Sample records for defrees small wave

  1. DeFrees Large Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database DataDatatechnicNew Jersey: EnergyDeForest,DeFrees FlumeWave

  2. DeFrees Small Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database DataDatatechnicNew Jersey: EnergyDeForest,DeFrees

  3. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  4. Wave scattering by small particles in a medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Ramm

    2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave scattering is considered in a medium in which many small particles are embedded. Equations for the effective field in the medium are derived when the number of particles tends to infinity.

  5. Title of dissertation: SENSING SMALL CHANGES IN A WAVE CHAOTIC SCATTERING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: SENSING SMALL CHANGES IN A WAVE CHAOTIC SCATTERING SYSTEM Dissertation directed by: Professor Steven M. Anlage Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Wave of the cavity within its direct line-of-sight. In the first part of the dissertation, we propose and test a new

  6. Bragg scattering and wave-power extraction by an array of small buoys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bragg scattering and wave-power extraction by an array of small buoys By Xavier Garnaud & Chiang C to power-takeoff devices. The spacing between buoys is assumed to be comparable to the incident wavelength to the potential of power extraction from sea waves by an isolated unit such as a buoy, a raft or an oscillating

  7. Small divisor problem in the theory of three-dimensional water gravity waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iooss, Gérard

    Small divisor problem in the theory of three-dimensional water gravity waves G´erard Iooss , Pavel of Sciences, Lavryentyev pr. 15, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia gerard.iooss@inln.cnrs.fr, plotnikov@hydro of small divisors, the main difficulty is the inversion of the linearized operator at a non trivial point

  8. The life-cycle of drift-wave turbulence driven by small scale instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colm Connaughton; Sergey Nazarenko; Brenda Quinn

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate theoretically and numerically the zonal-flow/drift-wave feedback mechanism for the LH transition in an idealised model of plasma turbulence driven by a small scale instability. Zonal flows are generated by a secondary modulational instability of the modes which are directly driven by the primary instability. The zonal flows then suppress the small scales thereby arresting the energy injection into the system, a process which can be described using nonlocal wave turbulence theory. Finally, the arrest of the energy input results in saturation of the zonal flows at a level which can be estimated from the theory and the system reaches stationarity without damping of the large scales.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic kink waves in nonuniform solar flux tubes: phase mixing and energy cascade to small scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soler, Roberto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves are ubiquitously observed in the solar atmosphere. The propagation and damping of these waves may play relevant roles for the transport and dissipation of energy in the solar atmospheric medium. However, in the atmospheric plasma dissipation of transverse MHD wave energy by viscosity or resistivity needs very small spatial scales to be efficient. Here, we theoretically investigate the generation of small scales in nonuniform solar magnetic flux tubes due to phase mixing of MHD kink waves. We go beyond the usual approach based on the existence of a global quasi-mode that is damped in time due to resonant absorption. Instead, we use a modal expansion to express the MHD kink wave as a superposition of Alfv\\'en continuum modes that are phase mixed as time evolves. The comparison of the two techniques evidences that the modal analysis is more physically transparent and describes both the damping of global kink motions and the building up of small scales due to phase mixing. In ...

  10. Shock Formation in Small-Data Solutions to $3D$ Quasilinear Wave Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jared Speck

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In his 2007 monograph, D. Christodoulou proved a breakthrough result giving a detailed description of the formation of shocks in solutions to the relativistic Euler equations in three spatial dimensions. He assumed that the data have small $H^N$ norm, where $N$ is a sufficiently large integer. To deduce the shock formation, he also assumed that the data verify a signed integral inequality. In the present monograph, we extend Christodoulou's framework and use it to prove that shock singularities often develop in initially small, regular solutions to two important classes of quasilinear wave equations in three spatial dimensions. Our work also generalizes and unifies earlier work on singularity formation initiated by F. John in the 1970's and continued by L. H\\"ormander, S. Alinhac, and many others. Specifically, we study $\\mbox{i)}$ covariant scalar wave equations of the form $\\square_{g(\\Psi)} \\Psi = 0$ and $\\mbox{ii)}$ non-covariant scalar wave equations of the form $(h^{-1})^{\\alpha \\beta}(\\partial \\Phi) \\partial_{\\alpha} \\partial_{\\beta} \\Phi = 0.$ Our main result shows that whenever the nonlinear terms fail Klainerman's classic null condition, shocks develop in solutions arising from an open set of small data. Hence, within the classes $\\mbox{i)}$ and $\\mbox{ii)}$, our work can be viewed as a sharp converse to the well-known result of Christodoulou and Klainerman, which showed that when the classic null condition is verified, small-data global existence holds.

  11. Inflation that runs naturally: Gravitational waves and suppression of power at large and small scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn E. Minor; Manoj Kaplinghat

    2015-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out three correlated predictions of the axion monodromy inflation model: large amplitude of gravitational waves, suppression of power on horizon scales and on scales relevant for the formation of dwarf galaxies. While these predictions are likely generic to models with oscillations in the inflaton potential, the axion monodromy model naturally accommodates the required running spectral index through Planck-scale corrections to the inflaton potential. Applying this model to a combined data set of Planck, ACT, SPT, and WMAP low-$\\ell$ polarization cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, we find a best-fit tensor-to-scalar ratio $r_{0.05} = 0.07^{+0.05}_{-0.04}$ due to gravitational waves, which may have been observed by the BICEP2 experiment. Despite the contribution of gravitational waves, the total power on large scales (CMB power spectrum at low multipoles) is lower than the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology with a power-law spectrum of initial perturbations and no gravitational waves, thus mitigating some of the tension on large scales. There is also a reduction in the matter power spectrum of 20-30\\% at scales corresponding to $k = 10~{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, which are relevant for dwarf galaxy formation. This will alleviate some of the unsolved small-scale structure problems in the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology. The inferred matter power spectrum is also found to be consistent with recent Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest data, which is in tension with the Planck-favored $\\Lambda$CDM model with power-law primordial power spectrum.

  12. No steady water waves of small amplitude are supported by a shear flow with still free surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Kozlov; Nikolay Kuznetsov

    2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-dimensional free-boundary problem describing steady gravity waves with vorticity on water of finite depth is considered. It is proved that no small-amplitude waves are supported by a horizontal shear flow whose free surface is still in a coordinate frame such that the flow is time-independent in it. The class of vorticity distributions for which such flows exist includes all positive constant distributions, as well as linear and quadric ones with arbitrary positive coefficients.

  13. Experimental investigation of small-scale breaking waves : flow visualization across the air-water interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Angus Kai

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of breaking waves significantly affect air-sea fluxes of heat, momentum, mass and energy across the ocean interface. Breaking waves also contribute considerable loading to offshore and coastal structures, and ...

  14. Assessment of P and S wave energy radiated from very small shear-tensile seismic events in a deep South African mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    Assessment of P and S wave energy radiated from very small shear-tensile seismic events in a deep. Citation: Kwiatek, G., and Y. Ben-Zion (2013), Assessment of P and S wave energy radiated from very small of radiated seismic energy in S and P phases and derive ratios of S-to-P radiated energy (ES/EP) of 539

  15. SMALL-SCALE PRESSURE-BALANCED STRUCTURES DRIVEN BY OBLIQUE SLOW MODE WAVES MEASURED IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao Shuo [School of Geophysics and Information Technology, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); He, J.-S.; Tu, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-H. [Department of Geophysics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Marsch, E., E-mail: yaoshuo@cugb.edu.cn [Christian Albrechts University at Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, small-scale pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) were identified in the solar wind, but their formation mechanism remains unclear. This work aims to reveal the dependence of the properties of small-scale PBSs on the background magnetic field (B{sub 0}) direction and thus to corroborate the in situ mechanism that forms them. We analyze the plasma and magnetic field data obtained by WIND in the quiet solar wind at 1 AU. First, we use a developed moving-average method to obtain B{sub 0}(s, t) for every temporal scale (s) at each time moment (t). By wavelet cross-coherence analysis, we obtain the correlation coefficients between the thermal pressure P{sub th} and the magnetic pressure P{sub B}, distributing against the temporal scale and the angle {theta}{sub xB} between B{sub 0}(s, t) and Geocentric Solar Ecliptic coordinates (GSE)-x. We note that the angle coverage of a PBS decreases with shorter temporal scale, but the occurrence of the PBSs is independent of {theta}{sub xB}. Suspecting that the isolated small PBSs are formed by compressive waves in situ, we continue this study by testing the wave modes forming a small-scale PBS with B{sub 0}(s, t) quasi-parallel to GSE-x. As a result, we identify that the cross-helicity and the compressibility attain values for a slow mode from theoretical calculations. The wave vector is derived from minimum variance analysis. Besides, the proton temperatures obey T < T{sub Parallel-To} derived from the velocity distribution functions, excluding a mirror mode, which is the other candidate for the formation of PBSs in situ. Thus, a small-scale PBS is shown to be driven by oblique, slow-mode waves in the solar wind.

  16. Non-linear numerical simulations of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in small-scale flux tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Khomenko; M. Collados; T. Felipe

    2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of non-linear, 2D, numerical simulations of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in the photosphere and chromosphere of small-scale flux tubes with internal structure. Waves with realistic periods of three to five minutes are studied, after applying horizontal and vertical oscillatory perturbations to the equilibrium model. Spurious reflections of shock waves from the upper boundary are minimized thanks to a special boundary condition. This has allowed us to increase the duration of the simulations and to make it long enough to perform a statistical analysis of oscillations. The simulations show that deep horizontal motions of the flux tube generate a slow (magnetic) mode and a surface mode. These modes are efficiently transformed into a slow (acoustic) mode in the vA propagates vertically along the field lines, forms shocks and remains always within the flux tube. It might deposit effectively the energy of the driver into the chromosphere. When the driver oscillates with a high frequency, above the cut-off, non-linear wave propagation occurs with the same dominant driver period at all heights. At low frequencies, below the cut-off, the dominant period of oscillations changes with height from that of the driver in the photosphere to its first harmonic (half period) in the chromosphere. Depending on the period and on the type of the driver, different shock patterns are observed.

  17. Radiation and dissipation of internal waves generated by geostrophic motions impinging on small-scale topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikurashin, Maxim (Maxim Anatolevich)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations and inverse models suggest that small-scale turbulent mixing is enhanced in the Southern Ocean in regions above rough topography. The enhancement extends 1 km above the topography suggesting that mixing is ...

  18. Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCure, Mari Mae

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Waves is the supporting document to the Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition of the same title. Exhibited March 7-12 2010 in the Art and Design Gallery at the University of Kansas, Waves was comprised of a series of mixed media drawings...

  19. The effect of small inter-pulsar distance variations in stochastic gravitational wave background searches with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiara M. F. Mingarelli; Trevor Sidery

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary objectives for Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) is to detect a stochastic background generated by the incoherent superposition of gravitational waves (GWs), in particular from the cosmic population of supermassive black hole binaries. Current stochastic background searches assume that pulsars in a PTA are separated from each other and the Earth by many GW wavelengths. As more millisecond pulsars are discovered and added to PTAs, some may be separated by only a few radiation wavelengths or less, resulting in correlated GW phase changes between close pulsars in the array. Here we investigate how PTA overlap reduction functions (ORFs), up to quadrupole order, are affected by these additional correlated phase changes, and how they are in turn affected by relaxing the assumption that all pulsars are equidistant from the solar system barycenter. We find that in the low frequency GW background limit of $f\\sim10^{-9}$~Hz, and for pulsars at varying distances from the Earth, that these additional correlations only affect the ORFs by a few percent for pulsar pairs at large angular separations, as expected. However when nearby (order 100 pc) pulsars are separated by less than a few degrees, the correlated phase changes can introduce variations of a few tens of percent in the magnitude of the isotropic ORF, and much larger fractional differences in the anisotropic ORFs-- up to 188 in the $m=0$, $l=2$ ORF for equidistant pulsars separated by 3 degrees. In fact, the magnitude of most of the anisotropic ORFs is largest at small, but non-zero, pulsar separations. Finally, we write down a small angle approximation for the correlated phase changes which can easily be implemented in search pipelines, and for completeness, examine the behavior of the ORFs for pulsars which lie at a radiation wavelength from the Earth.

  20. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendel, Mark W [ORNL] [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL] [ORNL; Sangrey, Robert L [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Shea, Thomas J [ORNL] [ORNL; Hasegawa, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Kogawa, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Naoe, Dr. Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Farny, Dr. Caleb H. [Boston University] [Boston University; Kaminsky, Andrew L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  1. DeFrees Flume 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database DataDatatechnicNew Jersey: EnergyDeForest,

  2. DeFrees Flume 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database DataDatatechnicNew Jersey: EnergyDeForest,DeFrees Flume 2

  3. DeFrees Flume 3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database DataDatatechnicNew Jersey: EnergyDeForest,DeFrees Flume

  4. DeFrees Flume 4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05b No revisionDbrodt's blog Home

  5. Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry An interferometer is an instrument that is sensitive to the interference of two or more waves (optical or acoustic). For example, an optical interferometer uses two interfering light beams to measure small length changes. Coda wave interferometry

  6. Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    s & Dt^boooo^j Risø-R-525 Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation (Small-Scale Experiments EXPLOSION CHARACTERIZATION, WAVE PROPAGATION (Small-Scale Experiments) G.C. Larsen Abstract. A number characteristics 14 3.5. Characteristics of the primary pressure wave 21 3.6. Pressure propagation over a hard

  7. Gravity Waves Gravity Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    ;14/03/2014 6 H L H L L Phase & Group Velocity #12;14/03/2014 7 Doppler Effect #12;14/03/2014 8 Shock Waves #12;14/03/2014 14 Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Supernova blast waves #12;14/03/2014 15 Tycho's Remnant (SN 1572AD A SNR flythrough Theory of Supernova Blast Waves Supernovae: Type Ia Subsonic deflagration wave turning

  8. Creating Wave-Focusing Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Ramm

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic ideas for creating wave-focusing materials by injecting small particles in a given material are described. The number of small particles to be injected around any point is calculated. Inverse scattering problem with fixed wavenumber and fixed incident direction of the plane acoustic wave is formulated and solved.

  9. Nonlinear spherical Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulf Torkelsson; G. Christopher Boynton

    1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an one-dimensional numerical study of Alfven waves propagating along a radial magnetic field. Neglecting losses, any spherical Alfven wave, no matter how small its initial amplitude is, becomes nonlinear at sufficiently large radii. From previous simulations of Alfven waves in plane parallel atmospheres we did expect the waves to steepen and produce current sheets in the nonlinear regime, which was confirmed by our new calculations. On the other hand we did find that even the least nonlinear waves were damped out almost completely before 10 solar radii. A damping of that kind is required by models of Alfven wave-driven winds from old low-mass stars as these winds are mainly accelerated within a few stellar radii.

  10. Steady water waves with multiple critical layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnstrm; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahln

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

  11. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

  12. DISCOVERY OF SMALL-SCALE SPIRAL STRUCTURES IN THE DISK OF SAO 206462 (HD 135344B): IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PHYSICAL STATE OF THE DISK FROM SPIRAL DENSITY WAVE THEORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muto, T.; Takeuchi, T. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Grady, C. A. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland CA 96002 (United States); Hashimoto, J. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Fukagawa, M. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Hornbeck, J. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Sitko, M. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut St., Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Russell, R. [The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA 90009 (United States); Werren, C. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0011 (United States); Cure, M. [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valparaiso, Avda. Gran Bretana 1111, Casilla 5030, Valparaiso (Chile); Currie, T. [ExoPlanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ohashi, N. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Okamoto, Y.; Momose, M. [College of Science, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Honda, M. [Department of Information Science, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Inutsuka, S. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8602 (Japan); Dong, R.; Brandt, T. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, NJ08544 (United States); Abe, L. [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, 06300 Nice (France); Brandner, W., E-mail: muto@geo.titech.ac.jp [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high-resolution, H-band imaging observations, collected with Subaru/HiCIAO, of the scattered light from the transitional disk around SAO 206462 (HD 135344B). Although previous sub-mm imagery suggested the existence of a dust-depleted cavity at r {<=} 46 AU, our observations reveal the presence of scattered light components as close as 0.''2 ({approx} 28 AU) from the star. Moreover, we have discovered two small-scale spiral structures lying within 0.''5 ({approx} 70 AU). We present models for the spiral structures using the spiral density wave theory, and derive a disk aspect ratio of h {approx} 0.1, which is consistent with previous sub-mm observations. This model can potentially give estimates of the temperature and rotation profiles of the disk based on dynamical processes, independently from sub-mm observations. It also predicts the evolution of the spiral structures, which can be observable on timescales of 10-20 years, providing conclusive tests of the model. While we cannot uniquely identify the origin of these spirals, planets embedded in the disk may be capable of exciting the observed morphology. Assuming that this is the case, we can make predictions on the locations and, possibly, the masses of the unseen planets. Such planets may be detected by future multi-wavelength observations.

  13. WAVE HEIGHTS IN A 4D OCEAN WAVE FIELD Paul C. Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WAVE HEIGHTS IN A 4D OCEAN WAVE FIELD Paul C. Liu NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research a preliminary examination and analysis of a small suite of 4-D wave data to explore what new insight century. We feel it is timely to encourage further 4-D ocean wave measurement and thereby facilitate fresh

  14. Developing de Broglie Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J X Zheng-Johansson; P-I Johansson

    2006-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity $v$, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed $c$ between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$$=(\\frac{v}{c}){\\mit\\Lambda}$ and phase velocity $c^2/v+v$ which resembles directly L. de Broglie's hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transporting the particle mass at the speed $v$ and angular frequency ${\\mit\\Omega}_d=2\\pi v /{\\mit\\Lambda}_d$, with ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$ and ${\\mit\\Omega}_d$ obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase) wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schr\\"odinger equation of an identical system.

  15. Water Waves and Integrability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossen I. Ivanov

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

  16. Transport and generation of macroscopically modulated waves in diatomic chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Giannoulis

    2011-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive and justify analytically the dynamics of a small macroscopically modulated amplitude of a single plane wave in a nonlinear diatomic chain with stabilizing on-site potentials including the case where a wave generates another wave via self-interaction. More precisely, we show that in typical chains acoustical waves can generate optical but not acoustical waves, while optical waves are always closed with respect to self-interaction.

  17. Global coherence of dust density waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killer, Carsten; Melzer, Andr [Institut fr Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitt Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The coherence of self-excited three-dimensional dust density waves has been experimentally investigated by comparing global and local wave properties. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a radio frequency plasma with thermophoretic levitation. Global wave properties have been measured from the line-of-sight integrated dust density obtained from homogenous light extinction measurements. Local wave properties have been obtained from thin, two-dimensional illuminated laser slices of the cloud. By correlating the simultaneous global and local wave properties, the spatial coherence of the waves has been determined. We find that linear waves with small amplitudes tend to be fragmented, featuring an incoherent wave field. Strongly non-linear waves with large amplitudes, however, feature a strong spatial coherence throughout the dust cloud, indicating a high level of synchronization.

  18. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Small Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Award Success Story Proton Energy Systems Proton Energy Systems is a suc- cessful small business specializing in clean production that can be coupled with HOGEN RE® hydrogen generators are wind, solar, hydro, and wave power. Proton

  19. Vacuum Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

  20. Small Industrial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou are here Home » SmallEnergy

  1. acoustic wave properties: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1998, 2001 production by small animals limit the efficiency of sound communication (Bennet-Clark, 1998; Larsen Elias, Damian Octavio 136 Effect of drift-acoustic waves on...

  2. Circular polarization of obliquely propagating whistler wave magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellan, P. M. [Applied Physics, Caltech, Pasadena California 91125 (United States)] [Applied Physics, Caltech, Pasadena California 91125 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The circular polarization of the magnetic field of obliquely propagating whistler waves is derived using a basis set associated with the wave partial differential equation. The wave energy is mainly magnetic and the wave propagation consists of this magnetic energy sloshing back and forth between two orthogonal components of magnetic field in quadrature. The wave electric field energy is small compared to the magnetic field energy.

  3. Small Buildings and Small Portfolios

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocusOfficeMicrosoft PowerPointDepartment ofSmall

  4. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelista, Francesco A., E-mail: francesco.evangelista@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  5. Traveling water waves with point vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffer Varholm

    2015-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct small-amplitude solitary traveling gravity-capillary water waves with a finite number of point vortices along a vertical line, on finite depth. This is done using a local bifurcation argument. The properties of the resulting waves are also examined: We find that they depend significantly on the position of the point vortices in the water column.

  6. Active doublet method for measuring small changes in physical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Peter M. (Los Alamos, NM); Fehler, Michael C. (Los Alamos, NM); Johnson, Paul A. (Santa Fe, NM); Phillips, W. Scott (Santa Fe, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small changes in material properties of a work piece are detected by measuring small changes in elastic wave velocity and attenuation within a work piece. Active, repeatable source generate coda wave responses from a work piece, where the coda wave responses are temporally displaced. By analyzing progressive relative phase and amplitude changes between the coda wave responses as a function of elapsed time, accurate determinations of velocity and attenuation changes are made. Thus, a small change in velocity occurring within a sample region during the time periods between excitation origin times (herein called "doublets") will produce a relative delay that changes with elapsed time over some portion of the scattered waves. This trend of changing delay is easier to detect than an isolated delay based on a single arrival and provides a direct measure of elastic wave velocity changes arising from changed material properties of the work piece.

  7. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

  8. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  9. Sound wave propagation in weakly polydisperse granular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    Sound wave propagation in weakly polydisperse granular materials O. Mouraille, S. Luding NSM/DCT/TUDelft, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft, Netherlands Abstract Dynamic simulations of wave propagation are performed. A small perturbation is created on one side of a static packing and its propagation, for both P- and S-waves

  10. SURFING A WAVE TO COMPACT LASER TECHNOLOGY December 10 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    to waves trailing behind a moving boat and small bunches of electrons can gather energy from the waveSURFING A WAVE TO COMPACT LASER TECHNOLOGY December 10 2007 New laser-based technology could laser pulses can be fired into plasma to create a wake and its huge electric fields can be harnessed

  11. Linear water waves with vorticity: rotational features and particle paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnstrom; Gabriele Villari

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Steady linear gravity waves of small amplitude travelling on a current of constant vorticity are found. For negative vorticity we show the appearance of internal waves and vortices, wherein the particle trajectories are not any more closed ellipses. For positive vorticity the situation resembles that of Stokes waves, but for large vorticity the trajectories are affected.

  12. The parametric decay of Alfven waves into shear Alfven waves and dust lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamil, M. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Crescent Model School Shadman, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A.; Zubia, K.; Zeba, I.; Uzma, Ch. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The parametric decay instability of Alfven wave into low-frequency electrostatic dust-lower-hybrid and electromagnetic shear Alfven waves has been investigated in detail in a dusty plasma in the presence of external/ambient uniform magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic fluid equations of plasmas have been employed to find the linear and nonlinear response of the plasma particles for this three-wave nonlinear coupling in a dusty magnetoplasma. Here, relatively high frequency electromagnetic Alfven wave has been taken as the pump wave. It couples with other two low-frequency internal possible modes of the dusty magnetoplasma, viz., the dust-lower-hybrid and shear Alfven waves. The nonlinear dispersion relation of the dust-lower-hybrid wave has been solved to obtain the growth rate of the parametric decay instability. The growth rate is maximum for small value of external magnetic field B{sub s}. It is noticed that the growth rate is proportional to the unperturbed electron number density n{sub oe}.

  13. Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    of the second buoy's curved face. Upon deployment, the WEC successfully logged the power output of the system a wave energy converter (WEC) capable of providing at least a quarter-Watt of power to a small aquatic and basic wave generation technology to improving the power capture design of a basic direct drive WEC

  14. Propagating spectroscopy of backward volume spin waves in a metallic FeNi film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, N.; Ishida, N.; Kawakami, T. [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Sekiguchi, K., E-mail: koji-s@phys.keio.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); JST-PRESTO, Gobancho 7, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a propagating spin wave spectroscopy for a magnetostatic backward volume spin wave in a metallic Fe{sub 19}Ni{sub 81} film. We show that the mutual-inductance between two independent antennas detects a small but clear propagation signal of backward volume spin waves. All experimental data are consistent with the time-domain propagating spin-wave spectroscopy. The control of propagating backward spin wave enables to realize the miniaturize spin-wave circuit.

  15. Method and system for small scale pumping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Insepov, Zeke (Darien, IL); Hassanein, Ahmed (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to the field of small scale pumping and, more specifically, to a method and system for very small scale pumping media through microtubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for small scale pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more microtubes, the one or more tubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more tubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the tubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the tube.

  16. Dispersion equation for water waves with vorticity and Stokes waves on flows with counter-currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Kozlov; Nikolay Kuznetsov

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-dimensional free-boundary problem of steady periodic waves with vorticity is considered for water of finite depth. We investigate how flows with small-amplitude Stokes waves on the free surface bifurcate from a horizontal parallel shear flow in which counter-currents may be present. Two bifurcation mechanisms are described: for waves with fixed Bernoulli's constant and fixed wavelength. In both cases the corresponding dispersion equations serve for defining wavelengths from which Stokes waves bifurcate. Sufficient conditions guaranteeing the existence of roots of these equations are obtained. Two particular vorticity distributions are considered in order to illustrate general results.

  17. Experimental studies of the hydrodynamic characteristics of a sloped wave energy device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Chia-Po

    2000-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Many wave energy convertors are designed to use either vertical (heave) or horizontal (surge) movements of waves. But the frequency response of small heaving buoys and oscillating water column devices shows that they are ...

  18. Quantification of the influence of directional sea state parameters over the performances of wave energy converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascal, Remy Claude Rene

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate predictions of the annual energy yield from wave energy converters are essential to the development of the wave industry. The current method based on power matrices uses only a small part of the data available ...

  19. Small Generator Aggregation (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section establishes requirements for electricity providers to purchase electricity from small generators, with the goal of ensuring that small electricity generators (those with a nameplate...

  20. New Mexico Small Business

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA) helps small businesses in New Mexico access cutting-edge technologies, solve technical issues, and gain knowledge from technical experts...

  1. Small Business - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE - RL ContractsProcurements > Small Business DOE - RL ContractsProcurements RL Contracts & Procurements Home Prime Contracts Current Solicitations Small Business Other Sources...

  2. INL Small Business Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Business Program The Idaho National Laboratory Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Small Business Program is a fundamental component of the Supply Chain Management organization....

  3. Numerical wave optics and the lensing of gravitational waves by globular clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. Moylan; David E. McClelland; Susan M. Scott; Antony C. Searle; G. V. Bicknell

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possible effects of gravitational lensing by globular clusters on gravitational waves from asymmetric neutron stars in our galaxy. In the lensing of gravitational waves, the long wavelength, compared with the usual case of optical lensing, can lead to the geometrical optics approximation being invalid, in which case a wave optical solution is necessary. In general, wave optical solutions can only be obtained numerically. We describe a computational method that is particularly well suited to numerical wave optics. This method enables us to compare the properties of several lens models for globular clusters without ever calling upon the geometrical optics approximation, though that approximation would sometimes have been valid. Finally, we estimate the probability that lensing by a globular cluster will significantly affect the detection, by ground-based laser interferometer detectors such as LIGO, of gravitational waves from an asymmetric neutron star in our galaxy, finding that the probability is insignificantly small.

  4. Protective, Modular Wave Power Generation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vvedensky, Jane M.; Park, Robert Y.

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of small wave energy conversion modules that can be built into large, scalable arrays, in the same vein as solar panels, has been developed. This innovation lends itself to an organic business and development model, and enables the use of large-run manufacturing technology to reduce system costs. The first prototype module has been built to full-scale, and tested in a laboratory wave channel. The device has been shown to generate electricity and dissipate wave energy. Improvements need to be made to the electrical generator and a demonstration of an array of modules should be made in natural conditions.

  5. SRS Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

  6. SRS Small Modular Reactors

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

  7. Geometrical vs wave optics under gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond Anglil; Prasenjit Saha

    2015-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or, geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics - rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches - we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  8. Celebrating National Small Business Week, and Our FY 2011 Small...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Celebrating National Small Business Week, and Our FY 2011 Small Business Award Winners Celebrating National Small Business Week, and Our FY 2011 Small Business Award Winners May...

  9. Co-existence of whistler waves with kinetic Alfven wave turbulence for the high-beta solar wind plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mithaiwala, Manish; Crabtree, Chris; Ganguli, Gurudas [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5346 (United States); Rudakov, Leonid [Icarus Research Inc., P.O. Box 30780, Bethesda, Maryland 20824-0780 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the dispersion relation for whistler waves is identical for a high or low beta plasma. Furthermore, in the high-beta solar wind plasma, whistler waves meet the Landau resonance with electrons for velocities less than the thermal speed, and consequently, the electric force is small compared to the mirror force. As whistlers propagate through the inhomogeneous solar wind, the perpendicular wave number increases through refraction, increasing the Landau damping rate. However, the whistlers can survive because the background kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence creates a plateau by quasilinear (QL) diffusion in the solar wind electron distribution at small velocities. It is found that for whistler energy density of only {approx}10{sup -3} that of the kinetic Alfven waves, the quasilinear diffusion rate due to whistlers is comparable to KAW. Thus, very small amplitude whistler turbulence can have a significant consequence on the evolution of the solar wind electron distribution function.

  10. Water Waves Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,2) provide a kinematic description of water waves, which to this point means that the conditionsWater Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves

  11. International Workshop on Water Waves and Floating Bodies, Zelenogorsk, Russia, April 2008. Generation of focalized wave packet.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    fully nonlinear wave model follows from the theoretical developments by Krasny (1985) and Tuck (1997 a desingularized technique ­as proposed by Krasny (1985)­ leads to place sources at a small distance in the normal

  12. Steady water waves with multiple critical layers: interior dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnstrm; Joachim Escher; Gabriele Villari

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study small-amplitude steady water waves with multiple critical layers. Those are rotational two-dimensional gravity-waves propagating over a perfect fluid of finite depth. It is found that arbitrarily many critical layers with cat's-eye vortices are possible, with different structure at different levels within the fluid. The corresponding vorticity depends linearly on the stream function.

  13. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoto Yokoyama

    2011-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In wave turbulence, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, in which nonlinear interactions among wavenumbers are assumed to be small. In the weak turbulence theory, separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from the weak nonlinearity is also assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated even in weak turbulent systems where the nonlinear interactions are actually weak. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived without assuming the separation of the time scales in accordance with Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA), which has been successfully applied to Navier--Stokes turbulence. The kinetic equation of the weak turbulence theory is recovered from the DIA equations if the weak nonlinearity is assumed as an additional assumption. It suggests that the DIA equations is a natural extension of the conventional kinetic equation to not-necessarily-weak wave turbulence.

  14. Small Business Status

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Teaming Arrangements on Small Business Status The Department of Energy is planning to set aside for small businesses a number of acquisitions of a very complex nature, requiring a...

  15. the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    1 waves the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance propagating at a well-defined wave speed v. In transverse waves the particles of the medium move perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. In longitudinal waves the particles of the medium move parallel to the direction

  16. Aspects of Wave Turbulence in Preheating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jos A. Crespo; H. P. de Oliveira

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we have studied the nonlinear preheating dynamics of the $\\frac{1}{4} \\lambda \\phi^4$ inflationary model. It is well established that after a linear stage of preheating characterized by the parametric resonance, the nonlinear dynamics becomes relevant driving the system towards turbulence. Wave turbulence is the appropriated description of this phase since matter distributions are fields instead of usual fluids. Therefore, turbulence develops due to the nonlinear interations of waves, here represented by the small inhomogeneities of the inflaton field. We present relevant aspects of wave turbulence such as the Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectrum in frequency and wave number domains that indicates that there are a transfer of energy through scales. From the power spectrum of the matter energy density we were able to estimate the temperature of the thermalized system.

  17. Mid-frequency sound propagation through internal waves at short range with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mid-frequency sound propagation through internal waves at short range with synoptic oceanographic internal waves often are modeled as a background random process introducing small changes in the sound, during, and after the passage of a nonlinear internal wave on 18 August, 2006. Using oceanographic data

  18. Interaction of gravitational waves with strongly magnetized plasmas Heinz Isliker,1,* Ingmar Sandberg,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isliker, Heinz

    by the plasma from the GW and in the kind of plasma waves excited by the GW, and we focus on the case of veryInteraction of gravitational waves with strongly magnetized plasmas Heinz Isliker,1,* Ingmar of a gravitational wave (GW) with a plasma that is strongly magnetized. The GW is considered a small disturbance

  19. Musical Acoustics Lab, C. Bertulani PreLab 5 Wave Interference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    that the resultant displacement at a point is equal to the vector sum of the displacements of different waves-bottomed tray that can be filled with a small depth of water. A lamp is placed above the tank to project light by a digital function generator driving either a single or double point wave-source or a long straight wave

  20. Wave-current interaction in strongly sheared mean flows Zhifei Dong and James T. Kirby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Wave-current interaction in strongly sheared mean flows Zhifei Dong and James T. Kirby Center@udel.edu Abstract We describe a framework for wave-current interaction theory for small-amplitude surface gravity waves propagating on the strongly sheared mean flows. Using a multiple-scale perturbation method, we

  1. ON THE EXISTENCE OF STEADY PERIODIC CAPILLARY-GRAVITY STRATIFIED WATER WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    points for steady water waves. The condition which ensures the lack of stagnation points for 1991ON THE EXISTENCE OF STEADY PERIODIC CAPILLARY-GRAVITY STRATIFIED WATER WAVES DAVID HENRY AND BOGDANVASILE MATIOC Abstract. We prove the existence of small steady periodic capillary-gravity water waves

  2. Photon wave function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iwo Bialynicki-Birula

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon wave function is a controversial concept. Controversies stem from the fact that photon wave functions can not have all the properties of the Schroedinger wave functions of nonrelativistic wave mechanics. Insistence on those properties that, owing to peculiarities of photon dynamics, cannot be rendered, led some physicists to the extreme opinion that the photon wave function does not exist. I reject such a fundamentalist point of view in favor of a more pragmatic approach. In my view, the photon wave function exists as long as it can be precisely defined and made useful.

  3. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution

  4. Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) An overview of the...

  5. Internal Wave Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Manikandan S.

    Internal waves are a ubiquitous and significant means of momentum and energy transport in the oceans, atmosphere, and astrophysical bodies. Here, we show that internal wave propagation in nonuniform density stratifications, ...

  6. New wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Matthieu J.

    We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (Exp. Fluids, vol. 42, 2007, pp. 123130). This ...

  7. Bragg grating rogue wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degasperis, Antonio; Aceves, Alejandro B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the rogue wave solution of the classical massive Thirring model, that describes nonlinear optical pulse propagation in Bragg gratings. Combining electromagnetically induced transparency with Bragg scattering four-wave mixing, may lead to extreme waves at extremely low powers.

  8. Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    , known as parametric sub- harmonic instability, results generally when a disturbance of one frequency imparts energy to disturbances of half that frequency.13,14 Generally, a plane periodic internal wave, energy from primary waves is transferred, for example, to waves with half frequency. Self

  9. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy with their announcement that: "We find that a new type of sound wave, namely, the dust-acoustic waves, can appear" [1 and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some

  10. Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Ren Rydhof

    Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

  11. NNSA Small Business Week 2012: Small businesses play vital role...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog NNSA Small Business Week 2012: Small businesses ... NNSA Small Business Week 2012: Small businesses play...

  12. Small Wind Information (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative maintains a website section devoted to information about small wind turbines for homeowners, ranchers, and small businesses. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource.

  13. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  14. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  15. Gravitational waves from a curvaton model with blue spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Kitajima, Naoya; Yokoyama, Shuichiro, E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: nk610@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: shu@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the gravitational wave background induced by the first order scalar perturbations in the curvaton models. We consider the quadratic and axion-like curvaton potential which can generate the blue-tilted power spectrum of curvature perturbations on small scales and derive the maximal amount of gravitational wave background today. We find the power spectrum of the induced gravitational wave background has a characteristic peak at the frequency corresponding to the scale reentering the horizon at the curvaton decay, in the case where the curvaton does not dominate the energy density of the Universe. We also find the enhancement of the amount of the gravitational waves in the case where the curvaton dominates the energy density of the Universe. Such induced gravitational waves would be detectable by the future space-based gravitational wave detectors or pulsar timing observations.

  16. New wave equation for ultrarelativistic particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gins R. Prez Teruel

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from first principles and general assumptions based on the energy-momentum relation of the Special Theory of Relativity we present a novel wave equation for ultrarelativistic matter. This wave equation arises when particles satisfy the condition, $p>>m$, i.e, when the energy-momentum relation can be approximated by, $E\\simeq p+\\frac{m^{2}}{2p}$. Interestingly enough, such as the Dirac equation, it is found that this wave equation includes spin in a natural way. Furthermore, the free solutions of this wave equation contain plane waves that are completely equivalent to those of the theory of neutrino oscillations. Therefore, the theory reproduces some standard results of the Dirac theory in the limit $p>>m$, but offers the possibility of an explicit Lorentz Invariance Violation of order, $\\mathcal{O}((mc)^{4}/p^{2})$. As a result, the theory could be useful to test small departures from Dirac equation and Lorentz Invariance at very high energies. On the other hand, the wave equation can also describe particles of spin 1 by a simple substitution of the spin operators, $\\boldsymbol{\\sigma}\\rightarrow\\boldsymbol{\\alpha}$. In addition, it naturally admits a Lagrangian formulation and a Hamiltonian formalism. We also discuss the associated conservation laws that arise through the symmetry transformations of the Lagrangian.

  17. Small Business News, Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan ManagingW.tepidumAngle X-raySmallSmallSmall

  18. A comparison between matter wave and light wave interferometers for the detection of gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacme Delva; Marie-Christine Angonin; Philippe Tourrenc

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate and compare the response of light wave interferometers and matter wave interferometers to gravitational waves. We find that metric matter wave interferometers will not challenge kilometric light wave interferometers such as Virgo or LIGO, but could be a good candidate for the detection of very low frequency gravitational waves.

  19. Small Business Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Focus on Energy offers a free energy assessment and free or discounted energy savings items to small businesses with a peak monthly electric demand of less than 100 kilowatts. After the initial...

  20. Small Business First Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to maximizing opportunities for small business contracts, including prime contracts and subcontracts, while driving towards operational excellence and efficiency across the enterprise. Does not cancel other directives.

  1. Small Business Resources

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    terms) * Monitor invoices. * Pay early when you can get a discount. * Always keep an eye on your cash. * Prepare cash flow statements. 20 Top 10 Small Business Best Practices...

  2. Small Grains for Forage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Ethan C.

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for both early and sustained production. Further testing of these varieties is underway. Otller varieties may be used satisfactorily, but the ones named have given the most consistent performance. Small grain varieties differ in growth habit, some... carried out at Crys- tal City to determine the import- ance of stage of growth at first clipping and frequency of clipping on small grain forage yields. These results are presented in Table 1. Under both field ancl greenhouse conditions...

  3. Wave turbulence revisited: Where does the energy flow?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. V. Abdurakhimov; I. A. Remizov; A. A. Levchenko; G. V. Kolmakov; Y. V. Lvov

    2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulence in a system of nonlinearly interacting waves is referred to as wave turbulence. It has been known since seminal work by Kolmogorov, that turbulent dynamics is controlled by a directional energy flux through the wavelength scales. We demonstrate that an energy cascade in wave turbulence can be bi-directional, that is, can simultaneously flow towards large and small wavelength scales from the pumping scales at which it is injected. This observation is in sharp contrast to existing experiments and wave turbulence theory where the energy flux only flows in one direction. We demonstrate that the bi-directional energy cascade changes the energy budget in the system and leads to formation of large-scale, large-amplitude waves similar to oceanic rogue waves. To study surface wave turbulence, we took advantage of capillary waves on a free, weakly charged surface of superfluid helium He-II at temperature 1.7K. Although He-II demonstrates non-classical thermomechanical effects and quantized vorticity, waves on its surface are identical to those on a classical Newtonian fluid with extremely low viscosity. The possibility of directly driving a charged surface by an oscillating electric field and the low viscosity of He-II have allowed us to isolate the surface dynamics and study nonlinear surface waves in a range of frequencies much wider than in experiments with classical fluids.

  4. Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation Small...

  5. Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universitt

    1 Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave) One dimensional (beam) +(/x)dx +(/x)dx = (/x) (/x)dx=(2/x2)dx Mz +(Mz/x)dx Mz vy Fy Fy +(Fy/x)dx Structure-borne sound Bending wave flexural wave #12;2 Structure-borne sound Two obliquely propagating waves + - + + - + - Structure

  6. Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation The wave equation in an ideal fluid can be derived #12;66 2. Wave Propagation Theory quantities of the quiescent (time independent) medium are identified perturbations is much smaller than the speed of sound. 2.1.1 The Nonlinear Wave Equation Retaining higher

  7. Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

  8. Preliminary Investigations on Uncertainty Analysis of Wind-Wave Predictions in Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nekouee, Navid

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With all the improvement in wave and hydrodynamics numerical models, the question rises in our mind that how the accuracy of the forcing functions and their input can affect the results. In this paper, a commonly used numerical third generation wave model, SWAN is applied to predict waves in Lake Michigan. Wind data were analyzed to determine wind variation frequency over Lake Michigan. Wave predictions uncertainty due to wind local effects were compared during a period where wind had a fairly constant speed and direction over the northern and southern basins. The study shows that despite model calibration in Lake Michigan area, the model deficiency arises from ignoring wind effects in small scales. Wave prediction also emphasizes that small scale turbulence in meteorological forces can increase error in predictions up to 35%. Wave frequency and coherence analysis showed that both models are able to reveal the time scale of the wave variation with same accuracy. Insufficient number of meteorological stations ...

  9. New wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Matthieu J; Mathur, Manikandan; Gostiaux, Louis; Peacock, Thomas; Dauxois, Thierry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (2007). This mechanism, which involves a tunable source comprised of oscillating plates, has so far been used for a few fundamental studies of internal waves, but its full potential has yet to be realized. Our studies reveal that this approach is capable of producing a wide variety of two-dimensional wave fields, including plane waves, wave beams and discrete vertical modes in finite-depth stratifications. The effects of discretization by a finite number of plates, forcing amplitude and angle of propagation are investigated, and it is found that the method is remarkably efficient at generating a complete wave field despite forcing only one velocity component in a controllable manner. We furthermore find that the nature of the radiated wave field is well predicted using Fourier transforms of the spatial structure of the wave generator.

  10. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  11. Weak and strong wave turbulence spectra for elastic thin plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoto Yokoyama; Masanori Takaoka

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Variety of statistically steady energy spectra in elastic wave turbulence have been reported in numerical simulations, experiments, and theoretical studies. Focusing on the energy levels of the system, we have performed direct numerical simulations according to the F\\"{o}ppl--von K\\'{a}rm\\'{a}n equation, and successfully reproduced the variability of the energy spectra by changing the magnitude of external force systematically. When the total energies in wave fields are small, the energy spectra are close to a statistically steady solution of the kinetic equation in the weak turbulence theory. On the other hand, in large-energy wave fields, another self-similar spectrum is found. Coexistence of the weakly nonlinear spectrum in large wavenumbers and the strongly nonlinear spectrum in small wavenumbers are also found in moderate energy wave fields.

  12. Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs are highly competitive opportunities that encourage U.S.-based small businesses to engage in...

  13. Vol 435|23 June 2005 Floater clustering in a standing wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falkovich, Gregory

    the distribution of small particles that float on water? Here we show that drifting small particles concentrate in either the nodes or anti- nodes of a standing wave, depending on whether they are hydrophilic or hydro, the mass of liquid displaced by an object is equal to the mass of that object. Small hydrophilic particles

  14. Plane wave holonomies in loop quantum gravity II: sine wave solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donald E. Neville

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper constructs an approximate sinusoidal wave packet solution to the equations of loop quantum gravity (LQG). There is an SU(2) holonomy on each edge of the LQG simplex, and the goal is to study the behavior of these holonomies under the influence of a passing gravitational wave. The equations are solved in a small sine approximation: holonomies are expanded in powers of sines, and terms beyond $\\sin^2$ are dropped; also, fields vary slowly from vertex to vertex. The wave is unidirectional and linearly polarized. The Hilbert space is spanned by a set of coherent states tailored to the symmetry of the plane wave case. Fixing the spatial diffeomorphisms is equivalent to fixing the spatial interval between vertices of the loop quantum gravity lattice. This spacing can be chosen such that the eigenvalues of the triad operators are large, as required in the small sine limit, even though the holonomies are not large. Appendices compute the energy of the wave, estimate the lifetime of the coherent state packet, discuss coarse-graining, and determine the behavior of the spinors used in the U(N) SHO realization of LQG.

  15. Wave Energy challenges and possibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Energy challenges and possibilities By: Per Resen Steenstrup www.WaveStarEnergy.com Ris-R-1608(EN) 161 #12; Wave energy is an old story.... The first wave energy patent is 200 years old. Over the last 100 years more than 200 new wave energy devices have been developped and more than 1.000 patents

  16. Decay of helical Kelvin waves on a quantum vortex filament

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Gorder, Robert A., E-mail: rav@knights.ucf.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816-1364 (United States)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of helical Kelvin waves moving along a quantum vortex filament driven by a normal fluid flow. We employ the vector form of the quantum local induction approximation (LIA) due to Schwarz. For an isolated filament, this is an adequate approximation to the full Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov dynamics. The motion of such Kelvin waves is both translational (along the quantum vortex filament) and rotational (in the plane orthogonal to the reference axis). We first present an exact closed form solution for the motion of these Kelvin waves in the case of a constant amplitude helix. Such solutions exist for a critical wave number and correspond exactly to the Donnelly-Glaberson instability, so perturbations of such solutions either decay to line filaments or blow-up. This leads us to consider helical Kelvin waves which decay to line filaments. Unlike in the case of constant amplitude helical solutions, the dynamics are much more complicated for the decaying helical waves, owing to the fact that the rate of decay of the helical perturbations along the vortex filament is not constant in time. We give an analytical and numerical description of the motion of decaying helical Kelvin waves, from which we are able to ascertain the influence of the physical parameters on the decay, translational motion along the filament, and rotational motion, of these waves (all of which depend nonlinearly on time). One interesting finding is that the helical Kelvin waves do not decay uniformly. Rather, such waves decay slowly for small time scales, and more rapidly for large time scales. The rotational and translational velocity of the Kelvin waves depend strongly on this rate of decay, and we find that the speed of propagation of a helical Kelvin wave along a quantum filament is large for small time while the wave asymptotically slows as it decays. The rotational velocity of such Kelvin waves along the filament will increase over time, asymptotically reaching a finite value. These decaying Kelvin waves correspond to wave number below the critical value for the Donnelly-Glaberson instability, and hence our results on the Schwarz quantum LIA correspond exactly to what one would expect from prior work on the Donnelly-Glaberson instability.

  17. Geophys. J. Znt. (1991) 107, 531-543 Effects of point singularities on shear-wave propagation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Geophys. J. Znt. (1991) 107, 531-543 Effects of point singularities on shear-wave propagation In most directions of propagation in anisotropic solids, seismic shear waves split in regular small to cause conventional cusps on the group-velocity wave surfaces. The effects of propagation near

  18. Junhong Wei and Fuqing Zhang, Pennsylvania State University Mesoscale Gravity Waves in Moist Baroclinic Jet-Front Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    with small amount of moisture, dry dynamic gravity wave modes continue to dominate. However, convective-permitting simulations with the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model are performed to study mesoscale gravity waves/negative), and 7-km dynamic tropopause (turquoise lines). Wave Identification Figure 3. Comparison of WP5 at 132 h

  19. Wave-Corpuscle Mechanics for Electric Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Anatoli; Figotin, Alexander

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    superposition in nonlinear wave dynamics. Rev. Math. Phys.6. Babin, A. , Figotin, A. : Wave-corpuscle mechanics forV. , Fortunato, D. : Solitary waves in the nonlinear wave

  20. Small Game -- Cooking Care.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, Mary K.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or place under cold running water. How Small Game Fits into Basic Four Food Groups Small game provides variety to meals of families of Texas sportsmen and contributes needed high quality nutrients. Utilization of this wild game means conservation of a... Preserves X Coffee/Milk X Lunch Rabbit Oriental X Rice X Spinach X Fruit Cup X Brownies X Coffee/Milk X Supper Roast Raccoon X Dressing X Mixed Vegetables X Cranberry Juice X Rolls X Sugar Cookies X Coffee/Milk X 7 Preparation and Recipes...

  1. Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to predict the response of wave energy converters an accurate representation of the wave climate resource is crucial. This paper gives an overview of wave resource modeling techniques as well as detailing a methodology for estimating...

  2. Small Buildings and Small Portfolios Overview - 2014 BTO Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Office's Small Buildings and Small Portfolios activities. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs....

  3. Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

  4. The unexpected role of D waves in low-energy neutral pion photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Fernandez-Ramirez

    2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been commonly assumed that low-energy neutral pion photoproduction from the proton can be described accounting only for S and P waves, and that higher partial waves are irrelevant. We have found that this assumption is not correct and that the inclusion of D waves is necessary to obtain a reliable extraction of the $E_{0+}$ multipole from experimental data. This is due in large measure to the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry in QCD which leads to very small S-wave contributions. This makes the usual partial wave expansion less accurate and although D waves are small, their contribution is enhanced through the interference with P waves, which compromises the S-wave extraction from data if D waves are not taken into account. In our work we have used Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory to one loop, and up to ${\\cal O}(q^4)$, to account for the S and P waves, while D waves are added in an almost model-independent way using standard Born terms and vector mesons. We also show that higher partial waves do not play an important role.

  5. Secondary dust density waves excited by nonlinear dust acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinrich, J. R.; Kim, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K.; Merlino, R. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Rosenberg, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary dust density waves were observed in conjunction with high amplitude (n{sub d}/n{sub d0}>2) dust acoustic waves (DAW) that were spontaneously excited in a dc glow discharge dusty plasma in the moderately coupled, {Gamma}{approx}1, state. The high amplitude dust acoustic waves produced large dust particle oscillations, displacements, and trapping. Secondary dust density waves were excited in the wave troughs of the high amplitude DAWs. The waveforms, amplitudes, wavelengths, and wave speeds of the primary DAWs and the secondary waves were measured. A dust-dust streaming instability is discussed as a possible mechanism for the production of the secondary waves.

  6. Recirculation in multiple wave conversions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brizard, A.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model lies with the simple wave energy conservation law itthe recirculation of wave energy introduces interference e?particles, the tertiary-wave energy may be negative and thus

  7. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

  8. Mexico Small Business Assistance fest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    celebrate success at New Mexico Small Business Assistance fest April 4, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, April 4, 2011-The New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program is...

  9. Wavevortex interactions in the nonlinear Schrdinger equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yuan, E-mail: yuanguo@cims.nyu.edu; Bhler, Oliver [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)] [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a theoretical study of wavevortex interaction effects in the two-dimensional nonlinear Schrdinger equation, which is a useful conceptual model for the limiting dynamics of superfluid quantum condensates at zero temperature. The particular wavevortex interaction effects are associated with the scattering and refraction of small-scale linear waves by the straining flows induced by quantized point vortices and, crucially, with the concomitant nonlinear back-reaction, the remote recoil, that these scattered waves exert on the vortices. Our detailed model is a narrow, slowly varying wavetrain of small-amplitude waves refracted by one or two vortices. Weak interactions are studied using a suitable perturbation method in which the nonlinear recoil force on the vortex then arises at second order in wave amplitude, and is computed in terms of a Magnus-type force expression for both finite and infinite wavetrains. In the case of an infinite wavetrain, an explicit asymptotic formula for the scattering angle is also derived and cross-checked against numerical ray tracing. Finally, under suitable conditions a wavetrain can be so strongly refracted that it collapses all the way onto a zero-size point vortex. This is a strong wavevortex interaction by definition. The conditions for such a collapse are derived and the validity of ray tracing theory during the singular collapse is investigated.

  10. Diagonalization of pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A coordinate transformation is found which diagonalizes the axisymmetric pp-waves. Its effect upon concrete solutions, including impulsive and shock waves, is discussed.

  11. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  12. Small ASM probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, J.N.; Olinger, B.; Vorthman, J.E.; Wilder, L.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A part of the ongoing effort to miniaturize the adjoint sensitivity method (ASM) probe, six small probes in different configurations were tested on a single experiment. The results of the different configurations are presented. The ASM probe is quite accurate and its performance is well understood in those situations where we have a relatively large area that has 1-D flow. Area is expensive and it is desirable to make measurements using a minimum of this resource. When we confine ourselves to a small area we get electromagnetic effects and perturbations in the hydrodynamic flows that were absent in experiments whose lateral extent was large enough to effectively eliminate these problems. We are forced toward magnet and coil configurations that are not ideal for best accuracy. In the experiment described in this report, we describe and report the results of six ASM probes that approach the goal of using less area. 2 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. New Mexico Small Business Assistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA) helps small businesses in New Mexico access counties solve their technical challenges through NMSBA. Economic Impact of the Small Businesses related to NMSBA Small Business Jobs Created/Retained 2,874 Average Salary $38,647 Increased Revenue $145.2M

  14. Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, John C.

    Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks J. C. Wright , P. T. Bonoli , C hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron

  15. amplitude ion-acoustic waves: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ion kinematic viscosities on the linear ion-acoustic instability as well as the nonlinear propagation of small but finite amplitude solitary waves and shocks (SWS) in a negative...

  16. Wind Wave Float

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Power Peer Review WindWaveFloat Alla Weinstein Principle Power, Inc. aweinstein@principlepowerinc.com November 1, 2011 2 | Wind and Water Power Program eere.energy.gov...

  17. Waving in the rain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavaleri, Luigi; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the effect of rain on wind wave generation and dissipation. Rain falling on a wavy surface may have a marked tendency to dampen the shorter waves in the tail of the spectrum, the related range increasing with the rain rate. Following the coupling between meteorological and wave models, we derive that on the whole this should imply stronger wind and higher waves in the most energetic part of the spectrum. This is supported by numerical experiments. However, a verification based on the comparison between operational model results and measured data suggests that the opposite is true. This leads to a keen analysis of the overall process, in particular on the role of the tail of the spectrum in modulating the wind input and the white-capping. We suggest that the relationship between white-capping and generation by wind is deeper and more implicative than presently generally assumed.

  18. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  19. Surface wave interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halliday, David Fraser

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis concerns the application of seismic interferometry to surface waves. Seismic interferometry is the process by which the wavefield between two recording locations is estimated, resulting in new recordings at ...

  20. Millimeter-wave sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seoktae

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    New millimeter wave interferometric, multifunctional sensors have been studied for industrial sensing applications: displacement measurement, liquid-level gauging and velocimetry. Two types of configuration were investigated to implement the sensor...

  1. Pilot-wave hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W. M.

    Yves Couder, Emmanuel Fort, and coworkers recently discovered that a millimetric droplet sustained on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath may self-propel through a resonant interaction with its own wave field. This article ...

  2. Slow Waves in Fractures Filled with Viscous Fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korneev, Valeri

    2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Stoneley guided waves in a fluid-filled fracture generally have larger amplitudes than other waves, and therefore, their properties need to be incorporated in more realistic models. In this study, a fracture is modeled as an infinite layer of viscous fluid bounded by two elastic half-spaces with identical parameters. For small fracture thickness, I obtain a simple dispersion equation for wave-propagation velocity. This velocity is much smaller than the velocity of a fluid wave in a Biot-type solution, in which fracture walls are assumed to be rigid. At seismic prospecting frequencies and realistic fracture thicknesses, the Stoneley guided wave has wavelengths on the order of several meters and an attenuation Q factor exceeding 10, which indicates the possibility of resonance excitation in fluid-bearing rocks. The velocity and attenuation of Stoneley guided waves are distinctly different at low frequencies for water and oil. The predominant role of fractures in fluid flow at field scales is supported by permeability data showing an increase of several orders of magnitude when compared to values obtained at laboratory scales. These data suggest that Stoneley guided waves should be taken into account in theories describing seismic wave propagation in fluid-saturated rocks.

  3. Electron Beam Transport in Advanced Plasma Wave Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Ronald L

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this grant was to develop a diagnostic for relativistic plasma wave accelerators based on injecting a low energy electron beam (5-50keV) perpendicular to the plasma wave and observing the distortion of the electron beam's cross section due to the plasma wave's electrostatic fields. The amount of distortion would be proportional to the plasma wave amplitude, and is the basis for the diagnostic. The beat-wave scheme for producing plasma waves, using two CO2 laser beam, was modeled using a leap-frog integration scheme to solve the equations of motion. Single electron trajectories and corresponding phase space diagrams were generated in order to study and understand the details of the interaction dynamics. The electron beam was simulated by combining thousands of single electrons, whose initial positions and momenta were selected by random number generators. The model was extended by including the interactions of the electrons with the CO2 laser fields of the beat wave, superimposed with the plasma wave fields. The results of the model were used to guide the design and construction of a small laboratory experiment that may be used to test the diagnostic idea.

  4. Global well-posedness of the 3-D full water wave problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sijue Wu

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of global in time existence and uniqueness of solutions of the 3-D infinite depth full water wave problem. We show that the nature of the nonlinearity of the water wave equation is essentially of cubic and higher orders. For any initial interface that is sufficiently small in its steepness and velocity, we show that there exists a unique smooth solution of the full water wave problem for all time, and the solution decays at the rate $1/t$.

  5. Autoresonant Excitation of Diocotron Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    of the wave, the pump and the wave will phase lock at very low wave amplitude. When the pump reachesAutoresonant Excitation of Diocotron Waves J. Fajans E. Gilson U.C. Berkeley L. Friedland Hebrew of phase with the oscillator, and the os- cillator's amplitude will decrease, eventually reaching zero

  6. Small Business Commitment | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology and Soft7/2014U.S.C.SlowSmall Business

  7. Small Particles, Big Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology| National Nuclear SecurityDepartmentSmall

  8. Small Modular Reactors - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariateSite Map Main Menu Aboutsmr Small Modular

  9. WAVE INTERACTION EFFECTS FOR NONCOMPLIANT TLP P. Teigen J.M. Niedzwecki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    of small (infinitesimal) wave heights and linearized boundary condi tions. A logical extension of linear predictions obtained with a second order diffraction program is compared to experimental results from model for wave height/deck clear ance are obtained from stochastic analysis performed on extensive experimental

  10. Circumferential creeping waves around a fluid-filled cylindrical cavity in an elastic medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    of fluid fuel trapped in these rather small approximately 67 mm in diameter holes would strongly affectCircumferential creeping waves around a fluid-filled cylindrical cavity in an elastic medium Waled The dispersion behavior of circumferential creeping waves around a fluid-filled cylindrical cavity in an infinite

  11. Possible Zero-Flux Transport induced by Density Waves in a Tube filled with Solid Helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwang-Hua W. Chu

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Macroscopic derivation of the entrainment in a supersolid cylinder induced by a surface elastic wave (of small amplitude) propagating along the flexible interface is conducted by considering the nonlinear coupling between the interface and the rarefaction effect. We obtain the critical bounds for zero-volume-flow-rate states corresponding to specific rarefaction measure and wave number which is relevant to the rather small critical velocity or disappearance of supersolid flows reported by Rittner and Reppy.

  12. Seismic waves in rocks with fluids and fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic wave propagation through the earth is often stronglyaffected by the presence of fractures. When these fractures are filledwith fluids (oil, gas, water, CO2, etc.), the type and state of the fluid(liquid or gas) can make a large difference in the response of theseismic waves. This paper summarizes recent work on methods ofdeconstructing the effects of fractures, and any fluids within thesefractures, on seismic wave propagation as observed in reflection seismicdata. One method explored here is Thomsen's weak anisotropy approximationfor wave moveout (since fractures often induce elastic anisotropy due tononuniform crack-orientation statistics). Another method makes use ofsome very convenient fracture parameters introduced previously thatpermit a relatively simple deconstruction of the elastic and wavepropagation behavior in terms of a small number of fracture parameters(whenever this is appropriate, as is certainly the case for small crackdensities). Then, the quantitative effects of fluids on thesecrack-influence parameters are shown to be directly related to Skempton scoefficient B of undrained poroelasticity (where B typically ranges from0 to 1). In particular, the rigorous result obtained for the low crackdensity limit is that the crack-influence parameters are multiplied by afactor (1 ? B) for undrained systems. It is also shown how fractureanisotropy affects Rayleigh wave speed, and how measured Rayleigh wavespeeds can be used to infer shear wave speed of the fractured medium.Higher crack density results are also presented by incorporating recentsimulation data on such cracked systems.

  13. Small Business Services | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Small Business Services Small Business Services Welcome to the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) The OSDBU advocates putting small business first in...

  14. Study Question: 7 May 2012 OC514 Waves Waveguide modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    condition at t=0. Now consider propagation down the channel, in the x-direction. A disturbance at the center-dispersive waves have, in the presence of confining boundaries, a sort of dispersion. Plot the frequency, and discuss how a initially small scale disturbance will propagate. Choose just one value of n, so that we

  15. Non-linear Langmuir waves in a warm quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinov, Alexander E., E-mail: dubinov-ae@yandex.ru; Kitaev, Ilya N. [Russian Federal Nuclear CenterAll-Russia Scientific and Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF), 37 Mira Ave., Nizhny Novgorod region, Sarov 607188 (Russian Federation); Sarov State Institute of Physics and Technology (SarFTI), National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, 607186 Sarov, Nizhny Novgorod region (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-linear differential equation describing the Langmuir waves in a warm quantum electron-ion plasma has been derived. Its numerical solutions of the equation show that ordinary electronic oscillations, similar to the classical oscillations, occur along with small-scale quantum Langmuir oscillations induced by the Bohm quantum force.

  16. Critical Waves and the Length Problem of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, R B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that the mystery of how biological systems measure their lengths vanishes away if one premises that they have discovered a way to generate linear waves analogous to compressional sound. These can be used to detect length at either large or small scales using echo timing and fringe counting. It is shown that suitable linear chemical potential waves can, in fact, be manufactured by tuning to criticality conventional reaction-diffusion with a small number substances. Min oscillations in E. coli are cited as precedent resonant length measurement using chemical potential waves analogous to laser detection. Mitotic structures in eucaryotes are identified as candidates for such an effect at higher frequency. The engineering principle is shown to be very general and functionally the same as that used by hearing organs. PNAS Significance Statement: This paper invokes physical principles to address the question of how living things might use reaction-diffusion to measure out and regulate the many thou...

  17. The Very Small Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angela C. Taylor

    2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Very Small Array (VSA) is a fourteen-element interferometer designed to study the cosmic microwave background on angular scales of 2.4 to 0.2 degrees (angular multipoles l = 150 to 1800). It operates at frequencies between 26 and 36 GHz, with a bandwidth of 1.5 GHz, and is situated at the Teide Observatory, Tenerife. The instrument also incorporates a single-baseline interferometer, with larger collecting area, operating simultaneously with and at the same frequency as the VSA main array. This provides accurate flux measurements of contaminating radio sources in the VSA observations. Since September 2000, the VSA has been making observations of primordial CMB fluctuations. We describe the instrument, observing strategy and current status of the first year of observations.

  18. Small caliber guided projectile

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, James F. (Albuquerque, NM); Kast, Brian A. (Albuquerque, NM); Kniskern, Marc W. (Albuquerque, NM); Rose, Scott E. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohrer, Brandon R. (Albuquerque, NM); Woods, James W. (Albuquerque, NM); Greene, Ronald W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-spinning projectile that is self-guided to a laser designated target and is configured to be fired from a small caliber smooth bore gun barrel has an optical sensor mounted in the nose of the projectile, a counterbalancing mass portion near the fore end of the projectile and a hollow tapered body mounted aft of the counterbalancing mass. Stabilizing strakes are mounted to and extend outward from the tapered body with control fins located at the aft end of the strakes. Guidance and control electronics and electromagnetic actuators for operating the control fins are located within the tapered body section. Output from the optical sensor is processed by the guidance and control electronics to produce command signals for the electromagnetic actuators. A guidance control algorithm incorporating non-proportional, "bang-bang" control is used to steer the projectile to the target.

  19. Modulational instability of electromagnetic waves in a collisional quantum magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastbood, E.; Bafandeh, F.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir [Physics Department of Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The modulational instability of right-hand circularly polarized electromagnetic electron cyclotron (CPEM-EC) wave in a magnetized quantum plasma is studied taking into account the collisional effects. Employing quantum hydrodynamic and nonlinear Schrdinger equations, the dispersion relation of modulated CPEM-EC wave in a collisional plasma has been derived. It is found that this wave is unstable in such a plasma system and the growth rate of the associated instability depends on various parameters such as electron Fermi temperature, plasma number density, collision frequency, and modulation wavenumber. It is shown that while the increase of collision frequency leads to increase of the growth rate of instability, especially at large wavenumber limit, the increase of plasma number density results in more stable modulated CPEM-EC wave. It is also found that in contrast to collisionless plasma in which modulational instability is restricted to small wavenumbers, in collisional plasma, the interval of instability occurrence can be extended to a large domain.

  20. An integrable evolution equation for surface waves in deep water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Kraenkel; H. Leblond; M. A. Manna

    2011-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to describe the dynamics of monochromatic surface waves in deep water, we derive a nonlinear and dispersive system of equations for the free surface elevation and the free surface velocity from the Euler equations in infinite depth. From it, and using a multiscale perturbative methods, an asymptotic model for small-aspect-ratio waves is derived. The model is shown to be completely integrable. The Lax pair, the first conserved quantities as well as the symmetries are exhibited. Theoretical and numerical studies reveal that it supports periodic progressive Stokes waves which peak and break in finite time. Comparison between the limiting wave solution of the asymptotic model and classical irrotational results is performed.

  1. Small Power Production Facilities (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that:...

  2. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  3. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Study of Magnetohydrodynamic Surface Waves on Liquid Gallium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hantao Ji; William Fox; David Pace; H.L. Rappaport

    2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) surface waves on liquid gallium are studied theoretically and experimentally in the small magnetic Reynolds number limit. A linear dispersion relation is derived when a horizontal magnetic field and a horizontal electric current is imposed. No wave damping is found in the shallow liquid limit while waves always damp in the deep liquid limit with a magnetic field parallel to the propagation direction. When the magnetic field is weak, waves are weakly damped and the real part of the dispersion is unaffected, while in the opposite limit waves are strongly damped with shortened wavelengths. In a table-top experiment, planar MHD surface waves on liquid gallium are studied in detail in the regime of weak magnetic field and deep liquid. A non-invasive diagnostic accurately measures surface waves at multiple locations by reflecting an array of lasers off the surface onto a screen, which is recorded by an Intensified-CCD camera. The measured dispersion relation is consistent with the linear theory with a reduced surface tension likely due to surface oxidation. In excellent agreement with linear theory, it is observed that surface waves are damped only when a horizontal magnetic field is imposed parallel to the propagation direction. No damping is observed under a perpendicular magnetic field. The existence of strong wave damping even without magnetic field suggests the importance of the surface oxide layer. Implications to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors, especially on the wave damping and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability when the Lorentz force is used to support liquid metal layer against gravity, are discussed.

  5. Scattering of radio frequency waves by blobs in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, Abhay K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Kominis, Yannis [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, Athens, GR-15773 (Greece)] [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, Athens, GR-15773 (Greece)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The density fluctuations and blobs present in the edge region of magnetic fusion devices can scatter radio frequency (RF) waves through refraction, reflection, diffraction, and coupling to other plasma waves. This, in turn, affects the spectrum of the RF waves and the electromagnetic power that reaches the core of the plasma. The usual geometric optics analysis of RF scattering by density blobs accounts for only refractive effects. It is valid when the amplitude of the fluctuations is small, of the order of 10%, compared to the background density. In experiments, density fluctuations with much larger amplitudes are routinely observed, so that a more general treatment of the scattering process is needed. In this paper, a full-wave model for the scattering of RF waves by a blob is developed. The full-wave approach extends the range of validity well beyond that of geometric optics; however, it is theoretically and computationally much more challenging. The theoretical procedure, although similar to that followed for the Mie solution of Maxwell's equations, is generalized to plasmas in a magnetic field. Besides diffraction and reflection, the model includes coupling to a different plasma wave than the one imposed by the external antenna structure. In the model, it is assumed that the RF waves interact with a spherical blob. The plasma inside and around the blob is cold, homogeneous, and imbedded in a uniform magnetic field. After formulating the complete analytical theory, the effect of the blob on short wavelength electron cyclotron waves and longer wavelength lower hybrid waves is studied numerically.

  6. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  7. Standing wave compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  8. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  9. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

    2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  10. Coherent cooling of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave: Wave function and stochastic trajectory approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argonov, V. Yu., E-mail: argonov@poi.dvo.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Pacific Oceanological Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field can suppress packet splitting for some atoms whose specific velocities are in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We demonstrate and explain this effect numerically and analytically. We also demonstrate that the modulated field can not only trap but also cool the atoms. We perform a numerical experiment with a large atomic ensemble having wide initial velocity and energy distributions. During the experiment, most of atoms leave the wave while the trapped atoms have a narrow energy distribution.

  11. Magnetic instability in a dilute circular rarefaction wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dieckmann, M. E. [Department of Science and Technology (ITN), Linkoping University, 60174 Norrkoping (Sweden); Sarri, G.; Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of magnetic fields in the density gradient of a rarefaction wave has been observed in simulations and in laboratory experiments. The thermal anisotropy of the electrons, which gives rise to the magnetic instability, is maintained by the ambipolar electric field. This simple mechanism could be important for the magnetic field amplification in astrophysical jets or in the interstellar medium ahead of supernova remnant shocks. The acceleration of protons and the generation of a magnetic field by the rarefaction wave, which is fed by an expanding circular plasma cloud, is examined here in form of a 2D particle-in-cell simulation. The core of the plasma cloud is modeled by immobile charges, and the mobile protons form a small ring close to the cloud's surface. The number density of mobile protons is thus less than that of the electrons. The protons of the rarefaction wave are accelerated to 1/10 of the electron thermal speed, and the acceleration results in a thermal anisotropy of the electron distribution in the entire plasma cloud. The instability in the rarefaction wave is outrun by a TM wave, which grows in the dense core distribution, and its magnetic field expands into the rarefaction wave. This expansion drives a secondary TE wave.

  12. Real-time Water Waves with Wave Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuksel, Cem

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the wave particles technique for simulating water surface waves and two way fluid-object interactions for real-time applications, such as video games. Water exists in various different forms in our environment...

  13. Propagation of seismic waves through liquefied soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiebat, Mahdi; Jeremic, Boris; Dafalias, Yannis; Kaynia, Amir; Cheng, Zhao

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the mechanisms of wave propagation and ARTICLE IN PRESS M.Numerical analysis Wave propagation Earthquake Liquefactionenergy during any wave propagation. This paper summarizes

  14. mm-Wave Phase Shifters and Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adabi Firouzjaei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.1.1 Slow wave transmissioncombiners . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 mm-Wave implementationfailed to predict current mm-wave design trend [1] . . . . .

  15. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  16. Wave refraction and wave energy on Cayo Arenas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Donald Eugene

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis By Donald E. Welsh Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1962 Major Subject: Physical Oceanography WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis Donald E. Walsh Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of the Committee ead of Department ' / January 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

  17. Shear Waves, Sound Waves On A Shimmering Horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omid Saremi

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of the so called ``membrane paradigm'' of black holes/branes, it has been known for sometime that the dynamics of small fluctuations on the stretched horizon can be viewed as corresponding to diffusion of a conserved charge in simple fluids. To study shear waves in this context properly, one must define a conserved stress tensor living on the stretched horizon. Then one is required to show that such a stress tensor satisfies the corresponding constitutive relations. These steps are missing in a previous treatment of the shear perturbations by Kovtun, Starinets and Son. In this note, we fill the gap by prescribing the stress tensor on the stretched horizon to be the Brown and York (or Balasubramanian-Kraus (BK) in the AdS/CFT context) holographic stress tensor. We are then able to show that such a conserved stress tensor satisfies the required constitutive relation on the stretched horizon using Einstein equations. We read off the shear viscosity from the constitutive relations in two different channels, shear and sound. We find an expression for the shear viscosity in both channels which are equal, as expected. Our expression is in agreement with a previous membrane paradigm formula reported by Kovtun, Starinets and Son.

  18. Using Fluctuations of the Local Energy to Improve Many-Body Wave Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Kiel T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is developed that allows analysis of quantum Monte Carlo simulations to identify errors in trial wave functions. The purpose of this method is to allow for the systematic improvement of variational wave functions by identifying degrees of freedom that are not well-described by an initial trial state. We provide proof of concept implementations of this method both by identifying the need for a Slater-Jastrow wave function, and implementing a selected multi-determinant wave function algorithm for small dimers that systematically decreases the variational energy. This method may provide a route to analyze and systematically improve descriptions of complex quantum systems in a scalable way.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic Shearing Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan M. Johnson

    2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    I consider the nonaxisymmetric linear theory of a rotating, isothermal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shear flow. The analysis is performed in the shearing box, a local model of a thin disk, using a decomposition in terms of shearing waves, i.e., plane waves in a frame comoving with the shear. These waves do not have a definite frequency as in a normal mode decomposition, and numerical integration of a coupled set of amplitude equations is required to characterize their time dependence. Their generic time dependence, however, is oscillatory with slowly-varying frequency and amplitude, and one can construct accurate analytical solutions by applying the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method to the full set of amplitude equations. The solutions have the following properties: 1) Their accuracy increases with wavenumber, so that most perturbations that fit within the disk are well-approximated as modes with time-dependent frequencies and amplitudes. 2) They can be broadly classed as incompressive and compressive perturbations, the former including the nonaxisymmetric extension of magnetorotationally unstable modes, and the latter being the extension of fast and slow modes to a differentially-rotating medium. 3) Wave action is conserved, implying that their energy varies with frequency. 4) Their shear stress is proportional to the slope of their frequency, so that they transport angular momentum outward (inward) when their frequency increases (decreases). The complete set of solutions constitutes a comprehensive linear test suite for numerical MHD algorithms that incorporate a background shear flow. I conclude with a brief discussion of possible astrophysical applications.

  20. Instability of low density supersonic waves of a viscous isentropic gas flow through a nozzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weishi

    of isentropic compressible fluid through a narrow nozzle with variable cross-section area (see [1, 2, 3, 10, 11 flows through a nozzle with varying cross-section areas. The main result in this paper is, for small-section area a(x) is sufficiently small. T. P. Liu then focused on transonic waves of gas flow in a nozzle

  1. CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland ABSTRACT Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) operating on the water surface are subject to storms at station 139. Keywords: wave energy, survivability, breaking waves, joint distribution, OWEC INTRODUCTION

  2. Breakdown-prone volume in terahertz wave beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Qiao, F.; Kashyn, D. G.; Pu, R. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-3511 (United States)] [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-3511 (United States); Dolin, L. S. [Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod 603600 (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod 603600 (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was motivated by the recently proposed concept of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials by a focused terahertz (THz) radiation [V. L. Granatstein and G. S. Nusinovich, J. Appl. Phys. 108, 063304 (2010)]. According to this concept, a high-power THz radiation should be focused in a small spot where the field intensity exceeds the breakdown threshold. In the presence of free electrons in such a breakdown-prone volume, a THz discharge will occur there. However, this volume should be so small that in the absence of ionizing sources in its vicinity the probability to have there any free electrons is low. Then, the increased breakdown rate in a series of THz pulses would indicate the presence of hidden radioactive materials in the vicinity of the focused spot. For this concept, it is important to accurately determine the breakdown-prone volume created by a focused THz radiation. This problem is analyzed in this paper, first, for the case of a single wave beam and, then, for the case of crossing wave beams of different polarizations. The problem is studied first ignoring the diffraction spread of wave beams in the vicinity of the focal plane and, then, with the account for the diffraction spreading. Then, relations between the THz wave power, the range of such a system and the breakdown-prone volume are analyzed. Finally, the effect of the atmospheric turbulence on propagation and focusing of THz wave beams in air is considered.

  3. 2, 70177025, 2014 Freaque wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NHESSD 2, 70177025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract to the corresponding final paper in NHESS if available. Brief Communication: Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  4. EVOLUTION OF L HYBRID WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    is an envelope solitary wave. These solitary waves are not solitons. The occurrence of the constant phase pulses-state propagation of one of the two lower hybrid rays in a homogeneous considering the balance between thermal break up into two types of solitary waves, constant phase pulses or envelope pulses. e examine

  5. Microstructural Design for Stress Wave Energy Management /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tehranian, Aref

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nemat-Nasser, Stress-wave energy management through materialNasser, S. , 2010. Stress-wave energy management throughconstitute pressure wave energy and/or shear wave energy.

  6. Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains NearMaster University Tsunamis and ocean waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent

  7. Projected Constraints on Lorentz-Violating Gravity with Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devin Hansen; Nicolas Yunes; Kent Yagi

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational waves are excellent tools to probe the foundations of General Relativity in the strongly dynamical and non-linear regime. One such foundation is Lorentz symmetry, which can be broken in the gravitational sector by the existence of a preferred time direction, and thus, a preferred frame at each spacetime point. This leads to a modification in the orbital decay rate of binary systems, and also in the generation and chirping of their associated gravitational waves. We here study whether waves emitted in the late, quasi-circular inspiral of non-spinning, neutron star binaries can place competitive constraints on two proxies of gravitational Lorentz-violation: Einstein-\\AE{}ther theory and khronometric gravity. We model the waves in the small-coupling (or decoupling) limit and in the post-Newtonian approximation, by perturbatively solving the field equations in small deformations from General Relativity and in the small-velocity/weak-gravity approximation. We assume a gravitational wave consistent with General Relativity has been detected with second- and third-generation, ground-based detectors, and with the proposed space-based mission, DECIGO, with and without coincident electromagnetic counterparts. Without a counterpart, a detection consistent with General Relativity of neutron star binaries can only place competitive constraints on gravitational Lorentz violation when using future, third-generation or space-based instruments. On the other hand, a single counterpart is enough to place constraints that are 10 orders of magnitude more stringent than current binary pulsar bounds, even when using second-generation detectors. This is because Lorentz violation forces the group velocity of gravitational waves to be different from that of light, and this difference can be very accurately constrained with coincident observations.

  8. Heating Cooling Flows with Weak Shock Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. G. Mathews; A. Faltenbacher; F. Brighenti

    2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of extended, approximately spherical weak shock waves in the hot intercluster gas in Perseus and Virgo has precipitated the notion that these waves may be the primary heating process that explains why so little gas cools to low temperatures. This type of heating has received additional support from recent gasdynamical models. We show here that outward propagating, dissipating waves deposit most of their energy near the center of the cluster atmosphere. Consequently, if the gas is heated by (intermittent) weak shocks for several Gyrs, the gas within 30-50 kpc is heated to temperatures that far exceed observed values. This heating can be avoided if dissipating shocks are sufficiently infrequent or weak so as not to be the primary source of global heating. Local PV and viscous heating associated with newly formed X-ray cavities are likely to be small, which is consistent with the low gas temperatures generally observed near the centers of groups and clusters where the cavities are located.

  9. Small Business- Xcel Energy Customers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Xcel Energy small business program offers both custom and prescriptive incentives toward energy efficient equipment installations including lighting, HVAC, compressed air, refrigeration, VFDs,...

  10. New Mexico Small Business Assistance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Los Alamos, Sandia national laboratories LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, May 31, 2012-The New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, a collaboration of Los Alamos National...

  11. Small Business Goals and Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Statistics The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is committed to supporting the small business objectives of the U.S. Government and the Department of Energy (DOE) and recognizes...

  12. Interconnection Standards for Small Generators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) adopted "small generator" interconnection standards for distributed energy resources up to 20 megawatts (MW) in capacity in May 2005.* The FERC's...

  13. Modulation of drift-wave envelopes in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, A. P., E-mail: apmisra@visva-bharati.ac.in, E-mail: apmisra@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan-731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the amplitude modulation of low-frequency, long-wavelength electrostatic drift-wave envelopes in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma consisting of cold ions and degenerate electrons. The effects of tunneling associated with the quantum Bohm potential and the Fermi pressure for nonrelativistic degenerate electrons, as well as the equilibrium density and magnetic field inhomogeneities are taken into account. Starting from a set of quantum magnetohydrodynamic equations, we derive a nonlinear Schrdinger equation (NLSE) that governs the dynamics of the modulated quantum drift-wave packets. The NLSE is used to study the modulational instability (MI) of a Stoke's wave train to a small plane wave perturbation. It is shown that the quantum tunneling effect as well as the scale length of inhomogeneity plays crucial roles for the MI of the drift-wave packets. Thus, the latter can propagate in the form of bright and dark envelope solitons or as drift-wave rogons in degenerate dense magnetoplasmas.

  14. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cabaret; P. Bquin; G. Theocharis; V. Andreev; V. E. Gusev; V. Tournat

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

  15. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabaret, J; Theocharis, G; Andreev, V; Gusev, V E; Tournat, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control de...

  16. DNA waves and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Montagnier; J. Aissa; E. Del Giudice; C. Lavallee; A. Tedeschi; G. Vitiello

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.

  17. Resources for Small Businesses | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources for Small Businesses System for Award Management: Enables small business owners to register to do business with the federal government and self-certify as a small...

  18. Millimeter Wave Sensor For On-Line Inspection Of Thin Sheet Dielectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bakhtiari, Sasan (Westmont, IL); Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A millimeter wave sensor is provided for non-destructive inspection of thin sheet dielectric materials. The millimeter wave sensor includes a Gunn diode oscillator (GDO) source generating a mill meter wave electromagnetic energy signal having a single frequency. A heater is coupled to the GDO source for stabilizing the single frequency. A small size antenna is coupled to the GDO source for transmitting the millimeter wave electromagnetic energy signal to a sample material and for receiving a reflected millimeter wave electromagnetic energy signal from the sample material. Ferrite circulator isolators coupled between the GDO source and the antenna separate the millimeter wave electromagnetic energy signal into transmitted and received electromagnetic energy signal components and a detector detects change in both amplitude and phase of the transmitted and received electromagnetic energy signal components. A millimeter wave sensor is provided for non-destructive inspection of thin sheet dielectric materials. The millimeter wave sensor includes a Gunn diode oscillator (GDO) source generating a mill meter wave electromagnetic energy signal having a single frequency. A heater is coupled to the GDO source for stabilizing the single frequency. A small size antenna is coupled to the GDO source for transmitting the millimeter wave electromagnetic energy signal to a sample material and for receiving a reflected millimeter wave electromagnetic energy signal from the sample material. Ferrite circulator isolators coupled between the GDO source and the antenna separate the millimeter wave electromagnetic energy signal into transmitted and received electromagnetic energy signal components and a detector detects change in both amplitude and phase of the transmitted and received electromagnetic energy signal components.

  19. Maritime Interdiction Operations Small Craft Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougan, A D; Trombino, D; Dunlop, W; Bordetsky, A

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Naval Postgraduate School has been conducting Tactical Network Topology (TNT) Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO) experiments with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) since early in 2005. In this work, we are investigating cutting edge technology to evaluate use of networks, advanced sensors and collaborative technology for globally-supported maritime interdiction operations. Some examples of our research include communications in harsh environments, between moving ships at sea; small boat drive-by radiation detection; network-centric collaboration with global partners; situational awareness; prototype sensors & biometric instruments. Since 2006, we have studied the concept of using a small vessel with fixed radiation sensors to do initial searches for illicit radioactive materials. In our work, we continue to evaluate concepts of operation for small boat monitoring. For example, in San Francisco Bay we established a simulated choke point using two RHIBs. Each RHIB had a large sodium iodide radiation sensor on board, mounted on the side nearest to the passing potential target boats. Once detections were made, notification over the network prompted a chase RHIB also equipped with a radiation sensor to further investigate the potential target. We have also used an unmanned surface vessel (USV) carrying a radiation sensor to perform the initial discovery. The USV was controlled remotely and to drive by boats in different configurations. The potential target vessels were arranged in a line, as a choke point and randomly spaced in the water. Search plans were problematic when weather, waves and drift complicated the ability to stay in one place. A further challenge is to both detect and identify the radioactive materials during the drive-by. Our radiation detection system, ARAM, Adaptable Radiation Area Monitor, is able to detect, alarm and quickly identify plausible radionuclides in real time. We have performed a number of experiments to better understand parameters of vessel speed, time, shielding, and distance in this complex three-dimensional space. At the NMIOTC in September 2009, we employed a dual detector portal followed by a chase. In this event, the challenge was to maintain communications after a lapse. When the chase went past the line-of sight reach of the Tactical Operational Center's (TOC) antenna, with interference from a fortress island in Suda Bay, Wave Relay extended the network for continued observation. Sodium iodide radiation detectors were mounted on two Hellenic Navy SEAL fast boats. After making the detection one of the portal boats maintained line-of sight while the other pursued the target vessel. Network access via Wave Relay antennas was maintained until the conclusion of the chase scenario. Progress has been made in the detection of radioactive materials in the maritime environment. The progression of the TNT MIO experiments has demonstrated the potential of the hardware to solve the problems encountered in this physically challenging environment. There continue to be interesting opportunities for research and development. These experiments provide a variety of platforms and motivated participants to perform real-world testing as solutions are made available.

  20. Spiral and concentric waves in active media with soft and hard excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malomed, B.A.; Rudenko, A.N.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An approximation method is presented for describing spiral waves with the generalized Ginzburg-Landau equation, which for weak overcriticality is a universal model of active media with soft excitation of self-oscillation. A comparison with numerical results indicates the this method, which is based on direct matching of asymptotic expansions, is valid for large and small values of the radial variable, and yields satisfactory values for the asymptotic radial wave number of a spiral wave for values of the dispersion coefficients that are not too small. Spiral waves are described with a simple model of an active medium with hard excitation. This description is based on the rigorous method of asymptotic expansion matching for small dispersion coefficients and on the direct matching method for the general case. Both methods are used to show that, in contrast to spiral waves, the asymptotic wave number for concentric waves is an arbitrary parameter, and the group velocity is directed from the periphery to the center.

  1. Chaotic dynamics induced by space-charge waves in cyclotron resonance accelerators R. Pakter and I. L. Caldas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caetano, Tiberio

    particles is the so called cyclotron-resonance accel- erator 1,2 , where a coherent electromagnetic wave may wave-particle synchro- nism may be self-sustained throughout the accelerating pe- riod. Transverse the related fields tend to be small if the particle beam is of ap- propriate thickness 2 . As for longitudinal

  2. Damage from the impacts of small asteroids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hills, J.G.; Goda, M.P.

    1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The fragmentation of a small asteroid in the atmosphere greatly increases its aerodynamic drag and rate of energy dissipation. The differential atmospheric pressure across it disperses its fragments at a velocity that increases with atmospheric density and impact velocity and decreases with asteroid density. Extending our previous work, we use a spherical atmosphere and a fitted curve to its density profile to find the damage done by an asteroid entering the atmosphere at various zenith angles. In previous work we estimated the blast damage by scaling from data on nuclear explosions in the atmosphere during the 1940s, 1950s and early 1960s. This underestimated the blast from asteroid impacts because nuclear fireballs radiate away a larger fraction of their energy than do meteors, so less of their energy goes into the blast wave. We have redone the calculations to allow for this effect. We have found the area of destruction around the impact point in which the over pressure in the blast wave exceeds 4 pounds/inch{sup 2} = 2.8 X 10{sup 5} dynes/cm{sup 3}, which is enough to knock over trees and destroy buildings. About every 100 years an impactor should blast an area of 300 km{sup 2} or more somewhere on the land area of Earth. The optical flux from asteroids 60 meters or more in diameter is enough to ignite pine forests. However, the blast from an impacting asteroid goes beyond the radius within which the fire starts. It tends to blow out the fire, so it is likely that the impact will char the forest (as at Tunguska), but it will not produce a sustained fire. Because of the atmosphere, asteroids less than about 200 m in diameter are not effective in producing craters and earthquakes. They are also not effective in producing water waves and tsunami in ocean impacts. Tsunami is probably the most devastating type of damage for asteroids that are between 200 meters and 1 km in diameter.

  3. Nondestructive testing using stress waves: wave propagation in layered media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortega, Jose Alberto

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING USING STRESS WAVES: WAVE PROPAGATION IN LAYERED MEDIA A Senior Honors Thesis by JOSE ALBERTO ORTEGA Submitted to the Office of Honors Program & Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2002 Group: Engineering NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING USI WAVE PROPAGATION IN LA A Senior Honors The ~pe -C JOSE ALBERTO ORTI /CI Submitted to the Office of Honors Program k. Academic...

  4. Observable spectra of induced gravitational waves from inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alabidi, Laila; Sasaki, Misao [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kohri, Kazunori [Cosmophysics Group, Theory Center, IPNS, KEK, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Sendouda, Yuuiti, E-mail: laila@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp, E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: sendouda@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measuring the primordial power spectrum on small scales is a powerful tool in inflation model building, yet constraints from Cosmic Microwave Background measurements alone are insufficient to place bounds stringent enough to be appreciably effective. For the very small scale spectrum, those which subtend angles of less than 0.3 degrees on the sky, an upper bound can be extracted from the astrophysical constraints on the possible production of primordial black holes in the early universe. A recently discovered observational by-product of an enhanced power spectrum on small scales, induced gravitational waves, have been shown to be within the range of proposed space based gravitational wave detectors; such as NASA's LISA and BBO detectors, and the Japanese DECIGO detector. In this paper we explore the impact such a detection would have on models of inflation known to lead to an enhanced power spectrum on small scales, namely the Hilltop-type and running mass models. We find that the Hilltop-type model can produce observable induced gravitational waves within the range of BBO and DECIGO for integral and fractional powers of the potential within a reasonable number of e?folds. We also find that the running mass model can produce a spectrum within the range of these detectors, but require that inflation terminates after an unreasonably small number of e?folds. Finally, we argue that if the thermal history of the Universe were to accomodate such a small number of e?folds the Running Mass Model can produce Primordial Black Holes within a mass range compatible with Dark Matter, i.e. within a mass range 10{sup 20}g?

  5. Electromechanical Wave Green's Function Estimation from Ambient Electrical Grid Frequency Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backhaus, Scott

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many electrical grid transients can be described by the propagation of electromechanical (EM) waves that couple oscillations of power flows over transmission lines and the inertia of synchronous generators. These EM waves can take several forms: large-scale standing waves forming inter-area modes, localized oscillations of single or multi-machine modes, or traveling waves that spread quasi-circularly from major grid disturbances. The propagation speed and damping of these EM waves are potentially a powerful tool for assessing grid stability, e.g. small signal or rotor angle stability, however, EM wave properties have been mostly extracted from post-event analysis of major grid disturbances. Using a small set of data from the FNET sensor network, we show how the spatially resolved Green's function for EM wave propagation can be extracted from ambient frequency noise without the need for a major disturbance. If applied to an entire interconnection, an EM-wave Green's function map will enable a model-independent...

  6. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet [Terahertz Systems Laboratory (TeSLa) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  7. Elements of Radio Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank G. Borg; Ismo Hakala; Jukka Mttl

    2007-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a summary of the basic properties of the radio wave generation, propagation and reception, with a special attention to the gigahertz bandwidth region which is of interest for wireless sensor networks. We also present some measurement results which use the so-called RSSI indicator in order to track how the field strength varies with position and distance of the transceivers. We hope the paper may be useful to anyone who looks for a quick review of the fundamentals of electromagnetic theory with application to antennas.

  8. Spin waves in the (

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscombe, O. J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chen, G. F. [The Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Fang, Chen [Purdue University; Perring, T. G. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL; Egami, Takeshi [ORNL; Wang, Nanlin [The Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Hu, Jiangping [Purdue University and Chinese Academy of Sciences; Dai, Pengcheng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use neutron scattering to show that spin waves in the iron chalcogenide Fe{sub 1.05}Te display novel dispersion clearly different from both the first principles density functional calculations and recent observations in the related iron pnictide CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By fitting to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that although the nearest-neighbor exchange couplings in the two systems are quite different, their next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings are similar. This suggests that superconductivity in the pnictides and chalcogenides share a common magnetic origin that is intimately associated with the NNN magnetic coupling between the irons.

  9. Wave-driven

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOETHE FUTURE LOOKSof Energy Wave

  10. Big Efficieny for Small Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trombley, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Energize Connecticut Small commercial and industrial customers ? Peak demand between 10 & 200 kW ESL-IE-14-05-10 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans...

  11. Small Business Loans (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Loan Fund, a non-profit organization, offers loans for small businesses and start-ups, and for business lines of credit. The loan can be used to finance equipment, inventory, building...

  12. Small Enterprise Growth Fund (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Small Enterprise Growth Fund is a professionally-managed venture capital fund that invests in Maine companies which demonstrate high potential for growth and public benefit. The fund has...

  13. Small Business | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that deliver high-quality goods or services, on time and at a fair and reasonable price. The office strives to enhance the small business community by supporting recognized...

  14. Wave Decay in MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Beresnyak; Alex Lazarian

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for nonlinear decay of the weak wave in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that the decay rate is different for parallel and perpendicular waves. We provide a general formula for arbitrarily directed waves and discuss particular limiting cases known in the literature. We test our predictions with direct numerical simulations of wave decay in three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and discuss the influence of turbulent damping on the development of linear instabilities in the interstellar medium and on other important astrophysical processes.

  15. Conical Emission from Shock Waves in Ne(1-20 AGeV)+U Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Rau; Jan Steinheimer; Barbara Betz; Hannah Petersen; Marcus Bleicher; Horst Stcker

    2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation and propagation of high-density compression waves, e.g. Mach shock waves, in cold nuclear matter is studied by simulating high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions of Ne with U in the energy range from E_lab = 0.5 AGeV to 20 AGeV. In an ideal hydrodynamic approach, the high-density shock wave created by the small Ne nucleus passing through the heavy U nucleus is followed by a slower and more dilute Mach shock wave which causes conical emission of particles at the Mach cone angle. The conical emission originates from low-density regions with a small flow velocity comparable to the speed of sound. Moreover, it is shown that the angular distributions of emitted baryons clearly distinguish between a hydrodynamic approach and binary cascade processes used in the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) transport model.

  16. Wave Evolution On the Evolution of Curvelets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hart F.

    Curvelets Wave Evolution On the Evolution of Curvelets by the Wave Equation Hart F. Smith of Curvelets by the Wave Equation #12;Curvelets Wave Evolution Curvelets and the Second Dyadic Decomposition Curvelets A curvelet frame {} is a wave packet frame on L2(R2) based on second dyadic decomposition. f

  17. Wave Mechanics and the Fifth Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson; James M. Overduin

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Replacing 4D Minkowski space by 5D canonical space leads to a clearer derivation of the main features of wave mechanics, including the wave function and the velocity of de Broglie waves. Recent tests of wave-particle duality could be adapted to investigate whether de Broglie waves are basically 4D or 5D in nature.

  18. Nonlinear Hydromagnetic Wave Support of a Stratified Molecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Kudoh; S. Basu

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform numerical simulations of nonlinear MHD waves in a gravitationally stratified molecular cloud that is bounded by a hot and tenuous external medium. We study the relation between the strength of the turbulence and various global properties of a molecular cloud, within a 1.5-dimensional approximation. Under the influence of a driving source of Alfvenic disturbances, the cloud is lifted up by the pressure of MHD waves and reaches a steady-state characterized by oscillations about a new time-averaged equilibrium state. The nonlinear effect results in the generation of longitudinal motions and many shock waves; however, the wave kinetic energy remains predominantly in transverse, rather than longitudinal, motions. There is an approximate equipartition of energy between the transverse velocity and fluctuating magnetic field (aspredicted by small-amplitude theory) in the region of the stratified cloud which contains most of the mass; however, this relation breaks down in the outer regions, particularly near the cloud surface, where the motions have a standing-wave character. This means that the Chandrasekhar-Fermi formula applied to molecular clouds must be significantly modified in such regions. Models of an ensemble of clouds show that, for various strengths of the input energy, the velocity dispersion in the cloud $\\sigma \\propto Z^{0.5}$, where $Z$ is a characteristic size of the cloud.Furthermore, $\\sigma$ is always comparable to the mean Alfven velocity of the cloud, consistent with observational results.

  19. Rapidity resummation for $B$-meson wave functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue-Long Shen; Yu-Ming Wang

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Transverse-momentum dependent (TMD) hadronic wave functions develop light-cone divergences under QCD corrections, which are commonly regularized by the rapidity $\\zeta$ of gauge vector defining the non-light-like Wilson lines. The yielding rapidity logarithms from infrared enhancement need to be resummed for both hadronic wave functions and short-distance functions, to achieve scheme-independent calculations of physical quantities. We briefly review the recent progress on the rapidity resummation for $B$-meson wave functions which are the key ingredients of TMD factorization formulae for radiative-leptonic, semi-leptonic and non-leptonic $B$-meson decays. The crucial observation is that rapidity resummation induces a strong suppression of $B$-meson wave functions at small light-quark momentum, strengthening the applicability of TMD factorization in exclusive $B$-meson decays. The phenomenological consequence of rapidity-resummation improved $B$-meson wave functions is further discussed in the context of $B \\to \\pi$ transition form factors at large hadronic recoil.

  20. The Whitham Equation as a Model for Surface Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daulet Moldabayev; Henrik Kalisch; Denys Dutykh

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of uni-directional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. As the Whitham equation incorporates the full linear dispersion relation of the water wave problem, it is thought to provide a more faithful description of shorter waves of small amplitude than traditional long wave models such as the KdV equation. In this work, we identify a scaling regime in which the Whitham equation can be derived from the Hamiltonian theory of surface water waves. The Whitham equation is integrated numerically, and it is shown that the equation gives a close approximation of inviscid free surface dynamics as described by the Euler equations. The performance of the Whitham equation as a model for free surface dynamics is also compared to two standard free surface models: the KdV and the BBM equation. It is found that in a wide parameter range of amplitudes and wavelengths, the Whitham equation performs on par with or better than both the KdV and BBM equations.

  1. Whistler wave generation by non-gyrotropic, relativistic, electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skender, M.; Tsiklauri, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, 327 Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, 327 Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle-in-cell code, EPOCH, is used for studying features of the wave component evident to propagate backwards from the front of the non-gyrotropic, relativistic beam of electrons injected in the Maxwellian, magnetised background plasma with decreasing density profile. According to recent findings presented in Tsiklauri [Phys. Plasmas 18, 052903 (2011)], Schmitz and Tsiklauri [Phys. Plasmas 20, 062903 (2013)], and Pechhacker and Tsiklauri [Phys. Plasmas 19, 112903 (2012)], in a 1.5-dimensional magnetised plasma system, the non-gyrotropic beam generates freely escaping electromagnetic radiation with properties similar to the Type-III solar radio bursts. In this study, the backwards propagating wave component evident in the perpendicular components of the electromagnetic field in such a system is presented for the first time. Background magnetic field strength in the system is varied in order to prove that the backwards propagating wave's frequency, prescribed by the whistler wave dispersion relation, is proportional to the specified magnetic field. Moreover, the identified whistlers are shown to be generated by the normal Doppler-shifted relativistic resonance. Large fraction of the energy of the perpendicular electromagnetic field components is found to be carried away by the whistler waves, while a small but sufficient fraction is going into L- and R-electromagnetic modes.

  2. Colliding axisymmetric pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An exact solution is found describing the collision of axisymmetric pp-waves with M=0. They are impulsive in character and their coordinate singularities become point curvature singularities at the boundaries of the interaction region. The solution is conformally flat. Concrete examples are given, involving an ultrarelativistic black hole against a burst of pure radiation or two colliding beam- like waves.

  3. Fully nonlinear wave-current interactions and kinematics by a BEM-based numerical wave tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Fully nonlinear wave-current interactions and kinematics by a BEM-based numerical wave tank S. Ryu and the resulting kinematics. In the present paper, the variation of wave amplitude and wave length and minimize wave reflections from the down- stream wall. Nonlinear wave kinematics as a result of nonlinear

  4. Stochastic Gravitational Wave Background from Exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ain, Anirban; Mitra, Sanjit

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent exoplanet surveys have predicted a very large population of planetary systems in our galaxy, more than one planet per star on the average, perhaps totalling about two hundred billion. These surveys, based on electro-magnetic observations, are limited to a very small neighbourhood of the solar system and the estimations rely on the observations of only a few thousand planets. On the other hand, orbital motions of planets around stars are expected to emit gravitational waves (GW), which could provide information about the planets not accessible to electro-magnetic astronomy. The cumulative effect of the planets, with periods ranging from few hours to several years, is expected to create a stochastic GW background (SGWB). We compute the characteristic GW strain of this background based on the observed distribution of planet parameters. We also show that the integrated extragalactic background is comparable or less than the galactic background at different frequencies. Our estimate shows that the net backg...

  5. Steady periodic gravity waves with surface tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Walsh

    2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider two-dimensional, stratified, steady water waves propagating over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. The motion is assumed to be driven by capillarity (that is, surface tension) on the surface and a gravitational force acting on the body of the fluid. We prove the existence of global continua of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. This is accomplished by first constructing a 1-parameter family of laminar flow solutions, $\\mathcal{T}$, then applying bifurcation theory methods to obtain local curves of small amplitude solutions branching from $\\mathcal{T}$ at an eigenvalue of the linearized problem. Each solution curve is then continued globally by means of a degree theoretic theorem in the spirit of Rabinowitz. Finally, we complement the degree theoretic picture by proving an alternate global bifurcation theorem via the analytic continuation method of Dancer.

  6. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  7. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  8. Correlated Detection of sub-mHz Gravitational Waves by Two Optical-Fiber Interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill; Finn Stokes

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from two optical-fiber gravitational-wave interferometric detectors are reported. The detector design is very small, cheap and simple to build and operate. Using two detectors has permitted various tests of the design principles as well as demonstrating the first simultaneous detection of correlated gravitational waves from detectors spatially separated by 1.1km. The frequency spectrum of the detected gravitational waves is sub-mHz with a strain spectral index a=-1.4 +/- 0.1. As well as characterising the wave effects the detectors also show, from data collected over some 80 days in the latter part of 2007, the dominant earth rotation effect and the earth orbit effect. The detectors operate by exploiting light speed anisotropy in optical-fibers. The data confirms previous observations of light speed anisotropy, earth rotation and orbit effects, and gravitational waves.

  9. Energy Momentum Pseudo-Tensor of Relic Gravitational Wave in Expanding Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daiqin Su; Yang Zhang

    2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the energy-momentum pseudo-tensor of gravitational wave, and examine the one introduced by Landau-Lifshitz for a general gravitational field and the effective one recently used in literature. In short wavelength limit after Brill-Hartle average, both lead to the same gauge invariant stress tensor of gravitational wave. For relic gravitational waves in the expanding universe, we examine two forms of pressure, $p_{gw}$ and $\\mathcal{P}_{gw}$, and trace the origin of their difference to a coupling between gravitational waves and the background matter. The difference is shown to be negligibly small for most of cosmic expansion stages starting from inflation. We demonstrate that the wave equation is equivalent to the energy conservation equation using the pressure $\\mathcal{P}_{gw}$ that includes the mentioned coupling.

  10. Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; B. Abbott; R. Abbott; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; R. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; H. Armandula; P. Armor; Y. Aso; S. Aston; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; S. Ballmer; H. Bantilan; B. C. Barish; C. Barker; D. Barker; B. Barr; P. Barriga; M. A. Barton; M. Bastarrika; K. Bayer; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; R. Biswas; E. Black; K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; T. P. Bodiya; L. Bogue; R. Bork; V. Boschi; S. Bose; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; M. Brinkmann; A. Brooks; D. A. Brown; G. Brunet; A. Bullington; A. Buonanno; O. Burmeister; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. B. Camp; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; J. Cao; L. Cardenas; T. Casebolt; G. Castaldi; C. Cepeda; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; S. Chatterji; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; N. Christensen; D. Clark; J. Clark; T. Cokelaer; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. Corbitt; D. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; R. M. Cutler; J. Dalrymple; K. Danzmann; G. Davies; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; M. Degree; V. Dergachev; S. Desai; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Daz; J. Dickson; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; R. W. P. Drever; I. Duke; J. -C. Dumas; R. J. Dupuis; J. G. Dwyer; C. Echols; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; E. Espinoza; T. Etzel; T. Evans; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; L. S. Finn; K. Flasch; N. Fotopoulos; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. Fyffe; J. Garofoli; I. Gholami; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; K. Goda; E. Goetz; L. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; M. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; F. Grimaldi; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; M. Guenther; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. Harry; E. Harstad; K. Hayama; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; I. S. Heng; M. Hennessy; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; D. Hosken; J. Hough; S. H. Huttner; D. Ingram; M. Ito; A. Ivanov; B. Johnson; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kamat; J. Kanner; D. Kasprzyk; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; F. Ya. Khalili; R. Khan; E. Khazanov; C. Kim; P. King; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. K. Kopparapu; D. Kozak; I. Kozhevatov; B. Krishnan; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam; M. Landry; M. M. Lang; B. Lantz; A. Lazzarini; M. Lei; N. Leindecker; V. Leonhardt; I. Leonor; K. Libbrecht; H. Lin; P. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lormand; P. Lu; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lck; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; V. Mandic; S. Mrka; Z. Mrka; A. Markosyan; J. Markowitz; E. Maros; I. Martin; R. M. Martin; J. N. Marx; K. Mason; F. Matichard; L. Matone; R. Matzner; N. Mavalvala; R. McCarthy; D. E. McClelland; S. C. McGuire; M. McHugh; G. McIntyre; G. McIvor; D. McKechan; K. McKenzie; T. Meier; A. Melissinos; G. Mendell; R. A. Mercer; S. Meshkov; C. J. Messenger; D. Meyers; J. Miller; J. Minelli; S. Mitra; V. P. Mitrofanov; G. Mitselmakher; R. Mittleman; O. Miyakawa; B. Moe; S. Mohanty; G. Moreno; K. Mossavi; C. MowLowry; G. Mueller; S. Mukherjee; H. Mukhopadhyay; H. Mller-Ebhardt; J. Munch; P. Murray; E. Myers; J. Myers; T. Nash; J. Nelson; G. Newton; A. Nishizawa; K. Numata; J. O'Dell; G. Ogin; B. O'Reilly; R. O'Shaughnessy; D. J. Ottaway; R. S. Ottens; H. Overmier; B. J. Owen; Y. Pan; C. Pankow; M. A. Papa; V. Parameshwaraiah; P. Patel; M. Pedraza; S. Penn; A. Perreca; T. Petrie; I. M. Pinto; M. Pitkin; H. J. Pletsch; M. V. Plissi; F. Postiglione; M. Principe; R. Prix; V. Quetschke; F. Raab; D. S. Rabeling; H. Radkins; N. Rainer; M. Rakhmanov; M. Ramsunder; H. Rehbein; S. Reid; D. H. Reitze; R. Riesen; K. Riles; B. Rivera; N. A. Robertson; C. Robinson; E. L. Robinson; S. Roddy; A. Rodriguez; A. M. Rogan; J. Rollins; J. D. Romano; J. Romie; R. Route; S. Rowan; A. Rdiger; L. Ruet; P. Russell; K. Ryan; S. Sakata; M. Samidi; L. Sancho de la Jordana; V. Sandberg; V. Sannibale; S. Saraf; P. Sarin; B. S. Sathyaprakash; S. Sato; P. R. Saulson; R. Savage; P. Savov; S. W. Schediwy; R. Schilling; R. Schnabel; R. Schofield; B. F. Schutz; P. Schwinberg; S. M. Scott; A. C. Searle; B. Sears; F. Seifert; D. Sellers; A. S. Sengupta; P. Shawhan; D. H. Shoemaker; A. Sibley; X. Siemens; D. Sigg; S. Sinha; A. M. Sintes; B. J. J. Slagmolen; J. Slutsky; J. R. Smith; M. R. Smith; N. D. Smith; K. Somiya; B. Sorazu; L. C. Stein; A. Stochino; R. Stone; K. A. Strain; D. M. Strom; A. Stuver; T. Z. Summerscales; K. -X. Sun; M. Sung; P. J. Sutton; H. Takahashi; D. B. Tanner; R. Taylor; R. Taylor; J. Thacker; K. A. Thorne; K. S. Thorne; A. Thring; K. V. Tokmakov; C. Torres; C. Torrie; G. Traylor; M. Trias; W. Tyler

    2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct upper limits on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar using data from the first nine months of the fifth science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). These limits are based on two searches. In the first we assume that the gravitational wave emission follows the observed radio timing, giving an upper limit on gravitational wave emission that beats indirect limits inferred from the spin-down and braking index of the pulsar and the energetics of the nebula. In the second we allow for a small mismatch between the gravitational and radio signal frequencies and interpret our results in the context of two possible gravitational wave emission mechanisms.

  11. 2011 Interference -1 INTERFERENCE OF SOUND WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    2011 Interference - 1 INTERFERENCE OF SOUND WAVES The objectives of this experiment are: · To measure the wavelength, frequency, and propagation speed of ultrasonic sound waves. · To observe interference phenomena with ultrasonic sound waves. APPARATUS: Oscilloscope, function generator, ultrasonic

  12. Electrostatic-plasma-wave energy flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amendt, P.; Rostoker, N.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    would reduce cross- field wave-energy convection since theor cross-field leakage of wave energy are ap- that thecomposition of electrostatic-wave-energy field degrees of

  13. Three dimensional electrostatic solitary waves in a dense magnetoplasma with relativistically degenerate electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ata-ur-Rahman,; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan) [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Masood, W. [National Centre for Physics, QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan) [National Centre for Physics, QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); COMSATS, Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Eliasson, B. [Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG, Scotland (United Kingdom)] [Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, small but finite amplitude electrostatic solitary waves in a relativistic degenerate magnetoplasma, consisting of relativistically degenerate electrons and non-degenerate cold ions, are investigated. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived employing the reductive perturbation technique and its solitary wave solution is analyzed. It is shown that only compressive electrostatic solitary structures can propagate in such a degenerate plasma system. The effects of plasma number density, ion cyclotron frequency, and direction cosines on the profiles of ion acoustic solitary waves are investigated and discussed at length. The relevance of the present investigation vis-a-vis pulsating white dwarfs is also pointed out.

  14. Tracing spiral density waves in M81

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kendall; R. C. Kennicutt; C. Clarke; M. D. Thornley

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use SPITZER IRAC 3.6 and 4.5micron near infrared data from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS), optical B, V and I and 2MASS Ks band data to produce mass surface density maps of M81. The IRAC 3.6 and 4.5micron data, whilst dominated by emission from old stellar populations, is corrected for small-scale contamination by young stars and PAH emission. The I band data are used to produce a mass surface density map by a B-V colour-correction, following the method of Bell and de Jong. We fit a bulge and exponential disc to each mass map, and subtract these components to reveal the non-axisymmetric mass surface density. From the residual mass maps we are able to extract the amplitude and phase of the density wave, using azimuthal profiles. The response of the gas is observed via dust emission in the 8micron IRAC band, allowing a comparison between the phase of the stellar density wave and gas shock. The relationship between this angular offset and radius suggests that the spiral structure is reasonably long lived and allows the position of corotation to be determined.

  15. Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khlebnikov, Sergei; Kruczenski, Martin; Michalogiorgakis, Georgios [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Shock waves are supersonic disturbances propagating in a fluid and giving rise to dissipation and drag. Weak shocks, i.e., those of small amplitude, can be well described within the hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, strong shocks are discontinuous within hydrodynamics and therefore probe the microscopics of the theory. In this paper, we consider the case of the strongly coupled N=4 plasma whose microscopic description, applicable for scales smaller than the inverse temperature, is given in terms of gravity in an asymptotically AdS{sub 5} space. In the gravity approximation, weak and strong shocks should be described by smooth metrics with no discontinuities. For weak shocks, we find the dual metric in a derivative expansion, and for strong shocks we use linearized gravity to find the exponential tail that determines the width of the shock. In particular, we find that, when the velocity of the fluid relative to the shock approaches the speed of light v{yields}1 the penetration depth l scales as l{approx}(1-v{sup 2}){sup 1/4}. We compare the results with second-order hydrodynamics and the Israel-Stewart approximation. Although they all agree in the hydrodynamic regime of weak shocks, we show that there is not even qualitative agreement for strong shocks. For the gravity side, the existence of shock waves implies that there are disturbances of constant shape propagating on the horizon of the dual black holes.

  16. Kinematic Density Waves in Accretion Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svetlin Tassev; Edmund Bertschinger

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    When thin accretion disks around black holes are perturbed, the main restoring force is gravity. If gas pressure, magnetic stresses, and radiation pressure are neglected, the disk remains thin as long as orbits do not intersect. Intersections would result in pressure forces which limit the growth of perturbations. We find that a discrete set of perturbations is possible for which orbits remain non-intersecting for arbitrarily long times. These modes define a discrete set of frequencies. We classify all long-lived perturbations for arbitrary potentials and show how their mode frequencies are related to pattern speeds computed from the azimuthal and epicyclic frequencies. We show that modes are concentrated near radii where the pattern speed has vanishing radial derivative. We explore these modes around Kerr black holes as a possible explanation for the high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations of black hole binaries such as GRO J1655-40. The long-lived modes are shown to coincide with diskoseismic waves in the limit of small sound speed. While the waves have long lifetime, they have the wrong frequencies to explain the pairs of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations observed in black hole binaries.

  17. Simple Waves in Ideal Radiation Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan M. Johnson

    2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the dynamic diffusion limit of radiation hydrodynamics, advection dominates diffusion; the latter primarily affects small scales and has negligible impact on the large scale flow. The radiation can thus be accurately regarded as an ideal fluid, i.e., radiative diffusion can be neglected along with other forms of dissipation. This viewpoint is applied here to an analysis of simple waves in an ideal radiating fluid. It is shown that much of the hydrodynamic analysis carries over by simply replacing the material sound speed, pressure and index with the values appropriate for a radiating fluid. A complete analysis is performed for a centered rarefaction wave, and expressions are provided for the Riemann invariants and characteristic curves of the one-dimensional system of equations. The analytical solution is checked for consistency against a finite difference numerical integration, and the validity of neglecting the diffusion operator is demonstrated. An interesting physical result is that for a material component with a large number of internal degrees of freedom and an internal energy greater than that of the radiation, the sound speed increases as the fluid is rarefied. These solutions are an excellent test for radiation hydrodynamic codes operating in the dynamic diffusion regime. The general approach may be useful in the development of Godunov numerical schemes for radiation hydrodynamics.

  18. Particle Acceleration at High-$?$ Shock Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacek Niemiec

    2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    First-order Fermi acceleration processes at ultrarelativistic shocks are studied with Monte Carlo simulations. The accelerated particle spectra are obtained by integrating the exact particle trajectories in a turbulent magnetic field near the shock, with a few ``realistic'' features of the field structure included. We show that the main acceleration process at oblique shocks is the particle compression at the shock. Formation of energetic spectral tails is possible in a limited energy range for highly perturbed magnetic fields. Cut-offs in the spectra occur at low energies in the resonance range considered. We relate this feature to the structure of the magnetic field downstream of the shock, where field compression produces effectively 2D turbulence in which cross-field diffusion is very small. Because of the field compression downstream, the acceleration process is inefficient also in parallel high-$\\gamma$ shocks for larger turbulence amplitudes, and features observed in oblique shocks are recovered. For small-amplitude perturbations, particle spectra are formed in a wide energy range and modifications of the acceleration process due to the existence of long-wave perturbations are observed. The critical turbulence amplitude for efficient acceleration at parallel shocks decreases with shock Lorentz factor. We also study the influence of strong short-wave perturbations downstream of the shock on the particle acceleration processes. The spectral indices obtained do not converge to the ``universal'' value . Our results indicate inefficiency of the first-order Fermi process to generate high-energy cosmic rays at ultrarelativistic shocks with the considered perturbed magnetic field structures.

  19. Linear and nonlinear theories of a large-orbit gyrotron traveling wave amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao Chongqing [Beijing Key Laboratory of High Voltage and EMC, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Luo Jirun [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear and nonlinear theories of large-orbit gyrotron traveling wave amplifiers (gyro-TWAs) have been developed based on the corresponding theories of small-orbit gyro-TWAs. The linear theory is in good agreement with the nonlinear theory in the small signal region of large-orbit gyro-TWAs. The phenomenon that most electrons move toward the axis of interaction circuit during the beam-wave interaction is observed and its potential effect on the design of large-orbit coaxial gyro-TWAs is emphasized.

  20. Walking Wave as a Model of Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Goryunov

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of walking wave is introduced from classical relativistic positions. One- and three-dimensional walking waves considered with their wave equations and dispersion equations. It is shown that wave characteristics (de Broglie's and Compton's wavelengths) and corpuscular characteristics (energy-momentum vector and the rest mass) of particle may be expressed through parameters of walking wave. By that the new view on a number concepts of physic related with wave-particle duality is suggested.

  1. Small Business | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou are here Home » Small BusinessSmall

  2. Small Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteel Corporation Jump to:SleepySmallSmall

  3. Small Wind Guidebook/Things to Consider When Purchasing a Small...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Small Wind GuidebookThings to Consider When Purchasing a Small Wind Turbine < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT &...

  4. Is your small business eligible? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Is your small business eligible? Is your small business eligible? Is your small business eligible? Get Started Here Is your small business eligible? Is your small business...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Wave Energy Resource Characterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    eECEnergyComputational Modeling & SimulationWave Energy Resource Characterization at US Test Sites Wave Energy Resource Characterization at US Test Sites Sandia Report Presents...

  6. Small Flock Poultry Management Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    to care for your chicks in advance of them arriving at your home. Newly hatched chicks can not control (water splashed on the hot bulb will shatter it); Where possible use a `Hard Glass' bulb Family, HomeSmall Flock Poultry Management Series Brooding Chicks Starting your chicks Raising a flock

  7. Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indrebo, Ann Kristin

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accurate prediction of wave runup on deepwater offshore platform columns is of great importance for design engineers. Although linear predictive models are commonly used in the design and analysis process, many of the important effects...

  8. Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the naturally available and technically recoverable resource in a given location. The methodology was developed by the EPRI and uses a modified Gamma spectrum that interoperates hindcast sea state parameter data produced by NOAA's Wave watch III. This Gamma...

  9. Backreacting p-wave Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ral E. Arias; Ignacio Salazar Landea

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the gravitational backreaction of the non-abelian gauge field on the gravity dual to a 2+1 p-wave superconductor. We observe that as in the $p+ip$ system a second order phase transition exists between a superconducting and a normal state. Moreover, we conclude that, below the phase transition temperature $T_c$ the lowest free energy is achieved by the p-wave solution. In order to probe the solution, we compute the holographic entanglement entropy. For both $p$ and $p+ip$ systems the entanglement entropy satisfies an area law. For any given entangling surface, the p-wave superconductor has lower entanglement entropy.

  10. Nonlinear dust acoustic waves and shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merlino, R. L.; Heinrich, J. R.; Hyun, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe experiments on (1) nonlinear dust acoustic waves and (2) dust acoustic shocks performed in a direct current (DC) glow discharge dusty plasma. First, we describe experiments showing nonlinear dust acoustic waves characterized by waveforms of the dust density that are typically sharper in the wave crests and flatter in the wave troughs (compared to sinusoidal waves), indicating the development of wave harmonics. We discuss this behavior in terms of a second-order fluid theory for dust acoustic waves. Second, experimental observations of the propagation and steepening of large-amplitude dust acoustic waves into dust acoustic shock waves are presented. The observed shock wave evolution is compared with numerical calculations based on the Riemann solution of the fully nonlinear fluid equations for dust acoustic waves.

  11. Plasma waves driven by gravitational waves in an expanding universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Papadopoulos

    2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model with zero spatial curvature, we consider the interaction of the gravitational waves with the plasma in the presence of a weak magnetic field. Using the relativistic hydromagnetic equations it is verified that large amplitude magnetosonic waves are excited, assuming that both, the gravitational field and the weak magnetic field do not break the homogeneity and isotropy of the considered FRW spacetime.

  12. Canada Small Business Financing Program (Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since 1961, the Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP) seeks to increase the availability of loans for establishing, expanding, modernizing and improving small businesses. It does this by...

  13. LANL engineers help New Mexico small businesses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineers help New Mexico small businesses LANL engineers help New Mexico small businesses Charles Lucero and G. Loren Toole received Principal Investigator Excellence (PIE) Awards...

  14. Small Specimen Mechanical Property Testing at PNNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Small Specimen Mechanical Property Testing at PNNL Mychailo Toloczko, Dave Senor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory December, 2013 1 #12;Overview of PNNL Capabilities for Small Specimen Testing Long

  15. NREL: Business Opportunities - Small Business Commitment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Business Commitment USDOE'14 Tampa, Florida, June 10-12, 2014 Central to NREL's mission is our commitment to small business through a comprehensive and mature outreach...

  16. Engaging and Growing Small Contractor Businesses | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Growing Small Contractor Businesses Engaging and Growing Small Contractor Businesses Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Engaging and Growing...

  17. Ecology Action: Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecology Action: Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation Program - 2015 Peer Review Ecology Action: Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation Program - 2015 Peer Review...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Small Generator Interconnection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commission Revised Its Small Generator Interconnection Procedure and Small Generator Interconnection Agreement On March 4, 2014, in Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Grid...

  19. Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications for Large Wind Turbines Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications for Large Wind Turbines November...

  20. Small Business Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    set aside funding for competitions among small businesses only. Small businesses that win awards in these programs keep the rights to any technology developed and are encouraged...

  1. Developing Best Practices for Small and Very Small Pork Processing Plants to Improve Food Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendricks, Matthew Benton

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    may not always be applicable to the operations of Small and Very Small establishments. Small and Very Small establishments warrant unique consideration in terms of financial and technological capabilities. While larger processors utilize multiple...

  2. Engaging Small Business: Energy Efficiency and On-Bill Financing for Small Businesses Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Engaging Small Business: Energy Efficiency and On-Bill Financing for Small Businesses Webinar, from May 2011.

  3. Mixed-domain performance model of the piezoelectric traveling-wave motor and the development of a two-sided device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn, Timothy Scott, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recognition of the growing consideration of piezoelectric traveling-wave motors as suitable replacements for small-scale electromagnetic motors, the present work addresses two parallel objectives: (1) to develop an ...

  4. Wave Energy Extraction from buoys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnaud, Xavier

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Different types of Wave Energy Converters currently tested or under development are using the vertical movement of floating bodies to generate electricity. For commercial applications, arrays have to be considered in order ...

  5. Jet quenching in shock waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Spillane; Alexander Stoffers; Ismail Zahed

    2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the propagation of an ultrarelativistic light quark jet inside a shock wave using the holographic principle. The maximum stopping distance and its dependency on the energy of the jet is obtained.

  6. A dimension-breaking phenomenon for water waves with weak surface tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark D. Groves; Shu-Ming Sun; Erik Wahln

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that the water-wave problem with weak surface tension has small-amplitude line solitary-wave solutions which to leading order are described by the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. The present paper contains an existence theory for three-dimensional periodically modulated solitary-wave solutions which have a solitary-wave profile in the direction of propagation and are periodic in the transverse direction; they emanate from the line solitary waves in a dimension-breaking bifurcation. In addition, it is shown that the line solitary waves are linearly unstable to long-wavelength transverse perturbations. The key to these results is a formulation of the water wave problem as an evolutionary system in which the transverse horizontal variable plays the role of time, a careful study of the purely imaginary spectrum of the operator obtained by linearising the evolutionary system at a line solitary wave, and an application of an infinite-dimensional version of the classical Lyapunov centre theorem.

  7. Two-photon wave mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian J. Smith; M. G. Raymer

    2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The position-representation wave function for multi-photon states and its equation of motion are introduced. A major strength of the theory is that it describes the complete evolution (including polarization and entanglement) of multi-photon states propagating through inhomogeneous media. As a demonstration of the two-photon wave function's use, we show how two photons in an orbital-angular-momentum entangled state decohere upon propagation through a turbulent atmosphere.

  8. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

  9. Wave function as geometric entity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. I. Lev

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach to the geometrization of the electron theory is proposed. The particle wave function is represented by a geometric entity, i.e., Clifford number, with the translation rules possessing the structure of Dirac equation for any manifold. A solution of this equation is obtained in terms of geometric treatment. Interference of electrons whose wave functions are represented by geometric entities is considered. New experiments concerning the geometric nature of electrons are proposed.

  10. Management Controls for Small Ranches.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, L. A. Jr.

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to operate their cattle business as efficiently as possible. Pro- duction, quality and cost control records can be assembled to help make decisions more accu- rately. Some problems still require a cowman's "sixth sense" until better measures... of productivity and quality control are developed. Many small cow-calf operators are looking for practical records and summaries that will help them 'Extensioti beef cattle specialist, The Texas A&M University System. make decisions affecting the future...

  11. Dynamics of wave fluctuations in the homogeneous Yang-Mills condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Prokhorov; Roman Pasechnik; Grigory Vereshkov

    2014-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, the Yang-Mills (YM) quantum-wave excitations of the classical homogeneous YM condensate have been studied in quasi-classical approximation. The formalism is initially formulated in the Hamilton gauge and is based upon canonical quantisation in the Heisenberg representation. This canonical framework is then extended and related to YM dynamics in arbitrary gauge and symmetry group containing at least one $SU(2)$ subgroup. Such generic properties of the interacting YM system as excitation of longitudinal wave modes and energy balance between the evolving YM condensate and waves have been established. In order to prove these findings, the canonical quasi-classical YM system "waves + condensate" in the pure simplest $SU(2)$ gauge theory has been thoroughly analysed numerically in the linear and next-to-linear approximations in the limit of small wave amplitudes. The effective gluon mass dynamically generated by wave self-interactions in the gluon plasma has been derived. A complete set of equations of motion for the YM "condensate + waves" system accounting for second- and third-order interactions between the waves has been obtained. In the next-to-linear approximation in waves we have found that due to interactions between the YM waves and the YM condensate, the latter looses its energy leading to the growth of amplitudes of the YM wave modes. A similar effect has been found in the maximally-supersymmetric ${\\cal N}=4$ Yang-Mills theory as well as in two-condensate $SU(4)$ model. Possible implications of these findings to Cosmology and gluon plasma physics have been discussed.

  12. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Small HVAC System Design Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Small HVAC System Design Guide DESIGNGUIDELINES October 2003 500;#12;Small HVAC System Design Guide Acknowledgements i Acknowledgements The products and outcomes presented; Darren Goody, PECI, Design Guide review. #12;Small HVAC System Design Guide Preface ii Preface The Small

  13. Installing Small Wind Turbines Seminar and Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seminar and Workshop Installing Small Wind Turbines Seminar and Workshop Location: Murdoch January 2011 Details for Registration and Payment: Mr Daniel Jones, National Small Wind Turbine Test: The National Small Wind Turbine Centre at Murdoch University is holding a Small Wind Turbine short training

  14. Thermoviscoplasticity at small strains Soren Bartels1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartels, Soeren

    simplifications: small strains and additive plasiticity, linear elastic response (so that, in particular

  15. Small Wind Site Assessor Guidelines Document (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation on what the small wind site assessor guidelines document will cover and timeline for completion.

  16. Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Site EnvironmentalEnergySafely Delivering DOE'sEnergy Small Business

  17. Physica D 159 (2001) 3557 Wave group dynamics in weakly nonlinear long-wave models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelinovsky, Dmitry

    Physica D 159 (2001) 35­57 Wave group dynamics in weakly nonlinear long-wave models Roger Grimshawa Communicated by A.C. Newell Abstract The dynamics of wave groups is studied for long waves, using the framework reserved. Keywords: Wave group dynamics; Korteweg­de Vries equation; Nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation 1

  18. Gravity Wave Turbulence in Wave Tanks: Space and Time Statistics Sergei Lukaschuk,1,* Sergey Nazarenko,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    Gravity Wave Turbulence in Wave Tanks: Space and Time Statistics Sergei Lukaschuk,1,* Sergey the first simultaneous space-time measurements for gravity wave turbulence in a large laboratory flume. We found that the slopes of k and ! wave spectra depend on wave intensity. This cannot be explained by any

  19. Eulerian simulations of collisional effects on electrostatic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Perrone, Denise; Veltri, Pierluigi [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Universit della Calabria, 87036 Rende (CS) (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Universit della Calabria, 87036 Rende (CS) (Italy)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of collisions in a plasma is a wide subject with a huge historical literature. In fact, the description of realistic plasmas is a tough problem to attack, both from the theoretical and the numerical point of view. In this paper, a Eulerian time-splitting algorithm for the study of the propagation of electrostatic waves in collisional plasmas is presented. Collisions are modeled through one-dimensional operators of the Fokker-Planck type, both in linear and nonlinear forms. The accuracy of the numerical code is discussed by comparing the numerical results to the analytical predictions obtained in some limit cases when trying to evaluate the effects of collisions in the phenomenon of wave plasma echo and collisional dissipation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves. Particular attention is devoted to the study of the nonlinear Dougherty collisional operator, recently used to describe the collisional dissipation of electron plasma waves in a pure electron plasma column [M. W. Anderson and T. M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112110 (2007)]. Finally, for the study of collisional plasmas, a recipe to set the simulation parameters in order to prevent the filamentation problem can be provided, by exploiting the property of velocity diffusion operators to smooth out small velocity scales.

  20. Propagation Plane waves -High order Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes y x a One wave: p(x,y,t)=p0 cos(k y)e-jk x e j t vy(y,t)= 0 ; y=0,a xy } ky = n a Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes x n a p(x,y,t)=pn cos( y + - +- + + - +- + - + + +- - - (m,n) #12;4 Propagation · Circular duct ­ Helical waves (spiralling waves) kc=m/a kz k

  1. Propagation Plane waves -High order Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes y x a ky = n a One wave: p(x,y,t)=p0 cos(k y)e-jk x e j t vy(y,t)= 0 ; y=0,a xy } Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes x n a p(x,y,t)=pn cos( y;4 Propagation · Circular duct ­ Helical waves (spiralling waves) kc=m/a kz kH Projection: Propagation #12

  2. Control of the chaotic velocity dispersion of a cold electron beam interacting with electrostatic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guido Ciraolo; Cristel Chandre; Ricardo Lima; Marco Pettini; Michel Vittot

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we present an application of a method of control of Hamiltonian systems to the chaotic velocity diffusion of a cold electron beam interacting with electrostatic waves. We numerically show the efficiency and robustness of the additional small control term in restoring kinetic coherence of the injected electron beam.

  3. A nonlinear model for magnetoacoustic waves in dense dissipative plasmas with degenerate electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masood, W. [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad (Pakistan); Jahangir, R.; Siddiq, M. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad (Pakistan); Eliasson, B. [SUPA, Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic waves in dense dissipative plasmas with degenerate electrons are studied theoretically in the framework of the Zabolotskaya-Khokhlov (ZK) equation for small but finite amplitude excitations. Shock-like solutions of the ZK equation are obtained and are applied to parameters relevant to white dwarf stars.

  4. Wave Processes at Interfaces Sigrid Andreae 1 , Josef Ballmann 2 , and Siegfried Muller 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a small, hot gas bubble at very high temperature. This experimental setup provides an exact positioning regarding cav­ itation processes in water. Due to the highly dynamical, unsteady processes under­plastic solid exposed to shock and rarefaction waves in water was investigated by Specht in [ASB00]. Hanke

  5. Almost global existence for nonlinear wave equations in an exterior domain in two space dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideo Kubo

    2012-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we deal with the exterior problem for a system of nonlinear wave equations in two space dimensions, assuming that the initial data is small and smooth. We establish the same type of lower bound of the lifespan for the problem as that for the Cauchy problem, despite of the weak decay property of the solution in two space dimensions.

  6. Nonlinear features of ion acoustic shock waves in dissipative magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, Biswajit, E-mail: biswajit-sahu@yahoo.co.in [Department of Mathematics, West Bengal State University, Barasat, Kolkata 700126 (India); Sinha, Anjana, E-mail: sinha.anjana@gmail.com [Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar, E-mail: rroychoudhury123@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731204, India and Advanced Centre for Nonlinear and Complex Phenomena, 1175 Survey Park, Kolkata 700075 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear propagation of small as well as arbitrary amplitude shocks is investigated in a magnetized dusty plasma consisting of inertia-less Boltzmann distributed electrons, inertial viscous cold ions, and stationary dust grains without dust-charge fluctuations. The effects of dissipation due to viscosity of ions and external magnetic field, on the properties of ion acoustic shock structure, are investigated. It is found that for small amplitude waves, the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) equation, derived using Reductive Perturbation Method, gives a qualitative behaviour of the transition from oscillatory wave to shock structure. The exact numerical solution for arbitrary amplitude wave differs somehow in the details from the results obtained from KdVB equation. However, the qualitative nature of the two solutions is similar in the sense that a gradual transition from KdV oscillation to shock structure is observed with the increase of the dissipative parameter.

  7. Can High Frequency Acoustic Waves Heat the Quiet Sun Chromosphere?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Carlsson; Viggo H. Hansteen; Bart De Pontieu; Scott McIntosh; Theodore D. Tarbell; Dick Shine; Saku Tsuneta; Yukio Katsukawa; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Yoshinori Suematsu; Toshifumi Shimizu; Shin'ichi Nagata

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We use Hinode/SOT Ca II H-line and blue continuum broadband observations to study the presence and power of high frequency acoustic waves at high spatial resolution. We find that there is no dominant power at small spatial scales; the integrated power using the full resolution of Hinode (0.05'' pixels, 0.16'' resolution) is larger than the power in the data degraded to 0.5'' pixels (TRACE pixel size) by only a factor of 1.2. At 20 mHz the ratio is 1.6. Combining this result with the estimates of the acoustic flux based on TRACE data of Fossum & Carlsson (2006), we conclude that the total energy flux in acoustic waves of frequency 5-40 mHz entering the internetwork chromosphere of the quiet Sun is less than 800 W m$^{-2}$, inadequate to balance the radiative losses in a static chromosphere by a factor of five.

  8. Hanford Small Building Demolition Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diebel, J.A.; Douglas, L.M.; Shuck, R.G.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 1,100 buildings currently exist on the Hanford Site. Many of these structures are outdated and no longer needed to support the environmental restoration mission. The Hanford Small Building Demolition Program is part of a combined effort of an Accelerated Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program and Landlord Site Preparation and Stabilization Program aimed at reducing the inventory of noncontaminated surplus facilities onsite. The reduction of surplus facilities results in reduced surveillance and maintenance (S and M) costs and eliminates the safety and environmental hazards associated with aging buildings. The project involves decommissioning up to 80 surplus facilities over the next five years.

  9. Small Hydroelectric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG SolarSkykomish,New York:Lake,Slovenia:EnergySmall))

  10. Wave-Turbulence Interactions in a Breaking Mountain Wave Craig Epifanio and Tingting Qian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Dissipation of Mean Wave Energy Mean wave energy E is just the total energy (kinetic + available The dissipation of mean wave energy is caused by the turbulent momentum fluxes--specifically, by their tendency

  11. Energy-momentum relation for solitary waves of relativistic wave equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Dudnikova; A. I. Komech; H. Spohn

    2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Solitary waves of relativistic invariant nonlinear wave equation with symmetry group U(1) are considered. We prove that the energy-momentum relation for spherically symmetric solitary waves coincides with the Einstein energy-momentum relation for point particles.

  12. Experimental studies of irregular water wave component interactions with comparisons to the hybrid wave model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longridge, Jonathon Kent

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waves in the oceans pose challenging problems to offshore structural design because they arc irregular and can be highly nonlinear. Although these irregular waves can be viewed as the summation of many linear wave components of different...

  13. Energy Department Small Business Partner Success Stories | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small Business Partner Success Stories Energy Department Small Business Partner Success Stories Energy Department Small Business Partner Success Stories...

  14. DEATH BY SMALL FORCES: FAILURE BY FATIGUE IN WAVE-SWEPT MACROALGAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    cases the intertidal region supports rich communities of organisms, the compositions of which depend through the process of fatigue. Through laboratory tests employing standard techniques from fracture mechanics and fatigue analysis, I found that cracks introduced into flat-bladed macroalgae grow in length

  15. Study of small-amplitude magnetohydrodynamic surface waves on liquid Hantao Ji,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Hantao

    by an intensified-CCD (charge-coupled device) camera. The measured dispersion relation is consistent with the linear and a RayleighTaylor instability when the Lorentz force is used to support liquid metal layer against gravity as the material facing the burning plasma in fusion reactors, directly handling the heat flux and breeding tritium

  16. Reactions of small molecular systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittig, C. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE program remains focused on small molecular systems relevant to combustion. Though a number of experimental approaches and machines are available for this research, the authors` activities are centered around the high-n Rydberg time-of-flight (HRTOF) apparatus in this laboratory. One student and one postdoc carry out experiments with this machine and also engage in small intra-group collaborations involving shared equipment. This past year was more productive than the previous two, due to the uninterrupted operation of the HRTOF apparatus. Results were obtained with CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 3}SH, Rg-HX complexes, HCOOH, and their deuterated analogs where appropriate. One paper is in print, three have been accepted for publication, and one is under review. Many preliminary results that augur well for the future were obtained with other systems such as HNO{sub 3}, HBr-HI complexes, toluene, etc. Highlights from the past year are presented below that display some of the features of this program.

  17. Modulation and kinematics of mechanically-generated short gravity waves riding on long waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spell, Charles Anthony

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering MODULATION AND KINEMATICS OF MECHANICALLY- GENERATED SHORT GRAVITY WAVES RIDING ON LONG WAVES A Thesis by C~S ANTHONY SPELL Approved as to style and content by: Jun Zhang... fundamental nonlinear wave interaction occurring in an irregular wave field. The objectives of the present study are now stated: ~ Generate a dual-component wave formed from the interaction of two inde- pendently propagating monochromatic wave trains in a...

  18. Mixing of partial waves near B*B?* threshold in e?e? annihilation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xin; Voloshin, M. B.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the production of B*B?* meson pairs in e?e? annihilation near the threshold. The rescattering due to pion exchange between the mesons results in a mixing between three partial wave amplitudes: two P-wave amplitudes with the total spin of the meson pair S=0 and S=2 and an F-wave amplitude. The mixing due to pion exchange with a low momentum transfer is calculable up to c.m. energy E?1520 MeV above the threshold. We find that the PF mixing is numerically quite small in this energy range, while the mixing of the two P-wave amplitudes is rapidly changing with energy and can reach of order one at such low energies.

  19. Breaking of relativistically intense longitudinal space charge waves: A description using Dawson sheet model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, Sudip, E-mail: sudip@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat , Gandhinagar - 382428 (India)

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatio-temporal evolution of relativistically intense longitudinal space charge waves in a cold homogeneous plasma is studied analytically as well as numerically, as an initial value problem, using Dawson sheet model. It is found that, except for very special initial conditions which generates the well known longitudinal Akhiezer-Polovin mode, for all other initial conditions, the waves break through a novel mechanism called phase mixing at an amplitude well below the Akhiezer-Polovin limit. An immediate consequence of this is, that Akhiezer-Polovin waves break when subjected to arbitrarily small longitudinal perturbations. We demonstrate this by performing extensive numerical simulations. This result may be of direct relevance to ultrashort, ultraintense laser/beam pulse-plasma interaction experiments where relativistically intense waves are routinely excited.

  20. S-P wave interference in the K+K- photoproduction on hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Bibrzycki; L. Lesniak; A. P. Szczepaniak

    2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the partial wave interference effects to obtain a new information about the contribution of the S-wave to the cross section of the K+K- photoproduction on hydrogen. The K+K- photoproduction channel for the effective masses around 1 GeV is dominated by the phi(1020) resonance with only a small fraction of events coming from decays of scalar resonances f0(980) and a0(980). However, a careful analysis of angular distributions of the outgoing kaons shows that the S-wave adds an asymmetry to the angular distribution of kaons. A fairly precise estimation of the K+K- photoproduction cross section in the S-wave has been obtained.

  1. Studies of the superconducting traveling wave cavity for high gradient LINAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of a traveling wave (TW) accelerating structure with a small phase advance per cell instead of standing wave may provide a significant increase of accelerating gradient in a superconducting linear accelerator. The TW section achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2-1.4 larger than TESLA-shaped standing wave cavities for the same surface electric and magnetic fields. Recent tests of an L-band single-cell cavity with a waveguide feedback demonstrated an accelerating gradient comparable to the gradient in a single-cell ILC-type cavity from the same manufacturer. This article presents the next stage of the 3- cell TW resonance ring development which will be tested in the traveling wave regime. The main simulation results of the microphonics and Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD) are also considered.

  2. Mechanism of destruction of transport barriers in geophysical jets with Rossby waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uleysky, M Yu; Prants, S V; 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.017202

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanism of destruction of a central transport barrier in a dynamical model of a geophysical zonal jet current in the ocean or the atmosphere with two propagating Rossby waves is studied. We develop a method for computing a central invariant curve which is an indicator of existence of the barrier. Breakdown of this curve under a variation of the Rossby wave amplitudes and onset of chaotic cross-jet transport happen due to specific resonances producing stochastic layers in the central jet. The main result is that there are resonances breaking the transport barrier at unexpectedly small values of the amplitudes that may have serious impact on mixing and transport in the ocean and the atmosphere. The effect can be found in laboratory experiments with azimuthal jets and Rossby waves in rotating tanks under specific values of the wave numbers that are predicted in the theory.

  3. Surface wave chemical detector using optical radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface wave chemical detector comprising at least one surface wave substrate, each of said substrates having a surface wave and at least one measurable surface wave parameter; means for exposing said surface wave substrate to an unknown sample of at least one chemical to be analyzed, said substrate adsorbing said at least one chemical to be sensed if present in said sample; a source of radiation for radiating said surface wave substrate with different wavelengths of said radiation, said surface wave parameter being changed by said adsorbing; and means for recording signals representative of said surface wave parameter of each of said surface wave substrates responsive to said radiation of said different wavelengths, measurable changes of said parameter due to adsorbing said chemical defining a unique signature of a detected chemical.

  4. Two-wave interaction in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Zaqarashvili; B. Roberts

    2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The weakly nonlinear interaction of sound and linearly polarised Alfv{\\'e}n waves propagating in the same direction along an applied magnetic field is studied. It is found that a sound wave is coupled to the Alfv{\\'e}n wave with double period and wavelength when the sound and Alfv{\\'e}n speeds are equal. The Alfv{\\'e}n wave drives the sound wave through the ponderomotive force, while the sound wave returns energy back to the Alfv{\\'e}n wave through the parametric (swing) influence. As a result, the two waves alternately exchange their energy during propagation. The process of energy exchange is faster for waves with stronger amplitudes. The phenomenon can be of importance in astrophysical plasmas, including the solar atmosphere and solar wind.

  5. B8 Page 1 B8. Using CMS-Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    B8 Page 1 B8. Using CMS-Wave The most recent CMS-Wave code developed is Version 3.2. Several new capabilities and advanced features in this version include: Full-plane wind-generation of waves Automatic wave run-up calculation Infra-gravity wave calculation Nonlinear wave-wave interaction Muddy

  6. Excellence in Celebrating Small Business: Meet the Woman who...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Excellence in Celebrating Small Business: Meet the Woman who Runs our Small Business Awards Program Excellence in Celebrating Small Business: Meet the Woman who Runs our Small...

  7. Observations and HighObservations and High--Resolution Modeling of SmallResolution Modeling of Small--Scale FlowScale Flow--TopographyTopography Interactions Near Caribbean Coral ReefsInteractions Near Caribbean Coral Reefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    of Small--Scale FlowScale Flow--TopographyTopography Interactions Near Caribbean Coral ReefsInteractions Near Caribbean Coral Reefs Tal Ezer Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Old Dominion University wave-induced mixing and dispersion, providing a possible explanation why many species of Caribbean fish

  8. Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, Delhi 110054 (India)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

  9. Oblique propagation of nonlinear electrostatic waves in dense astrophysical magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masood, W.; Siddiq, M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad 54000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000, Islamabad (Pakistan); Rizvi, H. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad 54000 (Pakistan)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear quantum ion-acoustic waves in dense dissipative as well as non-dissipative magnetized plasmas are investigated employing the quantum hydrodynamic model. In this regard, Zakharov Kuznetsov Burgers equation is derived in quantum plasmas, for the first time, using the small amplitude perturbation expansion method. The unique features of nonlinear electrostatic structures in pure electron-ion quantum magnetoplasma are highlighted and the parametric domain of the applicability of the model is unequivocally expressed. The present study may be useful to understand the nonlinear propagation characteristics of electrostatic shock and solitary structures in dense astrophysical systems where the quantum effects are expected to dominate.

  10. Cosmological Baryon Sound Waves Coupled with the Primeval Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhiro Yamamoto; Naoshi Sugiyama; Humitaka Sato

    1997-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluid equations for the baryon-electron system in an expanding universe are derived from the Boltzmann equation. The effect of the Compton interaction is taken into account properly in order to evaluate the photon-electron collisional term. As an application, the acoustic motions of the baryon-electron system after recombination are investigated. The effective adiabatic index $\\gamma$ is computed for sound waves of various wavelengths, assuming the perturbation amplitude is small. The oscillations are found to be dumped when $\\gamma$ changes from between 1 (for an isothermal process) to 5/3 (for an adiabatic process).

  11. On the drift magnetosonic waves in anisotropic low beta plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naim, Hafsa, E-mail: roohi-phy@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, G. C. University Lahore, Katchery Road, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Bashir, M. F., E-mail: frazbashir@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Visiting Professor, Department of Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized dispersion relation of obliquely propagating drift magnetosonic waves is derived by using the gyrokinetic theory for anisotropic low beta plasmas. The stability analysis applicable to a wide range of plasma parameters is performed to understand the stabilization mechanism of the drift magnetosonic instability and the estimation of the growth rate is also presented. It is noted that the growth rate of the drift instability enhances for small anisotropy (A{sub e,i}?=?T{sub ?e,i}/T{sub ?e,i}??1)

  12. Wave propagation in anisotropic viscoelasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Hanyga

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the theory of complete Bernstein functions to matrix-valued functions and apply it to analyze Green's function of an anisotropic multi-dimension\\-al linear viscoelastic problem. Green's function is given by the superposition of plane waves. Each plane wave is expressed in terms of matrix-valued attenuation and dispersion functions given in terms of a matrix-valued positive semi-definite Radon measure. More explicit formulae are obtained for 3D isotropic viscoelastic Green's functions. As an example of an anisotropic medium the transversely isotropic medium with a constant symmetry axis is considered.

  13. Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation,Goff, 2002) | OpenEnergy AS Jump to:WaveWave

  14. Alfven waves in the solar wind in association with solar energetic particles: Sunspot umbral origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullan, D.J.; Owens, A.J.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a search for Alfven waves in the solar wind during solar particle events using ISEE 3 data. During the period 1979 June 6--6, we find signatures of outgoint Alfven waves which could have been released from the Sun simultaneously with the initial release of energetic particles. The waves have durations of 200--900 s. An isolated Alfven wave is also seen when the first particles (with E< or approx. =57 MeV) are detected by ISEE 3; the width of this wave is approx.950 s. A series of five small-amplitude ''spikes'' in the magnetic field are also seen, preceding the arrival of the first particles by a few hours. The spikes are separated by intervals of 854 +- 20 s. We suggest that these periodicities may be determined by the propagation characteristics of Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere. The features which we have detected apper to be consistent with Alfven waves released from the umbra of a sunspot during a flare.

  15. atmospheric gravity waves: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gravity waves (AGWs). Satellite imagery shows evidence the characteristics of these waves. The favorable wave propagation conditions in 12;this region are illustrated 5...

  16. anomalous spin waves: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    branches of wave dispersion: spin-electromagnetic plasma waves and self-consistent spin waves. Propagation of neutron beams through quantum plasmas is also considered....

  17. Identifying two steps in the internal wave energy cascade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Oliver Ming-Teh

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1.1 The internal wave energy cascade . . . . . . .? ? , which contain only wave energy trav- eling upward anddistinction is made between wave energy propagating upward

  18. Fundamentals of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fundamentals of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Fundamentals of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Abstract: Traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TW IMS) is a...

  19. MHK Technologies/New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable Mobile...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Renewable Mobile Wind and Wave Power Plant Platform < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable...

  20. alfven wave spectrum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waves are easily excited by various processes. Linear waves propagate at the Alfv'en speed v Guedel, Manuel 14 Anisotropic weak turbulence of Alfven waves in collisionless...

  1. alfven wave avalanches: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waves are easily excited by various processes. Linear waves propagate at the Alfv'en speed v Guedel, Manuel 13 Anisotropic weak turbulence of Alfven waves in collisionless...

  2. Multicomponent seismic data, combining P-wave and converted P-to-SV wave (C-wave) wavefields, provide inde-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    (fast and slow) with differing polarization. The 4C, 3D ocean-bottom cable (OBC) multicomponent seismic and stratigraphic features within the gas-charged intervals. C- waves (Figure 3) penetrate these P-wave wipeout

  3. Injection system for small betatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuorygin, V.P.; Chakhlov, V.L.; Pushin, U.S.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to reduce the head loads on the injector electrodes and to raise the efficiency of electron capture during acceleration, small betatrons are provided with an injection system with a controlled three-electrode injector in which injection current pulse with steep leading and trailing edges is formed by the application of a voltage pulse to the control electrode from a separate circuit through a pulse transformer. In a betatron injection system described, elements of the controlled injector of the accelerating chamber are used to correct the shape of the current pulse. The circuit for correcting the current-pulse shape can increase the accelerated charge by the average of 75% per betatron cycle and decrease the heat loads on the electrodes of the injector without the use of a generator of controlling voltage pulses.

  4. Wave VelocityWave Velocity Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Wave VelocityWave Velocity v=/T =f Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity Depends on the medium in which the wave travelsDepends on the medium in which the wave travels stringaonvelocity F v of Waves11-8. Types of Waves Transverse wave Longitudinal wave Liu UCD Phy1B 2014 37 #12;Sound Wave

  5. Small Business Express Program (EXP) (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Small Business Express Program (EXP) provides loans and grants to small businesses (not more than 100 employees) to spur job creation and growth. The Program provides access to capital through...

  6. Small Business Linked Deposit Program (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Small Business Linked Deposit Program provides below-market interest rates for qualified small businesses and certified industrial parks through local financing sources. Loans are for a two...

  7. Small-Scale Energy Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) - created in 1981 after voters approved a constitutional amendment authorizing the sale of bonds to finance small-scale, local energy projects - is...

  8. Wisconsin Small Business Guarantee Program (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wisconsin Small Business Guarantee Program offers low-interest financing to small businesses for fixed assets, working capital, or inventory purchase. The loan guarantee maximum is 50 percent...

  9. 2014 National Small Business Federal Contracting Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2014 National Small Business Federal Contracting Summit - DC Summer Conference presented jointly by the U.S. Women's Chamber of Commerce and the American Small Business Chamber of Commerce /...

  10. Multiple Scales in Small-World Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasturirangan, Rajesh

    1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-world architectures may be implicated in a range of phenomena from networks of neurons in the cerebral cortex to social networks and propogation of viruses. Small-world networks are interpolations of regular and ...

  11. NYSEG (Electric)- Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSEG offers a lighting incentive program designed to serve small business customers with a demand of 100 kilowatts (kW) or less. These small business customers may schedule a free energy...

  12. Small Power Production and Cogeneration (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maine's Small Power Production and Cogeneration statute says that any small power producer or cogenerator may generate or distribute electricity through his private property solely for his own use,...

  13. State Small Business Credit Initiative (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State Small Business Credit Initiative (SSBCI) uses federal funding to stimulate private-sector lending and improve access to capital for small businesses and manufacturers that are credit...

  14. USDA Rural Small Business Connection Event

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will host Rural Small Business Connections, providing small businesses with networking sessions and opportunities to build capacity and do business with USDA and other Federal agencies.

  15. Small Business Job Creation Tax Credit (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Small Business Jobs Creation Tax Credit program provides small business owners and non-profits with an extra boost to grow their business over the next four years. After creating one...

  16. Helping Wisconsin Small Businesses Increase Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Almost 100 Wisconsin small- and medium-sized businesses have been helped thanks to the Wisconsin Profitable Sustainability Initiative.

  17. The relationship between small learning communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turnbo, Bobbie Jo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    /vocational pathways. In the 1970s, schools progressed toward developing magnet programs, career academies, and mini-schools (Oxley, 2006). Charter schools became part of the high school evolution in the 1980s - 1990s, and are still strong advocates for small... traditional campus. Small Learning Communities Models and Strategies Sammon (2000) describes small learning communities by clustering them into six main models: career academies, houses, small learning community (SLC)/school- within-school, magnet schools...

  18. Small Wind Independent Testing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the Small Wind Independent Testing at the NWTC and the Regional Test Centers project.

  19. WAVE-ENERGY DENSITY AND WAVE-MOMENTUM DENSITY OF EACH SPECIES OF A COLLISION-LESS PLASMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cary, John R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    case, the electrons have negative wave energy for 2w ne w wave energy for 2w .w > 0 nl Hence, unstable waves with negative phase velocity,

  20. Einstein, Black Holes Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Greg

    1 #12;Einstein, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves Gregory B. Cook Wake Forest University 2 #12;Einstein's Miraculous Year: 1905 Einstein, A. "Uber einen die Erzeugung und Verwandlung des Lichtes Concerning the Production and Transformation of Light. Einstein, A. "Uber die von der molekularkinetischen

  1. Wave functions of linear systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Sowinski

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Complete analysis of quantum wave functions of linear systems in an arbitrary number of dimensions is given. It is shown how one can construct a complete set of stationary quantum states of an arbitrary linear system from purely classical arguments. This construction is possible because for linear systems classical dynamics carries the whole information about quantum dynamics.

  2. Small Wind Guidebook/What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind...

  3. Nonlinear Saturation of Vertically Propagating Rossby Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannitsis, Constantine

    The interaction between vertical Rossby wave propagation and wave breaking is studied in the idealized context of a beta-plane channel model. Considering the problem of propagation through a uniform zonal flow in an ...

  4. Arnold Schwarzenegger DEVELOPING WAVE ENERGY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor DEVELOPING WAVE ENERGY IN COASTAL CALIFORNIA: POTENTIAL SOCIO. Developing Wave Energy In Coastal California: Potential Socio-Economic And Environmental Effects. California-ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program

  5. Mathematical aspects of surface water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    questions remain. These have to do with the evolution of surface water waves, their approximation by model normally being chosen. Unless we are describing waves of a global extent, such as a tsunami, for our

  6. Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

  7. On quantization of nondispersive wave packets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altaisky, M. V. [Space Research Institute RAS, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)] [Space Research Institute RAS, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Kaputkina, N. E. [National University of Science and Technology MISIS Leninsky prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)] [National University of Science and Technology MISIS Leninsky prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nondispersive wave packets are widely used in optics and acoustics. We found it interesting that such packets could be also a subject of quantum field theory. Canonical commutation relations for the nondispersive wave packets are constructed.

  8. Wave Mechanics and General Relativity: A Rapprochement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson

    2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Using exact solutions, we show that it is in principle possible to regard waves and particles as representations of the same underlying geometry, thereby resolving the problem of wave-particle duality.

  9. Wind effects on shoaling wave shape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddersen, F; Veron, F

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    breaking in the presence of wind drift and swell. J. Fluidlin, 1995: Asymmetry of wind waves studied in a laboratorycoupling between swell and wind-waves. J. Phys. Oceanogr. ,

  10. Carbon nanotube-guided thermopower waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Wonjoon

    Thermopower waves are a new concept for the direct conversion of chemical to electrical energy. A nanowire with large axial thermal diffusivity can accelerate a self-propagating reaction wave using a fuel coated along its ...

  11. Oblique reflections of internal gravity wave beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karimi, Hussain H. (Hussain Habibullah)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study nonlinear effects in reflections of internal gravity wave beams in a continuously stratified liquid which are incident upon a uniform slope at an oblique angle. Wave motion in a stratified fluid medium is unique ...

  12. Turbulent round jet under gravity waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Yong Uk

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of a neutrally buoyant horizontal turbulent round jet under a wavy environment was investigated. Progressive waves with different wave amplitudes in an intermediate water depth were used. The Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique...

  13. Gravitational waves from merging compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Scott A.

    Largely motivated by the development of highly sensitive gravitational-wave detectors, our understanding of merging compact binaries and the gravitational waves they generate has improved dramatically in recent years. ...

  14. Analysis of optimum Lamb wave tuning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Yijun, 1970-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guided waves are of enormous interest in the nondestructive evaluation of thin-walled structures and layered media. Due to their dispersive and multi-modal nature, it is desirable to tune the waves by discriminating one ...

  15. Hydrodynamic forces due to waves and a current induced on a pipeline placed in an open trench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jaeyoung

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . For the first test, calibration was carried out in a small wave flume with an electric carnage. This carriage is designed to move at a steady speed in the range of 0. 5 ? 8. 0 fps (15 ? 24 cm/sec). The probe support, which has a hot ? wire anemometer at its.... This proves that the calibration has to be done at the same water temperature as the temperature in which the probe will be employed. Since the test wave flume is not equipped with a carriage, a small plastic ball (OD = 0. 197 in. (0. 5 cm)) was placed...

  16. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The projects scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industrys development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industrys development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory issues (Pacific Energy Ventures) and navigational issues (PCCI). The results of this study are structured into three reports: (1) Wave power scenario description (2) Tidal power scenario description (3) Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the first report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of wave power plants deployed in Humboldt County, California and Oahu, Hawaii. These two sites contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other wave power sites in the U.S. and serve as representative case studies. Wave power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize potential effects, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informed the process of selecting representative wave power devices. The selection criteria requires that devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties, and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. Table 1 summarizes the selected wave power technologies. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development, but are not directly mentioned here. Many environmental effects will largely scale with the size of the wave power plant. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) a small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial sc

  17. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the ? channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

  18. Wave Propagation in Fractured Poroelastic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic wave propagation through fractures and cracks is an important subject in exploration and production geophysics, earthquake seismology and mining.

  19. Comparison of P-wave and S-wave data processed by DIP moveout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Misnid, Abdulaziz Mugbel

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of compressional (P) and shear (S) wave data in a fractured reservoir can show whether amplitude anomalies on the P-wave section are associated with the presence of gas or change of lithology. The P-wave and S-wave data selected for this study were shot in Burleson...

  20. High amplitude wave propagation in collapsible tubes. II. Forerunners and high amplitude waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    773 High amplitude wave propagation in collapsible tubes. II. Forerunners and high amplitude waves that, under certain circumstances, a pressure wave of large amplitude which propagates in a fluid feature of such a shock wave propagation inside an initially collapsed tube is the presence ofwavelets

  1. Thompson/Ocean 420/Winter 2004 2D waves 1 Two-dimensional wave propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    Thompson/Ocean 420/Winter 2004 2D waves 1 Two-dimensional wave propagation So far we have talked about wave propagation in one-dimension. For two or three spatial dimensions, we vectorize our ideas propagation. For surface waves, there is no vertical propagation, and we are only concerned with the two

  2. Wave Front Interaction Model of Stabilized Propagating Wave Segments Vladimir S. Zykov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Showalter, Kenneth

    Wave Front Interaction Model of Stabilized Propagating Wave Segments Vladimir S. Zykov1 and Kenneth; published 14 February 2005) A wave front interaction model is developed to describe the relationship between excitability and the size and shape of stabilized wave segments in a broad class of weakly excitable media

  3. Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Outline Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He: Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena Conference, Chernogolovka, 3 August 2009 McClintock Efimov Ganshin Kolmakov Mezhov-Deglin Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He #12;Outline Outline 1 Introduction Motivation 2 Modelling wave turbulence Need for models

  4. Wave-pinned filaments of scroll waves Tams Bnsgi, Jr., Kevin J. Meyer, and Oliver Steinbocka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbock, Oliver

    Wave-pinned filaments of scroll waves Tams Bnsgi, Jr., Kevin J. Meyer, and Oliver Steinbocka Received 5 November 2007; accepted 26 December 2007; published online 6 March 2008 Scroll waves are three can be pinned to the wake of traveling wave pulses. This pinning is studied in experiments with the 1

  5. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Spencer

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    waves generated by the thermoacoustic mechanism, little workproduction by the thermoacoustic mechanism is suppressed,

  6. Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Dan

    Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building Paper: Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building John residential light- frame wood buildings and wave and surge loading be- cause often little is left residential structures and wave loading. To do this, one-sixth scale residen- tial building models typical

  7. Beauty waves: an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, Jay Allen

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we present a method for computing an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves. Wave forms are loosely based on procedural wave models and are designed to emulate those found in both art and nature. The wave forms...

  8. Autoresonance of coupled nonlinear waves L. Friedland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedland, Lazar

    wave train solutions of the decoupled problem. At the same time, the waves are globally phase locked, allowing the continuation of the phase locking between the waves despite the variation of system's param and sustaining this multidimensional autoresonance are the internal reso- nant excitation of one of the coupled

  9. EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES ON YOUNG SALMON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES ON YOUNG SALMON Marine Biological Laboratory X. 1 33 R A. RTT ir.':; WOODS instantaneously to sounds. It was con- were tested in an experimental tank and in eluded that sound waves were, Wash . sound studies conducted under the above contract are terminated. #12;EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES

  10. Coupled Parabolic Equations for Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hongkai

    Coupled Parabolic Equations for Wave Propagation Kai Huang, Knut Solna and Hongkai Zhao #3; April simulation of wave propagation over long distances. The coupled parabolic equations are derived from a two algorithms are important in order to understand wave propagation in complex media. Resolving the wavelength

  11. Solitary waves propagating over variable Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solitary waves propagating over variable topography Roger Grimshaw Loughborough University waves that can propagate steadily over long distances. They were first observed by Russell in 1837 in a now famous report [26] on his observations of a solitary wave propagating along a Scottish canal

  12. Seminario de Matemtica Aplicada "Renowable wave energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tradacete, Pedro

    Seminario de Matemtica Aplicada "Renowable wave energy: potencial and technical challenges Abstract: Among the various renewable energy sources, ocean wave energy has been only recently investiga will be at first to introduce the potential of wave energy, as a significant, and often neglected, contributor

  13. Wave propagation Remco Hartkamp (University of Twente)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    ) waves Sound: 20 Hz 20 kHz Gas: P Liquid: P Plasma: P Solid: P & S #12;Stretched string example 1D wave Dispersion: Waves with different wavelengths propagate at different speeds 6 k c k k Shallow water: c gh mJ K material parameter (related to the strain saturation of the material) det FJ bulk modulus

  14. Multi-reflective acoustic wave device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andle, Jeffrey C.

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

  15. Wave guides: vacuum w/ tube of conductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Wave guides: vacuum w/ tube of conductor boundary conditions for conductor Properties: non-transverse waves except TEM mode in coaxial cable speed normal modes (from Liouville problem) TE or TM TEM for coaxial cable cuto frequency otherwise evanescent waves separation into and components with 1 #12;B

  16. WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

  17. Wave Packets and Turbulent Peter Jordan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    Wave Packets and Turbulent Jet Noise Peter Jordan1 and Tim Colonius2 1 Departement Fluides-control efforts is incomplete. Wave packets are intermittent, advecting disturbances that are correlated over review evidence of the existence, energetics, dynamics, and acous- tic efficiency of wave packets. We

  18. EFFICIENCY OF FAST WAVE CURRENT DRIVE FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    EFFICIENCY OF FAST WAVE CURRENT DRIVE FOR A WEAKLY RELATIVISTIC PLASMA by S.C. CHIU, C.F.F. KARNEY: http://charles.karney.info/biblio/chiu94.html #12;Chiu e t al. THE EFFICIENCY OF FAST WAVE CURRENT DRIVE FOR A WEAKLY RELATIVISTIC PLASMA THE EFFICIENCY OF FAST WAVE CURRENT DRIVE FOR A WEAKLY

  19. Visualizing the kinematics of relativistic wave packets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernd Thaller

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This article investigates some solutions of the time-dependent free Dirac equation. Visualizations of these solutions immediately reveal strange phenomena that are caused by the interference of positive- and negative-energy waves. The effects discussed here include the Zitterbewegung, the opposite direction of momentum and velocity in negative-energy wave packets, and the superluminal propagation of the wave packet's local maxima.

  20. Hybrid wave model and its applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jun

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonlinear hybrid wave model (HWM) is developed. It uses the conventional mode-coupling method (MCM) and the phase modulation method (PMM) to address the nonlinear interactions between free-wave components in an ocean wave field. The PMM is a...

  1. Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleiss, Jessica M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. M. Janssen, 1996: Wave energy dissipation by whitecaps.waves: Surface impulse and wave energy dissipation rates. J.to the ocean, dissipating wave energy that is then available

  2. ITB KNAW UTwente Lectures on Free Surface Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    , Acknowledgment Surface waves are phenomena that are characterised by the dynamic interplay between linear.3 Linear Dispersive wave model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.4 Wave groupsITB KNAW UTwente Lectures on Free Surface Waves Brenny van Groesen, Applied Analysis & Mathematical

  3. Traveling wave device for combining or splitting symmetric and asymmetric waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mbius, Arnold (Eggenstein, DE); Ives, Robert Lawrence (Saratoga, CA)

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A traveling wave device for the combining or splitting of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy includes a feed waveguide for traveling wave energy, the feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for coupling wave energy between the feed waveguide and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of wave energy to or from the reflector. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which includes a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which includes a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

  4. Gravitational wave radiometry: Mapping a stochastic gravitational wave background

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitra, Sanjit [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Souradeep, Tarun [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Lazzarini, Albert; Mandic, Vuk; Ballmer, Stefan [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 18-34, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bose, Sukanta [Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2814 (United States)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of the detection and mapping of a stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB), either cosmological or astrophysical, bears a strong semblance to the analysis of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and polarization, which too is a stochastic field, statistically described in terms of its correlation properties. An astrophysical gravitational wave background (AGWB) will likely arise from an incoherent superposition of unmodelled and/or unresolved sources and cosmological gravitational wave backgrounds (CGWB) are also predicted in certain scenarios. The basic statistic we use is the cross correlation between the data from a pair of detectors. In order to ''point'' the pair of detectors at different locations one must suitably delay the signal by the amount it takes for the gravitational waves (GW) to travel to both detectors corresponding to a source direction. Then the raw (observed) sky map of the SGWB is the signal convolved with a beam response function that varies with location in the sky. We first present a thorough analytic understanding of the structure of the beam response function using an analytic approach employing the stationary phase approximation. The true sky map is obtained by numerically deconvolving the beam function in the integral (convolution) equation. We adopt the maximum likelihood framework to estimate the true sky map using the conjugate gradient method that has been successfully used in the broadly similar, well-studied CMB map-making problem. We numerically implement and demonstrate the method on signal generated by simulated (unpolarized) SGWB for the GW radiometer consisting of the LIGO pair of detectors at Hanford and Livingston. We include 'realistic' additive Gaussian noise in each data stream based on the LIGO-I noise power spectral density. The extension of the method to multiple baselines and polarized GWB is outlined. In the near future the network of GW detectors, including the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors that will be sensitive to sources within a thousand times larger spatial volume, could provide promising data sets for GW radiometry.

  5. Damage Detection in Plate Structures using Guided Ultrasonic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarmer, Gregory James Sylvester

    Guided Wave Structural Health Monitoring. Ultrasonics 50 (to Structural Health Monitoring. Philosophicalfor Guided-wave Structural Health Monitoring. Structural

  6. Three-cell traveling wave superconducting test structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; /Euclid Techlabs, Solon; Kazakov, Sergey; Solyak, Nikolay; Wu, Genfa; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure with a small phase advance per cell rather than a standing wave structure may provide a significant increase of the accelerating gradient in the ILC linac. For the same surface electric and magnetic fields the STWA achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2 larger than TESLA-like standing wave cavities. The STWA allows also longer acceleration cavities, reducing the number of gaps between them. However, the STWA structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few hundreds of MW of circulating RF power from the structure output to the structure input. A test single-cell cavity with feedback was designed, manufactured and successfully tested demonstrating the possibility of a proper processing to achieve a high accelerating gradient. These results open way to take the next step of the TW SC cavity development: to build and test a travelingwave three-cell cavity with a feedback waveguide. The latest results of the single-cell cavity tests are discussed as well as the design of the test 3-cell TW cavity.

  7. Dynamics of Sound Waves in an Interacting Bose Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. -A. Deckert; J. Frhlich; P. Pickl; A. Pizzo

    2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a non-relativistic quantum gas of $N$ bosonic atoms confined to a box of volume $\\Lambda$ in physical space. The atoms interact with each other through a pair potential whose strength is inversely proportional to the density, $\\rho=\\frac{N}{\\Lambda}$, of the gas. We study the time evolution of coherent excitations above the ground state of the gas in a regime of large volume $\\Lambda$ and small ratio $\\frac{\\Lambda}{\\rho}$. The initial state of the gas is assumed to be close to a \\textit{product state} of one-particle wave functions that are approximately constant throughout the box. The initial one-particle wave function of an excitation is assumed to have a compact support independent of $\\Lambda$. We derive an effective non-linear equation for the time evolution of the one-particle wave function of an excitation and establish an explicit error bound tracking the accuracy of the effective non-linear dynamics in terms of the ratio $\\frac{\\Lambda}{\\rho}$. We conclude with a discussion of the dispersion law of low-energy excitations, recovering Bogolyubov's well-known formula for the speed of sound in the gas, and a dynamical instability for attractive two-body potentials.

  8. A k-space method for nonlinear wave propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Jing; Greg. T. Clement

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A k-space method for nonlinear wave propagation in absorptive media is presented. The Westervelt equation is first transferred into k-space via Fourier transformation, and is solved by a modified wave-vector time-domain scheme [Mast et al., IEEE Tran. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 48, 341-354 (2001)]. The present approach is not limited to forward propagation or parabolic approximation. One- and two-dimensional problems are investigated to verify the method by comparing results to the finite element method. It is found that, in order to obtain accurate results in homogeneous media, the grid size can be as little as two points per wavelength, and for a moderately nonlinear problem, the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy number can be as small as 0.4. As a result, the k-space method for nonlinear wave propagation is shown here to be computationally more efficient than the conventional finite element method or finite-difference time-domain method for the conditions studied here. However, although the present method is highly accurate for weakly inhomogeneous media, it is found to be less accurate for strongly inhomogeneous media. A possible remedy to this limitation is discussed.

  9. Propagation of three-dimensional electron-acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shalaby, M.; El-Sherif, L. S. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Labany, S. K. [Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Mansoura University, Damietta Branch, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Sabry, R. [Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Mansoura University, Damietta Branch, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Physics Department, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Alkharj University, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical investigation is carried out for understanding the properties of three-dimensional electron-acoustic waves propagating in magnetized plasma whose constituents are cold magnetized electron fluid, hot electrons obeying nonthermal distribution, and stationary ions. For this purpose, the hydrodynamic equations for the cold magnetized electron fluid, nonthermal electron density distribution, and the Poisson equation are used to derive the corresponding nonlinear evolution equation, Zkharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, in the small- but finite- amplitude regime. The ZK equation is solved analytically and it is found that it supports both solitary and blow-up solutions. It is found that rarefactive electron-acoustic solitary waves strongly depend on the density and temperature ratios of the hot-to-cold electron species as well as the nonthermal electron parameter. Furthermore, there is a critical value for the nonthermal electron parameter, which decides whether the electron-acoustic solitary wave's amplitude is decreased or increased by changing various plasma parameters. Importantly, the change of the propagation angles leads to miss the balance between the nonlinearity and dispersion; hence, the localized pulses convert to explosive/blow-up pulses. The relevance of this study to the nonlinear electron-acoustic structures in the dayside auroral zone in the light of Viking satellite observations is discussed.

  10. Flat Lens Criterion by Small-Angle Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, Peter; Lezec, Henri J; Chau, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a classical imaging criterion based on angular dependence of small-angle phase can be applied to any system composed of planar, uniform media to determine if it is a flat lens capable of forming a real paraxial image and to estimate the image location. The real paraxial image location obtained by this method shows agreement with past demonstrations of far-field flat-lens imaging and can even predict the location of super-resolved images in the near-field. The generality of this criterion leads to several new predictions: flat lenses for transverse-electric polarization using dielectric layers, a broadband flat lens working across the ultraviolet-visible spectrum, and a flat lens configuration with an image plane located up to several wavelengths from the exit surface. These predictions are supported by full-wave simulations. Our work shows that small-angle phase can be used as a generic metric to categorize and design flat lenses.

  11. CBR Temperature Fluctuations Induced by Gravitational Waves in a Spatially-Closed Inflationary Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce Allen Robert Caldwell Scott Koranda

    1994-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Primordial gravitational waves are created during the de Sitter phase of an exponentially-expanding (inflationary) universe, due to quantum zero-point vacuum fluctuations. These waves produce fluctuations in the temperature of the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR). We calculate the multipole moments of the correlation function for these temperature fluctuations in a spatially-closed Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model. The results are compared to the corresponding multipoles in the spatially-flat case. The differences are small unless the density parameter today, $\\Omega_0$, is greater than 2. (Submitted to Physical Review D).

  12. Measurement of acoustoelastic effect of Rayleigh surface waves using laser ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, W.Y.; Peng, L.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Materials and Engineering Sciences Center; Holland, S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Electrical Engineering Dept.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The acoustoelastic effect refers to the fact that elastic wave velocities vary with stress. Measurements of the change in stress induced velocity yield information which leads to the determination of stresses. Some work has been done to explore the possibility of using ultrasonic waves, including bulk longitudinal and shear waves as well as surface waves, for the nondestructive evaluation of stresses. This paper focuses on Rayleigh surface waves, which have the advantage of detecting both surface stresses and stress gradients. Piezoelectric or electromagnetic acoustic transducers have been used for the application of Rayleigh waves in the acoustoelastic measurement of stress. The size of these transducers and their fixtures limit the distance between transducers. Sharp edge wedges are usually bound to the pick-up piezoelectric transducers, known as the Rayleigh or surface wave device (SWD), to provide a better spatial resolution when the stress field is not uniform. The smallest distance reported is 11 mm. On the other hand, acoustic microscopes (AM) can measure localized stress for a very small area, from 30 {micro}m to 2 mm. Both SWD and AM method may lack the agility required for general applications. Laser ultrasonics (LU) is a method for optical generation and detection of ultrasound. The generation and detection areas can be focused to very small spot sizes, less than 1 mm, which allow velocity measurements to be made over a path length of a few millimeters. The LU technique is non-contact and can be applied remotely; it has many potential applications. The authors used the LU technique to measure the acoustoelastic behavior of an aluminum alloy, A16061-T6.

  13. Construction of KP solitons from wave patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbarish Chakravarty; Yuji Kodama

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We often observe that waves on the surface of shallow water form complex web-like patterns. They are examples of nonlinear waves, and these patterns are generated by nonlinear interactions among several obliquely propagating waves. In this note, we discuss how to construct an exact soliton solution of the KP equation from such web-pattern of shallow water wave. This can be regarded as an "inverse problem" in the sense that by measuring certain metric data of the solitary waves in the given pattern, it is possible to construct an exact KP soliton solution which can describe the non-stationary dynamics of the pattern.

  14. Thermal Gravitational Waves from Primordial Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal gravitational waves can be generated in various sources such as, in the cores of stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars due to the fermion collisions in the dense degenerate Fermi gas. Such high frequency thermal gravitational waves can also be produced during the collisions in a gamma ray burst or during the final stages of the evaporation of primordial black holes. Here we estimate the thermal gravitational waves from primordial black holes and estimate the integrated energy of the gravitational wave emission over the entire volume of the universe and over Hubble time. We also estimate the gravitational wave flux from gamma ray bursts and jets.

  15. Refractive gravitational waves and quantum fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John W. Barrett

    2000-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Refractive gravitational waves are a generalisation of impulsive waves on a null hypersurface in which the metric is discontinuous but a weaker continuity condition for areas holds. A simple example of a plane wave is examined in detail and two arguments are given that this should be considered a solution of Einstein's vacuum field equations. The study of these waves is motivated by quantum gravity, where the refractive plane waves are considered as elementary quantum fluctuations and the `area geometry' of a null hypersurface plays a primary role.

  16. Matter Wave Radiation Leading to Matter Teleportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong-Yi Huang

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of matter wave radiation is put forward, and its equation is established for the first time. The formalism solution shows that the probability density is a function of displacement and time. A free particle and a two-level system are reinvestigated considering the effect of matter wave radiation. Three feasible experimental designs, especially a modified Stern-Gerlach setup, are proposed to verify the existence of matter wave radiation. Matter wave radiation effect in relativity has been formulated in only a raw formulae, which offers another explanation of Lamb shift. A possible mechanics of matter teleportation is predicted due to the effect of matter wave radiation.

  17. Ponderomotive Forces On Waves In Modulated Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodin, I.Y; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear interactions of waves via instantaneous cross-phase modulation can be cast in the same way as ponderomotive wave-particle interactions in high-frequency electromagnetic fi eld. The ponderomotive effect arises when rays of a probe wave scatter off perturbations of the underlying medium produced by a second, modulation wave, much like charged particles scatter off a quasiperiodic field. Parallels with the point-particle dynamics, which itself is generalized by this theory, lead to new methods of wave manipulation, including asymmetric barriers for light.

  18. Kinematic dynamo induced by helical waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Xing

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate numerically the kinematic dynamo induced by the superposition of two helical waves in a periodic box as a simplified model to understand the dynamo action in astronomical bodies. The effects of magnetic Reynolds number, wavenumber and wave frequency on the dynamo action are studied. It is found that this helical-wave dynamo is a slow dynamo. There exists an optimal wavenumber for the dynamo growth rate. A lower wave frequency facilitates the dynamo action and the oscillations of magnetic energy emerge at some particular wave frequencies.

  19. Gravitational waves from perturbed stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeria Ferrari

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Non radial oscillations of neutron stars are associated with the emission of gravitational waves. The characteristic frequencies of these oscillations can be computed using the theory of stellar perturbations, and they are shown to carry detailed information on the internal structure of the emitting source. Moreover, they appear to be encoded in various radiative processes, as for instance in the tail of the giant flares of Soft Gamma Repeaters. Thus, their determination is central to the theory of stellar perturbation. A viable approach to the problem consists in formulating this theory as a problem of resonant scattering of gravitational waves incident on the potential barrier generated by the spacetime curvature. This approach discloses some unexpected correspondences between the theory of stellar perturbations and the theory of quantum mechanics, and allows us to predict new relativistic effects.

  20. Reconstruction of nonlinear wave propagation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Jason W; Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are systems and methods for characterizing a nonlinear propagation environment by numerically propagating a measured output waveform resulting from a known input waveform. The numerical propagation reconstructs the input waveform, and in the process, the nonlinear environment is characterized. In certain embodiments, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment facilitates determination of an unknown input based on a measured output. Similarly, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment also facilitates formation of a desired output based on a configurable input. In both situations, the input thus characterized and the output thus obtained include features that would normally be lost in linear propagations. Such features can include evanescent waves and peripheral waves, such that an image thus obtained are inherently wide-angle, farfield form of microscopy.

  1. Millimeter-wave active probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majidi-Ahy, Gholamreza (Sunnyvale, CA); Bloom, David M. (Portola Valley, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A millimeter-wave active probe for use in injecting signals with frequencies above 50GHz to millimeter-wave and ultrafast devices and integrated circuits including a substrate upon which a frequency multiplier consisting of filter sections and impedance matching sections are fabricated in uniplanar transmission line format. A coaxial input and uniplanar 50 ohm transmission line couple an approximately 20 GHz input signal to a low pass filter which rolls off at approximately 25 GHz. An input impedance matching section couples the energy from the low pass filter to a pair of matched, antiparallel beam lead diodes. These diodes generate odd-numberd harmonics which are coupled out of the diodes by an output impedance matching network and bandpass filter which suppresses the fundamental and third harmonics and selects the fifth harmonic for presentation at an output.

  2. Freak waves in white dwarfs and magnetars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabry, R. [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Moslem, W. M. [International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Shukla, P. K. [International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report properties of ion acoustic freak waves that propagate in a plasma composed of warm ions and ultrarelativistic electrons and positrons. The dynamics of the nonlinear freak waves is governed by the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The possible region for the freak waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of white dwarfs and magnetars corona. It is found that for low wave number, the nonlinear ion-acoustic wave packets are structurally stable in magnetars corona than in white dwarfs. However, for large wave numbers the situation is opposite. The critical wave number threshold (k{sub c}), which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, is defined for both applications. It is seen that near to k{sub c} the freak wave amplitude becomes high, but it decreases whenever we stepped away from k{sub c}. For the wave numbers close to k{sub c}, the increase of the unperturbed density ratio of positrons-to-electrons ({beta}) would lead to increase the freak wave amplitude, but for larger wave numbers the amplitude decreases with the increase of {beta}.

  3. Critical Waves and the Length Problem of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Laughlin

    2015-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that the mystery of how biological systems measure their lengths vanishes away if one premises that they have discovered a way to generate linear waves analogous to compressional sound. These can be used to detect length at either large or small scales using echo timing and fringe counting. It is shown that suitable linear chemical potential waves can, in fact, be manufactured by tuning to criticality conventional reaction-diffusion with a small number substances. Min oscillations in E. coli are cited as precedent resonant length measurement using chemical potential waves analogous to laser detection. Mitotic structures in eucaryotes are identified as candidates for such an effect at higher frequency. The engineering principle is shown to be very general and functionally the same as that used by hearing organs. PNAS Significance Statement: This paper invokes physical principles to address the question of how living things might use reaction-diffusion to measure out and regulate the many thousands of lengths required to make their body parts and internal organs. It argues that two ideas have been missing. One is that oscillation is necessary to achieve the necessary design stability and plasticity. The other is that the system must be tuned to criticality to stabilize the propagation velocity, thus enabling clocks to function as meter sticks. The broader significance is twofold: First, a fundamental piece of the machinery of life is probably invisible to present-day biochemical methods because they are too slow. Second, the simplicity of growth and form identified a century ago by D'Arcy Thompson is probably a symptom of biological engineering strategies, not primitive law.

  4. The Nature of Running Penumbral Waves Revealed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Shaun Bloomfield; Andreas Lagg; Sami K. Solanki

    2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We seek to clarify the nature of running penumbral (RP) waves: are they chromospheric trans-sunspot waves or a visual pattern of upward-propagating waves? Full Stokes spectropolarimetric time series of the photospheric Si I 10827 \\AA line and the chromospheric He I 10830 \\AA multiplet were inverted using a Milne-Eddington atmosphere. Spatial pixels were paired between the outer umbral/inner penumbral photosphere and the penumbral chromosphere using inclinations retrieved by the inversion and the dual-height pairings of line-of-sight velocity time series were studied for signatures of wave propagation using a Fourier phase difference analysis. The dispersion relation for radiatively cooling acoustic waves, modified to incorporate an inclined propagation direction, fits well the observed phase differences between the pairs of photospheric and chromospheric pixels. We have thus demonstrated that RP waves are in effect low-beta slow-mode waves propagating along the magnetic field.

  5. Corvino's construction using Brill waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domenico Giulini; Gustav Holzegel

    2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For two-black-hole time-symmetric initial data we consider the Corvino construction of gluing an exact Schwarzschild end. We propose to do this by using Brill waves. We address the question of whether this method can be used to reduce the overall energy, which seems to relate to the question of whether it can reduce the amount of `spurious' gravitational radiation. We find a positive answer at first order in the inverse gluing radius.

  6. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Patterson, CA); Poole, Brian R. (Tracy, CA)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  7. Wave propagation in axion electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakov Itin

    2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the axion contribution to the electromagnetic wave propagation is studied. First we show how the axion electrodynamics model can be embedded into a premetric formalism of Maxwell electrodynamics. In this formalism, the axion field is not an arbitrary added Chern-Simon term of the Lagrangian, but emerges in a natural way as an irreducible part of a general constitutive tensor.We show that in order to represent the axion contribution to the wave propagation it is necessary to go beyond the geometric approximation, which is usually used in the premetric formalism. We derive a covariant dispersion relation for the axion modified electrodynamics. The wave propagation in this model is studied for an axion field with timelike, spacelike and null derivative covectors. The birefringence effect emerges in all these classes as a signal of Lorentz violation. This effect is however completely different from the ordinary birefringence appearing in classical optics and in premetric electrodynamics. The axion field does not simple double the ordinary light cone structure. In fact, it modifies the global topological structure of light cones surfaces. In CFJ-electrodynamics, such a modification results in violation of causality. In addition, the optical metrics in axion electrodynamics are not pseudo-Riemannian. In fact, for all types of the axion field, they are even non-Finslerian.

  8. Topological Aspects of Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Valero

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of wave propagation on a manifold X, the characteristic functions are real valued functions on cotangent bundle of X that specify the allowable phase velocities of the waves. For certain classes of differential operators (e.g Maxwell's Equations) the associated characteristic functions have singularities. These singularities account for phenomena like conical refraction and the transformation of longitudinal waves into transversal ones (or viceversa). For a specific class of differential operators on surface, we prove that the singularities of the characteristic functions can be accounted from purely topological considerations. We also prove that there is a natural way to desingularsize the characteristic functions, and observe that this fact and Morse Theory establishes a specific connection between singularities and critical points of these functions. The relation between characteristic functions and differential operators is obtained through what is known as the symbol of the operator. We establish a connection between these symbols and holomorphic vector fields, which will provide us with symbols whose characteristic functions have interesting singularity sets.

  9. Numerical approximation of the Schrdinger equation with the electromagnetic field by the Hagedorn wave packets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Zhennan, E-mail: zhou@math.wisc.edu

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we approximate the semi-classical Schrdinger equation in the presence of electromagnetic field by the Hagedorn wave packets approach. By operator splitting, the Hamiltonian is divided into the modified part and the residual part. The modified Hamiltonian, which is the main new idea of this paper, is chosen by the fact that Hagedorn wave packets are localized both in space and momentum so that a crucial correction term is added to the truncated Hamiltonian, and is treated by evolving the parameters associated with the Hagedorn wave packets. The residual part is treated by a Galerkin approximation. We prove that, with the modified Hamiltonian only, the Hagedorn wave packets dynamics give the asymptotic solution with error O(?{sup 1/2}), where ? is the scaled Planck constant. We also prove that, the Galerkin approximation for the residual Hamiltonian can reduce the approximation error to O(?{sup k/2}), where k depends on the number of Hagedorn wave packets added to the dynamics. This approach is easy to implement, and can be naturally extended to the multidimensional cases. Unlike the high order Gaussian beam method, in which the non-constant cut-off function is necessary and some extra error is introduced, the Hagedorn wave packets approach gives a practical way to improve accuracy even when ? is not very small.

  10. On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry Effective, economic extraction of ocean wave energy requires an intimate under- standing of the ocean wave

  11. Small Modular Reactors: Institutional Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Perkowski, Ph.D.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Objectives include, among others, a description of the basic development status of small modular reactors (SMRs) focused primarily on domestic activity; investigation of the domestic market appeal of modular reactors from the viewpoints of both key energy sector customers and also key stakeholders in the financial community; and consideration of how to proceed further with a pro-active "core group" of stakeholders substantially interested in modular nuclear deployment in order to provide the basis to expedite design/construction activity and regulatory approval. ? Information gathering was via available resources, both published and personal communications with key individual stakeholders; published information is limited to that already in public domain (no confidentiality); viewpoints from interviews are incorporated within. Discussions at both government-hosted and private-hosted SMR meetings are reflected herein. INL itself maintains a neutral view on all issues described. Note: as per prior discussion between INL and CAP, individual and highly knowledgeable senior-level stakeholders provided the bulk of insights herein, and the results of those interviews are the main source of the observations of this report. ? Attachment A is the list of individual stakeholders consulted to date, including some who provided significant earlier assessments of SMR institutional feasibility. ? Attachments B, C, and D are included to provide substantial context on the international status of SMR development; they are not intended to be comprehensive and are individualized due to the separate nature of the source materials. Attachment E is a summary of the DOE requirements for winning teams regarding the current SMR solicitation. Attachment F deserves separate consideration due to the relative maturity of the SMART SMR program underway in Korea. Attachment G provides illustrative SMR design features and is intended for background. Attachment H is included for overview purposes and is a sampling of advanced SMR concepts, which will be considered as part of the current DOE SMR program but whose estimated deployment time is beyond CAPs current investment time horizon. Attachment I is the public DOE statement describing the present approach of their SMR Program.

  12. Sound waves and modulational instabilities on continuous wave solutions in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard S. Tasgal; Y. B. Band

    2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze sound waves (phonons, Bogoliubov excitations) propagating on continuous wave (cw) solutions of repulsive $F=1$ spinor Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), such as $^{23}$Na (which is antiferromagnetic or polar) and $^{87}$Rb (which is ferromagnetic). Zeeman splitting by a uniform magnetic field is included. All cw solutions to ferromagnetic BECs with vanishing $M_F=0$ particle density and non-zero components in both $M_F=\\pm 1$ fields are subject to modulational instability (MI). MI increases with increasing particle density. MI also increases with differences in the components' wavenumbers; this effect is larger at lower densities but becomes insignificant at higher particle densities. CW solutions to antiferromagnetic (polar) BECS with vanishing $M_F=0$ particle density and non-zero components in both $M_F=\\pm 1$ fields do not suffer MI if the wavenumbers of the components are the same. If there is a wavenumber difference, MI initially increases with increasing particle density, then peaks before dropping to zero beyond a given particle density. The cw solutions with particles in both $M_F=\\pm 1$ components and nonvanishing $M_F=0$ components do not have MI if the wavenumbers of the components are the same, but do exhibit MI when the wavenumbers are different. Direct numerical simulations of a cw with weak white noise confirm that weak noise grows fastest at wavenumbers with the largest MI, and shows some of the results beyond small amplitude perturbations. Phonon dispersion curves are computed numerically; we find analytic solutions for the phonon dispersion in a variety of limiting cases.

  13. Information Sources for Small Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    E - 4 3 8 0 2 - 0 7 ?The protection of water quality is vital for managers of small water systems.? Information S o urces for Small Water System s Monty Dozier, Associate Professor and Extension Specialist; Gene Theodori, Associate Professor... and Extension Program Leader; and Ric Jensen, Assistant Research Scientist, Texas Water Resources Institute, The Texas A&M University T The protection of water quality is vital for managers of small water systems. Ample resources related to water quality...

  14. Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation Program (SMART...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and government administrators of energy efficiency programs for small- and medium-sized buildings (SMBs). SMART Scale is looking to achieve an average of 20% energy savings per...

  15. 10th Annual Small Wind Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This conference is designed for small wind professionals, including installers, manufacturers, dealers, distributors, educators, and advocates. The conference features presentations, exhibits,...

  16. Small-Scale Renewable Energy Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vermont's Small Scale Renewable Energy Incentive Program (SSREIP), initiated in June 2003, provides funding for new solar water heating, solar electric (photovoltaic), modern wood pellet heating,...

  17. Small Business Independent Market Research Program | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Market Research Program Researching, identifying, and evaluating, high-quality, top-performing, and competitively-priced small business suppliers for NNSA programs is the...

  18. National Fuel (Gas)- Small Commercial Conservation Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National Fuel has partnered with Blue Spring Energy to provide outreach, education, and technical assistance services to small business customers. Blue Spring energy will provide consultation at no...

  19. A Biorefinery Goes 'Mod' and Small

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota-based Easy Energy Systems sells small-scale, easy-to use biorefineries. The company expects to create 100 jobs because of new orders.

  20. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF A CORONAL MORETON WAVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harra, Louise K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Sterling, Alphonse C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goemoery, Peter [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Veronig, Astrid, E-mail: lkh@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: gomory@astro.s, E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed a coronal wave (EIT wave) on 2011 February 16, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV spectral data from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The wave accompanied an M1.6 flare that produced a surge and a coronal mass ejection (CME). EIS data of the wave show a prominent redshifted signature indicating line-of-sight velocities of {approx}20 km s{sup -1} or greater. Following the main redshifted wave front, there is a low-velocity period (and perhaps slightly blueshifted), followed by a second redshift somewhat weaker than the first; this progression may be due to oscillations of the EUV atmosphere set in motion by the initial wave front, although alternative explanations may be possible. Along the direction of the EIS slit the wave front's velocity was {approx}500 km s{sup -1}, consistent with its apparent propagation velocity projected against the solar disk as measured in the AIA images, and the second redshifted feature had propagation velocities between {approx}200 and 500 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the observed wave being generated by the outgoing CME, as in the scenario for the classic Moreton wave. This type of detailed spectral study of coronal waves has hitherto been a challenge, but is now possible due to the availability of concurrent AIA and EIS data.

  1. A KINETIC MODEL OF SOLAR WIND GENERATION BY OBLIQUE ION-CYCLOTRON WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The fast solar wind is generated by extended perpendicular ion heating in coronal holes, but the kinetic mechanism responsible for this heating has not been determined. One long-standing possibility is the resonant-cyclotron dissipation of ion-cyclotron waves, replenished from a turbulent cascade of interacting counter-propagating Alfven waves. We present results of a kinetic model for proton heating by the quasilinear resonant-cyclotron wave-particle interaction in a coronal hole. The resonant wave spectrum is taken as a power law in wavenumber, uniformly distributed in propagation direction between 0 deg. and 60 deg. with respect to the large-scale radial magnetic field. We obtain the steady-state solution of the kinetic guiding-center equation for the proton distribution in an expanding coronal hole, including the effects of large-scale forces of gravity, charge-separation electric field, Alfven wave ponderomotive force, and mirror force, along with the small-scale scattering from the wave dissipation. We find that plausible wave intensities can yield reasonable flow speeds and temperatures in the heliocentric radial range between 2 and 6 solar radii. We address the claim in earlier work that dissipation of parallel-propagating ion-cyclotron waves cannot provide enough acceleration and show that claim to be incorrect. We find that the combined action of the large-scale forces and the resonant-cyclotron scattering produces proton distribution functions with a characteristic structure: compressed in the sunward half of velocity space with a high-density shell separate from the origin, and relatively expanded in the anti-sunward half of velocity space. We suggest that qualitatively similar proton distributions would result from the kinetic evolution of any sufficiently effective perpendicular heating mechanism operating in an expanding coronal hole.

  2. Ten New Mexico small businesses recognized at Innovation Celebration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NM small businesses recognized at Innovation Celebration Ten New Mexico small businesses recognized at Innovation Celebration April 3 Small businesses participating in projects...

  3. LANL, Sandia celebrate success at New Mexico Small Business Assistance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    success at NM Small Business Assistance fest LANL, Sandia celebrate success at New Mexico Small Business Assistance fest The New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA)...

  4. 2014 National Small Business Contracting Summit - US Women's...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2014 National Small Business Contracting Summit - US Women's Chamber of Commerce & National Association of Small Business Contractors 2014 National Small Business Contracting...

  5. Small Business Award Winners - FY 2011 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Small Business Award Winners - FY 2011 Small Business Award Winners - FY 2011 Each year, the Energy Department celebrates small business advocates who have advanced the role of...

  6. Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, June Han

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand ResponseforSmallCommercialBuildings. CEC?500?automateddemandresponse Forsmallcommercialbuildings,AUTOMATED DEMAND RESPONSE FOR SMALL COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

  7. Wave

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOETHE FUTURE LOOKS

  8. USACE Small Business Area of Responsibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ACE Page 1 USACE Small Business Area of Responsibility OFC CODE STREET CITY ST ZIP TELEPHONE D S N-761-4609 Deputy to PARCs , Office of Small Business Prog, HQ U.S. Army Corps of CESB 60 Forsyth Street RM10M15

  9. Information Technology Security for Small Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Information Technology Security for Small Business (video script) Descriptive Text for the Visually symbolic of information technology security and cyber crime. Narration: "No matter how well you protect, "Information Technology Security for Small Business" and "It's not just good business. It's essential business

  10. Fixture for mounting small parts for processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foreman, Larry R. (2456 36th St., Los Alamos, NM 87544); Gomez, Veronica M. (Rte. 5 Box 283, Santa Fe, NM 87501); Thomas, Michael H. (Rte. 3-193-1, Espanola, NM 87532)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fixture for mounting small parts, such as fusion target spheres or microelectronic components. A glass stalk is drawn and truncated near its tip. The truncated end of the glass stalk is dipped into silicone rubber forming an extending streamer. After the rubber cures for approximately 24 hours, a small part is touched to the streamer, and will be held securely throughout processing.

  11. Ion-acoustic solitary waves in ultra-relativistic degenerate pair-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasheed, A.; Tsintsadze, N. L. [Department of Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The arbitrary and the small amplitude ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) have been studied. The former is studied by using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach in a plasma consisting of the degenerate ultrarelativistic electrons, positrons, and the non-relativistic classical ions. It is seen that only compressive solitary waves can propagate through such plasmas. The numerical calculations show that the region of existence of the ion-acoustic solitary waves depends upon the positron (ion) number density and the plasma thermal temperature. This study is appropriate for applications in inertial confinement fusion laboratory research as well as the study of astrophysical dense objects such as white dwarf and dense neutron stars.

  12. Lunar Laser-Ranging Detection of Light-Speed Anisotropy and Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Apache Point Lunar Laser-ranging Operation (APOLLO), in NM, can detect photon bounces from retro-reflectors on the moon surface to 0.1ns timing resolution. This facility enables not only the detection of light speed anisotropy, which defines a local preferred frame of reference - only in that frame is the speed of light isotropic, but also fluctuations/turbulence (gravitational waves) in the flow of the dynamical 3-space relative to local systems/observers. So the APOLLO facility can act as an effective "gravitational wave" detector. A recently published small data set from November 5, 2007, is analysed to characterise both the average anisotropy velocity and the wave/turbulence effects. The results are consistent with some 13 previous detections, with the last and most accurate being from the spacecraft earth-flyby Doppler-shift NASA data.

  13. Optical-Fiber Gravitational Wave Detector: Dynamical 3-Space Turbulence Detected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results from an optical-fiber gravitational wave interferometric detector are reported. The detector is very small, cheap and simple to build and operate. It is assembled from readily available opto-electronic components. A parts list is given. The detector can operate in two modes: one in which only instrument noise is detected, and data from a 24 hour period is reported for this mode, and in a 2nd mode in which the gravitational waves are detected as well, and data from a 24 hour period is analysed. Comparison shows that the instrument has a high S/N ratio. The frequency spectrum of the gravitational waves shows a pink noise spectrum, from 0 to 0.1Hz.

  14. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, Aptdo 2759, Quito (Ecuador); Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  15. The Loudest Gravitational Wave Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsin-Yu Chen; Daniel E. Holz

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    As first emphasized by Bernard Schutz, there exists a universal distribution of signal-to-noise ratios for gravitational wave detection. Because gravitational waves (GWs) are almost impossible to obscure via dust absorption or other astrophysical processes, the strength of the detected signal is dictated solely by the emission strength and the distance to the source. Assuming that the space density of an arbitrary population of GW sources does not evolve, we show explicitly that the distribution of detected signal-to-noise (SNR) values depends solely on the detection threshold; it is independent of the detector network (interferometer or pulsar timing array), the individual detector noise curves (initial or Advanced LIGO), the nature of the GW sources (compact binary coalescence, supernova, or some other discrete source), and the distributions of source variables (only non-spinning neutron stars of mass exactly $1.4\\,M_\\odot$ or a complicated distribution of masses and spins). We derive the SNR distribution for each individual detector within a network as a function of the relative detector orientations and sensitivities. While most detections will have SNR near the detection threshold, there will be a tail of events to higher SNR. We derive the SNR distribution of the loudest (highest SNR) events in any given sample of detections. We find that the median SNR of the loudest out of the first four events should have an $\\mbox{SNR}=22$ (for a threshold of 12, appropriate for the Advanced LIGO/Virgo network), increasing to a median value for the loudest SNR of 47 for 40 detections. We expect these loudest events to provide particularly powerful constraints on their source parameters, and they will play an important role in extracting astrophysics from gravitational wave sources. These distributions also offer an important internal calibration of the response of the GW detector networks.

  16. Particle acceleration in superluminal strong waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teraki, Yuto; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the electron acceleration in random superluminal strong waves (SLSWs) and radiation from them by using numerical methods in the context of the termination shock of the pulsar wind nebulae. We pursue the electrons by solving the equation of motion in the analytically expressed electromagnetic turbulences. These consist of primary SLSW and isotropically distributed secondary electromagnetic waves. Under the dominance of the secondary waves, all electrons gain nearly equal energy. On the other hand, when the primary wave is dominant, selective acceleration occurs. The phase of the primary wave felt by the electrons moving nearly along the wavevector changes very slowly compared to the oscillation of the wave, which is called "phase locked", and such electrons are continuously accelerated. This acceleration by SLSWs may play a crucial role in the pre-acceleration for the shock acceleration. In general, the radiation from the phase-locked population is different from the synchro-Compton radiation. How...

  17. Wave Heating of the Solar Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arregui, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic waves are a relevant component in the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Their significance has increased because of their potential as a remote diagnostic tool and their presumed contribution to plasma heating processes. We discuss our current understanding on coronal heating by magnetic waves, based on recent observational evidence and theoretical advances. The discussion starts with a selection of observational discoveries that have brought magnetic waves to the forefront of the coronal heating discussion. Then, our theoretical understanding on the nature and properties of the observed waves and the physical processes that have been proposed to explain observations are described. Particular attention is given to the sequence of processes that link observed wave characteristics with concealed energy transport, dissipation, and heat conversion. We conclude with a commentary on how the combination of theory and observations should help us understanding and quantifying magnetic wave heating of the sola...

  18. Refrigeration system having standing wave compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Timothy S. (Glen Allen, VA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compression-evaporation refrigeration system, wherein gaseous compression of the refrigerant is provided by a standing wave compressor. The standing wave compressor is modified so as to provide a separate subcooling system for the refrigerant, so that efficiency losses due to flashing are reduced. Subcooling occurs when heat exchange is provided between the refrigerant and a heat pumping surface, which is exposed to the standing acoustic wave within the standing wave compressor. A variable capacity and variable discharge pressure for the standing wave compressor is provided. A control circuit simultaneously varies the capacity and discharge pressure in response to changing operating conditions, thereby maintaining the minimum discharge pressure needed for condensation to occur at any time. Thus, the power consumption of the standing wave compressor is reduced and system efficiency is improved.

  19. Scattering of internal gravity waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leaman Nye, Abigail

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    of the perturbed buoy- ancy field throughout a period of the motion. Curves represent cross-sections taken from the incident beam (cyan); a beam after reflection from a solid horizontal bound- ary (dark blue) and a beam after interaction with the sponge formation... wavenumber components and (b) plots power spectra calculated with Fourier and maximum entropy methods. k is a nondimensional wavenumber representing the number of waves in an across-beam section of length Rc. . . . . . . 114 4.7 Two-dimensional power spectra...

  20. Wave | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph HomeWaranaWater Power ForumGeothermalWave

  1. Elgen Wave | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| OpenElectromagnetic ProfilingElgen Wave Jump to:

  2. Fast Gravitational Wave Radiometry using Data Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anirban Ain; Prathamesh Dalvi; Sanjit Mitra

    2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational Waves (GWs) from the early universe and unresolved astrophysical sources are expected to create a stochastic GW background (SGWB). The GW radiometer algorithm is well suited to probe such a background using data from ground based laser interferometric detectors. Radiometer analysis can be performed in different bases, e.g., isotropic, pixel or spherical harmonic. Each of these analyses possesses a common temporal symmetry which we exploit here to fold the whole dataset for every detector pair, typically a few hundred to a thousand days of data, to only one sidereal day, without any compromise in precision. We develop the algebra and a software pipeline needed to fold data, accounting for the effect of overlapping windows and non-stationary noise. We implement this on LIGO's fifth science run data and validate it by performing a standard anisotropic SGWB search on both folded and unfolded data. Folded data not only leads to orders of magnitude reduction in computation cost, but it results in a conveniently small data volume of few gigabytes, making it possible to perform an actual analysis on a personal computer, as well as easy movement of data. A few important analyses, yet unaccomplished due to computational limitations, will now become feasible. Folded data, being independent of the radiometer basis, will also be useful in reducing processing redundancies in multiple searches and provide a common ground for mutual consistency checks. Most importantly, folded data will allow vast amount of experimentation with existing searches and provide substantial help in developing new strategies to find unknown sources.

  3. Study on small-strain behaviours of methane hydrate sandy sediments using discrete element method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Yanxin; Cheng Yipik [Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London (UCL), Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Xu Xiaomin; Soga, Kenichi [Geotechnical and Environmental Research Group, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane hydrate bearing soil has attracted increasing interest as a potential energy resource where methane gas can be extracted from dissociating hydrate-bearing sediments. Seismic testing techniques have been applied extensively and in various ways, to detect the presence of hydrates, due to the fact that hydrates increase the stiffness of hydrate-bearing sediments. With the recognition of the limitations of laboratory and field tests, wave propagation modelling using Discrete Element Method (DEM) was conducted in this study in order to provide some particle-scale insights on the hydrate-bearing sandy sediment models with pore-filling and cementation hydrate distributions. The relationship between shear wave velocity and hydrate saturation was established by both DEM simulations and analytical solutions. Obvious differences were observed in the dependence of wave velocity on hydrate saturation for these two cases. From the shear wave velocity measurement and particle-scale analysis, it was found that the small-strain mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sandy sediments are governed by both the hydrate distribution patterns and hydrate saturation.

  4. Long-range propagation of ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    hours. Friday, February 22, 2013 #12;OceanPowerTechnologies A 103 foot long, 260ton buoy being tested #12;Wave Power? PelamisWavePower With T=10sec and a = 1 meter, the energy flux is 40kW/meter. An average 40kW/meter of wave power is typical of good sites. Energy Flux = cg Energy Density = g2 Ta2 8

  5. Irregular wave induced velocities in shallow water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sultan, Nels John

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    probabil- ity density function. This thesis applies this expanded distribution to fluid particle velocities instead of wave elevations. Ochi (1982) presents a review of recent ad- vances in the stochastic analysis of random seas. He notes that the first..., (Longuet-Higgins 1963), that purely linear waves will have a Gaussian distribu- tion. Therefore, any deviation from a Gaussian distribution must be attributed to wave nonlinearities. Ochi (1982) discusses a series of experiments by Honda and Mitsuyasu...

  6. Successful Pursuit of Small Electrical and Controls Projects by a Small Civil Engineering Firm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Craig

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper determines how a small, primarily civil engineering firm possessing an electrical and controls group can successfully pursue small electrical and controls projects issued by local electrical generation utilities. Not only...

  7. Excellence in Celebrating Small Business: Meet the Woman who Runs our Small Business Awards Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the Department of Energy, we are committed to supporting small and disadvantaged businesses. You can see this commitment through the various programs created within the Office of Small and...

  8. Reaction force control implementation of a linear generator in irregular waves for a wave power system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bin

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Most designs for wave energy converters include a hydraulic (or pneumatic) interface between the wave device and the generator to smooth electricity production, but a direct drive power take-off system is a possible way ...

  9. Full-wave modeling of lower hybrid waves on Alcator C-Mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meneghini, Orso (Orso-Maria Cornelio)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on several aspects of the Lower Hybrid (LH) wave physics, the common theme being the development of full-wave simulation codes based on Finite Element Methods (FEM) used in support of experiments carried ...

  10. Using a Bore-Soliton-Splash to understand Rogue Waves, Tsunamis & Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    )compression] use wave focussing in a convergence [3]. IPS wave buoy has a linear dynamo below sea level. Designed & built new RogueWavEnergy device: it works, a LED is blinking & we measured the power output. 8

  11. Interaction of gravitational waves with matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Cetoli; C. J. Pethick

    2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a unified formalism for describing the interaction of gravitational waves with matter that clearly separates the effects of general relativity from those due to interactions in the matter. Using it, we derive a general expression for the dispersion of gravitational waves in matter in terms of correlation functions for the matter in flat spacetime. The self energy of a gravitational wave is shown to have contributions analogous to the paramagnetic and diamagnetic contributions to the self energy of an electromagnetic wave. We apply the formalism to some simple systems - free particles, an interacting scalar field, and a fermionic superfluid.

  12. Elastic Wave Behavior Across Linear Slip Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, M.

    plane waves incident at arbitrary angles upon a plane linear slip interface are computed ... Also included in these sections is an analysis ... ish, Ut is of the form.

  13. Nonlinear manipulation and control of matter waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. V. Goldstein; M. G. Moore; P. Meystre

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews some of our recent results in nonlinear atom optics. In addition to nonlinear wave-mixing between matter waves, we also discuss the dynamical interplay between optical and matter waves. This new paradigm, which is now within experimental reach, has the potential to impact a number of fields of physics, including the manipulation and applications of atomic coherence, and the preparation of quantum entanglement between microscopic and macroscopic systems. Possible applications include quantum information processing, matter-wave holography, and nanofabrication.

  14. Wave Propagation in Fractured Poroelastic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave Propagation in Fractured. Poroelastic Media. WCCM, Barcelona, Spain, July 2014. Juan E. Santos,. 1. 1. Instituto del Gas y del Petroleo (IGPUBA), UBA,

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: wave energy converter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    release. This model has ... Sandia Funded to Model Power Pods for Utility-Scale Wave-Energy Converter On September 16, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy,...

  16. Stochastic Quantum Trajectories without a Wave Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeroen C. Vink

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    After summarizing three versions of trajectory-based quantum mechanics, it is argued that only the original formulation due to Bohm, which uses the Schr\\"odinger wave function to guide the particles, can be readily extended to particles with spin. To extend the two wave function-free formulations, it is argued that necessarily particle trajectories not only determine location, but also spin. Since spin values are discrete, it is natural to revert to a variation of Bohm's pilot wave formulation due originally to Bell. It is shown that within this formulation with stochastic quantum trajectories, a wave function free formulation can be obtained.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: reflected optical wave

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reflected optical wave New Sandia Mirror Isn't Shiny: Instead It Reflects Infrared Light Using a Metamaterial On December 12, 2014, in Capabilities, Materials Science, News, News &...

  18. Wave Packets Propagation in Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kourosh Nozari; S. H. Mehdipour

    2005-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave packet broadening in usual quantum mechanics is a consequence of dispersion behavior of the medium which the wave propagates in it. In this paper, we consider the problem of wave packet broadening in the framework of Generalized Uncertainty Principle(GUP) of quantum gravity. New dispersion relations are derived in the context of GUP and it has been shown that there exists a gravitational induced dispersion which leads to more broadening of the wave packets. As a result of these dispersion relations, a generalized Klein-Gordon equation is obtained and its interpretation is given.

  19. Fast methods for inverse wave scattering problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jung Hoon, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inverse wave scattering problems arise in many applications including computerized/diffraction tomography, seismology, diffraction/holographic grating design, object identification from radar singals, and semiconductor ...

  20. Experiment Indicates Sound Waves Can Trigger Quakes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a laboratory setting, a Los Alamos researcher and his colleagues have shown that seismic waves-the sounds radiated from earthquakes-can induce earthquake aftershocks, often...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: wave energy converters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team includes a partnership between...

  2. Non-linear propagation of kink waves to the solar chromosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stangalini, M; Jafarzadeh, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-scale magnetic field concentrations (magnetic elements) in the quiet Sun are believed to contribute to the energy budget of the upper layers of the Sun's atmosphere, as they are observed to support a large number of MHD modes. In recent years, kink waves in magnetic elements were observed at different heights in the solar atmosphere, from the photosphere to the corona. However, the propagation of these waves has not been fully evaluated. Our aim is to investigate the propagation of kink waves in small magnetic elements in the solar atmosphere. We analysed spectropolarimetric data of high-quality and long duration of a photospheric quiet Sun region observed near the disk center with the spectropolarimeter CRISP at the Swedish Solar Telescope (SST), and complemented by simultaneous and co-spatial broad-band chromospheric observations of the same region. Our findings reveal a clear upward propagation of kink waves with frequency above $~2.6$ mHz. Moreover, the signature of a non-linear propagation process ...

  3. Global stability of the rarefaction wave of the Vlasov-Poisson-Boltzmann system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renjun Duan; Shuangqian Liu

    2014-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to the study of the nonlinear stability of the rarefaction waves of the Vlasov-Poisson-Boltzmann system with slab symmetry in the case where the electron background density satisfies an analogue of the Boltzmann relation. We allows that the electric potential may take distinct constant states at both far-fields. The rarefaction wave whose strength is not necessarily small is constructed through the quasineutral Euler equations coming from the zero-order fluid dynamic approximation of the kinetic system. We prove that the local Maxwellian with macroscopic quantities determined by the quasineutral rarefaction wave is time-asymptotically stable under small perturbations for the corresponding Cauchy problem on the Vlasov-Poisson-Boltzmann system. The main analytical tool is the combination of techniques we developed in [10] for the viscous compressible fluid with the self-consistent electric field and the reciprocal energy method based on the macro-micro decomposition of the Boltzmann equation around a local Maxwellian. Both the time decay property of the rarefaction waves and the structure of the Poisson equation play a key role in the analysis.

  4. Chaotic wave functions and exponential convergence of low-lying energy eigenvalues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihai Horoi; Alexander Volya; Vladimir Zelevinsky

    1998-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that low-lying eigenvalues of realistic quantum many-body hamiltonians, given, as in the nuclear shell model, by large matrices, can be calculated, instead of the full diagonalization, by the diagonalization of small truncated matrices with the exponential extrapolation of the results. We show numerical data confirming this conjecture. We argue that the exponential convergence in an appropriate basis may be a generic feature of complicated ("chaotic") systems where the wave functions are localized in this basis.

  5. Phase Diagram of a Holographic Superconductor Model with s-wave and d-wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitsuhiro Nishida

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a holographic model with a scalar field, a tensor field and a direct coupling between them as a superconductor with an s-wave and a d-wave. We find a rich phase structure in the model. The model exhibits a phase of coexistence of the s-wave and the d-wave, or a phase of an order competition. Furthermore, it has a triple point.

  6. Sound Waves from Quenched Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Khachatryan; Edward Shuryak

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion collisions at RHIC/LHC energies are well described by the (nearly ideal) hydrodynamics. Last year this success has been extended to higher angular harmonics, $v_n,n=3..9$ induced by initial-state perturbations, in analogy to cosmic microwave background fluctuations. Here we use hydrodynamics to study sound propagation emitted by quenched jets. We use the so called "geometric acoustics" to follow the sound propagation, on top of the expanding fireball. The conical waves, known as "Mach cones", turn out to be strongly distorted. We show that large radial flow makes the observed particle spectra to be determined mostlly by the vicinity of their intersection with the fireball's space-like and time-like freezeout surfaces. We further show how the waves modify the freezeout surfaces and spectra. We end up comparing our calculations to the two-particle correlation functions at RHIC, while emphasizing that studies of dijet events observed at LHC should provide much better test of our theory.

  7. Wave Propagation in Lipid Monolayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Griesbauer; A. Wixforth; M. F. Schneider

    2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Sound waves are excited on lipid monolayers using a set of planar electrodes aligned in parallel with the excitable medium. By measuring the frequency dependent change in the lateral pressure we are able to extract the sound velocity for the entire monolayer phase diagram. We demonstrate that this velocity can also be directly derived from the lipid monolayer compressibility and consequently displays a minimum in the phase transition regime. This minimum decreases from v0=170m/s for one component lipid monolayers down to vm=50m/s for lipid mixtures. No significant attenuation can be detected confirming an adiabatic phenomenon. Finally our data propose a relative lateral density oscillation of \\Delta\\rho/\\rho ~ 2% implying a change in all area dependent physical properties. Order of magnitude estimates from static couplings therefore predict propagating changes in surface potential of 1-50mV, 1 unit in pH (electrochemical potential) and 0.01{\\deg}K in temperature and fall within the same order of magnitude as physical changes measured during nerve pulse propagation. These results therefore strongly support the idea of propagating adiabatic sound waves along nerves as first thoroughly described by Kaufmann in 1989 and recently by Heimburg and Jackson, but claimed by Wilke already in 1912.

  8. "Nonrelativistic" kinematics: Particles or waves?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Madsen Houlrik; Germain Rousseaux

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinematics of particles refer to events and tangent vectors, while that of waves refer to dual gradient planes. Special relativity [1-3] applies to both objects alike. Here we show that spacetime exchange symmetry [7] implicit in the SIdefinition of length based on the universal constant c has profound consequences at low velocities. Galilean physics, exact in the limit c \\to \\infty, is mirrored by a dual so-called Carrollian superluminal kinematics [4-6] exact in the limit c \\to 0. Several new results follow. The Galilean limit explains mass conservation in Newtonian mechanics, while the dual limit is a kinematical prerequisite for wavelike tachyonic motion [8, 9]. As an example, the Land\\'e paradox [19, 20] of waveparticle duality has a natural resolution within special relativity in terms of superluminal, particlelike waves. It is emphasized that internal particle energy mc^2 can not be ignored, while kinetic energy leads to an extended Galilei group. We also demonstrate that Maxwell's equations have magnetic and electric limits covariant under Galilean and Carrollian symmetry.

  9. Rogue Waves 2008, 1314 October 2008, Brest, France WIND-FORCED MODULATIONS OF GRAVITY WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Rogue Waves 2008, 1314 October 2008, Brest, France WIND-FORCED MODULATIONS OF GRAVITY WAVES S in deep water of weakly nonlinear packets of surface gravity waves under wind forcing is derived. Stokes Theoretically, some progress has been made recently for modulational instability under wind forcing [9]. Let (x

  10. Thompson/Ocean 420/Winter 2005 Surface Gravity Wave Surface Gravity Wave Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    the wavelength. Wind energy in Waves Wave energy out (breaking) #12;Thompson/Ocean 420/Winter 2005 Surface waves with different periods and phases. The spectrum of energy is usually plotted as energy density, (unit of energy/unit frequency interval, Hz). The energy density is given by the amount of energy

  11. FastFEM: Breaking Wave Impact on Ships Wave breaking and wave impact on maritime structures are difficult to model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    are difficult to model mathematically and numerically. The challenge is that nonlinear and breaking waves with fine-scale dynamic air-water interfaces need to be modelled efficiently, including their interactions measurements in wave basins. These potential flow models will be developed further at the University of Twente

  12. Calculation of Extreme Wave Loads on Coastal Highway Bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Bo

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    force on bridge decks. 2D Model is a linear wave model, which has the capability of calculating wave velocity potential components in time domain based on wave parameters such as wave height, wave period and water depth, and complex structural geometries...

  13. Aquatic manoeuvering with counter-propagating waves: a novel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    Aquatic manoeuvering with counter-propagating waves: a novel locomotive strategy Oscar M. Curet1 of these inward counter-propagating waves. In addition, we compare the flow structure and upward force generated by inward counter-propagating waves to standing waves, unidirectional waves, and outward counter-propagating

  14. Singular value decomposition methods for wave propagation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santolik, Ondrej

    Singular value decomposition methods for wave propagation analysis O. Santoli´k,1 M. Parrot, and F planarity. Simulations of Z-mode waves, which simultaneously propagate with different wave vectors, indicate the waves simultaneously propagate with wave vectors in two opposite hemispheres. Finally, we show

  15. 16. Wave-particle interaction 16.1 Landau damping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Martin Karl Wilhelm

    16. Wave-particle interaction 16.1 Landau damping We started our discussion of hydromagnetic waves with simple one-dimensional electrostatic fluctuations, the Langmuir waves. We derived their dispersion was the relationship between the waves and the plasma. Can the waves change plasma properties or, vice versa, can

  16. Aphids on Texas Small Grains and sorghum.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoelscher, Clifford E.; Thomas, John G.; Teetes, George L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , primarily wheat, provide the major winter host of greenbugs; sorghum is the major summer host in Texas. John songrass and other grasses serve as interim hosts when the growth of small grains and sorghum do not overlap. Oats may host greenbugs, but tends... found on small grains within the tightly curled leaf of the newest growth of the plant. As is the case with greenbugs, small populations of the Russian wheat aphid are not readily visible on casual observation. Infested plants some times have purple...

  17. Quantum Capacities of Channels with small Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael M. Wolf; David Perez-Garcia

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the quantum capacity of noisy quantum channels which can be represented by coupling a system to an effectively small environment. A capacity formula is derived for all cases where both system and environment are two-dimensional--including all extremal qubit channels. Similarly, for channels acting on higher dimensional systems we show that the capacity can be determined if the channel arises from a sufficiently small coupling to a qubit environment. Extensions to instances of channels with larger environment are provided and it is shown that bounds on the capacity with unconstrained environment can be obtained from decompositions into channels with small environment.

  18. Small Fuel Cell Systems with Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary ofSmall Business Vouchers Documents SmallSmall

  19. Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator] [Principal Investigator; Downie, Bruce [Project Manager] [Project Manager

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean wave power can be a significant source of large?scale, renewable energy for the US electrical grid. The Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) conservatively estimated that 20% of all US electricity could be generated by wave energy. Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. (OPT), with funding from private sources and the US Navy, developed the PowerBuoy? to generate renewable energy from the readily available power in ocean waves. OPT's PowerBuoy converts the energy in ocean waves to electricity using the rise and fall of waves to move the buoy up and down (mechanical stroking) which drives an electric generator. This electricity is then conditioned and transmitted ashore as high?voltage power via underwater cable. OPT's wave power generation system includes sophisticated techniques to automatically tune the system for efficient conversion of random wave energy into low cost green electricity, for disconnecting the system in large waves for hardware safety and protection, and for automatically restoring operation when wave conditions normalize. As the first utility scale wave power project in the US, the Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, OR, will consist of 10 PowerBuoys located 2.5 miles off the coast. This U.S. Department of Energy Grant funding along with funding from PNGC Power, an Oregon?based electric power cooperative, was utilized for the design completion, fabrication, assembly and factory testing of the first PowerBuoy for the Reedsport project. At this time, the design and fabrication of this first PowerBuoy and factory testing of the power take?off subsystem are complete; additionally the power take?off subsystem has been successfully integrated into the spar.

  20. Waves, instability and geostrophic turbulence Nick.Hall@legos.obs-mip.fr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Roisin Atmospheric and Oceanic Fluid Dynamics - Vallis El Niño - Philander Waves in the Ocean - wave kinematics - shallow water waves - inertia-gravity (Poincaré) waves - Kelvin waves - Rossby waves - internal waves Francis #12;Wave kinematics Consider a propagating sinusoidal wave equivalently so and we note

  1. Transition from soft- to hard-Pomeron in the structure functions of hadrons at small-$x$ from holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akira Watanabe; Katsuhiko Suzuki

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the nucleon and pion structure functions at small Bjorken-$x$ region in the framework of holographic QCD with a special emphasis on the roles of AdS space wave functions. Using the BPST kernel for the Pomeron exchange and calculating its coupling to target hadrons in the AdS space, we obtain $F_2$ structure functions at the small-$x$. Results for the proton $F^p_2$ as well as the pion $F^\\pi_2$ are consistent with experimental data of the deep inelastic scattering and the forward electroproduction of a neutron. Observed $Q^2$ dependence of the Pomeron intercept is well reproduced from soft non-perturbatibve $(Q^2 \\sim 0)$ to hard perturbative $(Q^2 \\gg 1 GeV^2)$ region. We find the interplay between soft and hard Pomerons is closely related with behavior of AdS wave functions of hadrons and the virtual photon.

  2. Prospects for joint gravitational wave and short gamma-ray burst observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Clark; H. Evans; S. Fairhurst; I. W. Harry; E. Macdonald; D. Macleod; P. J. Sutton; A. R. Williamson

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed evaluation of the expected rate of joint gravitational-wave and short gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations over the coming years. We begin by evaluating the improvement in distance sensitivity of the gravitational wave search that arises from using the GRB observation to restrict the time and sky location of the source. We argue that this gives a 25% increase in sensitivity when compared to an all-sky, all-time search, corresponding to more than doubling the number of detectable gravitational wave signals associated with GRBs. Using this, we present the expected rate of joint observations with the advanced LIGO and Virgo instruments, taking into account the expected evolution of the gravitational wave detector network. We show that in the early advanced gravitational wave detector observing runs, from 2015-2017, there is only a small chance of a joint observation. However, as the detectors approach their design sensitivities, there is a good chance of joint observations provided wide field GRB satellites, such as Fermi and the Interplanetary Network, continue operation. The rate will also depend critically upon the nature of the progenitor, with neutron star--black hole systems observable to greater distances than double neutron star systems. The relative rate of binary mergers and GRBs will depend upon the jet opening angle of GRBs. Consequently, joint observations, as well as accurate measurement of both the GRB rate and binary merger rates will allow for an improved estimation of the opening angle of GRBs.

  3. Gravitational waves from a test particle scattered by a neutron star: Axial mode case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhiro Tominaga; Motoyuki Saijo; Kei-ichi Maeda

    1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a metric perturbation method, we study gravitational waves from a test particle scattered by a spherically symmetric relativistic star. We calculate the energy spectrum and the waveform of gravitational waves for axial modes. Since metric perturbations in axial modes do not couple to the matter fluid of the star, emitted waves for a normal neutron star show only one peak in the spectrum, which corresponds to the orbital frequency at the turning point, where the gravitational field is strongest. However, for an ultracompact star (the radius $R \\lesssim 3M$), another type of resonant periodic peak appears in the spectrum. This is just because of an excitation by a scattered particle of axial quasinormal modes, which were found by Chandrasekhar and Ferrari. This excitation comes from the existence of the potential minimum inside of a star. We also find for an ultracompact star many small periodic peaks at the frequency region beyond the maximum of the potential, which would be due to a resonance of two waves reflected by two potential barriers (Regge-Wheeler type and one at the center of the star). Such resonant peaks appear neither for a normal neutron star nor for a Schwarzschild black hole. Consequently, even if we analyze the energy spectrum of gravitational waves only for axial modes, it would be possible to distinguish between an ultracompact star and a normal neutron star (or a Schwarzschild black hole).

  4. Computer simulation study of surface wave dynamics at the crystal--melt interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge Benet; Luis G. MacDowell; Eduardo Sanz

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study, by means of computer simulations, the crystal-melt interface of three different systems: hard-spheres, Lennard Jones and the TIP4P/2005 water model. In particular, we focus on the dynamics of surface waves. We observe that the processes involved in the relaxation of surface waves are characterized by distinct time scales: a slow one related to the continuous recrystallization and melting, that is governed by capillary forces; and a fast one which we suggest to be due to a combination of processes that quickly cause small perturbations to the shape of the interface (like e. g. Rayleigh waves, subdiffusion, or attachment/detachment of particles to/from the crystal). The relaxation of surface waves becomes dominated by the slow process as the wavelength increases. Moreover, we see that the slow relaxation is not influenced by the details of the microscopic dynamics. In a time scale characteristic for the diffusion of the liquid phase, the relaxation dynamics of the crystal-melt interface of water is around one order of magnitude slower than that of Lennard Jones or hard spheres, which we ascribe to the presence of orientational degrees of freedom in the water molecule. Finally, we estimate the rate of crystal growth from our analysis of the capillary wave dynamics and compare it with previous simulation studies and with experiments for the case of water.

  5. An effective long-range attraction between protein molecules in solutions studied by small angle neutron scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Liu; Emiliano Fratini; Piero Baglioni; Wei-Ren Chen; Sow-Hsin Chen

    2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Small angle neutron scattering intensity distributions taken from cytochrome C and lysozyme protein solutions show a rising intensity at very small wave vector, Q, which can be interpreted in terms of the presence of a weak long-range attraction between protein molecules. This interaction has a range several times that of the diameter of the protein molecule, much greater than the range of the screened electrostatic repulsion. We show evidence that this long-range attraction is closely related to the type of anion present and ion concentration in the solution.

  6. Talking Small Business in Knoxville, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During the last fiscal year, the Energy Department contracted with over 7,000 small businesses, doing over $8 billion worth of business overall. While this is the second highest number in terms of...

  7. NSTAR (Electric)- Small Business Direct Install Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The NSTAR Small Business Solutions Program offers incentives for business customers whose average monthly demand is 300 kW or less. The first step of the program is a free energy audit to identify...

  8. Commonwealth Small Pellet Boiler Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) and the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) are offering the Commonwealth Small Pellet Boiler Pilot Grant Program to provide grants to residents...

  9. Resources for Small Water Systems in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    and Extension Specialist; Monty Dozier, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist; and Ric Jensen, Assistant Research Scientist, Texas Water Resources Institute; The Texas A&M University System There are many resources to help managers of small water...

  10. Scaling considerations for small aircraft engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Nicholas Y. S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small aircraft engines traditionally have poorer performance compared to larger engines, which until recently, has been a factor that outweighed the aerodynamic benefits of commoditized and distributed propulsion. Improvements ...

  11. Resources for Small Water Systems in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication is a guide to finding the many resources available to help managers of small water systems in Texas. Details are provided about sources of financial assistance, tools for capacity building, training programs and educational...

  12. Information Sources for Small Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Managers of small waters systems must have information about a variety of topics. This publication lists essential printed and electronic resources on disaster preparedness, national drinking water standards, private water well management, water...

  13. Utility competition with small business. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Addario, P.J.

    1986-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study is to take a further, and broader, look at the competition issue between utilities and small businesses of energy-related utility programs. The contractor examined in greater depth the reasons for utility interest in diversifying into nonregulated, and competitive, energy-related fields; the elements of utility subsidization of these non-regulated activities; the potential remedies that small businesses have to counter unfair or illegal competition; the scope of the cross-subsidy problem; and the effectiveness of specific actions taken by small businesses against utilities. The purpose of the report is, therefore, to address these five areas, including five key case studies of actual small business complaints against alleged unfair or illegal utility competition.

  14. Rate Setting for Small Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowing how to set the proper rate for water service is a challenge for small water systems. They must generate enough revenue to remain solvent, but offer affordable service. This publication describes the various types of rates and explains...

  15. Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands Table of Contents Summary p2 Background: Wave Power Conversion p3 Licensing and Permitting p3 Challenges and Barriers p4 Wave Power Resources: Previous Work p5 Wave

  16. Nonlinear inertial Alfven wave in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, P.O. Nilore Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics, Shadra Valley, Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Saleem, H. [National Center for Physics, Shadra Valley, Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Solitary inertial Alfven wave in the presence of positively and negatively charged dust particles is studied. It is found that electron density dips are formed in the super Alfvenic region and wave amplitude is increased for the case of negatively charged dust particles in comparison with positively charged dust particles in electron-ion plasmas.

  17. WAVENET : Nearshore Wave Recording Network for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WAVENET : Nearshore Wave Recording Network for England and Wales Feasibility Study P J Hawkes R Atkins A H Brampton D Fortune R Garbett B P Gouldby Report TR 122 April 2001 #12;#12;WAVENET : Nearshore 05/03/02 Summary WAVENET : Nearshore Wave Recording Network for England and Wales Feasibility Study P

  18. Wave propagation in the magnetic sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Hartlep; M. S. Miesch; N. N. Mansour

    2008-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on efforts to simulate wave propagation in the solar interior. Presented is work on extending a numerical code for constant entropy acoustic waves in the absence of magnetic fields to the case where magnetic fields are present. A set of linearized magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) perturbation equations has been derived and implemented.

  19. Possible new wave phenomena in the brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerzy Szwed

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to search for new wave phenomena in the brain by using interference effects in analogy to the well-known double slit (Young) experiment. This method is able to extend the range of oscillation frequencies to much higher values than currently accessible. It is argued that such experiments may test the hypothesis of the wave nature of information coding.

  20. Gravimagnetic shock waves in the anisotropic plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. G. Ignatyev; D. N. Gorokhov

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic magnetohydrodynamic equations for the anisotropic magnetoactive plasma are obtained and accurately integrated in the plane gravitational wave metrics. The dependence of the induction mechanism of the gravimagnetic shock waves on the degree of the magnetoactive plasma anisotropy is analyzed.