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1

OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR...

2

Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL DEGAS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

COAL DEGAS COAL DEGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL DEGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL DEGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL DEGAS CALEDONIA ABERD EEN HOL T COAL DEGAS MULDON ELD RIDGE MCKINLEY CREEK TREBLOC HEARTLIN E SH ANNON TROY_MS_D BOXES CREEK WISE GAP NOR THSID E TREMONT VAN VLEET HOL LY BET HEL CHU RCH ABERD EEN S ST RONG BAN KST ON MOLLOY WR EN COR INT H WELLS THORN REID REID HOU STON ST AR DEERLICK CR EEK C OAL DEGAS OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS BIG SANDY C REEK COAL D EGAS MABEN LITT LE SAND Y CREEK COAL DEGAS

3

ARM - ARM Facility at EGU 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CenterARM Facility at EGU 2012 CenterARM Facility at EGU 2012 Media Contact Lynne Roeder lynne-dot-roeder-at-pnnl-dot-gov @armnewsteam Field Notes Blog Topics Field Notes89 AGU 3 AMIE 10 ARM Aerial Facility 2 ARM Mobile Facility 1 6 ARM Mobile Facility 2 47 BAECC 1 BBOP 4 MAGIC 12 MC3E 17 SGP 2 STORMVEX 29 TCAP 3 Search News Search Blog News Center All Categories What's this? Social Media Guidance News Center All Categories Features and Releases Facility News Field Notes Blog feed Events feed Employment Research Highlights Data Announcements Education News Archive What's this? Social Media Guidance ARM Facility at EGU 2012 At the 2012 European Geophysical Union General Assembly in Vienna, the ARM Climate Research Facility is hosting a booth located near the escalators in the Exhibition Entrance Hall. In their first time attending the assembly,

4

Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation  

SciTech Connect

Gas-Puff-Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge D? light emission from a neutral D2 gas puff nears the outer mid-plane of NSTX. DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and atomic physics in tokamak plasmas. In this paper we compare measurements of the D? light emission obtained by GPI on NSTX with DEGAS 2 simulations of D? light emission for specific experiments. Both the simulated spatial distribution and absolute intensity of the D? light emission agree well with the experimental data obtained between ELMs in H-mode. __________________________________________________

B. Cao, D.P. Stotler, S.J. Zweben, M. Bell, A. Diallo and B. Leblanc

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

5

Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation  

SciTech Connect

Gas-Puff-Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge D? light emission from a neutral D2 gas puff nears the outer mid-plane of NSTX. DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and atomic physics in tokamak plasmas. In this paper we compare measurements of the D? light emission obtained by GPI on NSTX with DEGAS 2 simulations of D? light emission for specific experiments. Both the simulated spatial distribution and absolute intensity of the D? light emission agree well with the experimental data obtained between ELMs in H-mode.

B. Cao, D.P. Stotler, S.J. Zweben, M. Bell, A. Diallo and B. Leblanc

2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

6

DEGAS 2 Neutral Transport Modeling of High Density, Low Temperature Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutral transport in the high density, low temperature plasma regime is examined using the degas 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. Degas 2 is shown to agree with an analytic fluid neutral model valid in this regime as long as the grid cell spacing is less than twice the neutral mean-free path. Using new atomic physics data provided by the collisional radiative code cramd, degas 2 is applied to a detached Alcator C-Mod discharge. A model plasma with electron temperature # 1 eV along detached flux tubes, between the target and the ionization front, is used to demonstrate that recombination is essential to matching the experimental data. With the cramd data, # 20% of the total recombination is due to molecular activated recombination. # Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Plasma Fusion Center, 167 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA + Also at I. V. Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy 1 Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123098, Russia # Presently at McKinsey & Company, Inc., London...

D. P. Stotler; A. Yu. Pigarov; C. F. F. Karney; S. I. Krasheninnikov; B. LaBombard; B. Lipschultz; G. M. McCracken; A. Niemczewski; J. A. Snipes; J. L. Terry; R. A. Vesey

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation  

SciTech Connect

Gas-Pu -Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge D? light emission from a neutral D? gas puff near the outer mid- plane of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and plasma-neutral interactions in fusion plasmas. In this paper, we compare the measured and modeled D? light emission for speci c NSTX experiments. Both the simulated spatial distribution and radiance of the D? light emission agree well with the experimental data obtained between Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in ELMy H-modes.

B. Cao, D.P. Stotler, S.J. Zweben, M. Bell, A.Diallo, B. LeBlanc

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

Summary of Degas II performance at the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill site.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crude oil stored at the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) requires mitigation procedures to maintain oil vapor pressure within program delivery standards. Crude oil degasification is one effective method for lowering crude oil vapor pressure, and was implemented at the Big Hill SPR site from 2004-2006. Performance monitoring during and after degasification revealed a range of outcomes for caverns that had similar inventory and geometry. This report analyzed data from SPR degasification and developed a simple degas mixing (SDM) model to assist in the analysis. Cavern-scale oil mixing during degassing and existing oil heterogeneity in the caverns were identified as likely causes for the range of behaviors seen. Apparent cavern mixing patterns ranged from near complete mixing to near plug flow, with more mixing leading to less efficient degassing due to degassed oil re-entering the plant before 100% of the cavern oil volume was processed. The report suggests that the new cavern bubble point and vapor pressure regain rate after degassing be based on direct in-cavern measurements after degassing as opposed to using the plant outlet stream properties as a starting point, which understates starting bubble point and overstates vapor pressure regain. Several means to estimate the cavern bubble point after degas in the absence of direct measurement are presented and discussed.

Rudeen, David K. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Lord, David L.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL D EGAS CALEDONIA ABERD EEN HOL T COAL D EGAS MULDON ELD RIDGE MCKINLEY CREEK TREBLOC HEARTLIN E SH ANNON TROY_MS_D BOXES CREEK WISE GAP NOR THSID E TREMONT VAN VLEET HOL LY BET HEL CHU RCH ABERD EEN S ST RONG BAN KST ON MOLLOY WR EN COR INTH WELLS THORN REID REID HOU STON ST AR DEERLICK CREEK COAL D EGAS OAK GROVE COAL D EGAS BIG SANDY CREEK COAL D EGAS MABEN LITT LE SAND Y CREEK COAL D

10

The origin of summer monsoon rainfall at New Delhi by deuterium excess Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(1), 115118 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The origin of summer monsoon rainfall at New Delhi by deuterium excess 115 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(1), 115118 (2004) © EGU The origin of summer monsoon rainfall at New Delhi for corresponding author: phx_anu@hotmail.com Abstract The deuterium excess in summer monsoon precipitation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

11

Crystallization mechanisms and recording characteristics of Si/CuSi bilayer for write-once blu-ray disc  

SciTech Connect

The crystallization mechanisms of Si/CuSi bilayer and its recording characteristics for write-once blu-ray disc (BD-R) were investigated. It was found that Cu{sub 3}Si phase appeared during the room temperature sputtered deposition. Then, the Si atoms in CuSi layer segregated and crystallized to cubic Si in Cu{sub 3}Si nucleation sites as the film was annealed at 270 deg. C. After heating to 500 deg. C, the grains size of cubic Si phase grew and the hexagonal Si phase was observed. The dynamic tests show that the Si/CuSi bilayer has great feasibility for 1-4x BD-R with the bottom jitter values below 6.5%.

Ou, Sin-Liang; Kuo, Po-Cheng; Tsai, Tsung-Lin [Departmant of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Sheng-Chi [Department of Materials Engineering and Center for Thin Film Technologies and Applications, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taipei 243, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chin-Yen; Chang, Han-Feng [CMC Magnetics Corporation, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chao-Te; Chiang, Donyau [Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

12

Microsoft Word - BLU 2012 CR.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 UMTRCA Title II Sites Annual Report 2012 UMTRCA Title II Sites Annual Report November 2012 Bluewater, New Mexico Page 1-1 1.0 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site 1.1 Compliance Summary The Bluewater, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II Disposal Site was inspected on August 21, 2012. Several shallow depressions on the main tailings disposal cell cover had standing water at the time of the inspection; the cover is being evaluated to determine if additional monitoring or cover enhancement is necessary. No maintenance needs or cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. Uranium concentrations at an alluvium point-of-compliance (POC) monitoring well continue to exceed the alternate concentration limit (ACL). Two new alluvium monitoring wells were

13

Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 11, EGU2009-12466, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time-dependent deformation through stress corrosion cracking that allows rocks to deform at stresses that stress corrosion appears to be inhibited at higher effective stresses. The influence of doubling the pore on the rate of stress corrosion. We then discuss the results in light of acoustic emission hypocentre location

14

Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-5305, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Two power plants generate electricity and fluid extraction rate varies with time and wells features of the crust and to mon- itor underground changes of seismic wave ground velocity. We present French high-enthalpy geothermal system exploited for electrical power from 3 collocated productive wells

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

15

Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-7553, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-to-mild, but rather diverse with deposition of fallout tephra, base surges, and pyroclastic flows. Fallout deposits by Vulcanian-type activity. Deposits of pumice fallout (Md -4-(-2.5) phi, sorting 1.2-2.4 phi) from Plinian

Belousov, Alexander

16

Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 13, EGU2011-10343, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innocent (), Emmanuelle Petelet-Giraud (3), and Pierre Durst (4) (1) BRGM, Regional Geological Survey, Regional Geological Survey Service Bordeaux, France, p.durst@brgm.fr In the south-west of France

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

17

Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 13, EGU2011-9360-4, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of cloudless shortwave solar spectra incident on horizontal, tilted, or tracking surfaces, Solar energy, vol irradiance database for worldwide solar heat gain and building cooling load calculations. Solar Energy, vol pyranometer calibrations, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, V.124, 44-50,2002. Oumbe, A., Blanc, Ph

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

18

DEGAS 2 Neutral Transport Modeling of High Density, Low Temperature Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Atomic Energy 1 Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123098, Russia # Presently at McKinsey & Company, Inc., London SW1Y

19

BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline ID The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy.

20

BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration BIG PINEY TIP TOP BIR D CANYON SWAN FONTEN ELL E LABARGE...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "degas blu egu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

DANFORT H HILL S WIN TER C AM P BIG RID GEC O DRY FORKC O DRY FORKC O PR ICKLY PEAR BOOK CLIFF S COYOTE BASIN COON H OLL OW DRY CR EEKUT WEAVER RID GE ASBUR Y CREEK SKIN NER...

22

Earthquake dates and water level changes in wells in the Eskisehir region,Turkey Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 777781 (2003) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earthquake dates and water level changes in wells in the Eskisehir region,Turkey 777 Hydrology changes in wells in the Eskisehir region, Turkey Galip Yuce and Didem Ugurluoglu Department of Geological common indicators of an anomalous precursor is a change in groundwater level in existing wells. Further

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

23

The representation of rainfall drop-size distribution and kinetic energy Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 10011007 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The representation of rainfall drop-size distribution and kinetic energy 1001 Hydrology and Earth-size distribution and kinetic energy Neil I. Fox Department of Soil, Environmental and Atmospheric Sciences373 Mc component of drop velocity. Keywords: drop-size distribution, drop kinetic energy, soil erosion Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

24

Recession-based hydrological models for estimating low flows in ungauged catchments in the Himalayas Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 891902 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ungauged Himalayan catchments for planning microhydro projects. J. Hydrol. Eng.- ASCE, 6, 310316. Tallaksen

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

Do LEED-certified buildings save energy? Not really. . . John H. Scofield *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(quadrennial) · European Geosciences Union (EGU) (annual) · Liege Hydrodynamics Colloquium (annual) · JONSMOD

Scofield, John H.

26

Web-Ice: Integrated Data Collection and Analysis for Macromolecular Crystallography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Blu-Ice. Figure 7: SSRL Web-Ice interface displaying theRadiation Laboratory (SSRL), and subsequently adapted forsystems Blu-Ice / DCSS at SSRL (McPhillips et al. , 2002)

Gonzalez, Ana

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Engineering The College of Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Illuminating our world Careers Create electronic devices such as 3-D TVs, Blu-Ray players, cellphones and i

Saskatchewan, University of

28

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Power Monitoring, Communication and Control Upgrade at Bryan Mound Degas Plant (Install) CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 10312012 Location(s): Texas...

29

Abatement of wetland loss in Louisiana through diversions of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Books for Everyone on Your List: Shop Now; FREE Express Shipping, Save in Stores with Membership; 50% Off Criterion DVD & Blu-ray; Special Offer: ...

30

Science with the Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for Solar Terrestrial Research 19 / 30 Energy Release and Particle Acceleration Energy ReleaseScience with the Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope Dale E. Gary New Jersey Institute of Technology #12;EGU Meeting 2004 April 29 NJIT Center for Solar Terrestrial Research 2 / 30 #12;EGU Meeting

31

Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G. Park

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

32

Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

33

SciTech Connect: "smart grid"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technical Report: Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX...

34

DIY CHECKLIST FOR RENTERS Check your lease carefully. Make a very detailed inspection report before signing lease, include photos. Develop a good  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIY CHECKLIST FOR RENTERS Check your lease carefully. Make a very detailed inspection report before. Carpetdyeingforpaleandstainedcarpet. Re-caulkingandre-groutingofkitchenandbathrooms. Tileandbathresurfacingpaint. DIY FOR RENTERS;12DOM_MI089 DIY CHECKLIST FOR RENTERS WALLS Low-adhesivetapeorhookstohangartwork(neveruse Blu

Peters, Richard

35

Web-Ice: Integrated Data Collection and Analysis for Macromolecular Crystallography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Blu-Ice. Figure 7: SSRL Web-Ice interface displaying theTable 1: Programs used by Web-Ice for data analysis. ProgramWeb-Ice: Integrated Data Collection and Analysis for

Gonzalez, Ana

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

NIST SGAC Federal Advisory Committee Homework 1 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and HD DVD versus Blu-Ray market forces took ... the cost for a barrel of crude oil that played ... cost of doing business for coal, natural gas, and nuclear ...

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

37

Web-Ice: Integrated Data Collection and Analysis for Macromolecular Crystallography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

results. A summary list is also available in Blu-Ice.Figure 7: SSRL Web-Ice interface displaying the summarizedTable 1: Programs used by Web-Ice for data analysis. Program

Gonzalez, Ana

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

CORN ER S GRU GAN NEBRASKA AR TEMAS MILL R UN DRIF TING TOBY CR EEK RUNVILLE MURRYSVILLE CAT FISH R UN HECKMAN HOLLOW KART HAUS WEST FIELD POT R IDGE PARSONSVILLE RED BRUSH BLU E...

39

Reading of cracked optical discs using iterative learning control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical discs, including Compact Discs (CDs), Digital Versatile Discs (DVDs), and Blu-ray Discs (BDs), can get cracked during storage and usage. Such cracks commonly lead to discontinuities in the data track, potentially preventing reading of the data ...

Maarten Steinbuch; Koos Van Berkel; George Leenknegt; Tom Oomen; Jeroen Van De Wijdeven

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

5, 1289512937, 2005 Rn concentration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis or direct time series inspection. The analysis of the time series has10 identified specific Print Version Interactive Discussion EGU Shimo, 1972; Beck et al., 1979; Vinod Kumar et al., 1999

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "degas blu egu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds The Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak, A, G Wen, JA Coakley, LA Remer, NG Loeb, and RF Cahalan. 2008. "A simple model of the cloud adjacency effect and the apparent bluing of aerosols near clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D14S17, doi: 10.1029/2007JD009196. (upper panel) A schematic two-layer model of a broken cloud field and Rayleigh scatterers. (lower panel) An example of the Poisson distribution of broken cloud fields with cloud fraction Ac = 0.3 for a 10 by 10 km area. For a cloud vertical thickness of 1 km, the left lower panel has cloud

42

SU(N) Wigner-Racah algebra for the matrix of second moments of embedded Gaussian unitary ensemble of random matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently Pluhar and Weidenmueller [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) Vol 297, 344 (2002)] showed that the eigenvectors of the matrix of second moments of embedded Gaussian unitary ensemble of random matrices generated by k-body interactions (EGUE(k)) for m fermions in N single particle states are SU(N) Wigner coefficients and derived also an expression for the eigenvalues. Going beyond this work, we will show that the eigenvalues of this matrix are square of a SU(N) Racah coefficient and thus the matrix of second moments of EGUE(k) is solved completely by SU(N) Wigner-Racah algebra.

V. K. B. Kota

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Colors of the daytime overcast sky Raymond L. Lee, Jr. and Javier Hernndez-Andrs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

depth. Simulations using the radiative-transfer model MODTRAN4 help explain the observed bluing T , we use the detailed and extensively tested radiative-transfer model MOD- TRAN4. MODTRAN combines as noted below, each of our MODTRAN simulations includes the following parameters: a default midlatitude

Lee Jr., Raymond L.

44

Perceptually motivated guidelines for voice synchronization in film  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consume video content in a multitude of ways, including in movie theaters, on television, on DVDs and Blu-rays, online, on smart phones, and on portable media players. For quality control purposes, it is important to have a uniform viewing experience ... Keywords: Multisensory perception and integration, auditory perceptual research, human perception and performance, visual psychophysics

Elizabeth J. Carter; Lavanya Sharan; Laura Trutoiu; Iain Matthews; Jessica K. Hodgins

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

HMNewsFall09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTENTS CONTENTS Japan's R&D Program ..................1 Hydrate in Nature..........................7 HYFLUX Expedition ......................12 Sub Sampling for GH ................ 16 Gas Production Geomechanical Implications ................................. 18 Announcements ...................... 23 * Database Now Available * Global Assessment * NETL-NAS Fellowship * New Zealand Workshop * EGU 2010 Abstracts

46

6, 40814107, 2006 Correlation between  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between traffic density and particle size distribution in a street canyon and the dependence on wind-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU Abstract Combustion of fossil fuel in gasoline and diesel powered were identified by a multiple re- gression method. In our experiment only wind parameters have

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

Density of Cristae and Distribution of Mitochondria in the Slow Muscle Fibers of Antarctic Fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactive Discussion EGU Abstract Long-term measurements of erythemally weighted UV irradiance (Qer) have since 1968. The estimates of different atmospheric parameters effects, includ- ing NO2 content, on Qer in conditions of large megalopolis provides average Qer decrease of about 1.5­2%. The seasonal variations

Johnston, Ian A.

48

Towards a Revised Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Surface Interaction Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The components of the neutral- and plasma-surface interaction model used in the Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS 2 are reviewed. The idealized surfaces and processes handled by that model are inadequate for accurately simulating neutral transport behavior in present day and future fusion devices. We identify some of the physical processes missing from the model, such as mixed materials and implanted hydrogen, and make some suggestions for improving the model.

D.P. Stotler

2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

Microsoft Word - 13055299_DVP.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/BLU/S00513 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-May 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico August 2013 RIN 13055299 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site Sample Location Map.......................................................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

50

Microsoft Word - 11073944 DVP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2011 LMS/BLU/S00711 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-July 2011, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2011 RIN 11073944 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site .....................................................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

51

Microsoft Word - 13015067 DVP.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site April 2013 LMS/BLU/S00113 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-January 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico April 2013 RIN 13015067 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site Sample Location Map.......................................................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

52

Microsoft Word - RIN 10113426 DVP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2011 LMS/BLU/S01110 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2010, Bluewater, New Mexico February 2011 RIN 10113426 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ......................................................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7 Laboratory Performance Assessment ..........................................................................................9

53

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and October 2013 and October 2013 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2013 LMS/BLU/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August and October 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2013 RIN 13085537 and 13095651 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Private Wells Sampled August 2013 and October 2013, Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site ................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

54

A Report on Energy Efficiency of Consumer Electronic Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growth in the use of consumer electronics technologies and regular introductions of new products are dramatically increasing electrical load density in worldwide residential and commercial sectors. Gaming consoles such as Xbox 360 or Playstation 3, big-screen high-definition liquid crystal display and plasma televisions, Blu-ray Disc players, and a host of other electronic technologies use large amounts of electricity, and their aggregate load could eventually offset or even negate the decades of savings...

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

55

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2012 [Facility News] 6, 2012 [Facility News] News Tips from 2012 EGU General Assembly Bookmark and Share The ARM Facility is attending the 2012 European Geophysical Union General Assembly at the Austria Center in Vienna for the first time. The ARM Facility is attending the 2012 European Geophysical Union General Assembly at the Austria Center in Vienna for the first time. VIENNA - The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is the world's most comprehensive outdoor laboratory and data archive for research related to atmospheric processes that affect Earth's climate. At the European Geophysical Union (EGU) General Assembly 2012 in Vienna, find out how scientists use the ARM Facility to study the interactions between clouds,

56

ESP Performance Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The draft Electric Generating Unit Maximum Achievable Control Technology (EGU MACT) standard currently proposes a total particulate matter (TPM) emission limit of 0.03 lb/106 Btu for existing coal-fired generating units. The study described in this report investigated the variety of upgrade strategies that can be employed to improve existing electrostatic precipitator (ESP) collection efficiency so that the more-stringent limits can be met. The data and information assembled for this report include the r...

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

57

Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Public Meeting L'Enfant Plaza Hotel - Degas Room (2 nd Floor) September 23, 2008 8:00 Continental breakfast 9:00 Opening remarks Bill Martin, Washington Policy & Analysis 9:15 Opening Remarks Dennis Spurgeon, Assistant Secretary, Office of Nuclear Energy 9:30 Facilities subcommittee report John Ahearne, Sigma Xi 10:10 Break 10:30 Facilities report deliberation Bill Martin, Washington Policy & Analysis 11:30 Lunch 12:30 Mo-99 production Tom Cochran, Natural Resources Defense Council 1:30 Policy subcommittee report Dan Poneman, The Scowcroft Group 2:45 Break 3:00 Policy report deliberation Bill Martin, Washington Policy

58

Feasibility report on alternative methods for cooling cavern oils at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil caverns at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) are subjected to geothermal heating from the surrounding domal salt. This process raises the temperature of the crude oil from around 75 F upon delivery to SPR to as high as 130 F after decades of storage. While this temperature regime is adequate for long-term storage, it poses challenges for offsite delivery, with warm oil evolving gases that pose handling and safety problems. SPR installed high-capacity oil coolers in the mid-1990's to mitigate the emissions problem by lowering the oil delivery temperature. These heat exchanger units use incoming raw water as the cooling fluid, and operate only during a drawdown event where incoming water displaces the outgoing oil. The design criteria for the heat exchangers are to deliver oil at 100 F or less under all drawdown conditions. Increasing crude oil vapor pressures due in part to methane intrusion in the caverns is threatening to produce sufficient emissions at or near 100 F to cause the cooled oil to violate delivery requirements. This impending problem has initiated discussion and analysis of alternative cooling methods to bring the oil temperature even lower than the original design basis of 100 F. For the study described in this report, two alternative cooling methods were explored: (1) cooling during a limited drawdown, and (2) cooling during a degas operation. Both methods employ the heat exchangers currently in place, and do not require extra equipment. An analysis was run using two heat transfer models, HEATEX, and CaveMan, both developed at Sandia National Laboratories. For cooling during a limited drawdown, the cooling water flowrate through the coolers was varied from 1:1 water:oil to about 3:1, with an increased cooling capacity of about 3-7 F for the test cavern Bryan Mound 108 depending upon seasonal temperature effects. For cooling in conjunction with a degas operation in the winter, cavern oil temperatures for the test cavern Big Hill 102 were cooled sufficiently that the cavern required about 9 years to return to the temperature prior to degas. Upon reviewing these results, the authors recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy that a broader study of the cooling during degas be pursued in order to examine the potential benefits of cooling on all caverns in the current degasification schedule.

Levin, Bruce L.; Lord, David L.; Hadgu, Teklu

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Simulation of Diffusive Lithium Evaporation Onto the NSTX Vessel Walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for simulating the diffusive evaporation of lithium into a helium filled NSTX vacuum vessel is described and validated against an initial set of deposition experiments. The DEGAS 2 based model consists of a three-dimensional representation of the vacuum vessel, the elastic scattering process, and a kinetic description of the evaporated atoms. Additional assumptions are required to account for deuterium out-gassing during the validation experiments. The model agrees with the data over a range of pressures to within the estimated uncertainties. Suggestions are made for more discriminating experiments that will lead to an improved model.

D.P. Stotler, C.H. Skinner, W.R. Blanchard, P.S. Krstic, H.W. Kugel, H. Schneider, and L.E. Zakharov

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

60

JBluIce-EPICS control system for macromolecular crystallography.  

SciTech Connect

The trio of macromolecular crystallography beamlines constructed by the General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA-CAT) in Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) have been in growing demand owing to their outstanding beam quality and capacity to measure data from crystals of only a few micrometres in size. To take full advantage of the state-of-the-art mechanical and optical design of these beamlines, a significant effort has been devoted to designing fast, convenient, intuitive and robust beamline controls that could easily accommodate new beamline developments. The GM/CA-CAT beamline controls are based on the power of EPICS for distributed hardware control, the rich Java graphical user interface of Eclipse RCP and the task-oriented philosophy as well as the look and feel of the successful SSRL BluIce graphical user interface for crystallography. These beamline controls feature a minimum number of software layers, the wide use of plug-ins that can be written in any language and unified motion controls that allow on-the-fly scanning and optimization of any beamline component. This paper describes the ways in which BluIce was combined with EPICS and converted into the Java-based JBluIce, discusses the solutions aimed at streamlining and speeding up operations and gives an overview of the tools that are provided by this new open-source control system for facilitating crystallographic experiments, especially in the field of microcrystallography.

Stepanov, S.; Makarov, O.; Hilgart, M.; Pothineni, S.; Urakhchin, A.; Devarapalli, S.; Yoder, D.; Becker, M.; Ogata, C.; Sanishvili, R.; Nagarajan, V.; Smith, J. L.; Fischetti, R. F. (Biosciences Division); (Univ. of Michigan)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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61

Microsoft Word - Annual Report 2010 Master_Nov22_2011.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Petroleum Reserve Petroleum Reserve Annual Report for Calendar Year 2010 Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Office of Petroleum Reserves U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Strategic Petroleum Reserve: www.spr.doe.gov DOE/FE - 0545 Report to Congress November 2011 Degas Plant Strategic Petroleum Reserve Annual Report for Calendar Year 2010 | Page 1 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Annual Report for Calendar Year 2010 Report to Congress November 2011 U.S. Department of ENERGY United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Annual Report for Calendar Year 2010 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Annual Report for Calendar Year 2010 | Page i Message from the Secretary Section 165 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (42 U.S.C. 6245), as amended, requires

62

Microsoft Word - NEAC Meeting Agenda for June 9th v2.DOC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renoir Room, 2 Renoir Room, 2 nd Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 June 9, 2009 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast NEAC members 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Chairman Bill Martin and Shane Johnson, Acting Assistant Secretary NE 9:15 a.m. Under Secretary Kristina Johnson 9:35 a.m. NE's FY 2009 Budget and FY 2010 Shane Johnson Budget Request 10:30 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m. University Programs Marsha Lambregts and John Gilligan (INL) 11:45 a.m. Lunch Degas Room 12:45 p.m. Advanced Nuclear Transformation Burton Richter Technology report for approval 1:15 p.m. Pu-238 report John Ahearne, Mike Corridini, and Alice Caponiti 2:00 p.m. ATR Management Assistance Dennis Miotla, Deputy Assist. Secretary, NE Subcommittee

63

Microsoft Word - Final Agenda for NEAC Meeting 6-12-12  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monet Ballroom, (2nd Floor) Monet Ballroom, (2nd Floor) Washington, DC 20024 June 12, 2012 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast NEAC members 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Chairman Bill Martin and Dr. Pete Lyons, NE-1 9:15 a.m. Current Events, NE FY2013 Budget Dr. Pete Lyons, NE-1 9:45 a.m. Used Fuel Disposition R&D Monica Regalbuto 10:15 a.m. SMR Program Update Rebecca Smith-Kevern 10:45 a.m. Break 11:00 a.m. Accident Tolerant Fuels Frank Goldner 11:30 a.m. International Subcommittee Presentation Dr. Allen Sessoms, Subcommittee Chair 12:00 noon Lunch (NEAC members and Degas Room- 1 st Floor Presenters only) 1:00 p.m. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Report Dr. Burton Richter,

64

Global Collaboration in Clean Fossil Energy A Column from the Deputy Assistant Secretary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, Second Quarter, 2012 6, Second Quarter, 2012 www.fossil.energy.gov/news/energytoday.html HigHligHts inside 2 Global Collaboration in Clean Fossil Energy A Column from the Deputy Assistant Secretary for International Affairs 3 Exchanging CO 2 for Methane An Update on Methane Hydrate Testing on Alaska's North Slope 4 McConnell Confirmed Charles McConnell Sworn in As 12th Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy in April 5 Hydrogen-Based Fuel Cells New Catalyst Technology Reduces Diesel Engine Idling 7 Petroleum Reserves Degas Program Ensures Crude Oil Always Ready for Use One of the world's fastest supercomputers will be installed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory this summer to help develop solutions to carbon capture, utilization and

65

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fumarole discharges (95-560°C) collected from the dacite dome inside Mount St. Helens crater show temporal changes in their isotopic and chemical compositions. A ΔD vs. Δ18O plot shows that condensed waters from the gases are mixtures of meteoric and magmatic components, but that the apparent magmatic end-member in 1994 was depleted by about 7‰ in ΔD relative to the apparent end-member in 1980. Based on ΔD modeling, approximately 63% of shallow, post-1980 magma has yet to degas.

66

CSChang.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tokamak Edge Physics Tokamak Edge Physics C.-S. Chang Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NERSC BER Requirements for 2017 September 11-12, 2012 Rockville, MD 1. Project Description C.-S. Chang, PPPL and SciDAC EPSI (XGC family codes) X. Xu, LLNL (TEMPEST/COGENT and BOUT++) XGC1: Kinetic PIC (ODE) code in diverted geometry * Our present focus is in - Adding continuum technology into PIC method  Total-f - Electrostatic turbulence, background evolution, ions, electrons, neutral particles, impurity particles: Built-in DEGAS-2 - 3D perturbed magnetic field from XGC0 (XGCa) - Adding in electromagnetic micro-turbulence * By 2017 we expect to have - Full-scale gyrokinetic electromagnetic turbulence with both parity - Higher fidelity PMI data (in collaboration with SciDAC PWI)

67

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 31, 2012 October 31, 2012 CX-009509: Categorical Exclusion Determination Power Monitoring, Communication and Control Upgrade at Bryan Mound Degas Plant (Install) CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 10/31/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office October 30, 2012 CX-009510: Categorical Exclusion Determination Strategic Petroleum Reserve Emergency Pipeline and Piping Repair, 2013-2017 CX(s) Applied: B5.4 Date: 10/30/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office October 2, 2012 CX-009216: Categorical Exclusion Determination ADAS System Life Cycle Support, 2012-2015 CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 10/02/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office September 24, 2012 CX-009217: Categorical Exclusion Determination

68

Comparative study of two chromatographic columns used in the GLC determination of methylmercury  

SciTech Connect

A large effort has gone into finding an adequate analytical method for the determinations of methylmercury. Various stationary phases in GC determination have been tested. It was obvious with every method that the stationary phase had to be saturated to give a stable response without tailing the peaks or walking the retention time. To accomplish this several authors have reported treatments which included the injection of the solutions containing inorganic or organic mercuric chloride metoxyethylmercuric iodide, or large amount of potassium iodide. The authors report here a simple and efficient way to obtain satisfactory stable response from the chromatographic column based on the use of 10% diethyleneglycol adipate (DEGA) and 3% polyethyleneglycol (Carbowax 20 M).

Najdek, M.; Bazulic, D.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Tensile tests of niobium material for SRF cavities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mechanical tests of cavity-grade niobium samples were conducted to provide engineering information for the certification of 3rd-harmonic superconducting radio-frequency cavities and cryomodules. Large changes of mechanical properties occur throughout the cavity fabrication process due to the cold work introduced by forming, the heating introduced by electron beam welding, and the recovery of cold work during the anneal used to degas hydrogen after chemical processing. Data is provided here to show the different properties at various stages of fabrication, including both weld regions and samples from the bulk niobium far away from the weld. Measurements of RRR were used to assure that any contamination during annealing was negligible.

Wu, G.; Dhanaraj, N.; Cooley, L.; Hicks, D.; Hahn, E.; Burk, D.; Muranyi, W.; Foley, N.; Edwards, H.; Harms, E.; Champion, M.; /Fermilab /Michigan State U.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Analysis of Neutral Transport in the GAMMA10 Anchor-Cell Using H{alpha}-Emission Detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The neutral transport was studied in the anchor cell. The H{alpha} line intensities were measured by using axially aligned H{alpha} detectors. It was found that the intensity is considerably dependent on ECRH and GP 3,4. A 5ch H{alpha} detector was newly installed in the outer-transition region of the anchor-cell. From the measurement of the spatial distributions, the vertical intensity profile is estimated to be about 2.5 cm on the half width half maximum, while the horizontal distribution shows roughly flat around Z=-670 cm. The above characteristics were discussed with aid of neutral transport simulation using DEGAS Monte-Carlo Code.

Higashizono, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nakashima, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ohki, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Islam, M.K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Shoji, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Kobayashi, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University (Japan); Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kubota, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Murakami, R. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yamada, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

2012 CERTS R&M Peer Review - Summary: Dynamic Energy and Environmental Dispatch of Power Systems - Max Zhang  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dispatch of Power Systems Dispatch of Power Systems Project Lead: Max Zhang, Dick Schuler 1. Project objective This project will develop a framework that allows power system operators to co-optimize power flows and environmental flows (air pollution transport). This framework has the potential to provide a cost-effective way for the power sector to meet the increasingly stringent environmental regulations and systems reliability. 2. Major technical accomplishments that will be completed this year We have developed a new mechanism to analyzer Continuous Emission Measurement (CEM) data of electric generation units (EGUs). We have came up with a methodology evaluating the effects of dynamic pricing on load profiles. We will soon finish evaluating the effects of dynamic pricing on reducing EGU emissions during high energy demand

72

Microsoft PowerPoint - DSSE_Portfolio.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Office Subject Matter Expert Support Compliance Office Subject Matter Expert Support Data Systems Sciences & Engineering Group Computational Sciences & Engineering Division  Problem Statement: - Provide technical expertise to resolve user problems escalated by DHS Compliance Office  Technical Approach: - Enlist team of IT and Chemical experts - Develop body of expertise necessary to resolve complicated issues to enable sponsor's user community to comply with federally mandated regulations a dated egu at o s - Develop depth of knowledge necessary to respond quickly to ever- changing user problems - Develop and document Standard Operating Procedures that are repeatable and defensible  Benefit:  Benefit: - The depth of knowledge and body of expertise developed in support of this task ensures that the project sponsor and user

73

Particle balance in a TFTR supershot  

SciTech Connect

Particle balance in a TFTR supershot is studied self-consistently. The TRANSP analysis code is used to model plasma parameters within the last closed flux surface, deriving time-dependent plasma profiles from measurements. The poloidal flux surfaces are derived using TRANSP and an equivalent-filament analysis code which distributes axisymmetric currents to match measurements of the poloidal field and flux and the total plasma current. The plasma in the edge and scrape off regions are modeled during a relatively steady state phase of the neutral beam injection using the B2 code which calculates plasma profiles in 2 dimensions. The recycled hydrogenic neutrals from the limiter are modeled with the DEGAS neutrals code. The recycling rates within the last closed flux surface are input into TRANSP. The edge and scrape off modeling results are compared with those from TRANSP in the main plasma and with measurements of the D{sub {alpha}} emission and thermocouple measurements of temperature increases in the inner limiter. The recycling coefficients at the last closed flux surface and at the limiter are discussed.

Budny, R.V.; Coster, D.; Stotler, D.; Bell, M.G.; Janos, A.C.; Owens, D.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Degassing a vacuum system with in-situ UV radiation  

SciTech Connect

Photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) from a high-powered ultraviolet source was investigated as a technique to degas a vacuum system. A stainless steel vacuum system was pumped down from atmosphere with different time doses of 185 nm light, and the resulting outgassing rates were compared to that of a control pumpdown without UV assistance. PSD was found to provide a factor of 2 advantage in pumpdown pressure after only 30 min of UV exposure, with no additional advantage observed for longer irradiation times. Specifically, an outgassing rate of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Torr L s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} was reached 3 h sooner in pumpdowns with UV assistance compared to those without UV, while a rate of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Torr L s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} was reached 16 h sooner in UV runs. The authors calculated that about 22 monolayers of water were desorbed after 30 min of UV exposure. The results indicate that PSD by a 40 W 185 nm UV source can serve as a nonthermal technique to significantly speed the pumpdown of a vacuum system from atmosphere after only 30 min.

Koebley, Sean R.; Outlaw, Ronald A.; Dellwo, Randy R. [College of William and Mary, Department of Applied Science, 325 McGlothlin Street Hall, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); RBD Instruments, 2437 Northeast Twin Knolls Drive, Bend, Oregon 97701 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Determination of free CO2 in emergent groundwaters using a commercial beverage carbonation meter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolved CO{sub 2} in groundwater is frequently supersaturated relative to its equilibrium with atmospheric partial pressure and will degas when it is conveyed to the surface. Estimates of dissolved CO{sub 2} concentrations can vary widely between different hydrochemical facies because they have different sources of error (e.g., rapid degassing, low alkalinity, non-carbonate alkalinity). We sampled 60 natural spring and mine waters using a beverage industry carbonation meter, which measures dissolved CO{sub 2} based on temperature and pressure changes as the sample volume is expanded. Using a modified field protocol, the meter was found to be highly accurate in the range 0.235 mMCO{sub 2}. The meter provided rapid, accurate and precise measurements of dissolved CO{sub 2} in natural waters for a range of hydrochemical facies. Dissolved CO{sub 2} concentrations measured in the field with the carbonation meter were similar to CO{sub 2} determined using the pH-alkalinity approach, but provided immediate results and avoided errors from alkalinity and pH determination. The portability and ease of use of the carbonation meter in the field made it well-suited to sampling in difficult terrain. The carbonation meter has proven useful in the study of aquatic systems where CO{sub 2} degassing drives geochemical changes that result in surficial mineral precipitation and deposition, such as tufa, travertine and mine drainage deposits.

Vesper, Dorothy J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

76

Assessment of the Poloidal Distribution of Core Plasma Fueling and Impurity Sources in DIII-D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements and modeling of the 2D poloidal D{sub {alpha}} intensity distribution in DIII-D low density L-mode and medium density ELMy H-mode plasmas indicate that the core plasma is predominately fueled near the divertor x-point region. The neutral hydrogen and ion carbon emission were measured in the divertor and inner main chamber scrape-off layer (SOL) using a plasma imaging technique, covering 85% of the poloidal cross-section. Typically, the peak emission in the inner main SOL at the tokamak midplane was three orders of magnitude lower than in the divertor. For discharges with the ion Bx{del}B drift direction toward the lower divertor the UEDGE/DEGAS codes predict strong core plasma fueling from the significantly higher density and lower temperature plasma calculated in the inner divertor leg. The concomitant carbon ion flow reversal in the inner divertor leg enhances the leakage of carbon from the divertor into the main SOL, and hence into the core.

Groth, M; Owen, L; Porter, G; Brooks, N; Fenstermacher, M; Meyer, W; Leonard, A; Petrie, T; Rudakov, D; Wang, G; Watkins, J; Wolf, N

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

77

H/sub. cap alpha. / studies on TFTR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission is a useful indicator of hydrogen ionization since the energy required to excite hydrogen to the n = 3 level is approximately the same as to ionize the hydrogen atom. Other aspects of recycling, such as plasma scrape-off parameters, wall particle fluxes, and wall retention rates can be inferred from spatial distributions of H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission. There are two H/sub ..cap alpha../ diagnostics on TFTF observing the inner limiter: a relatively calibrated wide-angle TV camera, and the absolutely calibrated HAIFA diagnostic, both viewing the inner limiter. H/sub ..cap alpha../ observations by these instruments have been analyzed using the DEGAS neutral transport code. The core recycling rate, and ion and neutral particle limiter fluxes, have been deduced from the calculations. The results are very sensitive to the ion flux distribution, and therefore also provide information on the plasma scrape-off conditions. A survey was made of over 500 TFTR discharges. H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission appears to increase in proportion to /bar n//sub e//sup 2/. The ratio of core ionization to average H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission was calculated to be roughly constant over a large range of discharges. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Heifetz, D.B.; Ehrhardt, A.B.; Ramsey, A.T.; Dylla, H.F.; Budny, R.; McNeill, D.; Medley, S.; Ulrickson, M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Neutral Beam Injection Experiments and Related Behavior of Neutral Particles in the GAMMA 10 Tandem Mirror  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of neutral beam injection (NBI) experiments in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasmas are presented together with the neutral particle behavior observed in the experiments. A hydrogen neural beam was injected into the hot-ion-mode plasmas by using the injector installed in the central-cell for the plasma heating and fueling. High-energy ions produced by NBI were observed and its energy distribution was measured for the first time with a neutral particle analyzer installed in the central-cell. The temporal and spatial behavior of hydrogen was observed with axially aligned H{sub {alpha}} detectors installed from the central midplane to anchor-cell. Enhancement of hydrogen recycling due to the beam injection and the cause of the observed decrease in plasma diamagnetism are discussed. The Monte-Carlo code DEGAS for neutral transport simulation was applied to the GAMMA 10 central-cell and a 3-dimensional simulation was performed in the NBI experiment. Localization of neutral particle during the beam injection is investigated based on the simulation and it was found that the increased recycling due to the beam injection was dominant near the injection port.

Nakashima, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Watanabe, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Higashizono, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ohki, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ogita, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Shoji, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science(Japan); Kobayashi, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University (Japan); Islam, M.K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kubota, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yamada, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Murakami, R. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Replacing chemicals in recycle mills with mechanical alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-intensity spark fired underwater decomposes a small amount of the water into hydroxyl radicals, which are strong oxidants. These are able to oxidize contaminants such as glue and wood pitch that enter paper recycling mills as a part of the incoming furnish and cost the industry several hundred million dollars. The sparking technique is safe, inexpensive, and is capable of treating large volumes of water, which makes it attractive for mill applications. Several mill trials were run. Sparking caused a decrease in the tack of the deposits in one case. Lower bleach use occurred in two other mills; sparking reduced the degree of ink reattachment to fiber. The payback for either application is attractive. Sparking induced deposition of contaminants in another mill, which is a positive development--if it can be controlled. The technique is also able to degas water and to oxidize odor-causing sulfur compounds. Although one unit has been purchased by a mill, second-order effects caused by the technology needs to be defined further before the technology can be broadly applied.

Institute of Paper Science Technology

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) brought about new awareness regarding the overall health-effects of stationary source fossil combustion emissions. Title III of the CAAA identified 189 pollutants, including mercury, as hazardous or toxic and required the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate their emissions by source, health effects and environmental implications, including the need to control these emissions. These pollutants are collectively referred to as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The provisions in Title III specific to electric generating units (EGU) were comprehensively addressed by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaborative air toxic characterization programs conducted between 1990 and 1997. This work provided most of the data supporting the conclusions found in EPA's congressionally mandated reports regarding air toxic emissions from coal-fired utility boilers; the Mercury Study Report to Congress (1997)1 and the "Study of Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Electric Utility Steam Generating Units -- Final Report to Congress" (1998).2 The first report identified coal-fired power plants as the largest source of human-generated mercury emissions in the U.S. and the second concluded that mercury from coal-fired utilities was the HAP of "greatest potential concern" to the environment and human health that merited additional research and monitoring.

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81

High-emission cold cathode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field-emission cathode having a multitude of field emission points for emitting a copious stream of electrons when subjected to a high field is described. The cathode is constructed by compressing a multitude of tungsten strips alternately arranged with molybdenum strips and copper ribbons or compressing alternately arranged copper plated tungsten and molybdenum strips, heating the arrangement to braze the tungsten and molybdenum strips together with the copper, machining and grinding the exposed strip edges of one side of the brazed arrangement to obtain a precisely planar surface, etching a portion of the molybdenum and copper to leave the edges of the tungsten strips protruding for electron emission, and subjecting the protruding edges of the tungsten strips to a high electric field to degas and roughen the surface to pnovide a large number of emitting points. The resulting structure is particularly useful as a cathode in a transversely excited gaseous laser where the cathode is mounted in a vacuum chamber for emitting electrons under the influence of a high electric field between the cathode and an extractor grid. The electrons pass through the extractor grid, a thin window in the wall of the laser chamber and into the laser chamber which is filled with a gaseous mixture of helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. A second grid is mounted on the gaseous side of the window. The electrons pass into the laser chamber under the influence of a second electric field between the second grid and an anode in the laser chamber to raise selected gas atoms of the gaseous mixture to appropriately excited states so that a subsequent coherent light beam passing through the mixture transversely to the electron stream through windows in opposite ends of the laser chamber stimulates the excited atoms to amplify the beam. (Official Gazette)

Mancebo, L.

1974-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

Investigation of flammable gas and thermal safety issues for retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this report is to identify and resolve some of the flammable gas and thermal safety issues potentially associated with the retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105 (AN-105), which is the first double-shell tank scheduled for waste retrieval at Hanford. The planned retrieval scenario includes the following steps in AN-105: (1) degas the tank using two submerged mixing pumps, (2) turn off the mixer pump(s) and allow any suspended solids to settle, (3) decant the supernatant to the intermediate feed staging tank(s) (IFSTs) (AP-102 and/or AP-104) using water/caustic dilution at the transfer pump inlet, (4) add the remaining dilution water/caustic to the slurry remaining in AN-105, (5) mix the tank with the mixer pump(s) until the soluble solids dissolve, (6) turn off the mixer pump(s) and let the insoluble solids settle, and (7) decant the new supernatant to the IFST(s), leaving the insoluble solids behind. Three waste retrieval safety issues are addressed in this report. They are (1) the controlled degassing of AN-105 to ensure that the headspace remains <25% of the lower flammability limit (LFL), (2) an assessment of how dissolved gas (mainly ammonia) released during the transfer of the supernatant in AN-105 to the IFSTs and the water/caustic dilution of the remaining slurry in AN-105 will affect the flammability in these tanks; and (3) an assessment of the maximum waste temperatures that might occur in AN-105 during retrieval operations.

Caley, S.M.; Stewart, C.W.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Cuta, J.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Panisko, F.E.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Flue gas injection control of silica in cooling towers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injection of CO{sub 2}-laden flue gas can decrease the potential for silica and calcite scale formation in cooling tower blowdown by lowering solution pH to decrease equilibrium calcite solubility and kinetic rates of silica polymerization. Flue gas injection might best inhibit scale formation in power plant cooling towers that use impaired makeup waters - for example, groundwaters that contain relatively high levels of calcium, alkalinity, and silica. Groundwaters brought to the surface for cooling will degas CO{sub 2} and increase their pH by 1-2 units, possibly precipitating calcite in the process. Recarbonation with flue gas can lower the pHs of these fluids back to roughly their initial pH. Flue gas carbonation probably cannot lower pHs to much below pH 6 because the pHs of impaired waters, once outgassed at the surface, are likely to be relatively alkaline. Silica polymerization to form scale occurs most rapidly at pH {approx} 8.3 at 25 C; polymerization is slower at higher and lower pH. pH 7 fluids containing {approx}220 ppm SiO{sub 2} require > 180 hours equilibration to begin forming scale whereas at pH 8.3 scale formation is complete within 36 hours. Flue gas injection that lowers pHs to {approx} 7 should allow substantially higher concentration factors. Periodic cycling to lower recoveries - hence lower silica concentrations - might be required though. Higher concentration factors enabled by flue gas injection should decrease concentrate volumes and disposal costs by roughly half.

Brady, Patrick Vane; Anderson, Howard L., Jr.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

LOCATING THE TRAILING EDGE OF THE CIRCUMBINARY RING IN THE KH 15D SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Following two years of complete occultation of both stars in the binary T Tauri star KH 15D by its opaque circumbinary ring, KH 15D has abruptly brightened again during apastron phases, reaching I = 15 mag. Here, we show that the brightening is accompanied by a change in spectral class from K6/K7 (the spectral class of star A) to {approx}K1, and a bluing of the system in V - I by about 0.3 mag. A radial velocity measurement confirms that, at apastron, we are now seeing direct light from star B, which is more luminous and of earlier spectral class than star A. Evidently, the trailing edge of the occulting screen has just become tangent to one anse of star B's projected orbit. This confirms a prediction of the precession models, supports the view that the tilted ring is self-gravitating, and ushers in a new era of the system's evolution that should be accompanied by the same kind of dramatic phenomena observed from 1995 to 2009. It also promotes KH 15D from a single-lined to a double-lined eclipsing binary, greatly enhancing its value for testing pre-main-sequence models. The results of our study strengthen the case for truncation of the outer ring at around 4 AU by a sub-stellar object such as an extremely young giant planet. The system is currently at an optimal configuration for detecting the putative planet and we urge expedient follow-up observations.

Capelo, Holly L.; Herbst, William [Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Leggett, S. K. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Hamilton, Catrina M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA 17013 (United States); Johnson, John A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

Brines formed by multi-salt deliquescence  

SciTech Connect

The FY05 Waste Package Environment testing program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory focused on determining the temperature, relative humidity, and solution compositions of brines formed due to the deliquescence of NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures. Understanding the physical and chemical behavior of these brines is important because they define conditions under which brines may react with waste canister surfaces. Boiling point experiments show that NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures form brines that transform to hydrous melts that do not truly 'dry out' until temperatures exceed 300 and 400 C, respectively. Thus a conducting solution is present for these salt assemblages over the thermal history of the repository. The corresponding brines form at lower relative humidity at higher temperatures. The NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has a mutual deliquescence relative humidity (MDRH) of 25.9% at 120 C and 10.8% at 180 C. Similarly, the KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has MDRH of 26.4% at 120 C and 20.0% at 150 C. The KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture salts also absorb some water (but do not appear to deliquesce) at 180 C and thus may also contribute to the transfer of electrons at interface between dust and the waste package surface. There is no experimental evidence to suggest that these brines will degas and form less deliquescent salt assemblages. Ammonium present in atmospheric and tunnel dust (as the chloride, nitrate, or sulfate) will readily decompose in the initial heating phase of the repository, and will affect subsequent behavior of the remaining salt mixture only through the removal of a stoichiometric equivalent of one or more anions. Although K-Na-NO{sub 3}-Cl brines form at high temperature and low relative humidity, these brines are dominated by nitrate, which is known to inhibit corrosion at lower temperature. Nitrate to chloride ratios of the NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture are about NO{sub 3}:Cl = 19:1. The role of nitrate on corrosion at higher temperatures is addressed in a companion report (Dixit et al., 2005).

Carroll, S; Rard, J; Alai, M; Staggs, K

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

Continuous Emissions Monitoring System Monitoring Plan for the Y-12 Steam Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), managed by BWXT, is submitting this Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) Monitoring Plan in conformance with the requirements of Title 40 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 75. The state of Tennessee identified the Y-12 Steam Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as a non-electrical generation unit (EGU) nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) budget source as a result of the NO{sub x} State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-3-27. Following this introduction, the monitoring plan contains the following sections: CEMS details, NO{sub x} emissions, and quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC). The following information is included in the attachments: fuel and flue gas diagram, system layout, data flow diagrams, Electronic Monitoring Plan printouts, vendor information on coal and natural gas feed systems, and the Certification Test Protocol. The Y-12 Steam Plant consists of four Wickes boilers. Each is rated at a maximum heat input capacity of 296.8 MMBtu/hour or 250,000 lb/hour of 250-psig steam. Although pulverized coal is the principal fuel, each of the units can fire natural gas or a combination of coal and gas. Each unit is equipped with a Joy Manufacturing Company reverse air baghouse to control particulate emissions. Flue gases travel out of the baghouse, through an induced draft fan, then to one of two stacks. Boilers 1 and 2 exhaust through Stack 1. Boilers 3 and 4 exhaust through Stack 2. A dedicated CEMS will be installed in the ductwork of each boiler, downstream of the baghouse. The CEMS will be designed, built, installed, and started up by URS Group, Inc. (URS). Data acquisition and handling will be accomplished using a data acquisition and handling system (DAHS) designed, built, and programmed by Environmental Systems Corporation (ESC). The installed CEMS will continuously monitor NO{sub x}, flue gas flowrate, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The CEMS will be utilized to report emissions from each unit for each ozone season starting May 1, 2003. Each boiler has independent coal and natural gas metering systems. Coal is fed to each boiler by belt-type coal feeders. Each boiler has two dedicated coal feeders. Natural gas may be burned along with coal for flame stability. The boilers may also be fired on natural gas alone. Orifice meters measure the natural gas flow to each boiler.

None

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

EMPIRE: Nuclear Reaction Model Code System for Data Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

EMPIRE is a modular system of nuclear reaction codes, comprising various nuclear models, and designed for calculations over a broad range of energies and incident particles. A projectile can be a neutron, proton, any ion (including heavy-ions) or a photon. The energy range extends from the beginning of the unresolved resonance region for neutron-induced reactions ({approx} keV) and goes up to several hundred MeV for heavy-ion induced reactions. The code accounts for the major nuclear reaction mechanisms, including direct, pre-equilibrium and compound nucleus ones. Direct reactions are described by a generalized optical model (ECIS03) or by the simplified coupled-channels approach (CCFUS). The pre-equilibrium mechanism can be treated by a deformation dependent multi-step direct (ORION + TRISTAN) model, by a NVWY multi-step compound one or by either a pre-equilibrium exciton model with cluster emission (PCROSS) or by another with full angular momentum coupling (DEGAS). Finally, the compound nucleus decay is described by the full featured Hauser-Feshbach model with {gamma}-cascade and width-fluctuations. Advanced treatment of the fission channel takes into account transmission through a multiple-humped fission barrier with absorption in the wells. The fission probability is derived in the WKB approximation within the optical model of fission. Several options for nuclear level densities include the EMPIRE-specific approach, which accounts for the effects of the dynamic deformation of a fast rotating nucleus, the classical Gilbert-Cameron approach and pre-calculated tables obtained with a microscopic model based on HFB single-particle level schemes with collective enhancement. A comprehensive library of input parameters covers nuclear masses, optical model parameters, ground state deformations, discrete levels and decay schemes, level densities, fission barriers, moments of inertia and {gamma}-ray strength functions. The results can be converted into ENDF-6 formatted files using the accompanying code EMPEND and completed with neutron resonances extracted from the existing evaluations. The package contains the full EXFOR (CSISRS) library of experimental reaction data that are automatically retrieved during the calculations. Publication quality graphs can be obtained using the powerful and flexible plotting package ZVView. The graphic user interface, written in Tcl/Tk, provides for easy operation of the system. This paper describes the capabilities of the code, outlines physical models and indicates parameter libraries used by EMPIRE to predict reaction cross sections and spectra, mainly for nucleon-induced reactions. Selected applications of EMPIRE are discussed, the most important being an extensive use of the code in evaluations of neutron reactions for the new US library ENDF/B-VII.0. Future extensions of the system are outlined, including neutron resonance module as well as capabilities of generating covariances, using both KALMAN and Monte-Carlo methods, that are still being advanced and refined.

Herman, M. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)], E-mail: mwherman@bnl.gov; Capote, R. [Nuclear Data Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Carlson, B.V. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, 12228-900, SP, Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Oblozinsky, P. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sin, M. [Nuclear Physics Department, Bucharest University, P.O. Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Trkov, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Physics Division R-1, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Wienke, H. [Belgonucleaire, Dessel, B2480 (Belgium); Zerkin, V. [Nuclear Data Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Observations on vapor pressure in SPR caverns : sources.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The oil of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) represents a national response to any potential emergency or intentional restriction of crude oil supply to this country, and conforms to International Agreements to maintain such a reserve. As assurance this reserve oil will be available in a timely manner should a restriction in supply occur, the oil of the reserve must meet certain transportation criteria. The transportation criteria require that the oil does not evolve dangerous gas, either explosive or toxic, while in the process of transport to, or storage at, the destination facility. This requirement can be a challenge because the stored oil can acquire dissolved gases while in the SPR. There have been a series of reports analyzing in exceptional detail the reasons for the increases, or regains, in gas content; however, there remains some uncertainty in these explanations and an inability to predict why the regains occur. Where the regains are prohibitive and exceed the criteria, the oil must undergo degasification, where excess portions of the volatile gas are removed. There are only two known sources of gas regain, one is the salt dome formation itself which may contain gas inclusions from which gas can be released during oil processing or storage, and the second is increases of the gases release by the volatile components of the crude oil itself during storage, especially if the stored oil undergoes heating or is subject to biological generation processes. In this work, the earlier analyses are reexamined and significant alterations in conclusions are proposed. The alterations are based on how the fluid exchanges of brine and oil uptake gas released from domal salt during solutioning, and thereafter, during further exchanges of fluids. Transparency of the brine/oil interface and the transfer of gas across this interface remains an important unanswered question. The contribution from creep induced damage releasing gas from the salt surrounding the cavern is considered through computations using the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, suggesting a relative minor, but potentially significant, contribution to the regain process. Apparently, gains in gas content can be generated from the oil itself during storage because the salt dome has been heated by the geothermal gradient of the earth. The heated domal salt transfers heat to the oil stored in the caverns and thereby increases the gas released by the volatile components and raises the boiling point pressure of the oil. The process is essentially a variation on the fractionation of oil, where each of the discrete components of the oil have a discrete temperature range over which that component can be volatized and removed from the remaining components. The most volatile components are methane and ethane, the shortest chain hydrocarbons. Since this fractionation is a fundamental aspect of oil behavior, the volatile component can be removed by degassing, potentially prohibiting the evolution of gas at or below the temperature of the degas process. While this process is well understood, the ability to describe the results of degassing and subsequent regain is not. Trends are not well defined for original gas content, regain, and prescribed effects of degassing. As a result, prediction of cavern response is difficult. As a consequence of this current analysis, it is suggested that solutioning brine of the final fluid exchange of a just completed cavern, immediately prior to the first oil filling, should be analyzed for gas content using existing analysis techniques. This would add important information and clarification to the regain process. It is also proposed that the quantity of volatile components, such as methane, be determined before and after any degasification operation.

Munson, Darrell Eugene

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Driving Down HB-LED Costs: Implementation of Process Simulation Tools and Temperature Control Methods of High Yield MOCVD Growth  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this multi-faceted program is to develop epitaxial growth systems that meet a goal of 75% (4X) cost reduction in the epitaxy phase of HB-LED manufacture. A 75% reduction in yielded epitaxy cost is necessary in order to achieve the cost goals for widespread penetration of HB-LED??s into back-lighting units (BLU) for LCD panels and ultimately for solid-state lighting (SSL). To do this, the program will address significant improvements in overall equipment Cost of Ownership, or CoO. CoO is a model that includes all costs associated with the epitaxy portion of production. These aspects include cost of yield, capital cost, operational costs, and maintenance costs. We divide the program into three phases where later phases will incorporate the gains of prior phases. Phase one activities are enabling technologies. In collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories we develop a Fluent-compatible chemistry predictive model and a set of mid-infrared and near-ultraviolet pyrometer monitoring tools. Where previously the modeling of the reactor dynamics were studied within FLUENT alone, here, FLUENT and Chemkin are integrated into a comprehensive model of fluid dynamics and the most advanced transport equations developed for Chemkin. Specifically, the Chemkin model offered the key reaction terms for gas-phase nucleation, a key consideration in the optimization of the MOCVD process. This new predictive model is used to design new MOCVD reactors with optimized growth conditions and the newly developed pyrometers are used monitor and control the MOCVD process temperature to within 0.5°C run-to-run and within each wafer. This portion of the grant is in collaboration with partners at Sandia National Laboratories. Phase two activities are continuous improvement projects which extend the current reactor platform along the lines of improved operational efficiency, improved systems control for throughput, and carrier modifications for increased yield. Programmatically, improvements made in Phase I are applied to developments of Phase II when applicable. Phase three is the culmination of the individual tasks from both phases one and two applied to proposed production platforms. We selectively combine previously demonstrated tasks and other options to develop a high-volume production-worthy MOCVD system demonstrating >3x throughput, 1.3x capital efficiency, and 0.7x cost of ownership. In a parallel demonstration we validate the concept of an improved, larger deposition system which utilizes the predictive modeling of chemistry-based flow analysis and extensions of the improvements demonstrated on the current platforms. This validation includes the build and testing of a prototype version of the hardware and demonstration of 69% reduction in the cost of ownership. Also, in this phase we present a stand-alone project to develop a high-temperature system which improves source efficiency by 30% while concurrently increasing growth rate by 1.3x. The material quality is held to the same material quality specifications of our existing baseline processes. The merits of other line item tasks in phase three are discussed for inclusion on next-generation platforms.

William Quinn

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z