find that both de Sitter and power law expansion lead to the same results at sufficiently large number of e-foldings. We also find that the necessary scale invariance property of the PMF cannot be obtained in NI in first order of slow roll limits under the constraint of inflationary potential, $V\\left( 0 \\right) \\simeq 0$. Furthermore, if this constraint is relaxed to achieve scale invariance, then the model suffers from the backreaction problem for almost all values of model parameters. We show that there is a narrow range of the height of the potential $\\Lambda $ around ${\\Lambda _{\\min }} \\approx 0.00874{M_{{\\rm{Pl}}}}$ and of the co-moving wave number $k$ around ${k_{\\min }} \\sim 0.0173{\\rm{Mp}}{{\\rm{c}}^{ - 1}}$, at which the problem of backreact...

  5. The Early Universe $f^{2}FF$ Model of Primordial Magnetic Field in Natural Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anwar S AlMuhammad; Rafael Lopez-Mobilia

    2015-05-18

    We study the simple gauge invariant model ${f^2}FF$ as a way to generate primordial magnetic fields (PMF) in Natural Inflation (NI). We compute both magnetic and electric spectra generated by the ${f^2}FF$ model in NI for different values of model parameters and find that both de Sitter and power law expansion lead to the same results at sufficiently large number of e-foldings. We also find that the necessary scale invariance property of the PMF cannot be obtained in NI in first order of slow roll limits under the constraint of inflationary potential, $V\\left( 0 \\right) \\simeq 0$. Furthermore, if this constraint is relaxed to achieve scale invariance, then the model suffers from the backreaction problem for almost all values of model parameters. We show that there is a narrow range of the height of the potential $\\Lambda $ around ${\\Lambda _{\\min }} \\approx 0.00874{M_{{\\rm{Pl}}}}$ and of the co-moving wave number $k$ around ${k_{\\min }} \\sim 0.0173{\\rm{Mp}}{{\\rm{c}}^{ - 1}}$, at which the problem of backreaction might be avoided. The value of ${\\Lambda _{\\min }}$ lies within the range of $\\Lambda $ compatible with the BICEP2 results, and the range of $k$ lies within some the observable scale. However, the relatively short range of $k$ presents a serious challenge to the viability of this model.

  6. Report on geological surveys in the 300-FF-1 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandness, G.A.

    1991-03-01

    This report describes a set of geophysical surveys performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory at selected locations within the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit at Hanford. Field work and preliminary data processing activities were initiated in September 1989. These actions were terminated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company before completion in December 1989. Work was reinitiated in October 1990, to complete the processing of the data that had already been collected and to report the results. Because the field work was only partially completed, the task objectives, as presented in the Statement of Work, could not be fully met. This report is, therefore, a progress report covering the work performed through December 11, 1989. This task involved (1) ground-penetrating radar surveys of the 618-4 and 618-5 Burial Grounds, and (2) ground-penetrating radar and electromagnetic induction surveys along the assumed routes of the abandoned process sewers and radioactive liquid waste sewers in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. The surveys in the burial grounds were intended to identify burial trenches and pits, to determine the depth of fill, and to locate waste materials, including any that might be outside the perimeter fences. The surveys along the sewer routes were intended, first, to confirm the locations of the sewers as shown on existing maps or to otherwise accurately determine their locations, and second, to attempt to identify locations of possible leaks. 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. ReaxFF Reactive Force Field for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems with Application to Oxygen Ion Transport in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    ReaxFF Reactive Force Field for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems with Application to Oxygen Ion through yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) membranes. All parameters for Reax and cluster systems. We validated the use of ReaxFF for fuel cell applications by using it in molecular

  8. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. D. Ludowise

    2006-12-12

    This report provides the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of six solid waste disposal sites (referred to as burial grounds) located in the 300-FF-2 Operable Unit (OU) on the Hanford Site. These six sites (618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 Burial Grounds) were determined to have a total radionuclide inventory (WCH 2005a, WCH 2005d, WCH 2005e and WCH 2006b) that exceeds the DOE-STD-1027 Category 3 threshold quantity (DOE 1997) and are the subject of this analysis. This FHC document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the FHC and commitments for the 300-FF-2 Burial Grounds Remediation Project.

  9. ReaxFF Reactive Force Field for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hydrocarbon Kimberly Chenoweth, Adri C. T. van Duin, and William A. Goddard, III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    MoOx heterogeneous cata- lysts,22 fuel cells,23 crack propagation in silicon crystals,24 dissociation of H2 on Pt additional transition states and chemical reactivity of systems relevant to these reactions and optimizedFF potential obtained after parameter optimization, we performed a range of NVT-MD simulations on various

  10. BBIIOOLLOOGGYY SSEEMMIINNAARR AAFF FF II LL II AA TT EE AAPP PP OO II NN TT MM EE NN TT LLEE CC TT UU RR EE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    BBIIOOLLOOGGYY SSEEMMIINNAARR AAFF FF II LL II AA TT EE AAPP PP OO II NN TT MM EE NN TT LLEE CC TT UU RR EE 44::0000 PPMM SSEE MM II NNAA RR PPHH YY SSII CCSS //AASS TTRR OONN OO MM YY AAUU DD .. AA

  11. Development of the ReaxFF reactive force field for mechanistic studies of catalytic selective oxidation processes on BiMoOx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Duin, Adri

    our mechanistic understanding of catalytic hydrocarbon oxidation sufficiently to suggest modificationsDevelopment of the ReaxFF reactive force field for mechanistic studies of catalytic selective oxidation processes on BiMoOx William A. Goddard III*, Adri van Duin, Kimberly Chenoweth, Mu-Jeng Cheng

  12. i i h i ffMeasures to mitigate the Negative Effects of Complex Hydropower Schemes on River Systemsp y p y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenstra, Arjen K.

    i i h i ffMeasures to mitigate the Negative Effects of Complex Hydropower Schemes on River Systemsp Temperature pp High-head storage hydropower Temperature Temperature Modelling plants in Alpine areas are able mental conditions downstream of hydropower schemes taken into account for producing the dominant

  13. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  14. Radiation Characterization Summary: ACRR Central Cavity Free-Field Environment with the 32-Inch Pedestal at the Core Centerline (ACRR-FF-CC-32-cl).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Lippert, Lance L.; Vehar, David W.; Griffin, Patrick J.

    2015-08-01

    This document presents the facilit y - recommended characteri zation o f the neutron, prompt gamma - ray, and delayed gamma - ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor ( ACRR ) for the cen tral cavity free - field environment with the 32 - inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environmen t is ACRR - FF - CC - 32 - cl. The neutron, prompt gamma - ray , and delayed gamma - ray energy spectra , uncertainties, and covariance matrices are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma - ray fluence profiles within the experiment area of the cavity . Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse operations are presented with conversion examples . Acknowledgements The authors wish to th ank the Annular Core Research Reactor staff and the Radiation Metrology Laboratory staff for their support of this work . Also thanks to David Ames for his assistance in running MCNP on the Sandia parallel machines.

  15. ANL-FF-262i

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval Ordnance,:n5.5.8GE

  16. vanDuin_ReaxFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXu Named|Got Solitons?scriptEnv -MediasupercomputersR4

  17. BiL4i|h@ EtU@ Q b @h3L 2ff L? 4i?L _ SD T?| t _ii hTi|ihi *L tUh||Lc |h@ SD i H t ghyh u@hi *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catenacci, Roberto

    BiL4i|h@ EtU@ Q b @h3L 2ff L? 4i?L _ SD T?| t _ii hTi|ihi *L tUh||Lc |h@ SD i H t ghyh u@hi *@*ic tLTh@ H t sxr u@hi *Ec fc i ~ ' Efc c f n |Ec fc f n rEfc fc E@ AhL@hi ?@ hi||@ o T@tt@?|i Tih *

  18. FF CADDCAP_FR1.book

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    contamination are not cost effective. Second, because of the high remediation costs, closure in place with monitoring and institutional controls is the only likely...

  19. O10'I'uf^^ff%

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 the RFSOG AppendixJNaturita,O

  20. BiL4i|h@ EW?uLh4@|U@ Q 2 ti||i4Mhi 2ff2 +ULh_L *i hi}L*i _i* }LULG tL||L . T?| t _ii hTi|ihi *L tUh||LcUL? . i H t CDOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catenacci, Roberto

    BiL4i|h@ EW?uLh4@|U@ Q 2#12; ti||i4Mhi 2ff2 +ULh_L *i hi}L*i _i* }LULG tL||L . T?| t _ii hTi|ihi *L tUh||LcUL? . i H t CDOD u@hi *hi *hi _@|L _@**i i^@3L? % n + &5 ' c &% n + n 5 ' & c &% n + ' UL? & T@h@4i|hL hi@*i E@ AhL@hi @*Lh _ & Tih U

  1. BiL4i|h@ EW?uLh4@|U@ Q b }i??@L 2ff +ULh_L *i hi}L*i _i* }LULG tL||L SD T?| t _ii hTi|ihi *L tUh||Lc |h@ SD i H t

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catenacci, Roberto

    BiL4i|h@ EW?uLh4@|U@ Q b }i??@L 2ff +ULh_L *i hi}L*i _i* }LULG tL||L SD T?| t _ii hTi|ihi *L tUh||Lc |h@ SD i H t ghyh u@hi *hi *?i % + n 5 ' f i * T?|L @ ' Ec c @ tUhihi *hi||@ T@tt@?|i Tih @ i Lh|L}L?@*i @ Z ?| #12; M

  2. DEGAS 2 Neutral Transport Modeling of High Density, Low Temperature Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the resulting fluid neutral momentum balance in a slab geometry is d dx ³ mnv 2 + nT ´ = # T n dT dx - m# cx nv.24, and the charge exchange frequency, # cx = 2.93# cx n(T/m) 1/2 . With a neutral source on one end of the slab (x density # # n(x)/n(L), d# dx = - 2 4 (1-# T ) T (L) dT (x) dx # + ##cx [T (L)/m] 1/2 T (x) T (L) - # 2 # 2

  3. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby a contractorEnergy, science,6. Radiative5 PPPL- 4865

  4. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements ofCOMPOSITION OF VAPORS FROMSciDACReport) |Transverse(Technical

  5. Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL DEGAS

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160 October 2015 Table 44. PAD075

  6. GaN nanowires show more 3D piezoelectricity than bulk GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    director cds murder nudity soundtrack BBC movie releases footage worth documentary film Blu-rays Blu-ray Ga

  7. Vor ref.: NH/BLU/CBEI Notat nr.: 02-0346d

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : The report describes methods for reducing deposition of chlorides on boiler tubes in relation to biomass fractions - optimization of boiler air and fuel supply - additive dosing. Among those possibilities it has

  8. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.10 CoolingNotes &* jRealglobalAa AA3BOE

  9. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.10 CoolingNotes &* jRealglobalAa

  10. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.10 CoolingNotes &* jRealglobalAaLiquids

  11. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101 (Million Short6RU N INDIANA315BNSFBOE

  12. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101 (Million Short6RU N INDIANA315BNSFBOEGas

  13. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101 (Million Short6RU N

  14. Calibrating Speed-Density Functions for ff SMesoscopic Traffic Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    -line) · DynaMIT: Mesoscopic model to be calibrated - Disaggregate (microscopic) demand - Aggregate (macroscopic (2002), Balakrishna et al. (2007) · On-line - Adjustments in response to real-time data · Doan et al-level supply calibration with counts D d R f- Demand same as Ref #12;Case Study II: Lower Westchester County

  15. Microsoft Word - Advanced Scholars Program Agenda 2015-FF.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ectures ( Phil C ornwell) Week 2 Monday, A pril 2 0 Modeling A dditive M anufacturingWelding ( (Tarasankar D ebRoy) Tech T ransfer ( Kathleen M cDonald) Tuesday, A pril 2 1 GET T...

  16. F.F. (Russ) Knapp | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of radionuclides for nuclear medicine. Following the completion of his Ph.D. in biochemistry at the St. Louis University School of Medicine in 1970, Russ Knapp was a National...

  17. Hanford Site - 300-FF-3 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plume Information Source: Active Area of Plume (acres): 171.91 Plume Status: Plume static or shrinking in size Remedial Approach Remedy Name Status Start Date End Date...

  18. 13450 13470 13490 13510 Fluorescenceyield(FF/I0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and carboys. Tygon tubing routes leachate from interaction of rainwater with plant material in trays facilitate microbial exchange with surrounding mulch. Underground tubing routes leachate into buried carboys. Leachate was manually pumped from underground carboys during periodic collections. #12;

  19. A Science Service Ff5ature Released upon receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as well ae the distant blinking beacons far t o the northward along the two transcontinental airways acro

  20. Microsoft Word - Advanced Scholars Program Agenda 2015-FF.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OF PAGESpersonal informationAGENCYB Listing of Appendix

  1. 206 DISTRIBUTEDGENERATION ff/.<,'IJIV '~l"'tJIV'I'""/LJII~C/' U/' (\\C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    and finally electrical power, fuel cell efficiency is not constrained by the Camot limits of heat engines (Fig. 4.25). Fuel-to-electric power efficiencies as high as 65% are likely, which gives fuel cells the potential to be roughly twice as efficient as the average central power station operating today. Fuel cells

  2. Anisotropic power spectrum and bispectrum in the f(?)F² mechanism

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Peloso, Marco; Ricciardone, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    A suitable coupling of the inflaton ? to a vector kinetic term F² gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations. We compute the cosmological perturbations ? that result from such coupling by taking into account the classical vector field that unavoidably gets generated at large scales during inflation. This generically results in a too-anisotropic power spectrum of ?. Specifically, the anisotropy exceeds the 1% level (10% level) if inflation lasts ~5 e-folds (~50 e-folds) more than the minimal amount required to produce the cosmic microwave background modes. This conclusion applies, among others, to the application of this mechanism for magnetogenesis, for anisotropic inflation, and for the generation of anisotropic perturbations at the end of inflation through a waterfall field coupled to the vector (in this case, the unavoidable contribution that we obtain is effective all throughout inflation, and it is independent of the waterfall field). For a tuned duration of inflation, a 1% (10%) anisotropy in the power spectrum corresponds to an anisotropic bispectrum which is enhanced like the local one in the squeezed limit, and with an effective local fNL~3(~30). More in general, a significant anisotropy of the perturbations may be a natural outcome of all models that sustain higher than 0 spin fields during inflation.

  3. Thin Liquid Wall Concepts and the CLiFF Design APEX Interim Report November, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    , and then removed from the vacuum chamber by gravity drainage, an EM pump (if the working liquid is an electrical of the preliminary design, heat transfer, power balance, thermal-hydraulic performance, neutronics, activation/blanket concept will behave (thermal- hydraulically) in a very similar fashion to the various thick liquid wall

  4. Anisotropic power spectrum and bispectrum in the f(?)F² mechanism

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Peloso, Marco; Ricciardone, Angelo

    2013-01-04

    A suitable coupling of the inflaton ? to a vector kinetic term F² gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations. We compute the cosmological perturbations ? that result from such coupling by taking into account the classical vector field that unavoidably gets generated at large scales during inflation. This generically results in a too-anisotropic power spectrum of ?. Specifically, the anisotropy exceeds the 1% level (10% level) if inflation lasts ~5 e-folds (~50 e-folds) more than the minimal amount required to produce the cosmic microwave background modes. This conclusion applies, among others, to the application of this mechanism for magnetogenesis,more »for anisotropic inflation, and for the generation of anisotropic perturbations at the end of inflation through a waterfall field coupled to the vector (in this case, the unavoidable contribution that we obtain is effective all throughout inflation, and it is independent of the waterfall field). For a tuned duration of inflation, a 1% (10%) anisotropy in the power spectrum corresponds to an anisotropic bispectrum which is enhanced like the local one in the squeezed limit, and with an effective local fNL~3(~30). More in general, a significant anisotropy of the perturbations may be a natural outcome of all models that sustain higher than 0 spin fields during inflation.« less

  5. Agricultural Injuries Mike Jensen, MS, EMT-B, WEMT, FF 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    on the farms · In addition to the youth who live on farms, an additional 230,000 children and adolescents were inputs and services · Food and kindred products manufacturing · Forest products manufacturing · Food · Environmental #12;Additional Factors · Emergency Preparedness · Age of Workers · Protective Equipment · Remote

  6. UNIVERSIT`A DEGLI STUDI DI PERUGIA Facolt`a di Scienze MM. FF. e NN.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippucci, Roberta

    gravemente non solo sul comportamento ma anche sulla fisiologia. Si considerano 12560 balene che vivono nell

  7. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR Free-Field Environment (ACRR-FF-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity free-field reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  8. Development and Validation of ReaxFF Reactive Force Field for Hydrocarbon Chemistry Catalyzed by Nickel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    nickel has also been used extensively to catalyze the formation and growth of carbon nanotubes from by Nickel Jonathan E. Mueller, Adri C. T. van Duin, and William A. Goddard III*, Materials and Process reactions catalyzed by nickel surfaces and particles using reactive molecular dynamics on thousands of atoms

  9. 300-FF-1 Operable Unit physical separation of soils pilot plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1994-01-15

    Alternative Remedial Technologies, Inc. (ART) was selected in a competitive selection process to conduct a pilot study for the physical separation of soils in the North Process Pond of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site. In January 1994, ART mobilized its 15 tons-per-hour pilot plant to the site. The plant was initially staged in a commercial area to allow for pretest inspections and minor modifications. The plant was specifically designed for use as a physical separations unit and consisted of a feed hopper, wet screens, hydrocyclones, as well as settling and dewatering equipment. The plant was supported in the field with prescreening equipment, mobile generators, air compressors, and water storage tanks. The plant was moved into the surface contamination area on March 24, 1994. The testing was conducted during the period March 23, 1994 through April 13, 1994. Two soil types were treated during the testing: a natural soil contaminated with low levels of uranium, cesium, cobalt, and heavy metals, and a natural soil contaminated with a uranium carbonate material that was visually recognizable by the presence of a green sludge material in the soil matrix. The ``green`` material contained significantly higher levels of the same contaminants. Both source materials were treated by the plant in a manner that fed the material, produced clean gravel and sand fractions, and concentrated the contaminants in a sludge cake. Process water was recycled during the operations. The testing was extremely successful in that for both source waste streams, it was demonstrated that volume reductions of greater than 90% could be achieved while also meeting the test performance criteria. The volume reduction for the natural soils averaged a 93.8%, while the ``green`` soils showed a 91.4% volume reduction.

  10. Facolt di Scienze MM.FF.NN Corso di Laurea in informatica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo Cigno, Renato Antonio

    della SSTHRESH; 2. tempo di trasferimento; 3. numero totale di pacchetti inviati in rete ed efficienza

  11. )FF-A 618 1-12 (1968) S. Fish Wildl. Servo Fish. Leafl.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1968-01-01

    ries Washington, D.C. 20240 ABSTRACT The following list of builders includes data on 23 8 shipyards 04843 Bass Harbor 04653 West Brooklin 04616 Jonesport 04 64 9 East Boothbay 04544 Shipyard Rd. South--Con. Lash Brothers Shipyard Francis MacDonald Morse Boatbuilding Co. Newbert &. Wallace Reeds Shipyard

  12. Mesquite Solar Plan - build out next to existing FF plants Solar Power

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump1.2619821°,EnergyCounty,Merton, Wisconsin:MesoFuel

  13. This is the user's manual for DEGAS 2 -A Monte Carlo code for the study of neutral atom and molecular transport in confined plasmas. It is intended to cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    . Institute for Plasma Research, India November 16, 2001 2 #12;1This file is written in TEX. A hyper

  14. This is the user's manual for DEGAS 2 -A Monte Carlo code for the study of neutral atom and molecular transport in confined plasmas. It is intended to provide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budny, Robert

    Randall Kanzleiter Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Jaishankar S. Institute for Plasma Research, India

  15. This is the user's manual for DEGAS 2 A Monte Carlo code for the study of neutral atom and molecular transport in confined plasmas. It is intended to provide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budny, Robert

    Randall Kanzleiter Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Jaishankar S. Institute for Plasma Research, India

  16. APPENDIX 1: AE3 PROGRAM 1 FfVSCLR PROGRAM=%H! DATA=.PDP:INPUT NAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    ANS,COUNT,COUNT A,DUMMY,FLAG 1,FLAG2,s43,S54,S91 18 COUNTA = 2 19 K = 2 20 MM = 2 21 NCAP7 = 13 22,164)DAT(4) 52 IF (DAT(5).NE.0.ODO) WRITE(6,165)DAT(5) 53 IF (DAT(6).NE.0.ODO) WRITE(6,166)DAT(6) 54.0) THEN 98 WRITE(6,52) 99 WRITE(6,53) 100 88 WRITE(6,54) 101 GOTO 88 102 ENDIF 103C 104 C CALCULATION OF MOLE

  17. Ei fh i di I f ti b h ffEinfhrung in die Informationsbeschaffung Heike Hotzel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossak, Wilhelm R.

    of crude oil in soils)(Bioremedation of crude oil in soils) Aufgabe:Aufgabe: a) Beschaffen von, , , , , , , , Assessing natural biodegradation potential at a former oil refinery site in Austria. Land Contamination

  18. Application of the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field to Reactive Dynamics of Hydrocarbon Chemisorption and Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    on nickel clusters. 1.0. Introduction Nickel is the primary catalyst in the steam reforming process1 to larger catalytic problems, such as the role of feedstock decomposition in CNT growth. Thus, surface

  19. Dynamics of the Dissociation of Hydrogen on Stepped Platinum Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Duin, Adri

    for Catalytic Science and Technology, UniVersity of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716-3110 Adri C. T. van Duin-board hydrocarbon reforming, and preferential oxidation reactions for hydrogen-purification needs in fuel cells challenges because the typical methods for studying catalytic reactions, density functional theory (DFT) used

  20. High-temperature high-pressure phases of lithium from electron force field (eFF) quantum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    University), Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701, Republic of Korea; and b Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 Contributed National Laboratory, Z-Pinch at Sandia National Laboratory) that gener- ate data about materials under

  1. Ross Taylor Papers Collection Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /17/1938 Box 1 FF 26 R. I. Digeer Autobiography, not dated Box 1 FF 27 Speech Material, not dated Box 1 FF 28

  2. Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  3. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  4. W.W.T. Fok, F.F. Wu, V.O.K. Li, G. Yang, J. Zhong, D.Y.C Leung,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Cheong

    : Sensor and Actuator Networks for Smart Grid Prof. Victor O.K. Li, Associate Dean (Research), Faculty of Engineering, HKU Dr. Guanghua Yang, Post Doctoral Fellow, Department of EEE, HKU Chapter 4: Smart Grid ............................................................................................................ 29 2.3 Smart Grid of the Future

  5. L: Lifetimes of Civilizations N = N* fs fGHZ fp nH fl fJ ffEufmfifcL /T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    : natural resources regeneration, depletion · w: wealth production ­ consumption · C : consumption ­ Cc, depends on wealth · Consumption depends on wealth ­ Commoners consumption ceases when wealth falls below threshold ­ Elites consumption ceases when wealth falls below threshold/ #12;Handy Solutions · Vary

  6. Data:Ed3f81ff-1848-460a-9611-fe3dbf7b368e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a-9611-fe3dbf7b368e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  7. Data:1f590a33-1ff5-482b-91c2-e8dd847f3b0a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  8. Early maturation processes in coal. Part 2: Reactive dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF reactive force field on Morwell Brown coal structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    the low temperature, high pressure conditions in practical laboratory experiments. This has made interest in determining a kinetic model to de- scribe oil and gas generation from the thermal decomposition pathways of these precursors evolving to produce oil and gas that would help to locate the opti- mum

  9. A review of "For My Worthy Freind Mr. Franciscus Junius: An Edition of the Correspondence of Francis Junius F.F. (1591-1677)" by Sophie van Romburgh. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernest B. Gilman

    2004-01-01

    , both social and material, that is the very medium of European intellectual life in the early modern period. It is worthy of study in itself, not as adjunct to the printed book but as the vital matrix in which the published products of human- ist... culture took shape. Jeremy Black. European Warfare, 1494?1660. London: Routledge, 2002. xii + 244 pp. $25.95. Review by MITCHELL MCNAYLOR, OUR LADY OF THE LAKE COLLEGE, BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA. This is a very broad book in conception and the author...

  10. M thanh ton 4310-55 [FWS-R4-FHC-2013-N108; [FVHC98130406900-XXX-FF04G01000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lng cha tng có du và thi khác t các giàn khoan và t u ging khoan trên áy bin. Deepwater Horizon tràn tràn. Mt s lng cha xác nh khí t nhiên cng c phát hành cho môi trng nh là kt qu ca v tràn du. Ngi c y gian c bn (cht lng và iu kin có th tn ti nu s c tràn du ã không xy ra tài nguyên) hoàn tt. Cn c các

  11. ReaxFF Reactive Force Field for the Y-Doped BaZrO3 Proton Conductor with Applications to Diffusion Rates for Multigranular Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    for a proton ceramic fuel cell (PCFC) that might permit much lower temperatures (from 400 to 600 °C). However of atomistic first principles predictions on models of a complete fuel cell. 1. Introduction Fuel cells provide operation (500-700 °C). Promising candidates for lower temperature fuel cell mem- branes include the family

  12. Hybrid Zones: Representations of Race in Late Nineteenth-Century French Visual Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringer, Rozanne McGrew

    2011-04-26

    In this study, I examine images of the black female and black male body and the female Spanish Gypsy by four artists ??_?? Edgar Degas, ?_??douard Manet, Fr?_??d?_??ric Bazille, and Henri de Toulouse??_???Lautrec ??_?? ...

  13. Quasi-Ohmic Single Molecule Charge Transport through Highly Conjugated meso-to-meso Ethyne-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borguet, Eric

    S-1 Quasi-Ohmic Single Molecule Charge Transport through Highly Conjugated meso-to-meso Ethyne, subjected to three freeze-pump-thaw- degas cycles, was added to the reaction tube. After the reaction

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 10, NO. 7, JULY 2001 1069 MOMS: Maximal-Order Interpolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 10, NO. 7, JULY 2001 1069 MOMS: Maximal-Order Interpolation of Minimal Support Thierry Blu, Member, IEEE, Philippe Thévenaz, and Michael Unser, Fellow, IEEE

  15. M. Alice Isely Papers Collection Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Fairmount College. Box 1 FF 8 Autobiography of James McClellan Boomer, 1911. Box 1 FF 9 Letter from Charles

  16. SARS Coronavirus nsp1 Protein Induces Template-Dependent Endonucleolytic Cleavage of mRNAs: Viral mRNAs Are Resistant to nsp1-Induced RNA Cleavage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    CVB) and human rhinovirus (HRV), while picornavirus type IICVB (Ren-CVB-FF), and HRV 2 (Ren-HRV2-FF) or a flavivirus,

  17. BB UU LL GG AA RR II AA NN AA CC AA DD EE MM YY OO FF SS CC II EE NN CC EE SS IINNSSTTIITTUUTTEE OOFF IINNFFOORRMMAATTIIOONN AANNDD CCOOMMMMUUNNIICCAATTIIOONN TTEECCHHNNOOLLOOGGIIEESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    Library (ITIL) ­ essence development, open problems Abstract: This article aims to give an overview over the ITIL framework objective. It is going to explain the rapidly growing IT business needs which had caused the development of this library. We are also going to follow the ITIL evolution history and find the circumstances

  18. 2/17/2014 Individual.com http://www.individual.com/storyrss.php?story=187041904&hash=60cc388427344e151660dd160421ff9d 1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    Telecom Transportation *XH Correct: Coal stocks at 4 Bohai-Rim ports down 3.29 pct on wk to 21.78 mln to efficiently power medical devices, Chiao said. The team used a cost-effective approach that opens the door

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF THE FIFTEENTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PLASMA PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    . Calibrat,ed models will be required to carry out the extrapolation to full ITER used in DEGAS sirnulatioru of Alcator C-Mod. The PLANET mesh is restricted to the cells contained is covered with aclditional cells. Large cells filling the core plasma are also aclded (see Fig. 1). PLANET[5

  20. Effect of reflection on H emissions in Alcator C-MOD C. F. F. Karney, D. P. Stotler, and C. H. Skinner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    Effect of reflection on H emissions in Alcator C-MOD C. F. F. Karney, D. P. Stotler, and C. H in Alcator C-MOD, the H emissions in that experiment have been modeled with the DEGAS 2 code including of plasma emission and are often difficult to diagnose. However reflection does affect the polarization

  1. instructions i 71-7077-00 Edition AE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    detergent-solubilized membranes, separation of membrane vesicles, and the study of changes in composition for reaction with Con A. Con A coupled to Sepharose is routinely used for separation and purification. De-gas the medium slurry. 3. Eliminate air from the column dead spaces by flushing the end pieces

  2. CentralBasin Matador Arch Eastern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OAKWOOD 24 ELK HILLS 25 PARACHUTE 26 OAK HILL 27 MAMM CREEK 28 RULISON 29 STRONG CITY DISTRICT 30 PINON 31 COAL DEGAS 67 B-43 68 ELK CITY 69 ECHO SPRINGS 70 DOWDY RANCH 71 SLIGO 72 BRUFF 73 MISSISSIPPI CANYON

  3. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 15, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2006 3053 Local Image Registration by Adaptive Filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Gaurav

    by Adaptive Filtering Gulcin Caner, Student Member, IEEE, A. Murat Tekalp, Fellow, IEEE, Gaurav Sharma, Senior and approving it for publication was Dr. Thierry Blu. G. Caner and W. Heinzelman are with the Electrical and Computer Engi- neering Department, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0126 USA (e-mail: caner

  4. Deep-SeaResearch, 1974,Vol.21,pp. 481 to 488.PergamonPress.Printed in Great Britain. Dissolved hydrocarbons in the eastern Gulf of Mexico Loop Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    hydrocarbons in the eastern Gulf of Mexico Loop Current and the Caribbean Sea THOMASM. ILIFFE*and JOHNA. CALDER---Concentrations of dissolved non-polar hydrocarbons extracted from waters taken at several stations and depths in the Gulf THEREhave been few studies of the dissolved hydrocarbons in seawater. BLU~R (1970) reported carbon numbers

  5. Power laws, Highly Optimized Tolerance, and generalized source coding Control and Dynamical Systems, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Jean

    for world wide web traffic (WWW) and forest fires(FF), and obtain excellent agreement with measured data], and forest fires (FF) [4]. These and other applications in which a single relationship between resources

  6. Time Type Abstract # Title Speaker 7:30 -8:30am Breakfast x La Fonda Breakfast Buffet Sponsored by NEB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :40 Speaker 8 FF0039 Optical Mapping Aids Contig Localization and Order: Lessons Learned from Applying Gibbs 9:30 ­ 9:50 Speaker 1 FF0064 Elucidating the Effects of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

  7. Mary K. Hudson Title: Professor of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through CISM), Seth Claudepierre, Richard Selesnick, C.-L. Huang, Harlan Spence, Scot Elkington, F.F. Chu

  8. A report by Civic Enterprises and the National Peace Corps Association in partnership with Peter D. Hart Research Associates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    . Hart Research Associates By: John M. Bridgeland, Harris Wofford, Kevin F.F. Quigley, Jessica A. Milano

  9. Andante q=80 Copyright notices follow the score, on page 6.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, Peter

    - 2 #12;44 S. A. T. B. in hot dark ness- a gainst- the heart, held molt ff en- in hot dark f ness- en- in hot dark ness- a gainst- the heart, held ff molt en- in hot f dark - en - in hot dark ness- a gainst- the heart, molt ff en- a f - in hot dark ness- a gainst- the heart, held ff molt en- in hot dark f ness

  10. Impact of a Superhydrophobic Sphere onto Water Duck-Gyu Lee and Ho-Young Kim*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ho-Young

    having densityFf, surface tension and viscosity µ, the sphere experiences various forces while), added inertia (FfR3 h¨), form drag (Ff h 2R2), viscous force (µh R) and surface tension (R).2 Here of motion for the sphere is obtained by equating the sphere inertia (FsR3h¨) to the sum of the above forces

  11. Coherence metric for optimal compressive J. Ray1 , J. Lee1 , S. Lefantzi1 and S. A. McKenna2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Jaideep

    · Explanation of the physics-based linear inverse problem ­ Estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in a physics inversion · Aim: Devise a method to estimate fossil-fuel CO2 (ff-CO2) emissions ­ Data: measurements of ff-CO2 concentrations at a sparse set of sensors · Motivation ­ Monitoring emission & cap

  12. Heavy metals emission from controlled combustion of PVC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ayyoubi, Mohammed A.

    1989-01-01

    such as direct heating and uv radiation exposure e (IZ). The PVC polymer chain contains weak sites that represent the initiating sites of chemical deter ioration. These sites are formed during polymerization of the vinyl chloride monomer. Thus attempts...HEAVY METALS EMISSION FROM CONTROLLED COMBUSTION OF PVC A Thesis by MOHAMMED A. EL-AYYOUBI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas Ag M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degas ee of' MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  13. 12/17/07 10:20 AMA component of DNA might survive space -Evolution -tribe.net Page 1 of 3http://bioevolution.tribe.net/thread/7ff000cc-1433-4476-afd2-c102baa8e5b6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    of adenine per square foot of space, but over millions of years, enough could have accumulated to help make assemble into rings. Although adenine's first ring needs a tiny energy boost from starlight to form, Glaser't require activation energy. If you do this reaction in space, this is a huge advantage because it takes

  14. The Colorful Chemical Bottle Experiment Kit: From School Laboratory To Public Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpanuparb, Taweetham

    2015-01-01

    The blue bottle experiment was first introduced to the chemical education literature as a simple demonstration on kinetics. Its original formulation contains only glucose, NaOH and small amount of methylene blue. The solution turns blue when shaken and fades to colorless upon standing. This bluing/de-bluing cycle may be repeated and may be compared to blood colors in animal's respiratory cycle. Inspired by the blue bottle experiment, the colorful chemical bottle experiment kit was commercially developed in 2006. The kit is a versatile pedagogical tool, not only for physical chemistry but also for analytical, biological and organic chemistry. It also helps teaching concepts in scientific method and laboratory safety. This manuscript contains four parts, brief review on literature relating to the blue bottle experiment, description of the colorful chemical bottle experiment kit, pedagogical discussion of the experiments and preliminary evaluation from students.

  15. 0.13-mu m CMOS phase shifters for X-, Ku-, and K-band phased arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Kwang-Jin; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    2007-01-01

    C = 275 fF and R = 48 : 2 . foundry passive models ( L = 639layout inductance using the foundry models with full-wave

  16. Uranium Geochemistry in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments from the 300 Area Uranium Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Davis, Jim A.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Qafoku, Nik; Wellman, Dawn M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2005-07-21

    This report documents research conducted by the RCS Project to update the record of decision for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site.

  17. Impact of Traffic States on Freeway Collision Frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeo, Hwasoo; Jang, Kitae; Skabardonis, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    a section using upstream and downstream traffic states: freeBQ). In FF, both upstream and downstream traffic phases arephase means that both upstream and downstream locations are

  18. MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN INSPECTOR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regarding the attended the meetings Jprovided expanded information during recent Congressional testimony.-C -- F-f -testified that, during 3ould not recall hearing this...

  19. Asteroseismology of alpha Centauri 1 Asteroseismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provost, Janine

    system obtained by fitting the observed data for ff Cen A & B. ABV(BBV ) Aov(Bov ) AGD(BGD) ACM(BCM ) (1

  20. SYMBOLIC COMPUTATION OF NONLINEnR WAVE INTERACTIONS A. Bers, J. L. Kulp, and C.F.F. Karney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    .F.F. Karney Plasma Research Report PR 76/17 August 1976 Presented as an invited review talk at the: Second

  1. COMPLEX MODIFIED K-DV EQUATION AND NONLINEAR PROPAGATION OF LOWER HYBRID WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    .F.F. Karney, + A. Bers, and N.R. Pereira t Plasma Research Report PRR 781'6 February 1978 To appear i n

  2. Corps of Engineers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    multispectral detection unit which consisted of dichroic mirrors (DM2: T>95%@439-647 nm, LM01-427-25, DM3: T>95%@492-950 nm, FF484-Fdi01, Semrock), bandpass filters (F1: FF01-390/40, F2: FF01-452/45, Semrock), a long pass filter (F3: FF01-496, Semrock... of interest: collagen (F1: 390 ± 20 nm), NADH (F2: 452 ± 22.5 nm) and FAD (F3: >500 nm). The three multimode fibers with different lengths provided a time delay of 60ns with 12 meter length difference and helped temperately separate the signals from...

  3. NETL-Developed Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method, Topics in Catalysis, 55...

  4. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 43174337, 2015 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/4317/2015/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    ) precalciner kilns with fabric filters (FF) in cement production; (3) mechanized coking ovens gas desulfuriza- tion (FGD) and selective catalyst reduction (SCR) systems in power generation; (2

  5. Computer and Human Reasoning: Single Implicative Axioms for Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCune, William

    with five variables was given by Sholander [6]. If we allow one of ff and fi to be a variable, it is trivial

  6. Potential Electricity Impacts of a 1978 California Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2011-01-01

    refinery by-products, hydroelectric generation allocated toOctober Resources 1978 Hydroelectric Assuming Precipitation.PG&E Area 1978 Hydroelectric Resources Assuming 1977 Run 0ff

  7. DEP Directions | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost Ground8 Gas Hydrate12/21/2012 Ref:DEGAS 2 Daren

  8. DEP F2F Curriculum Page | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost Ground8 Gas Hydrate12/21/2012 Ref:DEGAS 2

  9. DEP Field Trip Check List | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost Ground8 Gas Hydrate12/21/2012 Ref:DEGAS 2To

  10. DEP Increase Workshop | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost Ground8 Gas Hydrate12/21/2012 Ref:DEGAS

  11. Modern Art and Modern Movement: Images of Dance in American Art, c. 1900-1950

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, JoLee Gillespie

    2011-04-12

    published books of their photographs 3 of Isadora Duncan (1926) and Martha Graham (1941), respectively. In the final years of the 1930s, Paul Meltsner created six oil paintings of Martha Grah am. Throughout the 1940s Franz Kline depicted Nijinsky...Illustrations 287 288 Fig. 1.1 Louis Kronberg, Preparing For the Dance, n.d., oil on canvas, 28 7/10 x 23 7/10”, William Doyle Galleries, New York. Fig. 1.2 Edgar Degas, The Ballet Class, c. 1878-1880, oil on canvas, 32 1/8 x 30 1...

  12. 10/28/14, 1:55 PMAbstract Print View Page 1 of 3http://www.abstractsonline.com/Plan/AbstractPrintView.aspx?mID=3527&sKe...b-e272-489b-a12e-0392a61363e8&cKey=08ff6a21-cf84-43cb-8608-adf8709d3f11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Krishna V.

    to manipulate a 3 degree of freedom haptic feedback device (delta.3, Force Dimension) fitted with a 3d-printed

  13. A New Local-Search Algorithm for Forward-Chaining Planning Andrew Coles, Maria Fox and Amanda Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Andrew

    established and successful planners in re- cent years, FF (Hoffmann & Nebel 2001) and LPG (Gerevini & Serina paradigms. FF performs forward-chaining state-space search, whilst LPG searches through a space of plans a solution plan, exhaustive best-first search is performed from the ini- tial state to solve the problem. LPG

  14. UBV RI Photometry of the Type Ic SN 1994I in M51 Michael W. Richmond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Michael W.

    . 00 84, equinox 1950.0, corresponding to a position in the J2000.0 system of ff = 13 h 29 m 54. s 06 with a meridian circle yield ff = 13 h 29 m 54. s 072, ffi = +47 ffi 11 0 30. 00 50, equinox J2000.0. The small

  15. WELL KNOWN . . . TO A FEW PEOPLE: ATTRIBUTION OF EXCESS ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND RESULTING GLOBAL TEMPERATURE CHANGE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    century the major source of incremental atmospheric CO2 was not FF emissions but emissions from so to deforestation. LUC CO2 emissions have been a substantial fraction of anthropogenic CO2 emissions throughout the industrial period and even at present are about a third as great as FF emissions. Cumulative LUC CO2

  16. Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

    2005-04-01

    This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

  17. Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2004-12-01

    This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

  18. Nucleosynthesis at the proton drip line a challenge for nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Thomas

    are thermonuclear flashes on the surface of accreting neutron stars [1--3] (see also the review article [4 in a thermonuclear runaway. Helium is burned via the 3ff­reaction and the ffp­process (a sequence of (ff,p) and (p fuel to power the second burst and can therefore not be explained by the simple #12; thermonuclear

  19. www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 342 25 OCTOBER 2013 425 POLICYFORUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    and biodiversity loss from exposure to FF extraction. Consumption of FF (oil, natural gas, and coal) grew from 26 effects on eco- system function and productivity. We explore the overlap between regions of high marine to increase by over 30%, natural gas by 53%, and coal by 50% (4). It is often assumed that legally mandated

  20. Radiative recoil correction to the Lamb shift Krzysztof Pachucki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    analyzed the nuclear self­energy contribution and the corresponding definition of the nuclear mean square of the radiative recoil correction to hydrogenic energy levels in m 2 M ff (Z ff) 5 n 3 order is presented. The method bases on evaluation of the proton kinetic energy term on the electron state. The obtained result

  1. Review: Matjaž Klemen?i?: Zgodovina skupnosti slovenskih ameri?anov v Pueblu, Kolorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verbi?, Maruša

    2012-01-01

    : zgodovina skuPnosti slovenskih ameri?anov v PueBlu, kolorado. Maribor: Mednarodna založba Oddelka za slovanske jezike in književnosti, Filozofska fakulteta Univerza v Mariboru; Ljubljana: Inštitut za narodnostna vprašanja, 2011. (Mednarodna... knjižna zbirka Zora, 79) (Ethnicity, 13). 353 str. Leta 2011 je kot 79. knjiga Mednarodne knjižne zbirke Zora izšla znanstvena monografija Zgodovina skupnosti slo- venskih Ameri?anov v Pueblu, Kolo- rado, Matjaža Klemen?i?a, slovenske- ga zgodovinarja...

  2. Why Condensing Steam Turbines are More Efficient than Gas Turbines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, K. E.

    1988-01-01

    turbine at 75'rc adiabatic efficiency to a vacuum of 2"Hg. No steam is extracted. 15,7 ~Blu/hr STACK Figure 3. Enthalpy analysis of power plant cycle. Analyzing this system points to the steam turbine condenser as the source of inefficiency... it's thrown away. Why be concerned about throwing away something that has virtually no value? But there is concern. The steam turbine condenser is nearly always viewed as the source of inefficiency in the cycle. The problem is that the wrong thing...

  3. Elemental Fluorine-18 Gas: Enhanced Production and Availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanBrocklin, Henry F. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging

    2011-12-01

    The overall objective of this project was to develop an efficient, reproducible and reliable process for the preparation of fluorine-18 labeled fluorine gas ([¹?F]F?) from readily available cyclotron-produced [¹?F]fluoride ion. The two step process entailed the production of [¹?F]fluoromethane with subsequent conversion to [¹?F]F? by electric discharge of [¹?F]fluoromethane in the presence of carrier nonradioactive F? gas. The specific goals of this project were i) to optimize the preparation of [¹?F]fluoromethane from [¹?F]fluoride ion; ii) to develop a prototype automated system for the production of [¹?F]F? from [¹?F]fluoride ion and iii) develop a compact user friendly automated system for the preparation of [¹?F]F? with initial synthesis of fluorine-18 labeled radiotracers. Over the last decade there has been an increased interest in the production of "non-standard" positron-emitting isotopes for the preparation of new radiotracers for a variety of applications including medical imaging and therapy. The increased availability of these isotopes from small biomedical cyclotrons has prompted their use in labeling radiotracers. In much the same way the production of [¹?F]F? gas has been known for several decades. However, access to [¹?F]F? gas has been limited to those laboratories with the means (e.g. F? targetry for the cyclotron) and the project-based need to work with [¹?F]F? gas. Relatively few laboratories, compared to those that produce [¹?F]fluoride ion on a daily basis, possess the capability to produce and use [¹?F]F? gas. A simplified, reliable system employing [¹?F]fluoride ion from cyclotron targetry systems that are already in place coupled with on-demand production of the [¹?F]F? gas would greatly enhance its availability. This would improve the availability of [¹?F]F? gas and promote further work with a valuable precursor. The major goals of the project were accomplished over the funding period. The preparation of ¹?F]fluoromethane has been automated with reproducible yields greater than 90% conversion from [¹?F]fluoride ion. A trap and release system was established for the [¹?F]fluoride ion concentration and direct elution of the [¹?F]fluoride ion into the reaction vial with the appropriate base and precursor in DMSO. Other solvents were also investigated. The production time for [¹?F]fluoromethane is less than 10 minutes. An automated system for the [¹?F]F? gas production from the [18F]fluoromethane has been developed. The unit coupled to the [¹?F]fluoromethane system permits the on demand production of [¹?F]F? gas. In less than 30 minutes, mCi quantities of [¹?F]F? gas were produced. Several variables for the [¹?F]F? gas production were investigated and a set of parameters for reproducible operation were determined. These parameters included discharge chamber size, carrier gas (He, Ne, Ar), discharge time, discharge current, mass of F? gas added to the chamber. FDOPA and EF5 were used to test the reactivity of the [¹?F]F? gas. Both products were produced in low to modest yield. The ready availability of [¹?F]F? gas has potential impact to advance both DOE mission-driven initiatives and nuclear medicine initiatives through other federally funded agencies such as NIH and DoD. New reactions involving the use of [¹?F]F? gas will lead to direct labeling of new radiotracers and intermediates as well as new fluorine-18 labeled synthons that may be further reacted with other reagents to provide useful fluorine-18 labeled compounds. New tracers to understand and follow plant and microbial metabolism as well as new tracers for nuclear medicine applications, that have been either difficult to obtain or never produced due to the limited availability of [¹?F]F? gas, may be prepared using the techniques developed .

  4. Security Informatics Research Challenges for Mitigating Cyber Friendly Fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Thomas E.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2014-09-30

    This paper addresses cognitive implications and research needs surrounding the problem of cyber friendly re (FF). We dene cyber FF as intentional o*ensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission e*ectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. We describe examples of cyber FF and discuss how it ts within a general conceptual framework for cyber security failures. Because it involves human failure, cyber FF may be considered to belong to a sub-class of cyber security failures characterized as unintentional insider threats. Cyber FF is closely related to combat friendly re in that maintaining situation awareness (SA) is paramount to avoiding unintended consequences. Cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system and its nodes, the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive and o*ensive countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. We describe a test bed designed to support empirical research on factors a*ecting cyber FF. Finally, we discuss mitigation strategies to combat cyber FF, including both training concepts and suggestions for decision aids and visualization approaches.

  5. Unorthodox theoretical methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nedd, Sean

    2012-06-20

    The use of the ReaxFF force field to correlate with NMR mobilities of amine catalytic substituents on a mesoporous silica nanosphere surface is considered. The interfacing of the ReaxFF force field within the Surface Integrated Molecular Orbital/Molecular Mechanics (SIMOMM) method, in order to replicate earlier SIMOMM published data and to compare with the ReaxFF data, is discussed. The development of a new correlation consistent Composite Approach (ccCA) is presented, which incorporates the completely renormalized coupled cluster method with singles, doubles and non-iterative triples corrections towards the determination of heats of formations and reaction pathways which contain biradical species.

  6. The 'Genius' in Mycenaean Glyptic: the Later Evolution of an Aegean Cult Figure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehak, Paul

    1995-01-01

    . 13 (drawing by author); Fig.2.'Symeonoglou (inti'an.30)PI.73Fi1.231 (drawingbyauthor); Fig.5:Levi(infran.7)Fig. 175(drawingbyauthor); Flg.9.' reconstruction by author. Remaining figures from the archives of CMS. 1 M.A.V. cill, AM 79, 1964, lff.; ead...T.; J. Weingarten, OJA 5, 1986, 27ff .; ead., OJA 7, 1988, 1ff.; ead., in: ASSA 105ff. 13 The genius identified on a LH IIIC bull rhyton t)'om Tiryns is actually a l'ampant goat: see Appendix, Ellatum. la The Tiryns ring (CMS I No. 179) was discovered...

  7. 42 Ornamental OUTLOOK March 2008 By Cliff Sadof, Tamara Benjamin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    42 Ornamental OUTLOOK · March 2008 By Cliff Sadof, Tamara Benjamin, and Eduardo Hidalgo FF loridaEduardoHidalgoPhotocourtesyofCliffSadof #12;44 Ornamental OUTLOOK · March 2008 Plant Quality group at the Port of Miami took his team

  8. Does Representation Matter in the Planning Competition? Patricia J. Riddle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holte, Robert

    in the satisficing track of IPC2011. Metric-FF, MIPS and LPG-quality were all downloaded from the Strathclyde) is Edelkamp's model checking integrated planning system. LPG-quality (Gerevini, Saetti, and Serina 2003

  9. Useless Actions are Useful Martin Wehrle and Sebastian Kupferschmid and Andreas Podelski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetter, Thomas

    heuristics and planners like FF, LPG, FAST DOWNWARD or SGPLAN have been proposed in this con- text. However and Nebel 2001), LPG (Gerevini, Saetti, and Se- rina 2003), FAST DOWNWARD (Helmert 2006) or SGPLAN (Chen

  10. Generalizing the Relaxed Planning Heuristic to Non-Linear Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metric-FF, LPG, VHPOP, SimPlan, SAPA, and MIPS implemented refinements and extensions to the heuristic. In 2004, the plan- ners SGPlan, Marvin, FAP, Fast Diogonally Downward, Crikey, Roadmapper, YAHSP, LPG

  11. General Provisions for Study and Examination Regulations regarding Bachelor and Master Programmes at Ulm University (General Framework)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    of Baden-Württemberg ("Landeshochschulgesetz" ­ LHG) in the version of 1 January 2005 (Law Gazette p. 1 ff pursuant to § 34 (1) sentence 3 LHG. Preliminary remarks on language use I. General provisions § 1 Scope

  12. Hybrid Parallel Part I. Preliminaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Alan

    = 0123456789abcdef Nonce = 0000000000c0ff47 Digest = 00000009cc107197f63d1bfb134d8a40f2f71ae911b56d54e57bc 4c1e

  13. Twin Cities Campus Office of Classroom Management Academic Support Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    Technical Services Technology standards, planning, design, installation & maintenance Campus AV experts coordination, planning, and technology. Key areas include classroom space utilization, classroom standards physical standards, service levels, and room readiness FF&E standards and management Coordination

  14. A&A manuscript no. (will be inserted by hand later)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Russia Internet: glagol@relay.sao.ru 3 Th¨uringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, Karl April 1999 Abstract. We analyse spectra of the well­known bright CP2 star ff 2 CVn in order to test

  15. VOLUME 84, NUMBER 24 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 12 JUNE 2000 Power Laws, Highly Optimized Tolerance, and Generalized Source Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Jean

    compression, we construct specific solutions for world wide web traffic and forest fires, and obtain excellent wide web traffic (WWW) [1], and forest fires (FF) [2]. These and other applications in which a single

  16. Chapter 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    containing 200 gal of water and 150 lb of fertilizer ... contains 200 gal of water, in which initially 100 lb ... the fertilizer contents y1(t) in T1 and y2(t) in T2. ff 12 gal/ ...

  17. Alcator_DX_Bibliography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( meters) R - m ajor r adius ( meters) - v ertical e longation B - m agnetic f ield ( tesla) o n a xis ( R) q - s crape o ff l ayer h eat f lux c hannel w idth a t o...

  18. Vejledende besvarelse af opgave I.1.1 Rasmus Ejlers M gelberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grubb, Gerd

    , er ingen af m#26;ngderne f 1 (n); n 2 N , tomme, og vi f#23;ar at f[x]jx 2 Mg = ff 1 (n)jn 2 Ng som

  19. Tracking uncertainties in the causal chain from human activities to climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    CO 2 emissions from fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacture,CO 2 emissions due to fossil fuels, CO 2 emissions due to2 -equivalent per year. Fossil-fuel (FF) is used to describe

  20. Y.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' .;-;< 14 ,I> ,,.. &.<,y---.--- * 1 .? 1 c ,-J ..1, j ' ii ,; :I : j' - * - v- e . . *' ' -y " Y. ;: -.-, yl-j ' " : -2 F*;f yTJ IEYii, , .- -.,ir:.l -. ( z;y;,y:'...

  1. ISSN 0949-6025 AS 300 control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    . In this respect calibration certificates are also demanded for company certification according to ISO 9000 ff the instrument to a national standard via works standards and reference standards. All test agent certificates

  2. Cyber Friendly Fire: Research Challenges for Security Informatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2013-06-06

    This paper addresses cognitive implications and research needs surrounding the problem of cyber friendly fire (FF). We define cyber FF as intentional offensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintention-ally harms the mission effectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. Just as with combat friendly fire, maintaining situation awareness (SA) is paramount to avoiding cyber FF incidents. Cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system’s topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system and its nodes, the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive and offensive countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. Mitigation strategies to combat cyber FF— including both training concepts and suggestions for decision aids and visualization approaches—are discussed.

  3. Articulating Agency: Women in Shakespeare's History Plays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan-Pace, Emily

    2012-01-01

    framing He does refer to Doll Tearsheet when she is present,play. At II.4.48ff, when teasing Doll and Falstaff for theiremploys this pun to tease Doll. Given her ability to do this

  4. Cotton Response to 1-Methylcyclopropene Under Different Light Regimes and Growth Stages: Lint Yield and Yield Components 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carden, Charles Warren

    2010-10-12

    imposed at four developmental stages of growth: pinhead square (PHS), first flower (FF), peak flower (PF), and boll development (BD). Data pooled over both years indicated that there were no significant differences in yield for 1-MCP treatments; however...

  5. Economics, Quantitative Emphasis BA, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Economics, Quantitative Emphasis BA, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Quantitative Methods in Economics 3 FF ECON 422 Econometrics 3 Upper-division economics courses 16 MATH 175

  6. Instabilities in Circumstellar Discs Charles F. Gammie 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gammie, Charles F.

    . Observation gives only broad constraints in the form of timescales for disc dispersal (e.g. Strom 1994 in the last few years, detailed below. The shear stress is often characterized via a dimensionless ff = W r

  7. A Universal Level Converter Towards the Realization of Energy Efficient Implantable Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    with dual- VT h technique. The robustness of the design is tested by car- rying out three types of analysis, namely: parametric, load and power. It is observed that the ULC produces a stable output for voltages as low as 0.35V and loads varying from 50fF to 120fF. The average power dissipation of the proposed level

  8. Abstract Interpretation patrick cousot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cousot, Patrick

    ­specific abstract seman­ tics domain D ] and an abstract seman­ tics S ] 2 L 7! D ] which is designed in­ tuitively seman­ tics S and an approximation ff are cho­ sen, one can derive the best choice for the corresponding of a trace­based seman­ tics by a relational/denotational seman­ tics: ff(P ) def = fhs 0 ; s n i j s 0 s 1

  9. A special Riemann surface with application to the hyperelliptic case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conwell, Herman Henry

    1915-01-01

    L^i = c^ . Substitute the value of cA, from the first relation in the second and we have i 2. = 2Eor x > ff there are other maximum and minimum points or double points than for y...L^i = c^ . Substitute the value of cA, from the first relation in the second and we have i 2. = 2Eor x > ff there are other maximum and minimum points or double points than for y...

  10. Complex signal amplitude analysis for complete fusion nuclear reaction products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. S. Tsyganov

    2015-06-07

    A complex analysis has been performed on the energy amplitude signals corresponding to events of Z=117 element measured in the 249Bk+48Ca complete fusion nuclear reaction. These signals were detected with PIPS position sensitive detector. The significant values of pulse height defect both for recoils (ER) and fission fragments (FF) were measured. Comparison with the computer simulations and empirical formulae has been performed both for ER and FF signals.

  11. Complex signal amplitude analysis for complete fusion nuclear reaction products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsyganov, Yu S

    2015-01-01

    A complex analysis has been performed on the energy amplitude signals corresponding to events of Z=117 element measured in the 249Bk+48Ca complete fusion nuclear reaction. These signals were detected with PIPS position sensitive detector. The significant values of pulse height defect both for recoils (ER) and fission fragments (FF) were measured. Comparison with the computer simulations and empirical formulae has been performed both for ER and FF signals.

  12. Effect of Deuterium Gas Puff On The Edge Plasma In NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zweben, S. J.

    2014-02-20

    This paper describes a detailed examination of the effects of a relatively small pulsed deuterium gas puff on the edge plasma and edge turbulence in NSTX. This gas puff caused little or no change in the line-averaged plasma density or total stored energy, or in the edge density and electron temperature up to the time of the peak of the gas puff. The radial profile of the D? light emission and the edge turbulence within this gas puff did not vary significantly over its rise and fall, implying that these gas puffs did not significantly perturb the local edge plasma or edge turbulence. These measurements are compared with modeling by DEGAS 2, UEDGE, and with simplified estimates for the expected effects of this gas puff.

  13. Siphons for Geosiphon{trademark} Treatment Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, M.A.

    2001-07-26

    GeoSiphon{trademark} systems (patent pending) induce contaminated groundwater flow through permeable treatment media by utilizing a siphon between two points of hydraulic head difference. A siphon is a closed conduit that conveys liquid from a point of higher hydraulic head to one of lower head after raising it to a higher intermediate elevation, at sub-atmospheric conditions (negative gauge pressures or vacuum), without external power input. All surface waters and groundwaters contain dissolved gases, which degas within a siphon due to the vacuum and temperature within the siphon. Bubbles form, and if not properly managed will accumulate in the siphon, gradually reducing the flow rate until the system is ultimately shut down. Therefore appropriate management of gas within a siphon is the primary factor that must be considered to maintain continuous siphon flow. This report provides an overview of GeoSiphon technology and generic details concerning de-gassing in siphons and associated gas management methods.

  14. Analysis of Neutral Transport in the GAMMA10 Anchor-Cell Using H{alpha}-Emission Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higashizono, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nakashima, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ohki, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Islam, M.K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Shoji, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Kobayashi, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University (Japan); Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kubota, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Murakami, R. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yamada, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-01-15

    The neutral transport was studied in the anchor cell. The H{alpha} line intensities were measured by using axially aligned H{alpha} detectors. It was found that the intensity is considerably dependent on ECRH and GP 3,4. A 5ch H{alpha} detector was newly installed in the outer-transition region of the anchor-cell. From the measurement of the spatial distributions, the vertical intensity profile is estimated to be about 2.5 cm on the half width half maximum, while the horizontal distribution shows roughly flat around Z=-670 cm. The above characteristics were discussed with aid of neutral transport simulation using DEGAS Monte-Carlo Code.

  15. THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE): FOURTH DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M. E. K.; Piffl, T.; Enke, H.; Carrillo, I.; Boeche, C.; Roeser, S.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Zwitter, T.; Binney, J.; De Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bijaoui, A.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Freeman, K.; Munari, U.; Anguiano, B.; and others

    2013-11-01

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances, and distances determined for 425,561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). The stellar atmospheric parameters are computed using a new pipeline, based on the algorithms of MATISSE and DEGAS. The spectral degeneracies and the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometric information are now better taken into consideration, improving the parameter determination compared to the previous RAVE data releases. The individual abundances for six elements (magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, iron, and nickel) are also given, based on a special-purpose pipeline that is also improved compared to that available for the RAVE DR3 and Chemical DR1 data releases. Together with photometric information and proper motions, these data can be retrieved from the RAVE collaboration Web site and the Vizier database.

  16. Overview of Nucleon Form Factor Experiments with 12 GeV at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cisbani, Evaristo [INFN/Sanita, Roma, ITALY

    2014-06-01

    Since the R. Hofstadter pioneering experiments in the '50s, the measurements of the electromagnetic space-like nucleon form factors (FF's) have been a precious source of information for the understanding of the internal structure of the nucleons. In the last 15 years, the polarization transfer experiments at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) have undermined our view of the mechanism of the electron scattering and renewed critical interest in the FF measurements. In the coming years, JLab, with its upgraded 12 GeV polarized, high intensity, electron beam combined to new targets and readout equipments, will offer unprecedented opportunities to extend the current proton and neutron FF's measurements to higher momentum transfer Q{sup 2} and to improve statistical and uncertainties at lower Q{sup 2}, where the nucleon size can be accurately investigated. The measurements at high Q{sup 2} will provide also new insights on the elusive quark orbital angular momenta, will contribute to constraint two of the nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions that are expected to describe more consistently the nucleon structure, and in general will test the validity of quite a few fundamental nucleon models in a region of transition between perturbative and non perturbative regimes. A selection of the relevant properties of the FF's, and the main results of JLab are shortly reviewed; the new proposed and approved experiments on FF's at JLab are presented addressing some key details, the expected experimental achievements and the new equipment designed for them.

  17. Novel Approach for Correlating Capacitance Data with Performance During Thin-Film Device Stress Studies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R. L.; Albin, D. S.; Clark, L. A.

    2011-08-01

    A new data mining algorithm was developed to identify the strongest correlations between capacitance data (measured between -1.5 V and +0.49 V) and 1st and 2nd level performance metrics (efficiency, open-circuit voltage (VOC), short-circuit current density (JSC), and fill-factor (FF)) during the stress testing of voltage-stabilized CdS/CdTe devices. When considering only correlations between 1st and 2nd level metrics, 96.5% of the observed variation in efficiency was attributed to FF. The overall decrease in VOC after 1000 hours of open-circuit, light-soak stress at 60 degrees C was about 1.5%. As determined by our algorithm, the most consistent correlation existing between FF and 3rd level metric capacitance data at all stages during stress testing was between FF and the apparent CdTe acceptor density (Na) calculated at a voltage of +0.49 V during forward voltage scans. Since the contribution of back contact capacitance to total capacitance increases with increasing positive voltage, this result suggests that FF degradation is associated with decreases in Na near the CdTe/back contact interface. Also of interest, it appears that capacitance data at these higher voltages appears to more accurately fit the one-sided abrupt junction model.

  18. New Concept for Industrial Energy/Utility Values 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    /HR @ 600 PSIG $3.00/MBW FUEL $0.05/IOOi R:MER FIXED CHARGES @ 25% CF INVEST. (3SM$ FOR 3-500 KLB/HR OOILERB'lU x .82 - . BFW & Ol...EMICALS 0.67 $/KLBS 'IDl'AL CCST 600 PSIG STEAM 7.91 $/KLBS If we use a similar approach to calculate the cost of heat fran a furnace of 100 MBTU/hr with a $2.5M investment we ~uld get: $3.00/MBW + $2.5M x .25/yr = 4 24 $ MBW 0.85 eff. 100 MBW/hi x...

  19. Use of 2nd and 3rd Level Correlation Analysis for Studying Degradation in Polycrystalline Thin-Film Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albin, D. S.; del Cueto, J. A.; Demtsu, S. H.; Bansal, S.

    2011-03-01

    The correlation of stress-induced changes in the performance of laboratory-made CdTe solar cells with various 2nd and 3rd level metrics is discussed. The overall behavior of aggregated data showing how cell efficiency changes as a function of open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current density (Jsc), and fill factor (FF) is explained using a two-diode, PSpice model in which degradation is simulated by systematically changing model parameters. FF shows the highest correlation with performance during stress, and is subsequently shown to be most affected by shunt resistance, recombination and in some cases voltage-dependent collection. Large decreases in Jsc as well as increasing rates of Voc degradation are related to voltage-dependent collection effects and catastrophic shunting respectively. Large decreases in Voc in the absence of catastrophic shunting are attributed to increased recombination. The relevance of capacitance-derived data correlated with both Voc and FF is discussed.

  20. Co-localised Raman and force spectroscopy reveal the roles of hydrogen bonds and ?-? interactions in defining the mechanical properties of diphenylalanine nano- and micro-tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinjab, Faris; Bondakov, Georgi; Notingher, Ioan, E-mail: ioan.notingher@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-23

    An integrated atomic force and polarized Raman microscope were used to measure the elastic properties of individual diphenylalanine (FF) nano- and micro-tubes and to obtain quantitative information regarding the inter-molecular interactions that define their mechanical properties. For individual tubes, co-localised force spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements allowed the calculation of the Young's and shear moduli (25?±?5?GPa and 0.28?±?0.05?GPa, respectively) and the contribution of hydrogen bonding network to the Young's modulus (?17.6?GPa). The ?-? interactions between the phenyl rings, dominated by T-type arrangements, were estimated based on previously published X-ray data to only 0.20?GPa. These results provide experimental evidence obtained from individual FF tubes that the network of H-bonds dominates the elastic properties of the FF tubes.

  1. Characterization of AL2O3:C thermoluminescent dosimeter response to beta radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Chad Kelvin

    1992-01-01

    . Formulas for determining the correction factors KZERF, KLUFT, and KFFUCHT Source KzERF KLUFT KFEUCHT '47pm ~srM exp(-7. 248x10 x tD1FF. ) exp(-5. 024x10 x tD1FF ) exp(-6. 66x10 x tD1FF ) 219. 4exp(-15. 6p/T) + 0. 01 1. 000 + 0. 003 1. 000 + 0. 001... of Committee W. Wilson t, Jr Member -z A, W. Dan Recce, Jr. Member Rand L. Watson Member hn W. Poston Sr. Member John . Pos, Sr. Head of Department December 1992 ABSTRACT Characterization of A1203'. C Thermoluminescent Dosimeter Response to Beta...

  2. On the relationship between auroral and nebular oxygen line intensities in spectra of HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2005-04-18

    We investigate relationships between observed auroral and nebular oxygen line fluxes in spectra of HII regions. We find a relation that is metallicity-dependent at low metallicities, but becomes independent of metallicity (within the uncertainties of the available data) above 12+logO/H ~ 8.25, i.e. there is one-to-one correspondance (the ff - relation) between auroral and nebular oxygen line fluxes in spectra of high-metallicity HII regions. The ff - relation allows one to estimate the flux in the auroral line from strong oxygen line measurements. This solves the problem of the electron temperature (and, consequently, abundance) determination in high-metallicity HII regions. The ff - relation confirms the basic idea of the empirical method, proposed by Pagel et al. (1979) a qurter of a century ago, that the oxygen abundance in HII region can be estimated from the strong oxygen lines measurements only.

  3. A multiresolution spatial parametrization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet; Michalak, Anna M.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. To that end, we construct a multiresolution spatial parametrization for fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2), to be used in atmospheric inversions. Such a parametrization does not currently exist. The parametrization uses wavelets to accurately capture the multiscale, nonstationary nature of ffCO2 emissions and employs proxies of human habitation, e.g., images of lights at night and maps of built-up areas to reduce the dimensionality of the multiresolution parametrization. The parametrization is used in a synthetic data inversion to test its suitability for use in atmospheric inverse problem. This linear inverse problem is predicated on observations of ffCO2 concentrations collected at measurement towers. We adapt a convex optimization technique, commonly used in the reconstruction of compressively sensed images, to perform sparse reconstruction of the time-variant ffCO2 emission field. We also borrow concepts from compressive sensing to impose boundary conditions i.e., to limit ffCO2 emissions within an irregularly shaped region (the United States, in our case). We find that the optimization algorithm performs a data-driven sparsification of the spatial parametrization and retains only of those wavelets whose weights could be estimated from the observations. Further, our method for the imposition of boundary conditions leads to a 10computational saving over conventional means of doing so. We conclude with a discussion of the accuracy of the estimated emissions and the suitability of the spatial parametrization for use in inverse problems with a significant degree of regularization.

  4. State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) environmental checklist forms for 304 Concretion Facility Closure Plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 304 Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 304 Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Facility. The 304 Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

  5. 303-K Storage Facility closure plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-15

    Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 303-K Storage Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 303-K Storage Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 303-K Storage Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 303-K Storage Facility. The 303-K Storage Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

  6. Dynamics of Motivations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knoll, Jörn

    ) - Upot, f mean field = C(f(x, p, t)) Collision Term = p2 2m - Upot(x, p) dp1dp2dp3 d d (1 - f)f1(1 - f2, t)) Collision Term = p2 2m - Upot(x, p) dp1dp2dp3 d d (1 - f)f1(1 - f2)f3 + loss term. Voskresensky1,3 1GSI 2Kurchatov Inst. (Moscow) 3Moscow Ins. for Physics and Engineering #12;Dynamics

  7. Optimum Estimation via Partition Functions and Information Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merhav, Neri

    exp{T x}P(x) = Z(y, ) () J(Y ) = -E 2 ln P(Y ) =0 ff (Fisher info) tr{E} = nX i=1 E 2 ln Z(Y , ) 2 i =0 ff = nX i=1 " Var{Xi} + E ( 2 ln P(Y ) 2 i =0 )# = nX i=1 " Var{Xi} - E (» ln P(Y ) i ­2 =0 )# = nX i=1 " E{X2 i } - E (» ln Z(Y , ) i ­2 =0 )# 2nd & 3rd lines: ln P (Y ) can

  8. Beta Decays of Isotones with Neutron Magic Number of N=126 and R-process Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toshio Suzuki; Takashi Yoshida; Toshitaka Kajino; Takaharu Otsuka

    2011-12-16

    Beta decays of the isotones with N=126 are studied by shell model calculations taking into account both the Gamow-Teller (GT) and first-forbidden (FF) transitions. The FF transitions are found to be important to reduce the half-lives, by nearly twice to several times, from those by the GT contributions only. Possible implications of the short half-lives of the waiting point nuclei on the r-process nucleosynthesis during the supernova explosions are discussed. A slight shift of the third peak of the element abundances in the r-process toward higher mass region is found.

  9. Effectiveness of a cavity filler in inhibiting wood decay in post oak (Quercus stellata Wangenh.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condra, Rebecca Rushing

    1980-01-01

    Dressings. Cavity Fillers Open Method. Paints Shell Fillings Cap Treatment. THE STUDY AREA Location. Climate Vegetation. Soils MATERIALS AND METHODS. Ex pe ri ment a 1 Des i gn Treatments. Fungicide and Filler (FF) . Filler Only (FO) Control... tree 5 Photograph of a cavity in a control tree a year after woundi ng . 24 26 27 6 Diagram of the dimensions of a cavity. Point A is the location where the Endothea gyrosa was placed. Point 8 th 10 ti he~t~Pl ~hi id s p1 d. . . 2FF 7 Diagram...

  10. Pih...xhexgo/oo#Pih...g''syx#Rigrxs...if#exh#5yx''ix''#3xevo/oofsf#py'#E...v''swihse#Qi'+sgif# #''ri 7...'yiex#5GQR####...e''#3g''syx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , such as the ongoing ISO MPEG­4 standardisation phase as well as the new ISO MPEG­7 initiative. The aim is to define, Germany 3ff'''eg''. The general philosophy of COST projects is introduced before narrowing the focus to the COST 211 series. For more than 20 years COST 211 has been concerned with image coding and compression

  11. Princeton University Parking Rules & Regulations Transportation & Parking Services at Princeton University is committed to providing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torquato, Salvatore

    for a vehicle to be legally parked on campus. The hangtag indicates parking zone and lot assignments and must will be issued. II. Parking Zone and lot assignments FacUlty/StaFF PaRkIng Each UniversiPrinceton University Parking Rules & Regulations Transportation & Parking Services at Princeton

  12. Image courtesy of the Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center (ISS006-E-42326). The hydroelectrical potential of North-Western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borsdorf, Axel

    -42326). #12;The hydroelectrical potential of North-Western Patagonia ­ balancing economic development and ecological protection axel borsdorf #12;156 The hydroelectrical potential of North-Western Patagonia the rest an expansion of the hydroelectric potential, first proposed 30 years ago (Borsdorf 1987: 156ff), can

  13. RPT-DVZ-AFRI-007 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties Office of Environmental Management ERT electrical resistivity tomographic GPR ground-penetrating radar

  14. Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date General Degree Requirements ECE 380, 380L Electrical Engineering Practice and Lab 3 ECE 480 Senior Design Project I 3 FF ECE 482L Physics I & II with Calculus & Labs 10 Electrical Engineering electives* 12 Technical electives* 6

  15. Anisotropic Shock Sensitivity of Cyclotrimethylene Trinitramine (RDX) from Compress-and-Shear Reactive Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    by Dick1-3 that a large single crystal of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) displays dramat- ically involving interfaces, impurities, and defects. For example, for PETN, the pressure threshold of detonation shock sensitivity of PETN5 using the ReaxFF reactive force field.6 Our simulations showed dramatically

  16. Grupo 10 Control de Xarxes de Computadors 2 Q1: 30-10-2014 Nombre: Apellidos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operadora de telecomunicaciones es un LIR 3. En IPv6, marca las afirmaciones correctas ý Para el tipo loopback es ff02::1 ¨ Una dirección ULA es enrutable en Internet ý Para el tipo anycast se usan direcciones globales 4. En IPv6, marca las afirmaciones correctas ¨ El campo Etiqueta de flujo tiene el mismo

  17. n. DESCRIZIONE UOC DIRIG./RESPONS. 1 UOC Medicina interna "B" Prof. Barnaba Vincenzo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidoni, Leonardo

    . Bertazzoni Giuliano 35 UOC Angiologia Prof. Agati Luciano 36 UOC Radiologia "A" Prof. Catalano Carlo 37 UOC Radiologia "B" Prof. Tombolini Vincenzo (f.f.) 38 UOC Radiologia Testa-Collo Prof. D'Ambrosio Ferdinando 39 UOC Radiologia d'urgenza Prof. Gualdi Gianfranco 40 UOC Radioterapia Oncologica Prof. Tombolini

  18. Time Schedule Autumn Quarter 1986

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    : November 4-14 I · 1 #12;ZlFF-DAVIS SPECIAL MARKETS GROUP EcI1tor-in-Chlef and ~eral Manager Jeffrey A. Stem Group Publisher William S. David DIRECTORY OF CLASSES PresIdent Andrew C. Cltsay . Publisher Craig. ToohyAvenue Uncolnwood, illinois 60646 (312) 679-1100 WEST COAST Bill Curtis W.J. Curtis & Associates

  19. Time Schedu.le Preliminary

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    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    instead of Hutchinson Hall, which has stairway access only. 1 #12;ZlFF-DAVIS SPECIAL MARKETS GROUP EditC)r-I~lef and .General Manager Jeffrey A. Stern Group Publisher William S. David DIRECTORY OF CLASSES President Andrew C The Pattls Group 4761 W. Toohy Avenue Uncolnwood, Illinois 60646 (312)679-1100 WEST COAST Bill Curtis W

  20. Low noise Millimeter-wave and THz Receivers, Imaging Arrays, Switches in Advanced CMOS and SiGe Processes /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uzunkol, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    superstrate Oxide/Nitride/Polyimide GND M6 S M5 M4 GND GND40fF 2?m 2?m 90 ?m (a) Polyimide (2.5) / Nitride (0.45) /100 µm) Oxide/Nitride/Polyimide LB UB 6.3 µm UA B3 (GND)

  1. History of Art and Visual Culture BA, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    History of Art and Visual Culture BA, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Foundations I and II 6 CID ART 298 Seminar 3 ARTHIST 102 Survey of Western Art II 3 ARTHIST 450 Art History Practicum 3 FF ARTHIST 452 Methods and Theory in Art History 3 ARTHIST 499 Art History Seminar 3 One Ancient

  2. Applied Mathematics BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Applied Mathematics BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed Mathematics I 3 MATH 275 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4 CID MATH 287 Communication in the Mathematical To Computational Mathematics 3 FF MATH 401 Senior Thesis in the Mathematical Sciences 1 MATH 465 Numerical Analysis

  3. Applied Mathematics BS, Statistics Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Applied Mathematics BS, Statistics Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Mathematics I 3 MATH 275 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4 CID MATH 287 Communication in the Mathematical To Computational Mathematics 3 FF MATH 401 Senior Thesis in the Mathematical Sciences 1 MATH 465 Numerical Analysis

  4. www.lgpm.ecp.fr Director: Patrick Perr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezerianos, Anastasia

    .bouveret@ecp.fr École Centrale Paris, Research Centre Report 2011 Microtopography of pitting on stainless steel Chemi-A-MOUSSON, VÉOLIA, ALCAN, NIPPON STEEL CORPORATION, SULFURCELL SOLARTECHNIK GmbH, WÜRTH SOLAR GmbH, VALE (BrazilRcheRs: 13 administRative and technical staFF: 17 doctoRal students: 18 Rank a Publications (souRce: web

  5. A new species of Diochus from Baltic amber (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Diochini)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatzimanolis, Stylianos; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-10-19

    , University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045, USA † urn:lsid:zoobank.org:author:0BFB18A5-6424-4827-B500-DD36E99E1123 ‡ urn:lsid:zoobank.org:author:3714A7FF-E19E-495A-AAF9-98D2F597B757 Corresponding author: Stylianos Chatzimanolis (stylianos...

  6. BBIIOOLLOOGGYY SSEEMMIINNAARR PPRR OO MM OO TT II OO NN LLEE CC TT UU RR EE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    BBIIOOLLOOGGYY SSEEMMIINNAARR PPRR OO MM OO TT II OO NN LLEE CC TT UU RR EE 44::0000 PPMM SSEE MM II NNAA RR PPHH YY SSII CCSS //AASS TTRR OONN OO MM YY AAUU DD .. AA110022 RREE FF RR EE SSHHMM EE NN

  7. BBIIOOLLOOGGYY SSEEMMIINNAARR TTOO MM MM YY EEDD MM OO NN DD SS OO NN EENN DD OO WW EE DD LLEE CC TT UU RR EE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    BBIIOOLLOOGGYY SSEEMMIINNAARR TTOO MM MM YY EEDD MM OO NN DD SS OO NN EENN DD OO WW EE DD LLEE CC TT UU RR EE 44::0000 PPMM SSEE MM II NNAA RR HHII TTCC HH CC OOCC KK HH AA LL LL 113322 RREE FF RR EE

  8. FIVE PAPERS ON THE OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM REPRINTED FROM THE MARINE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY CONFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIVE PAPERS ON THE OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM REPRINTED FROM THE MARINE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY CONFERENCE OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TECHNICAL NOTE NUMBER 4 APRIL, 1986 Philip ff. Rabinowitz portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A & M University

  9. Some Teasers ffl Which is the ``best'' hyperplane that separates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roweis, Sam

    ` ) that are drawn i.i.d from P (x; y). ffl Empirical risk minimization (ERM) method: Pick ff ` which minimizes ` (we hope). ffl The method of ERM is not new: Least Squares is ERM for Regression loss fn. Maximum Likelihood is ERM for Density loss fn. Minimizing training error (e.g. in ANN) is ERM for Classification loss

  10. A Model for MPEG with Forward Error Correction and TCP-Friendly Bandwidth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claypool, Mark

    $4 9GCE¥&"P General Terms 3¥i©Q0u©%CEh&¥D1¥&PQ§ Keywords "¦9$(G%'¥&8¦GCfX¥x(7¤©vH§FF¨3ddge)H6¦©QbCc©a8d

  11. simcpm1.asm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... XTh$ ' ;E0-E3 dc.b 'CPO a$ PUSH p$ ANI n$ RST 4$ ' ;E4-E7 dc.b 'RPE$ PCh$ JPE a$ XCHG$ ' ;E8-EB dc.b 'CPE a$ ILLEGAL$ XRI n$ RST 5$ ' ;EC-FF dc.b ...

  12. J. Phys. Chem. 1995,99, 13321-13333 13321 Hessian Biased Force Field for Polysilane Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    J. Phys. Chem. 1995,99, 13321-13333 13321 ARTICLES Hessian Biased Force Field for Polysilane), Califomia Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Califomia 91125 Received: January 30, 1995; In Final Form:May 16, 1995@ We report a force field (FF)suitable for molecular dynamics simulations of polysilane

  13. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Jaideep

    , for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. #12;CO2 Emissions · CO2 responsible) emissions and CO/CO2 FF emissions predicted using population density, economic factors ("bottoms forcing. #12;ROM-based CO2 Source Inversion The convection-diffusion equation is used t

  14. Wavelet-based reconstruction of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions from sparse measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Jaideep

    for source locations #12;Background on ffCO2 inversion · Unlike biogenic CO2 emissions, anthropogenicWavelet-based reconstruction of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions from sparse measurements J. Ray1, V: Develop a technique to estimate anthropogenic (fossil- fuel) CO2 emissions from sparse observations

  15. Int'l PVSEC -121 Technical Digest of the International PVSEC-14, Bangkok, Thailand, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeo, Alessandro

    Properties of CIGS solar cells developed with evaporated II-VI buffer layers A. Romeo, R. Gysel, S. Buzzi, D in Voc and FF are measured. 1. Introduction High efficiency CIGS solar cells have been obtained. We present a comparison of the CIGS based solar cells made with CBD, PVD-CdS and PVD-Zn-based buffer

  16. Htfiffi m'* Effects of Alternative Fuels on Vehicle Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : gasoline, gasoline-ethanol l'rlends, diesel, biodiesel blends, LPG lquefied petroleurn gas) ancl CNG operating on gasoline arrd a similar non-FF\\-. llir:s rs a in-al ethanol composition blend requires vehicle in the atmosphere. For many r.ears, the primary vehicie fuels used have been gasoline and diesel fuels. These iuels

  17. -A Science Service Feature Released upoh receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . There are: "Hain wccter , 15 days; "moving of snakes, 15 days; "spring equinox, 15 days;. !pure brightness of heat," 16 days; "great heat," and l'signs Of autumn," together 31 days; Ifend of' heat" and "white dew," together 31 days; "cold dew,ff 15 days;%utumn equinox," 15 days; flhoar.frost,t) 15 days; "signs of winter

  18. MATHEMATISCHES INSTITUT DER UNIVERSIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forster, Otto

    234 5CBB 9346 AF4E 39B7 7AEC FF87 826C 397D y 3 = 4C43 FA0C 3563 A28C 8242 12EB 18F4 F47E 4BEB A2C6 37

  19. MATHEMATISCHES INSTITUT DER UNIVERSIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forster, Otto

    CAE5 AA0E 81BF #16; 1 = A122 6425 BEB4 59AE B52D 2D7D EFBA C46D 8D5C 0A15 #16; 2 = 892E 2105 2733 4FF0

  20. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 705721, 2011 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/705/2011/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    carbon dioxide and other anthropogenic trace gas emissions from airborne measurements over Sacramento) in atmospheric samples can be used to examine several car- bon cycle and air quality questions. We collected- sociated with urban emissions. From these correlations we estimate emission ratios between CO2ff

  1. 5/24/2004 Copyright 2002-2004 by Benjamin Grosof. All Rights Reserved. Revised and Extended

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5/24/2004 Copyright 2002-2004 by Benjamin Grosof. All Rights Reserved. Revised and Extended Strawman for SWSL: ROSE: Rules and Ontologies for web SErvices Slides presented at SWSL F2F May 23, 2004://ebusiness.mit.edu/bgrosof #12;5/24/2004 Copyright 2002-2004 by Benjamin Grosof. All Rights Reserved. PREVIOUS SLIDES FOLLOW · Ff

  2. Tunable optical fiber devices based on broadband long-period gratings and pumped microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Tunable optical fiber devices based on broadband long-period gratings and pumped microfluidics; accepted 8 October 2003 This letter describes classes of tunable microfluidic fiber FF devices that use spectral range. Dynamic tuning is achieved by electrowetting-based pumping of microfluidic plugs back

  3. Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

    1997-01-01

    Powerplant Efficiency (%) FF Vehicle Fuel/Technologies gmC02) pp I Llecmcity gmC02 ] j KJ)Fuel gm j Coal Steam Oil Steam GasGas from Biomass from Solar Carbon Dioxide Table 2: [gin ~mlsslons~-~iJf°r Usage for Various Powerplant

  4. Frame expansions for Gabor multipliers John J. Benedetto 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedetto, John J.

    design, where redundant frame decompositions are increasingly applicable. Key words: Gabor multipliers, Gabor frames 1 Introduction Inspired and initiated by von Neumann in quantum mechanics [1], pp.405 ff of the unitary operator U. The equivalence of (1) and (2) follows from the elementary calculation () Pg,h () f

  5. Nondestructive evaluation of Polymer Coating Structures on Pharmaceutical Pellets using Full Field Optical Coherence Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, C; Zeitler, J. A; Dong, Y; Shen, Y.-C

    Full field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) using a conventional LED light source and a CMOS camera has been developed for characterising coatings on small pellet samples. A set of en-face images covering an area of 700µm x 700µm were taken...

  6. A SUBSPACE SIGNAL PROCESSING TECHNIQUE FOR CONCEALED WEAPONS Ahmed S. Ibrahim, K. J Ray Liu *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, K. J. Ray

    . -60 65 -80 045 Semi Automatic Pistol -- -0 38 Steel Revoler 85 A 0 35 Magnum Reoler ffCell Phone -90 frequency spectrum re- flected from different objects, which are 0.45 semi-automatic pistol, 0.38 steel

  7. Electrical Engineering BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Electrical Engineering BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed In, 121L Computer Science I and lab 4 CS 221 Computer Science II 3 ECE 210 Introduction to Electric ECE 380, 380L Electrical Engineering Practice and Lab 3 ECE 480 Senior Design Project I 3 FF ECE 482

  8. Task Allocation onto a Hypercube by Recursive Mincut Bipartitioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanujam, J. "Ram"

    ­SBIR program through Universal Energy Systems, Inc. (S­776­000­001) and by the State of Ohio through the Thomas uppercase delta T Italic letter (capital) ``tee'' ff Greek lowercase alpha fi Greek lowercase beta fi l Greek lowercase beta superscript ``ell'' fi u Greek lowercase beta superscript ``you'' #12; Task

  9. Khesbn no. 149 - Spring 2007 - Journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Admin, LAYCC

    2007-01-01

    ryrrf,.t rybrse:XbXu X - 0"l'l nx r1$1l? - Dl'Dl5t6r1 "lltrro'. 'tuuxs yu'rgllpr) nx i:*pi*ulrii:rru>rp lyDll fN .ly:Eyl ? '? ff lltly vtrnrrn nx uDNVJrb orD D'tt Fryn ybr /? t{

  10. A DualDisk File System: ext4 Mihai Budiu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budiu, Mihai

    Characteristic Vocabulary ¥B©E5¡$§§£¦¥FGrt0¡j6¥£4F¡¥1§£8&WV¢ iFf$hgfUf6gi E0vgU5¡$§ )&§¡$¨§5¤&W©B! e9f$gIhi £¦¥b

  11. 24th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Hamburg, Germany, Sept. 2009 VIREEFFECT: VIARESISTANCE INDUCED RECOMBINATION ENHANCEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEVELOPMENT The strategies for efficiency improvement of EWT solar cells are comparable to those of any other­RESISTANCE INDUCED RECOMBINATION ENHANCEMENT ­ THE ORIGIN OF REDUCED FILL FACTORS OF EMITTER WRAP THROUGH SOLAR CELLS-Wolfen, Germany. ABSTRACT: Emitter wrap through solar cells (EWT) are known for exhibiting low fill factors (FF

  12. Merging Maps in 2D Structure and Motion Estimation Magnus Oskarsson, Kalle #str#m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    problem. ffl Reønement of the solution. Such complete systems are quite diOEcult to construct. The main di øxed. The bearing ff deøned in øg 1, depends on the position of the beacon (U x ; U y in the laser scanner. The position and the heading of the vehicle is calculated using these bearing

  13. Evidence of Structure in the Lymanff Forest Jochen Liske and John K. Webb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liske, Jochen

    of Ly­ff forest absorption systems toward a group of eight closely spaced QSOs has been analysed to the spectra of a close group of eight QSOs with a mean redshift of 2.97. The data (Williger et al. 1996 in the spectra of a group of eight closely spaced QSOs as a function of wavelength and smoothing scale

  14. 2/2007 B56133 MaxPlanckResearchSCIENCE MAGAZINE OF THE MAX PLANCK SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;2 / 2 0 0 7 M A X P L A N C K R E S E A R C H 3 A shared duty ­ Politics is never sim- ple there: the Institutes for Astronomy, Nuclear Physics, Medical Research and Comparative Public an abbreviated version of the chapter on "Politics in an Aging Society" in this issue (page 54 ff.), which deals

  15. Chemistry 120a AY 9596 Problem Set 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    and chemists of this century we know that electrons have two internal coordinates that by convention but electrons have three internal coordinates that for our purposes will be designated as ff, fi, and fl. a) Write down the first three rows of the periodic table for this universe (use the normal elemental names

  16. Volume II, Summer 1987 $10 In this issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Tim

    Gary Phillips on Doug little c Roy Solt YS QUARTERLY 30 CPU LR8 and 4P sorting PRO-WAM data ff on WORD with DW II #12;#12;THE MISOSYS QUARTERLY Volume II, Issue i Summer 1987 Table of Contents The ......................................69 PRO-WAM Window & Application Manager .................69 Sorting/Searching PRO-WAM Data files

  17. Some polynomial versions of an existence theorem for systems of ordinary differential equations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Duane Albert

    1964-01-01

    ' and for which Z(x ) = Y dx 0 o Let J" g J' such that Z(x) 6 R . Then 1 and Z(x) =Y + ( F(t, Z(t)) dt x 0 X Z( ) - Y ( II = II ~ F(t, Z(t)) - F(t'Y -I("' " ll x x 2 J(x- I ~~F t, Z(t)) ? F t, Y t? ~~ X It is shown that (L+M)K (x-x ) 22 But note... that ffZ ( ) - Y, ( ) f f = ffZ( ) ? Y ? Y (x) + Y x ff 5 B(t, z(t))dt lf+L( ?. ) x x j& - ) 5 ff?t &?)) f f ?+ L -x ) X J(x-x ) I M dt+ L(x-x ) X 0 0 X 0 Thus inductively L+M) ( -x ) 0 x 2 j& ?, 5 ffy, zt- x 0 x ( J(x- ) K X 0 J...

  18. PROPORTIONAL DIFFERENTIATED SERVICES FOR THE INTERNET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dovrolis, Constantinos

    PROPORTIONAL DIFFERENTIATED SERVICES FOR THE INTERNET by Konstantinos Dovrolis #12; PROPORTIONAL ­ MADISON 2000 #12; i To my family M ffae'šo& , Kff'øj, Ašš fflø ff, T ffoeo& #12; ii PROPORTIONAL develop the Proportional Differentiated Services (PDS) architecture. In PDS, the differentiation between

  19. Adhesion of vesicles to curved substrates Department of Mathematics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Qiang

    Adhesion of vesicles to curved substrates Sovan Das* Department of Mathematics, Pennsylvania State Received 12 November 2007; published 15 January 2008 We investigate the adhesion of vesicles, under.70.Uv, 68.35.Np, 46.15.Ff I. INTRODUCTION Adhesion is a key mechanism for the survival of many cells

  20. Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the Al -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C agin, Adri van Duin, and William A. Goddard III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the AlÕ -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C¸ agin 2004 Using a reactive force field ReaxFF , we investigated the structural, energetic, and adhesion and analysis of wetting and adhesion strength of liquid Al on an -Al2O3 surface via the sessile drop method.1

  1. Modeling of Hydrogen Storage Materials: A Reactive Force Field for NaH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    range transport mechanism of Al during the dissociation process. Briefly, the conventional (de to accurately predict the dynamical and reactive processes in hydrocarbons [2], sihcon/sihcon oxides [3 for hydrocarbons[5], ReaxFF has been successfully applied to study Si/Si02 interfaces[3], MgH2 systems and Al

  2. International Journal of Statistics and Management Systems, 2007, Vol. 2, No. 12, pp. 6787. c 2007 Serials Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schick, Anton

    of derivatives of convolutions of densities Jichang Du and Anton Schick Abstract In this paper we generalize;68 Jichang Du and Anton Schick Here we are interested in estimating derivatives of the convolution g = ff and Cao (2000) obtained root-n consistency of their estimators at fixed points x. Schick and Wefelmeyer

  3. Symmetry-broken crystal structure of elemental boron at low temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widom, Michael

    lower energies* * occur within larger unit cells. Alternative configurations lie nearby found its energy to be greater than the energy of the ff-rhombohe* *dral (red) form, implying of the configuration space we find a uniq* *ue, energy minimizing pattern of occupied and vacant sites

  4. Human Resource Management BBA, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    of Business 3 GENBUS 441 Business In Society 3 FF GENBUS 450 Business Policies 3 HRM 305 Human Resource Management 3 HRM 330 Human Resource Law 3 HRM 340 Employee and Labor Relations 3 HRM 406 Compensation department approval). 3 One of the following: COMM 307, COMM 390/DISPUT 390/SOC 390, HRM 408 3 #12;Electives

  5. Bachelor of Business Administration, Human Resource Management, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    3 3 FF GENBUS 450 Business Policies 3 HRM 305 Human Resource Management HRM 330 Human Resource Law HRM 340 Employee and Labor Relations HRM 406 Compensation and Benefits 3 3 3 3 Successful completion 390/DISPUT 390/SOC 390, HRM 408 3 Electives to total 120 credits 12-16 Total 120 #12;

  6. Arithmetic nature of sums of certain convergent series S. D. Adhikari and N. Saradha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saradha, N.

    * *s. In the present article, we shall discuss the questions of irrationality and transcend* *ence subject and its conne* *ction with the theory of numbers has a very long history. In our college days of sums of some infinite series. 2.Definitions_and_some_basic_observations_ A real number ff

  7. RTL Hardware Design Chapter 8 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Pong P.

    RTL Hardware Design by P. Chu Chapter 8 1 Sequential Circuit Design: Principle #12;RTL Hardware analysis 7. Alternative one-segment coding style 8. Use of variable for sequential circuit #12;RTL Hardware latch ­ D FF (Flip-Flop) ­ RAM · Synchronous vs asynchronous circuit #12;RTL Hardware Design by P. Chu

  8. RTL Hardware Design Chapter 8 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Pong P.

    1 RTL Hardware Design by P. Chu Chapter 8 1 Sequential Circuit Design: Principle RTL Hardware analysis 7. Alternative one-segment coding style 8. Use of variable for sequential circuit RTL Hardware latch ­ D FF (Flip-Flop) ­ RAM · Synchronous vs asynchronous circuit RTL Hardware Design by P. Chu

  9. Two-Phase Region in the DTAB/SL Mixed Surfactant System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianbin

    (SL)aqueoustwo-phasesystemhasbeenstudied.ByusingFF-TEM,dynamiclightscattering (DLS), a viscosity meter, and polarization microscopy, the effects of surfactant concentration and mixing ratio, temperature, salt concentration, and additives (octanol and toluene) on the phase such ionic surfactants have large and hydrophobic headgroups or the salt concentration was extremely high

  10. The nature and function of historical argument in the Henrician Reformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Graham David

    1977-02-22

    Soclety, Orig. series 176, 1928, p. 64. ('Proheyme' to Polychronicon, 1482) 2 On the contribution of Valla and Biondo, see below, p. 38, 43ff 5 but others. Bruni in particular,and Guarino,had Cicero's respect for history as rhetoric. for history which...

  11. Microfluidics Formation of Bubbles in a Multisection Flow-Focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Microfluidics Formation of Bubbles in a Multisection Flow-Focusing Junction Michinao Hashimoto the stable formation of trains of mono-, bi-, and tri-disperse bubbles in microfluidic flow- focusing (FF-assembly through the patterns of flow created by the bubbles. 1.1 Bubbles and Droplets in Microfluidics

  12. Economics BA, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Economics BA, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed InProgress Future Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 CID ECON 421 Quantitative Methods in Economics 3 FF ECON 422 Econometrics 3 Upper-division economics courses 15 Upper-division mathematics, business, or environmental studies courses or social

  13. Economics, Social Science Secondary Education Emphasis BA, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Economics, Social Science Secondary Education Emphasis BA, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number CID ECON 421 Quantitative Methods in Economics 3 FF ECON 422 Econometrics 3 Upper-division economics. 14 Social science field other than economics (history, political science, or sociology) 21 Electives

  14. A combination of computational and experimental approaches identifies DNA sequence constraints associated with target site binding specificity of the transcription factor CSL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torella, Rubben; Li, Jinghua; Kinrade, Eddie; Cerda-Moya, Gustavo; Contreras, Ashley N.; Foy, Robert; Stojnic, Robert; Glen, Robert C.; Kovall, Rhett A.; Adryan, Boris; Bray, Sarah J.

    2014-08-11

    protocol MD simulations were performed with the AMBER11 package (http://ambermd.org/) (27), using the AMBER FF99SB force field (28). All calculations were made with the CUDA enabled version of PMEMD (29), using TESLA GPUs at the High Performance Computing...

  15. arXiv:1111.4242v1[astro-ph.SR]18Nov2011 Solar Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , and Pohjolainen, 2011). Most of the quiescent solar microwave emission is due to free­free bremsstrahlung (FF profile in the whole microwave band, let alone the polar one. The 10.7 cm spatially integrated solar radioarXiv:1111.4242v1[astro-ph.SR]18Nov2011 Solar Physics DOI: 10.1007/·····-···-···-····-· Allen

  16. Alien Physiology, Convergent Evolution,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    Alien Physiology, Convergent Evolution, and fc #12;N = N* fs fGHZ fp nH fl fJ ffEufm fi fc L/T ·N Intelligent Aliens be Humanoids? #12;What might a Martian look like? Let's build an alien... #12;If we expect

  17. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 1054510554, 2013 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/13/10545/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    atmospheric pollution modifies weather: a case of mixed biomass burning with fossil fuel combustion pollution, China, we found that mixed agricultural burning plumes with fossil fuel combustion pollution resulted atmospheric pollution due to high amounts of FF combustion (Richter et al., 2005; Chan and Yao, 2008; Tie

  18. Invasive Insect Pathways Amanda Bertino, Adam Burt, Nikki Gautreau, Emily Mei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    affect the economy, human health and natural resources. o Yellow Fever Mosquito o Emerald Ash Borer #12://www.issg.org/database/welcome http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/fruit_flies/downloads/FF-of-Mexico- 5%20yr

  19. Bachelor of Science, Mathematics, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Algebra & Number Theory 3 MATH 314 Foundations of Analysis 3 MATH 361 Probability and Statistics I 3 FF Introduction to Linear Algebra or MATH 333 Differential Equations with Matrix Theory 3-4 MATH 403 Linear Algebra 3 Two of the following, with at least one at the 400-level: MATH 307, MATH 308, MATH 311, MATH 387

  20. The MSXX Force Field for the Barium Sulfate-Water Interface Yun Hee Jang,, Xiao Yan Chang, Mario Blanco, Sungu Hwang,, Yongchun Tang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    The MSXX Force Field for the Barium Sulfate-Water Interface Yun Hee Jang,, Xiao Yan Chang, Mario, 2001; In Final Form: April 3, 2002 A new force field (MSXX FF) was developed for barium sulfate (BaSO4, highly insoluble alkaline earth metal sulfates [barite (BaSO4), celestite (SrSO4), and anhydrite (CaSO4

  1. Transmission investment and expansion planning in a restructured electricity market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Cheong

    Transmission investment and expansion planning in a restructured electricity market F.F Wua,b , F.L. Zhengb,c , F.S. Wena,b, * a Center for Electrical Energy Systems, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Guangzhou, 510640, China Abstract Transmission planning in a restructured electricity market becomes

  2. BTWW Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship??

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilbury, Dawn

    : chicken and egg problem CEOs are supposed to write the business plan It is hard to attract a CEO without were only minimally valuable by the time the company was sold Early stage capital can be hard to come not have a history of raising funds through the sale of stocks, etc. F&F: sometime called family and fools

  3. Health Science Studies BS, Gerontology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Health Science Studies BS, Gerontology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Terminology 3 HLTHST 202 Health Delivery Systems 3 HLTHST 215 Introduction to Health Informatics 3 HLTHST 300 Pathophysiology 4 HLTHST 314 Health Law and Ethics 3 CID HLTHST 382 Research Methods in Health 3 FF HLTHST 400

  4. Health Science Studies BS, Public Health Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Health Science Studies BS, Public Health Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Terminology 3 HLTHST 202 Health Delivery Systems 3 HLTHST 215 Introduction to Health Informatics 3 HLTHST 300 Pathophysiology 4 HLTHST 314 Health Law and Ethics 3 CID HLTHST 382 Research Methods in Health 3 FF HLTHST 400

  5. Kalman-filtered compressive sensing for high resolution estimation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions from sparse measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet; Michalak, Anna M.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2013-09-01

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. The limited nature of the measured data leads to a severely-underdetermined estimation problem. If the estimation is performed at fine spatial resolutions, it can also be computationally expensive. In order to enable such estimations, advances are needed in the spatial representation of ffCO2 emissions, scalable inversion algorithms and the identification of observables to measure. To that end, we investigate parsimonious spatial parameterizations of ffCO2 emissions which can be used in atmospheric inversions. We devise and test three random field models, based on wavelets, Gaussian kernels and covariance structures derived from easily-observed proxies of human activity. In doing so, we constructed a novel inversion algorithm, based on compressive sensing and sparse reconstruction, to perform the estimation. We also address scalable ensemble Kalman filters as an inversion mechanism and quantify the impact of Gaussian assumptions inherent in them. We find that the assumption does not impact the estimates of mean ffCO2 source strengths appreciably, but a comparison with Markov chain Monte Carlo estimates show significant differences in the variance of the source strengths. Finally, we study if the very different spatial natures of biogenic and ffCO2 emissions can be used to estimate them, in a disaggregated fashion, solely from CO2 concentration measurements, without extra information from products of incomplete combustion e.g., CO. We find that this is possible during the winter months, though the errors can be as large as 50%.

  6. Neutral Beam Injection Experiments and Related Behavior of Neutral Particles in the GAMMA 10 Tandem Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakashima, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Watanabe, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Higashizono, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ohki, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ogita, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Shoji, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science(Japan); Kobayashi, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University (Japan); Islam, M.K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kubota, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yamada, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Murakami, R. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-01-15

    Results of neutral beam injection (NBI) experiments in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasmas are presented together with the neutral particle behavior observed in the experiments. A hydrogen neural beam was injected into the hot-ion-mode plasmas by using the injector installed in the central-cell for the plasma heating and fueling. High-energy ions produced by NBI were observed and its energy distribution was measured for the first time with a neutral particle analyzer installed in the central-cell. The temporal and spatial behavior of hydrogen was observed with axially aligned H{sub {alpha}} detectors installed from the central midplane to anchor-cell. Enhancement of hydrogen recycling due to the beam injection and the cause of the observed decrease in plasma diamagnetism are discussed. The Monte-Carlo code DEGAS for neutral transport simulation was applied to the GAMMA 10 central-cell and a 3-dimensional simulation was performed in the NBI experiment. Localization of neutral particle during the beam injection is investigated based on the simulation and it was found that the increased recycling due to the beam injection was dominant near the injection port.

  7. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Qian, Yun; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Black carbon (BC)particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source-receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source- receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although the HTP local emissions only contribute about 10% of BC in the HTP, this contribution is extremely sensitive to changes in the local emissions. Lastly, we show that the annual mean radiative forcing (0.42 W m-2) due to BC in snow outweighs the BC dimming effect-0.3 W m-2)at the surface over the HTP, although the mean BC-in- snow forcing is likely overestimated. We find strong seasonal and sub -region variation with a peak value of 5W m-2 in the spring over Northwest Plateau. The annual mean dust-in-snow forcing is comparable to that of BC over the entire HTP but significantly larger than BC over the North east Plateau. Such a large forcing of BC in snow is sufficient to cause earlier snow melting and potentially contribute to the acceleration of glacier retreat

  8. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Easter, R. C.; Ma, P. -L.; Singh, B.; Huang, J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-01-07

    Black carbon (BC) particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source–receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fatemore »of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source–receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although local emissions only contribute about 10% to BC in the HTP, this contribution is extremely sensitive to local emission changes. Lastly, we show that the annual mean radiative forcing (0.42 W m-2) due to BC in snow outweighs the BC dimming effect (-0.3 W m-2) at the surface over the HTP. We also find strong seasonal and spatial variation with a peak value of 5 W m-2 in the spring over Northwest Plateau. Such a large forcing of BC in snow is sufficient to cause earlier snow melting and potentially contribute to the acceleration of glacier retreat.« less

  9. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Easter, R. C.; Ma, P. -L.; Singh, B.; Huang, J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-06-08

    Black carbon (BC) particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source–receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source-tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate ofmore »BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation in the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source–receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on season and location in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer, when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in the Himalayas and central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to the northeast plateau in all seasons and southeast plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching the northwest plateau, especially in the summer. Although local emissions only contribute about 10% of BC in the HTP, this contribution is extremely sensitive to local emission changes. Lastly, we show that the annual mean radiative forcing (0.42 W m-2) due to BC in snow outweighs the BC dimming effect (-0.3 W m-2) at the surface over the HTP. We also find strong seasonal and spatial variation with a peak value of 5 W m-2 in the spring over the northwest plateau. Such a large forcing of BC in snow is sufficient to cause earlier snow melting and potentially contribute to the acceleration of glacier retreat.« less

  10. Lattice site location of impurities in group III nitrides using emission channeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vries, Bart; Wahl, Ulrich

    The group III nitrides comprise the semiconducting materials InN, GaN, AlN and their ternary alloys. During the last decade, GaN has attracted widespread attention due to its large band gap and hardness. These properties, combined with the fact that its band gap can be adjusted by alloying it with InN and AlN, make GaN a suitable material for the fabrication of optical components that operate in the blue to ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and for microwave and high-power applications. Indeed, during the last couple of years, GaN-based blue and violet light-emitting devices (LEDs) and laser diodes have been realized and commercialized: the violet laser diodes will even be the keystone to the next generation of optical data storage standards, Blu-ray and HD-DVD. \\\\ \\\\ A key aspect in device production is the incorporation of dopants that can alter the electronic, magnetic or optical properties of the host material. For example, Si is often used to generate n-type GaN, while Mg is the most fr...

  11. Multi-wavelength photometry of the T Tauri binary V582 Mon (KH 15D): A new epoch of occultations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windemuth, Diana; Herbst, William

    2014-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength (VRIJHK) observations of KH 15D obtained in 2012/2013, as well as a master table of standard photometry spanning the years 1967 to 2013. The system is a close, eccentric T Tauri binary embedded in an inclined precessing circumbinary (CB) ring. The most recent data show the continued rise of star B with respect to the trailing edge of the occulting horizon as the system's maximum brightness steadily increases. The wealth of data in time and wavelength domains allows us to track the long-term CCD color evolution of KH 15D. We find that the V – I behavior is consistent with direct and scattered light from the composite color of two stars with slightly different temperatures. There is no evidence for any reddening or bluing associated with extinction or scattering by interstellar-medium-size dust grains. Furthermore, we probe the system's faint phase behavior at near-infrared wavelengths in order to investigate extinction properties of the ring and signatures of a possible shepherding planet sometimes invoked to confine the CB ring at ?5 AU. The wavelength independence of eclipse depth at second contact is consistent with the ring material being fully opaque to 2.2 ?m. The color-magnitude diagrams demonstrate excess flux in J and H at low light levels, which may be due to the presence of a hot, young Jupiter-mass planet.

  12. Evolution of stellar disk truncations since z=1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignacio Trujillo; Ruyman Azzollini; Judit Bakos; John Beckman; Michael Pohlen

    2008-07-26

    We present our recent results on the cosmic evolution of the outskirst of disk galaxies. In particular we focus on disk-like galaxies with stellar disk truncations. Using UDF, GOODS and SDSS data we show how the position of the break (i.e. a direct estimator of the size of the stellar disk) evolves with time since z~1. Our findings agree with an evolution on the radial position of the break by a factor of 1.3+-0.1 in the last 8 Gyr for galaxies with similar stellar masses. We also present radial color gradients and how they evolve with time. At all redshift we find a radial inside-out bluing reaching a minimum at the position of the break radius, this minimum is followed by a reddening outwards. Our results constraint several galaxy disk formation models and favour a scenario where stars are formed inside the break radius and are relocated in the outskirts of galaxies through secular processes.

  13. Evolution of stellar disk truncations since z=1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trujillo, Ignacio; Bakos, Judit; Beckman, John; Pohlen, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We present our recent results on the cosmic evolution of the outskirst of disk galaxies. In particular we focus on disk-like galaxies with stellar disk truncations. Using UDF, GOODS and SDSS data we show how the position of the break (i.e. a direct estimator of the size of the stellar disk) evolves with time since z~1. Our findings agree with an evolution on the radial position of the break by a factor of 1.3+-0.1 in the last 8 Gyr for galaxies with similar stellar masses. We also present radial color gradients and how they evolve with time. At all redshift we find a radial inside-out bluing reaching a minimum at the position of the break radius, this minimum is followed by a reddening outwards. Our results constraint several galaxy disk formation models and favour a scenario where stars are formed inside the break radius and are relocated in the outskirts of galaxies through secular processes.

  14. Outskirts of spiral galaxies: result of a secular evolution process?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakos, J; Azzollini, R; Beckman, J E; Pohlen, M

    2010-01-01

    We present our recent results on the properties of the outskirts of disk galaxies. In particular, we focus on spiral galaxies with stellar disk truncations in their radial surface brightness profiles. Using SDSS, UDF and GOODS data we show how the position of the break (i.e., a direct estimator of the size of the stellar disk) evolves with time since z~1. Our findings agree with an evolution on the radial position of the break by a factor of 1.3+/-0.1 in the last 8 Gyr for galaxies with similar stellar masses. We also present radial color gradients and how they evolve with time. At all redshift we find a radial inside-out bluing reaching a minimum at the position of the break radius, this minimum is followed by a reddening outwards. Our results constrain several galaxy disk formation models and favour a scenario where stars are formed inside the break radius and are relocated in the outskirts of galaxies through secular processes.

  15. Calculation of the Electroelastic Green's Function of the Hexagonal Infinite Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Michelitsch

    2015-03-10

    The electroelastic 4 $\\times$ 4 Green's function of a piezoelectric hexagonal (transversely isotropic) infinitely extended medium is calculated explicitly in closed compact form (eqs. (73) ff. and (88) ff., respectively) by using residue calculation. The results can also be derived from Fredholm's method [2]. In the case of vanishing piezoelectric coupling the derived Green's function coincides with two well known results: Kr{\\"o}ner 's expressions for the elastic Green's function tensor [4] is reproduced and the electric part then coincides with the electric potential (solution of Poisson equation) which is caused by a unit point charge. The obtained electroelastic Green's function is useful for the calculation of the electroelastic Eshelby tensor [16].

  16. Data Package of Samples Collected for Hydrogeologic and Geochemical Characterization: 300 Area RI/FS Sediment Cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Michael J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Williams, Benjamin D.

    2011-05-01

    This is a data package for sediment samples received from the 300 FF 5 OU. This report was prepared for CHPRC. Between August 16, 2010 and April 25, 2011 sediment samples were received from 300-FF-5 for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

  17. SPECTROSCOPIC REDSHIFTS OF GALAXIES WITHIN THE FRONTIER FIELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebeling, Harald; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Barrett, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    We present a catalog of 1921 spectroscopic redshifts measured in the fields of the massive galaxy clusters MACSJ0416.1–2403 (z = 0.397), MACSJ0717.5+3745 (z = 0.546), and MACSJ1149.5+2223 (z = 0.544), i.e., three of the four clusters selected by Space Telescope Science Institute as the targets of the Frontier Fields (FFs) initiative for studies of the distant Universe via gravitational lensing. Compiled in the course of the Massive Cluster Survey project (MACS) that detected the FF clusters, this catalog is provided to the community for three purposes: (1) to allow the identification of cluster members for studies of the galaxy population of these extreme systems, (2) to facilitate the removal of unlensed galaxies and thus reduce shear dilution in weak-lensing analyses, and (3) to improve the calibration of photometric redshifts based on both ground- and spacebased observations of the FF clusters.

  18. Nuclear methods for surface modifications of polymers by ion induced cografting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzei, R O; Smolko, E; Tadey, D

    1996-01-01

    Polymer surface modifications are obtained by the application of radiation treatments and other physic-chemical methods: fission fragment irradiation (ff) or ion implantation and etching and/or grafting procedures. A method of surface modification consisting in the physical adsorption of protein after radiation was assayed. The biocompatibility of the surface was observed by cell seeding and cell adhesion experiments. Track membranes were prepared by ff radiation treatment, etching and grafting techniques of commercial foil polymers. PC, PET, PVDF, CTA, PMMA and PS were assayed as bulk polymers and NIPAAm, AAc, VP, Styrene, MMA and HEMA as grafting monomers. Fission fragment radiation from Cf-252, alpha-particles from Am-241, 25 MeV protons particles from CAE cyclotron accelerator and gamma-rays from Co-60 sources were employed in the experiments.

  19. The Force Field for Amino Acid Based Ionic Liquids: Polar Residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fileti, Eudes Eterno

    2015-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) constitute one of the most active fields of research nowadays. Many organic and inorganic molecules can be converted into ions via relatively simple procedures. These ions can be combined into ILs. Amino acid based ILs (AAILs) represent a specific interest due to solubilization of biological species, participation in enzymatic catalysis, and capturing toxic gases. We develop a new force field (FF) for the seven selected AAILs comprising 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation and amino acid anions with polar residues. The anions were obtained via deprotonation of carboxyl group. We account for peculiar interactions between the anion and the cation by fitting electrostatic potential for an ion pair, in contrast to isolated ions. The van der Waals interactions were transferred from the CHARMM36 FF with minor modifications, as suggested by hybrid density functional theory. Compatibility between our parameters and CHARMM36 parameters is preserved. The developed interaction model fosters computation...

  20. Satiric wit and satiric humor in Pope's Rape of the Lock and An Essay on Man 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnott, Carol Ann

    1970-01-01

    C A'l. f RTC ':. 'l'j' Aff f?". '&'i'IRXC ff 0""IQR &'q' "-0 -'~'" , 3 'j' ff", I CC W ?" If, ) A!i '-l, o?'gA f OIf ffqesjs CAROL A. "lif, "-XII30'. I!7. hixloi!I ate@ to tice V~t'edna. te ColI opo oi ~~e;. .e. s A2N University;r in v... AiiM H. t:i'lH'i3', I'. i! C C iL &~&r'o rc. 'd ~g to ~t vie ansi co&]+('n c by; C C O ? (C&1UI c'. ', '1 c J CG!l1911+ LGB) ~ @ pi gi~&+ JI~ . Z &. 'i . i-:-. . iT, rj~n~t 1 1 g)'( - "$ vll2- "~-/ i ~. i *, n1 "v, ;u. . t 1 '370 r'015 r...

  1. Using Measurements of Fill Factor at High Irradiance to Deduce Heterobarrier Band Offsets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, J. M.; Steiner, M. A.; Kanevce, A.

    2011-07-01

    Using a 2D device simulation tool, we examine the high irradiance behavior of a single junction, GaAs concentrator cell as a function of the doping in the back surface confinement layer. The confinement layer is designed to be a barrier for both holes and electrons in the base of the solar cell. For a p-type base we show that the FF of the cell at high concentrations is a strong function of both the magnitude of the valence band offset and the doping level in the barrier. In short, for a given valence band offset (VBO), there is a critical barrier doping, below which the FF drops rapidly with lower doping. This behavior is confirmed experimentally for a GaInP/GaAs double heterostructure solar cell where the critical doping concentration (at 500 suns) in the back surface confinement layer is ~1e18 cm-3 for a VBO of 300 meV.

  2. Modelling of Carbide and Laves Phase Precipitation in 9-12 wt% Chromium Steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robson, Joseph Douglas

    1997-01-28

    ????????? ? ??? ??? ???????? ???? ????? ? ?ff???flfi ffi?????fi ? ffifl?!?fl?? ?ffi? ?"ff?#"? ???? ?? $&%('&)+* "?, ?????????? ?-?? fi."?????? fi /10 2436587:93@?BADCFE@5HGI3KJ1583KL M CNE4OP7 M 36CFC 7QAK7 M E4R JBOTSNUVAK7 WYX:Z\\[][V^P_a`cb:`dZPe4fg[chjilkmZn`d`c^]XHope4_q`sr6^t... X@^sup_:^]^mevo w epxP`]e4_(eyo{z|r?Zn}de:[~ev6r??V b4`?`dr?^???f?p? ?H? ???T????~???s?s? ?s¡d¢4¡d??£4¤(?¥?H?s¦~§T¨???¡s¡d? ?ª©«£a?¡d?~?¬?~? ­4?d?P?¬£4©&®¯£Q° ¡s£a?£a©¯±6?T?¥²?£a?s£4³T?Q´µ¢4...

  3. Scenarios for the ATF2 Ultra-Low Betas Proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marin, Eduardo; Tomas, Rogelio; Bambade, Philip; Kuroda, Shigeru; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; Parker, Brett; Seryi, Andrei; White, Glen; Woodley, Mark; /SLAC

    2012-06-29

    The current ATF2 Ultra-Low beta proposal was designed to achieve 20nm vertical IP beam size without considering the multipolar components of the FD magnets. In this paper we describe different scenarios that avoid the detrimental effect of these multipolar errors to the beam size at the interaction point (IP). The simplest approach consists in modifying the optics, but other solutions are studied as the introduction of super-conducting wigglers to reduce the emittance or the replacement of the normal-conducting focusing quadrupole in the Final Doublet (NC-QF1FF) with a super-conducting quadrupole one (SC-QF1FF). These are fully addressed in the paper.

  4. Scenarios For The ATF2 Ultra-Low Betas Proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marin E.; Parker B.; Tomas R. Bambade Kuroda S. Okugi T. Tauchi T. Terunuma N. Urakawa J. Seryi A. White G. Woodley M.

    2010-05-23

    The current ATF2 Ultra-Low beta proposal was designed to achieve 20nm vertical IP beam size without considering the multipolar components of the FD magnets. In this paper we describe different scenarios that avoid the detrimental effect of these multipolar errors to the beam size at the interaction point (IP). The simplest approach consists in modifying the optics, but other solutions are studied as the introduction of super-conducting wigglers to reduce the emittance or the replacement of the normal-conducting focusing quadrupole in the Final Doublet (NC-QF1FF) with a super-conducting quadrupole one (SC-QF1FF). These are fully addressed in the paper.

  5. Microsphere Light-Scattering Layer Assembled by ZnO Nanosheets for the Construction of High Efficiency (>5%) Quantum Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    for CdS/CdSe quantum dot cosensitized solar cells (QDSCs) with a power conversion efficiency (PCE Efficiency (>5%) Quantum Dots Sensitized Solar Cells Jianjun Tian,*, Lili Lv, Xuyang Wang, Chengbin Fei. As a result, the solar cell displayed Jsc of 17.13 mA/cm2 , Voc of 0.56 V, FF of 0.53, and PCE of 5.08%, one

  6. Landscaping Housekeeping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Lot EE Lot CC Lot AA Lot O Lot P Lot J Event Parking Lot K Lot K Extension Lot M Lot N Lot E Lot F Lot IB Lot A LotB Lot FF Lot R1 Lot R2 Lot S Lot T Lot U Pedestrian Entrance College Road Park and Ride. 2 McNeill Hall Shops at the Crossing James Hall Seahawk Crossing SC 2 East Parking Deck Westside CEP

  7. A B C D E GF H A B C D E GF H

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adhar, Gur Saran

    Lot I Lot R2 Lot R1 Lot SLot T Service Lot Field or Event Parking V V V Field or Event Parking V Lot TR NA NX HA JA SM LH MO WA CS Lot U KA Building Code V Visitor Parking Key Not UNCW Property SeahawkLandingDrive LionfishDrive Lot SS Lot SS Lot HH Lot SS Lot II LotFF Lot EE Lot GG Lot CC Lot AA Lot

  8. '~IIf[l.frf511l1!1:1f~!UJK~Jlff8.!rJi ,if[iijt!JfJ'Q,~li~JiIJtllrl~~Il.k!!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sereno, Martin

    "8i~1iJilI I!Jil(tll"IIJjill!.~I!l~181L8JIliIt~!JI.r~ff}11 l§ilStfJ~fiflfiJ~i.~:..1:I~..~t!il. I~flriffiiti!!ifJf~I[.Jltr[itil~!jifr~tii!lfJ!irl I55lIII!i~f[tif;JB1~191~!a if[iff.~fijll!i~I~!B-ii!I1 1i

  9. The Effect of State Health Insurance Selection on the Pediatricral Health Benefit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orynich, Catherine Ashley

    2014-12-16

    responsibility lying with the federal government. Lastly, the SP exchanges have “partnered” with the federal government to share management and fiscal responsibilities, often with the longer-term goal of eventually adopting a more independent model (e..., including: State-Based (SB), State Partnership (SP), and Federally-Facilitated (FF). Data were collected using two mechanisms: public record investigation and health policy expert interviews. The confidentiality of the personally identifiable information...

  10. Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) Quality Assurance Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-02-20

    The scope of the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) is to provide technical and integration support to Fluor Hanford, Inc., including operable unit investigations at 300-FF-5 and other groundwater operable units, strategic integration, technical integration and assessments, remediation decision support, and science and technology. This Quality Assurance Management Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project).

  11. Real entire functions of infinite order and a conjecture of Wiman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-08-26

    Mar 1, 2003 ... so the asymptotic behaviour of f//f mostly depends on that of ?. One can ... proved that for an entire function f, the condition f(z)f//(z) = 0, z ? C, ... linna characteristic for meromorphic functions in a half-plane, and proved an ..... (14). Since L has finitely many non-real poles and L + L//L has finitely many.

  12. Precision Measurements at The Higgs Resonance: A Probe of Radiative Fermion Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. M. Borzumati; G. R. Farrar; N. Polonsky; S. Thomas

    1997-12-17

    The possibility of radiative generation of fermion masses from soft supersymmetry breaking chiral flavor violation is explored. Consistent models are identified and classified. Phenomenological implications for electric dipole moments and magnetic moments, as well as collider probes -- in particular those relevant at the Higgs resonance -- are discussed. It is shown that partial widths $\\Gamma_{h^{0} \\to ff}$ are enhanced compared with the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  13. Eeleac ed u;Jon receipt but intended f o r use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    t o be blackened w i t h India ink, so that it would f u l l y absorb the solar rays. In one minute of time such a cube, if it could be exposed with one face at right angles t o the solar beam outside readers; ffT:ie solar constant of radiation i s the intensity of the sunts rays as they would be found

  14. Important Basic Equations for Order of Magnitude Estimation Conservation Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    area 4r2 or d2 Sphere: volume 4 3r3 or 1 6d3 Forces Newton's Second Law F = ma Force due to gravity Fg = mg = Gm1m2 r2 Drag force Fd = 1 2cDAv2 Frictional force Ff = cf FN Buoyant force Fb = fluidV g valid for non-relativistic systems) · Energy · Linear momentum · Angular momentum Quantities Force mass

  15. Entwurf: 27.05.2004 Verffentlicht in den Amtlichen Bekanntmachungen der Universitt Ulm Nr. 17 vom 26.07.2011, Seite 192 -209

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    -Württemberg (Landeshochschulgesetz ­ LHG) i.V.m. §§ 38 Abs. 2 Satz 5 und 6 in der Fassung vom 01. Januar 2005 (GBl. S. 1 ff), zuletzt. S. 793, 966), hat der Senat der Universität Ulm gemäß § 38 Abs. 4 Satz 1 LHG am 14.07.2011 die nachstehende Satzung beschlossen. Der Präsident der Universität hat am 19.07.2011 gemäß 38 Abs. 4 Satz 1 LHG

  16. Design of a Surface Albedo Modification Payload for Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Mitigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Shen

    2011-10-21

    Atmospheric Oxygen AU Astronomical Unit ETF Effective Thickness Factor FF1 Far-field 1 FPTE First Pass Transfer Efficiency GCR Galactic Cosmic Radiation JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory KACST King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology LEO Low Earth... ....................................................... 73 4-9 Maximum Normalized Torque vs. Temperature Plot ................................ 73 4-10 Maximum Torque vs. Temperature Plot .................................................... 74 4-11 Maximum Force vs. Tilt Angle...

  17. Spectroscopic manifestations of local crystal distortions in excited 4f states in crystals of huntite structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malakhovskii, A. V.; Gnatchenko, S. L.; Kachur, I. S.; Piryatinskaya, V. G.; Sukhachev, A. L.; Sokolov, A. E.; Strokova, A. Ya.; Kartashev, A. V.; Temerov, V. L.

    2013-01-15

    Optical absorption spectra of YbAl{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4}, TmAl{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} and TbFe{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} trigonal crystals have been studied in temperature range 2-300 K. Temperature behavior of absorption lines parameters has shown, that during some f-f transitions the local environment of rare earth ions undergo distortions, which are absent in the ground state.

  18. Design and Simulation of Lithium Rechargeable Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    O.000640897dO c rr11=-2.35565d-6 c cx=xx(l,j) c c c c c c cc c c c c c c c c c ffl=«1.OdO+dtanh(rrO-cx**.5»/2.0dO)* +(rrl + rr2*cx**.5 + rr3*cx + rr4*cx**1.5 + rr5*cx**2) ff2=«

  19. When Function Follows Form: Effects of Donor Copolymer Side Chains on Film Morphology and BHJ Solar Cell Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szarko, Jodi M.; Guo, J. C.; Liang, Y. Y.; Lee, B.; Rolczynski, Brian S.; Strzalka, J.; Xu, T.; Loser, Stephen; Marks, Tobin J.; Yu, Luping P.; Chen, Lin X.

    2010-01-01

    Detailed structural organization in organic films are investigated using grazing incidence X-ray scattering (GIXS) methods. The key structural features are revealed and the influence of specific side chain positions and shapes are characterized. A correlation between the fill factor (FF) of the corresponding device and the tightness of the polymer chain stacking inspires a new set of structural parameters for design of materials to optimize device efficiency.

  20. Study of soils buried under embankments to determine the potential of burial as a preservation technique for archaeological sites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Tania

    1989-01-01

    (5 in. ) to 2. 8 m (9. 3 ff). Based on a statistical analysis of select soil properlies, it was concluded that buried soil horizons are thicker, and have yellower hues, lighter values, coarser structures, less calcium carbonate concretions and more.... TMPA Site. Chappell Hill Site. . 21 . . . 22 . . . . . . . 2 5 25 . . . 2 6 . . . . . 28 29 Beulah Site . . Field Investigation. . . . . . . . . 3 3 Laboratory Analyses. . Analysis of the Data. Physical and Morphological Properties...

  1. Grobner Bases & their Computation Definitions + First Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalla, Priyank

    ://www.ece.utah.edu/~kalla October 6-8, 2014 #12;Agenda: Now that we know how to perform the reduction f F={f1,...,fs } -------+ r Algorithm Inputs: f , f1, . . . , fs F[x1, . . . , xn], fi = 0 Outputs: u1, . . . , us , r s.t. f = fi ui + r where r is reduced w.r.t. F = {f1, . . . , fs} and max(lp(u1)lp(f1), . . . , lp(us)lp(fs), lp

  2. Washability of trace elements in product coals from Illinois mines. Technical report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demir, I.; Ruch, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.; Steele, J.D.; Khan, S. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The existing trace element washability data on Illinois coals are based on float-sink methods, and these data are not applicable to modern froth flotation or column flotation processes. Particularly, there is a lack of washability data on samples from modern preparation plants, as well as other product (as-shipped) coals. The goal of this project is to provide the needed trace element washability data on as-shipped coals that were collected during 1992--1993 from Illinois mines. During the second quarter, froth flotation/release analysis (FF/RA) tests on 34 project samples were completed at {minus}100, {minus}200, and {minus}400 mesh particle sizes. Products from the FF/RA tests were analyzed for ash, moisture, and some for total S and heating value (BTU), and the resulting data are being used to construct a series of washability curves. For example, these curves can show variation in BTU or combustible recovery as a function of the amount of ash or S rejected. Composite samples, each having 80% of the total BTU (or combustibles), were prepared for the {minus}100 and {minus}200 mesh FF/RA tests and submitted for trace element analysis. The composite samples for the {minus}400 mesh FF/RA tests will be submitted soon, and the analytical results are expected to be available in 3--4 months. The trace element data on the composite samples will indicate the potential for the removal of each element from the coals at the chosen flotation conditions and particle sizes.

  3. Washability of trace elements in product coals from Illinois mines. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demir, I.; Ruch, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.; Steele, J.D.; Khan, S.

    1994-09-01

    Existing washability data on trace elements in Illinois coals were generated using float-sink methods, which are not applicable to modern froth flotation or column flotation processes. Particularly, there is a lack of washability data on product (as-shipped) coals from modern preparation plants. The goal of this project is to provide the needed trace element washability (release analysis) data on as-shipped Illinois coals using a froth flotation/release analysis (FF/RA) procedure. The results generated by this project will promote industrial utilization of Illinois coals and help assess the effect of new environmental requirements on the use of these coals in utility steam generation. During the third quarter, preparation and submission of all samples for chemical analysis were completed. Analyses of the samples produced by cleaning 34 as-shipped coals using FF/RA were completed for ash, moisture, S, heating value (BTU), and F, and some for Mn and oxide composition. The rest of the analytical work is in progress. The analytical data are being used to evaluate removal of ash, S, and trace elements from the as-shipped coals at the chosen flotation conditions and particles sizes. Available data on the FF/RA of five as-shipped coals at {minus}100, {minus}200, {minus}400 mesh sizes indicate that ash and F rejections increase with decreasing particle size. For the {minus}400 mesh tests, 70--90% of the ash and 35--74% of F were rejected at a BTU or combustibles recovery of 80%. One of the as-shipped coals was previously subjected to FF/RA tests at {minus}100 and {minus}400 mesh sizes to investigate mass balances achievable for the procedure. Preliminary results on ash and F contents of complete set of flotation products from the two tests indicate a mass balance of 95 to 100%.

  4. hepph/9512272 ON THE THEORETICAL STATUS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (š)N scattering processes are described by six further structure functions W š;\\Sigma 2 , xW š;\\Sigma 3 , F 2Z structure at short distances. Since both charged leptons (e \\Sigma ; ¯ \\Sigma ) and neutrinos (š; š) may ) collects couplings and propagator terms, e.g. P l \\Sigma ;fl (Q 2 ) = 2�ff 2 =Q 4 , P š;W +(Q 2 ) = G 2 F M

  5. Martin Mller Larsen Anders Skovsgaard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiserslautern, Universität

    Index: EH Song METADATA Pos: 0 #12;10 The Proposed Algorithm s = EHFFNNFFNN9FFNNFFvvvvQ/rrrttAZvNNtttAAA99Q Index: EH Song METADATA Pos: 0 HF Song METADATA Pos: 1 #12;11 The Proposed Algorithm s = EHFFNNFFNN9FFNNFFvvvvQ/rrrttAZvNNtttAAA99Q Index: EH Song METADATA Pos: 0 HF Song METADATA Pos: 1 FF Song

  6. Universal Properties of Response Functions of Nonequilibrium States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimizu, Akira

    (pump field). timeJin Jout NESS . current A nonequilibrium steady states (NESS) is realized for [tinJin Jout NESS . current J0 J B(J) · Response of the NESS to f(t): see the response, A(t) A t F+f - A F · ) : expectation value in the NESS ( ^F Tr [ ^tot F (t) ]) This relation is general and universal! #12;Example

  7. Andante q=80 Andante q=80

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, Peter

    ness- a gainst- the heart, heat of her youth, Held f molt en- in hot dark ness- a gainst- heat of her youth, Held f molt - en in hot dark ness- a gainst- heat of her youth, Held f molt en- in hot dark ness- a gainst- the 52 V.S. S. A. T. B. Org. held molt ff en- in hot dark f ness- a gainst- the heart, mf con

  8. HydrodynamicallyBased Overshoot Treatment and Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrodynamically­Based Overshoot Treatment and Nucleosynthesis in AGB Stars F. Herwig 1 , T. Bl dominated by 12 C. This leads to the nucleosynthesis of 13 C via 12 C(p; fl) 13 N(fi; + š) 13 C and is prob­ ably the major source of neutrons ( 13 C(ff; n) 16 O) for subsequent s­process nucleosynthesis. We

  9. University of Bath Ashbed Plantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    CLAVERTO N HILL Lake El Sub Sta 2241 Bushey Norwood Sports Training Village 8700 W ard Bdy CLAVERTON HILL Start Track Facility 0019 FW Bushey Norwood Ward Bdy FF FW Path (um) FW FW Bushey Norwood 173.7m BM 174 158.2m LB NO RTH LAN E Wo odla nd Pla ce Wood Hill Place Uplands 1 2 1 Woodhill Mews Lodge WID COM

  10. Quantifying sources of black carbon in Western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-05-04

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source-receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over Western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over the Northwest USA andmore »West Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  11. Quantifying sources of black carbon in western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-11-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source–receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over northwestern USA and westernmore »Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  12. A density functional tight binding/force field approach to the interaction of molecules with rare gas clusters: Application to (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}){sup +/0}Ar{sub n} clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iftner, Christophe; Simon, Aude; Korchagina, Kseniia; Rapacioli, Mathias; Spiegelman, Fernand

    2014-01-21

    We propose in the present paper a SCC-DFTB/FF (Self-Consistent-Charge Density Functional based Tight Binding/Force-Field) scheme adapted to the investigation of molecules trapped in rare gas environments. With respect to usual FF descriptions, the model involves the interaction of quantum electrons in a molecule with rare gas atoms in an anisotropic scheme. It includes polarization and dispersion contributions and can be used for both neutral and charged species. Parameters for this model are determined for hydrocarbon-argon complexes and the model is validated for small hydrocarbons. With the future aim of studying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Ar matrices, extensive benchmark calculations are performed on (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}){sup +/0}Ar{sub n} clusters against DFT and CCSD(T) calculations for the smaller sizes, and more generally against other experimental and theoretical data. Results on the structures and energetics (isomer ordering and energy separation, cohesion energy per Ar atom) are presented in detail for n = 1–8, 13, 20, 27, and 30, for both neutrals and cations. We confirm that the clustering of Ar atoms leads to a monotonous decrease of the ionization potential of benzene for n ? 20, in line with previous experimental and FF data.

  13. Fiber-optic thermometer application of thermal radiation from rare-earth end-doped SiO{sub 2} fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katsumata, Toru, E-mail: katsumat@toyo.jp; Morita, Kentaro; Komuro, Shuji; Aizawa, Hiroaki [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Visible light thermal radiation from SiO{sub 2} glass doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu were studied for the fiber-optic thermometer application based on the temperature dependence of thermal radiation. Thermal radiations according to Planck's law of radiation are observed from the SiO{sub 2} fibers doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, and Lu at the temperature above 1100 K. Thermal radiations due to f-f transitions of rare-earth ions are observed from the SiO{sub 2} fibers doped with Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb at the temperature above 900 K. Peak intensities of thermal radiations from rare-earth doped SiO{sub 2} fibers increase sensitively with temperature. Thermal activation energies of thermal radiations by f-f transitions seen in Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb doped SiO{sub 2} fibers are smaller than those from SiO{sub 2} fibers doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, and Lu. Thermal radiation due to highly efficient f-f transitions in Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb ions emits more easily than usual thermal radiation process. Thermal radiations from rare-earth doped SiO{sub 2} are potentially applicable for the fiber-optic thermometry above 900 K.

  14. Simulations of the quart (101-bar1)/water interface: A comparison of classical force fields, ab initi molecular dynamics, and x-ray reflectivity experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skelton, Adam; Fenter, Paul; Kubicki, James D.; Wesolowski, David J; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the (1011) surface of quartz interacting with bulk liquid water are performed using three different classical force fields, Lopes et al., ClayFF, and CHARMM water contact angle (CWCA), and compared to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and X-ray reflectivity (XR) results. The axial densities of the water and surface atoms normal to the surface are calculated and compared to previous XR experiments. Favorable agreement is shown for all the force fields with respect to the position of the water atoms. Analyses such as the radial distribution functions between water and hydroxyl atoms and the average cosine of the angle between the water dipole vector and the normal of the surface are also calculated for each force field. Significant differences are found between the different force fields from such analyses, indicating differing descriptions of the structured water in the near vicinity of the surface. AIMD simulations are also performed to obtain the water and hydroxyl structure for comparison among the predictions of the three classical force fields to better understand which force field is most accurate. It is shown that ClayFF exhibits the best agreement with the AIMD simulations for water hydroxyl radial distribution functions, suggesting that ClayFF treats the hydrogen bonding more accurately.

  15. Design and package of a {sup 14}CO{sub 2} field analyzer The Global Monitor Platform (GMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bright, Michelle; Marino, Bruno D.V.; Gronniger, Glen

    2011-08-01

    Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is widely accepted as a means to reduce and eliminate the fossil fuel CO{sub 2} (ff- CO{sub 2}) emissions from coal fired power plants. Success of CCS depends on near zero leakage rates over decadal time scales. Currently no commercial methods to determine leakage of ff-CO{sub 2} are available. The Global Monitor Platform (GMP) field analyzer provides high precision analysis of CO{sub 2} isotopes [12C (99%), 13C (<1%), 14C (1.2x10-10 %)] that can differentiate between fossil and biogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. Fossil fuels contain no {sup 14}C; their combustion should lower atmospheric amounts on local to global scales. There is a clear mandate for monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) of CCS systems nationally and globally to verify CCS integrity, treaty verification (Kyoto Protocol) and to characterize the nuclear fuel cycle. Planetary Emissions Management (PEM), working with the National Secure Manufacturing Center (NSMC), has the goal of designing, ruggedizing and packaging the GMP for field deployment. The system will conduct atmosphere monitoring then adapt the system to monitor water and soil evaluations. Measuring {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in real time will provide quantitative concentration data for ff-CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere and CCS leakage detection. Initial results will be discussed along with design changes for improved detection sensitivity and manufacturability.

  16. Improved control system of the thyristor flicker suppressor for the KEK 12-GeV PS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumoto, S.; Baba, H.; Mikawa, K.; Sato, H.; Sueno, T.

    1983-08-01

    Thyristor control system of the 20 MVar flicker suppressor has been improved essentially. The previous feed forward (FF) loop with each single phase reactive current detector of the MR magnet power supply was exchanged to the present by both FF- and NFB-loops. The FF-loops consists of a three phase reactive power detector of the MPS and a forcing pattern generator on the fast but steady line voltage flicker, sag and surge. The NFB-loops control by the slow parts of the flicker and the unbalanced line voltages. These detectors of the reactive power, the voltage flicker and the unbalance have been developed. Sampled voltage flicker data with 12 bit ADC are processed by Z-80A micro computer system and the forcing pattern is generated by the system through 12 bit DAC into the loop. A typical voltage flicker including sag and surge has been reduced within + or - 1.5%, about 1/3 compared to the previous, at 66 kV primary line.

  17. The impact of alpha/Fe enhanced stellar evolutionary tracks on the ages of elliptical galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Thomas; Claudia Maraston

    2003-02-04

    We complement our study of alpha/Fe enhanced stellar population models of Lick absorption indices (Thomas et al. 2003) by comparing two sets of alpha/Fe enhanced models. In both models the impact on Lick indices due to alpha/Fe enhancement is accounted for through a modification of the stellar absorption line-strengths using the response functions of Tripicco & Bell (1995). One set of models, however, uses solar-scaled, the other alpha/Fe enhanced stellar evolutionary tracks. Since the alpha/Fe enhanced tracks are hotter than the solar-scaled ones (Salasnich et al. 2000), the correspondent stellar population models have slightly weaker metallic indices (i.e. Mgb, etc.) and stronger Balmer line indices (Hbeta) (Maraston et al 2003). Here we explore quantitatively the impact of this effect on the alpha/Fe ratios, metallicities and ages that are derived for elliptical galaxies. We find that the modest decrease of the metallic indices Mgb and balance each other, such that fully consistent alpha/Fe ratios are derived for stellar systems using alpha/Fe enhanced models with either solar-scaled or alpha/Fe enhanced stellar tracks. The decrease of the metallic indices and the increase of Hbeta conspire in a way that also consistent metallicities are obtained. The derived ages, instead, are significantly different. The inclusion of alpha/Fe enhanced stellar tracks leads to the derivation of ages as high as 30 Gyr for elliptical galaxies. For the same objects, ages not older than 15 Gyr are obtained, if alpha/Fe enhanced models using solar-scaled tracks are adopted. This may indicate that current stellar evolutionary models overestimate the bluing of stellar evolutionary tracks due to alpha/Fe enhanced chemical mixtures at super-solar metallicities.

  18. Cyber Friendly Fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2011-09-01

    Cyber friendly fire (FF) is a new concept that has been brought to the attention of Department of Defense (DoD) stakeholders through two workshops that were planned and conducted by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and research conducted for AFRL by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. With this previous work in mind, we offer a definition of cyber FF as intentional offensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission effectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. Just as with combat friendly fire, a fundamental need in avoiding cyber FF is to maintain situation awareness (SA). We suggest that cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system (and that populate the nodes), the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive (and offensive) countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. A training implication is to raise awareness and understanding of these critical knowledge units; an approach to decision aids and/or visualizations is to focus on supporting these critical knowledge units. To study cyber FF, we developed an unclassified security test range comprising a combination of virtual and physical devices that present a closed network for testing, simulation, and evaluation. This network offers services found on a production network without the associated costs of a real production network. Containing enough detail to appear realistic, this virtual and physical environment can be customized to represent different configurations. For our purposes, the test range was configured to appear as an Internet-connected Managed Service Provider (MSP) offering specialized web applications to the general public. The network is essentially divided into a production component that hosts the web and network services, and a user component that hosts thirty employee workstations and other end devices. The organization's network is separated from the Internet by a Cisco ASA network security device that both firewalls and detects intrusions. Business sensitive information is stored in various servers. This includes data comprising thousands of internal documents, such as finance and technical designs, email messages for the organization's employees including the CEO, CFO, and CIO, the organization's source code, and Personally Identifiable client data. Release of any of this information to unauthorized parties would have a significant, detrimental impact on the organization's reputation, which would harm earnings. The valuable information stored in these servers pose obvious points of interest for an adversary. We constructed several scenarios around this environment to support studies in cyber SA and cyber FF that may be run in the test range. We describe mitigation strategies to combat cyber FF including both training concepts and suggestions for decision aids and visualization approaches. Finally, we discuss possible future research directions.

  19. Computational Capabilities for Predictions of Interactions at the Grain Boundary of Refractory Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, Debasis; Kwak, Shaun; Vasenkov, Alex; Shin, Yun Kyung; Duin, Adri van

    2014-09-30

    New high performance refractory alloys are critically required for improving efficiency and decreasing CO2 emissions of fossil energy systems. The development of these materials remains slow because it is driven by a trial-and-error experimental approach and lacks a rational design approach. Atomistic Molecular Dynamic (MD) design has the potential to accelerate this development through the prediction of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of new materials. The success of MD simulations depends critically on the fidelity of interatomic potentials. This project, in collaboration with Penn State, has focused on developing and validating high quality quantum mechanics based reactive potentials, ReaxFF, for Ni-Fe-Al-Cr-O-S system. A larger number of accurate density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to generate data for parameterizing the ReaxFF potentials. These potentials were then used in molecular dynamics (MD) and molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo (MD-MC) for much larger system to study for which DFT calculation would be prohibitively expensive, and to understand a number of chemical phenomena Ni-Fe-Al-Cr-O-S based alloy systems . These include catalytic oxidation of butane on clean Cr2O3 and pyrite/Cr2O3, interfacial reaction between Cr2O3 (refractory material) and Al2O3 (slag), cohesive strength of at the grain boundary of S-enriched Cr compared to bulk Cr and Ssegregation study in Al, Al2O3, Cr and Cr2O3 with a grain structure. The developed quantum based ReaxFF potential are available from the authors upon request. During this project, a number of papers were published in peer-reviewed journals. In addition, several conference presentations were made.

  20. Investigating the Quartz (1010)/Water Interface using Classical and

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skelton, A A; Wesolowski, David J; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Two different terminations of the (1010) surface of quartz (R and ) interacting with water are simulated by classical (CMD) (using two different force fields) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and compared with previously published X-ray reflectivity (XR) experiments. Radial distribution functions between hydroxyl and water show good agreement between AIMD and CMDusing the ClayFF force field for both terminations. The Lopes et al. (Lopes, P. E. M.; Murashov, V.; Tazi, M.; Demchuk, E.; MacKerell, A. D. J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 27822792) force field (LFF), however, underestimates the extent of hydroxylwater hydrogen bonding. The termination is found to contain hydroxylhydroxyl hydrogen bonds; the quartz surface hydroxyl hydrogens and oxygens that hydrogen bond with each other exhibit greatly reduced hydrogen bonding to water. Conversely, the hydroxyl hydrogen and oxygens that are not hydrogen bonded to other surface hydroxyls but are connected to those that are show a considerable amount of hydrogen bonding to water. The electron density distribution of an annealed surface of quartz (1010) obtained by XR is in qualitative agreement with electron densities calculated byCMDand AIMD. In all simulation methods, the interfacial water peak appears farther from the surface than observed by XR. Agreement among AIMD, LFF, and XR is observed for the relaxation of the near-surface atoms; however, ClayFF shows a larger discrepancy. Overall, results show that for both terminations of (1010), LFF treats the near-surface structure more accurately whereas ClayFF treats the interfacial water structure more accurately. It is shown that the number of hydroxyl and water hydrogen bonds to the bridging SiOSi oxygens connecting the surface silica groups to the rest of the crystal is much greater for the R than the termination. It is suggested that this may play a role in the greater resistance to dissolution of the termination than that of the R termination.

  1. A B C D E GF H A B C D E GF H

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    T Service Lot Field or Event Parking M M Field or Event Parking M LotB Lot C Lot D Lot G M Lot F Lot E M LotDrive Lot SS Lot SS Lot HH Lot SS Lot II LotFF Lot EE Lot GG Lot CC Lot AA Lot AA Lot BB Lot O Lot O Extension Lot P Lot L Lot M LotN Lot K Lot K Extension Lot A Lot Q Lot H Lot I Lot R2 Lot R1 Lot SLot

  2. TREKisM Issue 59 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1988-01-01

    the Heart ••••• Bea Bula, a TREKisM reader and friend of this editor for many years, has been having a difficult time in her battle with cancer. Imagine her delight in August when she received a phone call from William Shatner -- she was definitely cheered... your name on the inside cover, because it's unlikely you'll want to keep it around to read again. Ji2 ~f?f' Star Trek Trivia' ~. by Peter r4. Kenda 11 [This quiz originally appeared in Mensana, the Western NY Mensa news- letter; Teri Prentiss, Editor...

  3. Compleximetric determination of sulfate with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spurlock, William W

    1961-01-01

    tftrstfoay causing fn esse cones the persfeteaoe of original colors well beyoad the point oy stofohfoaotry, sad 1a other oeoes es fndeffnite color reactions The lftersture sites various buffer solutioas an4 sony 1a4fes toro tor the tftratfoa of aetsl foas... would produce fascoureey ia detersfastfoa of other aetal foes ff sagaesiua foa be ?sed ia preperfag s buffer solutiosa This observstioa suggests the pos ?fbilfty of usfag tho neutral saLt oE aegaesfua, slreo4y roasted with QCk~ (Ngi&iygk) ae...

  4. Power and Memory Efficient Hashing Schemes for Some Network Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Heeyeol

    2010-07-14

    Filter FF Fingerprint Filter SBF Segmented Bloom Filter SL Successful Lookup UL Unsuccessful Lookup viii SS Successful Search US Unsuccessful Search BMF Bloomier Filter PPC Parallel Packet Classifier MPC Multi-tiered Packet Classifier 2TPC 2-tiered Packet... III Power value by CACTI in PPC(31Kx1, 20 ports), 2TPC(29Kx1, 19 ports), and 3TPC(14Kx1,18 ports). ................. 38 IV Complexities of operations to o?-chip in four schemes. ........ 61 V On-chip memory usage for three traces. The load factor is 0...

  5. Carbene reactions produced by recoil excitation methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowery, Kirby

    1968-01-01

    BEAD . . ' . 25 IX 4 DECAY CORRECTIONS FOR Cl 8 30 I. II-i. . RELATIVE YIELDS OF CH2F2 02 1~3 BUTADIENE-He3 SYSTEM . 35 III-2. REACTION PRODUCTS OF CTF WITH 1, 3-BUTADIENE 37 IV-I. RELATIVE YIELDS OF FLUOROCYCLOPROPANE F18 AND CH2FF18 IN RECOIL.... There are several isotopes which are used extensively in hot atom chemistry. These are hydrogen isotopes and halogen isotopes which include H , Cl , Br , Br ', Br 3 38 80 80m 82 128 11 14 32 and I . Higher valent isotopes such as C , C , F , and S have been...

  6. Cyclical Components in Economic Time Series: a Bayesian Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Andrew C.; Trimbur, Thomas; van Dijk, Herman

    2004-06-16

    V v 0 4 2Z*b S  f?He. f?H f?2DD f?H.S 2??e 2 f?D.e f?bfb f?eDb f?S.f 2D?. 6 f??f? f?b2f f?Se2 f?DH 2e?b 7 f?DDf f?b?D f?SSf f?D? 2e? Wdeoh 7= Srvwhulru phdqv iru d elyduldwh prgho iru txduwhuo| XV uhdo JGS dqg lqyhvwphqw iurp 4<7:=4 wr 5334...

  7. Observation of coherently enhanced tunable narrow-band terahertz transition radiation from a relativistic sub-picosecond electron bunch train

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piot, P.; Sun, Y. -E; Maxwell, T. J.; Ruan, J.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Rihaoui, M. M.; Thurman-Keup, R.

    2011-06-27

    We experimentally demonstrate the production of narrow-band (?f/f ~ =20% at f ~ = 0.5 THz) THz transition radiation with tunable frequency over [0.37, 0.86] THz. The radiation is produced as a train of sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches transits at the vacuum-aluminum interface of an aluminum converter screen. We also show a possible application of modulated beams to extend the dynamical range of a popular bunch length diagnostic technique based on the spectral analysis of coherent radiation.

  8. To what extent does The Spectator accurately reflect the popular moral issues of the early eighteenth century 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Lethan Alan

    1968-01-01

    1 er and ~Sectator were presented to the public, as Sherburn 2 Job Ant, E ~ '1L'1''~ntb*P. '?EG?A (New Yorl, lcl25), p. ~6; hereaf ter cited ac Ashton. G. A. Cranfield, The Develonment of the Provincial Ro . 1700-1760 60 ff~, fb-, pp. E-A Go 6... and ur. ified point of view helped it to catch on with the public, estimated to be around. 5, 500, 000, in- cluding England. and Wales. According to Bond's table, 15 the Spectator continued to climb throughout its publication until the government...

  9. Bronze Age Representations of Aegean Jewelry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    1992-01-01

    Gr I under arching papyrus (woman's grave; BSA 46 tlgsll 102 ff.) gold dress/hair pins wirh theriomorphic finiais (NMA 245-7) Vapheio Tholos (ArchEph 1889 pl. 7, p. l5): hair pin with palm finial Volos Tholoi (ArchEph 1906 23t-4, fig. 7 -9): hair pins... of necklaces. At top, she wears a common choker or fillet (cf. the similar choker or fillet on the Veil- Lifter #14 [Pl. LXIVc]). 5i"' 266 John G. YOLTNGER At bottom, a string of tiny gold beads is draped across the shoulders and from this hang gold dragonfly...

  10. Screening peach rootstocks for tolerance to iron deficiency stress: mechanisms of Fe?p3+ ?sreduction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egilla, Jonathan Nda

    1989-01-01

    ) GF 677 and (b) Nemaguard with and without Fe. 34 5 pH changes in nutrient solution with roots of Ff?s ha"1nrnfnn L with and without Fe. 35 6 pH depression in de-tonized water over 4 hours by roots of 'Montclar' and h emaguard peach rootstocks.... , 1987), and Romheld et al. (1984) provided evidence that the protons are excreted by an ATP- dependent pump in the plasma membrane. Ric de Vos et al. (1986), proposed that Fe- deficiency induces the production of organic acids in the roots, which...

  11. Judicial Review of Mass Metadata Surveillance in the Post-Snowden Era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni Loideain, Nora

    2015-07-14

    ’ relates to information generated or processed as a consequence of a communication’s transmission. Much can be revealed from this data including: “latitude, longitude and altitude of the sender’s or recipient’s terminal, direction of travel … any naming... from: http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/dont-let-america-be-boxed-in-by-its-own-computers/2015/04/02/30742192-cc04-11e4-8a46-b1dc9be5a8ff_story.html Harding, L. (2014). The Snowden Files. London, UK: Guardian. Kuner, C., Cate, F.H., Millard, C...

  12. Observation of Coherently-Enhanced Tunable Narrow-Band Terahertz Transition Radiation from a Relativistic Sub-Picosecond Electron Bunch Train

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piot, P [Northern Illinois U.; Fermilab; Sun, Y E [Fermilab; Maxwell, T J [Fermilab; Northern Illinois U.; Ruan, J.; Lumpkin, A H [Fermilab; Rihaoui, M M [Northern Illinois U.; Thurman-Keup, R [Fermilab

    2011-06-27

    We experimentally demonstrate the production of narrow-band (?f/f ~ =20% at f ~ = 0.5 THz) THz transition radiation with tunable frequency over [0.37, 0.86] THz. The radiation is produced as a train of sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches transits at the vacuum-aluminum interface of an aluminum converter screen. We also show a possible application of modulated beams to extend the dynamical range of a popular bunch length diagnostic technique based on the spectral analysis of coherent radiation.

  13. Outfits - Company F - 7 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-01-01

    p38 MAPK. The activation of p38 MAPK is elevated in the epithelium of the fusing palatal shelves (41). The treatment of K14-Cre; Smad4f/f palatal explants with a p38 MAPK inhibitor was able to block TGF?-dependent 5 expression of the p21 (Cdkn1... fusion due to persistence of the palatal epithelium (43,44). Recent findings demonstrated a partial rescue of the CP phenotype in Wnt1-Cre; TGF?r2 F/F;TGF?r3+/- mice suggesting that TGF?R3 played a pivotal role in maintaining homeostasis of TGF?...

  14. Instantaneous Chemical Reactions in Benzene and Toluene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Herman Camp

    1905-06-07

    KU ScholarWorks | The University of Kansas Pre-1923 Dissertations and Theses Collection Instantaneous Chemical Reac- tions in Benzene and Toluene June 7th, 1905 by Herman Camp Allen This work was digitized by the Scholarly Communications program... Chemistry Allen, H.C. 1905 "Instantaneous reactions (chemical) in benzene and toluene". I ! B f O H B M I O A L REACTIONS IN Bt«2F;»F! AND TQLUBMB, Presented to the faculty of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  15. The use of production records as a method for improving the reproductive performance of Rambouillet sheep 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Ronald Martin

    1986-01-01

    Freeman whose active participa- tion and enthusiasm has both broadened and improved the scope of the study. I would also like to thank several individuals whose help and encour- agement has allowed for the completion of this manuscript. Dr. W. H. Mc... of multiple births increases with age, report that ewes which are more prolific at younger ages do tend to produce larger litters throughout their productive life. H~tb11tt . Th h kt btltty f h t i dv t * h ff1 i t selection will be in improving future...

  16. Determination of mechanisms by which soluble fibers lower serum cholesterol 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xiao-Qing

    1991-01-01

    differ between fibers. We tested the efi'ect of five fiber sources on serum and liver cholesterol and hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis. Also, we tested the effect of fiber sources on fecal neutral sterol and bile acid excretion. Six groups of 12... Sprague Dawley rats were each fed either a fiber-free (FF) cholesterol and cholic acid supplemented diet or the same diet uniformly diluted by the addition of 8% dietary fiber from cellulose (C), pectin (P), oat bran (OB), whole amaranth (WA...

  17. Investigation of the deformed fermi surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jianxu

    2009-05-15

    = 1000/?BCS 6 2 Energy ofSarma?s solution III with N(0)V=0.3, ?T = 1k BT = 1000/?BCS 6 3 A rough picture of fermi surfaces of FF states . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 4 A rough picture of fermi surfaces of DFS states . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 5 3D plot... relative to the chemical potential ??. This Hamiltonian reduces to the corresponding one in 4 the BCS theory if h ? ?BH is set to zero. As in the BCS theory, which is for an s-wave superconductor, Sarma assumed: Vkk? = ? ?? ?? V if |?k| < planckover2pi1?D...

  18. Concept of common bud and related phenomena in Bryozoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elias, M. K.

    1971-05-01

    that its coelomic fluid remains undivided distally as long as a branch grows. As soon as a polypide bud originates, subtending to it, an oblique septum begins to rise proxi- mally by fission (BoRc's term) from the cylindrical wall of a branch; thus, a new... Contributions—Paper 52 of fission, and develops into separate zoids [zooidsf " (Smurr, 1865, p. 6, translated by BoRc). He erred, however, in his belief that all Bryozoa developed in this manner; and it was NITSCHE (1871, sep. 31 ff.) who explained...

  19. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Postma, A.K.

    1984-09-07

    This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  20. The stress effects of fasting and insulin-induced hypoglycemia on the osteochondrody-strophic-like dwarf 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deyoe, Charles Walter

    1957-01-01

    ?mine a?lie c?. ?k acteristic, . hysiological d: ffer? ek cc w. '~ich ~-';ht be u. =ed as a basis ~ or such a diagnostic tost a?d fok fur th r research. HEVI8% OR LITERATURE The ostsochondrodystx ophic-like type of dwarfism (Emerson and Hazel, 1956... "FF;'T OP Fi'-TI!. 0 Oil FWDl"A i'BHt', w?ISO, '"ID" OF NOHVal A, D Di'~AHF 0k~Vi. '8 Flasma Histidine Hours Fostprandial 16 Normal hei f ors Flasma Glutamio Flasma Glyoine Aoid 16 88 16 88 m . F asma Avo. age Dear f heifers 26. 9 ~26...

  1. European Bulletin of Himalayan Research (EBHR) Number 20 - 21, 2001 Double issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Asia Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany; (CNRS) Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France; (SOAS) School of Oriental and African Studies, UK

    2001-01-01

    ??????????????? When I tried to elicit life-histories (???????or?????????????in Nepali) among the Mewa- hang Rai of East Nepal, most respondents did not understand what I wanted. Con- versations typically led to a factual account of kinship relationships, and often... (Linde 1993: 21ff). Such stories may be quite short and can be part of larger discourse units, i.e. conversations, reports, etc. However, as Linde points out, like any story they imply features of coherence, and the principles of such coherence...

  2. A model study of the performance of water-driven anticlinal reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talash, Alvin Wesley

    1960-01-01

    II SUMMARY OF TEST DATA 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 ff 12 13 14 16 17 18 19 ZO Fluid Sam le A A A A A B B B B B B 'B B B B B B End End Ead Ead End End End End Ead f84 414 . 453 490 750 900 930 431 390 Ceater... influx. rate was 600 cc per hour (Figure 11). While the oil produced was 68 percent when the rate of water influx was 40 cc per hour (Figure 13) and the other con- ditions the same. Figure 14 is a plot of the reservoir oil saturation for optimum...

  3. A study of the foraminifera and sediments of Matagorda Bay, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenton, Edward Heriot

    1957-01-01

    A STUDY OF THE FORAMINIFERA AND SEDIMENTS OF MATAGORDA BAY& TEXAS ahg C0 L ( /SF OP FF QS A Thesis By Edward Heriot Shenton Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfilhaent... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1957 MaJor SubJect: Oceanography A STUDY OF THE FORAMINIFEBA AND SEDIMEETS OF MATAGOBDA BAY, TEXAS A Thesis By Edward Heriot Shenton Approved as to style and content by; Chairman of Couu~it e Head...

  4. The environment of deposition of the Dalton Coal (Upper Pennsylvanian), Palo Pinto Co., TX. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Glenn Robert

    1986-01-01

    C. L = 1ff I I I I I I I I I la 3. 75 I I I l l I l 2 7. 9 ~ ~'8 5 8. 5 0 2000 fi 0 500 rn Figure 5. Da1 ton Coa1 i sopach map based on coal thicknesses measured a1ong the outcrop face and in cores. 25 1D in appendi x C...THE ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF THE DALTON COAL (UPPER PENNSYI. VANIAN), PALO PINTO CO. , TX. A Thesis by GLENN ROBERT LOWENSTEIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for tne...

  5. Football - Individuals - 1980s - 22 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    =C, low=L, medium=M high=H), mulch (mulch=M, no-mulch=NM) and soil compaction by wheel traffic (track=T, NT=no-track), compared to mulched and untreated controls. . . . . . . . . . . 128 Density (plants/m2) and foliar cover ((t) of ~Sh t f eff t f... (track=T, NT=no-track), compared to mulched and untreated controls. . . . . . . . . . . 135 TABLE Page Density (pits/m2) and foliar cover (0) of ~Sb( ~fd *ff t f 't (summit, backslope, footslope), seeding rate (low, medium, high), mulch, soil...

  6. Evaluation of methods for restoration of tallgrass prairie in the Blackland Prairie region of North Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eidson, James Arthur

    1996-01-01

    =C, low=L, medium=M high=H), mulch (mulch=M, no-mulch=NM) and soil compaction by wheel traffic (track=T, NT=no-track), compared to mulched and untreated controls. . . . . . . . . . . 128 Density (plants/m2) and foliar cover ((t) of ~Sh t f eff t f... (track=T, NT=no-track), compared to mulched and untreated controls. . . . . . . . . . . 135 TABLE Page Density (pits/m2) and foliar cover (0) of ~Sb( ~fd *ff t f 't (summit, backslope, footslope), seeding rate (low, medium, high), mulch, soil...

  7. The production-assembly-distribution system design problem: modeling and solution approaches 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Dong

    2009-05-15

    used to make p ( 2 p ). Similarly, material flows are always transferred from facility 1 f to facility f and then to facility 2 f ; that is, ____________ *Part of this section is reprinted with permission from Wilhelm, W. E., D. Liang, B. R. T.... Vasudeva, D. Warrier, X. Zhu, S. Bulusu (2005) Design of international assembly sys- tems and their supply chains under NAFTA. Transportation Research Part E, 41, 467- 493. doi:10.1016/j.tre.2005.06.002 21 the corresponding facility relationship 12 f ff...

  8. Aerial photographic monitoring of spruce damage in Bayerischer Wald National Park, Federal Republic of Germany 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goebel, John Martin

    1989-01-01

    with a lens with a focal length of 305mm. In 1981 a Zeiss D filter (dark orange) was attached while in 1983 this was replaced with a Wzatten 12 filter (yellow or "minus 'Ihe reader should routinely refer to Appends A ? Ehotogzapbs for visual.... interpose(mtion keys and phot' b. graduated sample plot template c. Wild Heerbrugg Type 392824 dual view stereoscope d. ~ff 2050 electrical counting machine e. data entry (tally) sheets (one per plat) Beginning with the 1981 photo set and utilizing...

  9. Direct Analysis of JV-Curves Applied to an Outdoor-Degrading CdTe Module (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D; Kurtz, S.; Ulbrich, C.; Gerber, A.; Rau, U.

    2014-03-01

    We present the application of a phenomenological four parameter equation to fit and analyze regularly measured current density-voltage JV curves of a CdTe module during 2.5 years of outdoor operation. The parameters are physically meaningful, i.e. the short circuit current density Jsc, open circuit voltage Voc and differential resistances Rsc, and Roc. For the chosen module, the fill factor FF degradation overweighs the degradation of Jsc and Voc. Interestingly, with outdoor exposure, not only the conductance at short circuit, Gsc, increases but also the Gsc(Jsc)-dependence. This is well explained with an increase in voltage dependent charge carrier collection in CdTe.

  10. An intelligent floor field cellular automata model for pedestrian dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekaterina Kirik; Tat'yana Yurgel'yan; Dmitriy Krouglov

    2009-06-15

    A stochastic cellular automata (CA) model for pedestrian dynamics is presented. Our goal is to simulate different types of pedestrian movement, from regular to panic. But here we emphasize regular situations which imply that pedestrians analyze environment and choose their route more carefully. And transition probabilities have to depict such effect. The potentials of floor fields and environment analysis are combined in the model obtained. People patience is included in the model. This makes simulation of pedestrians movement more realistic. Some simulation results are presented and comparison with basic FF-model is made.

  11. Football - 1960-1969 - 50 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughead Photographers

    2007-08-24

    . Winter et al. , found that the one metacentric pair of Bos gaurus corresponds to the fusion of chromosome 2 and 27 in cattle. C-band analysis has been performed on Bos taurus, Bubalus bubalis, ~s* ff d B' b' . 'Ih 1t h th tr t. 't heterochromatin... corresponds to the fusion of chromosomes 1 and 11; and chromosome 3 of the Congo buffalo corresponds to the fusion of chromosomes 9 and 25 of Bos taurus (see Figure 13). C-banding analysis shows centromeric staining only on the autosomes with the X...

  12. A prospective randomised, open-labeled, trial comparing sirolimus-containing versus mTOR-inhibitor-free immunosuppression in patients undergoing liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnitzbauer, Andreas A.; Zuelke, Carl; Graeb, Christian; Rochon, Justine; Bilbao, Itxarone; Burra, Patrizia; de Jong, Koert P.; Duvoux, Christophe; Kneteman, Norman M.; Adam, Rene; Bechstein, Wolf O.; Becker, Thomas; Beckebaum, Susanne; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Cillo, Umberto; Colledan, Michele; Fandrich, Fred; Gugenheim, Jean; Hauss, Johann P.; Heise, Michael; Hidalgo, Ernest; Jamieson, Neville; Konigsrainer, Alfred; Lamby, Philipp E.; Lerut, Jan P.; Makisalo, Heikki; Margreiter, Raimund; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Mutzbauer, Ingrid; Otto, Gerd; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Pinna, Antonio D.; Pirenne, Jacques; Rizell, Magnus; Rossi, Giorgio; Rostaing, Lionel; Roy, Andre; Sanchez Turrion, Victor; Schmidt, Jan; Troisi, Roberto I.; van Hoek, Bart; Valente, Umberto; Wolf, Philippe; Wolters, Heiner; Mirza, Darius F.; Scholz, Tim; Steininger, Rudolf; Soderdahl, Gunnar; Strasser, Simone I.; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Neuhaus, Peter; Schlitt, Hans J.; Geissler, Edward K.

    2010-05-11

    is the study statistician. CG, IB, PB, KPdeJ, CD, KK, RA, WOB, TB, SB, OC, UDdiC, MC, FF, JG, JPH, MH, EH, NJ, AK, PEL, JPL, HM, RM, VM, IM, GO, GPP, ADP, JP, MR, GR, LR, AR, VST, JS, RT, BvanH, UV, PW, HHW, DFM, TS, RS, GS, SIS, KWJ, and PN partici- pated... of the Friedrich-Schiller- University, Jena, Germany, 20Scottish Liver Transplant Unit, The Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA, UK, 21Department of Surgery, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK, 22Department of General-, Visceral...

  13. A method of predicting surge in centrifugal compressors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elchuri, Vijayvardhan

    1975-01-01

    of impeller and diffuser. i. ~111 P R t o: Th ad' b t' ff o' y' of the impeller can be written as n tes ti I E (10) For a calorically perfect fluid, and in view of equations (2) and (7), equation (10) becomes TH e (11) The temperature rise... as h ? h t5S se (15) 2 Once again, for an adiabatic flow of a calorically perfect gas, equation (15) modified to ) ' (16) In view of negligible wake mixing losses, we can say that, te t4 (17) Hence equation (16) can be rewritten as y-1...

  14. A technique for using historical analogues to forecast the central pressure of tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific Ocean and south China Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagoner, Richard Allen

    1973-01-01

    of Terna AA? Un! veroity in pert!el fnlfil!m nt of the reqnirement for the degree of i&STER OP SO(ENCE D e::;:;b& r 1973 He jor Sob jeet. Neteoroicgy A TECHNIQUE FOR USING fIISTORICAL ANALOGUES TO FORECAST THF. CENTRAL PRESSURE 01' TROPICAL CYCLONES... IN THE WESTERN NORTH PACIl'IC OCL'AiV AND SOUTH CHINA SEA A Thesis by ffICHARD Af LEN WAGOiVFR Approve&! as to style and content by: (Chairman oI Coi!miit tee) (Nemb e r ) ( iember) (Member) 1'acorn!ier 1973 ABSTRACT A Technique for Iising Historical...

  15. BPA-2011-0043-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomassBudgetAugust 19, 2009E+^ , FO,cF^ `10 InNT oFF Depa

  16. BPA-2011-00430-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomassBudgetAugust 19, 2009E+^ , FO,cF^ `10 InNT oFF

  17. BPA-2011-00430-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomassBudgetAugust 19, 2009E+^ , FO,cF^ `10 InNT oFF'^

  18. BPA-2011-00443-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomassBudgetAugust 19, 2009E+^ , FO,cF^ `10 InNT oFF'^NT

  19. BPA-2011-00443-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomassBudgetAugust 19, 2009E+^ , FO,cF^ `10 InNT oFF'^NTj

  20. BPA-2011-01633-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomassBudgetAugust 19, 2009E+^ ,0,3,OFF'^ gNT,o FF Depa

  1. BPA-2011-01634-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomassBudgetAugust 19, 2009E+^ ,0,3,OFF'^ gNT,o FF DepaT

  2. BPA-2011-01634-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomassBudgetAugust 19, 2009E+^ ,0,3,OFF'^ gNT,o FF

  3. fxn6174.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001, $$" . . 'ff2 "% - . .

  4. fy09 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001, $$" . . 'ff2 "% - .

  5. fy10 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001, $$" . . 'ff2 "% - .0

  6. fy11 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001, $$" . . 'ff2 "% - .01

  7. fy12 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001, $$" . . 'ff2 "% -

  8. fy13 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001, $$" . . 'ff2 "% -3

  9. g

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001, $$" . . 'ff2 "% -3

  10. g99040075 4/99

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001, $$" . . 'ff2 "%

  11. gabriel-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001, $$" . . 'ff2 "%1 A

  12. galvin | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001, $$" . . 'ff2 "%1

  13. gas_flooding | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001, $$" . . 'ff2 "%1Gas

  14. gasification index | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001, $$" . . 'ff2

  15. gasifier intro | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual ConferenceFall 2001, $$" . . 'ff2Gasification

  16. In-situ gamma-ray assay of the west cell line in the 235-F plutonium fuel form facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couture, A. H.; Diprete, D.

    2014-09-01

    On August 29th, 2013, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements in the maintenance trench beneath Cells 6-9 on the west line of the PuFF facility using an uncollimated, highpurity germanium detector. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Data analysis was performed using three gamma-rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells. The weighted mean of these three results was used as the best estimate of Pu-238 holdup in the West Cell Line of PuFF. The results of the assay measurements are found in the table below along with the results from the scoping assay performed in 2006. All uncertainties in this table (as well as the rest of the report) are given as 1?. The total holdup in the West Cell Line was 2.4 ± 0.7 grams. This result is 0.6 g higher than the previous estimate, a 0.4? difference.

  17. Intern experience at Arkansas Nuclear One Steam Electric Station: an internship report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William Bruce, 1953-

    2013-03-13

    FGo- NDGLFOW R)eU)FFWU)e INTERN EXPERIENCE AT ARKANSAS NUCLEAR ONE STEAM ELECTRIC STATION I) T)oFW).iUa XFatWo cf SULLUOM BWDGF (ULLFW IaaWt8Fn O. ot .ofLF O)n Gt)oF)o cf- i t - (ey& tiu . l(FMcFW12 I 7 N T N E l(FMcFW1 l(FMcFW1 (Of rsms ABSTRACT... T)oFW) RVaFWUF)GF Oo IW4O).O. NDGLFOW K)F PoFOM RLFGoWUG PoOoUt) l(Of rsms1 SULLUOM BWDGF (ULLFW6 B2P26 5)U8FW.Uof td (U..tDWUvXtLLOy (2R)e26 EFVO. I * ( 5)U8FW.Uof uiOUWMO) td In8U.tWf utMMUooFF- wW2 gti) w2 XO)nOLL EiU. WFatWo U. O .DW8Ff td...

  18. Structures, Mechanisms, and Kinetics of Ammoxidation and Selective Oxidation of Propane Over the M2 Phase of MoVNbTeO Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddard, William A.; Liu, Lianchi; Mueller, Jonathan E.; Pudar, Sanja; Nielsen, Robert J.

    2011-05-04

    We report here first-principles-based predictions of the structures, mechanisms, and activation barriers for propane activation by the M2 phase of the MoVNbTeO multi-metal oxide catalysts capable of the direct conversion of propane to acrylonitrile. Our approach is to combine extensive quantum mechanical (QM) calculations to establish the mechanisms for idealized representations of the surfaces for these catalytic systems and then to modify the parameters in the ReaxFF reactive force field for molecular dynamics (MD) calculations to describe accurately the activation barriers and reaction mechanisms of the chemical reactions over complex mixed metal oxides. The parameters for ReaxFF are derived entirely from QM without the use of empirical data so that it can be applied to novel systems on which there is little or no data. To understand the catalysis in these systems it is essential to determine the surface structures that control the surface chemistry. High quality three-dimensional (3D) Rietveld structures are now available for the M1 and M2 phases of the MoVNbTeO catalysts.

  19. TOWARD UNDERSTANDING STELLAR RADIAL VELOCITY JITTER AS A FUNCTION OF WAVELENGTH: THE SUN AS A PROXY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchwinski, Robert C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Robertson, Paul; Ramsey, Lawrence; Harder, Jerald E-mail: suvrath@astro.psu.edu E-mail: lwr@psu.edu

    2015-01-01

    Using solar spectral irradiance measurements from the SORCE spacecraft and the F/F' technique, we have estimated the radial velocity (RV) scatter induced on the Sun by stellar activity as a function of wavelength. Our goal was to evaluate the potential advantages of using new near-infrared (NIR) spectrographs to search for low-mass planets around bright F, G, and K stars by beating down activity effects. Unlike M dwarfs, which have higher fluxes and therefore greater RV information content in the NIR, solar-type stars are brightest at visible wavelengths, and, based solely on information content, are better suited to traditional optical RV surveys. However, we find that the F/F' estimated RV noise induced by stellar activity is diminished by up to a factor of four in the NIR versus the visible. Observations with the upcoming future generation of NIR instruments can be a valuable addition to the search for low-mass planets around bright FGK stars in reducing the amount of stellar noise affecting RV measurements.

  20. How ARCO drills high-angle wells offshore Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tjondrodiputro, B.; Eddyarso, H.; Jones, K. (Atlantic Richfield Indonesia, Inc., Jakarta (Indonesia))

    1993-03-01

    Atlantic Richfield Indonesia, Inc. (ARII) drilled and completed 28 high-angle wells since early 1986 in Bima, Papa and FF fields in the Offshore North West Java Sea (ONWJ) contract area. Early wells were drilled with conventional rotary bottomhole assemblies (BHAs); introduction of a steerable tool and MWD subsequently increased efficiency and reduced drilling costs. Both lignosulfonate and dispersed pac polymer muds have been used with good success. Cost to drill a high-angle well has been only marginally more than that of a 45[degree] directional well. Elimination of open hole logging and use of preperforated liners have reduced drilling costs by 10%. Production performance for wells has been higher than for vertical or low-angle wells. High-angle wells in Bima have outperformed offset vertical wells and are classified as a success. However, horizontal wells in Papa, which has a strong bottom-water drive, have not shown any improved recovery over conventional wells. The new well in FF field is still being evaluated. In this first of a two-part report, high-angle drilling operations including well planning, BHA selection, casing and mud programs, hole cleaning and logging are described. Specific wells in the Bima area are discussed as examples.

  1. A New Method of Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectrum Unfolding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeynalova, O. V. [Moscow State Institute of Radioengineering, Electronics and Automation, Moscow (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Zeynalov, Sh. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S. [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium)

    2010-11-25

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. The goal was to find out the reasons of a long time existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of fission fragments (FF). On the one hand the {sup 252}Cf(sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data, on the other hand the understanding of PFN emission mechanism is very important for nuclear fission theory. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in total about 10{sup 7} fission fragment-neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. For the first time the dependence of the number of emitted neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations in the range of TKE from 140-220 MeV.

  2. Tomographic imaging using poissonian detector data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aspelmeier, Timo; Ebel, Gernot; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-10-15

    An image reconstruction method for reconstructing a tomographic image (f.sub.j) of a region of investigation within an object (1), comprises the steps of providing detector data (y.sub.i) comprising Poisson random values measured at an i-th of a plurality of different positions, e.g. i=(k,l) with pixel index k on a detector device and angular index l referring to both the angular position (.alpha..sub.l) and the rotation radius (r.sub.l) of the detector device (10) relative to the object (1), providing a predetermined system matrix A.sub.ij assigning a j-th voxel of the object (1) to the i-th detector data (y.sub.i), and reconstructing the tomographic image (f.sub.j) based on the detector data (y.sub.i), said reconstructing step including a procedure of minimizing a functional F(f) depending on the detector data (y.sub.i) and the system matrix A.sub.ij and additionally including a sparse or compressive representation of the object (1) in an orthobasis T, wherein the tomographic image (f.sub.j) represents the global minimum of the functional F(f). Furthermore, an imaging method and an imaging device using the image reconstruction method are described.

  3. Baudha Tantra Vajrayana ki Samiksha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yogi, P. G.

    1998-01-01

    <.n 3JTll1i CfiT jpJ ~ j?; I ~ ~ I (q:;) ~e;I~rtj ;;m ('§) ~ I . Cfifrf.:r-T r:p;fi '1<.n ~ C@ 'ff-~ qe; ir ~ I ~ ~4T ~fm1111 ~ ~ ~ ~e;~*h 3W~'.i t I 1~ ~ ~.m if YRf 1p.ff ~ I ~nq;:jf ~ ~-T ~ iT Jf¥IT~.ffi1Jf m Tlf.f, t ~ ;;nlil"W ir ~ 175rrff ~ q... JQ.lli, ~ 't&t::l1:tJ£ ~ h':.Ull:t, ~ E.h I ~ .~. ~ '~f:.:;l:: 11£ ~~. M~!tal:- ::tUb::: '\\.J'ajPjtJl£ l!llth 32 i~.l'::l2lli. 1.::1 ~ ~~ ~,f:.:;l:: 'ill:I2tl1f 'q?hltr.-t?f! t:l.l:ub h Qh tfl - .:; .J ~.; )) ~ [PI Zf 1ij M] I I ~.l:! ~¥R '~1i ~S~.l:! 1 'It...

  4. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multi-resolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2015-04-29

    Atmospheric inversions are frequently used to estimate fluxes of atmospheric greenhouse gases (e.g., biospheric CO2 flux fields) at Earth's surface. These inversions typically assume that flux departures from a prior model are spatially smoothly varying, which are then modeled using a multi-variate Gaussian. When the field being estimated is spatially rough, multi-variate Gaussian models are difficult to construct and a wavelet-based field model may be more suitable. Unfortunately, such models are very high dimensional and are most conveniently used when the estimation method can simultaneously perform data-driven model simplification (removal of model parameters that cannot be reliably estimated) and fitting.more »Such sparse reconstruction methods are typically not used in atmospheric inversions. In this work, we devise a sparse reconstruction method, and illustrate it in an idealized atmospheric inversion problem for the estimation of fossil fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the USA. Our new method is based on stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), a method used to reconstruct compressively sensed images. Our adaptations bestow three properties to the sparse reconstruction procedure which are useful in atmospheric inversions. We have modified StOMP to incorporate prior information on the emission field being estimated and to enforce non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, though based on wavelets, our method allows for the estimation of fields in non-rectangular geometries, e.g., emission fields inside geographical and political boundaries. Our idealized inversions use a recently developed multi-resolution (i.e., wavelet-based) random field model developed for ffCO2 emissions and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also reduces the overall computational cost by a factor of 2. Further, the sparse reconstruction scheme imposes non-negativity without introducing strong nonlinearities, such as those introduced by employing log-transformed fields, and thus reaps the benefits of simplicity and computational speed that are characteristic of linear inverse problems.« less

  5. A proposed college level teacher-training program in agricultural education for East Pakistan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Moslehuddin

    1959-01-01

    PQRKQBTURR, "%- THi? UNXYED BMTMs At the time ef' the~ssage cf the Fedeiei Act~ 13Nle instrugMen on college level teacher-training was given th M~iroes whereas it' was ~ff&5~-with xdxita=tauw~s? Nor Megr45sx- ~M= thQ W@4?QLCiQQ. -~ fus po. "gt~~:pgQ@k g... extension soak en the sub-division arid higher. 2-- Agxicultxxxal xeseaech woxk in the dUfszent linies ef epeeisl- search and education branch of the Mx'actor'ats of Agxieultuxe? 'a'gx4eultv'gsl;sduosti~ , though . the agxiqu3, tm'al q~en'-sesylce. ie...

  6. The influence of biotin on reproduction in the white rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, William Anderson

    1957-01-01

    ??G?????G? ??G?? ???i?????i G? 6i??G?? 0??? ??ifi?G? r?A?? ?i?A???1G?? ?i?A?? 0???G? 3???GfGA???f ??? 3???G??i????f ???????G?? ?? 4??i???i???f ??? 9G???Gf 0??? 3i??? ????i? 7??i? ?5?98??5r6 ?6? 9r6978?5r6? ?8???0? ?7?Y4? 75Y40?Y804 95Y4? ???46?5? 5 9... ????? ??? ?? ?? ?G??G? ??? ??? ?? 3? 3G????? G? ??i 1?GfGA? ?i?????i??? ??? ?? 0? 9G??? ??? ??? ?? ?? ??i??G?? G? ??i ?i?????i?? G? 1?G??i?????? ??? 6??????G?? ??? ??? ?? 7? ???G? G? ??i ??f?f??i ????Ai?i?? ?i?????i??? ?ff G? ??i ?A????f????f ??? ?i???????f 9Gffi...

  7. Remote monitoring of soil moisture using airborne microwave radiometers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Charles Lindsey

    1973-01-01

    ) site G (b) site H I V-6 i IV- 7 'IV- 8 iV- I iV- 2 ! iV-3 Chickasha test site I V-4 Ground cover for Chickasha sites: site A (b) site B 62 63 64 67 68 69 71 X1 I I' I giirc I';i g| c Ground cover I or Chickashn sites: (n) site C (b... /&[&9 T (~~)~n ~/h &. r) ryder)zn 7?'(i)? (I I-IS) ff?(~~)~a r/~ year) ~n where: V = vertical polarization H = horizontal polarization j = desired received polarization, either verti- cal or horizontal In well designed antennas, the design...

  8. Single spin asymmetries of inclusive hadrons produced in electron scattering from a transversely polarized 3 He target

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allada, K.; Zhao, Y. X.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; et al

    2014-04-07

    We report the first measurement of target single-spin asymmetries (AN) in the inclusive hadron production reaction, e + 3He??h+X, using a transversely polarized 3 He target. This experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a 5.9-GeV electron beam. Three types of hadrons (?±, K± and proton) were detected in the transverse hadron momentum range 0.54 T F for pions was -0.29 FF+ and K+. Amore »negative asymmetry is observed for ?–. The magnitudes of the asymmetries follow |A? –|? +|K +|. The K– and proton asymmetries are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties. The ?+ and ?– asymmetries measured for the 3He target and extracted for neutrons are opposite in sign with a small increase observed as a function of pT.« less

  9. Development of EEM based silicon–water and silica–water wall potentials for non-reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Junghan; Iype, Eldhose; Frijns, Arjan J.H.; Nedea, Silvia V.; Steenhoven, Anton A. van

    2014-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of heat transfer in gases are computationally expensive when the wall molecules are explicitly modeled. To save computational time, an implicit boundary function is often used. Steele's potential has been used in studies of fluid–solid interface for a long time. In this work, the conceptual idea of Steele's potential was extended in order to simulate water–silicon and water–silica interfaces. A new wall potential model is developed by using the electronegativity-equalization method (EEM), a ReaxFF empirical force field and a non-reactive molecular dynamics package PumMa. Contact angle simulations were performed in order to validate the wall potential model. Contact angle simulations with the resulting tabulated wall potentials gave a silicon–water contact angle of 129°, a quartz–water contact angle of 0°, and a cristobalite–water contact angle of 40°, which are in reasonable agreement with experimental values.

  10. Reduced yield stress for zirconium exposed to iodine: Reactive force field simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rossi, Matthew L.; Taylor, Christopher D.; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2014-11-04

    Iodine-induced stress-corrosion cracking (ISCC), a known failure mode for nuclear fuel cladding, occurs when iodine generated during the irradiation of a nuclear fuel pellet escapes the pellet through diffusion or thermal cracking and chemically interacts with the inner surface of the clad material, inducing a subsequent effect on the cladding’s resistance to mechanical stress. To complement experimental investigations of ISCC, a reactive force field (ReaxFF) compatible with the Zr-I chemical and materials systems has been developed and applied to simulate the impact of iodine exposure on the mechanical strength of the material. The study shows that the material’s resistance tomore »stress (as captured by the yield stress of a high-energy grain boundary) is related to the surface coverage of iodine, with the implication that ISCC is the result of adsorption-enhanced decohesion.« less

  11. Field Notes, Middle America (1956-1968) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, William B.

    2012-04-09

    &&dLdI f{. L & ? P'3< a3Lc t xLQc32s_? 42...T3{3k VL!e Cat5 j/b) [&vvL,L t e{ff^ 3 te{ . !2Q,^ a&vv&g ~Qsv&?Lc uL3&i ? [& !k & ? t !2QL &3 j2??hL \\ hT uQ 4Ur te{Qc{3c2YLc p&?2e2&Q X r ?Z t e{ . ! 2Q C }2eL X t e{ . ! 2Q $ &vc...

  12. New Precision Limit on the Strange Vector Form Factors of the Proton

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Baturin, P.; Bellini, V.; Benesch, J.; Beminiwattha, R.; Benmokhtar, F.; et al

    2012-03-01

    The parity-violating cross-section asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from unpolarized protons has been measured at a four-momentum transfer squared Q2 = 0.624 GeV2 and beam energy Eb = 3.48 GeV to be APV = -23.80 ± 0.78 (stat) ± 0.36 (syst) parts per million. This result is consistent with zero contribution of strange quarks to the combination of electric and magnetic form factors GEs + 0.517 GMs = 0.003 ± 0.010 (stat) ± 0.004 (syst) ± 0.009 (ff), where the third error is due to the limits of precision on the electromagnetic form factors and radiative corrections.more »With this measurement, the world data on strange contributions to nucleon form factors are seen to be consistent with zero and not more than a few percent of the proton form factors.« less

  13. Reactive Molecular Dynamics study on the first steps of DNA-damage by free hydroxyl radicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolfath, Ramin M; Brabec, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We employ a large scale molecular simulation based on bond-order ReaxFF to simulate the chemical reaction and study the damage to a large fragment of DNA-molecule in the solution by ionizing radiation. We illustrate that the randomly distributed clusters of diatomic OH-radicals that are primary products of megavoltage ionizing radiation in water-based systems are the main source of hydrogen-abstraction as well as formation of carbonyl- and hydroxyl-groups in the sugar-moiety that create holes in the sugar-rings. These holes grow up slowly between DNA-bases and DNA-backbone and the damage collectively propagate to DNA single and double strand break.

  14. Health Information Technology in US Hospitals: Analysis of Current Status and Development of Future Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jungyeon

    2015-06-01

    s t ha t s up po rt EH R a pp lic at io ns ? *4 D oe s t he h os pi ta l C hi ef In fo rm at io n O ff ic er (C IO ) h av e re sp on si bi lit y fo r H ea lth In fo rm at io n M an ag em en t ( H IM )? 16 17 Hospitals’ past experience with IE... R at io o f I S FT Es to to ta l F TE s 97 3 1. 00 4 (1 .0 00 3- 1. 00 70 ) 0. 03 1 62 5 1. 00 6 (1 .0 00 7- 1. 01 16 ) 0. 02 7 FT Es su pp or tin g EH R a pp lic at io ns *1 83 3 1. 51 (1 .0 6- 2. 17 ) 0. 02 4 62 5 1. 46 (0...

  15. On the explanation and calculation of anomalous reflood hydrodynamics in large PWR cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    Reflood hydrodynamics from large-scale (1:20) test facilities in Japan have yielded apparently anomalous behavior relative to FLECHT tests. Namely, even at reflooding rates below one inch per second, very large liquid volume fractions (10-15%) exist above the quench fronts shortly after flood begins; thus cladding temperature excursions are terminated early in the reflood phase. This paper discusses an explanation for this behavior: liquid films on the core's unheated rods. The experimental findings are shown to be correctly simulated with a new four-field (vapor, films, droplets) version of the best-estimate TRAC-PF1 computer code, TRAC-FF. These experimental and analytical findings have important implications for PWR large-break LOCA licensing.

  16. Single Spin Asymmetries of Inclusive Hadrons Produced in Electron Scattering from a Transversely Polarized 3He Target

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allada, Kalyan; Zhao, Yongxiang; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bradshaw, Peter; Bosted, Peter; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chen, Wei; Chirapatpimol, Khem; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Cornejo, Juan; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De, Cornelis; , Jager; De, Raffaele; , Leo; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Ding, Huaibo; Dolph, Peter; Dutta, Chiranjib; Dutta, Dipangkar; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Frullani, Salvatore; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Guo, Lei; Hamilton, David; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jin; Huang, Min; Ibrahim, Hassan; Iodice, Mauro; Jin, Ge; Jones, Mark; Katich, Joseph; Kelleher, Aidan; Kim, Wooyoung; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; LeRose, John; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Y; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lu, Hai-jiang; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Munoz, Carlos; , Camacho; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Oh, Yongseok; Osipenko, Mikhail; Parno, Diana; Peng, Jen-chieh; Phillips, Sarah; Posik, Matthew; Puckett, Andrew; Qian, Xin; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Ransome, Ronald; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Schulte, Elaine; Shahinyan, Albert; Hashemi, Mitra; , Shabestari; Sirca, Simon; Stepanyan, Stepan; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tang, Liguang; Tobias, William; Urciuoli, Guido; Vilardi, Ignazio; Wang, Kebin; Wang, Y; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Z; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yawei; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zong, Xing

    2014-04-01

    We report the first measurement of target single-spin asymmetries (AN) in the inclusive hadron production reaction, e + 3He??h+X, using a transversely polarized 3 He target. The experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a 5.9-GeV electron beam. Three types of hadrons (?±, K± and proton) were detected in the transverse hadron momentum range 0.54 T F for pions was -0.29 FF+ and K+. A negative asymmetry is observed for ?–. The magnitudes of the asymmetries follow |A? –|? +|K +|. The K– and proton asymmetries are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties. The ?+ and ?– asymmetries measured for the 3He target and extracted for neutrons are opposite in sign with a small increase observed as a function of pT.

  17. Single Spin Asymmetries of Inclusive Hadrons Produced in Electron Scattering from a Transversely Polarized 3He Target

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allada, Kalyan; Zhao, Yongxiang; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bradshaw, Peter; Bosted, Peter; Camsonne, Alexandre; et al

    2014-04-01

    We report the first measurement of target single-spin asymmetries (AN) in the inclusive hadron production reaction, e + 3He??h+X, using a transversely polarized 3 He target. The experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a 5.9-GeV electron beam. Three types of hadrons (?±, K± and proton) were detected in the transverse hadron momentum range 0.54 T F for pions was -0.29 FF+ and K+. Amore »negative asymmetry is observed for ?–. The magnitudes of the asymmetries follow |A? –|? +|K +|. The K– and proton asymmetries are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties. The ?+ and ?– asymmetries measured for the 3He target and extracted for neutrons are opposite in sign with a small increase observed as a function of pT.« less

  18. Amorphous/crystalline silicon interface passivation: Ambient-temperature dependence and implications for solar cell performance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Seif, Johannes P.; Krishnamani, Gopal; Demaurex, Benedicte; Ballif, Christophe; Wolf, Stefaan De

    2015-03-02

    Silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells feature amorphous silicon passivation films, which enable very high voltages. We report how such passivation increases with operating temperature for amorphous silicon stacks involving doped layers and decreases for intrinsic-layer-only passivation. We discuss the implications of this phenomenon on the solar cell's temperature coefficient, which represents an important figure-of-merit for the energy yield of devices deployed in the field. We show evidence that both open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) are affected by these variations in passivation and quantify these temperature-mediated effects, compared with those expected from standard diode equations. We confirm that devicesmore »with high Voc values at 25°C show better high-temperature performance. Thus, we also argue that the precise device architecture, such as the presence of charge-transport barriers, may affect the temperature-dependent device performance as well.« less

  19. Stabilization of three-wave vortex beams in the waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gammal, Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    We consider two-dimensional (2D) localized vortical modes in the three-wave system with the quadratic ($\\chi ^{(2)}$) nonlinearity, alias nondegenerate second-harmonic-generating system, guided by the isotropic harmonic-oscillator (HO) (alias parabolic) confining potential. In addition to the straightforward realization in optics, the system models mixed atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). The main issue is stability of the vortex modes, which is investigated through computation of instability growth rates for eigenmodes of small perturbations, and by means of direct simulations. The threshold of parametric instability for single-color beams, represented solely by the second harmonic (SH) with zero vorticity, is found in an analytical form with the help of the variational approximation (VA). Trapped states with vorticities $\\left( +1,-1,0\\right) $ in the two fundamental-frequency (FF) components and the SH one [the so-called \\textit{hidden-vorticity} (HV) modes] are completely unstable. Also un...

  20. A technique for determining volumetric strain of soils under rapid triaxial loading 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahoney, Joe Paul

    1970-01-01

    tr'd. Secondly, it has long been the consensus tnat the uniaxial test is truly indicative of in situ conditions for a', rblast problems. This has delayed the de!elopm:nt of '! aoid loading triax&al tests for several years. It is the au'g&or's o.... "( Tl=Cll'll'". , ;ill. F((!1 fl. . 'l(:i. . 'Cf. :fill' ". ':i I', ". ;, fC SI "f, f!! O'= SUiLS I!Sfli: R 1?. '. ' !Q t~T(", . 1:(f f (f. '', (( llS (( Tln iS Jy (fO I O (1 i Ol, 1 1' '1', l((( f(f *, 1 ('1 . 1 O G:'3!fO3OO CO I 1OCO...

  1. Classes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    ?GfiArlY & M ?GffiAi rl Y2 Y34 56l784694 rl 15rY56 r6 04?0r?89Y5r6 56 Y34 ?35Y4 0?Y ? ????i?????G? 1? ?5775?? ?6?40?r6 9rr?40? ?0? ???????i? ?G ??i ???????i ???GGf G? ??i ?A????f????f ??? ?i???????f 9GffiAi G? Yi??? ?? ??????f ??f??ff?i?? G...?? ???? ??????? 112 ?? i??i????f ?G? ??G?????G? G? ?i?f??? G???????A ?? ???? ?? 0???????G? ??? 1?G?? ?? ???? ??? ????i ?? ????? li??fi ???? ?i????i? G? ??????? 13.2 ??G? ?i?G?i ??i ???i G? ?????A ????f ??i i?? G? Ai?????G? ??G???i? ??GAi?? ????? ???i??i? ?i...

  2. Three-Dimensional Groundwater Models of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site, Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Chen, Yousu

    2008-09-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed field-scale groundwater flow and transport simulations of the 300 Area to support the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit Phase III Feasibility Study. The 300 Area is located in the southeast portion of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. Historical operations involving uranium fuel fabrication and research activities at the 300 Area have contaminated engineered liquid-waste disposal facilities, the underlying vadose zone, and the uppermost aquifer with uranium. The main objectives of this research were to develop numerical groundwater flow and transport models to help refine the site conceptual model, and to assist assessment of proposed alternative remediation technologies focused on the 300 Area uranium plume.

  3. The production and characterization of protective monoclonal antibodies against Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma mansoni 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Carolyn Sue

    1988-01-01

    -polyacrylamide gel dp t' ff ' 1 h~t' t'g 6A. Western blot analysis of monoclonal antibody A12 hdgtoF1h~ tg 6B. Western blot analysis of monoclonal antibody D4 h d g to ~F* 1 ~ht t g Page 71 71 73 73 74 74 75 77 77 79 81 83 83 Viii 6C. Western blot... b f t*d 'th P. ~ht' p 'ly by the ingestion of watercress comtaminated with metacercariae (Soulsby 1982) . F. hf~d(tica causes malaise, intermittent fever, weight loss, pain under the right 1 g', d ' ph'1' . b' g ' f P. h~t is by eggs...

  4. Recovery Act: Molecular Simulation of Dissolved Inorganic Carbons for Underground Brine CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddard, William

    2012-11-30

    To further our understanding and develop the method for measuring the DICs under geological sequestration conditions, we studied the infrared spectra of DICs under high pressure and temperature conditions. First principles simulations of DICs in brine conditions were performed using a highly optimized ReaxFF-DIC forcefield. The thermodynamics stability of each species were determined using the 2PT method, and shown to be consistent with the Reax simulations. More importantly, we have presented the IR spectra of DIC in real brine conditions as a function of temperature and pressure. At near earth conditions, we find a breaking of the O-C-O bending modes into asymmetric and symmetric modes, separated by 100cm{sup -1} at 400K and 5 GPa. These results can now be used to calibrate FTIR laser measurements.

  5. Reduced yield stress for zirconium exposed to iodine: Reactive force field simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossi, Matthew L.; Taylor, Christopher D.; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2014-11-04

    Iodine-induced stress-corrosion cracking (ISCC), a known failure mode for nuclear fuel cladding, occurs when iodine generated during the irradiation of a nuclear fuel pellet escapes the pellet through diffusion or thermal cracking and chemically interacts with the inner surface of the clad material, inducing a subsequent effect on the cladding’s resistance to mechanical stress. To complement experimental investigations of ISCC, a reactive force field (ReaxFF) compatible with the Zr-I chemical and materials systems has been developed and applied to simulate the impact of iodine exposure on the mechanical strength of the material. The study shows that the material’s resistance to stress (as captured by the yield stress of a high-energy grain boundary) is related to the surface coverage of iodine, with the implication that ISCC is the result of adsorption-enhanced decohesion.

  6. The use of radar data in the investigation of precipitation distributions and anomalous propagation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truppi, Lawrence Ernest

    1957-01-01

    ~', ". 'f"' & 'P'3 ", , 3;CILflCIP. '. . I! l !lCI, XIII' . Qfif 30 fifCILVBIZ~Z. 'I ClI 'I V;YG VVff'3'P, dC ', 3". ff '&3Z SVXBI JO . =8: J1 2 'A V X 2%~ozbeq. eg goagqnS so&sg Enrnusl dONSIOS dO KKJSVN Jo eaxSap aqua uoJ eguaeegynbaz aqua Jo qua...Lxwnuep 30iV. '20S 3C P, ':IJGKI go eez3ap aqua cog egueurezynbez aqua go guantIIygIng Iaygmd uy sexed go a3aIIog Ieoyuaqoaff pua IamgInoyzqy aqua go Iooqog agenpezg a~ og peggILqng Icf BflHI 3 . ". fOif, fPJifWI ?C'I I'fO'fdC'Pif, "f1C...

  7. The CHPRC Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) Quality Assurance Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2009-04-03

    The scope of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC) Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) is for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory staff to provide technical and integration support to CHPRC. This work includes conducting investigations at the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit and other groundwater operable units, and providing strategic integration, technical integration and assessments, remediation decision support, and science and technology. The projects under this Master Project will be defined and included within the Master Project throughout the fiscal year, and will be incorporated into the Master Project Plan. This Quality Assurance Management Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the CHPRC Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) and all releases associated with the CHPRC Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project. The plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

  8. Graphdiyne as a Promising Substrate for Stabilizing Pt Nanoparticle Catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zheng-Zhe

    2015-01-01

    At present, Pt nanoparticle catalysts in fuel cells suffer from aggregation and loss of chemical activity. In this work, graphdiyne, which has natural porous structure, was proposed as substrate with high adsorption ability to stabilize Pt nanoparticles. Using multiscale calculations by ab initio method and the ReaxFF potential, geometry optimizations, molecular dynamics simulations, Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations and minimum energy paths calculations were performed to investigate the adsorption energy and the rates of desorption and migration of Pt nanoparticles on graphdiyne and graphene. According to the comparison between graphdiyne and graphene, it was found that the high adsorption ability of graphdiyne can avoid Pt nanoparticle migration and aggregation on substrate. Then, simulations indicated the potential catalytic ability of graphdiyne-Pt-nanoparticle system to the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. In summary, graphdiyne should be an excellent material to replace graphite or amorphous ca...

  9. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multiresolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a sparse reconstruction scheme that can also be used to ensure non-negativity when fitting wavelet-based random field models to limited observations in non-rectangular geometries. The method is relevant when multiresolution fields are estimated using linear inverse problems. Examples include the estimation of emission fields for many anthropogenic pollutants using atmospheric inversion or hydraulic conductivity in aquifers from flow measurements. The scheme is based on three new developments. Firstly, we extend an existing sparse reconstruction method, Stagewise Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (StOMP), to incorporate prior information on the target field. Secondly, we develop an iterative method that uses StOMP tomore »impose non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, we devise a method, based on compressive sensing, to limit the estimated field within an irregularly shaped domain. We demonstrate the method on the estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the US. The application uses a recently developed multiresolution random field model and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also reduces the overall computational cost by a factor of two. Further, the sparse reconstruction scheme imposes non-negativity without introducing strong nonlinearities, such as those introduced by employing log-transformed fields, and thus reaps the benefits of simplicity and computational speed that are characteristic of linear inverse problems.« less

  10. A Study of the Stability and Characterization Plutonium Dioxide and Chemical Characterization [of] Rocky Flats and Los Alamos Plutonium-Containing Incinerator Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, A.K.; Boettger, J.C.; Behrens, Robert G.

    1999-11-29

    In the presentation ''A Study of the Stability and Characterization of Plutonium Dioxide'', the authors discuss their recent work on actinide stabilities and characterization, in particular, plutonium dioxide PuO{sub 2}. Earlier studies have indicated that PuO{sub 2} has the fluorite structure of CaF{sub 2} and typical oxide semiconductor properties. However, detailed results on the bulk electronic structure of this important actinide oxide have not been available. The authors have used all-electron, full potential linear combinations Gaussian type orbitals fitting function (LCGTO-FF) method to study PuO{sub 2}. The LCGTO-FF technique characterized by its use of three independent GTO basis sets to expand the orbitals, charge density, and exchange-correlation integral kernels. Results will be presented on zero pressure using both the Hedin-Lundquist local density approximation (LDA) model or the Perdew-Wang generalized gradient approximation (GGA) model. Possibilities of different characterizations of PuO{sub 2} will be explored. The paper ''Chemical Characterization Rocky Flats and Los Alamos Plutonium-Containing Incinerator Ash'' describes the results of a comprehensive study of the chemical characteristics of virgin, calcined and fluorinated incinerator ash produced at the Rocky Flats Plant and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory prior to 1988. The Rocky Flats and Los Alamos virgin, calcined, and fluorinated ashes were also dissolved using standard nitrate dissolution chemistry. Corresponding chemical evaluations were preformed on the resultant ash heel and the results compared with those of the virgin ash. Fluorination studies using FT spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool were also performed to evaluate the chemistry of phosphorus, sulfur, carbon, and silicon containing species in the ash. The distribution of plutonium and other chemical elements with the virgin ash, ash heel, fluorinated ash, and fluorinated ash heel particulates were studied in detail using microprobe analysis. Some of the more interesting results of these investigations are presented.

  11. Precision Measurement of the proton neutral weak form factors at Q{sup 2} ~ 0.1 GeV{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Kaufman

    2007-02-01

    This thesis reports the HAPPEX measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry for longitudinally polarized electrons elastically scattered from protons in a liquid hydrogen target. The measurement was carried out in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility using a beam energy E = 3 GeV and scattering angle = 6?. The asymmetry is sensitive to the weak neutral form factors from which we extract the strange quark electric and magnetic form factors (G{sup s}{sub E} and G{sup s}{sub M}) of the proton. The measurement was conducted during two data-taking periods in 2004 and 2005. This thesis describes the methods for controlling the helicity-correlated beam asymmetries and the analysis of the raw asymmetry. The parity-violating asymmetry has been measured to be A{sub PV} = ?1.14± 0.24 (stat)±0.06 (syst) ppm at = 0.099 GeV{sup 2} (2004), and A{sub PV} = ?1.58±0.12 (stat)±0.04 (syst) ppm at = 0.109 GeV{sup 2} (2005). The strange quark form factors extracted from the asymmetry are G{sup s}{sub E} + 0.080G{sup s}{sub M} = 0.030 ± 0.025 (stat) ± 0.006 (syst) ± 0.012 (FF) (2004) and G{sup s}{sub E} +0.088G{sup s}{sub M} = 0.007±0.011 (stat)±0.004 (syst)±0.005 (FF) (2005). These results place the most precise constraints on the strange quark form factors and indicate little strange dynamics in the proton.

  12. Inflationary Magnetogenesis in $R^{2}$-Inflation after Planck 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anwar Saleh AlMuhammad

    2015-05-19

    We study the primordial magnetic field generated by the simple model $f^2 FF$ in Starobinsky, $R^2$-inflationary, model. The scale invariant PMF is achieved at relatively high power index of the coupling function, $\\left| \\alpha \\right| \\approx 7.44$. This model does not suffer from the backreaction problem as long as, the rate of inflationary expansion, $H$, is in the order of or less than the upper bound reported by Planck ($\\le 3.6 \\times 10^{-5} M_\\rm{Pl}$) in both de Sitter and power law expansion, which show similar results. We calculate the lower limit of the reheating parameter, $R_\\rm{rad} > 6.888$ in $R^2$-inflation. Based on the upper limit obtained from CMB, we find that the upper limits of magnetic field and reheating energy density as, $\\left(\\rho_{B_\\rm{end}} \\right)_\\rm{CMB} right)_\\rm{CMB} energy density for all possible values of $w _\\rm{reh}$ are respectively constrained as, $T_\\rm{reh} < 4.32 \\times 10^{13} \\rm{GeV}$ and $\\rho_\\rm{reh} < 3.259 \\times 10^{-18} M_\\rm{Pl}^4$ at $n_\\rm{s} \\approx 0.9674$. This value of spectral index is well consistent with Planck, 2015 results. Adopting $T_\\rm{reh}$, enables us to constrain the reheating e-folds number, $N_\\rm{reh}$ on the range $1 < N_\\rm{reh} < 8.3$, for $- 1/3 < w_\\rm{reh} < 1$. By using the scale invariant PMF generated by $f^2 FF$, we find that the upper limit of present magnetic field, $B_0 < 8.058 \\times 10^{-9} \\rm{G}$.

  13. Observations on vapor pressure in SPR caverns : sources.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Darrell Eugene

    2010-05-01

    The oil of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) represents a national response to any potential emergency or intentional restriction of crude oil supply to this country, and conforms to International Agreements to maintain such a reserve. As assurance this reserve oil will be available in a timely manner should a restriction in supply occur, the oil of the reserve must meet certain transportation criteria. The transportation criteria require that the oil does not evolve dangerous gas, either explosive or toxic, while in the process of transport to, or storage at, the destination facility. This requirement can be a challenge because the stored oil can acquire dissolved gases while in the SPR. There have been a series of reports analyzing in exceptional detail the reasons for the increases, or regains, in gas content; however, there remains some uncertainty in these explanations and an inability to predict why the regains occur. Where the regains are prohibitive and exceed the criteria, the oil must undergo degasification, where excess portions of the volatile gas are removed. There are only two known sources of gas regain, one is the salt dome formation itself which may contain gas inclusions from which gas can be released during oil processing or storage, and the second is increases of the gases release by the volatile components of the crude oil itself during storage, especially if the stored oil undergoes heating or is subject to biological generation processes. In this work, the earlier analyses are reexamined and significant alterations in conclusions are proposed. The alterations are based on how the fluid exchanges of brine and oil uptake gas released from domal salt during solutioning, and thereafter, during further exchanges of fluids. Transparency of the brine/oil interface and the transfer of gas across this interface remains an important unanswered question. The contribution from creep induced damage releasing gas from the salt surrounding the cavern is considered through computations using the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, suggesting a relative minor, but potentially significant, contribution to the regain process. Apparently, gains in gas content can be generated from the oil itself during storage because the salt dome has been heated by the geothermal gradient of the earth. The heated domal salt transfers heat to the oil stored in the caverns and thereby increases the gas released by the volatile components and raises the boiling point pressure of the oil. The process is essentially a variation on the fractionation of oil, where each of the discrete components of the oil have a discrete temperature range over which that component can be volatized and removed from the remaining components. The most volatile components are methane and ethane, the shortest chain hydrocarbons. Since this fractionation is a fundamental aspect of oil behavior, the volatile component can be removed by degassing, potentially prohibiting the evolution of gas at or below the temperature of the degas process. While this process is well understood, the ability to describe the results of degassing and subsequent regain is not. Trends are not well defined for original gas content, regain, and prescribed effects of degassing. As a result, prediction of cavern response is difficult. As a consequence of this current analysis, it is suggested that solutioning brine of the final fluid exchange of a just completed cavern, immediately prior to the first oil filling, should be analyzed for gas content using existing analysis techniques. This would add important information and clarification to the regain process. It is also proposed that the quantity of volatile components, such as methane, be determined before and after any degasification operation.

  14. In-situ gamma-ray assay of the east cell line in the 235-F Plutonium fuel form facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diprete, D.

    2015-08-21

    On September 17th -19th , 2013, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements in the maintenance trench beneath Cells 1-5 on the east line of the PuFF facility using a well-collimated, high-purity germanium detector. The cell interiors were assayed along with the furnaces and storage coolers that protrude beneath the cells. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Data analysis was performed using three gamma-rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells. The weighted mean of these three results was used as the best estimate of Pu-238 holdup in the East Cell Line of PuFF. The results of the assay measurements are found in the table on the following page along with the results from the scoping assay performed in 2006. All uncertainties in this table (as well as the rest of the report) are reported at 1?. Summing the assay results and treating MDAs as M238Pu= 0 ± MDA, the total holdup in the East Cell Line was 240 ± 40 grams. This result is 100 grams lower than the previous estimate, a 0.55? difference. The uncertainty in the Pu-238 holdup is also reduced substantially relative to the 2006 scoping assay. However, the current assay results are in agreement with the 2006 scoping assay results due to the large uncertainty associated with the 2006 scoping assays. The current assay results support the conclusion that the 2006 results bound the Pu-238 mass in Cells 1-5. These results should be considered preliminary since additional measurements of the East Cell line are scheduled for 2017 and 2018. Those measurements will provide detailed information about the distribution of Pu-238 in the cells to be used to refine the results of the current assay.

  15. Controllable atomistic graphene oxide model and its application in hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Liangliang; Gubbins, Keith E., E-mail: keg@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J. [Department of Chemistry, The City College of New York and the Graduate School of the City University of New York, New York 10031 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, The City College of New York and the Graduate School of the City University of New York, New York 10031 (United States); Duin, Adri C. T. van [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16801 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16801 (United States); Lu, Xiaohua [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2013-11-21

    The determination of an atomistic graphene oxide (GO) model has been challenging due to the structural dependence on different synthesis methods. In this work we combine temperature-programmed molecular dynamics simulation techniques and the ReaxFF reactive force field to generate realistic atomistic GO structures. By grafting a mixture of epoxy and hydroxyl groups to the basal graphene surface and fine-tuning their initial concentrations, we produce in a controllable manner the GO structures with different functional groups and defects. The models agree with structural experimental data and with other ab initio quantum calculations. Using the generated atomistic models, we perform reactive adsorption calculations for H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}S mixtures on GO materials and compare the results with experiment. We find that H{sub 2}S molecules dissociate on the carbonyl functional groups, and H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and CO molecules are released as reaction products from the GO surface. The calculation reveals that for the H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}S mixtures, H{sub 2}O molecules are preferentially adsorbed to the carbonyl sites and block the potential active sites for H{sub 2}S decomposition. The calculation agrees well with the experiments. The methodology and the procedure applied in this work open a new door to the theoretical studies of GO and can be extended to the research on other amorphous materials.

  16. Sodium bromide electron-extraction layers for polymer bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhi; Qu, Bo, E-mail: bqu@pku.edu.cn; Xiao, Lixin; Chen, Zhijian [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); New Display Device and System Integration Collaborative Innovation Center of the West Coast of the Taiwan Strait, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang, Lipei [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gong, Qihuang [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-03-10

    Inexpensive and non-toxic sodium bromide (NaBr) was introduced into polymer solar cells (PSCs) as the cathode buffer layer (CBL) and the electron extraction characteristics of the NaBr CBL were investigated in detail. The PSCs based on NaBr CBL with different thicknesses (i.e., 0?nm, 0.5?nm, 1?nm, and 1.5?nm) were prepared and studied. The optimal thickness of NaBr was 1?nm according to the photovoltaic data of PSCs. The open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}), short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}), fill factor (FF), and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSC with 1?nm NaBr were evaluated to be 0.58?V, 7.36?mA/cm{sup 2}, 0.63, and 2.70%, respectively, which were comparable to those of the reference device with the commonly used LiF. The optimized photovoltaic performance of PSC with 1?nm NaBr was ascribed to the improved electron transport and extraction capability of 1?nm NaBr in PSCs. In addition, the NaBr CBL could prevent the diffusion of oxygen and water vapor into the active layer and prolong the lifetime of the devices to some extent. Therefore, NaBr layer could be considered as a promising non-toxic CBL for PSCs in future.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and application of sol-gel derived mesoporous TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles for dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, M. Alam; Shaheer Akhtar, M.; Yang, O-Bong [School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Dukjin Dong, Dukjingu, Jeon-ju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Nanocrystalline mesoporous titania of anatase crystal phase were prepared by sol-gel route by varying calcination (400 C and 600 C) conditions, and the photo-electrochemical properties were investigated for dye-sensitized solar cell applications. The TTIP precursor in n-heptane solvent with ratio of water to TTIP (5:1) was found to be effective substrate for the working electrodes. The overall conversion efficiency of 7.59% was achieved under 1 sun irradiation with open circuit voltage of 0.77 V, current density of 17.00 mA/cm{sup 2} and FF of 51.12. The high efficiency of the 400 C calcined sample were attributed to its mesopores, high BET surface area (80.1 m{sup 2}/g) and large pore volume of prepared titania substrate which provide better surface for the absorption of dye, improves light harvesting efficiency and better charge injection. The prepared samples were characterized by XRD, small angle XRD, FE-SEM, TEM, IPCE, I-V curve, BET surface area and BJH plot techniques. (author)

  18. The detection of reconstituted milk in natural milk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulay, Charudatta Anant

    1959-01-01

    l i b r a r y A A M COLLEGE O F TEXAS lib rblbalymO mnk 'bamOnlylSlbr Pyy. yY OslS'so Pyo. s rNppFR^J^Nh? a?JRHEJ^^J s?J?^ PH4JC nHe?N^^FE ^h ^?F *RJEHJ^F n??hh4 h? ^?F s?RN?H4^HRJ4 J?E PF??J?N?J4 ah44F?F h? lF?Jp N? ?JR^NJ4 ?H4?N44?F?^ h...? ^?F 'F?HNRF?F?^ ?hR ^?F rF?RFF h? rh?^hR h? ??N4hph??C PJC ???? PJ?hR nHe?F?^? rJNRC PJ?H?J?^HRN?? lib rblbalymO m? 'bamOnlylSlbr Pyo. yO OslS'so Pyo. s rNppFR^J^Nh? ??C a?JRH?J^^J s?J?^ PH4JC s??Rh?FE Jp ^h p^C4F J?E ?h?^F?^ ?eC? 0 ? y 4 a...

  19. The effect of a synthetic cytokinin, 6-benzylaminopurine, and light quality on Ficus benjamina under low light intensities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadows, Sylvia Elise

    1979-01-01

    CU CU CU CU CU CU CU CU CU CU CU CU CU CU CU Cg CU CU CU CU CU CU R M M LC M SL' R hC R M R M M M M M R R M GC SC LC CU Gf (J Ia 5 Gl CL O f(f CU LA JJ 0 GS JJ GJ GJ 000 J S 3 3 3 S S S J J'j J 3 3 3'7 3 J J J S 3 LLJ IJJ UJ IJJ LJJ LLJ... the lowest levels. All treatments exhibited more activity I C5W IX: I Q? U CI RQ CS Cl tJ W CL CS CI ~ '? I IU 5- CU O 0 O Ql ;U ) Cl Qt V) X rU rU 5- ) CD 0 QJ 0. 4 0) CU ?t C Q3 O 5 O Ql V) E C 0 I. 'I IU C C C 0 5- 0 (1...

  20. Towards a model independent approach to fragmentation functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christova, Ekaterina; Leader, Elliot [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-01

    We show that the difference cross sections in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering e+N{yields}e+h+X and pp hadron production p+p{yields}h+X determine independently in a model independent way, in any order in QCD, the two fragmentation functions (FFs): D{sub u}{sup h-h} and D{sub d}{sup h-h}, h={pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}} or a sum over charged hadrons. If both K{sup {+-}} and K{sub s}{sup 0} are measured, then e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}K+X, e+N{yields}e+K+X, and p+p{yields}K+X present independent measurements of just one FF: D{sub u-d}{sup K{sup +}}{sup +K{sup -}}. The above results allow one to test the existing parametrizations, obtained with various different assumptions about the FFs, and to test the Q{sup 2} evolution and factorization.

  1. A Model Independent Approach for Determining the Fragmentation Functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christova, Ekaterina [Institute for Nuclear research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Leader, Elliot [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-04

    We show that the difference cross sections in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS)e+N{yields}e+h+X and pp hadron production p+p{yields}h+X determine independently in a model independent way, in any order in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the two FFs: D{sub u}{sup h-h-bar} and D{sub d}{sup h-h-bar}, h = {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}} or a sum over charged hadrons. If both K{sup {+-}} and K{sub 2}{sup 0} are measured, then e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}K+X, e+N{yields}e+K+X and p+p{yields}K+X present independent measurements of just one FF: D{sub u-d}{sup K{sup +}+K{sup -}}. The above results allow to test the existing parameterizations, obtained with various different assumptions about the FFs, and to test the Q{sup 2} evolution and factorization.

  2. Shedding of Vortex Rings from an Oscillating Sphere in Superfluid He-4 below 0.5 K - The Origin of the Turbulent Drag Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoepe, W

    2013-01-01

    The onset of turbulent flow around an oscillating sphere is known to occur at a critical velocity vc ~ sqrt(kappa omega) where kappa is the circulation quantum and omega is the oscillation frequency. However, in a small interval of driving force amplitudes F (or corresponding velocity amplitudes of few percent above vc) the turbulent flow is found to be unstable. The flow pattern switches intermittently between potential flow and turbulence. The lifetimes of the turbulent phases have an exponential distribution and the mean lifetimes tau grow very rapidly with increasing driving force, namely as tau(F) ~ exp [(F/F1)^2]. In this work this experimental result is analyzed in more detail than before, in particular the force F1 is identified. As a result, the turbulent drag force F(v) ~ (v^2 - vc^2) can be ascribed quantitatively to the shedding of vortex rings having the size of the sphere. Moreover, we can infer the average number of vortex rings that are shed per half-period at any given velocity v on the turbu...

  3. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Ensemble Spectroscopic Variability of Quasar Broad Emission Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Mouyuan; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W N; Dawson, Kyle; Denney, Kelly D; Hall, Patrick B; Ho, Luis C; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Richards, Gordon T; Schneider, Donald P; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Kinemuchi, Karen; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    We explore the variability of quasars in the MgII and Hbeta broad emission lines and UV/optical continuum emission using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project (SDSS-RM). This is the largest spectroscopic study of quasar variability to date: our study includes 29 spectroscopic epochs from SDSS-RM over $6$ months, containing 357 quasars with MgII and 41 quasars with Hbeta . On longer timescales, the study is also supplemented with two-epoch data from SDSS-I/II. The SDSS-I/II data include an additional $2854$ quasars with MgII and 572 quasars with Hbeta. The MgII emission line is significantly variable ($\\Delta f/f$ 10% on 100-day timescales), indicating that it is feasible to use the broad MgII line for reverberation mapping studies. The data also confirm that continuum variability increases with timescale and decreases with luminosity, and the continuum light curves are consistent with a damped random-walk model on rest-frame timescales of $\\gtrsim 5$ days. We compare the emission-line and...

  4. Inclusive and Exclusive |Vub|

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrella, Antonio; /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara

    2011-11-17

    The current status of the determinations of CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| via exclusive and inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays is reviewed. The large datasets collected at the B-Factories, and the increased precision of theoretical calculations have allowed an improvement in the determination of |V{sub ub}|. However, there are still significant uncertainties. In the exclusive approach, the most precise measurement of the pion channel branching ratio is obtained by an untagged analysis. This very good precision can be reached by tagged analyses with more data. The problem with exclusive decays is that the strong hadron dynamics can not be calculated from first principles and the determination of the form factor has to rely on light-cone sum rules or lattice QCD calculations. The current data samples allow a comparison of different FF models with data distributions. With further developments on lattice calculations, the theoretical error should shrink to reach the experimental one. The inclusive approach still provides the most precise |V{sub ub}| determinations. With new theoretical calculations, the mild (2.5{sigma}) discrepancy with respect to the |V{sub ub}| value determined from the global UT fit has been reduced. As in the exclusive approach, theoretical uncertainties represent the limiting factor to the precision of the measurement. Reducing the theoretical uncertainties to a level comparable with the statistical error is challenging. New measurements in semileptonic decays of charm mesons could increase the confidence in theoretical calculations and related uncertainties.

  5. Development and Application of ANN Model for Worker Assignment into Virtual Cells of Large Sized Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murali, R. V.; Fathi, Khalid [Faculty Members, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Caledonian College of Engineering (Oman); Puri, A. B. [Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, NIT, Durgapur, West Bengal (India)

    2010-10-26

    This paper presents an extended version of study already undertaken on development of an artificial neural networks (ANNs) model for assigning workforce into virtual cells under virtual cellular manufacturing systems (VCMS) environments. Previously, the same authors have introduced this concept and applied it to virtual cells of two-cell configuration and the results demonstrated that ANNs could be a worth applying tool for carrying out workforce assignments. In this attempt, three-cell configurations problems are considered for worker assignment task. Virtual cells are formed under dual resource constraint (DRC) context in which the number of available workers is less than the total number of machines available. Since worker assignment tasks are quite non-linear and highly dynamic in nature under varying inputs and conditions and, in parallel, ANNs have the ability to model complex relationships between inputs and outputs and find similar patterns effectively, an attempt was earlier made to employ ANNs into the above task. In this paper, the multilayered perceptron with feed forward (MLP-FF) neural network model has been reused for worker assignment tasks of three-cell configurations under DRC context and its performance at different time periods has been analyzed. The previously proposed worker assignment model has been reconfigured and cell formation solutions available for three-cell configuration in the literature are used in combination to generate datasets for training ANNs framework. Finally, results of the study have been presented and discussed.

  6. Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 2, 13-18 October 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Kashish Das

    ]v]s} sf/ 0fn] g]kfnsf s]xL dxTjk"0f{ klqsfn] ;/ sf/L k|jQmf 6+s 9sfnsf] 7f8f] cfb]zsf] e/df ;/sf/L cfly{s gfsfaGbLsf] ;fdgf ug'{ k/]sf] 5. oltdfq x}g klqsf jlu{s/ 0fdf ;d]t slxNo} g;f]lrPsf] lg0f{o ePsf] 5 . :d/0f /xf]; g]kfndf æsÆ ævÆ / æuÆ ju... sfnsf] df}lvs cfb]zsf] e/df cfly{s gfsfjGbLsf] ;fdgf ul//x]sf klqsfx?df b]zfGt/, ljdz{, xfFs, k|sfz, ;fF3' / a'waf/ ;fKtflxs /x]sf 5g\\ . pQm :j]R5frf/L lg0f{osf lj?2 kqsf/x? cfGbf]ngdf plqP/ k|]z sfplG;nsf cWoIf dfyj/ l;+x a:g]tn] t'?Gt /fh...

  7. R and D in France and in Western Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastin, A.J.F. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper deals with worldwide electric utility R and D, but focuses on France first, and not on Western Europe as a whole. Apart from the fact that the R and D of European utilities hardly show a homogeneous set, there are four basic reasons. To begin with, France represents roughly 20 percent of Western Europe by itself. Germany, now extended to the late DDR, is the only country to have a larger share. Second, Electricite de France (EDF) is the largest electric utility worldwide, with annual sales of about 410 TWh. Third, EDF has consistently shown one of the lowest electricity prices: as an average .44 FF par kWh (about $.08 per kWh) which comes up on comparing the 410 TWh sales with a 165 GFF turnover. Beyond these three points, which are more or less permanent, it appears that both EDF and its R and D division have been stable over the last three years. So the French power system is the largest subsystem in Western Europe where a single well-defined R and D policy can be described and assessed; this is what the authors are going to do now.

  8. Passiflora spp. (Cultivated) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monique D. Reed

    2011-08-10

    ??2) D(5)=25. ?(X??Z)+(OMEGA??2) F(LpL)=AM(2)+AM(3) Fi, ), 2)=(H(Z)??Z)+(Hi', 31??2)?AR(2)?AMf3) F(L, 31'=AM(ZI?(H(3)??2)?AM(31?(H(2)??2) Fi L, 4!= i H(21??2)?( H( 3)??2) Ff)p'5!'=F(). sLJ+AM(4) F(). , 61=F(J. pZJ+AM(4)?F('L, ()+(H(4)??2) Fffp7)=F..."=Filp71+AM(5)?FIL?6)+(H(5)??21?F(J?5) FiLp L4)=-i=(fp81', +AM(51?F(L, 71+(H(5)??2)?F(Lp6) F(LpL5)=F(Lp9!'+AM(51'?F(Lp8)+(H(51??2)?F(fp7) F:L, L6)=F(LpLDI+AM('5J'?F((, 9)?(H(5)??2)?F(. fp81 F(LpL7)=AM(51?F(L, LD)+(H(5)??21?F((p9) F(Lp)81'=(H(51??2)?F...

  9. Testing scalar-tensor theories and PPN parameters in Earth orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Schärer; Raymond Angélil; Ruxandra Bondarescu; Philippe Jetzer; Andrew Lundgren

    2014-10-29

    We compute the PPN parameters $\\gamma$ and $\\beta$ for general scalar-tensor theories in the Einstein frame, which we compare to the existing PPN formulation in the Jordan frame for alternative theories of gravity. This computation is important for scalar-tensor theories that are expressed in the Einstein frame, such as chameleon and symmetron theories, which can incorporate hiding mechanisms that predict environment-dependent PPN parameters. We introduce a general formalism for scalar-tensor theories and constrain it using the limit on $\\gamma$ given by the Cassini experiment. In particular we discuss massive Brans-Dicke scalar fields for extended sources. Next, using a recently proposed Earth satellite experiment, in which atomic clocks are used for spacecraft tracking, we compute the observable perturbations in the redshift induced by PPN parameters deviating from their general relativistic values. Our estimates suggest that $|\\gamma - 1| \\sim |\\beta -1| \\sim 10^{-6}$ may be detectable by a satellite that carries a clock with fractional frequency uncertainty $\\Delta f/f \\sim 10^{-16}$ in an eccentric orbit around the Earth. Such space experiments are within reach of existing atomic clock technology. We discuss further the requirements necessary for such a mission to detect deviations from Einstein relativity.

  10. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2012-11-01

    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  11. Atomic clocks as a tool to monitor vertical surface motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Lundgren, Andrew; Hetényi, György; Houlié, Nicolas; Jetzer, Philippe; Bondarescu, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Atomic clock technology is advancing rapidly, now reaching stabilities of $\\Delta f/f \\sim 10^{-18}$, which corresponds to resolving $1$ cm in equivalent geoid height over an integration timescale of about 7 hours. At this level of performance, ground-based atomic clock networks emerge as a tool for monitoring a variety of geophysical processes by directly measuring changes in the gravitational potential. Vertical changes of the clock's position due to magmatic, volcanic, post-seismic or tidal deformations can result in measurable variations in the clock tick rate. As an example, we discuss the geopotential change arising due to an inflating point source (Mogi model), and apply it to the Etna volcano. Its effect on an observer on the Earth's surface can be divided into two different terms: one purely due to uplift and one due to the redistribution of matter. Thus, with the centimetre-level precision of current clocks it is already possible to monitor volcanoes. The matter redistribution term is estimated to b...

  12. Thermal degradation mechanisms in GaAs solar cells with high-temperature contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, S.P.; Bajgar, C.; Vernon, S.M.; Keavney, C.J.; Chung, M.A.; Ruby, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    This objective of this work was to characterize the thermal stability of GaAs solar cells with high-temperature contacts. High-temperature stability is important for threat environments in space, for compatibility with high-temperature assembly techniques, and for enhanced reliability of cells. Our contact system, described previously, relies on a Pt solid-phase ohmic contact, a TiN barrier layer, and an Au conductor, with contact to a heavily doped p-GaAs contact layer. The behavior of both flat-plate and concentrator cells has been characterized as a function of temperature (400-600/degree/C) and time (5-15 minutes) of the anneal. We find that GaAs cells experience minimal electrical degradation up to 550/degree/C for 5 minutes, or to 490/degree/C for 15 minutes. Increases in the 2kT perimeter dark current are responsible for small decreases in Voc and FF up to these temperatures. At higher temperatures a drastic decrease in efficiency is caused by metallurgical reactions at isolated regions along the grid lines. The reaction, which appears to involve Au-Ga, is initiated at the edges of the grid lines. Away from edges, the contacts are metallurgically stable to at least 600/degree/C. 4 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Evidence for an unorthodox firing sequence employed by the Berlin Painter. Deciphering ancient ceramic firing conditions through high-resolution material characterization and replication

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cianchetta, I.; Trentelman, K.; Maish, J.; Saunders, D.; Foran, B.; Walton, M.; Sciau, Ph.; Wang, T.; Pouyet, E.; Cotte, M.; et al

    2014-12-10

    XANES spectroscopy was used to complement the results previously obtained with Raman spectroscopy by the same group to determine the firing conditions used in the production of a single vessel painted by the Berlin Painter in the 5th century B.C. The vessel, part of the collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, presents a complicated layered architecture of black and red gloss, with different stratigraphies present on the interior and exterior surfaces. The study of two samples, one each from the interior and exterior surface of the vessel, was performed with the complementary analytical techniques of X-ray nano- and micro-spectroscopymore »(X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and full-field transmission X-ray micro-spectroscopy (FF-XANES) across the Fe K edge), and supported by a replication study. The replicates, made in a laboratory furnace providing complete control over the firing temperature and oxygen partial pressure, provided a paradigm for the comparison of the mineralogical phases observed in the ancient samples, which led to a deeper understanding of the firing conditions necessary for the production of the Berlin Painter's vessel. Our results confirm the necessity of multiple firings and painting applications to obtain the Berlin Painter's architecture and provide a further example of the multiplicity of techniques and practices employed by the potters of the Kerameikos in ancient Athens.« less

  14. Hierarchical Petascale Simulation Framework For Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grama, Ananth

    2013-12-18

    A number of major accomplishments resulted from the project. These include: • Data Structures, Algorithms, and Numerical Methods for Reactive Molecular Dynamics. We have developed a range of novel data structures, algorithms, and solvers (amortized ILU, Spike) for use with ReaxFF and charge equilibration. • Parallel Formulations of ReactiveMD (Purdue ReactiveMolecular Dynamics Package, PuReMD, PuReMD-GPU, and PG-PuReMD) for Messaging, GPU, and GPU Cluster Platforms. We have developed efficient serial, parallel (MPI), GPU (Cuda), and GPU Cluster (MPI/Cuda) implementations. Our implementations have been demonstrated to be significantly better than the state of the art, both in terms of performance and scalability. • Comprehensive Validation in the Context of Diverse Applications. We have demonstrated the use of our software in diverse systems, including silica-water, silicon-germanium nanorods, and as part of other projects, extended it to applications ranging from explosives (RDX) to lipid bilayers (biomembranes under oxidative stress). • Open Source Software Packages for Reactive Molecular Dynamics. All versions of our soft- ware have been released over the public domain. There are over 100 major research groups worldwide using our software. • Implementation into the Department of Energy LAMMPS Software Package. We have also integrated our software into the Department of Energy LAMMPS software package.

  15. Many-electron hyperpolarizability density analysis: Application to the dissociation process of one-dimensional H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakano Masayoshi; Nagao Hidemi; Yamaguchi Kizashi |

    1997-02-01

    A method for density analysis of static polarizabilities ({alpha}) and second hyperpolarizabilities ({gamma}) on the basis of the finite-field (FF) many-electron wave packets (MEWP) method is developed and applied to evaluation of the longitudinal {alpha} and {gamma} in the dissociation process for a one-dimensional H{sub 2} model. Remarkable increases in {alpha} and {gamma} are observed in the intermediate dissociation region. The internuclear distance where the {gamma} is maximized is also found to be larger than that where the {alpha} is maximized. In order to elucidate the characteristics of {alpha} and {gamma} in the dissociation process, we extract their classical pictures describing displacements of two-electron configurations by using (hyper)polarizability densities on the two-electron coordinate plane. It is suggested from these classical pictures that the polarization in the ionic structure contributes primarily to the enhancement of (hyper)polarizability in the intermediate dissociation region, while the polarization in the diradical structure causes the decrease of the (hyper)polarizability at a large internuclear distance. This implies that the experimental search for species with chemical bonds in the intermediate correlation regime is important and interesting in relation to the molecular design of nonlinear optical materials. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Returns-Based Beliefs and The Prisoner's Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velu, C; Iyer, Sriya

    ( ) ( l ) 75.0. 76.2. 77.3. 78.3. 79.2. Cooperative Probability (Column 2) r ti r ilit ( l ) 0.39. 0.4. 0.41. 0.42. 0.43. 80.0. 0.44. 5.2. 80.8. 0.45. 5.4. 81.5. 0.45. 5.6. 82.1. 0.46. 5.8. 82.8. 0.47. Figure 3: Loss Index and Cooperative Probability... (D,C) Payoff( , ) ff 6.0. 6.2. 6.4. 6.6. 6.8. 7.0. Temptation Index (%) (Column 1) t ti I ( ) ( l ) 50.0. 55.0. 60.0. 65.0. 70.0. Cooperative Probability (Column 2) r ti r ilit ( l ) 0.39. 0.38. 0.37. 0.37. 0.36. 75.0. 0.36. 7.2. 80.0. 0...

  17. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment of Bethel Valley low-level waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 3092 (Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3092 Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in responsible to the requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, relating to environmental protection requirements for buried tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new scrubber recirculation tank in a new, below ground, lines concrete vault, replacing and existing recirculation sump that does not provide double containment. A new buried, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of spent scrubber recirculation fluid to the Central Waste Collection Header. The new vault, tank, and discharge line are provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. New scrubber recirculation pumps, piping, and accessories are also provided. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, as set forth in Appendix F to the Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  18. Bilayer Polymer Solar Cells with Improved Power Conversion Efficiency and Enhanced Spectrum Coverage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kekuda, Dhananjaya [Department of Physics, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal University, Manipal, India 576 104 (India); Chu, Chih-Wei [Research Center for Applied Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 300 13 (China)

    2011-10-20

    We demonstrate the construction of an efficient bilayer polymer solar cell comprising of Poly(3-hexylthiophene)(P3HT) as a p-type semiconductor and asymmetric fullerene (C{sub 70}) as n-type counterparts. The bilayer configuration was very efficient compared to the individual layer performance and it behaved like a regular p-n junction device. The photovoltaic characteristic of the bilayers were studied under AM 1.5 solar radiation and the optimized device parameters are the following: Voc = 0.5V, Jsc = 10.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF = 0.60 and power conversion efficiency of 3.6 %. A high fill factor of {approx}0.6 was achieved, which is only slightly reduced at very intense illumination. Balanced mobility between p-and n-layers is achieved which is essential for achieving high device performance. Correlation between the crystallinity, morphology and the transport properties of the active layers is established. The External quantum efficiency (EQE) spectral distribution of the bilayer devices with different processing solvents correlates well with the trends of short circuit current densities (J{sub sc}) measured under illumination. Efficiency of the bilayer devices with rough P3HT layer was found to be about 3 times higher than those with a planar P3HT surface. Hence it is desirable to have a larger grains with a rough surface of P3HT layer for providing larger interfacial area for the exciton dissociation.

  19. Broadband extended emission in gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Amir; Pick, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Black holes in core-collapse of massive stars are expected to surge in mass and angular momentum by hyper-accretion immediately following their formation. We here describe a general framework of extended emission in gravitational waves from non-axisymmetric accretion flows from fallback matter of the progenitor envelope. It shows (a) a maximum efficiency in conversion of accretion energy into gravitational waves at hyper-accretion rates exceeding a critical value set by the ratio of the quadrupole mass inhomogeneity and viscosity with (b) a peak characteristic strain amplitude at the frequency $f_b=\\Omega_b/\\pi$, where $\\Omega_b$ is the Keplerian angular velocity at which viscous torques equal angular momentum loss in gravitational radiation, with $h_{char}\\propto f^{1/6}$ at $ff_b$. Upcoming gravitational wave observations may probe this scaling by extracting broadband spectra using time-sliced matched filtering with chirp templates, recently developed for identifying turbulence in noisy time series.

  20. An Approach to Ground Moving Target Indication Using Multiple Resolutions of Multilook Synthetic Aperture Radar Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akers, Geoffrey

    2009-12-15

    D445 u1D461u1D465 (ru1D460,u1D461)u1D445u1D45Fu1D465 (ru1D460,ru1D45F,u1D461) uni222B.alt02 u1D447 u1D452?u1D457u1D7140u1D461?u1D6FF[u1D461?u1D461? ?u1D70F (ru1D460,ru1D45F,u1D461)]u1D460(u1D461?)u1D451u1D461?, (2.8) 17 where T is the transit signal...460)2. Using this approximation and the sifting property of integrating the delta function results in u1D70C(ru1D460,ru1D45F,u1D461) = u1D43A(ru1D460)u1D445(r u1D460) 2u1D452 ?u1D457u1D7140u1D70F(ru1D460,ru1D45F,u1D461)u1D460(u1D461?u1D70F (ru1D460,ru1...

  1. Music in the Aegean Bronze Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    1998-01-01

    >: -! C),/- d;ivrY v9bo .q v ?\\-o .= (h.= g E n2v ';: t^= ch. t*i .= H H fi!oHX cd '=(gE-> (h G9 .--H _HU d.r ta .'- Itscg -a. P- .. c)ii> io9: !i9-- () riU) +/ F.F F. z F U tr'l ft1 00?€ vt iQ FHEe fi g E,F;E ? - ?"yili$*sF; id ?* d#o. 6 9... a L q N q C) >' G -6 k O (.) (.) d -F a C)a - o O N a o HG (.) lJ d a H o C) - o () N q @ a C) a - q F |r B () O C) ii o : - .no F.i !() rol](J! o- cd (v k Btr O(g =* .. B C)- 9ir -JZ B= (J'- bob s!e! trO -c!0JOO OF EO >'(.) .n G - B 6 a o cd.F o V...

  2. Oxygen Incorporation During Fabrication of Substrate CdTe Photovoltaic Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duenow, J. N.; Dhere, R. G.; Kuciauskas, D.; Li, J. V.; Pankow, J. W.; DeHart, C. M.; Gessert, T. A.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices fabricated in the nonstandard substrate configuration have attracted increasing interest because of their potential compatibility with flexible substrates such as metal foils and polymer films. This compatibility could lead to the suitability of CdTe for roll-to-roll processing and building-integrated PV. Currently, however, the efficiencies of substrate CdTe devices reported in the literature are significantly lower ({approx}6%-8%) than those of high-performance superstrate devices ({approx}17%) because of significantly lower open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF). In our recent device development efforts, we have found that processing parameters required to fabricate high-efficiency substrate CdTe PV devices differ from those necessary for traditional superstrate CdTe devices. Here, we investigate how oxygen incorporation in the CdTe deposition, CdCl2 heat treatment, CdS deposition, and post-deposition heat treatment affect device characteristics through their effects on the junction. By adjusting whether oxygen is incorporated during these processing steps, we have achieved Voc values greater than 860 mV and efficiencies greater than 10%.

  3. The 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2009-04-29

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a group of expert collaborators are using the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site 300 Area uranium plume within the footprint of the 300-FF-5 groundwater operable unit as a site for an Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC). The IFRC is entitled Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on the Hanford Site 300 Area Uranium Plume Project. The theme is investigation of multi-scale mass transfer processes. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research that relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements/approaches needed to characterize and model a mass transfer-dominated system. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the 300 Area IFRC Project. This plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

  4. The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-31

    The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

  5. Fullerene C{sub 70} as a p-type donor in organic photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Taojun; Wang, Xiao-Feng E-mail: zrhong@ucla.edu Sano, Takeshi; Kido, Junji E-mail: zrhong@ucla.edu; Hong, Ziruo E-mail: zrhong@ucla.edu; Li, Gang; Yang, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Fullerenes and their derivatives have been widely used as n-type materials in organic transistor and photovoltaic devices. Though it is believed that they shall be ambipolar in nature, there have been few direct experimental proofs for that. In this work, fullerene C{sub 70}, known as an efficient acceptor, has been employed as a p-type electron donor in conjunction with 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile as an electron acceptor in planar-heterojunction (PHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. High fill factors (FFs) of more than 0.70 were reliably achieved with the C{sub 70} layer even up to 100?nm thick in PHJ cells, suggesting the superior potential of fullerene C{sub 70} as the p-type donor in comparison to other conventional donor materials. The optimal efficiency of these unconventional PHJ cells was 2.83% with a short-circuit current of 5.33?mA/cm{sup 2}, an open circuit voltage of 0.72?V, and a FF of 0.74. The results in this work unveil the potential of fullerene materials as donors in OPV devices, and provide alternative approaches towards future OPV applications.

  6. Quantum speed-up transition in open system dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang Hao; Wenjiong Wu

    2015-10-20

    The rate of the trace distance is used to evaluate quantum speed-up for arbitrary mixed states. Compared with some present methods, the approach based on trace distance can provide an optimal bound to the speed of the evolution. The dynamical transition from no speed-up region to speed-up region takes on in the spontaneous decay of an two-level atom with detuning. The evolution is characteristic of the alternating behavior between quantum speed-up and speed-down in the strong system-reservoir coupling regime. Under the o?ff-resonance condition, the dynamical evolution can be accelerated for short previous times and then decelerated to a normal process either in the weak or strong coupling regime. From the time-energy uncertainty relation, we demonstrate that the potential capacity for quantum speed-up evolution is closely related to the energy flow-back from the reservoir to the system. The negative decay rate for short time intervals leads to the speed-up process where the photons previously emitted by the atom are reabsorbed at a later time. The values of the spontaneous decay rate becomes positive after a long enough time, which results in the normal evolution with no speed-up potential.

  7. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic High Frequency Axisymmetric Cavity Scars.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warne, Larry K.; Jorgenson, Roy E.

    2014-10-01

    This report examines the localization of high frequency electromagnetic fi elds in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This report treats both the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex, where there are no interior foci, and the case where they are concave, leading to interior foci. The scalar problem is treated fi rst but the approximations required to treat the vector fi eld components are also examined. Particular att ention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the fi eld along the scarred orbit as well as point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are m ade with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation. This axisymmetric cas eformstheoppositeextreme(wherethetwomirror radii at each end of the ray orbit are equal) from the two -dimensional solution examined previously (where one mirror radius is vastly di ff erent from the other). The enhancement of the fi eldontheorbitaxiscanbe larger here than in the two-dimensional case. Intentionally Left Blank

  8. Testing General Relativity and Alternative Theories of Gravity with Space-based Atomic Clocks and Atom Interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruxandra Bondarescu; Andreas Schärer; Philippe Jetzer; Raymond Angélil; Prasenjit Saha; Andrew Lundgren

    2014-12-05

    The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft's reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gravitational perturbations in Earth's gravitational field, potentially differentiating between different theories of gravity. This mission can measure multiple relativistic effects all during the course of a single experiment, and constrain the Parametrized Post-Newtonian Parameters around the Earth. A satellite carrying a clock of fractional timing inaccuracy of $\\Delta f/f \\sim 10^{-16}$ in an elliptic orbit around the Earth would constrain the PPN parameters $|\\beta -1|, |\\gamma-1| \\lesssim 10^{-6}$. We also briefly review potential constraints by atom interferometers on scalar tensor theories and in particular on Chameleon and dilaton models.

  9. Evaluation of Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Facilities with SCR and FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. A. Withum; J. E. Locke

    2006-02-01

    CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)--wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential mercury removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that this data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize mercury removal. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of SCR catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. This document, the tenth in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on two 468 MW units burning bituminous coal containing 1.3-1.7% sulfur. Unit 2 is equipped with an SCR, ESP, and wet FGD to control NO{sub x}, particulate, and SO{sub 2} emissions, respectively. Unit 1 is similar to Unit 2, except that Unit 1 has no SCR for NOx control. Four sampling tests were performed on both units in January 2005; flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the economizer outlet, air heater outlet (ESP inlet), ESP outlet (FGD inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Process samples for material balances were collected with the flue gas measurements. The results show that the SCR increased the oxidation of the mercury at the air heater outlet. At the exit of the air heater, a greater percentage of the mercury was in the oxidized and particulate forms on the unit equipped with an SCR compared to the unit without an SCR (97.4% vs 91%). This higher level of oxidation resulted in higher mercury removals in the scrubber. Total mercury removal averaged 97% on the unit with the SCR, and 87% on the unit without the SCR. The average mercury mass balance closure was 84% on Unit 1 and 103% on Unit 2.

  10. Process Development for High Voc CdTe Solar Cells: Phase I, Annual Technical Report, October 2005 - September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferekides, C. S.; Morel, D. L.

    2007-04-01

    The focus of this project is the open-circuit voltage of the CdTe thin-film solar cell. CdTe continues to be one of the leading materials for large-scale cost-effective production of photovoltaics, but the efficiency of the CdTe solar cell has been stagnant for the last few years. At the manufacturing front, the CdTe technology is fast paced and moving forward with U.S.-based First Solar LLC leading the world in CdTe module production. To support the industry efforts and continue the advancement of this technology, it will be necessary to continue improvements in solar cell efficiency. A closer look at the state-of-the-art performance levels puts the three solar cell efficiency parameters of short-circuit current density (JSC), open-circuit voltage (VOC), and fill factor (FF) in the 24-26 mA/cm2, 844?850 mV, and 74%-76% ranges respectively. During the late 1090s, efforts to improve cell efficiency were primarily concerned with increasing JSC, simply by using thinner CdS window layers to enhance the blue response (<510 nm) of the CdTe cell. These efforts led to underscoring the important role 'buffers' (or high-resistivity transparent films) play in CdTe cells. The use of transparent bi-layers (low-p/high-p) as the front contact is becoming a 'standard' feature of the CdTe cell.

  11. Flattening filter removal for improved image quality of megavoltage fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, James D.; Kirichenko, Alexander; Gayou, Olivier

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Removal of the linear accelerator (linac) flattening filter enables a high rate of dose deposition with reduced treatment time. When used for megavoltage imaging, an unflat beam has reduced primary beam scatter resulting in sharper images. In fluoroscopic imaging mode, the unflat beam has higher photon count per image frame yielding higher contrast-to-noise ratio. The authors’ goal was to quantify the effects of an unflat beam on the image quality of megavoltage portal and fluoroscopic images.Methods: 6 MV projection images were acquired in fluoroscopic and portal modes using an electronic flat-panel imager. The effects of the flattening filter on the relative modulation transfer function (MTF) and contrast-to-noise ratio were quantified using the QC3 phantom. The impact of FF removal on the contrast-to-noise ratio of gold fiducial markers also was studied under various scatter conditions.Results: The unflat beam had improved contrast resolution, up to 40% increase in MTF contrast at the highest frequency measured (0.75 line pairs/mm). The contrast-to-noise ratio was increased as expected from the increased photon flux. The visualization of fiducial markers was markedly better using the unflat beam under all scatter conditions, enabling visualization of thin gold fiducial markers, the thinnest of which was not visible using the unflat beam.Conclusions: The removal of the flattening filter from a clinical linac leads to quantifiable improvements in the image quality of megavoltage projection images. These gains enable observers to more easily visualize thin fiducial markers and track their motion on fluoroscopic images.

  12. Single-Source Nets of Algebraically-Quantized Reflective Liouville Potentials on the Line I. Almost-Everywhere Holomorphic Solutions of Rational Canonical Sturm-Liouville Equations with Second-Order Poles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory Natanson

    2015-03-15

    The paper presents the unified technique for constructing SUSY ladders of rational Liouville potentials (RLPs) starting from the so-called "Gauss-reference" (GRef) potentials exactly quantized on the line via classical Jacobi, classical (generalized) Laguerre, or Romanovski-Routh polynomials with energy-dependent indexes. Each RLP is obtained by means of the Liouville transformation (LT) of the appropriate rational canonical Sturm-Liouville equation (RCSLE) with second-order poles. The presented analysis takes advantage of the generic factorization of canonical Sturm-Liouville equations (CSLEs) in terms of intertwining "generalized" Darboux operators. We refer to the latter operators as the canonical Liouville-Darboux transformations (CLDTs) to stress that they are equivalent to three-step operations: i) the LT from the CSLE to the Schrodinger equation; ii) the Darboux transformation (DT) of the appropriate LP; and iii) the inverse LT from the Schrodinger equation to the new CSLE. It is proven that the CLDT preserves the rational form of the RCSLE if its factorization function (FF) is an almost-everywhere holomorphic (AEH) solution of the RCSLE (or, in other words, a solution with a rational logarithmic derivative). As explained in the paper there are up to four gauge transformations which convert each RCSLE of our interest into the second-order differential equations with energy-dependent polynomial coefficients. The most important result of the paper is that polynomial solutions of these equations belong to sequences of Heine polynomials obtained by varying free terms at fixed values of singular points and the appropriate characteristic exponents. This allows us to construct networks of polynomial solutions -- the so-called "r-, c-, or i-Gauss-seed" (r-, c-, or i-GS) Heine polynomials -- starting from Jacobi, (generalized) Laguerre or Routh polynomials, respectively.

  13. Effects of photon escape on diagnostic diagrams for HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Giammanco; J. E. Beckman; B. Cedres

    2005-04-11

    In this article we first outline the mounting evidence that a significant fraction of the ionizing photons emitted by OB stars within HII regions escape from their immediate surroundings and explain how an HII region structure containing high density contrast in homogeneities facilitates this escape. Next we describe sets of models containing inhomogeneities which are used to predict tracks in the commonly used diagnostic diagrams (based on ratios of emission lines) whose only independent variable is the photon escape fraction, xi. We show that the tracks produced by the models in two of the most cited of these diagrams conform well to the distribution of observed data points, with the models containing optically thick inhomogeneities ("CLUMPY" models) yielding somewhat better agreement than those with optically thin inhomogeneities ("FF" models). We show how variations in the ionization parameter U, derived from emission line ratios, could be due to photon escape. Using a rather wide range of assumptions about the filling factor of dense clumps we find, for a selected set of regions observed in M51 photon escape fraction ranging between 30% and 50%. We show, using oxygen as the test element, that models with different assumptions about the gas inhomogeneity will give variations in the abundance values derived from diagnostic diagrams, but do not claim here to have a fully developed set of diagnostic tools to improve abundance determinations made in this way. We finally propose a combination of line ratios with the absolute Halpha luminosity of a given HII region, which allows us to determine the photon escape fraction, and hence resolve the degeneracy between U and xi.

  14. Dynamics of confined reactive water in Smectic clay-zeolite composites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  15. Dynamics of confined reactive water in smectite clay-zeolite composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  16. Improvement of the photoluminescent intensity of ZnTa{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Pr{sup 3+} phosphor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noto, L.L. Ntwaeaborwa, O.M.; Yagoub, M.Y.A.; Swart, H.C.

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The optimal luminescence intensity was obtained for 0.4 mol% Pr{sup 3+} doped ZnTa{sub 2}O{sub 6}. • The ZnTa{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Pr{sup 3+} has a colour index matching an ideal red emission. • The cross relaxation process led to a decrease in red emission at higher Pr{sup 3+} concentrations. • The blue emission continues to increase at higher Pr{sup 3+} concentrations. • The persistent luminescent increases with an increase in Pr{sup 3+} concentration. - Abstract: A red emitting ZnTa{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Pr{sup 3+} phosphor with Commission Internationale de l‘Eclairage coordinates that match those of an ideal red emission was prepared by solid state chemical reaction. X-ray diffraction confirmed that a pure orthorhombic phase of ZnTa{sub 2}O{sub 6} was crystallized. A homogeneous distribution of the Pr{sup 3+} ions was confirmed from the analysis of the time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy overlay images. In addition to the reflectance at 259 nm associated with band-to-band absorption, minor reflectance peaks associated with f-f transitions of Pr{sup 3+} were observed at 420–500 nm. The main red emission peak was split into minor peaks located at 608, 619 and 639 nm that were assigned to {sup 1}D{sub 2} ? {sup 3}H{sub 4}, {sup 3}P{sub 0} ? {sup 3}H{sub 6} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} ? {sup 3}F{sub 2} transitions of Pr{sup 3+}, respectively. With increasing concentration of Pr{sup 3+}, a relatively weak blue emission was observed at 488 nm and this phenomenon maybe attributed to virtual charge transfer or/and inter cross relaxation effects. The decay characteristics of the persistent emission were also calculated.

  17. Constraining fundamental constant evolution with HI and OH lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kanekar; G. I. Langston; J. T. Stocke; C. L. Carilli; K. L. Menten

    2012-01-16

    We report deep Green Bank Telescope spectroscopy in the redshifted HI 21cm and OH 18cm lines from the $z = 0.765$ absorption system towards PMN J0134-0931. A comparison between the "satellite" OH 18cm line redshifts, or between the redshifts of the HI 21cm and "main" OH 18cm lines, is sensitive to changes in different combinations of three fundamental constants, the fine structure constant $\\alpha$, the proton-electron mass ratio $\\mu \\equiv m_p/m_e$ and the proton g-factor $g_p$. We find that the satellite OH 18cm lines are not perfectly conjugate, with both different line shapes and stronger 1612 MHz absorption than 1720 MHz emission. This implies that the satellite lines of this absorber are not suitable to probe fundamental constant evolution. A comparison between the redshifts of the HI 21cm and OH 18cm lines, via a multi-Gaussian fit, yields the strong constraint $[\\Delta F/F] = [-5.2 \\pm 4.3] \\times 10^{-6}$, where $F \\equiv g_p [\\mu \\alpha^2]^{1.57}$ and the error budget includes contributions from both statistical and systematic errors. We thus find no evidence for a change in the constants between $z = 0.765$ and the present epoch. Incorporating the constraint $[\\Delta \\mu/\\mu ] < 3.6 \\times 10^{-7}$ from another absorber at a similar redshift and assuming that fractional changes in $g_p$ are much smaller than those in $\\alpha$, we obtain $[\\Delta \\alpha/\\alpha ] = (-1.7 \\pm 1.4) \\times 10^{-6}$ over a lookback time of 6.7 Gyrs.

  18. Combination of Measurements of Inclusive Deep Inelastic $e^{\\pm}p$ Scattering Cross Sections and QCD Analysis of HERA Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H1; ZEUS Collaborations

    2015-06-19

    A combination is presented of all inclusive deep inelastic cross sections previously published by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at HERA for neutral and charged current $e^{\\pm}p$ scattering for zero beam polarisation. The data were taken at proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV and an electron beam energy of 27.5 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb$^{-1}$ and span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, $Q^2$, and Bjorken $x$. The correlations of the systematic uncertainties were evaluated and taken into account for the combination. The combined cross sections were input to QCD analyses at leading order, next-to-leading order and at next-to-next-to-leading order, providing a new set of parton distribution functions, called HERAPDF2.0. In addition to the experimental uncertainties, model and parameterisation uncertainties were assessed for these parton distribution functions. Variants of HERAPDF2.0 with an alternative gluon parameterisation, HERAPDF2.0AG, and using fixed-flavour-number schemes, HERAPDF2.0FF, are presented. The analysis was extended by including HERA data on charm and jet production, resulting in the variant HERAPDF2.0Jets. The inclusion of jet-production cross sections made a simultaneous determination of these parton distributions and the strong coupling constant possible, resulting in $\\alpha_s(M_Z)=0.1183 \\pm 0.0009 {\\rm(exp)} \\pm 0.0005{\\rm (model/parameterisation)} \\pm 0.0012{\\rm (hadronisation)} ^{+0.0037}_{-0.0030}{\\rm (scale)}$. An extraction of $xF_3^{\\gamma Z}$ and results on electroweak unification and scaling violations are also presented.

  19. Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for 90% Mercury Removal for a PRB Unit a Spray Dryer and Fabric Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjostrom, Sharon; Amrhein, Jerry

    2009-04-30

    The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon (PAC) into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. The purpose of this test program was to evaluate the long-term mercury removal capability, long-term mercury emissions variability, and operating and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with sorbent injection on a configuration being considered for many new plants. Testing was conducted by ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA) at Rocky Mountain Power’s (RMP) Hardin Station through funding provided by DOE/NETL, RMP, and other industry partners. The Hardin Station is a new plant rated at 121 MW gross that was first brought online in April of 2006. Hardin fires a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and is configured with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOx control, a spray dryer absorber (SDA) for SO2 control, and a fabric filter (FF) for particulate control. Based upon previous testing at PRB sites with SCRs, very little additional mercury oxidation from the SCR was expected at Hardin. In addition, based upon results from DOE/NETL Phase II Round I testing at Holcomb Station and results from similarly configured sites, low native mercury removal was expected across the SDA and FF. The main goal of this project was met—sorbent injection was used to economically and effectively achieve 90% mercury control as measured from the air heater (AH) outlet to the stack for a period of ten months. This goal was achieved with DARCO® Hg-LH, Calgon FLUEPAC®-MC PLUS and ADA Power PAC PREMIUM brominated activated carbons at nominal loadings of 1.5–2.5 lb/MMacf. An economic analysis determined the twenty-year levelized cost to be 0.87 mills/kW-hr, or $15,000/lb Hg removed. No detrimental effects on other equipment or plant operations were observed. The results of this project also filled a data gap for plants firing PRB coal and configured with an SCR, SDA, and FF, as many new plants are being designed today. Another goal of the project was to evaluate, on a short-term basis, the mercury removal associated with coal additives and coal blending with western bituminous coal. The additive test showed that, at this site, the coal additive known as KNX was affective at increasing mercury removal while decreasing sorbent usage. Coal blending was conducted with two different western bituminous coals, and West Elk coal increased native capture from nominally 10% to 50%. Two additional co-benefits were discovered at this site. First, it was found that native capture increased from nominally 10% at full load to 50% at low load. The effect is believed to be due to an increase in mercury oxidation across the SCR caused by a corresponding decrease in ammonia injection when the plant reduces load. Less ammonia means more active oxidation sites in the SCR for the mercury. The second co-benefit was the finding that high ammonia concentrations can have a negative impact on mercury removal by powdered activated carbon. For a period of time, the plant operated with a high excess of ammonia injection necessitated by the plugging of one-third of the SCR. Under these conditions and at high load, the mercury control system could not maintain 90% removal even at the maximum feed rate of 3.5 lb/MMacf (pounds of mercury per million actual cubic feet). The plant was able to demonstrate that mercury removal was directly related to the ammonia injection rate in a series of tests where the ammonia rate was decreased, causing a corresponding increase in mercury removal. Also, after the SCR was refurbished and ammonia injection levels returned to normal, the mercury removal performance also returned to normal. Another goal of the project was to install a commercial-grade activated carbon injection (ACI) system and integrate it with new-generation continuous emissions monitors for mercury (Hg-CEMs) to allow automatic feedback control on outlet me

  20. Probing Novel Properties of Nucleons and Nuclei via Parity Violating Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luis Mercado

    2012-05-31

    This thesis reports on two experiments conducted by the HAPPEx (Hall A Proton Parity Experiment) collaboration at the Thomas Je#11;erson National Accelerator Facil- ity. For both, the weak neutral current interaction (WNC, mediated by the Z{sup 0} boson) is used to probe novel properties of hadronic targets. The WNC interaction amplitude is extracted by measuring the parity-violating asymmetry in the elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons o#11; unpolarized target hadrons. HAPPEx-III, con- ducted in the Fall of 2009, used a liquid hydrogen target at a momentum transfer of Q{sup 2} = 0.62 GeV{sup 2}. The measured asymmetry was used to set new constraints on the contribution of strange quark form factors (G{sup s}{sub E,M} ) to the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. A value of A{sub PV} = -23.803{+-}#6; 0.778 (stat){+-}#6; 0.359 (syst) ppm resulted in G{sup s}{sub E} + 0:517G{sup s}{sub M} = 0.003{+-} 0.010 (stat){+-} #6;0.004 (syst){+-}#6; #6;0.009 (FF). PREx, conducted in the Spring of 2010, used a polarized electron beam on a 208Pb target at a momentum transfer of Q{sup 2} = 0.009 GeV{sup 2}. This parity-violating asymmetry can be used to obtain a clean measurement of the root-mean-square radius of the neutrons in the {sup 208}Pb nucleus. The Z{sup 0} boson couples mainly to neutrons; the neutron weak charge is much larger than that of the proton. The value of this asymmetry is at the sub-ppm level and has a projected experimental fractional precision of 3%. We will describe the accelerator setup used to set controls on helicity-correlated beam asymmetries and the analysis methods for #12;nding the raw asymmetry for HAPPEx-III. We will also discuss in some detail the preparations to meet the ex- perimental challenges associated with measuring such a small asymmetry with the degree of precision required for PREx.

  1. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vener, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Wehmeyer, C.; Sebastiani, D.

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)–glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded ?-sheet structure. The 1 ?s NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898–915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short {sup +}N–H?O{sup ?} bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm{sup ?1}. It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the {sup +}N–H?O{sup ?} fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 2000–2800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is usually not considered in spectroscopic studies of peptides and proteins.

  2. Secondary structure of rat and human amylin across force fields

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.; Paci, Emanuele

    2015-07-29

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, ?-helices, and ?-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin wasmore »determined as a function of ?-helix and ?-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards ?-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly ?-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable dynamic pathways that facilitate the formation of aggregates and, eventually, amyloid fibrils.« less

  3. Biotransformation of furanic and phenolic compounds with hydrogen gas production in a microbial electrolysis cell

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2015-10-27

    In this study, furanic and phenolic compounds are problematic byproducts resulting from the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomass during biofuel production. This study assessed the capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to produce hydrogen gas (H2) using a mixture of two furanic (furfural, FF; 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, HMF) and three phenolic (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA) compounds as the sole carbon and energy source in the bioanode. The rate and extent of biotransformation of the five compounds, efficiency of H2 production, as well as the anode microbial community structure were investigated. The five compounds were completelymore »transformed within 7-day batch runs and their biotransformation rate increased with increasing initial concentration. At an initial concentration of 1,200 mg/L (8.7 mM) of the mixture of the five compounds, their biotransformation rate ranged from 0.85 to 2.34 mM/d. The anode coulombic efficiency was 44-69%, which is comparable to wastewater-fed MECs. The H2 yield varied from 0.26 to 0.42 g H2-COD/g COD removed in the anode, and the bioanode volume-normalized H2 production rate was 0.07-0.1 L/L-d. The major identified fermentation products that did not transform further were catechol and phenol. Acetate was the direct substrate for exoelectrogenesis. Current and H2 production were inhibited at an initial substrate concentration of 1,200 mg/L, resulting in acetate accumulation at a much higher level than that measured in other batch runs conducted with a lower initial concentration of the five compounds. The anode microbial community consisted of exoelectrogens, putative degraders of the five compounds, and syntrophic partners of exoelectrogens. The H2 production route demonstrated in this study has proven to be an alternative to the currently used process of reforming natural gas to supply H2 needed to upgrade bio-oils to stable hydrocarbon fuels.« less

  4. JV TASK 45-MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR ELECTRIC UTILITIES BURNING LIGNITE COAL, PHASE I BENCH-AND PILOT-SCALE TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John H. Pavlish; Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Edwin S. Olson; Kevin C. Galbreath; Ye Zhuang; Brandon M. Pavlish

    2003-10-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed the first phase of a 3-year, two-phase consortium project to develop and demonstrate mercury control technologies for utilities that burn lignite coal. The overall project goal is to maintain the viability of lignite-based energy production by providing utilities with low-cost options for meeting future mercury regulations. Phase I objectives are to develop a better understanding of mercury interactions with flue gas constituents, test a range of sorbent-based technologies targeted at removing elemental mercury (Hg{sup o}) from flue gases, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the most promising technologies at the pilot scale. The Phase II objectives are to demonstrate and quantify sorbent technology effectiveness, performance, and cost at a sponsor-owned and operated power plant. Phase I results are presented in this report along with a brief overview of the Phase II plans. Bench-scale testing provided information on mercury interactions with flue gas constituents and relative performances of the various sorbents. Activated carbons were prepared from relatively high-sodium lignites by carbonization at 400 C (752 F), followed by steam activation at 750 C (1382 F) and 800 C (1472 F). Luscar char was also steam-activated at these conditions. These lignite-based activated carbons, along with commercially available DARCO FGD and an oxidized calcium silicate, were tested in a thin-film, fixed-bed, bench-scale reactor using a simulated lignitic flue gas consisting of 10 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} Hg{sup 0}, 6% O{sub 2}, 12% CO{sub 2}, 15% H{sub 2}O, 580 ppm SO{sub 2}, 120 ppm NO, 6 ppm NO{sub 2}, and 1 ppm HCl in N{sub 2}. All of the lignite-based activated (750 C, 1382 F) carbons required a 30-45-minute conditioning period in the simulated lignite flue gas before they exhibited good mercury sorption capacities. The unactivated Luscar char and oxidized calcium silicate were ineffective in capturing mercury. Lignite-based activated (800 C, 1472 F) carbons required a shorter (15-minute) conditioning period in the simulated lignite flue gas and captured gaseous mercury more effectively than those activated at 750 C (1382 F). Subsequent tests with higher acid gas concentrations including 50 ppm HCl showed no early mercury breakthrough for either the activated (750 C, 1382 F) Bienfait carbon or the DARCO FGD. Although these high acid gas tests yielded better mercury capture initially, significant breakthrough of mercury ultimately occurred sooner than during the simulated lignite flue gas tests. The steam-activated char, provided by Luscar Ltd., and DARCO FGD, provided by NORIT Americas, were evaluated for mercury removal potential in a 580 MJ/hr (550,000-Btu/hr) pilot-scale coal combustion system equipped with four particulate control devices: (1) an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), (2) a fabric filter (FF), (3) the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter, and (4) an ESP and FF in series, an EPRI-patented TOXECON{trademark} technology. The Ontario Hydro method and continuous mercury monitors were used to measure mercury species concentrations at the inlet and outlet of the control technology devices with and without sorbent injection. Primarily Hg{sup o} was measured when lignite coals from the Poplar River Plant and Freedom Mine were combusted. The effects of activated Luscar char, DARCO FGD, injection rates, particle size, and gas temperature on mercury removal were evaluated for each of the four particulate control device options. Increasing injection rates and decreasing gas temperatures generally promoted mercury capture in all four control devices. Relative to data reported for bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases, higher sorbent injection rates were generally required for the lignite coal to effectively remove mercury. Documented results in this report provide the impacts of these and other parameters and provide the inputs needed to direct Phase II of the project.

  5. Novel Approaches to Wide Bandgap CuInSe2 Based Absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William N. Shafarman

    2011-04-28

    This project targeted the development of high performance wide bandgap solar cells based on thin film alloys of CuInSe2 to relax constraints on module design and enable tandem solar cell structures. This addressed goals of the Solar Energy Technologies Program for Next Generation PV to develop technology needed for higher thin film module efficiency as a means to reduce costs. Specific objectives of the research project were: 1) to develop the processes and materials required to improve the performance of wide bandgap thin film solar cells based on alloys of CuInSe2, and 2) to provide the fundamental science and engineering basis for the material, electronic, and device properties required to effectively apply these processes and materials to commercial manufacture. CuInSe2-based photovoltaics have established the highest efficiencies of the thin film materials at both the cell and module scales and are actively being scaled up to commercialization. In the highest efficiency cells and modules, the optical bandgap, a function of the CuInSe2-based alloy composition, is relatively low compared to the optimum match to the solar spectrum. Wider bandgap alloys of CuInSe2 produce higher cell voltages which can improve module performance and enable the development of tandem solar cells to boost the overall efficiency. A focus for the project was alloying with silver to form (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 pentenary thin films deposited by elemental co-evaporation which gives the broadest range of control of composition and material properties. This alloy has a lower melting temperature than Ag-free, Cu-based chalcopyrite compounds, which may enable films to be formed with lower defect densities and the (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 films give improved material properties and better device performance with increasing bandgap. A comprehensive characterization of optical, structural, and electronic properties of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 was completed over the complete compositional range 0 ? Ga/(In+Ga) ? 1 and 0 ? Ag/(Ag+Cu) ? 1. Evidence of improved material quality includes reduced sub-bandgap optical absorption, sharper bandtails, and increased grain size with Ag addition. The Ag alloying was shown to increase the range of bandgaps over which solar cells can be fabricated without any drop-off in performance. With bandgap greater than 1.6 eV, in the range needed for tandem solar cells, (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 gave higher efficiency than other CuInSe2-based alloys. Using a simple single-stage co-evaporation process, a solar cell with 17.6% efficiency using a film with bandgap = 1.3 eV was achieved, demonstrating the viability of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 for high efficiency devices. With a three-stage co-evaporation process for (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 deposition a device with efficiency = 13.0 % and VOC = 890 mV with JSC = 20.5 mA/cm2, FF = 71.3% was achieved. This surpasses the performance of other wide bandgap CuInSe2-based solar cells. Detailed characterization of the electronic properties of the materials and devices including the application of advanced admittance-based easements was completed.

  6. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 166: Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-08-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 166 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials' and consists of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 02-42-01, Condo Release Storage Yd - North; CAS 02-42-02, Condo Release Storage Yd - South; CAS 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area; CAS 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard; CAS 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum; CAS 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; and CAS 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain. Closure activities were conducted from March to July 2009 according to the FF ACO (1996, as amended February 2008) and the Corrective Action Plan for CAU 166 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2007b). The corrective action alternatives included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities are summarized. CAU 166, Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, consists of seven CASs in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the NTS. The closure alternatives included No Further Action and Clean Closure. This CR provides a summary of completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and confirmation that remediation goals were met. The following site closure activities were performed at CAU 166 as documented in this CR: (1) At CAS 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area, approximately 40 gal of lead shot were removed and are currently pending treatment and disposal as MW, and approximately 50 small pieces of DU were removed and disposed as LLW. (2) At CAS 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard, approximately 7.5 yd{sup 3} of soil impacted with lead and Am-241 were removed and disposed as LLW. As a BMP, approximately 22 ft{sup 3} of asbestos tile were removed from a portable building and disposed as ALLW, approximately 55 gal of oil were drained from accumulators and are currently pending disposal as HW, the portable building was removed and disposed as LLW, and accumulators, gas cylinders, and associated debris were removed and are currently pending treatment and disposal as MW. (3) At CAS 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum, as a BMP, an empty drum was removed and disposed as sanitary waste. (4) At CAS 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank, approximately 165 gal of lead-impacted liquid were removed and are currently pending disposal as HW, and approximately 10 gal of lead shot and 6 yd{sup 3} of wax embedded with lead shot were removed and are currently pending treatment and disposal as MW. As a BMP, approximately 0.5 yd{sup 3} of wax were removed and disposed as hydrocarbon waste, approximately 55 gal of liquid were removed and disposed as sanitary waste, and two metal containers were grouted in place. (5) At CAS 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain, no further action was required; however, as a BMP, approximately l.5 yd{sup 3} of wax were removed and disposed as hydrocarbon waste, and one metal container was grouted in place.

  7. Removal of the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor - 13031

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herzog, C. Brad [CH2M HILL, Inc. (United States)] [CH2M HILL, Inc. (United States); Guercia, Rudolph [US-DOE (United States)] [US-DOE (United States); LaCome, Matt [Meier Engineering Inc (United States)] [Meier Engineering Inc (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The 309 Facility housed the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR), an operating test reactor in the 300 Area at Hanford, Washington. The reactor first went critical in 1960 and was originally used for experiments under the Hanford Site Plutonium Fuels Utilization Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned in 1988-1989, and the facility was deactivated in 1994. The 309 facility was added to Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) response actions as established in an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) and Action Memorandum (AM). The IROD directs a remedial action for the 309 facility, associated waste sites, associated underground piping and contaminated soils resulting from past unplanned releases. The AM directs a removal action through physical demolition of the facility, including removal of the reactor. Both CERCLA actions are implemented in accordance with U.S. EPA approved Remedial Action Work Plan, and the Remedial Design Report / Remedial Action Report associated with the Hanford 300-FF-2 Operable Unit. The selected method for remedy was to conventionally demolish above grade structures including the easily distinguished containment vessel dome, remove the PRTR and a minimum of 300 mm (12 in) of shielding as a single 560 Ton unit, and conventionally demolish the below grade structure. Initial sample core drilling in the Bio-Shield for radiological surveys showed evidence that the Bio-Shield was of sound structure. Core drills for the separation process of the PRTR from the 309 structure began at the deck level and revealed substantial thermal degradation of at least the top 1.2 m (4LF) of Bio-Shield structure. The degraded structure combined with the original materials used in the Bio-Shield would not allow for a stable structure to be extracted. The water used in the core drilling process proved to erode the sand mixture of the Bio-Shield leaving the steel aggregate to act as ball bearings against the core drill bit. A redesign is being completed to extract the 309 PRTR and entire Bio-Shield structure together as one monolith weighing 1100 Ton by cutting structural concrete supports. In addition, the PRTR has hundreds of contaminated process tubes and pipes that have to be severed to allow for a uniformly flush fit with a lower lifting frame. Thirty-two 50 mm (2 in) core drills must be connected with thirty-two wire saw cuts to allow for lifting columns to be inserted. Then eight primary saw cuts must be completed to severe the PRTR from the 309 Facility. Once the weight of the PRTR is transferred to the lifting frame, then the PRTR may be lifted out of the facility. The critical lift will be executed using four 450 Ton strand jacks mounted on a 9 m (30 LF) tall mobile lifting frame that will allow the PRTR to be transported by eight 600 mm (24 in) Slide Shoes. The PRTR will then be placed on a twenty-four line, double wide, self powered Goldhofer for transfer to the onsite CERCLA Disposal Cell (ERDF Facility), approximately 33 km (20 miles) away. (authors)

  8. Emissions, Monitoring and Control of Mercury from Subbituminous Coal-Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Bland; Kumar Sellakumar; Craig Cormylo

    2007-08-01

    The Subbituminous Energy Coalition (SEC) identified a need to re-test stack gas emissions from power plants that burn subbituminous coal relative to compliance with the EPA mercury control regulations for coal-fired plants. In addition, the SEC has also identified the specialized monitoring needs associated with mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEM). The overall objectives of the program were to develop and demonstrate solutions for the unique emission characteristics found when burning subbituminous coals. The program was executed in two phases; Phase I of the project covered mercury emission testing programs at ten subbituminous coal-fired plants. Phase II compared the performance of continuous emission monitors for mercury at subbituminous coal-fired power plants and is reported separately. Western Research Institute and a number of SEC members have partnered with Eta Energy and Air Pollution Testing to assess the Phase I objective. Results of the mercury (Hg) source sampling at ten power plants burning subbituminous coal concluded Hg emissions measurements from Powder River Basin (PBR) coal-fired units showed large variations during both ICR and SEC testing. Mercury captures across the Air Pollution Control Devices (APCDs) present much more reliable numbers (i.e., the mercury captures across the APCDs are positive numbers as one would expect compared to negative removal across the APCDs for the ICR data). Three of the seven units tested in the SEC study had previously shown negative removals in the ICR testing. The average emission rate is 6.08 lb/TBtu for seven ICR units compared to 5.18 lb/TBtu for ten units in the SEC testing. Out of the ten (10) SEC units, Nelson Dewey Unit 1, burned a subbituminous coal and petcoke blend thus lowering the total emission rate by generating less elemental mercury. The major difference between the ICR and SEC data is in the APCD performance and the mercury closure around the APCD. The average mercury removal values across the APCDs are 2.1% and 39.4% with standard deviations (STDs) of 1990 and 75%, respectively for the ICR and SEC tests. This clearly demonstrates that variability is an issue irrespective of using 'similar' fuels at the plants and the same source sampling team measuring the species. The study also concluded that elemental mercury is the main Hg specie that needs to be controlled. 2004 technologies such as activated carbon injection (ACI) may capture up to 60% with double digit lb/MMacf addition of sorbent. PRB coal-fired units have an Hg input of 7-15 lb/TBtu; hence, these units must operate at over 60% mercury efficiency in order to bring the emission level below 5.8 lb/TBtu. This was non-achievable with the best technology available as of 2004. Other key findings include: (1) Conventional particulate collectors, such as Cold-side Electro-Static Precipitators (CESPs), Hot-side Electro-Static Precipitator (HESP), and Fabric Filter (FF) remove nearly all of the particulate bound mercury; (2) CESPs perform better highlighting the flue gas temperature effect on the mercury removal. Impact of speciation with flue gas cooling is apparent; (3) SDA's do not help in enhancing adsorption of mercury vapor species; and (4) Due to consistently low chlorine values in fuels, it was not possible to analyze the impact of chlorine. In summary, it is difficult to predict the speciation at two plants that burn the same fuel. Non-fuel issues, such as flue gas cooling, impact the speciation and consequently mercury capture potential.

  9. EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Withum

    2006-03-07

    CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), evaluated the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)-wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber-fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL determined mercury speciation and removal at 10 bituminous coal-fired facilities; at four of these facilities, additional tests were performed on units without SCR, or with the existing SCR bypassed. This project final report summarizes the results and discusses the findings of the body of work as a whole. Eleven Topical Reports were issued (prior to this report) that describe in great detail the sampling results at each of the ten power plants individually. The results showed that the SCR-FGD combination removed a substantial fraction of mercury from flue gas. The coal-to-stack mercury removals ranged from 65% to 97% for the units with SCR and from 53% to 87% for the units without SCR. There was no indication that any type of FGD system was more effective at mercury removal than others. The coal-to-stack mercury removal and the removal in the wet scrubber were both negatively correlated with the elemental mercury content of the flue gas and positively correlated with the scrubber liquid chloride concentration. The coal chlorine content was not a statistically significant factor in either case. Mercury removal in the ESP was positively correlated with the fly ash carbon content and negatively correlated with the flue gas temperature. At most of the units, a substantial fraction (>35%) of the flue gas mercury was in the elemental form at the boiler economizer outlet. After passing through the SCR-air heater combination very little of the total mercury (<10%) remained in the elemental form in the flue gas; this was true for all SCR catalyst types and sources. Although chlorine has been suggested as a factor affecting the mercury speciation in flue gas, coal chlorine was not a statistically significant factor affecting mercury speciation at the economizer exit or at the air heater exit. The only statistically significant factors were the coal ash CaO content and the fly ash carbon content; the fraction of mercury in the elemental form at the economizer exit was positively correlated with both factors. In a direct comparison at four SCR-equipped units vs. similar units at the same sites without SCR (or with the SCR bypassed), the elemental mercury fractions (measured at the ESP outlet) were lower, and the coal-to-stack mercury removals were higher, when the SCR was present and operating. The average coal-to-stack mercury removal at the four units without an operating SCR was 72%, whereas the average removal at the same sites with operating SCRs was 88%. The unit mercury mass balance (a gauge of the overall quality of the tests) at all of the units ranged from 81% to 113%, which were within our QA/QC criterion of 80-120%.

  10. Final Closeout report for grant FG36-08GO18018, titled: Functional Multi-Layer Solution Processable Polymer Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam J. Moule

    2012-05-01

    The original objectives were: (1) Develop a method to deposit multiple conjugated polymer film layers and avoid the problem of dissolution from mutually solubility; (2) Use this deposition method to develop multi-layer polymer based solar cells with layers that are function specific; (3) characterize these layers and devices; (4) develop electrical and optical models that describe and predict the properties of the multi-layers; and (5) Ultimate efficiency goals are {approx}6.75% with J{sub sc} = 12 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF = 0.75, and V{sub oc} = 0.75. The question of whether photovoltaic (PV) cells will ever be able to replace fossil fuels as the main provider of electrical power is not just a question of device efficiency; it is a question of how much power can be provided for what price. It has been well documented that PV devices at 10% power efficiency can provide for all of the world's power needs without covering too much of the earth's surface. Assuming desert like cloud coverage, an area equivalent to the land area of Texas would have to be covered. However, it has also been shown that using the current state-of-the-art silicon devices, the price-per-Watt will never be low enough to be economically feasible for large-scale development. Solution-processable PV devices based on polymers are a very attractive alternative to traditional Silicon PV because this technology is much lower in materials cost and in environmentally toxic waste production. Solution-based polymers can be rapidly deposited using printing technologies and are compatible with light-weight flexible substrates that can increase the range of available PV applications. In the past ten years, the efficiency of polymer based PV devices has increased from {approx}1% to over 10%. The highest efficiency organic solar cells are based upon a single layer than consists of a mixture of donor and acceptor moieties. This one layer has multiple optical and electrical functions, so the design of a single heterojunction layer is based upon the idea of balancing good and bad properties within a single film. This proposal addresses the idea that the use of multiple layers that have differing electrical and optical functions could lead to greater efficiency because fewer materials compromises must be made. This idea is not new, multiple functional layer have been successfully used in cross-linked OLED's and organic small molecule evaporated PV devices. The main reason that multiple layers of polymers are not commonly deposited is that most conjugated polymers are mutually soluble in the same solvents. The work outlined in the proposal was intended to develop a new deposition strategy that would allow multiple organic layers to be deposited from solution using spin coating. The deposition method that we proposed was successful, sometimes, but ultimately not reliable. Instead we focused on more reliable methods to implement doping along the interface between layers. This work has been very successful. We found that using PEDOT:PSS, the PSS would form a surface layer of {approx}2-3 nm thickness that would mix with and electrochemically react with P3HT upon heating. This mechanism is also a crosslinking reaction in that H{sub 2} is released and permanent new bonds are formed. Using the Plextronics Inc. replacement to PEDOT:PSS, for which there are no mobile dopants, we were able to show that a second and different mechanism can be used to p-type dope organic materials. We are currently working with Plextronics to develop a new product. Finally we produced n-type doping of a thin fullerene layer near the cathode also using a self-assembly method. Low work function metals will diffuse into the BHJ layer and dope the fullerene upon heating. This doping also affects the vertical segregation of BHJ materials in a predictable way. We accomplished all of the scientific goals that we set out in the proposal written in May 2007. Some of the methods we proposed were not fully successful, but we did come up with better methods to achieve the same goal. We did not achieve the efficiency g

  11. Principles of water oxidation and O2-based hydrocarbon transformation by multinuclear catalytic sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musaev, Djamaladdin G [Chemistry, Emory University; Hill, Craig L [Chemistry, Emory University; Morokuma, Keiji [Chemistry, Emory University

    2014-10-28

    Abstract The central thrust of this integrated experimental and computational research program was to obtain an atomistic-level understanding of the structural and dynamic factors underlying the design of catalysts for water oxidation and selective reductant-free O2-based transformations. The focus was on oxidatively robust polyoxometalate (POM) complexes in which a catalytic active site interacts with proximal metal centers in a synergistic manner. Thirty five publications in high-impact journals arose from this grant. I. Developing an oxidatively and hydrolytically stable and fast water oxidation catalyst (WOC), a central need in the production of green fuels using water as a reductant, has proven particularly challenging. During this grant period we have designed and investigated several carbon-free, molecular (homogenous), oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOCs, including the Rb8K2[{Ru4O4(OH)2(H2O)4}(?-SiW10O36)2]·25H2O (1) and [Co4(H2O)2(?-PW9O34)2]10- (2). Although complex 1 is fast, oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOC, Ru is neither abundant nor inexpensive. Therefore, development of a stable and fast carbon-free homogenous WOC, based on earth-abundant elements became our highest priority. In 2010, we reported the first such catalyst, complex 2. This complex is substantially faster than 1 and stable under homogeneous conditions. Recently, we have extended our efforts and reported a V2-analog of the complex 2, i.e. [Co4(H2O)2(?-VW9O34)2]10- (3), which shows an even greater stability and reactivity. We succeeded in: (a) immobilizing catalysts 1 and 2 on the surface of various electrodes, and (b) elucidating the mechanism of O2 formation and release from complex 1, as well as the Mn4O4L6 “cubane” cluster. We have shown that the direct O-O bond formation is the most likely pathway for O2 formation during water oxidation catalyzed by 1. II. Oxo transfer catalysts that contain two proximal and synergistically interacting redox active metal centers in the active site form another part of considerable interest of our grant because species with such sites [including methane monooxygenase (MMO) and more] are some of the most effective oxygenase catalysts known. Our team conducted the following research on ?-M2-Keggin complexes: (a) investigated stability of the trimer [{Fe3(OH)3(H2O)2}3(?-SiW10O36)3]15-, 4, in water, and developed the chemistry and catalysis of the di-iron centered POM, [?(1,2)-SiW10{Fe(OH)}2O38]6-, 5, in organic solvents (Figure 2). We also study the thermodynamic and structural stability of ?-M2-Keggin in aqueous media for different M’s (d-electron metals). We have defined two structural classes of POMs with proximally bound d-electron metal centers. We refer to these structural isomers of the {?-M2SiW10} family of POMs as “in-pocket” and “out-of pocket”. We have elucidated the factors controlling the structure and stability of the V, Fe, Ru, Tc, Mo and Rh derivatives of [(SiO4)M2(OH)2W10O32]4- using a range of computational tools. We have: (a) demonstrated that heteroatom X in these polyanions may function as an “internal switch” for defining the ground electronic states and, consequently, the reactivity of the ?-M2-Keggin POM complexes; (b) elucidated reactivity of divacant lacunary species and polyperoxotungstates (PPTs), {Xn+O4[WO(O2)2]4}n-, which could be degradation products of ?-M2-Keggin complexes in aqueous media; (c) elucidated the role of the POM ligand in stabilization of {Ru2} and {(Ru-oxo)2} fragments in the reactant and product of the reaction of {?-[(Xn+O4)Ru2(OH)2W10O32]}(8-n)- (where X = Si4+, P5+ and S6+) with O2, and (d) the mechanisms of olefin epoxidation catalyzed by these di-d-transition metal substituted and divacant lacunary ?-M2-Keggin complexes. III. Complementing the efforts presented above was the development of less time-consuming but reasonably accurate computational methods allowing one to explore more deeply large catalytic systems. We developed Reactive Force Field (ReaxFF) to study interaction of the targeted POMs with water, pro