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Sample records for degas blu egu

  1. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F

  2. Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL DEGAS

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    COAL DEGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL DEGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL DEGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  3. Neutral gas transport modeling with DEGAS 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stotler, D.; Karney, C.

    1993-10-01

    We are currently rewriting the neutral gas transport code, DEGAS with a view to not only making it faster, but also easing the process of including new physics. The goal is to make adding new species and reactions relatively simple so that the code can be rapidly adapted to new divertor physics regimes. DEGAS 2 will also be optimized for coupling to fluid plasma codes, incorporating many of the techniques utilized in B2-EIRENE. Finally, it is our intention that DEGAS 2, like DEGAS, be well-documented and easy to use. We ill present model calculations including ionization and charge exchange which will illustrate the way reactions are included into DEGAS 2 and will demonstrate operation of the code on a distributed network of workstations.

  4. Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  5. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation Gas-Pu -Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge Dα light emission from a neutral Dα gas puff near the outer mid- plane of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and

  6. DEGAS 2 Daren Stotler and Charles Karney | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DEGAS 2 Daren Stotler and Charles Karney This invention is a Monte Carlo simulation code designed to study the behavior of neutral particles in plasmas with an emphasis on fusion applications. No.: M-807 Inventor(s): Daren P Stotler

  7. Systematic characterization of degas-driven flow for poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, David Y. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States) Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center; Tentori, Augusto M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States) Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center; Dimov, Ivan K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States) Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center; Univ. de Valapariso, Valapariso (Chile); Lee, Luke P. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States) Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center

    2011-01-01

    Degas-driven flow is a novel phenomenon used to propel fluids in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices without requiring any external power. This method takes advantage of the inherently high porosity and air solubility of PDMS by removing air molecules from the bulk PDMS before initiating the flow. The dynamics of degas-driven flow are dependent on the channel and device geometries and are highly sensitive to temporal parameters. These dependencies have not been fully characterized, hindering broad use of degas-driven flow as a microfluidic pumping mechanism. Here, we characterize, for the first time, the effect of various parameters on the dynamics of degas-driven flow, including channel geometry, PDMS thickness, PDMS exposure area, vacuum degassing time, and idle time at atmospheric pressure before loading. We investigate the effect of these parameters on flow velocity as well as channel fill time for the degas-driven flow process. Using our devices, we achieved reproducible flow with a standard deviation of less than 8% for flow velocity, as well as maximum flow rates of up to 3 nL/s and mean flow rates of approximately 1-1.5 nL/s. Parameters such as channel surface area and PDMS chip exposure area were found to have negligible impact on degas-driven flow dynamics, whereas channel cross-sectional area, degas time, PDMS thickness, and idle time were found to have a larger impact. In addition, we develop a physical model that can predict mean flow velocities within 6% of experimental values and can be used as a tool for future design of PDMS-based microfluidic devices that utilize degas-driven flow.

  8. Systematic characterization of degas-driven flow for poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, David Y.; Tentori, Augusto M.; Dimov, Ivan K.; Lee, Luke P.

    2011-01-01

    Degas-driven flow is a novel phenomenon used to propel fluids in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices without requiring any external power. This method takes advantage of the inherently high porosity and air solubility of PDMS by removing air molecules from the bulk PDMS before initiating the flow. The dynamics of degas-driven flow are dependent on the channel and device geometries and are highly sensitive to temporal parameters. These dependencies have not been fully characterized, hindering broad use of degas-driven flow as a microfluidic pumping mechanism. Here, we characterize, for the first time, the effect of various parameters on the dynamics ofmore » degas-driven flow, including channel geometry, PDMS thickness, PDMS exposure area, vacuum degassing time, and idle time at atmospheric pressure before loading. We investigate the effect of these parameters on flow velocity as well as channel fill time for the degas-driven flow process. Using our devices, we achieved reproducible flow with a standard deviation of less than 8% for flow velocity, as well as maximum flow rates of up to 3 nL/s and mean flow rates of approximately 1-1.5 nL/s. Parameters such as channel surface area and PDMS chip exposure area were found to have negligible impact on degas-driven flow dynamics, whereas channel cross-sectional area, degas time, PDMS thickness, and idle time were found to have a larger impact. In addition, we develop a physical model that can predict mean flow velocities within 6% of experimental values and can be used as a tool for future design of PDMS-based microfluidic devices that utilize degas-driven flow.« less

  9. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, B.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Leblanc, B.

    2012-10-27

    Gas-Puff-Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge D? light emission from a neutral D2 gas puff nears the outer mid-plane of NSTX. DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and atomic physics in tokamak plasmas. In this paper we compare measurements of the D? light emission obtained by GPI on NSTX with DEGAS 2 simulations of D? light emission for specific experiments. Both the simulated spatial distribution and absolute intensity of the D? light emission agree well with the experimental data obtained between ELMs in H-mode.

  10. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, B.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Leblanc, B.

    2012-11-08

    Gas-Puff-Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge D? light emission from a neutral D2 gas puff nears the outer mid-plane of NSTX. DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and atomic physics in tokamak plasmas. In this paper we compare measurements of the D? light emission obtained by GPI on NSTX with DEGAS 2 simulations of D? light emission for specific experiments. Both the simulated spatial distribution and absolute intensity of the D? light emission agree well with the experimental data obtained between ELMs in H-mode. __________________________________________________

  11. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    5 PPPL- 4865 Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation April, 2013 Bin Cao, D.P. Stotler, S.J. Zweben, M. Bell, A. Diallo and B. LeBlanc Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Report Disclaimers Full Legal Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors or their employees,

  12. Summary of Degas II performance at the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudeen, David K.; Lord, David L.

    2007-10-01

    Crude oil stored at the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) requires mitigation procedures to maintain oil vapor pressure within program delivery standards. Crude oil degasification is one effective method for lowering crude oil vapor pressure, and was implemented at the Big Hill SPR site from 2004-2006. Performance monitoring during and after degasification revealed a range of outcomes for caverns that had similar inventory and geometry. This report analyzed data from SPR degasification and developed a simple degas mixing (SDM) model to assist in the analysis. Cavern-scale oil mixing during degassing and existing oil heterogeneity in the caverns were identified as likely causes for the range of behaviors seen. Apparent cavern mixing patterns ranged from near complete mixing to near plug flow, with more mixing leading to less efficient degassing due to degassed oil re-entering the plant before 100% of the cavern oil volume was processed. The report suggests that the new cavern bubble point and vapor pressure regain rate after degassing be based on direct in-cavern measurements after degassing as opposed to using the plant outlet stream properties as a starting point, which understates starting bubble point and overstates vapor pressure regain. Several means to estimate the cavern bubble point after degas in the absence of direct measurement are presented and discussed.

  13. ARM - ARM Facility at EGU 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Media Contact Hanna Goss hanna-dot-goss-at-pnnl-dot-gov @armnewsteam Field Notes Blog Topics Field Notes107 AGU 3 AMIE 10 ARM Aerial Facility 2 ARM Mobile Facility 1 6 ARM Mobile Facility 2 47 ARM Mobile Facility 3 1 BAECC 1 BBOP 4 ENA 1 GOAMAZON 7 MAGIC 15 MC3E 17 PECAN 3 SGP 7 STORMVEX 29 TCAP 3 Search News Search Blog News Center All Categories What's this? Social Media Guidance News Center All Categories Features and Releases Facility News Field Notes Blog Events Employment Research

  14. ARM - ARM Facility at EGU 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Media Contact Hanna Goss hanna-dot-goss-at-pnnl-dot-gov @armnewsteam Field Notes Blog Topics Field Notes107 AGU 3 AMIE 10 ARM Aerial Facility 2 ARM Mobile Facility 1 6 ARM Mobile Facility 2 47 ARM Mobile Facility 3 1 BAECC 1 BBOP 4 ENA 1 GOAMAZON 7 MAGIC 15 MC3E 17 PECAN 3 SGP 7 STORMVEX 29 TCAP 3 Search News Search Blog News Center All Categories What's this? Social Media Guidance News Center All Categories Features and Releases Facility News Field Notes Blog Events Employment Research

  15. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Uinta-Piceance 180 254,329 7,181,669 1,451,274 Basin Uinta-Piceance Basin Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  16. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Uinta-Piceance 180 254,329 7,181,669 1,451,274 Basin Uinta-Piceance Basin Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  17. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Basin Outline Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Uinta-Piceance 180 254,329 7,181,669 1,451,274 Basin Uinta-Piceance Basin Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  18. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline ID The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural

  19. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline ID The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface

  20. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Basin Outline ID The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural

  1. CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    new partitioned global address space programming system developed by researchers in the DEGAS group at Berkeley Lab. Romanowicz hopes eventually to obtain higher resolution...

  2. Meraculous: Deciphering the 'Book of Life' With Supercomputers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Katherine Yelick Lead Institution: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Project Title: DEGAS: Dynamic Exascale Global Address Space NERSC Resources Used: Edison DOE Program...

  3. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  4. Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  5. Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1980. Based on D modeling, approximately 63% of shallow, post-1980 magma has yet to degas. Surprisingly, Cl and F contents in the 1994 samples were only 0.47 and 3.8%,...

  6. Next generation Programming Models-042114.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Types of Parallelism Memory Data Representation Acceler ator affinity Motivation DEGAS Extensions to Fortran(CAF 2.0), C (Habanero C and UPC) and Python Tasks and Asynch...

  7. CX-009509: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Power Monitoring, Communication and Control Upgrade at Bryan Mound Degas Plant (Install) CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 10/31/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  8. ARM - Events Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 1, 2012 [Events] EGU 2013 Call for Abstracts Bookmark and Share Abstracts for session proposals are currently being accepted for the 2013 European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly in Vienna, Austria, April 07-12. This meeting aims to bring together scientists from across the globe specializing in all disciplines of the Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences. EGU also provides a forum where young scientists can present their work and discuss their ideas with experts in these fields.

  9. May and June 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    May and June 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site August 2015 LMS/BLU/S00515 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-May and June 2015, Bluewater, New Mexico August 2015 RIN 15057015 and 15067154 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, Sample Location

  10. Microsoft Word - 08101897 DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico Disposal Site April 2009 LMS/BLU/S01108 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2008, Bluewater, New Mexico April 2009 RIN 08101897 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site Sample Location Map.......................................................3 Data Assessment

  11. Microsoft Word - 09102641_DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site January 2010 LMS/BLU/S01109 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2009, Bluewater, New Mexico January 2010 RIN 09102641 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site Sample Location Map.......................................................3 Data Assessment

  12. Microsoft Word - 11073944 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2011 LMS/BLU/S00711 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-July 2011, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2011 RIN 11073944 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site .....................................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  13. Microsoft Word - 11114181 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2012 LMS/BLU/S01111 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2011, Bluewater, New Mexico February 2012 RIN 11114181 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site .....................................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  14. Microsoft Word - 13015067 DVP.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site April 2013 LMS/BLU/S00113 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-January 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico April 2013 RIN 13015067 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site Sample Location Map.......................................................5 Data Assessment Summary

  15. Microsoft Word - 13055299_DVP.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/BLU/S00513 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-May 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico August 2013 RIN 13055299 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site Sample Location Map.......................................................5 Data Assessment Summary

  16. Microsoft Word - 14046116 14046117 DVP.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site September 2014 LMS/BLU/S00414 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-April 2014, Bluewater, New Mexico September 2014 RINs 14046116 and 14046117 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, Sample Location

  17. Microsoft Word - RIN 10113426 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2011 LMS/BLU/S01110 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2010, Bluewater, New Mexico February 2011 RIN 10113426 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ......................................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  18. Microsoft Word - RIN 12044518 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Water Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site July 2012 LMS/BLU/S00512 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-May 2012, Bluewater, New Mexico July 2012 RIN 12044518 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site .....................................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  19. Microsoft Word - RIN 12114945 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Water Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2013 LMS/BLU/S01112 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2012, Bluewater, New Mexico February 2013 RIN 12114945 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site ......................................................5 Data Assessment

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    October 2013 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2013 LMS/BLU/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August and October 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2013 RIN 13085537 and 13095651 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Private Wells Sampled August 2013 and October 2013, Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2014 LMS/BLU/S01113 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico February 2014 RIN 13115746 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site Sample Location Map.......................................................5 Data Assessment Summary

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2015 LMS/BLU/S01114 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2014, Bluewater, New Mexico February 2015 RIN 14116606 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map......................................................5 Data

  3. Feasibility report on alternative methods for cooling cavern oils at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, Bruce L.; Lord, David L.; Hadgu, Teklu

    2005-06-01

    Oil caverns at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) are subjected to geothermal heating from the surrounding domal salt. This process raises the temperature of the crude oil from around 75 F upon delivery to SPR to as high as 130 F after decades of storage. While this temperature regime is adequate for long-term storage, it poses challenges for offsite delivery, with warm oil evolving gases that pose handling and safety problems. SPR installed high-capacity oil coolers in the mid-1990's to mitigate the emissions problem by lowering the oil delivery temperature. These heat exchanger units use incoming raw water as the cooling fluid, and operate only during a drawdown event where incoming water displaces the outgoing oil. The design criteria for the heat exchangers are to deliver oil at 100 F or less under all drawdown conditions. Increasing crude oil vapor pressures due in part to methane intrusion in the caverns is threatening to produce sufficient emissions at or near 100 F to cause the cooled oil to violate delivery requirements. This impending problem has initiated discussion and analysis of alternative cooling methods to bring the oil temperature even lower than the original design basis of 100 F. For the study described in this report, two alternative cooling methods were explored: (1) cooling during a limited drawdown, and (2) cooling during a degas operation. Both methods employ the heat exchangers currently in place, and do not require extra equipment. An analysis was run using two heat transfer models, HEATEX, and CaveMan, both developed at Sandia National Laboratories. For cooling during a limited drawdown, the cooling water flowrate through the coolers was varied from 1:1 water:oil to about 3:1, with an increased cooling capacity of about 3-7 F for the test cavern Bryan Mound 108 depending upon seasonal temperature effects. For cooling in conjunction with a degas operation in the winter, cavern oil temperatures for the test cavern Big Hill 102 were cooled sufficiently that the cavern required about 9 years to return to the temperature prior to degas. Upon reviewing these results, the authors recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy that a broader study of the cooling during degas be pursued in order to examine the potential benefits of cooling on all caverns in the current degasification schedule.

  4. Simulation of Diffusive Lithium Evaporation Onto the NSTX Vessel Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stotler, D. P.; Skinner, C. H.; Blanchard, W. R.; Krstic, P. S.; Kugel, H. W.; Schneider, H.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2010-12-09

    A model for simulating the diffusive evaporation of lithium into a helium filled NSTX vacuum vessel is described and validated against an initial set of deposition experiments. The DEGAS 2 based model consists of a three-dimensional representation of the vacuum vessel, the elastic scattering process, and a kinetic description of the evaporated atoms. Additional assumptions are required to account for deuterium out-gassing during the validation experiments. The model agrees with the data over a range of pressures to within the estimated uncertainties. Suggestions are made for more discriminating experiments that will lead to an improved model.

  5. ARM - Events Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 5, 2012 [Events] EGU 2012 Call for Abstracts Bookmark and Share Abstracts are being accepted for Session BG2.8: Remote Sensing and Data Assimilation in the Biogeosciences, which will take place during the 2012 European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna, Austria, April 22-27. This session aims to bring together scientists developing remote sensing techniques, products, and models leading to strategies with a higher (bio-geophysical) impact on the stability and sustainability of

  6. ARM - Events Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 8, 2013 [Events, Facility News] ARM Facility Highlights at EGU General Assembly 2013 Bookmark and Share Where do scientists get their data? The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility provides continuous data from heavily instrumented fixed sites in the United States (Alaska and Oklahoma), the Tropical Pacific (Australia and Papua New Guinea), and soon in the Azores. These measurements are supplemented through mobile observation facilities and research aircraft at

  7. ARM - Events Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Session at European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2009 Bookmark and Share A new session, Remote Sensing of Clouds and Aerosols: Techniques and Applications (AS1.6), will be convened at the upcoming European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly in Vienna, Austria, April 19-24, 2009. While the existing session "Clouds, Aerosols, and Radiation" has been very successful in bringing together theory, observations, and modeling in a climatological context, the details of

  8. THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE): FOURTH DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M. E. K.; Piffl, T.; Enke, H.; Carrillo, I.; Boeche, C.; Roeser, S.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Zwitter, T.; Binney, J.; De Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bijaoui, A.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Freeman, K.; Munari, U.; Anguiano, B.; and others

    2013-11-01

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances, and distances determined for 425,561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). The stellar atmospheric parameters are computed using a new pipeline, based on the algorithms of MATISSE and DEGAS. The spectral degeneracies and the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometric information are now better taken into consideration, improving the parameter determination compared to the previous RAVE data releases. The individual abundances for six elements (magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, iron, and nickel) are also given, based on a special-purpose pipeline that is also improved compared to that available for the RAVE DR3 and Chemical DR1 data releases. Together with photometric information and proper motions, these data can be retrieved from the RAVE collaboration Web site and the Vizier database.

  9. Analysis of Neutral Transport in the GAMMA10 Anchor-Cell Using H{alpha}-Emission Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higashizono, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nakashima, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ohki, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Islam, M.K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Shoji, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Kobayashi, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University (Japan); Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kubota, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Murakami, R. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yamada, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-01-15

    The neutral transport was studied in the anchor cell. The H{alpha} line intensities were measured by using axially aligned H{alpha} detectors. It was found that the intensity is considerably dependent on ECRH and GP 3,4. A 5ch H{alpha} detector was newly installed in the outer-transition region of the anchor-cell. From the measurement of the spatial distributions, the vertical intensity profile is estimated to be about 2.5 cm on the half width half maximum, while the horizontal distribution shows roughly flat around Z=-670 cm. The above characteristics were discussed with aid of neutral transport simulation using DEGAS Monte-Carlo Code.

  10. Siphons for Geosiphon{trademark} Treatment Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, M.A.

    2001-07-26

    GeoSiphon{trademark} systems (patent pending) induce contaminated groundwater flow through permeable treatment media by utilizing a siphon between two points of hydraulic head difference. A siphon is a closed conduit that conveys liquid from a point of higher hydraulic head to one of lower head after raising it to a higher intermediate elevation, at sub-atmospheric conditions (negative gauge pressures or vacuum), without external power input. All surface waters and groundwaters contain dissolved gases, which degas within a siphon due to the vacuum and temperature within the siphon. Bubbles form, and if not properly managed will accumulate in the siphon, gradually reducing the flow rate until the system is ultimately shut down. Therefore appropriate management of gas within a siphon is the primary factor that must be considered to maintain continuous siphon flow. This report provides an overview of GeoSiphon technology and generic details concerning de-gassing in siphons and associated gas management methods.

  11. Predictions for the Higgs Mass from the Stability and Triviality Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solis R, H. Gabriel; Juarez W, S. Rebeca; Kielanowski, P.

    2006-09-25

    In the context of the Standard Model (SM), we use the one-loop and two-loop Renormalization Group Equations (RGE) in order to analyze the evolution of the Higgs quartic coupling {lambda}H in the interval [mt, EGU], where mt is the mass of the top quark and EGU = 1014GeV. The analytical solution for the one-loop differential equation (Riccati type) is obtained and analyzed and in the two-loop case we obtain a numerical solution which takes into account all the parameters (couplings) at the same order of approximation. In both cases, we restrict the possible initial values for {lambda}H by means of imposing the triviality and stability conditions which determine the range of energies where the SM is valid. We obtain the following bounds: 0.387 < {lambda}H < 0.623 for the one-loop case and 0.360 < {lambda}H < 0.628 for the two-loop case. These results determine the interval of the possible Higgs mass values: 151.9 < MH < 192.3 GeV, 143.8 < MH < 190.3 GeV for the one-loop and two-loop cases, respectively.

  12. Neutral Beam Injection Experiments and Related Behavior of Neutral Particles in the GAMMA 10 Tandem Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakashima, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Watanabe, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Higashizono, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ohki, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ogita, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Shoji, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science(Japan); Kobayashi, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University (Japan); Islam, M.K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kubota, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yamada, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Murakami, R. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-01-15

    Results of neutral beam injection (NBI) experiments in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasmas are presented together with the neutral particle behavior observed in the experiments. A hydrogen neural beam was injected into the hot-ion-mode plasmas by using the injector installed in the central-cell for the plasma heating and fueling. High-energy ions produced by NBI were observed and its energy distribution was measured for the first time with a neutral particle analyzer installed in the central-cell. The temporal and spatial behavior of hydrogen was observed with axially aligned H{sub {alpha}} detectors installed from the central midplane to anchor-cell. Enhancement of hydrogen recycling due to the beam injection and the cause of the observed decrease in plasma diamagnetism are discussed. The Monte-Carlo code DEGAS for neutral transport simulation was applied to the GAMMA 10 central-cell and a 3-dimensional simulation was performed in the NBI experiment. Localization of neutral particle during the beam injection is investigated based on the simulation and it was found that the increased recycling due to the beam injection was dominant near the injection port.

  13. Multi-wavelength photometry of the T Tauri binary V582 Mon (KH 15D): A new epoch of occultations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windemuth, Diana; Herbst, William

    2014-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength (VRIJHK) observations of KH 15D obtained in 2012/2013, as well as a master table of standard photometry spanning the years 1967 to 2013. The system is a close, eccentric T Tauri binary embedded in an inclined precessing circumbinary (CB) ring. The most recent data show the continued rise of star B with respect to the trailing edge of the occulting horizon as the system's maximum brightness steadily increases. The wealth of data in time and wavelength domains allows us to track the long-term CCD color evolution of KH 15D. We find that the V I behavior is consistent with direct and scattered light from the composite color of two stars with slightly different temperatures. There is no evidence for any reddening or bluing associated with extinction or scattering by interstellar-medium-size dust grains. Furthermore, we probe the system's faint phase behavior at near-infrared wavelengths in order to investigate extinction properties of the ring and signatures of a possible shepherding planet sometimes invoked to confine the CB ring at ?5 AU. The wavelength independence of eclipse depth at second contact is consistent with the ring material being fully opaque to 2.2 ?m. The color-magnitude diagrams demonstrate excess flux in J and H at low light levels, which may be due to the presence of a hot, young Jupiter-mass planet.

  14. High-density grids for efficient data collection from multiple crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O.; Bonagura, Christopher A.; Brehmer, Winnie; Brunger, Axel T.; Calero, Guillermo; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Degrado, William F.; Fraser, James S.; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Kern, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Larsson, Karl M.; Lemke, Heinrik T.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Manglik, Aashish; McPhillips, Scott E.; Norgren, Erik; Pang, Siew S.; Soltis, S. M.; Song, Jinhu; Thomaston, Jessica; Tsai, Yingssu; Weis, William I.; Woldeyes, Rahel A.; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Zouni, Athina; Cohen, Aina E.

    2016-01-01

    Higher throughput methods to mount and collect data from multiple small and radiation-sensitive crystals are important to support challenging structural investigations using microfocus synchrotron beamlines. Furthermore, efficient sample-delivery methods are essential to carry out productive femtosecond crystallography experiments at X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). To address these needs, a high-density sample grid useful as a scaffold for both crystal growth and diffraction data collection has been developed and utilized for efficient goniometer-based sample delivery at synchrotron and XFEL sources. A single grid contains 75 mounting ports and fits inside an SSRL cassette or uni-puck storage container. The use of grids with an SSRL cassette expands the cassette capacity up to 7200 samples. Grids may also be covered with a polymer film or sleeve for efficient room-temperature data collection from multiple samples. New automated routines have been incorporated into theBlu-Ice/DCSSexperimental control system to support grids, including semi-automated grid alignment, fully automated positioning of grid ports, rastering and automated data collection. Specialized tools have been developed to support crystallization experiments on grids, including a universal adaptor, which allows grids to be filled by commercial liquid-handling robots, as well as incubation chambers, which support vapor-diffusion and lipidic cubic phase crystallization experiments. Experiments in which crystals were loaded into grids or grown on grids using liquid-handling robots and incubation chambers are described. Crystals were screened at LCLS-XPP and SSRL BL12-2 at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.

  15. High-density grids for efficient data collection from multiple crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O.; Bonagura, Christopher A.; Brehmer, Winnie; Brunger, Axel T.; Calero, Guillermo; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Chatterjee, Ruchira; et al

    2015-11-03

    Higher throughput methods to mount and collect data from multiple small and radiation-sensitive crystals are important to support challenging structural investigations using microfocus synchrotron beamlines. Furthermore, efficient sample-delivery methods are essential to carry out productive femtosecond crystallography experiments at X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). To address these needs, a high-density sample grid useful as a scaffold for both crystal growth and diffraction data collection has been developed and utilized for efficient goniometer-based sample delivery at synchrotron and XFEL sources. A single grid contains 75 mounting ports and fits inside an SSRL cassettemore » or uni-puck storage container. The use of grids with an SSRL cassette expands the cassette capacity up to 7200 samples. Grids may also be covered with a polymer film or sleeve for efficient room-temperature data collection from multiple samples. New automated routines have been incorporated into theBlu-Ice/DCSSexperimental control system to support grids, including semi-automated grid alignment, fully automated positioning of grid ports, rastering and automated data collection. Specialized tools have been developed to support crystallization experiments on grids, including a universal adaptor, which allows grids to be filled by commercial liquid-handling robots, as well as incubation chambers, which support vapor-diffusion and lipidic cubic phase crystallization experiments. Experiments in which crystals were loaded into grids or grown on grids using liquid-handling robots and incubation chambers are described. As a result, crystals were screened at LCLS-XPP and SSRL BL12-2 at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.« less

  16. Observations on vapor pressure in SPR caverns : sources.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Darrell Eugene

    2010-05-01

    The oil of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) represents a national response to any potential emergency or intentional restriction of crude oil supply to this country, and conforms to International Agreements to maintain such a reserve. As assurance this reserve oil will be available in a timely manner should a restriction in supply occur, the oil of the reserve must meet certain transportation criteria. The transportation criteria require that the oil does not evolve dangerous gas, either explosive or toxic, while in the process of transport to, or storage at, the destination facility. This requirement can be a challenge because the stored oil can acquire dissolved gases while in the SPR. There have been a series of reports analyzing in exceptional detail the reasons for the increases, or regains, in gas content; however, there remains some uncertainty in these explanations and an inability to predict why the regains occur. Where the regains are prohibitive and exceed the criteria, the oil must undergo degasification, where excess portions of the volatile gas are removed. There are only two known sources of gas regain, one is the salt dome formation itself which may contain gas inclusions from which gas can be released during oil processing or storage, and the second is increases of the gases release by the volatile components of the crude oil itself during storage, especially if the stored oil undergoes heating or is subject to biological generation processes. In this work, the earlier analyses are reexamined and significant alterations in conclusions are proposed. The alterations are based on how the fluid exchanges of brine and oil uptake gas released from domal salt during solutioning, and thereafter, during further exchanges of fluids. Transparency of the brine/oil interface and the transfer of gas across this interface remains an important unanswered question. The contribution from creep induced damage releasing gas from the salt surrounding the cavern is considered through computations using the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, suggesting a relative minor, but potentially significant, contribution to the regain process. Apparently, gains in gas content can be generated from the oil itself during storage because the salt dome has been heated by the geothermal gradient of the earth. The heated domal salt transfers heat to the oil stored in the caverns and thereby increases the gas released by the volatile components and raises the boiling point pressure of the oil. The process is essentially a variation on the fractionation of oil, where each of the discrete components of the oil have a discrete temperature range over which that component can be volatized and removed from the remaining components. The most volatile components are methane and ethane, the shortest chain hydrocarbons. Since this fractionation is a fundamental aspect of oil behavior, the volatile component can be removed by degassing, potentially prohibiting the evolution of gas at or below the temperature of the degas process. While this process is well understood, the ability to describe the results of degassing and subsequent regain is not. Trends are not well defined for original gas content, regain, and prescribed effects of degassing. As a result, prediction of cavern response is difficult. As a consequence of this current analysis, it is suggested that solutioning brine of the final fluid exchange of a just completed cavern, immediately prior to the first oil filling, should be analyzed for gas content using existing analysis techniques. This would add important information and clarification to the regain process. It is also proposed that the quantity of volatile components, such as methane, be determined before and after any degasification operation.

  17. Continuous Emissions Monitoring System Monitoring Plan for the Y-12 Steam Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-28

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), managed by BWXT, is submitting this Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) Monitoring Plan in conformance with the requirements of Title 40 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 75. The state of Tennessee identified the Y-12 Steam Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as a non-electrical generation unit (EGU) nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) budget source as a result of the NO{sub x} State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-3-27. Following this introduction, the monitoring plan contains the following sections: CEMS details, NO{sub x} emissions, and quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC). The following information is included in the attachments: fuel and flue gas diagram, system layout, data flow diagrams, Electronic Monitoring Plan printouts, vendor information on coal and natural gas feed systems, and the Certification Test Protocol. The Y-12 Steam Plant consists of four Wickes boilers. Each is rated at a maximum heat input capacity of 296.8 MMBtu/hour or 250,000 lb/hour of 250-psig steam. Although pulverized coal is the principal fuel, each of the units can fire natural gas or a combination of coal and gas. Each unit is equipped with a Joy Manufacturing Company reverse air baghouse to control particulate emissions. Flue gases travel out of the baghouse, through an induced draft fan, then to one of two stacks. Boilers 1 and 2 exhaust through Stack 1. Boilers 3 and 4 exhaust through Stack 2. A dedicated CEMS will be installed in the ductwork of each boiler, downstream of the baghouse. The CEMS will be designed, built, installed, and started up by URS Group, Inc. (URS). Data acquisition and handling will be accomplished using a data acquisition and handling system (DAHS) designed, built, and programmed by Environmental Systems Corporation (ESC). The installed CEMS will continuously monitor NO{sub x}, flue gas flowrate, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The CEMS will be utilized to report emissions from each unit for each ozone season starting May 1, 2003. Each boiler has independent coal and natural gas metering systems. Coal is fed to each boiler by belt-type coal feeders. Each boiler has two dedicated coal feeders. Natural gas may be burned along with coal for flame stability. The boilers may also be fired on natural gas alone. Orifice meters measure the natural gas flow to each boiler.

  18. Willow firing in retrofitted Irish peat plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broek, R. van den; Faaij, A.; Kent, T.

    1995-11-01

    Interest in biomass electricity in Ireland is being re-awakened by environmental concerns about CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation and the potential of biomass production to provide an alternative agricultural enterprise. The technical and economical feasibility of wood-fuelled power production using willow from energy farming in existing peat-fired plants in Ireland is being studied within the framework of the EU JOULE II+ programme. These options are compared with new combustion plants and a biomass integrated gasifier with combined cycle (BIG/CC). Background studies supplied data for yields of willow farming, establishment of willow plantations, harvesting methods, logistics and costs and efficiencies for different retrofit options at Irish peat plants. All technologies considered are currently available or are expected to be available in the near future. Neither agricultural subsidies nor possible CO{sub 2} taxes have been included. In the least cost supply scenario storage and chipping of wood is done at the power station. In this case wood is only stored in the form of sticks and wood harvested by a chips harvester is supplied to the plant directly during the harvesting season. Fuel costs at the plant gate were estimated between 3.3 and 11 EGU/GJ{sub LHV}. This wide range resulted in a wide range of kWh costs. For the lowest cost option they ranged between 5.4 and 15 ECUcents/kWh. The cheapest proven retrofit option is the conversion of the existing milled peat Lanesborough unit 3 into a bubbling fluidized bed with kWh costs ranging from 5.6 up to 16 ECUcents/kWh. For this plant, costs per tonne of avoided CO{sub 2} emissions varied between 1 and 70 ECU. It is noteworthy that the kWh costs for all options considered were very close. Especially in the high costs scenario a BIG/CC appeared to have lower kWh cost than all biomass combustion plants. Mainly for the retrofitted plants the fuel costs were by far the largest kWh cost component.

  19. Driving Down HB-LED Costs: Implementation of Process Simulation Tools and Temperature Control Methods of High Yield MOCVD Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Quinn

    2012-04-30

    The overall objective of this multi-faceted program is to develop epitaxial growth systems that meet a goal of 75% (4X) cost reduction in the epitaxy phase of HB-LED manufacture. A 75% reduction in yielded epitaxy cost is necessary in order to achieve the cost goals for widespread penetration of HB-LED’s into back-lighting units (BLU) for LCD panels and ultimately for solid-state lighting (SSL). To do this, the program will address significant improvements in overall equipment Cost of Ownership, or CoO. CoO is a model that includes all costs associated with the epitaxy portion of production. These aspects include cost of yield, capital cost, operational costs, and maintenance costs. We divide the program into three phases where later phases will incorporate the gains of prior phases. Phase one activities are enabling technologies. In collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories we develop a Fluent-compatible chemistry predictive model and a set of mid-infrared and near-ultraviolet pyrometer monitoring tools. Where previously the modeling of the reactor dynamics were studied within FLUENT alone, here, FLUENT and Chemkin are integrated into a comprehensive model of fluid dynamics and the most advanced transport equations developed for Chemkin. Specifically, the Chemkin model offered the key reaction terms for gas-phase nucleation, a key consideration in the optimization of the MOCVD process. This new predictive model is used to design new MOCVD reactors with optimized growth conditions and the newly developed pyrometers are used monitor and control the MOCVD process temperature to within 0.5°C run-to-run and within each wafer. This portion of the grant is in collaboration with partners at Sandia National Laboratories. Phase two activities are continuous improvement projects which extend the current reactor platform along the lines of improved operational efficiency, improved systems control for throughput, and carrier modifications for increased yield. Programmatically, improvements made in Phase I are applied to developments of Phase II when applicable. Phase three is the culmination of the individual tasks from both phases one and two applied to proposed production platforms. We selectively combine previously demonstrated tasks and other options to develop a high-volume production-worthy MOCVD system demonstrating >3x throughput, 1.3x capital efficiency, and 0.7x cost of ownership. In a parallel demonstration we validate the concept of an improved, larger deposition system which utilizes the predictive modeling of chemistry-based flow analysis and extensions of the improvements demonstrated on the current platforms. This validation includes the build and testing of a prototype version of the hardware and demonstration of 69% reduction in the cost of ownership. Also, in this phase we present a stand-alone project to develop a high-temperature system which improves source efficiency by 30% while concurrently increasing growth rate by 1.3x. The material quality is held to the same material quality specifications of our existing baseline processes. The merits of other line item tasks in phase three are discussed for inclusion on next-generation platforms.