Sample records for degas blu egu

  1. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 Federal RegisterImplementation3DPhotostat PriceO K

  2. Systematic characterization of degas-driven flow for poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Luke P.; Liang, David Y.; Tentori, Augusto M.; Dimov, Ivan K.

    2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Degas-driven flow is a novel phenomenon used to propel fluids in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices without requiring any external power. This method takes advantage of the inherently high porosity and air solubility of PDMS by removing air molecules from the bulk PDMS before initiating the flow. The dynamics of degas-driven flow are dependent on the channel and device geometries and are highly sensitive to temporal parameters. These dependencies have not been fully characterized, hindering broad use of degas-driven flow as a microfluidic pumping mechanism. Here, we characterize, for the first time, the effect of various parameters on the dynamics ofmore »degas-driven flow, including channel geometry, PDMS thickness, PDMS exposure area, vacuum degassing time, and idle time at atmospheric pressure before loading. We investigate the effect of these parameters on flow velocity as well as channel fill time for the degas-driven flow process. Using our devices, we achieved reproducible flow with a standard deviation of less than 8% for flow velocity, as well as maximum flow rates of up to 3 nL/s and mean flow rates of approximately 1-1.5 nL/s. Parameters such as channel surface area and PDMS chip exposure area were found to have negligible impact on degas-driven flow dynamics, whereas channel cross-sectional area, degas time, PDMS thickness, and idle time were found to have a larger impact. In addition, we develop a physical model that can predict mean flow velocities within 6% of experimental values and can be used as a tool for future design of PDMS-based microfluidic devices that utilize degas-driven flow.« less

  3. Systematic characterization of degas-driven flow for poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Luke P.; Liang, David Y.; Tentori, Augusto M.; Dimov, Ivan K. [Universidad de Valparaiso (Chile)

    2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Degas-driven flow is a novel phenomenon used to propel fluids in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices without requiring any external power. This method takes advantage of the inherently high porosity and air solubility of PDMS by removing air molecules from the bulk PDMS before initiating the flow. The dynamics of degas-driven flow are dependent on the channel and device geometries and are highly sensitive to temporal parameters. These dependencies have not been fully characterized, hindering broad use of degas-driven flow as a microfluidic pumping mechanism. Here, we characterize, for the first time, the effect of various parameters on the dynamics of degas-driven flow, including channel geometry, PDMS thickness, PDMS exposure area, vacuum degassing time, and idle time at atmospheric pressure before loading. We investigate the effect of these parameters on flow velocity as well as channel fill time for the degas-driven flow process. Using our devices, we achieved reproducible flow with a standard deviation of less than 8% for flow velocity, as well as maximum flow rates of up to 3 nL/s and mean flow rates of approximately 1-1.5 nL/s. Parameters such as channel surface area and PDMS chip exposure area were found to have negligible impact on degas-driven flow dynamics, whereas channel cross-sectional area, degas time, PDMS thickness, and idle time were found to have a larger impact. In addition, we develop a physical model that can predict mean flow velocities within 6% of experimental values and can be used as a tool for future design of PDMS-based microfluidic devices that utilize degas-driven flow.

  4. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, B.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Leblanc, B.

    2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas-Puff-Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge D? light emission from a neutral D2 gas puff nears the outer mid-plane of NSTX. DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and atomic physics in tokamak plasmas. In this paper we compare measurements of the D? light emission obtained by GPI on NSTX with DEGAS 2 simulations of D? light emission for specific experiments. Both the simulated spatial distribution and absolute intensity of the D? light emission agree well with the experimental data obtained between ELMs in H-mode. __________________________________________________

  5. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, B.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Leblanc, B.

    2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas-Puff-Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge D? light emission from a neutral D2 gas puff nears the outer mid-plane of NSTX. DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and atomic physics in tokamak plasmas. In this paper we compare measurements of the D? light emission obtained by GPI on NSTX with DEGAS 2 simulations of D? light emission for specific experiments. Both the simulated spatial distribution and absolute intensity of the D? light emission agree well with the experimental data obtained between ELMs in H-mode.

  6. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-233, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-233, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author with the best available petrophysical and geophysical information at the time of development. Engineering fluid

  7. DEGAS 2 Daren Stotler and Charles Karney | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUM SULFATE: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE W.DEGAS 2

  8. Summary of Degas II performance at the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudeen, David K. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Lord, David L.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oil stored at the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) requires mitigation procedures to maintain oil vapor pressure within program delivery standards. Crude oil degasification is one effective method for lowering crude oil vapor pressure, and was implemented at the Big Hill SPR site from 2004-2006. Performance monitoring during and after degasification revealed a range of outcomes for caverns that had similar inventory and geometry. This report analyzed data from SPR degasification and developed a simple degas mixing (SDM) model to assist in the analysis. Cavern-scale oil mixing during degassing and existing oil heterogeneity in the caverns were identified as likely causes for the range of behaviors seen. Apparent cavern mixing patterns ranged from near complete mixing to near plug flow, with more mixing leading to less efficient degassing due to degassed oil re-entering the plant before 100% of the cavern oil volume was processed. The report suggests that the new cavern bubble point and vapor pressure regain rate after degassing be based on direct in-cavern measurements after degassing as opposed to using the plant outlet stream properties as a starting point, which understates starting bubble point and overstates vapor pressure regain. Several means to estimate the cavern bubble point after degas in the absence of direct measurement are presented and discussed.

  9. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-8384, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-8384, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author are known to be highly dependent on local site characteristics. Therefore combining geophysical meth- ods. In order to calibrate geophysical measurements, obser- vations of 130 boreholes (4 meters deep) were made

  10. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4993, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4993, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author(s) 2010 Geophysical observations at cavity collapse Philippe Jousset, Behrooz Bazargan-Sabet, François relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals

  11. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4885, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4885, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author(s) 2010 The DIGISOIL multi-sensor system: from geophysical measurements to soil properties. Gilles geophysical technologies for answering this societal demand. To this aim, DIGISOIL addresses four issues

  12. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 10, EGU2008-A-06011, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulich, Thomas

    -06011 EGU General Assembly 2008 © Author(s) 2008 Reconstructing the Aa index to 1400 AD. Mark A. Clilverd (1), Ellen Clark (2), Martin J Jarvis (1), Thomas Ulich(3) (1) Physical Sciences Division, British

  13. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4777-1, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4777-1, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author" River and the damage caused can create routes for floods. Geophysical methods such as Multi

  14. Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting 799 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) © EGU Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models

  15. Andy Bullock and Mike Acreman Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 358389 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Andy Bullock and Mike Acreman 358 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 358389 (2003) © EGU The role of wetlands in the hydrological cycle Andy Bullock1 and Mike Acreman2 1 Independent Consultant, Ledbury, Herefordshire, HR8 2DX, UK 2 Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxon. OX10 8BB, UK

  16. Bettina Ott and Stefan Uhlenbrook Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(1), 6278 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bettina Ott and Stefan Uhlenbrook 62 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(1), 6278 (2004) © EGU, Wasserwirtschaftsamt Bamberg, Kasernstra�e 4, 96047 Bamberg, Germany 2 University of Freiburg, Institute of Hydrology, Fahnenbergplatz, D-79098 Freiburg, Germany E-mail for corresponding author: stefan.uhlenbro@hydrology

  17. Mira Kobold and Kay Suelj Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 322332 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mira Kobold and Kay Suelj 322 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 322332 (2005) © EGU Precipitation forecasts and their uncertainty as input into hydrological models Mira Kobold and Kay Suelj the weather forecasts with the information on catchment conditions and a hydrological forecasting model can

  18. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 6, 01855, 2004 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU04-A-01855

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 6, 01855, 2004 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU04-A-01855 c European (benoit@dstu.univ-montp2.fr), (2) Department of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A&M University, College

  19. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 9, 11521, 2007 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-11521

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 9, 11521, 2007 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-11521, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada, (3) Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Calgary

  20. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 05723, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-05723

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 05723, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-05723 © European) Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, UCSD, la Jolla, USA, (3) Dpt of Geology and Geophysics, Univ. of Wyoming

  1. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 06396, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-06396

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 06396, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-06396 © European) Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada This study investigates

  2. Riparian forestry management and adult stream insects Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 545549 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Riparian forestry management and adult stream insects 545 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 545549 (2004) © EGU Riparian forestry management and adult stream insects Robert A. Briers and John H The impacts of coniferous plantation forestry on the biology of upland streams in the UK are firmly

  3. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 3148, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/31/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 31­48, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/31/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-31 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Transport International Centre for Hydrology "Dino Tonini" and Dipartimento IMAGE, Universit`a di Padova, via Loredan 20

  4. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 111126, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/111/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 111­126, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/111/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-111 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Constraints of artificial neural networks for rainfall-runoff modelling: trade-offs in hydrological state representation

  5. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 1929, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/19/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 19­29, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/19/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-19 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Transport. Marani International Centre for Hydrology "Dino Tonini" and Dipartimento IMAGE, Universit`a di Padova

  6. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 127137, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/127/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 127­137, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/127/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-127 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Centre, Maun, Botswana Received: 11 August 2005 ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences

  7. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 314, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/3/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 3­14, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/3/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-3 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Bringing it all, Dublin, Ireland Received: 6 December 2004 ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions

  8. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 139155, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/139/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 139­155, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/139/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-139 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Using stable isotope tracers to assess hydrological flow paths, residence times and landscape influences in a nested

  9. DanielViviroli and RolfWeingartner Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 10161029 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DanielViviroli and RolfWeingartner 1016 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 10161029 (2004) © EGU The hydrological significance of mountains: from regional to global scale Daniel Viviroli and Rolf share of the worlds population with fresh water. Quantification of the hydrological significance

  10. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 95109, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/95/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 95­109, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/95/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-95 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences A conceptual glacio-hydrological model for high mountainous catchments B. Schaefli, B. Hingray, M. Niggli, and A. Musy

  11. Atul H. Haria and Paul Shand Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 334344 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Atul H. Haria and Paul Shand 334 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 334344 (2004) © EGU and stream flow generation Atul H. Haria1 and Paul Shand2 1 Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean, groundwater, Hafren, hillslope hydrology, Plynlimon, recharge, soil water, streamflow generation Introduction

  12. Soon Thiam Khu and Micha G.F.Werner Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 680692 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Soon Thiam Khu and Micha G.F.Werner 680 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 680692 (2003) © EGU Reduction of Monte-Carlo simulation runs for uncertainty estimation in hydrological modelling Soon applied for the estimation of uncertainties in hydrological models due to uncertain parameters. One

  13. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 7991, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/79/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 79­91, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/79/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-79 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Scale, USA Received: 1 August 2005 ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions: 30 August

  14. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 9, 06422, 2007 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-06422

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BrĂĽckl, Ewald

    Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 9, 06422, 2007 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-06422 © European Geosciences Union 2007 Deep Alpine Valleys - examples of geophysical explorations in Austria E. Brückl (1), J. Brückl (2), W. Chwatal (1), Ch. Ullrich (1,3) (1) Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics

  15. Operational hydro-meteorological warning and real-time flood forecasting:the Piemonte region case study Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 457466 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Operational hydro-meteorological warning and real-time flood forecasting:the Piemonte region case study 457 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 457466 (2005) © EGU Operational hydro forecasting system in the context of the Piemonte Regions hydro-meteorological operational alert procedure

  16. Sustainability of UK forestry: contemporary issues for the protection of freshwaters, a conclusion Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 589595 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Sustainability of UK forestry: contemporary issues for the protection of freshwaters, a conclusion 589 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 589595 (2004) © EGU Sustainability of UK forestry entitled Sustainability of UK forestry: contemporary issues for the protection of freshwaters by presenting

  17. H.Bach,M.Braun,G.Lampart andW.Mauser Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 862876 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    H.Bach,M.Braun,G.Lampart andW.Mauser 862 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 862876 (2003) © EGU Use of remote sensing for hydrological parameterisation of Alpine catchments H. Bach1 , M. Braun2, which makes the hydrological parameterisation of Alpine catchments difficult. Within a few kilometres

  18. The relation of physical attributes of the Plynlimon catchments to variations in hydrology and water status Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 345354 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The relation of physical attributes of the Plynlimon catchments to variations in hydrology and water status 345 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 345354 (2004) © EGU Anatomy of a catchment: the relation of physical attributes of the Plynlimon catchments to variations in hydrology and water status C

  19. Scale effects on the hydrological impact of upland afforestation and drainage using indices of flow variability Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 325338 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Scale effects on the hydrological impact of upland afforestation and drainage using indices of flow variability 325 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 325338 (2003) © EGU Scale effects on the hydrological impact of upland afforestation and drainage using indices of flow variability: the River Irthing

  20. Simulation of soil moisture and evapotranspiration in a soil profile during the 1999 MAP-Riviera Campaign Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 903919 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Riviera Campaign 903 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 903919 (2003) © EGU Simulation of soil moisture and evapotranspiration scheme in hydrological models. This study presents the validation of soil moisture soil plot at the edge of a corn field. The hydrological model PREVAH was driven using three

  1. Modelling water flow and seasonal soil moisture dynamics in an alluvial groundwater-fed wetland Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 5766 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 57­66 (2003) © EGU Modelling water flow and seasonal soil between groundwater, surface water and climatic conditions. Knowledge of the hydrology of these systems tool to capture their hydrological complexity. In this study, a 2D-model describing saturated

  2. The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and the river network downstream Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 339357 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and the river network downstream 339 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 339357 (2003) © EGU The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and Southern Africa. Owing to their importance in local agriculture and as a water resource, the hydrology

  3. Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in-field habitats: a case study from the Pevensey Levels, UK Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 4355 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 43­55 (2003) © EGU Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in and Hydrology, Wallingford, OX10 8BB, UK Email for corresponding author: rbb@ceh.ac.uk Abstract Historical drainage improvements have created complex hydrological regimes in many low-lying, wet coastal grassland

  4. Recession-based hydrological models for estimating low flows in ungauged catchments in the Himalayas Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 891902 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Recession-based hydrological models for estimating low flows in ungauged catchments in the Himalayas 891 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 891902 (2004) © EGU Recession-based hydrological.R. Young1 and S.R. Kansakar2 1 Centre for Ecology and Hydrology,Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 8BB, UK 2

  5. Future recovery of acidified lakes in southern Norway predicted by the MAGIC model Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(4), 467483 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Future recovery of acidified lakes in southern Norway predicted by the MAGIC model 467 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(4), 467483 (2003) © EGU Future recovery of acidified lakes in southern Norway.O. Box 173 Kjelsås, N-0411 Oslo, Norway 2 Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia

  6. Over-parameterisation,a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 693706 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over-parameterisation,a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? 693 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 693706 (2003) © EGU Over-parameterisation, a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? Eric Gaume and Raphael Gosset Ecole Nationale des

  7. Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial neural networks Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 313321 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial neural networks 313 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 313321 (2005) © EGU Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial Artificial neural networks (ANNs) provide a quick and flexible means of developing flood flow simulation

  8. The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales 503 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) © EGU The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water Email for corresponding author: cn@ceh.ac.uk Abstract Results for long term water quality monitoring

  9. An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine water balance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 2332 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of peat soils 23 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 23­32 (2003) © EGU An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine water balance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils.Schwaerzel@TU-Berlin.de Abstract A simple method for the installation of groundwater lysimeters in peat soils was developed which

  10. Analysis of the spatial variation in the parameters of the SWAT model with application in Flanders,Northern Belgium Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 931939 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ,Northern Belgium 931 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 931939 (2004) © EGU Analysis of the spatial.heuvelmans@agr.kuleuven.ac.be Abstract Operational applications of a hydrological model often require the prediction of stream flow of a large river basin. Keywords: hydrological model, regionalisation, parameterisation, spatial variability

  11. Integration of spatial datasets to suppor t the review of hydrometric networks and the identification of representative catchments Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11031117 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and the identification of representative catchments 1103 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11031117 (2004) © EGU of representative catchments C.L.R. Laize Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK E into account the reduction in hydrological uncertainty brought about by the data added since the last network

  12. Modelling floods in theAmmer catchment:limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 833847 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modelling floods in theAmmer catchment:limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach 833 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 833847 (2003) © EGU Modelling floods in the Ammer catchment: limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach R. Ludwig1

  13. Uncertainty of solute flux estimation in ungauged small streams:potential implications for input-output nutrient mass balances Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(6), 675684 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -output nutrient mass balances 675 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(6), 675684 (2005) © EGU Uncertainty of stream nutrient retention/release under a wide spectrum of hydrological conditions. Providing good estimates of the mass balances for nutrients depends on precise hydrological monitoring and good chemical

  14. C.J.M.Hewett, P.F.Quinn, P.G.Whitehead,A.L.Heathwaite and N.J. Flynn Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(4), 834845 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to nutrients transported in surface and subsurface flowpaths from farmland is an international environmental of land use and management, topography, hydrology, soil type and climate. However, recent work has Sciences, 8(4), 834845 (2004) © EGU Towards a nutrient export risk matrix approach to managing agricultural

  15. DEGAS 2 Neutral Transport Modeling of High Density, Low Temperature Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the resulting fluid neutral momentum balance in a slab geometry is d dx ł mnv 2 + nT ´ = # T n dT dx - m# cx nv.24, and the charge exchange frequency, # cx = 2.93# cx n(T/m) 1/2 . With a neutral source on one end of the slab (x density # # n(x)/n(L), d# dx = - 2 4 (1-# T ) T (L) dT (x) dx # + ##cx [T (L)/m] 1/2 T (x) T (L) - # 2 # 2

  16. Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL DEGAS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4. U.S. refi nerRefi nerU.S.11386045045COAL

  17. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov1CompactComparisonSciTech

  18. Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 Clean Energy Technologies5 PPPL- 4865

  19. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

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  20. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil ElectricityUsing EIA'sAa AA In3BOE

  3. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil ElectricityUsing EIA'sAa AA

  4. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil ElectricityUsing EIA'sAa AALiquids

  5. ARM - ARM Facility at EGU 2012

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  6. ARM - ARM Facility at EGU 2014

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  7. simple to use, while being compatible with existing popular MBone tools. Degas is also scalable in the number of gate-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    ] M. Yarvis, A. A. Wang, A. Rudenko, P. Reiher, , and G. J. Popek. Conductor: Distributed adaptation

  8. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 11, EGU2009-0, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulich, Thomas

    exception of a year at the end of WWII, the record of geomagnetic field variations is continuous. Since the IGY in 1957, many other routine measurements have been added to the observatory's operations and today outline the current EU Framework VII "Access to Research Infrastructures" project of SGO "LAPBIAT2." #12;

  9. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 10, EGU2008-A-10385, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    of flood events especially extreme events needs robust tools. End users and decision makers need some reliable is the forecast and its model in this case: risk of not forecasting the flood event, risk of false and parametrisation. The lat- ter can be derived from a sensitivity analysis of the rainfall runoff model. Stochastic

  10. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 10, EGU2008-A-10266, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BrĂĽckl, Ewald

    experience of observing possible effects of global change and its consequences (e.g. ecology, tourism) onto an accustomed environment will help to develop a sensibility towards a more sustainable perception of nature

  11. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 16, EGU2014-13962, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Klaus

    , Christian Haberland, Klaus Bauer, and Michael Weber GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, 2.2, Potsdam, Germany (ben

  12. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 16, EGU2014-3492, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Klaus

    Trumbull (2), Michael Schnabel (1), Ingo Heyde (1), Bernd Schreckenberger (1), Hannes Koopmann (1), Klaus Bauer (2), Wilfried Jokat (3), and Charlotte Krawczyk (4) (1) BGR , Hannover, Germany (katharina

  13. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 16, EGU2014-3676, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Klaus

    /Vogtland (German-Czech border region) Sima Mousavi (1), Klaus Bauer (2), and Michael Korn (1) (1) Leipzig

  14. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 13, EGU2011-9446, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brückl, Ewald

    horizontally. The lateral spreading suggests that the cold material has not penetrated the phase change at 660 to ordinary transition zone and has not yet undergone the phase change which would allow the 660 km boundary. This phase of extension followed a period of convergence driven by the collision of Adria and Europe

  15. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 13, EGU2011-14018, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    anthropogenic pressures: agricultural inputs upstream (mainly nitrate and chloride) and urban wastewater to natural inputs (related to water-rock interac- tion) and anthropogenic inputs (agricultural and urban

  16. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-234, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    of the formations) increases, the number of cells representing the model approaches several millions be developed regularly (as new versions of the full field model become available) off-line and can be put

  17. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 10, EGU2008-A-01841, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and a major part of existing offshore wind farms is located here. Each wind farm project has its own, Denmark (charlotte.hasager@risoe.dk) The Scandinavian Seas have high potential for wind farming meteorological measurement campaign for the local area, yet for a broader view of the offshore wind resources

  18. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-PREVIEW, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (s) 2010 Overview of seismic imagery techniques applied to landslides characterization. Gilles Grandjean, geophysical methods based on seismic surveying appear to be well-adapted to investigate the morpho and non-intrusive measurements of acoustic (Vp) or shear (Vs) wave velocity, two important physical

  19. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-2628, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (s) 2010 OASIS4: a coupling software for next generation earth system modelling René Redler (1), Sophie

  20. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 11, EGU2009-8032, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (s) 2009 OASIS4: An Efficient Parallel Code Coupler for Earth System Modelling L. Coquart (1), S. Valcke (1 of Earth system modelling in its full complexity. The development and maintenance of OASIS4 has been

  1. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 14, EGU2012-2444, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenburg, Axel

    in nonlinear dynamical systems (He & Chian, PRL 91, 034102, 2003; Rempel & Chian, PRL 98, 014101, 2007; Chian et al., PRL 104, 254102, 2010). The transition to an intermittent mean-field dynamo is studied using

  2. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-5280, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    hydrologists and water managers in charge of flood warning and scenario-based reservoir operation. An overview-hydrological modelling chains for forecasting and integrated flood risk assessment is an essential step to improve

  3. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 10, EGU2008-A-10654, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belousov, Alexander

    "toreva blocks". Well-known examples are torevas of Socompa (Chile) and Jocotit- lan (Mexico) volcanoes of a traveling debris avalanche some kind of natural lubricant is forming #12;(possibly in the form of dust cloud of strongly agitated particles). Being drugged under the traveling avalanche the lubricant reduces basal

  4. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 13, EGU2011-3504, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is a response to the temperature increase of ocean (steric effect) and to the melting of ice caps, (2) Internal. New Caledonia is an old shield largely faulted with long term alteration, affected by differential

  5. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-12118, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    will be influenced during the 21st century both by climate and related or anthro- pogenic land use changes. Many be particularly vulnerable to such global changes because of contrasted climate, low vegetation cover and specific within the Mediterranean basin. Specific drivers of soil erosion affected by the global change were

  6. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-11992, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    km. This method provides maps of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) which are the only reveal a wide K-depleted area which is absolutely unexpected from the existing geological maps. Careful to the weathering, erosion and transport of specific source rock materials. In this context, K-depleted alluviums

  7. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 13, EGU2011-PREVIEW, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belousov, Alexander

    collapsed and formed a powerful pyroclastic density current (PDC). This PDC completely devastated an area that the PDC was strongly channelized even by small (tens meters) topographic features; the front of the moving PDC was frequently split into multiple small tongues which were variously deflected by topography

  8. Sonochemistry of Organometallic Compounds Kenneth S. Suslick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    , disinfection, refining, cleaning, extraction, flotation of minerals and the degas- sing of liquids (5

  9. UTILITIES -STOKER BOILER REPLACEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    HUGHESAVE COUNTRY CL UBBLVD GRAEBER ST BIG BLU ESTEMCOURT LI TTLE BLUESTEM COURT CO LLEGE MAPLE, WILLOW

  10. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 16, EGU2014-14313-1, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forray, Ferenc

    (s) 2014. CC Attribution 3.0 License. Paleoclimate record from Zidita Cave (Romania) using guano-derived 13,3) (1) Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, (2) School of Geosciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, USA, (3) "Emil Racovi¸ta" Institute of Speleology, Cluj-Napoca, Romania In this study, we

  11. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 14, EGU2012-8040-2, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poslad, Stefan

    (s) 2012 A Distributed Architecture for Tsunami Early Warning and Collaborative Decision-support in Crises Warning System (TEWS) are manifold and the success of a system depends crucially on the system's architecture. A modern warning system following a system-of-systems approach has to integrate various

  12. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-8679-1, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and Aragon regions, western part of Greece and Balkan region as threatened areas while PESERA models

  13. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 16, EGU2014-14885-1, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Klaus

    for geothermal exploration in the Polish Basin using self-organizing maps Klaus Bauer (1), Marcin Pussak (1), Manfred Stiller (1), and Wieslaw Bujakowski (2) (1) GFZ Potsdam, 2.2, Potsdam, Germany (klaus

  14. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 13, EGU2011-9360-4, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tech and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), aiming at estimating surface downwelling solar irradiance (SSI of cloudless shortwave solar spectra incident on horizontal, tilted, or tracking surfaces, Solar energy, vol irradiance database for worldwide solar heat gain and building cooling load calculations. Solar Energy, vol

  15. Franois Anctil and Nicolas Lauzon Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 940958 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    François Anctil and Nicolas Lauzon 940 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 940958 (2004.lauzon@golder.com Abstract Since the 1990s, neural networks have been applied to many studies in hydrology and water and stacking having been applied regularly in hydrology and water resources for some years, while Bayesian

  16. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 14, EGU2012-6641-1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Z, Leipzig, DE, (4) Technical Services Center, US Bureau of Reclamation, Lakewood, CO, USA, (5) CEE Dept formulations that seek to combine surface and subsurface flow. Many of these models are coupled to land

  17. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 13, EGU2011-702-1, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , modelling, allocation strategies Carbon sequestration is an increasingly important consideration for forest gradient and an identified potential for carbon sequestration and other ecosystem services, longleaf pine(s) 2011 Carbon-Water Interactions of Longleaf Pine Ecosystems Jennifer Wright (1), Mathew Williams (1

  18. Baldassare Bacchi and Roberto Ranzi Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 785798 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -SOP conducted in autumn 1999 for the Mesoscale Alpine Programme MAP. The investigations were based on both field to investigate and test in an operational context the potential of both mesoscale meteorological and distributed

  19. This is the user's manual for DEGAS 2 -A Monte Carlo code for the study of neutral atom and molecular transport in confined plasmas. It is intended to cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    . Institute for Plasma Research, India November 16, 2001 2 #12;1This file is written in TEX. A hyper

  20. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 6, 05515, 2004 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU04-A-05515

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Pick (1) (1) LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, Meudon, 92195, France (monique.pick@obspm.fr) Radio. Interplanetary shocks, together with Earth-directed Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), represent one of the major

  1. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 9, 11330, 2007 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-11330

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolch, Tobias

    Shan as water towers under climate change conditions. In: Proceedings of the Workshop "Assessment.P., Titkov, S.N. 1989. Kamennye Gletchery Gor Srednej Azii (= Rock- glaciers of the Central Asian Mountains

  2. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 05998, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-05998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BrĂĽckl, Ewald

    .g. joints, shear faults, b-axes) to N-S striking joint direction. Conjugated joint systems combined with E was estimated. A rotational slider block model was adapted to this data and a state dependent friction law

  3. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 6, 07131, 2004 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU04-A-07131

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plane arrays of two 405 GHz and four 212 GHz radiometers operating simultaneously with high time amplitudes and repetition rates increase with bulk emission intensities at higher energy ranges (X- and gamma. It is likely that this emission component is due to a non-thermal mechanism, producing energies considerably

  4. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 7, 09200, 2005 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU05-A-09200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolch, Tobias

    Geosciences Union 2005 Glacier Retreat and Climate Change in Northern Tien Shan (Kazakhstan/Kyrgyzstan and Kyrgyzstan. The mountain ranges rise up in the north from the Kazkh Steppe at an altitude of about 800 m asl

  5. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 03262, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-03262

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calov, Reinhard

    the pressure melting point, so that very rapid basal sliding on a lubricating sediment layer develops. Besides with atmospheric boundary conditions representative for a glacial climate is employed, and rapid sediment sliding sliding will be discussed. #12;

  6. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 173183, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/173/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - fortunately, useful in-situ observations are rarely available as area representative measurements and scatterometers is of- ten considered to impede hydrological applications. Nev- ertheless, even if most hydrologic moisture products are compared to measured runoff of the Zambezi River in south-eastern Africa for several

  7. WaterdynamicsinalaurelmontanecloudforestintheGarajonayNationalPark(CanaryIslands,Spain) Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 10651075 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Aschan2 1 University of La Laguna, Department of Geography, Ctra. Tacoronte-Tejina 233,1ş, 38350 Tenerife Islands, Cape Green and Madeira) between 800 and 1300 m a.s.l., where stratocumulus clouds transported

  8. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 9, 04164, 2007 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-04164

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brückl, Ewald

    ), Ölgrube, and Kaiserberg (Ötztal Alps) rock glaciers. The source areas of these rock glaciers are situated Alpine rock glaciers H. Hausmann (1), K. Krainer (2), E. Brückl (1), W. Mostler (2), C. Ullrich (1,3) (1 and evolution of rock glaciers. Observations in either boreholes or com- binations of surface

  9. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 04718, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-04718

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brückl, Ewald

    Alps), Ölgrube, and Kaiserberg (Ötztal Alps) rock glaciers. The source areas of these rock glaciers Geosciences Union 2006 Dynamics of Alpine rock glaciers in the context of global warming H. Hausmann (1), K of Innsbruck, Austria Several Alpine rock glaciers exhibit increasing creep velocities since about 1990

  10. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 7, 07312, 2005 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU05-A-07312

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    System Model (ESM). This system is a collaborative effort to create a standard ice sheet model that can model. It is used for the land-ice component of the GENIE project which aims to develop a unified Earth

  11. Gabriel Arduino,Paolo Reggiani and EzioTodini Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 280284 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    multi-model ensembles of Global Circulation Model output for reference baseline and typical enhanced CO2 realisations capture the stochastic properties of the forecast precipitation and temperature fields increase in the frequency of high floods in the 20th century for basins greater than 2 × 105 km2

  12. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 9, 09375, 2007 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-09375

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -term geological CO2 storage in saline aquifers M. A. Sbai (1) (1) BRGM, Water Division, Orléans, France (a.sbai@brgm.fr / Fax: +33 2-38643446) Accurate numerical modelling of the effective dissolution rate of aqueous CO2 three-dimensional configurations. The simulator se- quentially couples groundwater flow and CO2

  13. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 03726, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-03726

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -slip system: Paleomagnetic analysis of the Gobi Altai Mesozoic-Cenozoic volcanic province (Mongolia) D continent, the Mesozoic history of southern and eastern Mongolia was characterized by widespread compressive stress-field in central Asia, which in Mongolia initiated a regional array of left

  14. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 535547, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/535/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    areas, irrigation serves to increase yields, to at- tenuate the effects of droughts or, in the case), Germany 2Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy Received: 16 June 2005 land cover inventories. 1 Introduction Agriculture is by far the largest water-use sector, accounting

  15. The Girl in the Painting

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    Kiel, Emily Lauren

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ) ............................................................ 26 ix FIGURE Page 19 Chanteuse au Gant (Singer with Glove), Edgar Degas, 1878 .................... 27 20 Chanteuse au Gant..., Emily Kiel, 2011 .................................................. 49 53 Chanteuse au Gant (Singer with Glove), Edgar Degas, 1878 .................... 50 54 Chanteuse au Gant (Singer with Glove), Emily Kiel, 2011 ....................... 50...

  16. Critiquing the Masters: Applying 3D Production Lighting Principles to Famous 2D Works of Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Angelique

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ’s Bedroom in Arles (3rd Version) ............................................................................................ 81 III.3.3. Enhancing Mood, Atmosphere, and Drama - Edgar Degas’ La Classe de Danse... ........................................................................................... 104 IV.2.3. Results .................................................................................................. 108 IV.3. Enhancing Mood, Atmosphere, and Drama – Edgar Degas’ La Classe de Danse (The Dancing Class...

  17. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 50, NO. 5, MAY 2002 1153 Sampling of Periodic Signals: A Quantitative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Mathews

    : A Quantitative Error Analysis Mathews Jacob, Student Member, IEEE, Thierry Blu, Member, IEEE, and Michael Unser- tute of Technology, Lausanne, Switzerland (e-mail: mathews.jacob@epfl.ch; thierry.blu@epfl.ch; michael, the formula bears a strong resemblance to the error expression of signals in . However, the recipe is dif

  18. 4, 12651299, 2007 Participatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Screen / Esc Printer-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU tousek et al., 1997; Bennet et al., 2001

  19. T.A. Clair, I.F. Dennis and B.J. Cosby Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(4), 574582 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    announced by the Canadian and US governments based on commitments under Canadas Post-2000 acid rain Strategy Atlantic Canada, located in the extreme north-eastern portion of North America, receives acid precipitation from all major acid emission sources on the eastern part of the continent. The region was glaciated

  20. Colin Neal, Brian Reynolds, Margaret Neal and BronwenWilliams Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 460484 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cycles on water resources and soil nutrient status (National Assembly for Wales, 2000; Good and Reynolds earth soils, Vyrnwy in mid-Wales Colin Neal1 , Brian Reynolds2 , Margaret Neal1 and Bronwen Williams2 1 as functions of flow and particularly of the supply of more acidic and aluminium-bearing soil water and of more

  1. An overview of forest management and change with respect to environmental protection in the UK Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 279285 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    management have evolved. The impacts of forestry on the environment have also been investigated a positive contribution to the environment. This paper describes the key stages in this process of change to an acceleration of conifer planting in the late 1940s and 1950s. Despite the emergence of nuclear weaponry

  2. Flood forecasting using a fully distributed model: application of the TOPKAPI model to the Upper Xixian Catchment Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 347364 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    on the lumping of a kinematic wave assumption in the soil, on the surface and in the drainage network, and leads Liu1 , Mario L.V. Martina2 and Ezio Todini2 1 Bureau of Hydrology, Ministry of Water Resources, 2 Lane, snowmelt, soil water, surface water and channel water, respectively. Percolation to deep soil layers

  3. Stein Beldring , Kolbjrn Engeland , Lars A. Roald , Nils Roar Slthun and AstridVoks Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 304316 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    independent catchments. Finally, a river routing procedure using a kinematic wave approximation to open Sælthun 2 and Astrid Voksø 1 1 Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate, P.O. Box 5091 Majorstua, 0301 Oslo, Norway 2 Norwegian Institute for Water Research, P.O. Box 173 Kjelsås, 0411 Oslo, Norway

  4. Effect of drought and fires on the quality of water in Lithuanian rivers Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 423427 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to biota at lower concentrations than nitrates, carbon and sulphur dioxides or oil products in the 21st Century, advances in technology have altered the geochemical properties of the natural

  5. An approach to integrated assessement of reservoir siltation: the Joaqun Costa reservoir as a case study Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11931199 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An approach to integrated assessement of reservoir siltation: the JoaquĂ­n Costa reservoir as a case to integrated assessement of reservoir siltation: the JoaquĂ­n Costa reservoir as a case study A. Navas1 , B of the main environments in the reservoir. Records of known flood events and of reservoir management data have

  6. Calibration of the INCA model in a Mediterranean forested catchment Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(4), 729741 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and high inter-annual variability. Accordingly, soil N processes and leaching of solutes in Mediterranean regions also show a marked seasonality, occurring in pulses as soils re-wet following rain. The Integrated are influenced strongly by soil moisture, which is highly variable within and between years; also, a single

  7. Hybrid Zones: Representations of Race in Late Nineteenth-Century French Visual Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringer, Rozanne McGrew

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, I examine images of the black female and black male body and the female Spanish Gypsy by four artists ??_?? Edgar Degas, ?_??douard Manet, Fr?_??d?_??ric Bazille, and Henri de Toulouse??_???Lautrec ??_?? ...

  8. Quasi-Ohmic Single Molecule Charge Transport through Highly Conjugated meso-to-meso Ethyne-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borguet, Eric

    S-1 Quasi-Ohmic Single Molecule Charge Transport through Highly Conjugated meso-to-meso Ethyne, subjected to three freeze-pump-thaw- degas cycles, was added to the reaction tube. After the reaction

  9. CX-009509: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Power Monitoring, Communication and Control Upgrade at Bryan Mound Degas Plant (Install) CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 10/31/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  10. Web-Ice: Integrated Data Collection and Analysis for Macromolecular Crystallography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Ana

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results. A summary list is also available in Blu-Ice.Figure 7: SSRL Web-Ice interface displaying the summarizedTable 1: Programs used by Web-Ice for data analysis. Program

  11. andis auhinna soome: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 THE BIOLOGICAL APPROACH Development in biology Fernandez, Thomas 176 Andy Bullock and Mike Acreman Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 358389 (2003) EGU Physics Websites...

  12. andi kivinukk julia: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 THE BIOLOGICAL APPROACH Development in biology Fernandez, Thomas 368 Andy Bullock and Mike Acreman Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 358389 (2003) EGU Physics Websites...

  13. andis kalvns tomas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 THE BIOLOGICAL APPROACH Development in biology Fernandez, Thomas 254 Andy Bullock and Mike Acreman Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 358389 (2003) EGU Physics Websites...

  14. andis vlja plaadi: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 THE BIOLOGICAL APPROACH Development in biology Fernandez, Thomas 177 Andy Bullock and Mike Acreman Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 358389 (2003) EGU Physics Websites...

  15. andy obernosterer elisabeth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 THE BIOLOGICAL APPROACH Development in biology Fernandez, Thomas 268 Andy Bullock and Mike Acreman Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 358389 (2003) EGU Physics Websites...

  16. apportionment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pollution generated in megacities poses a threat to human health and25 the environment; Mexico Discussion EGU which has caused many environmental problems, including severe air...

  17. agricultural systems final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yorke, James 191 Testing the INCA model in a small agricultural catchment in southern Finland Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(4), 717728 (2004) EGU Computer Technologies...

  18. agricultural systems including: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yorke, James 259 Testing the INCA model in a small agricultural catchment in southern Finland Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(4), 717728 (2004) EGU Computer Technologies...

  19. alternative agriculture system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yorke, James 300 Testing the INCA model in a small agricultural catchment in southern Finland Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(4), 717728 (2004) EGU Computer Technologies...

  20. ancient iberian brown: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Screen Esc Print Version Interactive Discussion EGU Abstract Wind speed data obtained from the National-March) wind in- dices for the western Iberian...

  1. Interactive open access publishing and public peer review: The effectiveness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    are clearly demonstrated by the highly successful interactive open access journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP, www.atmos- chem-phys.net) and a growing number of sister journals launched by the publisher Copernicus (www.copernicus.org) and the European Geosciences Union (EGU, www.egu.eu). These journals

  2. Lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium and yttrium in waters in an upland acidic and acid sensitive environment, mid-Wales Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(6), 645656 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    functioning in relation to environmental management issues of acid deposition, climate change level in the streams is variable and seems to be linked to the main soil types within the catchment complexation (e.g. with organic matter) and the degree of acidification and colloidal transport (Bookings et al

  3. Mechanisms of magmatic gas loss along the Southeast Indian Ridge and the Amsterdam ^St. Paul Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W.

    that ridge magmas degas by a Rayleigh distillation process. As a result, the absolute and relative noble gas abundances are highly fractionated with 4 He/40 Ar* ratios as high as 620 compared to a production ratio of V a particular magma is related to the degree of crystallization. Fractional crystallization forces

  4. Effect of reflection on H emissions in Alcator C-MOD C. F. F. Karney, D. P. Stotler, and C. H. Skinner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    Effect of reflection on H emissions in Alcator C-MOD C. F. F. Karney, D. P. Stotler, and C. H in Alcator C-MOD, the H emissions in that experiment have been modeled with the DEGAS 2 code including of plasma emission and are often difficult to diagnose. However reflection does affect the polarization

  5. The K/U ratio of the silicate Earth: Insights into mantle composition, structure and thermal evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    2009 Editor: R.D. van der Hilst Keywords: potassium uranium argon degas radiogenic volatile structure consisting of at least two independent reservoirs: a depleted upper mantle and a chemically in the silicate Earth. Although the budgets of thorium (Th) and uranium (U) in the planet are well

  6. Solar Diagnostics for a Space Weather Monique Pick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Diagnostics for a Space Weather program Monique Pick LESIA, Observatoire de Paris EGU 2004 #12;· Solar flares and CMEs: sources of major SW effects · Focuss on CMEs ( Earth effects: 2-4 days

  7. d'ordre : ANNE 2012 THSE / UNIVERSIT DE RENNES 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    `egue. Ils m'ont donn´e go^ut `a la th´eorie des probabilit´es d`es la Licence, ils sont toujours rest

  8. 4, 31953227, 2007 Modelling CH4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Interactive Discussion EGU 1 Introduction Together with water vapour and carbon dioxide (CO2), CH4, hydrology, soil physical properties, vegetation type and NPP.15 For Kytalyk the simulated CH4 fluxes show

  9. High-numerical aperture holographic data storage Floris M. H. Crompvoets, Frank Schuurmans, Marcello Balistreri, Teus Tukker, Gert 't Hoofi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stallinga, Sjoerd

    ,4 this technology has gained a lot of attention by the optical storage industry. The promise of HDS-layer Blu-ray Disc (ML-BD)5 and 'Near Field' (NF) recording6. The applications aimed at by the next generation optical storage are for instance professional and personal archiving. A comparison of the overall

  10. Deep-SeaResearch, 1974,Vol.21,pp. 481 to 488.PergamonPress.Printed in Great Britain. Dissolved hydrocarbons in the eastern Gulf of Mexico Loop Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    hydrocarbons in the eastern Gulf of Mexico Loop Current and the Caribbean Sea THOMASM. ILIFFE*and JOHNA. CALDER---Concentrations of dissolved non-polar hydrocarbons extracted from waters taken at several stations and depths in the Gulf THEREhave been few studies of the dissolved hydrocarbons in seawater. BLU~R (1970) reported carbon numbers

  11. Required Safety and Compliance Training for Researchers http://rac.berkeley.edu/training.html RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION AND COMPLIANCE OFFICE 1 of 7 pages UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    oversight committees and staff offices have developed training programs to facilitate compliance Online To enroll: Search for the title in the UC Learning Center or log in to BLU and select the UC Learning Center link Ergonomics Title: "Computer Health Matters" Employees who use computers more than four

  12. Phonons in sapphire Al2O3 substrate for ZnO and GaN H.W. Kunert a,, A.G.J. Machatine b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Phonons in sapphire Al2O3 substrate for ZnO and GaN H.W. Kunert a,, A.G.J. Machatine b , A. Keywords: Phonons; Sapphire; Group theory; Time reversal; Zno; GaN 1. Introduction The lattice structure in semiconductor research enabled fabrication of GaN-based blued emitting diodes and laser devices[1,2]. Due

  13. JOURNAL DEPHYSIQUEIV ColloqueC7,supplkmentauJournaldePhysique111, Volume3,novembre1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .C.-SABucharest, Romania ABSTRACT Aluminium alloy-matrix composites with ceramic parti- culates ( Graphite, Sic, A1203, Tic of the aluminium alloy A1-12.5 Si-1.3 Cu-1.8 Ni-1.5 Mg, bal .Al) at 1073 K. Argon purified gas were used to degas The influence of solidificationrate on structure parameters of aluminium-matrixparticulate composites P.M O L D

  14. The Colorful Chemical Bottle Experiment Kit: From School Laboratory To Public Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpanuparb, Taweetham

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The blue bottle experiment was first introduced to the chemical education literature as a simple demonstration on kinetics. Its original formulation contains only glucose, NaOH and small amount of methylene blue. The solution turns blue when shaken and fades to colorless upon standing. This bluing/de-bluing cycle may be repeated and may be compared to blood colors in animal's respiratory cycle. Inspired by the blue bottle experiment, the colorful chemical bottle experiment kit was commercially developed in 2006. The kit is a versatile pedagogical tool, not only for physical chemistry but also for analytical, biological and organic chemistry. It also helps teaching concepts in scientific method and laboratory safety. This manuscript contains four parts, brief review on literature relating to the blue bottle experiment, description of the colorful chemical bottle experiment kit, pedagogical discussion of the experiments and preliminary evaluation from students.

  15. 7, 849910, 2007 Reformulating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and gas/liquid/solid partitioning of mixed inorganic/organic multicomponent so- lutions and the associated Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References Tables Figures Back Close Full Screen / Esc Back Close Full Screen / Esc Printer-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU Abstract Modeling

  16. 3, 28992922, 2006 Hydrologic effects of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., 3, 2899­2922, 2006 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci-discuss.net and Mexico have resulted in a 25 percent decrease in streamflow in June, and a 9 percent decrease in annual as electric power, navigation, flood control, and other amenities for a growing20 population. Dams, built

  17. 2, 11971241, 2005 Control of methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Version Interactive Discussion EGU Abstract The North Sea hosts large coal, oil and gas reservoirs of giant sulphide- oxidizing bacteria above patches of black sediments and carbonate crusts, which are exposed 10 to 50 cm above seafloor forming small reefs. These Methane-Derived Au- thigenic Carbonates

  18. 5, 51675182, 2005 Gas-phase reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 5, 5167­5182, 2005 Gas-phase reaction of atomic chlorine with aldehydes D. Rodr´iguez et al Print Version Interactive Discussion EGU Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 5, 5167­5182, 2005 www.notario@uclm.es) © 2005 Author(s). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. 5167 #12;ACPD 5, 5167­5182

  19. 4, 81110, 2008 Modeling marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Discussion EGU Abstract When dating marine samples with 14 C, the reservoir-age effect is usually assumed and effect in paleoclimate data. We used a5 global ocean circulation model forced by transient atmospheric., 2004a). Regional reservoir-age anomalies for the time before nuclear weapon tests25 are mainly known

  20. 6, 22812702, 2006 Evaluated kinetic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2 School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK 3 Centre for Atmospheric Science, Dept Interactive Discussion EGU 7 Dept. of Environmental Science and Technology, Imperial College London, Silwood Park, Ascot, Berkshire SL5 7PY UK 8 Environment Naturel, Architectural et Construit, Pollution Atmosph

  1. 8, 30273142, 2008 Validation of ACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), Karlsruhe, Germany 7 Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosph´erique, Universit´e des sciences et technologies de Lille Screen / Esc Printer-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU 8 Department of Radio and Space Science'A´eronomie Spatiale de Belgique (IASB- BIRA), Bruxelles, Belgium 10 Department of Physics & Atmospheric Science

  2. 5, 85078646, 2005 Aerosol effects on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    11 , and E. Weingartner 12 1 Atmospheric Sciences Group, SEAES, University of Manchester, PO Box 88 05508-900 Sao Paulo, Brazil 3 Paul Scherrer Institut, Labor f¨ur Atmosph¨arenchemie, 5232 Villigen PSI / Esc Print Version Interactive Discussion EGU 7 Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science

  3. 5, 62957168, 2005 Evaluated kinetic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Centre for Atmospheric Science, Dept. of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road Cambridge CB2 / Esc Print Version Interactive Discussion EGU 7 Dept. of Environmental Science and Technology, Imperial Construit, Pollution Atmosph´erique et Sol(LPAS/ENAC), EPFL CH 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland 9 Institute

  4. Curriculum Vitae Vincent Soustelle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    -scale partial melting domain: the Ronda peridotite massif, Southern Spain. Journal of Petrology, 50(7), 1235 peridotite massif, Spain. Vol. 10, EGU2008-A-00000. Soustelle V., Tommasi A., Bodinier J.-L., Garrido C lithosphere above a large-scale partial melting domain: the Ronda peridotite massif, Southern Spain (talk

  5. Thermodynamic Model for Energy-Constrained Open-System Evolution of Crustal Magma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spera, Frank J.

    -mail: journals.permissions@ oup.com JOURNAL OF PETROLOGY VOLUME 0 NUMBER 0 PAGES1^33 2014 doi:10.1093/petrology/egu036 Journal of Petrology Advance Access published August 6, 2014 atUniversityofCalifornia,SantaBarbaraonAugust12,2014http://petrology.oxfordjournals.org/Downloadedfrom #12;arguments, does not occur because

  6. 7, 46574672, 2007 Stratospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Interactive Discussion EGU into the stratosphere could be employed as a strategy to reduce global warming due to increasing CO2 levels (Crutzen, 2006; Wigley, 2006). Stratospheric sulfate causes sur- face cooling and stratospheric warming (Robock, 2000). The average injection required is about 1­2 Tg(S) per year

  7. 6, 1184511875, 2006 A new SIze REsolved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the aerosol size distribution into sections and solves the GDE by splitting coagulation and condensation Interactive Discussion EGU that affect the aerosol size/composition distribution are therefore crucial. ThreeACPD 6, 11845­11875, 2006 A new SIze REsolved Aerosol Model E. Debry et al. Title Page Abstract

  8. 4, 42654295, 2007 Impact of land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    methodol- ogy which involves coupling a land-use change model with a water balance model and a groundwater groundwater model. Results show that the average recharge slowly de- creases for all scenarios, the decreases / Esc Printer-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU 1 Introduction Groundwater is a major source

  9. 2, 183201, 2005 Global terrestrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    dioxide (CO2) L. Sandoval-Soto 1 , M. Stanimirov 2 , M. von Hobe 3 , V. Schmitt 4 , J. Valdes 5 , A. Wild Discussion EGU 4 Institute for General Botany, University of Mainz, M¨ullerweg 6, 55128 Mainz, Germany 5

  10. 8, 181214, 2008 Hourly resolved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    compared to for instance cloud cover is that measured solar global irradiance contains already the effect Interactive Discussion EGU 1 Introduction Clouds may have a dramatic effect on the ultraviolet radiation (UV, Lindenberg, Germany 5 Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas, Norway 6 Federal Office

  11. 8, 18331912, 2008 Online coupled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of downward solar radiation (direct effect); a decrease in surface temperature and wind speed but an increase as an increase in liquid water content, cloud cover, and lifetime of low level clouds but a suppression Interactive Discussion EGU Abstract The climate-chemistry-aerosol-cloud-radiation feedbacks are important

  12. 7, 1476714811, 2007 Influence of Giant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    indirect effect. The effect of GCCN on global climate, especially on clouds and precipitation, within, the radiative budget is also changing. The GCCN cause a reduction of the anthropogenic aerosol indirect effect EGU Abstract Increased Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) load due to anthropogenic activity might lead

  13. The distribution of F-centers in Nacl crystals partially exposed to X-irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blount, Charles Edwin

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    irradiation produce F-centers. From these results an initial negative-ion vacancy of 101&/cm3 was obtained from Harshaw crystals. R. G. Brechenridgey obtained a positive-ion vacancy concen- tration of Z. 1 n 101y(cm3 at SSoC for Harshaw NaCl crystals. A...THE DISTRIBUTION OF F-CENTERS IN NACL CRYSTALS PARTIALLY EXPOSED TO X-IRRADIATION Charles E. Blount Submitted to ths Osaduats School cf the Ag&eultusal aad hlsehaaleal CoRege of Teeas ka ' . yae~ fulfSIttteet of the seejaka'~ 4e' the dega...

  14. Simulation of Diffusive Lithium Evaporation Onto the NSTX Vessel Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stotler, D. P.; Skinner, C. H.; Blanchard, W. R.; Krstic, P. S.; Kugel, H. W.; Schneider, H.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for simulating the diffusive evaporation of lithium into a helium filled NSTX vacuum vessel is described and validated against an initial set of deposition experiments. The DEGAS 2 based model consists of a three-dimensional representation of the vacuum vessel, the elastic scattering process, and a kinetic description of the evaporated atoms. Additional assumptions are required to account for deuterium out-gassing during the validation experiments. The model agrees with the data over a range of pressures to within the estimated uncertainties. Suggestions are made for more discriminating experiments that will lead to an improved model.

  15. Feasibility report on alternative methods for cooling cavern oils at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, Bruce L.; Lord, David L.; Hadgu, Teklu

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil caverns at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) are subjected to geothermal heating from the surrounding domal salt. This process raises the temperature of the crude oil from around 75 F upon delivery to SPR to as high as 130 F after decades of storage. While this temperature regime is adequate for long-term storage, it poses challenges for offsite delivery, with warm oil evolving gases that pose handling and safety problems. SPR installed high-capacity oil coolers in the mid-1990's to mitigate the emissions problem by lowering the oil delivery temperature. These heat exchanger units use incoming raw water as the cooling fluid, and operate only during a drawdown event where incoming water displaces the outgoing oil. The design criteria for the heat exchangers are to deliver oil at 100 F or less under all drawdown conditions. Increasing crude oil vapor pressures due in part to methane intrusion in the caverns is threatening to produce sufficient emissions at or near 100 F to cause the cooled oil to violate delivery requirements. This impending problem has initiated discussion and analysis of alternative cooling methods to bring the oil temperature even lower than the original design basis of 100 F. For the study described in this report, two alternative cooling methods were explored: (1) cooling during a limited drawdown, and (2) cooling during a degas operation. Both methods employ the heat exchangers currently in place, and do not require extra equipment. An analysis was run using two heat transfer models, HEATEX, and CaveMan, both developed at Sandia National Laboratories. For cooling during a limited drawdown, the cooling water flowrate through the coolers was varied from 1:1 water:oil to about 3:1, with an increased cooling capacity of about 3-7 F for the test cavern Bryan Mound 108 depending upon seasonal temperature effects. For cooling in conjunction with a degas operation in the winter, cavern oil temperatures for the test cavern Big Hill 102 were cooled sufficiently that the cavern required about 9 years to return to the temperature prior to degas. Upon reviewing these results, the authors recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy that a broader study of the cooling during degas be pursued in order to examine the potential benefits of cooling on all caverns in the current degasification schedule.

  16. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUM SULFATE: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE W.DEGAS 2

  17. 10 Physics Questions to Ponder for a Millennium or Two By GEORGE JOHNSON (NYT Tuesday, August 15, 2000)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, Catherine L.

    and the abundance of the mRNA I am trying to detect). Master Mix: Stock Deionized formamide 7ul (40% by vol membrane RNA side up, UV X-link with 100uJ of energy, and bake at 80C for 30 minutes to dry the membraneul 10mM ATP 1ul 10mM CTP 1ul 10mM GTP 5ul alpha P32 UTP (800Ci/mmol) NEN cat# : BLU007X 1ul 0.25M DTT

  18. POINT DE VUE SUR LES REFORMES EN COURS DANS LE SYST`EME EDUCATIF 61 Point de vue sur les reformes en

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demailly, Jean-Pierre

    POINT DE VUE SUR LES R´EFORMES EN COURS DANS LE SYST`EME ´EDUCATIF 61 Point de vue sur les r´eformes'^etre confront´e `a la r´eflexion sur les r´eformes, que ce soit `a l'Acad´emie des Sciences, `a l'Universit´e ou contenus de programmes reculent de r´eforme en r´eforme; jamais me semble-t-il les coll`egues ne s

  19. 1, 231253, 2005 Synoptic climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CPD 1, 231­253, 2005 Synoptic climate change as driver of New Zealand glaciation H. Rother and J / Esc Print Version Interactive Discussion EGU Climate of the Past Discussions, 1, 231­253, 2005 www.climate-of-the-past.net/cpd/1/231/ SRef-ID: 1814-9359/cpd/2005-1-231 European Geosciences Union Climate of the Past Discussions

  20. Analysis of Neutral Transport in the GAMMA10 Anchor-Cell Using H{alpha}-Emission Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higashizono, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nakashima, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ohki, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Islam, M.K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Shoji, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Kobayashi, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University (Japan); Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kubota, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Murakami, R. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yamada, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutral transport was studied in the anchor cell. The H{alpha} line intensities were measured by using axially aligned H{alpha} detectors. It was found that the intensity is considerably dependent on ECRH and GP 3,4. A 5ch H{alpha} detector was newly installed in the outer-transition region of the anchor-cell. From the measurement of the spatial distributions, the vertical intensity profile is estimated to be about 2.5 cm on the half width half maximum, while the horizontal distribution shows roughly flat around Z=-670 cm. The above characteristics were discussed with aid of neutral transport simulation using DEGAS Monte-Carlo Code.

  1. THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE): FOURTH DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M. E. K.; Piffl, T.; Enke, H.; Carrillo, I. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Boeche, C.; Roeser, S. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Seabroke, G. M. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Siebert, A. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l'Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Zwitter, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Binney, J. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); De Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bijaoui, A. [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR 7293, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, BP4229, F-06304 Nice (France); Wyse, R. F. G. [Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Freeman, K. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Munari, U. [INAF National Institute of Astrophysics, Astronomical Institute of Padova, I-36012 Asiago (VI) (Italy); Anguiano, B., E-mail: gkordo@ast.cam.ac.uk [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); and others

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances, and distances determined for 425,561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). The stellar atmospheric parameters are computed using a new pipeline, based on the algorithms of MATISSE and DEGAS. The spectral degeneracies and the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometric information are now better taken into consideration, improving the parameter determination compared to the previous RAVE data releases. The individual abundances for six elements (magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, iron, and nickel) are also given, based on a special-purpose pipeline that is also improved compared to that available for the RAVE DR3 and Chemical DR1 data releases. Together with photometric information and proper motions, these data can be retrieved from the RAVE collaboration Web site and the Vizier database.

  2. Tensile tests of niobium material for SRF cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, G.; Dhanaraj, N.; Cooley, L.; Hicks, D.; Hahn, E.; Burk, D.; Muranyi, W.; Foley, N.; Edwards, H.; Harms, E.; Champion, M.; /Fermilab /Michigan State U.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical tests of cavity-grade niobium samples were conducted to provide engineering information for the certification of 3rd-harmonic superconducting radio-frequency cavities and cryomodules. Large changes of mechanical properties occur throughout the cavity fabrication process due to the cold work introduced by forming, the heating introduced by electron beam welding, and the recovery of cold work during the anneal used to degas hydrogen after chemical processing. Data is provided here to show the different properties at various stages of fabrication, including both weld regions and samples from the bulk niobium far away from the weld. Measurements of RRR were used to assure that any contamination during annealing was negligible.

  3. Effect of Deuterium Gas Puff On The Edge Plasma In NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zweben, S. J.

    2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a detailed examination of the effects of a relatively small pulsed deuterium gas puff on the edge plasma and edge turbulence in NSTX. This gas puff caused little or no change in the line-averaged plasma density or total stored energy, or in the edge density and electron temperature up to the time of the peak of the gas puff. The radial profile of the D? light emission and the edge turbulence within this gas puff did not vary significantly over its rise and fall, implying that these gas puffs did not significantly perturb the local edge plasma or edge turbulence. These measurements are compared with modeling by DEGAS 2, UEDGE, and with simplified estimates for the expected effects of this gas puff.

  4. The Fix Issue 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR A COMMITMENT? WE'RE PARTNERS! THAT'S A PRETTY BIG COMMITMENT. 6 ? ? SHOW? ~ou COl) coli I...(Q 0 cO\\JJCrd fer doll1(3 IT tl)15 ~ buT I jJ5T couldl)'T look II)TO T~05Q ooouttful bluQ Qvp.5 of vpcr5 ol)d ~ Ol)~ of T~15. 13Q.IIQ\\JQ I...(Q bu~ T.... This was too new, too complicated, and he didn't know what the boundaries were. Both of them had a life-long tendency to fall hard and fast first and think relationships through later. He'd known th,is man for eight years, but now everything was changing...

  5. Enterprise Incidents Issue 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodison, Lorraine

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I'G"i.od, that would have boen just r. littlo too muoh for him. He snt nt thu Vulcan I s side ag8.in just e.s Nanr.the 00.00 entrance. Her robo soomed to glow in tho filtered light of Kirk frowned 38 he saw her eyos. Woron't thoy groy bofore? bluCl, ovon bluor than... anything to gi vo us a cluo!" "Ayo, sir - I'll tak' it tao bits if I hav0 tao!" IIThank8, Scotty, II grinned Kirk. Ho walked over to the entrance. "lKeanvihilo, Illl havo another word with our onigmatic quoen." HOWOV0r~ }7anatho was noy/hore to bo so"en...

  6. Replacing chemicals in recycle mills with mechanical alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity spark fired underwater decomposes a small amount of the water into hydroxyl radicals, which are strong oxidants. These are able to oxidize contaminants such as glue and wood pitch that enter paper recycling mills as a part of the incoming furnish and cost the industry several hundred million dollars. The sparking technique is safe, inexpensive, and is capable of treating large volumes of water, which makes it attractive for mill applications. Several mill trials were run. Sparking caused a decrease in the tack of the deposits in one case. Lower bleach use occurred in two other mills; sparking reduced the degree of ink reattachment to fiber. The payback for either application is attractive. Sparking induced deposition of contaminants in another mill, which is a positive development--if it can be controlled. The technique is also able to degas water and to oxidize odor-causing sulfur compounds. Although one unit has been purchased by a mill, second-order effects caused by the technology needs to be defined further before the technology can be broadly applied.

  7. Neutral Beam Injection Experiments and Related Behavior of Neutral Particles in the GAMMA 10 Tandem Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakashima, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Watanabe, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Higashizono, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ohki, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ogita, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Shoji, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science(Japan); Kobayashi, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University (Japan); Islam, M.K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kubota, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yamada, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Murakami, R. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of neutral beam injection (NBI) experiments in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasmas are presented together with the neutral particle behavior observed in the experiments. A hydrogen neural beam was injected into the hot-ion-mode plasmas by using the injector installed in the central-cell for the plasma heating and fueling. High-energy ions produced by NBI were observed and its energy distribution was measured for the first time with a neutral particle analyzer installed in the central-cell. The temporal and spatial behavior of hydrogen was observed with axially aligned H{sub {alpha}} detectors installed from the central midplane to anchor-cell. Enhancement of hydrogen recycling due to the beam injection and the cause of the observed decrease in plasma diamagnetism are discussed. The Monte-Carlo code DEGAS for neutral transport simulation was applied to the GAMMA 10 central-cell and a 3-dimensional simulation was performed in the NBI experiment. Localization of neutral particle during the beam injection is investigated based on the simulation and it was found that the increased recycling due to the beam injection was dominant near the injection port.

  8. Reservoir characterization of Mary Lee and Black Creek coals at the Rock Creek field laboratory, Black Warrior basin. Topical report, May-December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, G.B.C.; Paul, G.W.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional multi-well simulation study was performed for the Rock Creek project site to better understand the relationships between coal reservoir properties, well completion practices, and actual well performance. The reservoir study provided insights on the efficacy of single versus multiple seam completions, the incremental gas recovery resulting from remedial stimulations, and the impact of well spacing on expected long-term gas recovery. The Mary Lee and Black Creek coal groups were characterized by matching production and pressure history for eight Rock Creek producing wells and their surrounding monitor wells. The simulation grid included the Oak Grove mine and degas field located south of the Rock Creek site. Results of well test analyses, corehole-based gas content measurements, and individual coal group gas production from zone isolation packer tests were used to validate the simulation results. Various hydraulic fracture and remedial stimulations were analyzed to compare the effectiveness of different stimulation designs used at the site. Alternative well spacing strategies were examined to assess the effects of interference on long-term gas recovery.

  9. Degassing a vacuum system with in-situ UV radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koebley, Sean R.; Outlaw, Ronald A.; Dellwo, Randy R. [College of William and Mary, Department of Applied Science, 325 McGlothlin Street Hall, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); RBD Instruments, 2437 Northeast Twin Knolls Drive, Bend, Oregon 97701 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) from a high-powered ultraviolet source was investigated as a technique to degas a vacuum system. A stainless steel vacuum system was pumped down from atmosphere with different time doses of 185 nm light, and the resulting outgassing rates were compared to that of a control pumpdown without UV assistance. PSD was found to provide a factor of 2 advantage in pumpdown pressure after only 30 min of UV exposure, with no additional advantage observed for longer irradiation times. Specifically, an outgassing rate of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Torr L s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} was reached 3 h sooner in pumpdowns with UV assistance compared to those without UV, while a rate of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Torr L s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} was reached 16 h sooner in UV runs. The authors calculated that about 22 monolayers of water were desorbed after 30 min of UV exposure. The results indicate that PSD by a 40 W 185 nm UV source can serve as a nonthermal technique to significantly speed the pumpdown of a vacuum system from atmosphere after only 30 min.

  10. Bacteriology of cottage cheese: Sources of microorganisms causing spoilage and relative numbers at various stages during processing and storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maury, James B

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fcl Cl amming' 0 ~ ~ ~ l ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ 0 l5 XIX ~ Line Csunts Surini Pr&casein@ and ~n Cottage Cheese &hen Egu'pmsnt was not anitized Sef . re Ues. ~ ~ . . . . 21 Line Cauu', s' on a Sstoh of Cottage... . . $'I gc UCQQJcd T! l [Uc 66UQB 6~ J - I egg('' EIIel'-r ' i . Tg -" '$:iB 6" Q L'I ccvIsgcc6 -' i'ggc. l 8! ' P Qqg jc Beep 6 I 'Jcq. . inq pUB i";BJc eeg gc BJrlgce~r U:, 6. (g Ug EY6'?J:, I PBB& Bg gejJegqnq eqg ! i egBJsce- XTIcn', 6 6'( I . Jnn...

  11. Lattice site location of impurities in group III nitrides using emission channeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vries, Bart; Wahl, Ulrich

    The group III nitrides comprise the semiconducting materials InN, GaN, AlN and their ternary alloys. During the last decade, GaN has attracted widespread attention due to its large band gap and hardness. These properties, combined with the fact that its band gap can be adjusted by alloying it with InN and AlN, make GaN a suitable material for the fabrication of optical components that operate in the blue to ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and for microwave and high-power applications. Indeed, during the last couple of years, GaN-based blue and violet light-emitting devices (LEDs) and laser diodes have been realized and commercialized: the violet laser diodes will even be the keystone to the next generation of optical data storage standards, Blu-ray and HD-DVD. A key aspect in device production is the incorporation of dopants that can alter the electronic, magnetic or optical properties of the host material. For example, Si is often used to generate n-type GaN, while Mg is the most frequent...

  12. Evolution of stellar disk truncations since z=1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignacio Trujillo; Ruyman Azzollini; Judit Bakos; John Beckman; Michael Pohlen

    2008-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present our recent results on the cosmic evolution of the outskirst of disk galaxies. In particular we focus on disk-like galaxies with stellar disk truncations. Using UDF, GOODS and SDSS data we show how the position of the break (i.e. a direct estimator of the size of the stellar disk) evolves with time since z~1. Our findings agree with an evolution on the radial position of the break by a factor of 1.3+-0.1 in the last 8 Gyr for galaxies with similar stellar masses. We also present radial color gradients and how they evolve with time. At all redshift we find a radial inside-out bluing reaching a minimum at the position of the break radius, this minimum is followed by a reddening outwards. Our results constraint several galaxy disk formation models and favour a scenario where stars are formed inside the break radius and are relocated in the outskirts of galaxies through secular processes.

  13. Emission projections for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Section 812 Second Prospective Clean Air Act cost/benefit analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James H. Wilson, Jr.; Maureen A. Mullen; Andrew D. Bollman (and others) [E.H. Pechan & Associates, Inc., Springfield, VA (United States)

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the analysis, methods, and results of the recently completed emission projections. There are several unique features of this analysis. One is the use of consistent economic assumptions from the Department of Energy's Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO 2005) projections as the basis for estimating 2010 and 2020 emissions for all sectors. Another is the analysis of the different emissions paths for both with and without CAAA scenarios. Other features of this analysis include being the first EPA analysis that uses the 2002 National Emission Inventory files as the basis for making 48-state emission projections, incorporating control factor files from the Regional Planning Organizations (RPOs) that had completed emission projections at the time the analysis was performed, and modeling the emission benefits of the expected adoption of measures to meet the 8-hr ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), the Clean Air Visibility Rule, and the PM2.5 NAAQS. This analysis shows that the 1990 CAAA have produced significant reductions in criteria pollutant emissions since 1990 and that these emission reductions are expected to continue through 2020. CAAA provisions have reduced volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by approximately 7 million t/yr by 2000, and are estimated to produce associated VOC emission reductions of 16.7 million t by 2020. Total oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission reductions attributable to the CAAA are 5, 12, and 17 million t in 2000, 2010, and 2020, respectively. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emission benefits during the study period are dominated by electricity-generating unit (EGU) SO{sub 2} emission reductions. These EGU emission benefits go from 7.5 million t reduced in 2000 to 15 million t reduced in 2020. 16 refs., 6 figs., 13 tabs.

  14. Flue gas injection control of silica in cooling towers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Anderson, Howard L., Jr.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of CO{sub 2}-laden flue gas can decrease the potential for silica and calcite scale formation in cooling tower blowdown by lowering solution pH to decrease equilibrium calcite solubility and kinetic rates of silica polymerization. Flue gas injection might best inhibit scale formation in power plant cooling towers that use impaired makeup waters - for example, groundwaters that contain relatively high levels of calcium, alkalinity, and silica. Groundwaters brought to the surface for cooling will degas CO{sub 2} and increase their pH by 1-2 units, possibly precipitating calcite in the process. Recarbonation with flue gas can lower the pHs of these fluids back to roughly their initial pH. Flue gas carbonation probably cannot lower pHs to much below pH 6 because the pHs of impaired waters, once outgassed at the surface, are likely to be relatively alkaline. Silica polymerization to form scale occurs most rapidly at pH {approx} 8.3 at 25 C; polymerization is slower at higher and lower pH. pH 7 fluids containing {approx}220 ppm SiO{sub 2} require > 180 hours equilibration to begin forming scale whereas at pH 8.3 scale formation is complete within 36 hours. Flue gas injection that lowers pHs to {approx} 7 should allow substantially higher concentration factors. Periodic cycling to lower recoveries - hence lower silica concentrations - might be required though. Higher concentration factors enabled by flue gas injection should decrease concentrate volumes and disposal costs by roughly half.

  15. The impact of alpha/Fe enhanced stellar evolutionary tracks on the ages of elliptical galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Thomas; Claudia Maraston

    2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We complement our study of alpha/Fe enhanced stellar population models of Lick absorption indices (Thomas et al. 2003) by comparing two sets of alpha/Fe enhanced models. In both models the impact on Lick indices due to alpha/Fe enhancement is accounted for through a modification of the stellar absorption line-strengths using the response functions of Tripicco & Bell (1995). One set of models, however, uses solar-scaled, the other alpha/Fe enhanced stellar evolutionary tracks. Since the alpha/Fe enhanced tracks are hotter than the solar-scaled ones (Salasnich et al. 2000), the correspondent stellar population models have slightly weaker metallic indices (i.e. Mgb, etc.) and stronger Balmer line indices (Hbeta) (Maraston et al 2003). Here we explore quantitatively the impact of this effect on the alpha/Fe ratios, metallicities and ages that are derived for elliptical galaxies. We find that the modest decrease of the metallic indices Mgb and balance each other, such that fully consistent alpha/Fe ratios are derived for stellar systems using alpha/Fe enhanced models with either solar-scaled or alpha/Fe enhanced stellar tracks. The decrease of the metallic indices and the increase of Hbeta conspire in a way that also consistent metallicities are obtained. The derived ages, instead, are significantly different. The inclusion of alpha/Fe enhanced stellar tracks leads to the derivation of ages as high as 30 Gyr for elliptical galaxies. For the same objects, ages not older than 15 Gyr are obtained, if alpha/Fe enhanced models using solar-scaled tracks are adopted. This may indicate that current stellar evolutionary models overestimate the bluing of stellar evolutionary tracks due to alpha/Fe enhanced chemical mixtures at super-solar metallicities.

  16. Site Characterization Data from the U3ax/bl Exploratory Boreholes at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides qualitative analyses and preliminary interpretations of hydrogeologic data obtained from two 45-degree, slanted exploratory boreholes drilled within the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site. Borehole UE-3bl-D1 was drilled beneath the U3ax/bl mixed waste disposal unit, and Borehole UE-3bl-U1 was drilled in undisturbed alluvium adjacent to the disposal unit. The U3ax/bl disposal unit is located within two conjoined subsidence craters, U3ax and U3bl, which were created by underground nuclear testing. Data from these boreholes were collected to support site characterization activities for the U3ax/bl disposal unit and the entire Area 3 RWMS. Site characterization at disposal units within the Area 3 RWMS must address the possibility that subsidence craters and associated disturbed alluvium of the chimneys beneath the craters might serve as pathways for contaminant migration. The two boreholes were drilled and sampled to compare hydrogeologic properties of alluvium below the waste disposal unit with those of adjacent undisturbed alluvium. Whether Borehole UE-3bl-D1 actually penetrated the chimney of the U3bl crater is uncertain. Analyses of core samples showed little difference in hydrogeologic properties between the two boreholes. Important findings of this study include the following: No hazardous or radioactive constituents of waste disposal concern were found in the samples obtained from either borehole. No significant differences in physical and hydrogeologic properties between boreholes is evident, and no evidence of significant trends with depth for any of these properties was observed. The values observed are typical of sandy materials. The alluvium is dry, with volumetric water content ranging from 5.6 to 16.2 percent. Both boreholes exhibit a slight increase in water content with depth, the only such trend observed. Water potential measurements on core samples from both boreholes show a large positive potential gradient (water moves upward, via evapotranspiration) for the entire vertical depth. Very little liquid flow occurs through the vadose zone. The direction of flow in the upper vadose zone (approximately the upper 35 meters) is upward, based on unsaturated hydraulic conductivity data, water potential data, and environmental tracer data.

  17. Observations on vapor pressure in SPR caverns : sources.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Darrell Eugene

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The oil of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) represents a national response to any potential emergency or intentional restriction of crude oil supply to this country, and conforms to International Agreements to maintain such a reserve. As assurance this reserve oil will be available in a timely manner should a restriction in supply occur, the oil of the reserve must meet certain transportation criteria. The transportation criteria require that the oil does not evolve dangerous gas, either explosive or toxic, while in the process of transport to, or storage at, the destination facility. This requirement can be a challenge because the stored oil can acquire dissolved gases while in the SPR. There have been a series of reports analyzing in exceptional detail the reasons for the increases, or regains, in gas content; however, there remains some uncertainty in these explanations and an inability to predict why the regains occur. Where the regains are prohibitive and exceed the criteria, the oil must undergo degasification, where excess portions of the volatile gas are removed. There are only two known sources of gas regain, one is the salt dome formation itself which may contain gas inclusions from which gas can be released during oil processing or storage, and the second is increases of the gases release by the volatile components of the crude oil itself during storage, especially if the stored oil undergoes heating or is subject to biological generation processes. In this work, the earlier analyses are reexamined and significant alterations in conclusions are proposed. The alterations are based on how the fluid exchanges of brine and oil uptake gas released from domal salt during solutioning, and thereafter, during further exchanges of fluids. Transparency of the brine/oil interface and the transfer of gas across this interface remains an important unanswered question. The contribution from creep induced damage releasing gas from the salt surrounding the cavern is considered through computations using the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, suggesting a relative minor, but potentially significant, contribution to the regain process. Apparently, gains in gas content can be generated from the oil itself during storage because the salt dome has been heated by the geothermal gradient of the earth. The heated domal salt transfers heat to the oil stored in the caverns and thereby increases the gas released by the volatile components and raises the boiling point pressure of the oil. The process is essentially a variation on the fractionation of oil, where each of the discrete components of the oil have a discrete temperature range over which that component can be volatized and removed from the remaining components. The most volatile components are methane and ethane, the shortest chain hydrocarbons. Since this fractionation is a fundamental aspect of oil behavior, the volatile component can be removed by degassing, potentially prohibiting the evolution of gas at or below the temperature of the degas process. While this process is well understood, the ability to describe the results of degassing and subsequent regain is not. Trends are not well defined for original gas content, regain, and prescribed effects of degassing. As a result, prediction of cavern response is difficult. As a consequence of this current analysis, it is suggested that solutioning brine of the final fluid exchange of a just completed cavern, immediately prior to the first oil filling, should be analyzed for gas content using existing analysis techniques. This would add important information and clarification to the regain process. It is also proposed that the quantity of volatile components, such as methane, be determined before and after any degasification operation.

  18. Driving Down HB-LED Costs: Implementation of Process Simulation Tools and Temperature Control Methods of High Yield MOCVD Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Quinn

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this multi-faceted program is to develop epitaxial growth systems that meet a goal of 75% (4X) cost reduction in the epitaxy phase of HB-LED manufacture. A 75% reduction in yielded epitaxy cost is necessary in order to achieve the cost goals for widespread penetration of HB-LEDâ??s into back-lighting units (BLU) for LCD panels and ultimately for solid-state lighting (SSL). To do this, the program will address significant improvements in overall equipment Cost of Ownership, or CoO. CoO is a model that includes all costs associated with the epitaxy portion of production. These aspects include cost of yield, capital cost, operational costs, and maintenance costs. We divide the program into three phases where later phases will incorporate the gains of prior phases. Phase one activities are enabling technologies. In collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories we develop a Fluent-compatible chemistry predictive model and a set of mid-infrared and near-ultraviolet pyrometer monitoring tools. Where previously the modeling of the reactor dynamics were studied within FLUENT alone, here, FLUENT and Chemkin are integrated into a comprehensive model of fluid dynamics and the most advanced transport equations developed for Chemkin. Specifically, the Chemkin model offered the key reaction terms for gas-phase nucleation, a key consideration in the optimization of the MOCVD process. This new predictive model is used to design new MOCVD reactors with optimized growth conditions and the newly developed pyrometers are used monitor and control the MOCVD process temperature to within 0.5°C run-to-run and within each wafer. This portion of the grant is in collaboration with partners at Sandia National Laboratories. Phase two activities are continuous improvement projects which extend the current reactor platform along the lines of improved operational efficiency, improved systems control for throughput, and carrier modifications for increased yield. Programmatically, improvements made in Phase I are applied to developments of Phase II when applicable. Phase three is the culmination of the individual tasks from both phases one and two applied to proposed production platforms. We selectively combine previously demonstrated tasks and other options to develop a high-volume production-worthy MOCVD system demonstrating >3x throughput, 1.3x capital efficiency, and 0.7x cost of ownership. In a parallel demonstration we validate the concept of an improved, larger deposition system which utilizes the predictive modeling of chemistry-based flow analysis and extensions of the improvements demonstrated on the current platforms. This validation includes the build and testing of a prototype version of the hardware and demonstration of 69% reduction in the cost of ownership. Also, in this phase we present a stand-alone project to develop a high-temperature system which improves source efficiency by 30% while concurrently increasing growth rate by 1.3x. The material quality is held to the same material quality specifications of our existing baseline processes. The merits of other line item tasks in phase three are discussed for inclusion on next-generation platforms.

  19. Continuous Emissions Monitoring System Monitoring Plan for the Y-12 Steam Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), managed by BWXT, is submitting this Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) Monitoring Plan in conformance with the requirements of Title 40 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 75. The state of Tennessee identified the Y-12 Steam Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as a non-electrical generation unit (EGU) nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) budget source as a result of the NO{sub x} State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-3-27. Following this introduction, the monitoring plan contains the following sections: CEMS details, NO{sub x} emissions, and quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC). The following information is included in the attachments: fuel and flue gas diagram, system layout, data flow diagrams, Electronic Monitoring Plan printouts, vendor information on coal and natural gas feed systems, and the Certification Test Protocol. The Y-12 Steam Plant consists of four Wickes boilers. Each is rated at a maximum heat input capacity of 296.8 MMBtu/hour or 250,000 lb/hour of 250-psig steam. Although pulverized coal is the principal fuel, each of the units can fire natural gas or a combination of coal and gas. Each unit is equipped with a Joy Manufacturing Company reverse air baghouse to control particulate emissions. Flue gases travel out of the baghouse, through an induced draft fan, then to one of two stacks. Boilers 1 and 2 exhaust through Stack 1. Boilers 3 and 4 exhaust through Stack 2. A dedicated CEMS will be installed in the ductwork of each boiler, downstream of the baghouse. The CEMS will be designed, built, installed, and started up by URS Group, Inc. (URS). Data acquisition and handling will be accomplished using a data acquisition and handling system (DAHS) designed, built, and programmed by Environmental Systems Corporation (ESC). The installed CEMS will continuously monitor NO{sub x}, flue gas flowrate, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The CEMS will be utilized to report emissions from each unit for each ozone season starting May 1, 2003. Each boiler has independent coal and natural gas metering systems. Coal is fed to each boiler by belt-type coal feeders. Each boiler has two dedicated coal feeders. Natural gas may be burned along with coal for flame stability. The boilers may also be fired on natural gas alone. Orifice meters measure the natural gas flow to each boiler.

  20. Ground Penetrating Radar in Hydrogeophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan; Lambot, S.; Binley, A.; Slob, E.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the needs of a growing population and to provide us with a higher quality of life, increasing pressures are being placed on our environment through the development of agriculture, industry, and infrastructures. Soil erosion, groundwater depletion, salinization, and pollution have been recognized for decades as major threats to ecosystems and human health. More recently, the progressive substitution of fossil fuels by biofuels for energy production and climate change have been recognized as potential threats to our water resources and sustained agricultural productivity. The vadose zone mediates many of the processes that govern water resources and quality, such as the partition of precipitation into infiltration and runoff , groundwater recharge, contaminant transport, plant growth, evaporation, and energy exchanges between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. It also determines soil organic carbon sequestration and carbon-cycle feedbacks, which could substantially impact climate change. The vadose zone's inherent spatial variability and inaccessibility precludes direct observation of the important subsurface processes. In a societal context where the development of sustainable and optimal environmental management strategies has become a priority, there is a strong prerequisite for the development of noninvasive characterization and monitoring techniques of the vadose zone. In particular, hydrogeophysical approaches applied at relevant scales are required to appraise dynamic subsurface phenomena and to develop optimal sustainability, exploitation, and remediation strategies. Among existing geophysical techniques, ground penetrating radar (GPR) technology is of particular interest for providing high-resolution subsurface images and specifically addressing water-related questions. Ground penetrating radar is based on the transmission and reception of VHF-UHF (30-3000 MHz) electromagnetic waves into the ground, whose propagation is determined by the soil electromagnetic properties and their spatial distribution. As the dielectric permittivity of water overwhelms the permittivity of other soil components, the presence of water in the soil principally governs GPR wave propagation. Therefore, GPR-derived dielectric permittivity is usually used as surrogate measure for soil water content. In the areas of unsaturated zone hydrology and water resources, GPR has been used to identify soil stratigraphy, to locate water tables, to follow wetting front movement, to estimate soil water content, to assist in subsurface hydraulic parameter identification, to assess soil salinity, and to support the monitoring of contaminants. The purpose of this special section of the Vadose Zone Journal is to present recent research advances and applications of GPR in hydrogeophysics, with a particular emphasis on vadose zone investigations. This special section includes contributions presented at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2006 (EGU 2006, Vienna, Austria) and the 11th International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR 2006, Columbus, OH). The studies presented here deal with a wide range of surface and borehole GPR applications, including GPR sensitivity to contaminant plumes, new methods for soil water content determination, three-dimensional imaging of the subsurface, time-lapse monitoring of hydrodynamic events and inversion techniques for soil hydraulic properties estimation, and joint interpretation of GPR and electric resistivity tomography (ERT) data.