National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for deflate bp baghouse

  1. Deflate decompressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Robertson, Perry J.; Pierson, Lyndon G.; Olsberg, Ronald R.

    2012-02-28

    A deflate decompressor includes at least one decompressor unit, a memory access controller, a feedback path, and an output buffer unit. The memory access controller is coupled to the decompressor unit via a data path and includes a data buffer to receive the data stream and temporarily buffer a first portion the data stream. The memory access controller transfers fixed length data units of the data stream from the data buffer to the decompressor unit with reference to a memory pointer pointing into the memory buffer. The feedback path couples the decompressor unit to the memory access controller to feed back decrement values to the memory access controller for updating the memory pointer. The decrement values each indicate a number of bits unused by the decompressor unit when decoding the fixed length data units. The output buffer unit buffers a second portion of the data stream after decompression.

  2. Tire deflation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barker, Stacey G. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-01-05

    A tire deflation device includes (1) a component having a plurality of bores, (2) a plurality of spikes removably insertable into the plurality of bores and (3) a keeper within each among the plurality of bores, the keeper being configured to contact a sidewall surface of a spike among the plurality of spikes and to exert force upon the sidewall surface. In an embodiment, the tire deflation device includes (a) a component including a bore in a material, the bore including a receiving region, a sidewall surface and a base surface, (b) a channel extending from the sidewall surface into the material, (c) a keeper having a first section housed within the channel and a second section which extends past the sidewall surface into the receiving region, and (d) a spike removably insertable into the bore.

  3. Using high temperature baghouses to enhance desulfurization following economizer sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, G.; Keener, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    In order to explore the potential of using high temperature baghouses to enhance SO{sub 2} removal following upstream sorbent injection, an integrated two-stage reactor system has been built. It consists of an injection stage and a filtration stage. Distinct from one-stage fixed-bed reactors, sorbent particles in this system are initially converted under controlled injection conditions before entering the filtration reactor chamber. By the aid of the system, several unique features regarding the gas-solid reactions in the baghouse after economizer zone sorbent injection have been revealed. Results have shown that the appropriate usage of a high temperature baghouse may substantially enhance the performance of the process. The further SO{sub 2} removal in the baghouse is comprehensively affected by both the conditions in the injection zone and those in the baghouse.

  4. Baghouse Slipstream Testing at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Pavlish; Jason Laumb; Robert Jensen; Jeffery Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Brandon Pavlish; Stanley Miller; Lucinda Hamre

    2007-04-30

    Performing sorbent testing for mercury control at a large scale is a very expensive endeavor and requires months of planning and careful execution. Even with good planning, there are plant limitations on what operating/design parameters can be varied/tested and when. For parameters that cannot be feasibly tested at the full scale (lower/higher gas flow, different bag material, cleaning methods, sorbents, etc.), an alternative approach is used to perform tests on a slipstream unit using flue gas from the plant. The advantage that a slipstream unit provides is the flexibility to test multiple operating and design parameters and other possible technology options without risking major disruption to the operation of the power plant. Additionally, the results generated are expected to simulate full-scale conditions closely, since the flue gas used during the tests comes directly from the plant in question. The Energy & Environmental Research Center developed and constructed a mobile baghouse that allows for cost-effective testing of impacts related to variation in operating and design parameters, as well as other possible mercury control options. Multiple sorbents, air-to-cloth ratios, bag materials, and cleaning frequencies were evaluated while flue gas was extracted from Big Brown when it fired a 70% Texas lignite-30% Powder River Basin (PRB) blend and a 100% PRB coal.

  5. BP-12 Final Proposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rate Case Elements Step by Step Inactive Rate Cases BP-16 Rate Case BP-14 Rate Case BP-12 Rate Case REP-12 Proceeding Rate Information Residential Exchange Program Surplus Power...

  6. Hydrometallurgical process for recovering iron sulfate and zinc sulfate from baghouse dust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon; Lawson, Daniel B.

    1994-01-01

    A process for recovering zinc/rich and iron-rich fractions from the baghouse dust that is generated in various metallurgical operations, especially in steel-making and other iron-making plants, comprises the steps of leaching the dust by hot concentrated sulfuric acid so as to generate dissolved zinc sulfate and a precipitate of iron sulfate, separating the precipitate from the acid by filtration and washing with a volatile liquid, such as methanol or acetone, and collecting the filtered acid and the washings into a filtrate fraction. The volatile liquid may be recovered distillation, and the zinc may be removed from the filtrate by alternative methods, one of which involves addition of a sufficient amount of water to precipitate hydrated zinc sulfate at 10.degree. C., separation of the precipitate from sulfuric acid by filtration, and evaporation of water to regenerate concentrated sulfuric acid. The recovery of iron may also be effected in alternative ways, one of which involves roasting the ferric sulfate to yield ferric oxide and sulfur trioxide, which can be reconverted to concentrated sulfuric acid by hydration. The overall process should not generate any significant waste stream.

  7. Hydrometallurgical process for recovering iron sulfate and zinc sulfate from baghouse dust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, S.; Lawson, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    A process for recovering zinc-rich and iron-rich fractions from the baghouse dust that is generated in various metallurgical operations, especially in steel-making and other iron-making plants, comprises the steps of leaching the dust by hot concentrated sulfuric acid so as to generate dissolved zinc sulfate and a precipitate of iron sulfate, separating the precipitate from the acid by filtration and washing with a volatile liquid, such as methanol or acetone, and collecting the filtered acid and the washings into a filtrate fraction. The volatile liquid may be recovered by distillation, and the zinc may be removed from the filtrate by alternative methods, one of which involves addition of a sufficient amount of water to precipitate hydrated zinc sulfate at 10 C, separation of the precipitate from sulfuric acid by filtration, and evaporation of water to regenerate concentrated sulfuric acid. The recovery of iron may also be effected in alternative ways, one of which involves roasting the ferric sulfate to yield ferric oxide and sulfur trioxide, which can be reconverted to concentrated sulfuric acid by hydration. The overall process should not generate any significant waste stream. 1 figure.

  8. BP-18 Rate Proceeding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings...

  9. BP-12 Rate Case

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings...

  10. BP-16 Rate Case

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings...

  11. BP Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maryland Zip: 21703 Sector: Solar Product: Maryland-based subsidiary of BP Alternative Energy dealing with solar power. Website: www.bp.comgenericcountryjump. Coordinates:...

  12. BP Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77002-2700 Sector: Wind energy Product: Department of BP Alternative Energy that deals with BP's interest in wind power. Coordinates: 29.76045,...

  13. BP America | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BP America Place: Warrenville, Illinois Zip: 60555-3938 Product: US operations of BP Plc. Coordinates: 33.547976, -81.811933 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  14. Apex BP Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name: Apex BP Solar Place: St Mathieu de Treviers, France Zip: 34270 Sector: Solar Product: Regional subsidiary of BP Solar. References: Apex BP...

  15. BP Clipper Wind JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: BP Clipper Wind JV Place: United Kingdom Product: joint venture formed between Clipper and BP Alternative Energy References: BP Clipper Wind...

  16. BP Plc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: BP Plc Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: SW1Y 4PD Sector: Biofuels, Solar, Wind energy Product: London-based producer and distributor of oil and gas...

  17. BP Alternative Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BP Alternative Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: BP Alternative Energy Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: SW1Y 4PD Product: London-based holding company for BP's activities...

  18. BP Biofuels Brasil | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biofuels Brasil Jump to: navigation, search Name: BP Biofuels Brasil Place: Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 13025-320 Sector: Biofuels Product: Brazil based BP subsidiary focused...

  19. BP-12 Final Models Datasets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MB, XLS) Tier 2 Module of RAM RAM Tier 2 Pricing Module (4.8 MB, XLS) Tool Kit Files (TPP) ToolKit v4.8.1 BP-12 Final Studies Release 4-Aug-11 (12.5 MB, XLS) Risk Mod Output...

  20. BP Oil Spill Update | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BP Oil Spill Update BP Oil Spill Update August 10, 2010 - 10:48am Addthis Sec. Chu working on solutions to the BP Oil spill with a member of the Federal Science Team. | Energy Department Photo | Sec. Chu working on solutions to the BP Oil spill with a member of the Federal Science Team. | Energy Department Photo | Secretary Chu Secretary Chu Former Secretary of Energy "We also must remain focused on helping the people, businesses and communities in the Gulf Coast region who have been

  1. BP and Hydrogen Pipelines | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    BP Environmental Commitment: Green corporate philosophy and senior management commitment hpwgwbpyoho.pdf (207.38 KB) More Documents & Publications Proceedings of the 2005 ...

  2. Tata BP Solar India | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Tata BP Solar India Place: Bangalore, Karnataka, India Zip: 561 229 Sector: Solar Product: Manufacturer of PV cells and modules, and solar passive products....

  3. Meteorite search in the deflation basins in Lea County, New Mexico and Winkler County, Texas, USA: Discovery of Lea County 003 (H4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikouchi, T; Buchanan, P C; Zolensky, M E; Welten, K C; Hutchison, R; Hutchison, M

    2000-01-14

    During the past few decades great numbers of meteorites have been recovered from the ice accumulation zones of Antarctica and from the vast Sahara. Although these two great deserts are the two most productive areas, the Southern High Plains in USA (New Mexico and Texas) and Nullarbor Plain, Western Australia have great potential for meteorite recovery. The number of meteorite finds from Roosevelt County, New Mexico alone exceeds 100 in only approximately 11 km{sup 2} area. Most meteorites from this area have been found on the floors of active deflation basins (blowouts) that have been excavated from a mantle of sand dunes. This area has no apparent fluvial or permafrost activity within the last 50,000 years, suggesting that only prevailing winds and natural aridity aid in the concentration and preservation of meteorites. The authors investigated these deflation surfaces in Lea County (the SE corner of New Mexico) and neighboring Winkler County, Texas following a prior search in this area which found two chondrites. They found a tiny H4 chondrite in this search and here they report its mineralogy and petrology along with preliminary data on its exposure history.

  4. EA-314-A BP Energy Co | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-314-A BP Energy Co Order authorizing BP Energy Co to export electric energy to Mexico. File EA-314-A BP Energy.docx More Documents & Publications EA-379 FreePoint Commodities ...

  5. EA-315-A BP Energy Co | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -A BP Energy Co EA-315-A BP Energy Co Order authorizing BP Energy Co to export electric energy to Canada. EA-315-A BP Energy_CN_0.pdf (857.25 KB) More Documents & Publications Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-315-A BP Energy EA-97-D Portland General Electric Company EA-249-C Exelon Generation Company, LLC

  6. EA-314 BP Energy Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electric energy to Mexico PDF icon EA-314 BP Energy Company More Documents & Publications EA-318 CSW Power Marketing PP-89-1 Bangor Hydro-Electric Company EA-314-A BP Energy Co

  7. EA-315 BP Energy Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy to Canada EA-315 BP Energy Company (3.57 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-315-A BP Energy Co EA-97-D Portland General Electric Company EA-342 Royal Bank of Canada

  8. EA-314 BP Energy Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to export electric energy to Mexico EA-314 BP Energy Company More Documents & Publications EA-318 CSW Power Marketing EA-314-A BP Energy Co PP-89-1 Bangor Hydro-Electric Company...

  9. BP Purui New Energy Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 710021 Sector: Solar Product: China Xinjiang Sunoasis and BP Solar are planning a joint venture which will be called BP New Energy Co, and will focus on their combined...

  10. Hanford Site - 200-BP-5 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    BP-5 Hanford Site - 200-BP-5 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 200-BP-5 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Isotopes Present? Yes Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants? Yes

  11. BP Energy India Private Limited BPEIPL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    India Private Limited BPEIPL Jump to: navigation, search Name: BP Energy India Private Limited (BPEIPL) Place: India Sector: Wind energy Product: India-based, subsidiary of Green...

  12. BP Gas Power and Renewables | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: BP Gas, Power and Renewables Place: Central Milton Keynes, United Kingdom Zip: MK9 1ES Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Subsidiary of...

  13. BP Statistical Review of World Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI The BP Statistical Review of World Energy is an Excel spreadsheet which contains consumption and production data for Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, Oil, and Hydroelectric...

  14. BP SunOasis Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co Ltd Place: Xi'an, Shaanxi Province, China Zip: 710016 Sector: Solar Product: Solar module manufacturer. References: BP SunOasis Co Ltd1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  15. Marine04 Marine radiocarbon age calibration, 26 ? 0 ka BP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughen, K; Baille, M; Bard, E; Beck, J; Bertrand, C; Blackwell, P; Buck, C; Burr, G; Cutler, K; Damon, P; Edwards, R; Fairbanks, R; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T; Kromer, B; McCormac, F; Manning, S; Bronk-Ramsey, C; Reimer, P; Reimer, R; Remmele, S; Southon, J; Stuiver, M; Talamo, S; Taylor, F; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C

    2004-11-01

    New radiocarbon calibration curves, IntCal04 and Marine04, have been constructed and internationally ratified to replace the terrestrial and marine components of IntCal98. The new calibration datasets extend an additional 2000 years, from 0-26 ka cal BP (Before Present, 0 cal BP = AD 1950), and provide much higher resolution, greater precision and more detailed structure than IntCal98. For the Marine04 curve, dendrochronologically dated tree-ring samples, converted with a box-diffusion model to marine mixed-layer ages, cover the period from 0-10.5 ka cal BP. Beyond 10.5 ka cal BP, high-resolution marine data become available from foraminifera in varved sediments and U/Th-dated corals. The marine records are corrected with site-specific {sup 14}C reservoir age information to provide a single global marine mixed-layer calibration from 10.5-26.0 ka cal BP. A substantial enhancement relative to IntCal98 is the introduction of a random walk model, which takes into account the uncertainty in both the calendar age and the radiocarbon age to calculate the underlying calibration curve. The marine datasets and calibration curve for marine samples from the surface mixed layer (Marine04) are discussed here. The tree-ring datasets, sources of uncertainty, and regional offsets are presented in detail in a companion paper by Reimer et al.

  16. Secretary Chu Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill Response Efforts Secretary Chu Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill Response Efforts May 21, 2010 - 12:00am ...

  17. WA_02_034_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_LLC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_.pdf |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 4_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_LLC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_.pdf WA_02_034_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_LLC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_.pdf (734.86 KB) More Documents & Publications WA_02_035_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore.pdf WA_06_016_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Und

  18. WA_02_035_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore.pdf |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 5_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore.pdf WA_02_035_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore.pdf (1.18 MB) More Documents & Publications WA_06_016_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Und.pdf WA_02_034_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_LLC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_

  19. Feasibility study report for the 200-BP-1 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This feasibility study examines a range of alternatives and provides recommendations for selecting a preferred alternative for remediating contamination at the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The 200-BP-1 operable unit is located in the center of the Hanford Site along the northern boundary of the 200 East Area. The 241-BY Tank Farm is located immediately to the south of the operable unit. 200-BP-1 is a source operable unit with contaminated soils associated primarily with nine inactive cribs (known as the 216-B cribs). These cribs were used for disposal of low-level radioactive liquid waste from U Plant uranium recovery operations, and waste storage tank condensate from the adjacent 241-BY Tank Farm. The cribs used for disposal of U Plant waste were in operation from 1955--1965, and the cribs used for disposal of tank condensate were in operation from 1965--1975. In addition to the cribs, four unplanned releases of radioactive materials have occurred within the operable unit. Contaminated surface soils associated with the unplanned releases have been consolidated over the cribs and covered with clean soil to reduce contaminant migration and exposure. Discharge of wastes to the cribs has resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. The groundwater is being addressed as part of the 200 East Aggregate Area, groundwater operable unit. Contaminated soils at the site can be categorized by the types of contaminants, their distribution in the soil column, and the risk posed by the various potential exposure pathways. Below the clean soil cover, the near surface soils contain low-levels of contamination with cesium-137, radium-226, strontium-90, thorium-228, and uranium. The lifetime incremental cancer risk associated with these soils if they were exposed at the surface is 9{times}10{sup {minus}5}.

  20. BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-09-19

    BP West Coast Products, LLC (BP or the Applicant) proposes to construct and operate a nominal 720-megawatt (MW), natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility next to the existing BP Cherry Point Refinery in Whatcom County, Washington. The Applicant also owns and operates the refinery, but the cogeneration facility and the refinery would be operated as separate business units. The cogeneration facility and its ancillary infrastructure would provide steam and 85 MW of electricity to meet the operating needs of the refinery and 635 MW of electrical power for local and regional consumption. The proposed cogeneration facility would be located between Ferndale and Blaine in northwestern Whatcom County, Washington. The Canadian border is approximately 8 miles north of the proposed project site. The Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) has jurisdiction over the evaluation of major energy facilities including the proposed project. As such, EFSEC will recommend approval or denial of the proposed cogeneration facility to the governor of Washington after an environmental review. On June 3, 2002, the Applicant filed an Application for Site Certification (ASC No. 2002-01) with EFSEC in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 463-42. On April 22, 2003, the Applicant submitted an amended ASC that included, among other things, a change from air to water cooling. With the submission of the ASC and in accordance with the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) (WAC 463-47), EFSEC is evaluating the siting of the proposed project and conducting an environmental review with this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Because the proposed project requires federal agency approvals and permits, this EIS is intended to meet the requirements under both SEPA and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) also will use this EIS as part of their

  1. DOE Makes Public Detailed Information on the BP Oil Spill | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Public Detailed Information on the BP Oil Spill DOE Makes Public Detailed Information on the BP Oil Spill June 8, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's ongoing commitment to transparency surrounding the response to the BP oil spill, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that Department is providing online access to schematics, pressure tests, diagnostic results and other data about the malfunctioning blowout preventer. Secretary Chu

  2. WA_06_016_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Und.pdf |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 6_016_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Und.pdf WA_06_016_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Und.pdf (1.22 MB) More Documents & Publications WA_07_016_OSRAM_SYLVANIA_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights_Under_a_DOE.pdf Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-060 WA_02_035_BP_SOLAR_INTERNATIONAL_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore

  3. Photo Release: U.S. Energy Secretary Chu at BP Command Center in Houston |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Release: U.S. Energy Secretary Chu at BP Command Center in Houston Photo Release: U.S. Energy Secretary Chu at BP Command Center in Houston May 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington D.C. --- At the request of President Obama, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu has been helping oversee BP's "top kill" efforts from the BP Command Center in Houston. Below are two photographs from this week. Photo credit: Department of Energy. Secretary Steven Chu and National

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - BP 2030 Outlook (EIA conference Apr 2011).ppt

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BP Energy Outlook 2030 Washington, DC 26 April 2011 Energy Outlook 2030 2 © BP 2011 Global trends US particulars What can bend the trend? Outline Energy Outlook 2030 3 © BP 2011 Non-OECD economies drive consumption growth Billion toe Billion toe 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 OECD Non-OECD 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Renewables Hydro Nuclear Coal Gas Oil * * Includes biofuels Energy Outlook 2030 4 © BP 2011 Gas and renewables win as fuel shares

  5. Secretary Chu Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Response Efforts | Department of Energy Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill Response Efforts Secretary Chu Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill Response Efforts May 21, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington DC -- Energy Secretary Steven Chu will postpone a trip to China, scheduled for next week, at the request of President Obama and stay in the country to continue his work on response efforts to the BP oil spill. "Finding a solution to this crisis is a

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - RHWM_for_BP-14_T1SFCO_Computation.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1.1 0.0 0.6 10. PASA to BPA SNX DE-MS79-94BP93658 0.4 0.3 0.3 11. PASA to BPA Xchg Nrg DE-MS79-94BP93658 1.9 1.6 1.7 12. PPL to BPA So Idaho (netted 0 with Table 3.4 line 26)...

  7. NotCal04 - Comparison / Calibration 14C records 26-50 cal kBP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    der Plicht, J v; Beck, J; Bard, E; Baille, M

    2004-11-11

    The radiocarbon calibration curve, IntCal04, extends back to 26 cal kBP. While several high resolution records exist beyond this limit, these data sets exhibit discrepancies one to another of up to several millennia. As a result, no calibration curve for the time range 26-50 cal kBP can be recommended as yet, but in this paper the IntCal04 working group compares the available data sets and offers a discussion of the information that they hold.

  8. Phase 1 remedial investigation report for 200-BP-1 operable unit. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, in Washington State is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989 included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priority List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Inclusion on the NPL initiated the remedial investigation (RD process for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. These efforts are being addressed through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989) which was negotiated and approved by the DOE, the EPA, and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) in May 1989. This agreement, known as the Tri-Party Agreement, governs all CERCLA efforts at Hanford. In March of 1990, the Department of Energy, Richland Operations (DOE-RL) issued a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) work plan (DOE-RL 1990a) for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The work plan initiated the first phase of site characterization activities associated with the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The purpose of the 200-BP-1 operable unit RI is to gather and develop the necessary information to adequately understand the risks to human health and the environment posed by the site and to support the development and analysis of remedial alternatives during the FS. The RI analysis will, in turn, be used by Tri-Party Agreement signatories to make a risk-management-based selection of remedies for the releases of hazardous substances that have occurred from the 200-BP-1 operable unit.

  9. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-BP-5 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994) and a recent 200 NPL Agreement Change Control Form (Appendix A). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-BP-5 Operable Unit Interim Remedial Measure (IRM) Proposed Plan be developed for use in preparing an Interim Action Record of Decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-BP-5 Operable Unit activities (e.g., development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the Interim Action ROD will specify the interim action(s) for groundwater contamination at the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. The treatability test approach is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for each of the two contaminant plumes associated with the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are {sup 99}Tc and {sup 60}Co for underwater affected by past discharges to the 216-BY Cribs, and {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239/240}Pu, and Cs for groundwater affected by past discharges to the 216-B-5 Reverse Well. The purpose of the pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this testplan is to provide the data basis for preparing an IRM Proposed Plan. To achieve this objective, treatability testing must: Assess the performance of groundwater pumping with respect to the ability to extract a significant amount of the primary contaminant mass present in the two contaminant plumes.

  10. Analytical Data Report for Sediment Samples Collected From 200 BP 5 OU, C7514 (299-E28-30) L-Well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Michael J.

    2010-06-18

    This an analytical data report for samples received from BP-5 L Well. This report is being prepared for CHPRC.

  11. Feasibility study report for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This feasibility study (FS) examines a range of alternatives and provides recommendations for selecting a preferred altemative for remediating contamination at the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The 200-BP-1 operable unit is located in the center of the Hanford Site along the northern boundary of the 200 East Area. The 241-BY Tank Farm is located immediately to the south of the operable unit. 200-BP-1 is a source operable unit with contaminated soils associated primarily with nine inactive cribs (known as the 216-B cribs). These cribs were used for disposal of low-level radioactive liquid waste from U Plant uranium recovery operations, and waste storage tank condensate from the adjacent 241-BY Tank Farm. The cribs used for disposal of U Plant waste were in operation from 1955--1965, and the cribs used for disposal of tank condensate were in operation from 1965-1975. In addition to the cribs, four unplanned releases of radioactive materials have occurred within the operable unit. Contaminated surface soils associated with the unplanned releases have been consolidated over the cribs and covered with clean soil to reduce contaminant migration and exposure. Discharge of wastes to the cribs has resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. The groundwater is being addressed as part of the 200 East Aggregate Area groundwater operable unit. Contaminated soils at the site can be categorized by the types of contaminants, their distribution in the soil column, and the risk posed by the various potential exposure pathways. Below the clean soil cover, the near surface soils contain low-:levels of contamination with cesium-137, radium-226, strontium-90, thorium-228 and uranium. The lifetime incremental cancer risk associated with these soils if they were exposed at the surface is 9 {times} 10{sup 5}.

  12. Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology: A Systems Class Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, Daniel W; Wohlgemuth, John; Carlson, David E; Clark, Roger F; Gleaton, Mark; Posbic, John P; Zahler, James

    2010-12-06

    The primary target market for this program was the residential and commercial PV markets, drawing on BP Solar's premium product and service offerings, brand and marketing strength, and unique routes to market. These two markets were chosen because: (1) in 2005 they represented more than 50% of the overall US PV market; (2) they are the two markets that will likely meet grid parity first; and (3) they are the two market segments in which product development can lead to the added value necessary to generate market growth before reaching grid parity. Federal investment in this program resulted in substantial progress toward the DOE TPP target, providing significant advancements in the following areas: (1) Lower component costs particularly the modules and inverters. (2) Increased availability and lower cost of silicon feedstock. (3) Product specifically developed for residential and commercial applications. (4) Reducing the cost of installation through optimization of the products. (5) Increased value of electricity in mid-term to drive volume increases, via the green grid technology. (6) Large scale manufacture of PV products in the US, generating increased US employment in manufacturing and installation. To achieve these goals BP Solar assembled a team that included suppliers of critical materials, automated equipment developers/manufacturers, inverter and other BOS manufacturers, a utility company, and University research groups. The program addressed all aspects of the crystalline silicon PV business from raw materials (particularly silicon feedstock) through installation of the system on the customers site. By involving the material and equipment vendors, we ensured that supplies of silicon feedstock and other PV specific materials like encapsulation materials (EVA and cover glass) will be available in the quantities required to meet the DOE goals of 5 to 10 GW of installed US PV by 2015 and at the prices necessary for PV systems to reach grid parity in 2015

  13. Screening of Potential Remediation Methods for the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Dresel, P. EVAN; Nimmons, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2006-09-21

    A screening-level evaluation of potential remediation methods for application to the contaminants of concern (COC) in the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site was conducted based on the methods outlined in the Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies under CERCLA Interim Final (EPA 1988). The scope of this screening was to identify the most promising remediation methods for use in the more detailed analysis of remediation alternatives that will be conducted as part of the full feasibility study. The screening evaluation was conducted for the primary COC (potential major risk drivers) identified in the groundwater sampling and analysis plan for the operable unit (DOE/RL-2001-49, Rev. 1) with additions.

  14. BP Exploration`s Pompano subsea development: Operational strategy for a subsea project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, D.G.; Cordner, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    On a platform, facility modifications to cope with unexpected operating conditions or unanticipated problems may be made relatively easily at moderate cost. In contrast, subsea systems are placed on the seabed often beyond diver depth and are difficult if not impossible to retrieve or modify. Consequently the design must be optimized up front and have sufficient inherent flexibility to cope with the unexpected. It is therefore critical to develop an operational strategy in conjunction with suppliers, designers and operational staff, concurrently with the design. Input from Operations personnel is necessary from project conception throughout detailed design, fabrication, system integrating testing, installation and commissioning. This paper discusses BP Exploration`s work on the Pompano subsea project in the Gulf of Mexico and addresses many of the practical aspects in which Operations staff need to become involved with throughout a subsea project to ensure a problem free start-up and operation. It will provide a useful guide for Operations groups involved in the planning and operation of a subsea development

  15. 200-BP-1 Prototype Hanford Barrier -- 15 Years of Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Link, Steven O.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2011-09-30

    Monitoring is an essential component of engineered barrier system design and operation. A composite capacitive cover, including a capillary break and an evapotranspiration (ET) barrier at the Hanford Site, is generating data that can be used to help resolve these issues. The prototype Hanford barrier was constructed over the 216-B-57 Crib in 1994 to evaluate surface-barrier constructability, construction costs, and physical and hydrologic performance at the field scale. The barrier has been routinely monitored between November 1994 and September 1998 as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) treatability test of barrier performance for the 200 BP 1 Operable Unit. Since FY 1998, monitoring has focused on a more limited set of key water balance, stability, and biotic parameters. In FY 2009, data collection was focused on: (1) water-balance monitoring, consisting of precipitation, runoff, soil moisture storage, and drainage measurements with evapotranspiration calculated by difference; (2) stability monitoring, consisting of asphalt-layer-settlement, basalt-side-slope-stability, and surface-elevation measurements; (3) vegetation dynamics; and (4) animal use. September 2009 marked 15 years since the start of monitoring and the collection of performance data. This report describes the results of monitoring activities during the period October 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009, and summarizes the 15 years of performance data collected from September 1994 through September 2009.

  16. Analytical Data Report for Sediment Samples Collected From 200 BP 5 OU, C7515 (299-E24-25) M-Well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Michael J.

    2010-06-18

    This is an analytical data report for sediments received from BP 5 M Well for geochemical studies. Data will be reported to CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC).

  17. Structural Insights into Membrane Targeting by the Flagellar Calcium-binding Protein (FCaBP) a Myristoylated and Palmitoylated Calcium Sensor in Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Wingard; J Ladner; M Vanarotti; A Fisher; H Robinson; K Buchanan; D Engman; J Ames

    2011-12-31

    The flagellar calcium-binding protein (FCaBP) of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is targeted to the flagellar membrane where it regulates flagellar function and assembly. As a first step toward understanding the Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes important for membrane-targeting, we report here the x-ray crystal structure of FCaBP in the Ca{sup 2+}-free state determined at 2.2{angstrom} resolution. The first 17 residues from the N terminus appear unstructured and solvent-exposed. Residues implicated in membrane targeting (Lys-19, Lys-22, and Lys-25) are flanked by an exposed N-terminal helix (residues 26-37), forming a patch of positive charge on the protein surface that may interact electrostatically with flagellar membrane targets. The four EF-hands in FCaBP each adopt a 'closed conformation' similar to that seen in Ca{sup 2+}-free calmodulin. The overall fold of FCaBP is closest to that of grancalcin and other members of the penta EF-hand superfamily. Unlike the dimeric penta EF-hand proteins, FCaBP lacks a fifth EF-hand and is monomeric. The unstructured N-terminal region of FCaBP suggests that its covalently attached myristoyl group at the N terminus may be solvent-exposed, in contrast to the highly sequestered myristoyl group seen in recoverin and GCAP1. NMR analysis demonstrates that the myristoyl group attached to FCaBP is indeed solvent-exposed in both the Ca{sup 2+}-free and Ca{sup 2+}-bound states, and myristoylation has no effect on protein structure and folding stability. We propose that exposed acyl groups at the N terminus may anchor FCaBP to the flagellar membrane and that Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes may control its binding to membrane-bound protein targets..

  18. Investigations of Ba{sub 3}BP{sub 3}O{sub 12}:Eu{sup 2+} single crystal as a scintillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Hu, Guan-Qin; Wang, Hong; Zhu, Lin-Lin; Zhao, Jing-Tai

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Eu{sup 2+}-activated Ba{sub 3}BP{sub 3}O{sub 12} single crystals have been grown by the top-seeded solution growth method (TSSG) for the first time. • Ba{sub 3}BP{sub 3}O{sub 12}:Eu{sup 2+} single crystal exhibits wide transparency in the wavelength range from 250 to 700 nm. • Ba{sub 3}BP{sub 3}O{sub 12}:Eu{sup 2+} single crystal shows high overall scintillation efficiency (1.8 times of BGO) and moderate decay time (860 ns). - Abstract: Single crystals of Ba{sub 3}BP{sub 3}O{sub 12}:Eu{sup 2+} with high optical quality have been grown by the top-seeded solution growth (TSSG) method using BPO{sub 4}–NaF mixture as the flux. Ba{sub 3}BP{sub 3}O{sub 12}:Eu{sup 2+} single crystal exhibits wide transparency in the wavelength range from 250 to 700 nm, and shows a broad emission band in the wavelength range of 350–650 nm when excited by X-ray radiation. The overall scintillation efficiency is about 1.8 times of that of BGO crystal under the same conditions. Its room temperature fluorescence decay curve exhibits a single-exponent shape with decay time of about 860 ns. It is worth noting that Ba{sub 3}BP{sub 3}O{sub 12}:Eu{sup 2+} single crystal may be of great interest for applications in the field of scintillation materials considering its scintillation properties, as well as the good chemical stability.

  19. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wu Hao; Yang Qifeng; Aly, Amal; Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Golhar, Ryan; Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  20. DOE/BP-3828

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Want more information? BPA personnel who staff the toll-free hotline can answer your questions about how the Crime Witness program works. Call (800) 437-2744 for more information....

  1. BP and Hydrogen Pipelines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ng n va ves, a ow ng mo ecu ar H to s p by Concern about H auto- gn on near nv e f ame prox ty to other chem ca nes Stay to conservat ve s de of a owab e t me frame for DOT va ve ...

  2. Intragenomic heterogeneity of the 16S rRNA gene in strain UFO1 caused by a 100-bp insertion in helix 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison E. Ray; Stephanie A. Connon; Peter P. Sheridan; Jeremy Gilbreath; Malcolm S. Shields; Deborah T. Newby; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy S. Magnuson

    2010-06-01

    The determination of variation in 16S rRNA gene sequences is perhaps the most common method for assessing microbial community diversity. However, the occurrence of multiple copies of 16S rRNA genes within some organisms can bias estimates of microbial diversity. During phylogenetic characterization of a metal-transforming, fermentative bacterium (strain UFO1) isolated from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN, we detected an apparent 16S rRNA pseudogene. The putative 16S rRNA pseudogene was first detected in clone libraries constructed with 16S rRNA genes amplified from UFO1 genomic DNA. Sequencing revealed two distinct 16S rRNA genes, with one differing from the other by a 100 bp insert near the 5’ end. Ribosomal RNA was extracted from strain UFO1 and analyzed by RT-qPCR with insert and non-insert specific primers; however, only the non-insert 16S rRNA sequence was expressed. Reverse-transcribed rRNA from strain UFO1 was also used to construct a cDNA library. Of 190 clones screened by PCR, none contained the 16S rRNA gene with the 100 bp insert. Examination of GenBank 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the same insert sequence was present in other clones, including those from an environmental library constructed from FRC enrichments. These findings demonstrate the existence of widely disparate copies of the 16S rRNA gene in the same species and a putative 16S rRNA pseudogene, which may confound 16S rRNA-based methods for assessments of microbial diversity in environmental samples.

  3. BP Research continues at CAMD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    award amount is 13.98 million over three years. Only eight projects were funded by the GRI Board from 77 submissions. LSU participants in the project are Drs. K.T. Valsaraj,...

  4. Persistence of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in proliferating and nonproliferating human mammary epithelial cells after exposure to gamma-rays or iron ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groesser, Torsten; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Chen, James; Costes, Sylvain V.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Parvin, Bahram; Rydberg, Bjorn

    2010-12-22

    To investigate {gamma}-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) and 53BP1 (tumour protein 53 binding protein No. 1) foci formation and removal in proliferating and non-proliferating human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) after exposure to sparsely and densely ionizing radiation under different cell culture conditions. HMEC cells were grown either as monolayers (2D) or in extracellular matrix to allow the formation of acinar structures in vitro (3D). Foci numbers were quantified by image analysis at various time points after exposure. Our results reveal that in non-proliferating cells under 2D and 3D cell culture conditions, iron-ion induced {gamma}-H2AX foci were still present at 72 h after exposure, although 53BP1 foci returned to control levels at 48 h. In contrast in proliferating HMEC, both {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci decreased to control levels during the 24-48 h time interval after irradiation under 2D conditions. Foci numbers decreased faster after {gamma}-ray irradiation and returned to control levels by 12 h regardless of marker, cell proliferation status, and cell culture condition. Conclusions: The disappearance of radiation induced {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in HMEC have different dynamics that depend on radiation quality and proliferation status. Notably, the general patterns do not depend on the cell culture condition (2D versus 3D). We speculate that the persistent {gamma}-H2AX foci in iron-ion irradiated non-proliferating cells could be due to limited availability of double strand break (DSB) repair pathways in G0/G1-phase, or that repair of complex DSB requires replication or chromatin remodeling.

  5. Fine particle (2.5 microns) emissions: regulations, measurement, and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. McKenna; James H. Turner; James P. McKenna, Jr.

    2008-09-15

    Contents: Introduction; Health effects; Air monitoring; Emission control methods - fabric filter/baghouses, electrostatic precipitators, wet scrubbers; Environmental technology verification and baghouse filtration products; Cost considerations; and Nanoparticulates.

  6. BP Energy Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  7. eia846bp01_10.g

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... Coke - Unrefined or Green * Marketable Petroleum Coke - Calcined * Waste Oils and Tars (excluding Coal Tar) * Other Petroleum-based Combustion Energy Sources Energy Source ...

  8. BP-16 Transmission Rate Case Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discussion Purposes Only. September 8, 2015 Agenda Why are we here? Status: Fundamentals Approaches PrinciplesOpen Discussion Next steps * Workshop Timeline 2...

  9. EA-315_BP_Energy_CN.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  10. Evaluation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the p53 Binding Protein 1 (TP53BP1) Gene in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole-Breast Irradiation (BCS + RT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad; Kulkarni, Diptee; Green, Camille; Vazquez, Alexi; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Yang Qifeng; Ganesan, Shridar; Hirsfield, Kim M.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: TP53BP1 is a key component of radiation-induced deoxyribonucleic acid damage repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of a known common single nucleotide polymorphism in this gene (rs560191) in patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation (BCS + RT). Methods and Materials: The population consisted of 176 premenopausal women treated with BCS + RT (median follow-up, 12 years). Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was processed by use of TaqMan assays. Each allele for rs560191 was either C or G, so each patient was therefore classified as CC, CG, or GG. Patients were grouped as GG if they were homozygous for the variant G allele or CC-CG if they carried at least one copy of the common C allele (CC or CG). Results: Of the 176 women, 124 (71%) were CC-CG and 52 (29%) were GG. The mean age was 44 years for GG vs. 38 years for CC-CG (p < 0.001). GG was more common in African-American women than white women (69% vs. 13%, p < 0.001) and more commonly estrogen receptor negative (70% vs. 49%, p = 0.02). There were no significant correlations of rs560191 with other critical variables. Despite the fact that GG patients were older, the 10-year rate of local relapses was higher (22% for GG vs. 12% for CC-CG, p = 0.04). Conclusions: This novel avenue of investigation of polymorphisms in radiation repair/response genes in patients treated with BCS + RT suggests a correlation to local relapse. Additional evaluation is needed to assess the biological and functional significance of these single nucleotide polymorphisms, and larger confirmatory validation studies will be required to determine the clinical implications.

  11. Characterizing toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant demonstrating the AFGD ICCT Project and a plant utilizing a dry scrubber/baghouse system: Bailly Station Units 7 and 8 and AFGD ICCT Project. Final report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dismukes, E.B.

    1994-10-20

    This report describes results of assessment of the risk of emissions of hazardous air pollutants at one of the electric power stations, Bailly Station, which is also the site of a Clean Coal Technology project demonstrating the Pure Air Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization process (wet limestone). This station represents the configuration of no NO{sub x} reduction, particulate control with electrostatic precipitators, and SO{sub 2} control with a wet scrubber. The test was conducted September 3--6, 1993. Sixteen trace metals were determined along with 5 major metals. Other inorganic substances and organic compounds were also determined.

  12. DOE/BP-3391, 2002 Supplemental Power Rate Case

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 4-21 4.4 Implementation of Fish and Wildlife Funding Principles and Other Fish and Wildlife Issues......

  13. Baseline Risk Assessment for 200-BP-5 Groundwater Operable Unit |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    BIA Providers Conference Energy Track BIA Providers Conference Energy Track December 2, 2015 - 10:00am Addthis Dec. 2-3, 2015 Anchorage, Alaska Dena'ina Center The DOE Office of Indian Energy offered an energy track at the 25th Annual BIA Tribal Providers Conference Dec. 2-3, 2015. The track featured breakout sessions on a variety of topics to help tribal energy leaders and professionals make informed decisions about energy projects. Download agenda and presentations. Addthis Related Articles

  14. Administrator's Final Record of Decision, BP-14 Power and Transmission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    understanding of specific topics, generate ideas, and bring forward alternative proposals. The workshops placed significant emphasis on transmission and ancillary and control...

  15. EA-315-A BP Energy_CN_0.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  16. Microsoft Word - BP supply chain overview - draft v2.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    http://energy.gov/eere/amo/better-plant Supply Chain Initiative Overview BETTER BUILDINGS, BETTER PLANTS Around 40% to 60% of a manufacturing company's energy and carbon footprint can reside upstream in its supply chain-from raw materials, transport, and packaging to manufacturing processes-but this number can be as high as 80% for some sectors. 1 Manufacturing companies that coordinate energy management practices with their supply chains can significantly improve energy productivity and reduce

  17. May 28, 2010: Chu helps oversee BP's "top kill" efforts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    May 28, 2010Secretary Chu concludes several days in Houston monitoring the “top kill” attempt to stop the oil well leak in the Gulf of Mexico, analyzing the data as it comes in and helping to...

  18. Comment on "Radiocarbon Calibration Curve Spanning 0 to 50,000 Years B.P. Based on Paired 230Th/234U/238U and 14C Dates on Pristine Corals" by R.G. Fairbanks, R. A. Mortlock, T.-C. Chiu, L. Cao, A. Kaplan, T. P. Guilderson, T. W. Fairbanks, A. L. Bloom, P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimer, P J; Baillie, M L; Bard, E; Beck, J W; Blackwell, P G; Buck, C E; Burr, G S; Edwards, R L; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T P; Hogg, A G; Hughen, K A; Kromer, B; McCormac, G; Manning, S; Reimer, R W; Southon, J R; Stuiver, M; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C E

    2005-10-02

    Radiocarbon calibration curves are essential for converting radiocarbon dated chronologies to the calendar timescale. Prior to the 1980's numerous differently derived calibration curves based on radiocarbon ages of known age material were in use, resulting in ''apples and oranges'' comparisons between various records (Klein et al., 1982), further complicated by until then unappreciated inter-laboratory variations (International Study Group, 1982). The solution was to produce an internationally-agreed calibration curve based on carefully screened data with updates at 4-6 year intervals (Klein et al., 1982; Stuiver and Reimer, 1986; Stuiver and Reimer, 1993; Stuiver et al., 1998). The IntCal working group has continued this tradition with the active participation of researchers who produced the records that were considered for incorporation into the current, internationally-ratified calibration curves, IntCal04, SHCal04, and Marine04, for Northern Hemisphere terrestrial, Southern Hemisphere terrestrial, and marine samples, respectively (Reimer et al., 2004; Hughen et al., 2004; McCormac et al., 2004). Fairbanks et al. (2005), accompanied by a more technical paper, Chiu et al. (2005), and an introductory comment, Adkins (2005), recently published a ''calibration curve spanning 0-50,000 years''. Fairbanks et al. (2005) and Chiu et al. (2005) have made a significant contribution to the database on which the IntCal04 and Marine04 calibration curves are based. These authors have now taken the further step to derive their own radiocarbon calibration extending to 50,000 cal BP, which they claim is superior to that generated by the IntCal working group. In their papers, these authors are strongly critical of the IntCal calibration efforts for what they claim to be inadequate screening and sample pretreatment methods. While these criticisms may ultimately be helpful in identifying a better set of protocols, we feel that there are also several erroneous and misleading

  19. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems Electrostatic Precipitators Baghouses Select Catalytic and Non-Catalytic Reduction Systems Activated Carbon Injection Systems Direct Sorbent ...

  20. II

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    describes the concen- 1) because control devices, such as baghouse filters and tration of hydrogen ions along a scale (from 0 to 14) that electrostatic precipitators, remove most...

  1. A Framework for Developing Collaborative DER Programs: Working...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... For example, for PM10 abatement, this equipment could involve an entire pollution control system of a scrubber (wetdry), baghouse, fabric collector, or microclone technology. For ...

  2. Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment U.S. Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The zone is designated to be for general research and development with dry laboratories, ... IBRF particulate baghouse and ammonia scrubber system, and the RFHP operations. ...

  3. Environmental Performance Report 2012: Annual Site Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and limited dry laboratory research activities are currently conducted at the facility. ... air permits for two emergency generators and an ammonia scrubber and particulate baghouse. ...

  4. Final 2014 Site-Wide Environmental Assessment - South Table Mountain...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The zone is designated to be for general research and development with dry laboratories, ... IBRF particulate baghouse and ammonia scrubber system, and the RFHP operations. ...

  5. BP-16-A-02-AP02, Appendix B - Power Rate Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page iii COMMONLY USED ACRONYMS AND SHORT FORMS ACNR Accumulated Calibrated Net Revenue ACS Ancillary and Control Area Services AF Advance Funding aMW average megawatt(s)...

  6. BP Oil Company`s approach to the analysis of process plant buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryman, C.E. [BP Oil Co., Cleveland, OH (United States). HSE Dept.

    1996-11-01

    Explosions occurring in petroleum refineries and chemical plants have caused fatalities in occupied buildings. For the 5-year period from 1989 through 1994, there were four major incidents. All of these incidents caused multiple fatalities to people working in process buildings, and all of these incidents resulted in very large losses, exceeding $100 million dollars for most of the incidents. The OSHA Process Safety Management (PSM) regulation requires sites to address facility siting when conducting process hazards and analyses. This requirement applies to all occupied buildings in a facility, not just control rooms. OSHA has issued several citations for failure to comply with this PSM requirement, and some companies have disputed the validity of some of these citations. The US industry experienced some difficulties deciding on the proper methodology to use in meeting this regulatory requirement. To address these industry concerns, the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the Chemical Manufacturers Association (CMA) developed guidance that was published in June 1995, RP-752, Management of Hazards Associated with the Location of Process Plant Buildings.

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - BP-16 RHWM Workshop October 3 2014 [Compatibili...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    called for in the 2008 BiOp would occur because the available data showed transported fish returned at higher rates than fish that migrated in-river. The maximum transport (no...

  8. Materials Data on AlBP2H5NO9 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on KScBP2HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on RbScBP2HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on RbGaBP2HO9 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on BaCoBP2HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on ZnBP2H4NO8 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Customer Follow Up RHWM BP-16 Workshop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O N Pre-Decisional. For Discussion Purposes Only. August 5, 2014 2 RHWM Process Workshop Agenda Topic Presenter Intro and Purpose of Workshop, Introductions Peter Stiffler Part 1...

  15. The Effects of Fire on the Function of the 200-BP-1 Engineered Surface Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Link, Steven O.; Hasan, Nazmul; Draper, Kathryn E.

    2009-09-01

    A critical unknown in use of barrier technology for long-term waste isolation is performance after a major disturbance especially when institutional controls are intact, but there are no resources to implement corrective actions. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of wild fire on alterations the function of an engineered barrier. A controlled burn September 26, 2008 was used to remove all the vegetation from the north side of the barrier. Flame heights exceeded 9 m and temperatures ranged from 250 oC at 1.5 cm below the surface to over 700 oC at 1 m above the surface. Post-fire analysis of soil properties show significant decreases in wettability, hydraulic conductivity, air entry pressure, organic matter, and porosity relative to pre-fire conditions whereas dry bulk density increased. Decreases in hydraulic conductivity and wettabilty immediately after the fire are implicated in a surface runoff event that occurred in January 2009, the first in 13 years. There was a significant increase in macro-nutrients, pH, and electrical conductivity. After one year, hydrophobicity has returned to pre-burn levels with only 16% of samples still showing signs of decreased wettability. Over the same period, hydraulic conductivity and air entry pressure returned to pre-burn levels at one third of the locations but remained identical to values recorded immediately after the fire at the other two thirds. Soil nutrients, pH, and electrical conductivity remain elevated after 1 year. Species composition on the burned surface changed markedly from prior years and relative to the unburned surface and two analog sites. An increase in the proportion of annuals and biennials is characteristic of burned surfaces that have become dominated by ruderal species. Greenhouse seedling emergence tests conducted to assess the seed bank of pre- and post-burn soils and of two analog sites at the McGee Ranch show no difference in the number of species emerging from soils collected before and after the fire. However, there were fewer species emerging from the seed bank on the side slopes and more species emerging from two analog sites. Leaf area index measures confirmed the substantial differences in plant communities after fire. Xylem pressure potential were considerably higher on the burned half of the barrier in September 2009 suggesting that not all the water in the soil profile will be removed before the fall rains begin. The results of this study are expected to contribute to a better understanding of barrier performance after major disturbances in a post-institutional control environment. Such an understanding is needed to enhance stakeholder acceptance regarding the long-term efficacy of engineered barriers. This study will also support improvements in the design of evapotranspiration (ET) and hybrid (ET + capacitive) barriers and the performance monitoring systems.

  16. 200-BP-1 Prototype Hanford Barrier Annual Monitoring Report for Fiscal Years 2005 Through 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Andy L.; Link, Steven O.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2008-02-01

    A prototype Hanford barrier was deployed over the 216-B-57 Crib at the Hanford Site in 1994 to prevent percolation through the underlying waste and to minimize spreading of buried contaminants. This barrier is being monitored to evaluate physical and hydrologic performance at the field scale. This report summarizes data collected during the period FY 2005 through FY 2007. In FY 2007, monitoring of the prototype Hanford barrier focused on barrier stability, vegetative cover, evidence of plant and animal intrusion, and the main components of the water balance, including precipitation, runoff, storage, drainage, and deep percolation. Owing to a hiatus in funding in FY 2005 through 2006, data collected were limited to automated measurements of the water-balance components. For the reporting period (October 2004 through September 2007) precipitation amount and distribution were close to normal. The cumulative amount of water received from October 1994 through September 2007 was 3043.45 mm on the northern half of the barrier, which is the formerly irrigated treatment, and 2370.58 mm on the southern, non-irrigated treatments. Water storage continued to show a cyclic pattern, increasing in the winter and declining in the spring and summer to a lower limit of around 100 mm in response to evapotranspiration. The 600-mm design storage has never been exceeded. For the reporting period, the total drainage from the soil-covered plots ranged from near zero amounts under the soil-covered plots to almost 20 mm under the side slopes. Over the 13-yr monitoring period, side slope drainage accounted for about 20 percent of total precipitation while the soil-covered plots account for only 0.12 mm total. Above-asphalt and below-asphalt moisture measurements show no evidence of deep percolation of water. Topographic surveys show the barrier and protective side slopes to be stable. Plant surveys show a relatively high coverage of native plants still persists after the initial revegetation in 1994 although species diversity on the soil cover continues to decrease, from 35 in 1997 to 12 in 2007. The formerly irrigated treatments continue to show greater cover of grasses and litter than the non-irrigated treatments. On the formerly irrigated treatments, the mean cover class was 25 to 50 percent for both grasses and shrubs. On the non-irrigated treatments, the mean cover class was 5 to 25 percent from grasses and 25 to 50 percent for shrubs. The western and northern side slopes of the barrier show less plant cover than the soil surface, but show higher species diversity. This may be due to the influence of windblown soil and seeds from adjacent land, or the lack of shrubs competing for resources. Insects and small mammals continue to use the barrier surface and several holes and mounds were observed during the last year. This suggests that the restored barrier surface is beginning to function like a recovering ecosystem. Small-mammal burrowing on the top and sides of the barrier is most prevalent on the finer-grained and disturbed soils while active ant mounds were observed on the northern and western slopes.

  17. Phase 1 remedial investigation report for 200-BP-1 operable unit. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Volume two contains appendices for the following: crib soil sample reference table; crib soil analytical data; and crib soil quality control data.

  18. 200-BP-1 Prototype Hanford Barrier - 15 Years of Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Link, Steven O.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2009-09-01

    Engineered surface barriers are recognized as a remedial alternative to the removal, treatment and disposal of near-surface contaminants at a variety of waste sites within the DOE complex. One issue impacting their acceptance by stakeholders the use of limited data to predict long-term performance. In 1994, a 2-ha multi-component barrier was constructed over an existing waste disposal site at Hanford using natural materials. Monitoring has been almost continuous for the last 15 yrs and has focused on barrier stability, vegetative cover, plant and animal intrusion, and the components of the water balance, including precipitation, runoff, storage, drainage, and percolation. The total precipitation received from October 1994 through August 2008 was 3311 mm on the northern half (formerly irrigated), and 2638 mm on the southern, non-irrigated half. Water storage in the fine-soil layer shows a cyclic pattern, increasing in the winter and decreasing in the spring and summer to a lower limit of around 100 mm, regardless of precipitation, in response to evapotranspiration. Topographic surveys show the barrier and side slopes to be stable and the pea-gravel admix has proven effective in minimizing erosion through the creation of a desert pavement during deflationary periods. Three runoff events have been observed but the 600-mm design storage capacity has never been exceeded. Total percolation ranged from near zero amounts under the soil-covered plots to over 600 mm under the side slopes. The asphaltic concrete prevented any of this water from reaching the buried waste thereby eliminating the driving force for the contaminant remobilization. Plant surveys show a relatively high coverage of native plants still persists after the initial revegetation although the number of species decreased from 35 in 1994 to 10 in 2009. Ample evidence of insect and small mammal use suggests that the barrier is behaving like a recovering ecosystem. In September 2008, the north half of the barrier was burned to remove vegetation and study the effects of fire on barrier performance. The most immediate effects has been on water storage patterns with the bare surface showing a slower accumulation of water, a smaller peak storage and a delayed release relative to the unburned side due to evaporation . Nonetheless the residual storage at the end of the year was similar for the burned and unburned sides.

  19. Environmental Performance Report 2015 (Managment Publication...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... pond at the NWTC. Most years, the pond is dry except for a few weeks after snow runoff ... Permit APCD 13JE2829 Active Air STM IBRF scrubber and baghouse Permit APCD 11JE1798 Active ...

  20. Advanced emissions control development project. Phase I final report appendices, November 1, 1993--February 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farthing, G.A.

    1996-06-01

    Appendices are presented on the Advanced Emissions Control Development Project on the following: wet scrubber sampling and analysis; DBA/lime chemical analysis; limestone forced oxidation chemical analysis; benchmarking on baghouse conditions, electrostatic precipitators, and wet scrubber conditions.

  1. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. Deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. Denominators represent the value of...

  2. Materials Data on CaNiBP2H3O10 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on NaAlBP2H3O10 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Mult-Pollutant Control Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, Daniel P; Locke, James E

    2008-02-01

    CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-megawatt (MW) Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/induct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. Testing was conducted through ports located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor to evaluate the performance of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system, as well as through ports located at the air heater outlet and baghouse outlet or stack to determine pollutant removal efficiencies across the Turbosorp{reg_sign} scrubber and baghouse. Data from the unit's stack continuous emission monitor (CEM) were also used for determining attainment of the performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions and SO{sub 2} removal efficiency.

  5. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 5b. Economic and Physical Indicators...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    outputs. 3. Deflated using BEA's chain-type price indices for value added. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review 2004. (DOEEIA-0384(2004) Table 5.8...

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.6 Residential Home Improvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improving America's Housing, 2011, Table A-2, p. 28 for 2009; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for GDP and price deflators. 22,616 51,010 ...

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.6 Residential Home Improvement

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Improving America's Housing, 2011, Table A-2, p. 28 for 2009; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for GDP and price deflators. 33,263 186,326 ...

  8. Adrian Cooper CEO, Oxford Economics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cuts in supply put a floor under oil prices and mean that deflation has been avoided Lower oil prices are forcing faster innovation, cost-cutting and a raft of consolidation ...

  9. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 5a. Economic and Physical Indicators for the Forest Products Industry, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (NAICS 321 and NAICS 322) Notes: 1. Deflated using...

  10. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 5b. Economic and Physical Indicators for the Petroleum Industry (NAICS 324), 1998, 2002, and 2006 Notes: 1. Deflated using BEA's chain-type...

  11. Investigation and demonstration of dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control. Quarterly technical report, April 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, T.; Sjostrom, S.; Smith, J.; Chang, R.

    1996-07-27

    The overall objective this two phase program is to investigate the use of dry carbon-based sorbents for mercury control. During Phase 1, a bench-scale field test device that can be configured as an electrostatic precipitator, a pulse-jet baghouse, or a reverse-gas baghouse has been designed and will be integrated with an existing pilot-scale facility at PSCo`s Comanche Station. Up to three candidate sorbents will then be injected into the flue gas stream upstream of the test device to determine the mercury removal efficiency for each sorbent. During the Phase 11 effort, component integration for the most promising dry sorbent technology (technically and economically feasible) shall be tested at the 5000 acfm pilot-scale. An extensive work plan has been developed for the project. Three sorbents will be selected for evaluation at the facility through investigation, presentation, and discussion among team members: PSCO, EPRI, ADA, and DOE. The selected sorbents will be tested in the five primary bench-scale configurations: pulse `et baghouse, TOXECON, reverse-gas baghouse, electrostatic precipitator, and an ESP or fabric filter `with no Comanche ash in the flue gas stream. In the EPRI TOXECON system, mercury sorbents will be injected downstream of a primary particulate control device, and collected in a pulse-jet baghouse operated at air-to-cloth ratios of 12 to 16 ft/min, thus separating the mercury and sorbent from the captured flyash. In the no-ash configuration, an external flyash sample will be injected into a clean gas stream to investigate possible variations in sorbent effectiveness in the presence of different ashes. The use of an existing test facility, a versatile design for the test fixture, and installation of a continuous mercury analyzer will allow for the completion of this ambitious test plan. The primary activity during the quarter was to complete fabrication and installation of the facility.

  12. Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac

    2006-05-01

    This document provides a summary of the full-scale demonstration efforts involved in the project ''Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC{reg_sign} System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas''. The project took place at Alabama Power's Plant Gaston Unit 3 and involved the injection of sorbent between an existing particulate collector (hot-side electrostatic precipitators) and a COHPAC{reg_sign} fabric filter (baghouse) downstream. Although the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse was designed originally for polishing the flue gas, when activated carbon injection was added, the test was actually evaluating the EPRI TOXECON{reg_sign} configuration. The results from the baseline tests with no carbon injection showed that the cleaning frequency in the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit was much higher than expected, and was above the target maximum cleaning frequency of 1.5 pulses/bag/hour (p/b/h), which was used during the Phase I test in 2001. There were times when the baghouse was cleaning continuously at 4.4 p/b/h. In the 2001 tests, there was virtually no mercury removal at baseline conditions. In this second round of tests, mercury removal varied between 0 and 90%, and was dependent on inlet mass loading. There was a much higher amount of ash exiting the electrostatic precipitators (ESP), creating an inlet loading greater than the design conditions for the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Tests were performed to try to determine the cause of the high ash loading. The LOI of the ash in the 2001 baseline tests was 11%, while the second baseline tests showed an LOI of 17.4%. The LOI is an indication of the carbon content in the ash, which can affect the native mercury uptake, and can also adversely affect the performance of ESPs, allowing more ash particles to escape the unit. To overcome this, an injection scheme was implemented that balanced the need to decrease carbon injection during times when inlet loading to the baghouse was high and increase carbon injection

  13. Investigation and demonstration of dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control. Quarterly technical report, July 1, 1996--September 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, T.; Sjostrom, S.; Smith, J.

    1996-11-06

    The overall objective of this two phase program is to investigate the use of dry carbon-based sorbents for mercury control. This information is important to the utility industry in anticipation of pending regulations. During Phase I, a bench-scale field test device that can be configured as an electrostatic precipitator, a pulse-jet baghouse, or a reverse-gas baghouse has been designed, built and integrated with an existing pilot-scale facility at PSCo`s Comanche Station. Up to three candidate sorbents will be injected into the flue gas stream upstream of the test device to and mercury concentration measurements will be made to determine the mercury removal efficiency for each sorbent. During the Phase II effort, component integration for the most promising dry sorbent technology shall be tested at the 5000 acfm pilot-scale.

  14. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    Babcock and Wilcox`s (B and W) SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} process effectively removes SOx, NOx and particulate (Rox) from flue gas generated from coal-fired boilers in a single unit operation, a high temperature baghouse. The SNRB technology utilizes dry sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for removal of SOx and ammonia injection upstream of a zeolitic selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst incorporated in the baghouse to reduce NOx emissions. Because the SOx and NOx removal processes require operation at elevated gas temperatures (800--900 F) for high removal efficiency, high-temperature fabric filter bags are used in the baghouse. The SNRB technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B and W tested the SNRB pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R.E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B and W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB process. The SNRB facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993. About 2,300 hours of high-temperature operation were achieved. The main emissions control performance goals of: greater than 70% SO{sub 2} removal using a calcium-based sorbent; greater than 90% NOx removal with minimal ammonia slip; and particulate emissions in compliance with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) of 0.03 lb/million Btu were exceeded simultaneously in the demonstration program when the facility was operated at optimal conditions. Testing also showed significant reductions in emissions of some hazardous air pollutants.

  15. Micronized coal-fired retrofit system for SO{sub x} reduction: Krakow Clean Fossil Fuels and Energy Efficiency Program. Technical progress report No. 1, [April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Objective of the project is to retrofit the Balice Boilerhouse with a TCS Coal Micronization System and Amerex baghouses to achieve higher combustion efficiencies and lower air emissions, including SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO and particulate matter. The Balice Boilerhouse is located adjacent to the Krakow Airport and provides heating steam for the Polish Military Unit No. 1616, which is based in the vicinity of the Krakow airport. Progress is described.

  16. Design and operating experience of the Holcomb Station dry scrubber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emerson, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    The Holcomb Station dry flue gas desulfurization system has been operational since May, 1983. The lime based system, consisting of three spray drying absorbers and two baghouses, has met all regulatory compliance requirements and contractual guarantee values. Some serious operational problems were encountered during the startup of this system. This paper discusses these problems and subsequent solutions along with testing experience to-date. The availability of this system for the first quarter of 1985 was 99.51 percent.

  17. Spray drying for high-sulfur coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhudy, R.

    1988-09-01

    Recent pilot plant tests indicate that spray drying, now used to control SO/sub 2/ emissions from low-sulfur coal, can also be effective for high-sulfur coal. Spray drying coupled with baghouse particulate removal is the most effective configuration tested to date, removing over 90% of SO/sub 2/ while easily meeting New Source Performance Standards for particulate emissions. 2 figures, 1 table.

  18. Advanced dry scrubbing on Ohio coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amrhein, G.T.; Kudlac, G.A.; Smith, P.V.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate, at pilot scale, that advanced dry-scrubbing-based technologies can attain the performance levels specified by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments for SO{sub 2} emissions while burning high-sulfur Ohio coal, and that these technologies are economically competitive with wet scrubber systems. Dry scrubbing involves injecting an atomized mist of sorbent-containing slurry droplets into hot flue gas. The reaction products exit the scrubber as a dry powder that can be filtered from the gas and recycled or disposed. The project consists of testing an advanced dry scrubber system on two high sulfur Ohio coals. All testing will be conducted in the 5 MBtu pilot facility at B and W`s Alliance Research Center. The facility consists of a test furnace, a dry scrubber using a B and W DuraJet{trademark} two fluid atomizer, a pulse-jet baghouse, and an ash slaking system. Tests were conducted with and without recycling the solids collected from the baghouse. During recycle operation the solids were slurried with water and injected into the dry scrubber with the fresh lime slurry. Test results will be presented, including SO{sub 2} removal (70--99%), calcium to sulfur ratios (1.1--1.9), dry scrubber outlet temperatures (10--30 F), and system performance. An advanced feature of the project was the use of the B and W patented Droplet Impingement Device which removes large slurry droplets from the gas stream prior to the baghouse to prevent baghouse deposition. This allows operation at low approach temperatures.

  19. Penetrameter positioner for bore-side radiography of tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, E.V.; Foster, B.E.

    1980-02-05

    A positioner is provided for placing plaque or wire penetrameters, as used in radiographic inspection, in close proximity with the inner wall of tubing at any desired location along the tubing. The positioner head carrying the penetrameter is inflatable whereby it is positioned in tte deflated condition, inflated to place the penetrameter against a weld to be inspected in the tubing wall, and then deflated during removal. If desired, the penetrameter holder may be used to center the radiographic source on the axis of the tube.

  20. Penetrameter positioner for bore-side radiography of tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Earl V. (Oak Ridge, TN); Foster, Billy E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A positioner is provided for placing plaque or wire penetrameters, as used in radiographic inspection, in close proximity with the inner wall of tubing at any desired location along the tubing. The positioner head carrying the penetrameter is inflatable whereby it is positioned in the deflated condition, inflated to place the penetrameter against a weld to be inspected in the tubing wall, and then deflated during removal. If desired, the penetrameter holder may be used to center the radiographic source on the axis of the tube.

  1. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    -- -- Net Electricity 1.4 1.6 1.2 Residual Fuel Oil 0.4 * 0.2 Natural Gas 7.1 6.8 4.4 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 1.3 1.8 1.3 Notes:1. Value of production is deflated...

  2. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Fuel 0.6 0.0 0.9 Coke and Breeze 16.6 18.3 12.3 Notes:1. Deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry...

  3. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-315-A...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Application from BP Energy to export electric energy to Canada. EA-315-A BP Energy.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-315-A BP Energy Co EA-327-A DC Energy, LLC EA-258-D...

  4. Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

    2009-01-07

    The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the

  5. Richard Lazarus Named as Executive Director of National Commission...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling Richard Lazarus Named as Executive Director of National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore ...

  6. Cedar Creek Wind Farm I (GE) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & BrownBP America Developer Babcock & BrownBP America Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location...

  7. Cedar Creek Wind Farm I (Mitsubishi) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & BrownBP America Developer Babcock & BrownBP America Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location...

  8. Fowler Ridge Wind Farm Phase I (Clipper) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner BP Alternative EnergyDominion Energy Developer BP Alternative EnergyDominion Energy Energy...

  9. Golden Hills Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner BP Alternative Energy Developer BP Alternative Energy Location Near Wasco in Sherman County...

  10. Edom Hills (repower) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner BP Alternative Energy Developer BP Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Southern California...

  11. Fowler Ridge II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner BP Alternative Energy Developer BP Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser AEPVectron Energy...

  12. Sherbino I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner BP Alternative EnergyPadoma Wind Power Developer BP Alternative EnergyPadoma Wind Power...

  13. Titan I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner BP Alternative EnergyClipper Developer BP Alternative EnergyClipper Energy Purchaser...

  14. Fowler Ridge Wind Farm Phase I (Vestas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner BP Alternative EnergyDominion Energy Developer BP Alternative EnergyDominion Energy Energy...

  15. Aligning Building Owners and Service Providers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Certificate of Proficiency in Benchmarking for approximately (80 registered35 ... Additional Funding: BP5: 163K Budget History CBEI BP3 (past) 212013 - 4302014 CBEI ...

  16. CBEI Localized Benchmarking: Users and Analytics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Real Estate Life Cycle Data, metrics, and content: * Benchmarking * DOE SEED * DOE BPD * ... Budget History CBEI BP3 (past) 212013 - 4302014 CBEI BP4 (current) 512014 - 430...

  17. London, United Kingdom: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ltd ACF Ltd BMT Renewables Ltd BP Alternative Energy BP Plc Beetle Capital Partners BCP Biodiesel Energy Trading Limited Bioethanol Limited Biomass Fuels Ltd BFL Bloomberg New...

  18. ADVANCED EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Farthing

    2001-02-06

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, or air toxics) from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses), and wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) systems. Development work initially concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. Recent work has focused almost exclusively on the control of mercury emissions.

  19. Technology could deliver 90% Hg reduction from coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maize, K.

    2009-07-15

    Reducing mercury emissions at coal-fired power plants by 90% has been considered the holy grail of mercury control. A new technology promises to get used there, but at a price. This is a mixture of chemical approaches, including activated carbon injection into the gases coming off the combustor along with injection of trona or calcium carbonate to reduce sulfur trioxide in the exhaust gases. The trick according to Babcock and Wilcox's manager Sam Kumar, to 'capture the mercury as a particulate on the carbon and then capture the particulate' in an electrostatic precipitator or a fabric filter baghouse. 2 figs.

  20. Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Ruhl; Justin Smith; Sharon Sjostrom; Sheila Haythorthwaite; Terry Hunt

    1997-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO) a cost sharing contract to evaluate carbon-based sorbents for mercury control on a 600 acfm laboratory-scale particulate control module (PCM). The PCM can be configured as simulate an electrostatic precipitator, a pulse-jet fabric filter, or a reverse-gas fabric filter and is installed on an operating coal-fired power plant. Three different dry carbon-based sorbents were tested this quarter to determine their mercury removal capability in the different configurations. The project is currently in the seventh quarter of an eight-quarter Phase I project. Testing in all configurations is nearly complete. Original plans included the use of an on-line mercury analyzer to collect test data. However, due to very low baseline mercury concentration, on-line measurement did not provide accurate data. The project used a modified MESA method grab sample technique to determine inlet and outlet mercury concentrations. A major concern during sorbent evaluations was the natural ability of the flyash at the test site to remove mercury. This often made determination of sorbent only mercury removal difficult. The PCM was configured as a reverse-gas baghouse and brought online with "clean" flue gas on March 10* at an A/C of 2.0 ft/min. The dustcake forms the filtering media in a reverse gas baghouse. In the absence of flyash, the bags were precoated with a commercially available alumina silicate material to form an inert dustcake. Some baseline tests were completed with clean gas for comparison to clean gas pulse jet tests. The PCM was reconfigured as a TOXECON unit in April 1997 with testing completed in May 1997. TOXECON, an EPIU patented technology, is a pulse-jet baghouse operating at a high A/C ratio downstream of a primary particulate colIector with sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for air toxics removal. Mercury removals of O to 97o/0 were obtained depending on test conditions.

  1. J.K. Spruce power plant, Unit 1, San Antonio, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, R.

    2008-10-15

    CPS Energy's J.K. Spruce power plant, Unit 1 was recently recognised by the EUCG Fossil Productivity Committee as the best performer in the large coal plant category over the 2002-2006 evaluation period. The competition was tough, with more than 80 plants in the running, but Unit 1 emerged as the clear winner by earning top points for high plant reliability and very low nonfuel O & M costs. It meets its environmental goals when burning PRB coal in its tangentially fired furnace with recently upgraded low NOx burners, overfire air and a new combustion control system. A baghouse and wet flue gas desulfurization system clean up combustion products. 3 photos.

  2. Krakow clean fossil fuels and energy efficiency program. Final report: Initial site investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-15

    Original objective of this project was to retrofit the Balice Boilerhouse with a TCS Coal Micronization system and Amerex baghouses to achieve higher combustion efficiencies and lower air emission, including SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO and particulate matter. The Balice Boilerhouse is located adjacent to the Krakow Airport and provides heating steam for the Polish Military Unit No. 1616. In May 1995 the Polish Military announced it had decided to convert its boiler house to gas; thus cancelling the TCS Project. The balance of 1995 was spent considering alternative Project sites in Krakow for the application of the TCS coal Micronization technology.

  3. Kinetic studies of dry sorent for medium temperature applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keener, T.C.; Wang, Z.

    1996-07-12

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the fundamental nature of sorbent reactivity and reaction kinetics in the medium temperature range from 600{degrees}F (316{degrees}C) to 1200{degrees}F (649{degrees}C) available in the convective pass of a boiler upstream of the economizer, where dry sorbents are injected to remove SO{sub 2} from the flue gas. Research focuses on the mechanisms of sorbent- flue gas interaction under economizer and hot baghouse conditions utilizing the experimental setup and the results of the first four years of research.

  4. CWS-Fired Residential Warm-Air Heating System. Quarterly report, November 1, 1988--January 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balsavich, J.; Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

    1989-03-01

    Work continued on life-cycle testing, optimization, and refining of the second-generation furnace assembly as well as the auxiliary subsystems. Emphasis of combustor testing was to determine optimum size and location of air inlets in primary combustion chambers; it was found that using a single air inlet about 70 degrees upsteam from the agglomeration site produces a combustion efficiency of 99.0% while producing no agglomeration. The test of the fouling effect on heat exchanger performance showed a steady decrease in time of the overall heat transfer coefficient. Particle size distribution of fly ash in the baghouse showed 50% of the particles smaller than 11.2 microns.

  5. Mercury control challenge for industrial boiler MACT affected facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-15

    An industrial coal-fired boiler facility conducted a test program to evaluate the effectiveness of sorbent injection on mercury removal ahead of a fabric filter with an inlet flue gas temperature of 375{sup o}F. The results of the sorbent injection testing are essentially inconclusive relative to providing the facility with enough data upon which to base the design and implementation of permanent sorbent injection system(s). The mercury removal performance of the sorbents was significantly less than expected. The data suggests that 50 percent mercury removal across a baghouse with flue gas temperatures at or above 375{sup o}F and containing moderate levels of SO{sub 3} may be very difficult to achieve with activated carbon sorbent injection alone. The challenge many coal-fired industrial facilities may face is the implementation of additional measures beyond sorbent injection to achieve high levels of mercury removal that will likely be required by the upcoming new Industrial Boiler MACT rule. To counter the negative effects of high flue gas temperature on mercury removal with sorbents, it may be necessary to retrofit additional boiler heat transfer surface or spray cooling of the flue gas upstream of the baghouse. Furthermore, to counter the negative effect of moderate or high SO{sub 3} levels in the flue gas on mercury removal, it may be necessary to also inject sorbents, such as trona or hydrated lime, to reduce the SO{sub 3} concentrations in the flue gas. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Evaluation of activated carbon for control of mercury from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S.; Laudal, D.; Dunham, G.

    1995-11-01

    The ability to remove mercury from power plant flue gas may become important because of the Clean Air Act amendments` requirement that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assess the health risks associated with these emissions. One approach for mercury removal, which may be relatively simple to retrofit, is the injection of sorbents, such as activated carbon, upstream of existing particulate control devices. Activated carbon has been reported to capture mercury when injected into flue gas upstream of a spray dryer baghouse system applied to waste incinerators or coal-fired boilers. However, the mercury capture ability of activated carbon injected upstream of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or baghouse operated at temperatures between 200{degrees} and 400{degrees}F is not well known. A study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Electric power Research Institute is being conducted at the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to evaluate whether mercury control with sorbents can be a cost-effective approach for large power plants. Initial results from the study were reported last year. This paper presents some of the recent project results. Variables of interest include coal type, sorbent type, sorbent addition rate, collection media, and temperature.

  7. Characterization of trace element emissions from a pilot-scale coal combustion unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hargis, R.A.; Pennline, H.W.

    1996-12-31

    The flue gas cleanup projects in the in-house research program at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center range from laboratory-scale work to testing with the combustion products of coal at a scale equivalent to about 0.75 MW of electric power generation. The largest unit is a 500-pound-per-hour coal combustor, complete with ductwork, spray dryer, baghouse, and ancillary equipment. Over the past year, tests to investigate the distribution and fate of trace elements have been conducted with this pilot unit. These investigations are an integral component of the Air Toxics and Fine Particulate Control subprogrammatic area of the AR and ET Power Systems Program. The overall effort of this area focuses on the improvement of existing technologies and the development of new technologies for the control of hazardous air pollutants and fine particulates associated with coal combustion. A major endeavor within the subprogram is the characterization of trace elements in flue gas from coal combustion, including a special emphasis on mercury speciation. The study described in this paper examined the results from an investigation on the pilot unit; the distribution of trace elements in the ash streams and flue gas stream, material recoveries for the system, baghouse removal efficiencies, and enrichment of ash particulate. Also, a preliminary comparison between the results from the pilot unit and a full-scale utility that burned coal from the same coal batch is provided.

  8. PILOT-AND FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR LIGNITE-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jay R. Gunderson; Michael J. Holmes; Jason D. Laumb; Jill M. Mackenzie; Michelle R. Olderbak; John H. Pavlish; Li Yan; Ye Zhuang

    2005-02-01

    The overall objective of the project was to develop advanced innovative mercury control technologies to reduce mercury emissions by 50%-90% in flue gases typically found in North Dakota lignite-fired power plants at costs from one-half to three-quarters of current estimated costs. Power plants firing North Dakota lignite produce flue gases that contain >85% elemental mercury, which is difficult to collect. The specific objectives were focused on determining the feasibility of the following technologies: Hg oxidation for increased Hg capture in dry scrubbers, incorporation of additives and technologies that enhance Hg sorbent effectiveness in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses, the use of amended silicates in lignite-derived flue gases for Hg capture, and the use of Hg adsorbents within a baghouse. The approach to developing Hg control technologies for North Dakota lignites involved examining the feasibility of the following technologies: Hg capture upstream of an ESP using sorbent enhancement, Hg oxidation and control using dry scrubbers, enhanced oxidation at a full-scale power plant using tire-derived fuel and oxidizing catalysts, and testing of Hg control technologies in the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter.

  9. Reduced energy and volume air pump for a seat cushion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughn, M.R.; Constantineau, E.J.; Groves, G.E.

    1997-08-19

    An efficient pump system is described for transferring air between sets of bladders in a cushion. The pump system utilizes a reversible piston within a cylinder in conjunction with an equalizing valve in the piston which opens when the piston reaches the end of travel in one direction. The weight of a seated user then forces air back across the piston from an inflated bladder to the previously deflated bladder until the pressure is equalized. In this fashion the work done by the pump is cut in half. The inflation and deflation of the different bladders is controlled to vary the pressure on the several pressure points of a seated user. A principal application is for wheel chair use to prevent pressure ulcers. 12 figs.

  10. Fluid pumping apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.

    2006-01-17

    A method and apparatus suitable for coupling seismic or other downhole sensors to a borehole wall in high temperature and pressure environments. In one embodiment, one or more metal bellows mounted to a sensor module are inflated to clamp the sensor module within the borehole and couple an associated seismic sensor to a borehole wall. Once the sensing operation is complete, the bellows are deflated and the sensor module is unclamped by deflation of the metal bellows. In a further embodiment, a magnetic drive pump in a pump module is used to supply fluid pressure for inflating the metal bellows using borehole fluid or fluid from a reservoir. The pump includes a magnetic drive motor configured with a rotor assembly to be exposed to borehole fluid pressure including a rotatable armature for driving an impeller and an associated coil under control of electronics isolated from borehole pressure.

  11. Method and apparatus for coupling seismic sensors to a borehole wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.

    2005-03-15

    A method and apparatus suitable for coupling seismic or other downhole sensors to a borehole wall in high temperature and pressure environments. In one embodiment, one or more metal bellows mounted to a sensor module are inflated to clamp the sensor module within the borehole and couple an associated seismic sensor to a borehole wall. Once the sensing operation is complete, the bellows are deflated and the sensor module is unclamped by deflation of the metal bellows. In a further embodiment, a magnetic drive pump in a pump module is used to supply fluid pressure for inflating the metal bellows using borehole fluid or fluid from a reservoir. The pump includes a magnetic drive motor configured with a rotor assembly to be exposed to borehole fluid pressure including a rotatable armature for driving an impeller and an associated coil under control of electronics isolated from borehole pressure.

  12. Method and apparatus for advancing tethers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W. Thor

    1998-01-01

    A tether puller for advancing a tether through a channel may include a bellows assembly having a leading end fixedly attached to the tether at a first position and a trailing end fixedly attached to the tether at a second position so that the leading and trailing ends of the bellows assembly are located a substantially fixed distance apart. The bellows assembly includes a plurality of independently inflatable elements each of which may be separately inflated to an extended position and deflated to a retracted position. Each of the independently inflatable elements expands radially and axially upon inflation. An inflation system connected to the independently inflatable elements inflates and deflates selected ones of the independently inflatable elements to cause the bellows assembly to apply a tractive force to the tether and advance it in the channel.

  13. Method and apparatus for advancing tethers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1998-06-02

    A tether puller for advancing a tether through a channel may include a bellows assembly having a leading end fixedly attached to the tether at a first position and a trailing end fixedly attached to the tether at a second position so that the leading and trailing ends of the bellows assembly are located a substantially fixed distance apart. The bellows assembly includes a plurality of independently inflatable elements each of which may be separately inflated to an extended position and deflated to a retracted position. Each of the independently inflatable elements expands radially and axially upon inflation. An inflation system connected to the independently inflatable elements inflates and deflates selected ones of the independently inflatable elements to cause the bellows assembly to apply a tractive force to the tether and advance it in the channel. 9 figs.

  14. Reduced energy and volume air pump for a seat cushion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Constantineau, Edward J.; Groves, Gordon E.

    1997-01-01

    An efficient pump system for transferring air between sets of bladders in a cushion. The pump system utilizes a reversible piston within a cylinder in conjunction with an equalizing valve in the piston which opens when the piston reaches the end of travel in one direction. The weight of a seated user then forces air back across the piston from an inflated bladder to the previously deflated bladder until the pressure is equalized. In this fashion the work done by the pump is cut in half. The inflation and deflation of the different bladders is controlled to vary the pressure on the several pressure points of a seated user. A principal application is for wheel chair use to prevent pressure ulcers.

  15. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.1 Existing Regulations B1.1: Changing rates and prices Changing rates for services or prices for products marketed by parts of DOE other than Power Marketing Administrations, and approval of rate or price changes for non-DOE entities, that are consistent with the change in the implicit price deflator for the Gross Domestic Product published by the Department of Commerce, during the period since the last rate or price change. Previous Regulations

  16. Playa basin development, southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Holliday, V.T. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    More than 20,000 playa basins have formed on fine-grained eolian sediments of the Quaternary Blackwater Draw and Tertiary Ogallala Formations on the High Plains of TX and NM. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed for the development of playa basins: (1) subsidence due to dissolution of underlying Permian bedded salt, (2) dissolution of soil carbonate and piping of clastic sediment into the subsurface, (3) animal activity, and (4) deflation. Evidence of eolian processes includes lee dunes and straightened shorelines on the eastern and southern margins of many playas. Lee dunes, which occur on the eastern side of ca 15% of playa basins and contain sediment deflated from adjacent playas, are cresentic to oval in plain view and typically account for 15--40% of the volume of the playa basin. Quaternary fossil biotas and buried calcic soils indicate that grasslands and semi-arid to aid climatic conditions prevailed as these basins formed. Evidence of fluviolacustrine processes in playa basins includes centripetal drainage leading to fan deltas at playa margins and preserved deltaic and lacustrine sediments. Playa basins expanded as fluvial processes eroded basin slopes and carried sediment to the basin floor where, during periods of minimal vegetation cover, loose sediment was removed by deflation. Other processes that played secondary roles in the development of certain playa basins include subsidence induced by dissolution of deeply buried Permian salt, dissolution of soil carbonate and piping, and animal activity. Two small lake basins in Gray County, TX, occur above strata affected by dissolution-induced subsidence. Dissolution of soil carbonate was observed in exposures and cores of strata underlying playa basins. Cattle, and in the past vast numbers of migrating buffalo, destroy soil crusts in dry playas, making these sediments more susceptible to deflation, and carry sediment out of flooded playas on their hooves.

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - 8 Donna Morgans

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Baseline Risk Assessment for 200-BP-5 Groundwater Operable Unit Presented to: Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice Annual Technical Exchange December 16, 2015 Presented by: Doug Hildebrand (DOE-RL); Donna Morgans and Alaa Aly (INTERA) 2 200-BP-5 OU * Northeastern Central Plateau * Remedial Investigation Report: - DOE/RL-2009-127; Draft A * Under Ecology Review 3 200-BP-5 Source Sites 4 200-BP-5 Major Facilities 5 200-BP-5 Water Discharges 6 200-BP-5 Major Waste Discharges 7

  18. Continuous Emissions Monitoring System Monitoring Plan for the Y-12 Steam Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-28

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), managed by BWXT, is submitting this Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) Monitoring Plan in conformance with the requirements of Title 40 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 75. The state of Tennessee identified the Y-12 Steam Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as a non-electrical generation unit (EGU) nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) budget source as a result of the NO{sub x} State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-3-27. Following this introduction, the monitoring plan contains the following sections: CEMS details, NO{sub x} emissions, and quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC). The following information is included in the attachments: fuel and flue gas diagram, system layout, data flow diagrams, Electronic Monitoring Plan printouts, vendor information on coal and natural gas feed systems, and the Certification Test Protocol. The Y-12 Steam Plant consists of four Wickes boilers. Each is rated at a maximum heat input capacity of 296.8 MMBtu/hour or 250,000 lb/hour of 250-psig steam. Although pulverized coal is the principal fuel, each of the units can fire natural gas or a combination of coal and gas. Each unit is equipped with a Joy Manufacturing Company reverse air baghouse to control particulate emissions. Flue gases travel out of the baghouse, through an induced draft fan, then to one of two stacks. Boilers 1 and 2 exhaust through Stack 1. Boilers 3 and 4 exhaust through Stack 2. A dedicated CEMS will be installed in the ductwork of each boiler, downstream of the baghouse. The CEMS will be designed, built, installed, and started up by URS Group, Inc. (URS). Data acquisition and handling will be accomplished using a data acquisition and handling system (DAHS) designed, built, and programmed by Environmental Systems Corporation (ESC). The installed CEMS will continuously monitor NO{sub x}, flue gas flowrate, and carbon

  19. MERCURY CONTROL WITH ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller

    2005-05-01

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-00NT40769 and specifically addressed Technical Topical Area 4-Testing Novel and Less Mature Control Technologies on Actual Flue Gas at the Pilot Scale. The project team included the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as the main contractor; W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., as a technical and financial partner; and the Big Stone Power Plant operated by Otter Tail Power Company, host for the field-testing portion of the research. Since 1995, DOE has supported development of a new concept in particulate control called the advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). The AHPC has been licensed to W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., and has been marketed as the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter by Gore. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter also appears to have unique advantages for mercury control over baghouses or ESPs as an excellent gas--solid contactor. The objective of the project was to demonstrate 90% total mercury control in the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter at a lower cost than current mercury control estimates. The approach included bench-scale batch tests, larger-scale pilot testing with real flue gas on a coal-fired combustion system, and field demonstration at the 2.5-MW (9000-acfm) scale at a utility power plant to prove scale-up and demonstrate longer-term mercury control

  20. U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodolog...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well ...

  1. EIS-0349: Cherry Point Co-generation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to support BP West Coast Products, LLC proposal to construct and operate a 720-megawatt, natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility on land adjacent to its BP Cherry Point Refinery.

  2. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-314-A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Register Notice Volume 76, No. 217 - Nov. 9, 2011 Application from BP Energy to export electric energy to Mexico. Federal Register Notice. PDF icon EA-314-A BP...

  3. EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BP West Coast Products, LLC proposes to construct and operate a 720-megawatt, natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility on land adjacent to its BP Cherry Point...

  4. Appendix C: Transmission, Ancillary and Control Area Service...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADMINISTRATOR'S FINAL RECORD OF DECISION Appendix C: Transmission, Ancillary and Control Area Service Rate Schedules BP-16-A-02-AP03 July 2015 BP-16-A-02-AP03 Page i...

  5. DOE - Fossil Energy:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    04 Can Boston Gas Company (Nexen) 1970 FE04-23-NG 022704 Can Essex Gas Company (BP Canada) 1958 FE04-24-NG 022704 Can Boston Gas Company (BP Canada) 1959 FE04-25-NG 022704...

  6. Revamping AK-Ashland gas cleaning system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, H.; Koerbel, R.; Haberkamp, K.; Keeton, S.

    1995-07-01

    AK Steel`s (formerly Armco) BOF shop was using a static precipitator for the primary collection. The system was designed for full combustion in the gas collecting hoods. No secondary dust collection was in place. A detailed study on alternative solutions led to a completely different system in 1990, and an order was awarded to Mannesmann Demag Corp. (MDC) in Dec. 1990. The new gas collection system is using suppressed combustion with the capability to collect Co at a later stage. The gas cleaning uses the Mannesmann Demag Baumco scrubber with a venturi throat for gas flow control. All auxiliary components, water treatment plant, electric substations and sludge handling were designed and supplied by MDC. The secondary dust collection covers the hot metal and scrap charging into the BOF`s, reladling, desulfurization and deslagging by a pulse jet baghouse. All emission limits set by the EPA and guaranteed by MDC have been met by the systems installed.

  7. Follow that mercury!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linero, A.A.

    2008-07-01

    The article discusses one technology option for avoiding release of mercury captured by power plant pollution control equipment in order to render it usable in concrete. This is the use of selective catalytic reduction for NOx control and lime spray dryer absorbers (SDA) for SO{sub 2} control prior to particulate collection by fabric filters. In this scenario all mercury removed is trapped in the fabric filter baghouse. The US EPA did not establish mercury emission limits for existing cement plants in the latest regulation 40 CFR 63, Subpart LLL (December 2006) and was sued by the Portland Cement Association because of the Hg limits established for new kilns and by several states and environmental groups for the lack of limits on existing ones. A full version of this article is available on www.acaa-usa.org/AshatWork.htm. 2 figs.

  8. The Clean Coal Technology Program 100 MWe demonstration of gas suspension absorption for flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, F.E.; Hedenhag, J.G.; Marchant, S.K.; Pukanic, G.W.; Norwood, V.M.; Burnett, T.A.

    1997-12-31

    AirPol Inc., with the cooperation of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) under a Cooperative Agreement with the United States Department of Energy, installed and tested a 10 MWe Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Demonstration system at TVA`s Shawnee Fossil Plant near Paducah, Kentucky. This low-cost retrofit project demonstrated that the GSA system can remove more than 90% of the sulfur dioxide from high-sulfur coal-fired flue gas, while achieving a relatively high utilization of reagent lime. This paper presents a detailed technical description of the Clean Coal Technology demonstration project. Test results and data analysis from the preliminary testing, factorial tests, air toxics texts, 28-day continuous demonstration run of GSA/electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and 14-day continuous demonstration run of GSA/pulse jet baghouse (PJBH) are also discussed within this paper.

  9. Health assessment for Midvale Slag Site, Midvale, Utah, Region 8. CERCLIS No. UTD081834277. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-21

    The Midvale Slag Site (MSS) is on the National Priorities List. The site is located west of Midvale (Salt Lake County), Utah. MSS is a former copper and lead smelting facility. Approximately 2 million tons of slag containing lead, arsenic, cadmium, and potential radioactive contamination are present onsite. Arsenic, cadmium, copper, chromium, lead, silver, zinc slag, and bag-house dust are present on-site. Potential environmental pathways include contaminated ground water, surface water, soils, and contaminants entrained in air. MSS represents a public health concern to on-site employees, remedial workers, and area residents who have access to the site through inhalation and ingestion of, or direct contact with, contaminated media (soil, sediment, surface water, and ground water). Complete restriction of the site is warranted. In addition, the possibility for exposure through contaminated agricultural products, garden vegetables, fish, water fowl, and livestock cannot be overlooked.

  10. Modified IRC bench-scale arc melter for waste processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, T.L.; Sears, J.W.; Grandy, J.D.; Kong, P.C.; Watkins, A.D.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes the INEL Research Center (IRC) arc melter facility and its recent modifications. The arc melter can now be used to study volatilization of toxic and high vapor pressure metals and the effects of reducing and oxidizing (redox) states in the melt. The modifications include adding an auger feeder, a gas flow control and monitoring system, an offgas sampling and exhaust system, and a baghouse filter system, as well as improving the electrode drive, slag sampling system, temperature measurement and video monitoring and recording methods, and oxidation lance. In addition to the volatilization and redox studies, the arc melter facility has been used to produce a variety of glass/ceramic waste forms for property evaluation. Waste forms can be produced on a daily basis. Some of the melts performed are described to illustrate the melter`s operating characteristics.

  11. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  12. Cotton gin trash incinerator-air heat project. Consultant report (final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The California Energy Commission has funded the final phase of a four year project resulting in development of a successful system for burning cotton gin trash as a fuel providing the heat for ginning. The incinerator - air heater system installed in Corcoran, California operates continuously throughout the ginning season. Trash feeding and burning rate is automatically controlled from the combustion temperature, hot air temperature is controlled by the drying needs, and ashes are automatically removed from the system and pneumatically conveyed to the disposal site. The system complies with state and county air pollution codes by means of baghouse collectors. Savings in fossil fuel and trash disposal costs have demonstrated the equipment system is feasible for a four year payback at large, well utilized gins.

  13. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, Deborah A.; Farthing, George A.

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  14. USDOE Innovative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project: Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark}. Final report: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Final Report provides available design, operational, and maintenance information, and marketing plans, on the Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} demonstration Project at the Dragon Products company`s cement plant at Thomaston, Maine. In addition, data on pollutant removal efficiencies and system economics are reviewed. The Recovery Scrubber was developed to simultaneously address the emission of acid gas pollutants and the disposal of alkaline solid waste at a cement plant. The process, however, has general application to other combustion processes including waste or fossil fuel fired boilers. Selected chemistry of the exhaust gas, (before and after treatment by the Recovery Scrubber), selected chemistry of the cement plant kiln baghouse dust catch (before and after treatment by the Recovery Scrubber), and Dragon cement plant economics are presented. current marketing efforts and potential markets for the Recovery Scrubber in several industries are discussed.

  15. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, Deborah A.; Farthing, George A.

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  16. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  17. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  18. Richard Lazarus Named as Executive Director of National Commission on the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling | Department of Energy Richard Lazarus Named as Executive Director of National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling Richard Lazarus Named as Executive Director of National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling June 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The co-chairs of the bipartisan National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling

  19. Solar Assembly Line at Manufacturing Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this photograph, an associate oversees the automatic sorting of solar cells after final tests at a BP manufacturing facility.

  20. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Value of Fossil Fuel Net Imports, 1949-2011 Value of Fossil Fuel Net Imports Value of Fossil Fuel Net Imports by Fuel 84 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price deflators in Table D1. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Includes small amounts of coal coke. Note: Negative net imports indicate that the value of exports is greater than the value of imports. Source: Table

  1. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fossil Fuel Production Prices Prices, 1949-2011 Fossil Fuel Composite Price,² Change From Previous Year, 1950-2011 68 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Fossil Fuel Composite Natural Gas Coal 1 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price deflators in Table D1. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Based on real prices in chained (2005) dollars. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. Source: Table 3.1. 1950

  2. Word Pro - A

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Appendix C Table C1. Population, U.S. Gross Domestic Product, and U.S. Gross Output Population U.S. Gross Domestic Product U.S. Gross Output a United States b World United States as Share of World Billion Nominal Dollars d Billion Chained (2009) Dollars e Implicit Price Deflator c (2009 = 1.00000) Billion Nominal Dollars d Million People Percent 1950 .............. 152.3 2,557.6 6.0 300.2 2,184.0 0.13745 NA 1955 .............. 165.9 2,782.1 6.0 426.2 2,739.0 .15559 NA 1960 .............. 180.7

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 2003 Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace, by Vintage ($2010) Vintage $/SF Prior to 1960 1.44 1960 to 1969 1.70 1970 to 1979 1.88 1980 to 1989 2.09 1990 to 1999 1.88 2000 to 2003 1.72 Average 1.77 Source(s): EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Table C4; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Aug. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators

  4. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and the Macroeconomy Prakash Loungani International Monetary Fund EIA 2008 Energy Conference April 8, 2008 Happy 30 th Birthday, EIA! Disclaimer & Acknowledgments: Views expressed are my own and should not be attributed to the IMF I thank Hites Ahir for excellent research assistance (and Fred Joutz for sharing his discussion of an earlier version of Brown, Balke and Yucel) Real Oil Price and World Growth, 1970-2008 Real oil prices are defined as the nominal price deflated by the U.S. CPI.

  5. Method for contamination control and barrier apparatus with filter for containing waste materials that include dangerous particulate matter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinson, P.A.

    1998-02-24

    A container for hazardous waste materials that includes air or other gas carrying dangerous particulate matter has incorporated barrier material, preferably in the form of a flexible sheet, and one or more filters for the dangerous particulate matter sealably attached to such barrier material. The filter is preferably a HEPA type filter and is preferably chemically bonded to the barrier materials. The filter or filters are preferably flexibly bonded to the barrier material marginally and peripherally of the filter or marginally and peripherally of air or other gas outlet openings in the barrier material, which may be a plastic bag. The filter may be provided with a backing panel of barrier material having an opening or openings for the passage of air or other gas into the filter or filters. Such backing panel is bonded marginally and peripherally thereof to the barrier material or to both it and the filter or filters. A coupling or couplings for deflating and inflating the container may be incorporated. Confining a hazardous waste material in such a container, rapidly deflating the container and disposing of the container, constitutes one aspect of the method of the invention. The chemical bonding procedure for producing the container constitutes another aspect of the method of the invention. 3 figs.

  6. Method for contamination control and barrier apparatus with filter for containing waste materials that include dangerous particulate matter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinson, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A container for hazardous waste materials that includes air or other gas carrying dangerous particulate matter has incorporated in barrier material, preferably in the form of a flexible sheet, one or more filters for the dangerous particulate matter sealably attached to such barrier material. The filter is preferably a HEPA type filter and is preferably chemically bonded to the barrier materials. The filter or filters are preferably flexibly bonded to the barrier material marginally and peripherally of the filter or marginally and peripherally of air or other gas outlet openings in the barrier material, which may be a plastic bag. The filter may be provided with a backing panel of barrier material having an opening or openings for the passage of air or other gas into the filter or filters. Such backing panel is bonded marginally and peripherally thereof to the barrier material or to both it and the filter or filters. A coupling or couplings for deflating and inflating the container may be incorporated. Confining a hazardous waste material in such a container, rapidly deflating the container and disposing of the container, constitutes one aspect of the method of the invention. The chemical bonding procedure for producing the container constitutes another aspect of the method of the invention.

  7. Extending the eigCG algorithm to nonsymmetric Lanczos for linear systems with multiple right-hand sides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Rehim, A M; Stathopoulos, Andreas; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-08-01

    The technique that was used to build the EigCG algorithm for sparse symmetric linear systems is extended to the nonsymmetric case using the BiCG algorithm. We show that, similarly to the symmetric case, we can build an algorithm that is capable of computing a few smallest magnitude eigenvalues and their corresponding left and right eigenvectors of a nonsymmetric matrix using only a small window of the BiCG residuals while simultaneously solving a linear system with that matrix. For a system with multiple right-hand sides, we give an algorithm that computes incrementally more eigenvalues while solving the first few systems and then uses the computed eigenvectors to deflate BiCGStab for the remaining systems. Our experiments on various test problems, including Lattice QCD, show the remarkable ability of EigBiCG to compute spectral approximations with accuracy comparable to that of the unrestarted, nonsymmetric Lanczos. Furthermore, our incremental EigBiCG followed by appropriately restarted and deflated BiCGStab provides a competitive method for systems with multiple right-hand sides.

  8. TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90-MW COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven T. Derenne

    2006-04-28

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particulate control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} system designed to clean the combined flue gases of Units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON{trademark} is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed downstream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single

  9. U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well | Department of Energy Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well June 15, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington - Based on updated information and scientific assessments, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Secretary of the Interior Ken

  10. Secretaries Chu and Salazar Lead Administration Team Offering Federal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scientific and Technological Support to BP Engineers | Department of Energy Lead Administration Team Offering Federal Scientific and Technological Support to BP Engineers Secretaries Chu and Salazar Lead Administration Team Offering Federal Scientific and Technological Support to BP Engineers May 12, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis HOUSTON, TX -- At the request of the President, Secretary Chu and Secretary Salazar traveled to Houston today to participate in meetings with DOE and national lab staff,

  11. AmeriFlux CR-Lse La Selva

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loescher, Hank

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CR-Lse La Selva. Site Description - Site was occupied by Native Americans since 3000 B.P. practicing shifting cultivation. Some selective cutting along rivers (heart of palm). Charcoal dating indicate fires 2400 B.P. and 1100 B.P. Some clearing for pasture/cocoa production, second growth, humid tropical rain forest. Site resides on land presently owned by the Organization for Tropical Studies.

  12. Secretary Salazar and Secretary Chu to Meet with Scientists and Engineers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at BP Houston Command Center | Department of Energy Salazar and Secretary Chu to Meet with Scientists and Engineers at BP Houston Command Center Secretary Salazar and Secretary Chu to Meet with Scientists and Engineers at BP Houston Command Center May 11, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Report oiled shoreline or request volunteer information: (866)-448-5816 Submit alternative response technology, services or products: (281) 366-551 Submit your vessel for the Vessel of Opportunity Program: (281)

  13. Volumetric tumor burden and its effect on brachial plexus dosimetry in head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romesser, Paul B.; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Truong, Minh Tam

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effect of gross tumor volume of the primary (GTV-P) and nodal (GTV-N) disease on planned radiation dose to the brachial plexus (BP) in head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Overall, 75 patients underwent definitive IMRT to a median total dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions. The right BP and left BP were prospectively contoured as separate organs at risk. The GTV was related to BP dose using the unpaired t-test. Receiver operating characteristics curves were constructed to determine optimized volumetric thresholds of GTV-P and GTV-N corresponding to a maximum BP dose cutoff of > 66 Gy. Multivariate analyses were performed to account for factors associated with a higher maximal BP dose. A higher maximum BP dose (> 66 vs ? 66 Gy) correlated with a greater mean GTV-P (79.5 vs 30.8 cc; p = 0.001) and ipsilateral GTV-N (60.6 vs 19.8 cc; p = 0.014). When dichotomized by the optimized nodal volume, patients with an ipsilateral GTV-N ? 4.9 vs < 4.9 cc had a significant difference in maximum BP dose (64.2 vs 59.4 Gy; p = 0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed that an ipsilateral GTV-N ? 4.9 cc was an independent predictor for the BP to receive a maximal dose of > 66 Gy when adjusted individually for BP volume, GTV-P, the use of a low anterior neck field technique, total planned radiation dose, and tumor category. Although both the primary and the nodal tumor volumes affected the BP maximal dose, the ipsilateral nodal tumor volume (GTV-N ? 4.9 cc) was an independent predictor for high maximal BP dose constraints in head and neck IMRT.

  14. LAGRANGE SOLUTIONS TO THE DISCRETE-TIME GENERAL THREE-BODY PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minesaki, Yukitaka

    2013-03-15

    There is no known integrator that yields exact orbits for the general three-body problem (G3BP). It is difficult to verify whether a numerical procedure yields the correct solutions to the G3BP because doing so requires knowledge of all 11 conserved quantities, whereas only six are known. Without tracking all of the conserved quantities, it is possible to show that the discrete general three-body problem (d-G3BP) yields the correct orbits corresponding to Lagrange solutions of the G3BP. We show that the d-G3BP yields the correct solutions to the G3BP for two special cases: the equilateral triangle and collinear configurations. For the triangular solution, we use the fact that the solution to the three-body case is a superposition of the solutions to the three two-body cases, and we show that the three bodies maintain the same relative distances at all times. To obtain the collinear solution, we assume a specific permutation of the three bodies arranged along a straight rotating line, and we show that the d-G3BP maintains the same distance ratio between two bodies as in the G3BP. Proving that the d-G3BP solutions for these cases are equivalent to those of the G3BP makes it likely that the d-G3BP and G3BP solutions are equivalent in other cases. To our knowledge, this is the first work that proves the equivalence of the discrete solutions and the Lagrange orbits.

  15. REP-12 Final Proposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings...

  16. Related Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings...

  17. Home

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  18. Final Proposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings...

  19. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. FERC Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings...

  1. REP-12 Proceeding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings...

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    as evacuation of non-essential personnel from offshore platforms by BP, Chevron, and Shell early this calendar week, proved to have little impact on the futures contracts...

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    as evacuation of non-essential personnel from offshore platforms by BP, Chevron, and Shell early this calendar week, proved to have little impact on the futures contracts...

  4. Bioenergy Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Virent, Research Triangle Institute, Babcock and Wilcox, Separation Design Group, BP, ... Biorefneries") culminates the RD&D work of all other BETO technology areas- ...

  5. 2012 3rd Qtr Package

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    does not contains BPA-Approved Agency Financial information. Concerning the Network revenue requirement: Changes in Segmented Transmission Revenue Requirements from BP-14...

  6. Maryland's 6th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Maryland's 6th congressional district Atlantic Biomass Conversions Inc BP Solar Freedom Energy Solutions LLC Solarex Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  7. Sherbino 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sherbino 2 Jump to: navigation, search Name Sherbino 2 Facility Sherbino 2 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner BP Wind Energy...

  8. EIS-0349: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cogeneration Project, Washington and Oregon This notice announces the availability of the ROD to implement the proposed action identified in the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration ...

  9. EIS-0349: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cogeneration Project, Whatcom County, Washington BP West Coast Products, LLC proposes to construct and operate a 720-megawatt, natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration ...

  10. Record of Decision (ROD) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0, 2003 EIS-0349: Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project October 31, 2003 EIS-0312: Record of Decision Fish and Wildlife...

  11. EIS-0349: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    49: Record of Decision EIS-0349: Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has...

  12. BPA-2015-01500-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Project Manager), in coordination with BP A staff in Transmission Policy & Strategy, Long Term Sales & Purchases, and Regional Coordination have performed the...

  13. No Slide Title

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Indonesia Malaysia Australia Nigeria Trinidad & Tobago Algeria Russian Federation Oman Egypt All Others 5 Source: ENI 2012, from BP Statistical Review 2011 (data for CY 2010). ...

  14. Frederick County, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Companies in Frederick County, Maryland Atlantic Biomass Conversions Inc BP Solar Emerging Energy Consultants Solarex Places in Frederick County, Maryland Ballenger Creek,...

  15. Before a Rate Case

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings and Workshops Customer...

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  17. BPA's Costs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings and Workshops Customer...

  18. MANUSCRIPT PREPARATION TEMPLATE FOR THE 35TH IEEE PHOTOVOLTAIC...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar, Oakland, CA, USA 4 BP Solar, Fredrick, MD, USA 5 Hudson Clean Energy Partners, Teaneck, NJ ABSTRACT ... appropriate array performance datasets for model validation turns out ...

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Outreach Doing Business Expand Doing Business Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18...

  20. Evidence of large magneto-dielectric effect coupled to a metamagnetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 4 + Show Author Affiliations Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragn, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain) Institut de ...

  1. VT Nuclear Services ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    VT Nuclear Services ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: VT Nuclear Services ltd Place: Warrington, United Kingdom Zip: WA4 4BP Sector: Services Product: VT Nuclear Services...

  2. BPA-2015-01838-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    request was received in this office on Friday, September 11 ,2015. You requested: "Geotechnical survey done on property by Mr. Robinson of the BP A." You subsequently clarified...

  3. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcriptionmore factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a ...

  4. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcription factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ ...

  5. Becosolar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Becosolar Jump to: navigation, search Name: Becosolar Place: Dartmouth, United Kingdom Sector: Solar Product: Becosolar was established in 1980 and has been Solarex BP Solar UK...

  6. Targetneutral | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Targetneutral Jump to: navigation, search Name: Targetneutral Place: United Kingdom Product: Non-profit intiative by BP to offset vehicle emissions. References: Targetneutral1...

  7. Secretary Salazar and Secretary Chu to Meet with Scientists and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Offering Federal Scientific and Technological Support to BP Engineers Secretaries Chu and Salazar to Convene Meeting on Strengthening Deepwater Blowout Containment Capabilities

  8. Green Ventures Search | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Search Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Ventures Search Place: Surrey, United Kingdom Zip: GU3 3BP Sector: Renewable Energy Product: UK-based executive search firm...

  9. EA-1663: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory (BNL) and compares the potential impacts to the No Action Alternative. Environmental Assessment For Bp Solar Array Project Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New ...

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Announces Expanded Partnership with...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Electric Power Research Institute and Tesla Motors will join DOE and long-standing ... Motor Company, and General Motors) and Tesla Motors Energy industry - BP America, ...

  11. U.S. DRIVE Highlights of Technical Accomplishments Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    US LLC (formerly Chrysler Group LLC), Ford Motor Company, and General Motors Company; Tesla Motors, Inc.; five energy companies, (BP America, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66 ...

  12. NREL: News - Energy Secretary Abraham Welcomes College Students...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... BP Solar, one of the world's leading solar electric companies, manufactures, designs, markets and installs a wide range of crystalline silicon and new generation thin film solar ...

  13. NREL: News - Nationally Renowned Architect Panel Announces Judging...

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    ... BP Solar, one of the world's leading solar electric companies, manufactures, designs, markets and installs a wide range of crystalline silicon and new generation thin film solar ...

  14. Using DOE Tools

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Data Accelerator - On Bill Financing - Benchmarking data analytics - Building retuning ... from Carnegie Mellon University Budget History CBEI BP3 (past) 212013 - 4302014 CBEI ...

  15. Hydrogen Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hydrogen Energy Place: Surrey, England, United Kingdom Zip: KT13 0NY Sector: Carbon, Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Surrey-based BP subsidiary...

  16. Texas's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agribiofuels LLC Air and Liquid Advisors ALA American Electric Technologies Inc American Photovoltaics American Photovoltaics LP Arctas Capital Group Aspen Pipeline BP Wind...

  17. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    unit (ACDU) capacity in April 2014 than a year earlier, which has potentially offset the loss of intra-regional gasoline movements. Trade press also indicates that BP's...

  18. EIA-782B EXCLUSIONARY LIST INSTRUCTIONS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Age Refining Air BP Alon USA Amerada Hess (Hess Corporation) American Refining Group Amoco Amoco Canada Marketing Andrews Petroleum (Plains Marketing) Apex Oil Company Arco ...

  19. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Age Refining Air BP Alon USA American Refining Group Amoco Amoco Canada Marketing Anadarko ... Atlantic Richfield Atlantic Trading & Marketing Atofina Petro Axeon Specialty Products ...

  20. Sythesis of MCMC and Belief Propagation (Technical Report) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    both direct MCMC and bare BP schemes. less Authors: Ahn, Sungsoo 1 ; Chertkov, Michael 2 ; Shin, Jinwoo 3 + Show Author Affiliations Korea Advanced Institute of Science and ...

  1. Scrutinizing Exotic Cosmological Models Using ESSENCE Supernova...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Schmidt, B.P. ; Bohr Inst. Stockholm U. Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. Chile U., Catolica UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. Notre...

  2. TMC Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * Phase in adjustment over two rate periods * Revert back to BP-14 RHWM Process regulated hydro generation forecast Request for additional data: * Revised delta comparison on...

  3. A New Scheme for Stigmatic X-ray Imaging with Large Magnification

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043-Grenoble Cedex, France 4 Inrad Optics, 181 Legrand Avenue, Northvale, New Jersey 07647, USA (Presented 7 May 2012; received ...

  4. Energy Security and Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Statistics Division, UNDP, APERC, BP and IEA. For demand forecasts, it uses IEA methodology, albeit modified for Asia-Pacific conditions. The study uses the international...

  5. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by BP SOLAR LTD. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-GO17049

  6. BPA-2014-00614-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for potential statutorily required exemptions. Also, under the FOIA, BP A is required to consult with the United States Enrichment Corporation, Tennessee Valley Authority, Energy...

  7. THE RECENT STAR FORMATION IN NGC 6822: AN ULTRAVIOLET STUDY ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CA 91125 (United States) Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, BP 8, Traverse du Siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France) Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of...

  8. STUDYING LARGE- AND SMALL-SCALE ENVIRONMENTS OF ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOUS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MD 21218 (United States) Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, BP8, Traverse du Siphon, F-13376 Marseille (France) Center for Space Astrophysics, Yonsei University, Seoul...

  9. Bonneville Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    agreement (Agreement) between the BC Hydro and Power uthority (BCH) and the Bonneville Power Administration (BP A), jointly the Parties, which BA for accounting purposes is...

  10. Auwahi Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Auwahi Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Auwahi Wind Facility Auwahi Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner BP Wind Energy...

  11. Property:EIA/861/ActivityRetailMarketing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + B BP Energy Company + true + Beaver City Corporation (Utility Company) + true + Blue Star Energy Services + true + Bluerock Energy, Inc. + true + Board of Water Electric &...

  12. Investigation of the Effects of Fuels and Aftertreatment Devices...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2002 DEER Conference Presentation: BP 2002deersmith.pdf (2.57 MB) More Documents & Publications Concentrations and Size Distributions of Particulate Matter Emissions from ...

  13. Toxecon Retrofit for Mercury and Mulit-Pollutant Control on Three 90-MW Coal-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Derenne; Robin Stewart

    2009-09-30

    This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) project was based on a cooperative agreement between We Energies and the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to design, install, evaluate, and demonstrate the EPRI-patented TOXECON{trademark} air pollution control process. Project partners included Cummins & Barnard, ADA-ES, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The primary goal of this project was to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant in Marquette, Michigan. Additional goals were to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter emissions; allow reuse and sale of fly ash; advance commercialization of the technology; demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use at power plants; and demonstrate recovery of mercury from the sorbent. Mercury was controlled by injection of activated carbon upstream of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse, which achieved more than 90% removal on average over a 44-month period. During a two-week test involving trona injection, SO{sub 2} emissions were reduced by 70%, although no coincident removal of NOx was achieved. The TOXECON{trademark} baghouse also provided enhanced particulate control, particularly during startup of the boilers. On this project, mercury CEMs were developed and tested in collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific, resulting in a reliable CEM that could be used in the power plant environment and that could measure mercury as low as 0.1 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Sorbents were injected downstream of the primary particulate collection device, allowing for continued sale and beneficial use of captured fly ash. Two methods for recovering mercury using thermal desorption on the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture were successfully tested during this program. Two methods for using the TOXECON

  14. PILOT-AND FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR LIGNITE-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jay R. Gunderson; Mike J. Holmes; Jason D. Laumb; Michelle R. Olderbak; John H. Pavlish; Li Yan; Ye Zhuang; Jill M. Zola

    2004-02-01

    North Dakota lignite-fired power plants have shown a limited ability to control mercury emissions in currently installed electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), dry scrubbers, and wet scrubbers (1). This low level of control can be attributed to the high proportions of Hg{sup 0} present in the flue gas. Speciation of Hg in flue gases analyzed as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) information collection request (ICR) for Hg data showed that Hg{sup 0} ranged from 56% to 96% and oxidized mercury ranged from 4% to 44%. The Hg emitted from power plants firing North Dakota lignites ranged from 45% to 91% of the total Hg, with the emitted Hg being greater than 85% elemental. The higher levels of oxidized mercury were only found in a fluidized-bed combustion system. Typically, the form of Hg in the pulverized and cyclone-fired units was dominated by Hg{sup 0} at greater than 85%, and the average amount of Hg{sup 0} emitted from North Dakota power plants was 6.7 lb/TBtu (1, 2). The overall objective of this Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is to develop and evaluate advanced and innovative concepts for controlling Hg emissions from North Dakota lignite-fired power plants by 50%-90% at costs of one-half to three-fourths of current estimated costs. The specific objectives are focused on determining the feasibility of the following technologies: Hg oxidation for increased Hg capture in wet and dry scrubbers, incorporation of additives and technologies that enhance Hg sorbent effectiveness in ESPs and baghouses, the use of amended silicates in lignite-derived flue gases for Hg capture, and the use of Hg adsorbents within a baghouse. The scientific approach to solving the problems associated with controlling Hg emissions from lignite-fired power plants involves conducting testing of the following processes and technologies that have shown promise on a bench, pilot, or field scale: (1) activated carbon injection (ACI) upstream of an ESP

  15. WERF MACT Feasibility Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Bonnema; D. Moser; J. Riedesel; K. Kooda; K. Liekhus; K. Rebish; S. Poling

    1998-11-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the technical feasibility of upgrading the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to meet the offgas emission limits proposed in the Maximum Achievable Control Technologies (MACT)rule. Four practicable offgas treatment processes were identified, which, if installed, would enable the WERF to meet the anticipated MACT emission limits for dioxins and furans (D/F), hydrochloric acid (HCI), and mercury (Hg). Due to the three-year time restraint for MACT compliance, any technology chosen for the upgrade must be performed within the general plant project funding limit of $5 M. The option selected consists of a partial-quench evaporative cooler with dry sorbent injection for HCI removal followed by a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed for Hg control. The planning cost estimate for implementing the option is $4.17 M (with 24% contingency). The total estimated cost includes capital costs, design and construction costs, and project management costs. Capital costs include the purchase of a new offgas evaporative cooler, a dry sorbent injection system with reagent storage, a new fabric filter baghouse, a fixed carbon bed absorber, and two offgas induced draft exhaust fans. It is estimated that 21 months will be required to complete the recommended modification to the WERF. The partial-quench cooler is designed to rapidly cool the offgas exiting the secondary combustion chamber to minimize D/F formation. Dry sorbent injection of an alkali reagent into the offgas is recommended. The alkali reacts with the HCI to form a salt, which is captured with the fly ash in the baghouse. A design HCI removal efficiency of 97.2% allows for the feeding 20 lbs/hr of chlorine to the WERF incinerator. The sorbent feed rate can be adjusted to achieve the desired HCI removal efficiency. A fixed bed of sulfur-impregnated carbon was conservatively sized for a total Hg removal capacity when

  16. Pressurized fluidized bed combustion second-generation system research and development. Technical progress for Phase 2 and Phase 3, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Horazak, D.; Newby, R.; Rehmat, A.; White, J.

    1998-10-01

    When DOE funds were exhausted in March 1995, all Phase 2 activities were placed on hold. In February 1996 a detailed cost estimate was submitted to the DOE for completing the two remaining Phase 2 Multi Annular Swirl Burner (MASB) topping combustor test burns; in August 1996 release was received from METC to proceed with these tests. The first test (Test Campaign No.3) will be conducted to: (1) test the MASB at proposed demonstration plant full to minimum loading operating conditions; (2) identify the lower oxygen limit of the MASB; and (3) demonstrate natural gas to carbonizer fuel gas switching. The Livingston Phase 3 Pilot Plant was last operated under contract DE-AC21-86MC21023 in September 1995 for seven days in an integrated carbonizer-CPFBC configuration. In May, 1996, the pilot plant was transferred to Contract DE-AC22-95PC95143 to allow testing in support of the High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) Program. The HIPPS Program required modifications to the pilot plant and the following changes were incorporated: (1) installation of a dense phase transport system for loading pulverized coal into the feed system lock hopper directly from a pneumatic transport truck; (2) removal of the char transfer pipe between the char collecting hopper and the CPFBC to allow carbonizer only operation; (3) installation of a lock hopper directly under the char collecting hopper to facilitate char removal from the process, the hopper vent gases exhaust to the carbonizer baghouse filter and the depressured char is transferred via nitrogen to the CPFBC baghouse for dumping into drums; (4) removal of the carbonizer cyclone and top of bed overflow drain line; all material elutriated from the carbonizer bed will thus be removed by the 22-element Westinghouse ceramic candle filter; (5) replacement of the carbonizer continuous bottom bed drain (screw feeder) with a batch-type drain removal system; and (6) installation of a mass spectrometer that draws sample gas via a steam jacketed

  17. Effects of the UV filter benzophenone-3 (oxybenzone) at low concentrations in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blthgen, Nancy [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Grndenstrasse 40, CH?4132 Muttenz (Switzerland) [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Grndenstrasse 40, CH?4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); University of Basel, Division of Molecular and Systems Toxicology, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Klingelbergstrasse 50, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Zucchi, Sara [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Grndenstrasse 40, CH?4132 Muttenz (Switzerland)] [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Grndenstrasse 40, CH?4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Grndenstrasse 40, CH?4132 Muttenz (Switzerland) [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Grndenstrasse 40, CH?4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ), Department of Environmental Sciences, CH?8092 Zrich (Switzerland)

    2012-09-01

    Organic UV filters including benzophenone-3 (BP-3) are widely used to protect humans and materials from damage by UV irradiation. Despite the environmental occurrence of BP-3 in the aquatic environment, little is known about its effects and modes of action. In the present study we assess molecular and physiological effects of BP-3 in adult male zebrafish (Danio rerio) and in eleuthero-embryos by a targeted gene expression approach focusing on the sex hormone system. Fish and embryos are exposed for 14 days and 120 hours post fertilization, respectively, to 2.4312 ?g/L and 8.2438 ?g/L BP-3. Chemical analysis of water and fish demonstrates that BP-3 is partly transformed to benzophenone-1 (BP-1) and both compounds are accumulated in adult fish. Biotransformation to BP-1 is absent in eleuthero-embryos. BP-3 exposure leads to similar alterations of gene expression in both adult fish and eleuthero-embryos. In the brain of adult males esr1, ar and cyp19b are down-regulated at 84 ?g/L BP-3. There is no induction of vitellogenin expression by BP-3, both at the transcriptional and protein level. An overall down-regulation of the hsd3b, hsd17b3, hsd11b2 and cyp11b2 transcripts is observed in the testes, suggesting an antiandrogenic activity. No histological changes were observed in the testes after BP-3 treatment. The study leads to the conclusion that low concentrations of BP-3 exhibit similar multiple hormonal activities at the transcription level in two different life stages of zebrafish. Forthcoming studies should show whether this translates to additional physiological effects. Highlights: ? Activity of UV filter benzophenone-3 (BP-3) is assessed in zebrafish. ? BP-3 is partly metabolized to benzophenone-1 by adult fish but not embryos. ? Alterations of gene expression are similar in adult males and embryos. ? Gene expression alterations point to multiple hormonal activity of BP-3.

  18. Climate and lake-level history of the northern Altiplano, Bolivia, as recorded in Holocene sediments of the Rio Desaguadero

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baucom, P.C.; Rigsby, C.A.

    1999-05-01

    Strata exposed in terraces and modern cutbanks along the Rio Desaguadero contain a variety of lithofacies that were deposited in four distinct facies associations. These facies associations document a history of aggradation and downcutting that is linked to Holocene climate change on the Altiplano. Braided-stream, meandering-stream, deltaic and shoreline, and lacustrine sediments preserved in multi-level terraces in the northern Rio Desaguadero valley record two high-water intervals: one between 4,500 and 3,900 yr BP and another between 2,000 and 2,200 yr BP. These wet periods were interrupted by three periods of fluvial downcutting, centered at approximately 4,000 yr BP, 3,600 yr BP, and after 2,000 yr BP. Braided-river sediments preserved in a single terrace level in the southern Rio Desaguadero valley record a history of nearly continuous fluvial sedimentation from at least 7,000 yr BP until approximately 3,200 yr BP that was followed by a single episode (post-3,210 yr BP) of down-cutting and lateral migration. The deposition and subsequent fluvial downcutting of the northern strata was controlled by changes in effective moisture that can be correlated to Holocene water-level fluctuations of Lake Titicaca. The deposition and dissection of braided-stream sediments to the south are more likely controlled by a combination of base-level change and sediment input from the Rio Mauri.

  19. General Motors sidestream separator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tessier, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    On February 15, 1980, the United States Environmental Protection Agency, acting pursuant to Paragraph 113(D) (4) of the Clean Air Act, issued to General Motors an innovative technology order covering fifteen coal-fired spreader-stoker boilers located at six General Motors plants in Ohio. The purpose and effect of this order was to permit General Motors time to develop a new, innovative technique for controlling particulate emissions from the specified boilers before compliance with the federally approved Ohio particulate control regulation was required. This new technology was christened, The Sidestream Separator, by General Motors. It provides a highly cost effective means of reducing particulate emissions below levels currently obtainable with conventionally used high efficiency mechanical collectors. These improvements could prove to be of substantial benefit to many industrial facilities with spreader-stoker coal-fired boilers that cannot be brought into compliance with applicble air pollution regulations except by application of far more expensive and unwieldly electrostatic precipitators (ESP's) or fabric filters (baghouses).

  20. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  1. AFBC - operation of small scale demonstration for greenhouse heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashworth, R.A.; Plessinger, D.A.; Webner, R.L.; Machamer, T.

    1996-12-31

    A 2.2 million Btu/hr unit prototype AFBC system was installed in 1995 at Cedar Lane Farms, a commercial nursery in Ohio. The AFBC is in operation and is heating hot water for greenhouse temperature control. A team consisting of the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation, the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center of Ohio State University and the Will-Burt Company developed this technology with funding support from the Ohio Coal Development Office and the U.S. Department of Energy. The system is fully automated with little operator attention being required. Operating experience at Cedar Lane Farms has shown that only 2 hours per day of operation attention is required for the system. The system includes flyash/sorbent reinjection and underbed coal/limestone feed. These features provide for good limestone utilization; a Ca/S (in coal) ratio of 2.5 will maintain an SO{sub 2} emissions level of 1.2 lb/10{sup 6} Btu when burning high sulfur (3.2%) Ohio coal. A baghouse is used to control particulate emissions. Based on the success of the prototype unit, a design has been recently completed for a commercial size 10 x 10{sup 6} Btu/hr capacity range. Multiple AFBC units can be used to provide larger heat outputs. Potential coal-fired AFBC users include institutions (schools, hospitals, prisons, government), light industry (agricultural, food processing), commercial users (shopping centers), and large residential users (apartment complexes). 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. MERCURY AND LEAD SAMPLING AT MINNESOTA POWER'S BOSWELL ENERGY CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis L. Laudal

    2000-08-01

    At the request of the Minnesota Power, Inc., the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) sampled for lead at the stack (or duct directly leading to the stack) for three units at the Boswell Energy Center. All sampling was done in triplicate using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 12, with sampling procedures following EPA Methods 1 through 4. During the test program, lead sampling was done using EPA Method 12 in the duct at the outlet of the baghouse serving Unit 2 and the duct at the outlet of the wet particulate scrubber serving Unit 3. For Unit 4, lead sampling was done at the stack. The specific objective for the project was to determine the concentration of lead in the flue gas being emitted into the atmosphere from the Boswell Energy Center. The test program was performed during the period of May 8 through 11, 2000. This report presents the test data, sample calculations, and results, and a discussion of the lead sampling performed at the Boswell Energy Center. The detailed test data and test results, raw test data, process data, laboratory reports, and equipment calibration records are provided in Appendices A, B, and C.

  3. Investigation of Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Obtained from Pulverized Coal Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely; Zheng Yao

    2006-08-31

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addressed the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addressed the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project has determined the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed have also been determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control have been analyzed in an effort to determine the effects of SCR on the ash.

  4. INVESTIGATION OF FLY ASH AND ACTIVATED CARBON OBTAINED FROM PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely

    2004-11-01

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addresses the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addresses the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project is determining the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed are also being determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control, are being analyzed to determine the effect of SCR on the ash. These analyses will also determine the properties of ash which are important for Hg capture.

  5. INVESTIGATION OF FLY ASH AND ACTIVATED CARBON OBTAINED FROM PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely

    2005-11-01

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addresses the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addresses the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project is determining the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed are also being determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control, are being analyzed to determine the effect of SCR on the ash.

  6. Advances in controlling particulate emissions from fossil-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, R.

    1995-12-31

    Present and possible future Federal, state, and local air pollutant emission regulations coupled with an increasingly competitive business environment and the aging of existing particulate control equipment are motivating utilities to improve particulate control system effectiveness and reduce control cost. To these ends, several cost-effective means of improving particulate control are being developed and tested. Three fossil plant retrofit technologies of note include two flue gas conditioning systems--one ``agentless`` arrangement that uses the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas as the raw material for an SO{sub 3} conditioning system, and a promising new additive that has performed well in laboratory and pilot-scale tests. A second retrofit technology supplements all or most of the existing electrostatic precipitator with a pulse-jet baghouse. A third approach described in this paper is one example of a new class of advanced filtration systems, some of which can remove NO{sub x} and particulate in the same vessel. Technologies like these will enable utilities to boost particulate removal effectiveness after switching to lower-sulfur coal for Clean Air Act compliance, minimize compliance costs, and optimally position themselves for possible further emission regulations.

  7. Vojany Station reconstruction, repowering and expansion assessment: Options, issues and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coe, W.F.; Griswold, G.H.; Peyton, J.C.

    1995-12-01

    Recent European community and state specific environmental guideline, legislative, and regulatory activities have led power producers to assess their currently installed generation technologies with regard to clean air compliance strategies. For the application to older generation facilities, the prudence of linking facility rehabilitation with the addition of environmental control systems to repowering options is warranted. Similarly, ongoing privatization efforts emphasize the necessity for sound economic decisions of site specific technological applications that consider maintaining or enhancing thermal efficiencies. Southern Electric International (SEI) has conducted such a feasibility study assessment evaluating the reconstruction, repowering and possible expansion of the Slovensky Energeticky Podnik (SEP) 1320 MWe Vojany Station in the Republic of Slovakia. Alternatives included such technologies as atmospheric fluid bed combustion, furnace and duct sorbent injection, low NOx burners, gas re-burn, selective catalytic reduction, selective non-catalytic reduction, state of the art precipitators and baghouses, wet and dry flue gas desulfurization systems and repowering technologies. In addition, new, turn of the century environmentally plausible and efficient electric power technologies were addressed.

  8. High SO{sub 2} removal duct injection: A low-cost FGD alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, S.G.

    1995-12-01

    Sorbent Technologies Corporation, of the United States, is currently developing and demonstrating a new waste free, retrofitable, high-SO{sub 2} removal duct-injection process. Up to 85 percent SO{sub 2} removal is achieved by simply injecting a new dry lime-based sorbent into the flue-gas duct, collecting the sorbent downstream in a particulate collector, and then recycling the sorbent. By avoiding large, expensive components, the process can have low capital costs, making it especially appropriate for smaller, older, less-utilized plants. The key to the new technology is the use of sorbent supports. Supported sorbents are produced by coating hydrated lime onto inexpensive mineral supports, such as exfoliated vermiculite or perlite. Consequently, there are no liquid, sludge, or solid wastes with the new technology. Once saturated with SO{sub 2}, the spent sorbent can be easily pelletized into a valuable soil-conditioning agricultural by-product, for the sustainable development that the future requires. This paper describes Sorbent Technologies` pilot demonstration of supported sorbent injection at the Ohio Edison Company`s R.E. Burger station. The Burger effort is also the first demonstration of the Electric Power Research Institute`s new {open_quotes}COHPAC{close_quotes} baghouse technology in a sorbent-injection desulfurization application.

  9. Prioritized risk reduction at a Superfund site: A non-time-critical removal action approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, T.M.

    1994-12-31

    To speed hazardous waste site cleanup, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1992 instituted the Superfund Accelerated Cleanup Model (SACM). Investigation, evaluation, waste removal and documentation efforts at a smelter waste site near Midvale, Utah, have been compressed using SACM procedures and a Non-Time-Critical Removal Action approach. Twelve miles south of Salt Lake City, Utah, Midvale Slag Operable Unit 2 once was used for processing lead and copper ore. Baghouse dust, tailings, smelter building demolition debris, slag and calcine have contaminated soil and groundwater. Rapid area growth and the demand for useful land prompted the US EPA Region 8 and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality (UDEQ) to begin and complete site remediation on a fast-track schedule. The Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) is a project approach which focuses on practical, fast-track alternatives. By using an EE/CA it has been possible to significantly cut the time usually needed for investigation and study. This paper presents a case study of the accelerated removal action approach at Midvale Slag. The EE/CA elements completed to date include site characterization, baseline risk assessment, and evaluation of removal alternatives. Assuming future industrial/commercial use, the US EPA and UDEQ were able to focus on practical alternatives to quickly move the site to acceptable cleanup levels.

  10. Thermal Treatment of Solid Wastes Using the Electric Arc Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.

    1999-09-01

    A thermal waste treatment facility has been developed at the Albany Research Center (ARC) over the past seven years to process a wide range of heterogeneous mixed wastes, on a scale of 227 to 907 kg/h (500 to 2,000 lb/h). The current system includes a continuous feed system, a 3-phase AC, 0.8 MW graphite electrode arc furnace, and a dedicated air pollution control system (APCS) which includes a close-coupled thermal oxidizer, spray cooler, baghouse, and wet scrubber. The versatility of the complete system has been demonstrated during 5 continuous melting campaigns, ranging from 11 to 25 mt (12 to 28 st) of treated wastes per campaign, which were conducted on waste materials such as (a) municipal incinerator ash, (b) simulated low-level radioactive, high combustible-bearing mixed wastes, (c) simulated low-level radioactive liquid tank wastes, (d) heavy metal contaminated soils, and (e) organic-contaminated dredging spoils. In all cases, the glass or slag products readily passed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leachability Program (TCLP) test. Additional studies are currently under way on electric utility wastes, steel and aluminum industry wastes, as well as zinc smelter residues. Thermal treatment of these solid waste streams is intended to produce a metallic product along with nonhazardous glass or slag products.

  11. Advanced emissions control development project. Phase I, Final report, November 1, 1993--February 19, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-29

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP`s), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. B&W`s Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) and the AECDP equipment combined to form a state-of-the-art facility for integrated evaluation of combustion and post-combustion emissions control options. Phase 1 activities were primarily aimed at providing a reliable, representative test facility for conducting air toxic emissions control development work later in the project. This report summarizes the AECDP Phase I activities which consisted of the design, installation, shakedown, verification, and air toxics benchmarking of the AECDP facility. All verification and air toxic tests were conducted with a high sulfur, bituminous Ohio coal.

  12. Micronized coal-fired retrofit system for SO{sub x} reduction: Krakow clean fossil fuels and energy efficiency program. Technical progress report number 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-31

    The objective of the project is to retrofit the Balice Boilerhouse with a TCS Coal Micronization System and Amerex baghouses to achieve higher combustion efficiencies and lower air emissions, including S02, NOX, CO and particulate matter. The Balice Boilerhouse is located adjacent to the Krakow Airport and provides heating steam for the Polish Military Unit No. 1616, which is based in the vicinity of the Krakow airport. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) reduction during combustion with micronized coal is possible by co-micronizing limestone with coal. Nitrogen oxide reductions utilizing a TCS system result primarily from: the reduced combustion temperature of a micronized coal flame, lower excess air than other conventional coal combustion systems, and staged combustion achieved with the proprietary TCS Low-NO{sub x} burner. Carbon monoxide reductions result because of the extremely high degree of carbon burnout achieved with micronized coal. The original project scope of work envisioned that TCS coal micronization systems would be retrofitted to four existing boilers at the Balice Boilerhouse. However, shortly after the project`s start-up in March 1994, the Polish Military announced that it desired and intended to decommission its existing four boilers (due to old age and poor general condition) and replace them with two new units. As such, the project`s scope of equipment supply and assessment expanded from use of the existing boilers, to requirements for implementing new units. This report describes the progress made to date on the various tasks.

  13. Projects of the year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, T.

    2007-01-15

    The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

  14. Characterization of emissions from a fluidized-bed wood chip home heating furnace. Final report Apr 82-May 83

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truesdale, R.S.

    1984-03-01

    The report gives results of measurements of emissions from a residential wood-chip combustor, operated in both a fluidized-bed and cyclone-fired mode, and their comparison with those from a conventional woodstove and industrial wood-fired boilers. In general, the combustion efficiency of the fluidized-bed and cyclone-fired wood-chip burner is higher than that of conventional woodstoves. Concomitant with this increase in efficiency is a decrease in most emissions. For the fluidized-bed tests, significant reductions of total hydrocarbons and CO were observed, compared to woodstove emissions. The cyclone test showed PAH levels far below those of conventional woodstoves, approaching levels measured in industrial wood-fired boilers. A baghouse, installed during two fluidized-bed tests, was extremely effective in reducing both particulate and PAH emissions. Method 5 samples from above the fluid bed suggest that appreciable PAH is formed in the upper region of the furnace or in the watertube heat exchangers. In general, the cyclone-fired mode was more effective in reducing emissions from residential wood combustion than the fluidized-bed mode.

  15. A review of the global emissions, transport and effects of heavy metals in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, J.R.; Ashton, W.B.; Rapoport, R.D.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the sources and quantities of heavy metal emissions, their transport and fate, their potential health and environmental effects, and strategies to control them. The approach is to review the literature on this topic and to consult with experts in the field. Ongoing research activities and research needs are discussed. Estimates of global anthropogenic and natural emissions indicate that anthropogenic emissions are responsible for most of the heavy metals released into the atmosphere and that industrial activities have had a significant impact on the global cycling of trace metals. The largest anthropogenic sources of trace metals are coal combustion and the nonferrous metal industry. Atmospheric deposition is an important pathway by which trace metals enter the environment. Atmospheric deposition varies according to the solubility of the element and the length of time it resides in the atmosphere. Evidence suggests that deposition is influenced by other chemicals in the atmosphere, such as ozone and sulfur dioxide. Trace metals also enter the environment through leaching. Existing emissions-control technologies such as electrostatic precipitators, baghouses, and scrubbers are designed to remove other particulates from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants and are only partially effective at removing heavy metals. Emerging technologies such as flue gas desulfurization, lignite coke, and fluidized bed combustion could further reduce emissions. 108 refs.

  16. CWS-Fired Residential Warm-Air Heating System. Quarterly report, February 1, 1989--April 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balsavich, J.; Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    During the report period, work continued on the life-cycle testing, optimization and refining of the second-generation furnace assembly, which comprises all the major furnace components: The combustor, heat exchanger, and baghouse, as well as the auxiliary subsystems. The furnace has operated for about 90 hours, and has burned 1,000 pounds of CWS. During testing, the only maintenance that was performed on the system was to clean the bag filters to obtain ash samples for analysts. Concurrent with testing the second-generation furnace, fabrication and assembly of the third-generation furnace was completed, and a life-cycle testing and optimization process for this furnace has started. In contrast to the second-generation furnace, which was designed more as an experimental unit, the third-generation furnace is a stand-alone heating unit Incorporating the standard air handling system, blower, pump, and control box as part of the furnace. During the report period, the third-generation furnace operated for a total of 35 hours, and burned more than 300 pounds of CWS, with average tests lasting 6 hours. During the next quarter, life-cycle testing of the third-generation furnace will continue to identify areas needing further development.

  17. CWS-Fired Residential Warm-Air Heating System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balsavich, J.; Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    During the report period, work continued on the life-cycle testing, optimization and refining of the second-generation furnace assembly, which comprises all the major furnace components: The combustor, heat exchanger, and baghouse, as well as the auxiliary subsystems. The furnace has operated for about 90 hours, and has burned 1,000 pounds of CWS. During testing, the only maintenance that was performed on the system was to clean the bag filters to obtain ash samples for analysts. Concurrent with testing the second-generation furnace, fabrication and assembly of the third-generation furnace was completed, and a life-cycle testing and optimization process for this furnace has started. In contrast to the second-generation furnace, which was designed more as an experimental unit, the third-generation furnace is a stand-alone heating unit Incorporating the standard air handling system, blower, pump, and control box as part of the furnace. During the report period, the third-generation furnace operated for a total of 35 hours, and burned more than 300 pounds of CWS, with average tests lasting 6 hours. During the next quarter, life-cycle testing of the third-generation furnace will continue to identify areas needing further development.

  18. An experimental study of ammonia effects in a circulating dry scrubber process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neathery, J.K.; Schaefer, J.L.; Stencel, J.M.

    1995-06-01

    Utilities and independent power plants have increased needs to install both de-NO{sub x} and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Many de-NO{sub x} processes are based on the reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) by ammonia (NH{sub 3}) to elemental nitrogen (N{sub 2}). When applied upstream of a dry FGD system the issue of NH{sub 3} slippage, which may influence the scrubbing chemistry and/or the proficiency of the particulate collector`s performance, has become a concern. This paper addresses some of those concerns as they relate to the circulating dry scrubber (CDS) process. Fundamental aspects of sulfur capture and sorbent utilization under various Ca/S ratios and inlet NH{sub 3} concentrations were investigated with a 5.6 m{sup 3} min{sup -1} (200 ft{sup 3} min{sup -1}) pilot-scale CDS reactor. The objective of this research was to elucidate possible benefits (e.g., increased sulfur capture) and adverse side-effects (e.g., increased baghouse pressure drop) resulting from trace amounts of NH{sub 3} in the flue gas.

  19. Fabrication method for miniature plastic gripper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, W.J.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Folta, J.A.

    1998-07-21

    A miniature plastic gripper is described actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or dosed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis. 8 figs.

  20. Fabrication method for miniature plastic gripper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, Milton A.; Folta, James A.

    1998-01-01

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or dosed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis.

  1. Miniature plastic gripper and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, W.J.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Folta, J.A.

    1997-03-11

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same are disclosed. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or closed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis. 8 figs.

  2. Miniature plastic gripper and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, Milton A.; Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or closed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis.

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Residential Sector Energy Consumption March 2012 1.2.9 Implicit Price Deflators (2005 = 1.00) Year Year Year 1980 0.48 1990 0.72 2000 0.89 1981 0.52 1991 0.75 2001 0.91 1982 0.55 1992 0.77 2002 0.92 1983 0.58 1993 0.78 2003 0.94 1984 0.60 1994 0.80 2004 0.97 1985 0.62 1995 0.82 2005 1.00 1986 0.63 1996 0.83 2006 1.03 1987 0.65 1997 0.85 2007 1.06 1988 0.67 1998 0.86 2008 1.09 1989 0.70 1999 0.87 2009 1.10 2010 1.11 Source(s): EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, August 2011, Appendix D, p. 353.

  4. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  5. Extending the QUDA Library with the eigCG Solver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strelchenko, Alexei; Stathopoulos, Andreas

    2014-12-12

    While the incremental eigCG algorithm [ 1 ] is included in many LQCD software packages, its realization on GPU micro-architectures was still missing. In this session we report our experi- ence of the eigCG implementation in the QUDA library. In particular, we will focus on how to employ the mixed precision technique to accelerate solutions of large sparse linear systems with multiple right-hand sides on GPUs. Although application of mixed precision techniques is a well-known optimization approach for linear solvers, its utilization for the eigenvector com- puting within eigCG requires special consideration. We will discuss implementation aspects of the mixed precision deflation and illustrate its numerical behavior on the example of the Wilson twisted mass fermion matrix inversions

  6. Inflatable wing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Priddy, Tommy G.

    1988-01-01

    An inflatable wing is formed from a pair of tapered, conical inflatable tubes in bonded tangential contact with each other. The tubes are further connected together by means of top and bottom reinforcement boards having corresponding longitudinal edges lying in the same central diametral plane passing through the associated tube. The reinforcement boards are made of a stiff reinforcement material, such as Kevlar, collapsible in a direction parallel to the spanwise wing axis upon deflation of the tubes. The stiff reinforcement material cooperates with the inflated tubes to impart structural I-beam characteristics to the composite structure for transferring inflation pressure-induced tensile stress from the tubes to the reinforcement boards. A plurality of rigid hoops shaped to provide airfoil definition are spaced from each other along the spanwise axis and are connected to the top and bottom reinforcement boards. Tension lines are employed for stabilizing the hoops along the trailing and leading edges thereof.

  7. Method Of Making Solar Collectors By In-Situ Encapsulation Of Solar Cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrie, Peter J.; Chen, Kingsley D. D.

    2000-10-24

    A method of making solar collectors by encapsulating photovoltaic cells within a base of an elongated solar collector wherein heat and pressure are applied to the cells in-situ, after an encapsulating material has been applied. A tool is fashioned having a bladder expandable under gas pressure, filling a region of the collector where the cells are mounted. At the same time, negative pressure is applied outside of the bladder, enhancing its expansion. The bladder presses against a platen which contacts the encapsulated cells, causing outgassing of the encapsulant, while heat cures the encapsulant. After curing, the bladder is deflated and the tool may be removed from the collector and base and reflective panels put into place, if not already there, thereby allowing the solar collector to be ready for use.

  8. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Protective barriers have been identified as integral components of plans to isolate defense waste on the Hanford Site. The use of natural materials to construct protective barriers over waste site is being considered. Design requirements for protective barriers include preventing exposure of buried waste, and restricting penetration or percolation of surface waters through the waste zone. Studies were initiated to evaluate the effects of wind erosion on candidate protective barrier surfaces. A wind tunnel was used to provide controlled erosive stresses and to investigate the erosive effects of wind forces on proposed surface layers for protective barriers. Mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared and tested for resistance to wind erosion at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Aerosol Wind Tunnel Research Facility. These tests were performed to investigate surface deflation caused by suspension of soil from various surface layer configurations and to provide a comparison of the relative resistance of the different surfaces to wind erosion. Planning, testing, and analyzing phases of this wind erosion project were coordinated with other tasks supporting the development of protective barriers. These tasks include climate-change predictions, field studies and modeling efforts. This report provides results of measurements of deflation caused by wind forces over level surfaces. Section 2.0 reviews surface layer characteristics and previous relevant studies on wind erosion, describes effects of erosion, and discusses wind tunnel modeling. Materials and methods of the wind tunnel tests are discussed in Section 3.0. Results and discussion are presented in Section 4.0, and conclusions and recommendations Section 5.0. 53 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Role of retinoic acid in the modulation of benzo(a)pyrene-DNA adducts in human hepatoma cells: Implications for cancer prevention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Guodong; Richardson, Molly; Fazili, Inayat S.; Wang, Jianbo; Donnelly, Kirby C.; Wang Fen; Amendt, Brad; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2010-12-15

    Carcinogen-DNA adducts could lead to mutations in critical genes, eventually resulting in cancer. Many studies have shown that retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in inducing cell apoptosis. Here we have tested the hypothesis that levels of carcinogen-DNA adducts can be diminished by DNA repair and/or by eliminating damaged cells through apoptosis. Our results showed that the levels of total DNA adducts in HepG2 cells treated with benzo(a)pyrene (BP, 2 {mu}M) + RA (1 {mu}M) were significantly reduced compared to those treated with BP only (P = 0.038). In order to understand the mechanism of attenuation of DNA adducts, further experiments were performed. Cells were treated with BP (4 {mu}M) for 24 h to initiate DNA adduct formation, following which the medium containing BP was removed, and fresh medium containing 1 {mu}M RA was added. The cells were harvested 24 h after RA treatment. Interestingly, the levels of total DNA adducts were lower in the BP/RA group (390 {+-} 34) than those in the BP/DMSO group (544 {+-} 33), P = 0.032. Analysis of cell apoptosis showed an increase in BP + RA group, compared to BP or RA only groups. Our results also indicated that attenuation of BP-DNA adducts by RA was not primarily due to its effects on CYP1A1 expression. In conclusion, our results suggest a mechanistic link between cellular apoptosis and DNA adduct formation, phenomena that play important roles in BP-mediated carcinogenesis. Furthermore, these results help understand the mechanisms of carcinogenesis, especially in relation to the chemopreventive properties of nutritional apoptosis inducers.

  10. Proxy late Holocene climatic record deduced from northwest Alaska beach ridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, O.K.; Jordan, J.W.

    1992-03-01

    A climatically sensitive, oscillatory pattern of progradation and erosion is revealed in late Holocene accretionary sand ridge and barrier island complexes of Seward Peninsula, northwest Alaska. Archaeological and geological radiocarbon dates constrain the chronology for the Cape Espenberg beach ridge plain and the Shishmaref barrier islands, 50 km to the southwest. Cape Espenberg, the depositional sink for the northeastward longshore transport system, contains the oldest sedimentary deposits: 3700 +/- 90 B.P. (B-23170) old grass from a paleosol in a low dune. The oldest date on the Shishmaref barrier islands is 1550 +/- 70 B.P. (B-23183) and implies that the modern barrier is a comparatively recent phenomenon. Late Holocene sedimentation along the Seward Peninsula varied between intervals of rapid progradation and erosion. Rapid progradation predominated from 4000-3300 B.P. and from 2000-1200 B.P., with the generation of low beach ridges without dunes, separated by wide swales. During erosional periods higher dunes built atop beach ridges: as between 3300-2000 B.P. and intermittently from 1000 B.P. to the present. Dune formation correlates with the Neoglacial and Little Ice Age glacial advances and increased alluviation in northern and central Alaska, while rapid progradation is contemporaneous with warmer intervals of soil and/or, peat formation atop alluvial terraces, dated to 4000-3500 and 2000-1000 B.P.

  11. Non-dioxin-like PCBs interact with benzo[a]pyrene-induced p53-responses and inhibit apoptosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Anati, Lauy Hoegberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2010-12-01

    Non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (NDL-PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous pollutants often co-existing in contaminated environments. However, there are few studies on the effects of co-exposure, in particular on effects of pure NDL-PCB congeners and PAHs. We have evaluated the effects of some highly purified NDL-PCBs and benzo[a]pyrene (BP) on BP-induced Raf, Erk, Mdm2, p53 signaling and on BP-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. PCBs (1 {mu}M) were added to HepG2 cells 1 h prior to BP and the incubation was stopped at 24 h. Employing Western blotting we found that NDL-PCBs (28, 101 and 153) amplified the BP-induced inactivating phosphorylation of Raf (pRaf Ser 259) and decreased levels of pErk Tyr 204. This treatment also resulted in the attenuation of BP-induced Mdm2 phosphorylation at Ser166 and amplification of the p53 Ser15 response. These effects were associated with an unexpected inhibition of BP-induced apoptosis. A dioxin-like PCB (DL-PCB 126) was used as reference and gave results that were predictable from previous studies, i.e. it attenuated BP-induced p53 response and apoptosis. In an effort to explain why the NDL-PCB-induced amplification of the p53 response was associated with a decreased apoptotic response we analyzed FoxO3a, which may translocate p53 to the cytoplasm. We found that NDL-PCBs reduced the level of phosphorylated FoxO3a at Thr32. This phosphorylation promotes a cytoplasmic translocation of FoxO3a and p53 and our data suggest that NDL-PCBs may inhibit BP-induced apoptosis by preventing a FoxO3a-dependent translocation of p53 to the cytoplasm.

  12. CX-003863: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003863: Categorical Exclusion Determination Design and Demonstration of an Advanced Agricultural Feedstock Supply System for Lignocellulosic Bioenergy Production CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/01/2010 Location(s): Hugoton, Kansas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office This project is divided into two budget periods (BP) separated by a Go/No-Go decision. In the first BP (BP1), funds will be used to design and build

  13. BPA-2015-01342-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for records under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). Thank you for your interest in the Bonneville Power Administration (BP A). Your request was received in this...

  14. BPA-2014-01869-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    records of BP A Fish & Wildlife Department. We have located one page of material in an Excel spreadsheet format responsive to your request. We are releasing these records in...

  15. Structure of the SPRY domain of human Ash2L and its interactions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure of the SPRY domain of human Ash2L and its interactions with RbBP5 and DPY30 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of the SPRY domain of human Ash2L and its ...

  16. Director Biography | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Murray was appointed to the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling in 2010. She served on the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the ...

  17. BPA-2015-01481-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    481 -F Mr. Ms. Friedman Send via email to: taxliensearch@gmail.com Dear Mr. Ms. Friedman: This is a final response to your request for Bonneville Power Administration (BP A)...

  18. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    outage and was forced to reduce production. The BP Whiting refinery has a crude oil distillation unit (CDU) capacity of 413,500 barrels per calendar day (bd), and it is an...

  19. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    demand resulting from the restart of a 250,000 barrels per day (bbld) crude distillation unit at BP's Whiting, Indiana, refinery. Total U.S. refinery utilization increased...

  20. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and further supported by the startup of a 250,000-barrel-per-day (bbld) crude distillation unit at BP's Whiting, Indiana, refinery, combined with maintenance at Canadian...

  1. 36556,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED"...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    INC",9,134,"MOTOR GAS BLENDING COMPONENTS",1004,"PERTH AMBOY, NJ","NEW JERSEY",1,830,"SPAIN",245,0,0,"UNKNOWN PROCESSOR-NJ","UNKNOWN PROCESSOR-NJ","NJ","NEW JERSEY",1 36556,"BP...

  2. Search for: thorium | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for heavy water moderated reactors Bromley, B.P. ; Hyland, ... The behavior in both thermal and fast neutron energymore ... Soil samples are fused with sodium hydroxide at 600 C in ...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Belomestnykh, S. (10) Chang, X. (10) Roe, B.P. (10) Smedley, J. (10) Kewisch, J. (9) Litvinenko, V. (9) Smith, K. (8) Than, R. (8) Wang, E. G. (8) Save Results Save this search to ...

  4. Secretaries Chu and Salazar Lead Administration Team Offering...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Secretary Salazar said. "This is a vital national priority and we cannot and will not rest until BP has capped the well and controlled the spill." "Department of Energy ...

  5. Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    documentation) (Final Proposal) (Final Models, Datasets) The BP-16 Rate Case, which set power and transmission rates for the FY 2016-2017 rate period, was completed on July...

  6. Microsoft Word - Validation of two ribosomal RNA removal methods...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... bp), S. griseus subspecies griseus NITE Biological Resource Center (NBRC) 13350 (8,545,929 ... methods listed in run 4 a Lane 1 Control (i) b Control (i) Control (i) Lane 2 ...

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - wallace_aps_07

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21(10):1259-1264, October 1981. 3 TP8.00138, TO4.00006, BP8.00068 4 M. Porkolab. Physics of Fluids, 20, 2058, (1977). 5 A. Ekedahl, et al., Nuc. Fus. 45, (2005). 6 F....

  8. Stepout-Deepening Wells At Coso Geothermal Area (1986) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fluids with a temperature greater than 640 F. References Austin, C.F.; Bishop, B.P.; Moore, J. (1 May 1987) Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County,...

  9. Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to be completed with power on line by mid-1987. Authors Austin, C.F.; Bishop, B.P.; Moore and J. Published Journal AAPG Bulletin (American Association of Petroleum Geologists);...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    in Sunray, Texas, as a result of a compressor unit outage. Flows at the BP-Sunray and Moore receipt points will be limited to a maximum of 45,000 Dth per day, with allocations...

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    in Sunray, Texas, as a result of a compressor unit outage. Flows at the BP-Sunray and Moore receipt points will be limited to a maximum of 45,000 Dth per day, with allocations...

  12. Flange Connector Spool Assembly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This PowerPoint report entitled "DOE Tri-Lab Assessment of BP Flange Connector Spool & 3 Ram Capping Stack" provides an overview of the design of this device and recommended improvements as...

  13. Energy Saving Trust EST | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trust EST Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energy Saving Trust (EST) Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: SW1H 9BP Sector: Carbon Product: The Energy Saving Trust's goal is to...

  14. Category:Datasets | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8 pages are in this category, out of 8 total. B BP Statistical Review of World Energy C Coal Power Plant Database E ENERGY STAR Labeled Buildings and Plants N NSRDB 1961-1990 NSRDB...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    June 16, BP initiated operations for its second containment option, the Q4000. This strategy could expand total leak containment capacity to 20,000 to 28,000 barrels per day. The...

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    June 16, BP initiated operations for its second containment option, the Q4000. This strategy could expand total leak containment capacity to 20,000 to 28,000 barrels per day. The...

  17. Photovoltaic Enterway

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This photograph features the solar modules, designed for grid-connected applications, from BP Solar that grace the entrance of this 2007 Solar Decathlon competition home. With a rated power of 190...

  18. Microsoft Word - chapterCu_4.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Copper Alloys: Pure Copper (code 4001) Prepared by: C. San Marchi, Sandia National Laboratories Editors C. San Marchi B.P. Somerday Sandia National Laboratories This report may be ...

  19. D1 Fuel Crops Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    D1 Fuel Crops Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: D1 Fuel Crops Ltd Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: SE1 2RE Product: London-based JV between BP and D1 oils focusing on the...

  20. Form Approv

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    District. Townships, Ranges, and Sections cros sed by the proposed project are shown below. Range 6W Township ISS Description of the Proposed Action: BP A has a need to...

  1. Three Companies Awarded Contracts for Royalty-in-Kind Exchanges...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded contracts to Shell Trading Company, Sunoco Logistics, and BP North America for exchange of 12.3 million barrels of royalty oil produced...

  2. u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1.2 Test and Analysis Results (analysis and modeling) Task 1.3 Final Result (cost analysis. risk analysis, supply chain analysis) Budget Period 2 ( BP2)- Task 2.1 Component System ...

  3. Table of Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D. H. Youngblood Determination of the S18 Astrophysical Factor for 8B(p,)9C from the Breakup of 9C at Intermediate Energies L. Trache, F. Carstoiu, A. M. Mukhamedzhanov, and R....

  4. BPA-2014-01913-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electronic documents that discuss whether Ex 6 used his travel or purchase cards for personal expenses, and whether be has been asked to reimburse BP A or the government for...

  5. Office of Fossil Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pass, TX - - - - - - - - - - - - - Gulf LNG, MS - - - - - - - - - - - - - Lake Charles, ... June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL BG LNG 3.1 - 0.4 - - 1.9 - - - 1.8 - - 7.2 BP ...

  6. National Geographic Hosts the Energy Department's STEM Mentoring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... nationwide. Twenty scientists and STEM professionals - from the Energy Department, NASA, BP, and National Geographic, to name a few - engaged in show-and-tell chats with 5th- ...

  7. EA-379 FreePoint Commodities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Mexico. EA-379 Freepoint MXRevised.docx (155.84 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-380 Freeport Commodities EA-314-A BP Energy Co EA-176 Sempra Energy Trading Corporation

  8. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * BPA will engage the region in evaluating the business case for moving to expense and strategies for making a capital to expense transition, if warranted, prior to the BP18...

  9. G I E Al Wahdoui | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I E Al Wahdoui Jump to: navigation, search Name: G.I.E. Al Wahdoui Place: Morocco Zip: BP 131 Sector: Solar Product: GIE Al Wahdoui is developing a solar project in Plage, Morocco....

  10. Secretary Chu in Houston Today | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and continue his efforts as part of the Administration-wide ongoing oil spill response. ... Visit the Department of Energy Actions on BP Oil Spill web page for more information on ...

  11. Department of Energy Activities in Response to the Deepwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activities in Response to the Deepwater BP Oil Spill At the request of the President, ... and scientists involved in finding solutions to cap the flow of oil and contain the spill. ...

  12. BPA-2015-01342-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which public utilities across North America were surveyed about their discount theory and practice. ' (Referenced on page 4 of this BP A document: https:www.bpa.govFinance...

  13. Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Genealogy of major U.S. refiners 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Amoco SOHIO BP ARCO Mapco Williams Clark Refining 1/89 12/98 4/00 3/98 Orion Diamond Shamrock Ultramar k 12/96 7/03 Ultramar Diamond Shamrock (UDS) Total North America UDS 9/97 Valero Salomon (Basis) Valero Williams BP BP b BP-Husky Refining LLC (jv) Husky Huntway 5/97 6/01 9/05 Valero Premcor g Valero Valero Valero 12/01 7/94 e 12/98 f Carlyle Group y Coastal 3/03 d 12/88 a 6/01 o Sun Company

  14. Category:Datasets | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    out of 8 total. B BP Statistical Review of World Energy C Coal Power Plant Database E ENERGY STAR Labeled Buildings and Plants N NSRDB 1961-1990 NSRDB 1991-2005 R Renewable...

  15. B O N N E V I L L E ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    consistent with sound business principles." BP-14-A-01 12 16 U.S.C. 838g. Similar language is also contained in section 5 of the Flood Control Act. 16 U.S.C. 825s. As...

  16. Strain tunable electronic and magnetic properties of pristine and semihydrogenated hexagonal boron phosphide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Jin; Guo, Wanlin

    2015-01-26

    Tunable electromagnetic properties of pristine two-dimensional boron phosphide (h-BP) nanosheet and its semihydrogenated structure were studied by density functional theory computations. In sharp contrast to previously reported tensile strain-induced red shift in two-dimensional semiconductors, the direct gap of h-BP undergoes blue shift under biaxial tensile strain. Once semihydrogenated, the h-BP not only transform from the nonmagnetic semiconductor into metal which is spin-resolved but also exhibits linear response between the magnetic moment and biaxial strain with a slope up to 0.005 μB/1%. These findings provide a simple and effective route to tune the electronic and magnetic properties of h-BP nanostructures in a wide range and should inspire experimental enthusiasm.

  17. Office of Fossil Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - 0.0 Golden Pass, TX - - - - - - 0.0 Gulf LNG, MS - - - - - - 0.0 Lake Charles, LA - - - ... June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL BG LNG - - 2.9 - - - 2.9 BP Energy - - - - - - 0.0 ...

  18. Microsoft Word - cover_Al2000series.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marchi, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore CA Editors C. San Marchi B.P. Somerday ... C. San Marchi (MS-9402) 7011 East Ave Livermore CA 94550. This document was prepared ...

  19. Microsoft Word - cover_Al2000series.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Somerday, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore CA Editors C. San Marchi B.P. Somerday ... C. San Marchi (MS-9402) 7011 East Ave Livermore CA 94550. This document was prepared ...

  20. Large-scale stabilized dunes on the High Plains of Colorado: Understanding the landscape response to Holocene climates with the aid of images from space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forman, S.L. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States)); Goetz, A.F.H.; Yuhas, R.H. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Principal-component analysis of Landsat Thematic Mapper images from eastern Colorado reveals stabilized dune fields that are composed of single and compound parabolic dunes, some longer than 10 km. These dunes have been reactivated at least four times in the past 10,000 yr, at ca. 9500 to 5500 yr B.P., 5500 to {gt}4800 yr B.P., 4800 to {gt}1000 yr B.P., and {lt}1000 yr B.P., during droughts that probably exceeded the dry conditions during the 1930s. Dune orientations indicate that these landforms were molded by winds from the northwest, which now dominate during the winter and spring with the passage of Pacific air masses. This study underscores the sensitivity of the landscape of the High Plains to drought conditions, which may become more prevalent because of the anticipated effects of greenhouse warming.

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Belomestnykh, S. (10) Chang, X. (10) Roe, B.P. (10) Smedley, J. (10) Kewisch, J. (9) Litvinenko, V. (9) Smith, K. (8) Than, R. (8) Wang, E. G. (8) Save Results Save this search to ...

  2. Proteomic analysis of hippocampal proteins of F344 rats exposed to 1-bromopropane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenlie; Ichihara, Sahoko; Oikawa, Shinji; Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Takahashi, Masahide; Subramanian, Kaviarasan; Mohideen, Sahabudeen Sheik; Wang, Yun; Ichihara, Gaku

    2011-11-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is a compound used as an alternative to ozone-depleting solvents and is neurotoxic both in experimental animals and human. However, the molecular mechanisms of the neurotoxic effects of 1-BP are not well known. To identify the molecular mechanisms of 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity, we analyzed quantitatively changes in protein expression in the hippocampus of rats exposed to 1-BP. Male F344 rats were exposed to 1-BP at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8 h/day for 1 or 4 weeks by inhalation. Two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) combined with matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) were conducted to detect and identify protein modification. Changes in selected proteins were further confirmed by western blot. 2D-DIGE identified 26 proteins with consistently altered model (increase or decrease after both 1- and 4-week 1-BP exposures) and significant changes in their levels (p < 0.05; fold change {>=} {+-} 1.2) at least at one exposure level or more compared with the corresponding controls. Of these proteins, 19 were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS. Linear regression analysis of 1-BP exposure level identified 8 differentially expressed proteins altered in a dose-dependent manner both in 1- and 4-week exposure experiments. The identified proteins could be categorized into diverse functional classes such as nucleocytoplasmic transport, immunity and defense, energy metabolism, ubiquitination-proteasome pathway, neurotransmitter and purine metabolism. Overall, the results suggest that 1-BP-induced hippocampal damage involves oxidative stress, loss of ATP production, neurotransmitter dysfunction and inhibition of ubiquitination-proteasome system. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1-BP modified hippocampal proteome in rat and 19 altered proteins were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Ran, TPI, HSP60, PSMA1, ECH1, TPI, B-CK and DJ-1 was changed by 1-BP. Black

  3. Development and Testing of Industrial Scale Coal Fired Combustion System, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bert Zauderer

    1998-09-30

    contained in Appendix 'C'. It was implemented between 1994 and 1998 after the entire 20 MMBtu/hr combustor-boiler facility was relocated to Philadelphia, PA in 1994. A new test facility was designed and installed. A substantially longer combustor was fabricated. Although not in the project plan or cost plan, an entire steam turbine-electric power generating plant was designed and the appropriate new and used equipment for continuous operation was specified. Insufficient funds and the lack of a customer for any electric power that the test facility could have generated prevented the installation of the power generating equipment needed for continuous operation. All other task 5 project measures were met and exceeded. 107 days of testing in task 5, which exceeded the 63 days (about 500 hours) in the test plan, were implemented. Compared to the first generation 20 MMBtu/hr combustor in Williamsport, the 2nd generation combustor has a much higher combustion efficiency, the retention of slag inside the combustor doubled to about 75% of the coal ash, and the ash carryover into the boiler, a major problem in the Williamsport combustor was essentially eliminated. In addition, the project goals for coal-fired emissions were exceeded in task 5. SO{sub 2} was reduced by 80% to 0.2 lb/MMBtu in a combination of reagent injection in the combustion and post-combustion zones. NO{sub x} was reduced by 93% to 0.07 lb/MMBtu in a combination of staged combustion in the combustor and post-combustion reagent injection. A baghouse was installed that was rated to 0.03 lb/MMBtu stack particle emissions. The initial particle emission test by EPA Method 5 indicated substantially higher emissions far beyond that indicated by the clear emission plume. These emissions were attributed to steel particles released by wall corrosion in the baghouse, correction of which had no effect of emissions.

  4. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michelle R. Olderbak; Rich Gebert

    2001-12-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in an entirely novel manner. The AHPC concept combines fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. Phase I of the development effort consisted of design, construction, and testing of a 5.7-m{sup 3}/min (200-acfm) working AHPC model. Results from both 8-hr parametric tests and 100-hr proof-of-concept tests with two different coals demonstrated excellent operability and greater than 99.99% fine-particle collection efficiency. Since all of the developmental goals of Phase I were met, the approach was scaled up in Phase II to a size of 255 m{sup 3}/min (9000 acfm) (equivalent in size to 2.5 MW) and was installed on a slipstream at the Big Stone Power Plant. For Phase II, the AHPC at Big Stone Power Plant was operated continuously from late July 1999 until mid-December 1999. The Phase II results were highly successful in that ultrahigh particle collection efficiency was achieved, pressure drop was well controlled, and system operability was excellent. For Phase III, the AHPC was modified into a more compact configuration, and components were installed that were closer to what would be used in a full-scale commercial design. The modified AHPC was operated from April to July 2000. While operational results were acceptable during this time, inspection of bags in the summer of 2000 revealed some membrane damage to the fabric that appeared to be

  5. Addendum to Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project: Additiona NH3, NOx, and CO Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, Daniel P; Locke, James E

    2008-03-01

    On March 28-30 and May 1-4, 2007, CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-MW Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The testing in March and May demonstrated that the multi-pollutant control system attained its performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, acid gas (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF) removal efficiency, and mercury removal efficiency. However, the ammonia slip measured between the SCR outlet and air heater inlet was consistently greater than the guarantee of 2 ppmvd {at} 3% O{sub 2}. As a result, additional testing was performed on May 30-June 1 and on June 20-21, 2007, in conjunction with tuning of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system by BPEI, in an effort to achieve the performance target for ammonia slip. This additional testing occurred after the installation of a large particle ash (LPA) screen and removal system just above the SCR reactor and a fresh SCR catalyst layer in mid-May. This report describes the results of the additional tests. During the May 30-June 1 sampling period, CONSOL R&D and Clean Air Engineering (CAE) each measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet, downstream of the in-duct SCR reactor. In addition, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the

  6. Proteomic identification of carbonylated proteins in F344 rat hippocampus after 1-bromopropane exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenlie; Ichihara, Sahoko; Oikawa, Shinji; Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Subramanian, Kaviarasan; Mohideen, Sahabudeen Sheik; Ichihara, Gaku

    2012-08-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is neurotoxic in both experimental animals and humans. Previous proteomic analysis of rat hippocampus implicated alteration of protein expression in oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress plays a role in 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity. To understand this role at the protein level, we exposed male F344 rats to 1-BP at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8 h/day for 1 week or 4 weeks by inhalation and quantitated changes in hippocampal protein carbonyl using a protein carbonyl assay, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), immunoblotting, and matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). Hippocampal reactive oxygen species and protein carbonyl were significantly increased, demonstrating 1-BP-associated induction of oxidative stress and protein damage. MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS identified 10 individual proteins with increased carbonyl modification (p < 0.05; fold-change ≥ 1.5). The identified proteins were involved in diverse biological processes including glycolysis, ATP production, tyrosine catabolism, GTP binding, guanine degradation, and neuronal metabolism of dopamine. Hippocampal triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) activity was significantly reduced and negatively correlated with TPI carbonylation (p < 0.001; r = 0.83). Advanced glycation end-product (AGE) levels were significantly elevated both in the hippocampus and plasma, and hippocampal AGEs correlated negatively with TPI activity (p < 0.001; r = 0.71). In conclusion, 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity in the rat hippocampus seems to involve oxidative damage of cellular proteins, decreased TPI activity, and elevated AGEs. -- Highlights: ► 1-BP increases hippocampal ROS levels and hippocampal and plasma protein carbonyls. ► 1-BP increases TPI carbonylation and decreases TPI activity in the hippocampus. ► 1-BP increases hippocampal and plasma AGE levels.

  7. Untitled Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BP proposal selected The CAMD proposal "Elementally Resolved Chemistry of the Evolution of the Gulf Spill Oil" was one of twenty one selected, by peer review, from the fifty eight submitted for funding by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative sponsored by BP Exploration and Production. CAMD Researchers : Drs. Richard L Kurtz, Kyungmin Ham, Orhan Kizilkaya and Amitava Roy will be working with a team of faculty that include Drs. Ed Overton (Environmental Science), Annette Engels

  8. The UV-absorber benzophenone-4 alters transcripts of genes involved in hormonal pathways in zebrafish (Danio rerio) eleuthero-embryos and adult males

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zucchi, Sara; Bluethgen, Nancy; Ieronimo, Andrea; Fent, Karl

    2011-01-15

    Benzophenone-4 (BP-4) is frequently used as UV-absorber in cosmetics and materials protection. Despite its frequent detection in the aquatic environment potential effects on aquatic life are unknown. In this study, we evaluate the effects of BP-4 in eleuthero-embryos and in the liver, testis and brain of adult male fish on the transcriptional level by focusing on target genes involved in hormonal pathways to provide a more complete toxicological profile of this important UV-absorber. Eleuthero-embryos and males of zebrafish were exposed up to 3 days after hatching and for 14 days, respectively, to BP-4 concentrations between 30 and 3000 {mu}g/L. In eleuthero-embryos transcripts of vtg1, vtg3, esr1, esr2b, hsd17ss3, cyp19b cyp19a, hhex and pax8 were induced at 3000 {mu}g/L BP-4, which points to a low estrogenic activity and interference with early thyroid development, respectively. In adult males BP-4 displayed multiple effects on gene expression in different tissues. In the liver vtg1, vtg3, esr1 and esr2b were down-regulated, while in the brain, vtg1, vtg3 and cyp19b transcripts were up-regulated. In conclusion, the transcription profile revealed that BP-4 interferes with the expression of genes involved in hormonal pathways and steroidogenesis. The effects of BP-4 differ in life stages and adult tissues and point to an estrogenic activity in eleuthero-embryos and adult brain, and an antiestrogenic activity in the liver. The results indicate that BP-4 interferes with the sex hormone system of fish, which is important for the risk assessment of this UV-absorber.

  9. Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15/2008 Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Austenitc Steels: 300-Series Stainless Alloys Stabilized Alloys, Types 321 and 347 (code 2104) Prepared by: B.P. Somerday, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore CA Editors C. San Marchi B.P. Somerday Sandia National Laboratories This report may be updated and revised periodically in response to the needs of the technical community; up-to-date versions can be requested from the editors at the address given below or downloaded at

  10. Materials Development for Boron Phosphide Based Neutron Detectors: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edgar, James Howard

    2014-09-12

    The project goal was to improve the quality of boron phosphide (BP) by optimizing its epitaxial growth on single crystal substrates and by producing bulk BP single crystals with low dislocation densities. BP is potentially a good semiconductor for high efficiency solid state neutron detectors by combining neutron capture and charge creation within the same volume. The project strategy was to use newly available single crystal substrates, silicon carbide and aluminum nitride, engineered to produce the best film properties. Substrate variables included the SiC polytype, crystallographic planes, misorientation of the substrate surface (tilt direction and magnitude) from the major crystallographic plane, and surface polarity (Si and C). The best films were (111)BP on silicon-face (0001) 4H-SiC misoriented 4° in the [1-100] direction, and BP on (100) and (111) 3C-SiC/Si; these substrates resulted in films that were free of in-plane twin defects, as determined by x-ray topography. The impact of the deposition temperature was also assessed: increasing the temperature from 1000 °C to 1200 °C produced films that were more ordered and more uniform, and the size of individual grains increased by more than a factor of twenty. The BP films were free of other compounds such as icosahedral boron phosphide (B12P2) over the entire temperature range, as established by Raman spectroscopy. The roughness of the BP films was reduced by increasing the phosphine to diborane ratio from 50 to 200. Bulk crystals were grown by reacting boron dissolved in nickel with phosphorus vapor to precipitate BP. Crystals with dimensions up to 2 mm were produced.

  11. Mercury Control with Calcium-Based Sorbents and Oxidizing Agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas K. Gale

    2005-07-01

    This Final Report contains the test descriptions, results, analysis, correlations, theoretical descriptions, and model derivations produced from many different investigations performed on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, to investigate calcium-based sorbents and injection of oxidizing agents for the removal of mercury. Among the technologies were (a) calcium-based sorbents in general, (b) oxidant-additive sorbents developed originally at the EPA, and (c) optimized calcium/carbon synergism for mercury-removal enhancement. In addition, (d) sodium-tetrasulfide injection was found to effectively capture both forms of mercury across baghouses and ESPs, and has since been demonstrated at a slipstream treating PRB coal. It has been shown that sodium-tetrasulfide had little impact on the foam index of PRB flyash, which may indicate that sodium-tetrasulfide injection could be used at power plants without affecting flyash sales. Another technology, (e) coal blending, was shown to be an effective means of increasing mercury removal, by optimizing the concentration of calcium and carbon in the flyash. In addition to the investigation and validation of multiple mercury-control technologies (a through e above), important fundamental mechanism governing mercury kinetics in flue gas were elucidated. For example, it was shown, for the range of chlorine and unburned-carbon (UBC) concentrations in coal-fired utilities, that chlorine has much less effect on mercury oxidation and removal than UBC in the flyash. Unburned carbon enhances mercury oxidation in the flue gas by reacting with HCl to form chlorinated-carbon sites, which then react with elemental mercury to form mercuric chloride, which subsequently desorbs back into the flue gas. Calcium was found to enhance mercury removal by stabilizing the oxidized mercury formed on carbon surfaces. Finally, a model was developed to describe these mercury adsorption, desorption, oxidation, and removal mechanisms, including

  12. Advanced emissions control development program. Quarterly technical progress report {number_sign}4, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farthing, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls will likely arise as the US Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B and W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF will provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) measure and understand the production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of steam coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems (ESPs, baghouses, scrubbers), (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self-consistent air toxics data library. Development work is currently concentrated on the capture of mercury, fine particulate, and a variety of inorganic species such as the acid gases (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, etc.).

  13. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The SNRB{trademark} Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration Project was cooperatively funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B&W, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Ohio Edison, Norton Chemical Process Products Company and the 3M Company. The SNRB{trademark} technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. Development of the SNRB{trademark} process at B&W began with pilot testing of high-temperature dry sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} removal in the 1960`s. Integration of NO{sub x} reduction was evaluated in the 1970`s. Pilot work in the 1980`s focused on evaluation of various NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, SO{sub 2} sorbents and integration of the catalyst with the baghouse. This early development work led to the issuance of two US process patents to B&W - No. 4,309,386 and No. 4,793,981. An additional patent application for improvements to the process is pending. The OCDO was instrumental in working with B&W to develop the process to the point where a larger scale demonstration of the technology was feasible. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B&W tested the SNRB{trademark} pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B&W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB{trademark} process. The SNRB{trademark} facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993.

  14. Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S.J.

    1995-11-01

    As the consumption of energy increases, its impact on ambient air quality has become a significant concern. Recent studies indicate that fine particles from coal combustion cause health problems as well as atmospheric visibility impairment. These problems are further compounded by the concentration of hazardous trace elements such as mercury, cadmium, selenium, and arsenic in fine particles. Therefore, a current need exists to develop superior, but economical, methods to control emissions of fine particles. Since most of the toxic metals present in coal will be in particulate form, a high level of fine- particle collection appears to be the best method of overall air toxics control. However, over 50% of mercury and a portion of selenium emissions are in vapor form and cannot be collected in particulate control devices. Therefore, this project will focus on developing technology not only to provide ultrahigh collection efficiency of particulate air toxic emissions, but also to capture vapor- phase trace metals such as mercury and selenium. Currently, the primary state-of-the-art technologies for particulate control are fabric filters (baghouses) and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). However, they both have limitations that prevent them from achieving ultrahigh collection of fine particulate matter and vapor-phase trace metals. The objective of this project is to develop a highly reliable advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC) that can provide > 99.99 % particulate collection efficiency for all particle sizes between 0.01 and 50 14m, is applicable for use with all U.S. coals, and is cost-0443competitive with existing technologies. Phase I of the project is organized into three tasks: Task I - Project Management, Reporting, and Subcontract Consulting Task 2 - Modeling, Design, and Construction of 200-acfm AHPC Model Task 3 - Experimental Testing and Subcontract Consulting

  15. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program. Quarterly Technical Progress Report {number_sign}5 for the period October 1 to December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farthing, George A.

    1996-12-31

    Babcock {ampersand} Wilcox (B{ampersand}W) is conducting a five year project aimed at the development of practical, cost- effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls will likely arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF will provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) measure and understand the production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of steam coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems (ESPs, baghouses, scrubbers), (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self-consistent air toxics data library. Development work is currently concentrated on the capture of mercury, fine particulate, and a variety of inorganic species such as the acid gases (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, etc.).

  16. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program. Quarterly Technical Progress Report {number_sign}6 for the period: January 1 to March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farthing, George A.

    1996-12-31

    Babcock {ampersand} Wilcox (B{ampersand}W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls will likely arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B{ampersand}W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF will provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) measure and understand the production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of steam coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems (ESPs, baghouses, scrubbers), (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self- consistent air toxics data library. Development work is currently concentrated on the capture of mercury, fine particulate, and a variety of inorganic species such as the acid gases (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, etc.).

  17. Fluid bed dryer efficient with abrasive copper concentrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marczeski, C.D.; Hodel, A.E.

    1985-11-01

    Thermally efficient dryers were needed to remove 11-12% moisture from very fine (70%, -325 mesh), copper concentrate at Asarco, Inc., in Hayden, AZ. More than 128 t/hr of the wet, dust-like material produced by the copper mine's grinders had to be made bone dry (0.1% moisture) before being fed to a flash smelting furnace. Two 12 ft diam fluidized bed dryers, each with a capacity of 64 wet t/hr, were installed to dry the copper concentrate. Each dryer's push/pull air system employs a 1250 hp fluidizing air fan to provide air at 80 in (wc) static pressure. A natural gas fired heater raises the air temperature to 600/sup 0/F to dry the dense (100 lb/cu ft bulk density) ore. The dense, wet copper concentrate is fed to the dryer from the top, countercurrent to the flow of the light, dry product. Drying begins when the wet feed reaches the fluidized bed of gravel rock. Lighter, dried material is conveyed by the air back to the top of the dryer and out through a duct to the baghouse. The throughput of the dryer is determined by the wetness of the concentrate and the temperature of the fluidizing air. Asarco, Inc. has found the fluid bed drying system simple and efficient to operate. Fuel gas consumption of the dryer is on the order of 1000 cu ft/ton of wet feed. The abrasion resistant lining provided in the dryer (a hard brick lining in the rock bed zone; castable refractory in the top and in the ducting) and ceramic tiles at the inlet of the dust collector have been effective in long term operation with the highly abrasive product.

  18. York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. Annual report, [September 30, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Department of Energy, under the Clean Coal Technology program, proposes to provide cost-shared financial assistance for the construction of a utility-scale circulating fluidized bed technology cogeneration facility by York County Energy Partners, L.P (YCEP). YCEP, a project company of ir Products and Chemicals, Inc., would design, construct and operate a 250 megawatt (gross) coal-fired cogeneration facility on a 38-acre parcel in North Codorus Township, York County, Pennsylvania. The facility would be located adjacent to the P. H. Glatfelter Company paper mill, the proposed steam host. Electricity would be delivered to Metropolitan Edison Company. The facility would demonstrate new technology designed to greatly increase energy efficiency and reduce air pollutant emissions over current generally available commercial technology which utilizes coal fuel. The facility would include a single train circulating fluidized bed boiler, a pollution control train consisting of limestone injection for reducing emissions of sulfur dioxide by greater than 92 percent, selective non-catalytic reduction for reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides, and a fabric filter (baghouse) for reducing emissions of particulates. Section II of this report provides a general description of the facility. Section III describes the site specifics associated with the facility when it was proposed to be located in West Manchester Township. After the Cooperative Agreement was signed, YCEP decided to move the proposed site to North Codorus Township. The reasons for the move and the site specifics of that site are detailed in Section IV. This section of the report also provides detailed descriptions of several key pieces of equipment. The circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFB), its design scale-up and testing is given particular emphasis.

  19. Petropower energia project under way in Chile promises refiner better economics at lower cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    Construction of the Republic of Chile`s first public/private industrial partnership project is well under way. Ground was broken for the $232-million Petropower Energia Limitada project early this year, shortly after the final contract between the parties - Foster Wheeler Power Systems, Inc. (FWPS); Petrox S.A. Refineria de Petroleo and Empresa Nacional del Petroleo (ENAP) - was signed. The Petropower project, located adjacent to Petrox`s 84,000-b/d refinery in Talcahuano, represents the first project ever to combine petroleum coking technology with cogeneration technology in a single project financing. Petropower is 85% owned by FWPS, 7.5% by ENAP, the Chilean national oil company and parent of Petrox S.A. When completed in mid-1998, the Petropower project will enable Petrox to refine heavier crudes and enhance the refinery`s flexibility and economics. The project will consist of a delayed coking facility (a 12,000-b/d delayed coking unit and a 7,000-b/d hydrotreating plant) and a 67-MW (59 MW net) cogeneration plant. The coke produced will fuel a Foster Wheeler proprietary-design circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) boiler which will generate all the high-pressure steam and electric power needs of the Petrox refinery. This unit will be the first circulating fluidized-bed boiler to be built in Latin America. The cogeneration facility, using limestone as a reagent and equipped with a baghouse, will control SO{sub x} emissions from combustion of the green coke fuel and easily meet all Chilean environmental standards. Moreover, by constructing the cogeneration facility, Petrox will not have to proceed with capital improvements to existing facilities to ensure a reliable source of steam and electricity, resulting in substantial savings for Petrox. The cogeneration plant provides a permanent {open_quotes}disposal{close_quotes} for all coke produced by the delayed coker, thereby solving any future problems of unwanted or excess coke.

  20. The Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    Progress continued at MHD coal-fired flow facility. UTSI reports on progress in developing the technology for the steam bottoming portion of the MHD Steam Combined Cycle Power Plant. No Proof-of-Concept (POC) testing was conducted during the quarter but data analyses are reported from the test conducted during the prior quarter. Major results include corrosion data from the first 500 hours of testing on candidate tube materials in the superheater test module (SHTM). Solids mass balance data, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and baghouse (BH) performance data, diagnostic systems and environmental data results from previous POC tests are included. The major activities this quarter were in facility modifications required to complete the scheduled POC test program. Activities reported include the installation of an automatic ash/seed removal system on the SHTM, the BH, and ESP hoppers. Also, a higher pressure compressor (350 psi) is being installed to provide additional blowing pressure to remove solids deposits on the convective heat transfer tubes in the high temperature zone where the deposits are molten. These activities are scheduled to be completed and ready for the next test, which is scheduled for late May 1990. Also, experiments on drying western coal are reported. The recommended system for modifying the CFFF coal system to permit processing of western coal is described. Finally, a new effort to test portions of the TRW combustor during tests in the CFFF is described. The status of system analyses being conducted under subcontract by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation is also described. 2 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  2. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  3. Paleoclimatic implications of glacial and postglacial refugia for Pinus pumila in western Beringia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, P M; Lozhkin, A V; Solomatkina, T B; Brown, T A

    2010-02-05

    Palynological results from Julietta Lake currently provide the most direct evidence to support the existence of a glacial refugium for Pinus pumila in mountains of southwestern Beringia. Both percentages and accumulation rates indicate the evergreen shrub survived until at least {approx}19,000 14C yr B.P. in the Upper Kolyma region. Percentage data suggest numbers dwindled into the late glaciation, whereas pollen accumulation rates point towards a more rapid demise shortly after {approx}19,000 14C yr B.P. Pinus pumila did not re-establish in any great numbers until {approx}8100 14C yr B.P., despite the local presence {approx}9800 14C yr B.P. of Larix dahurica, which shares similar summer temperature requirements. The postglacial thermal maximum (in Beringia {approx}11,000-9000 14C yr B.P.) provided Pinus pumila shrubs with equally harsh albeit different conditions for survival than those present during the LGM. Regional records indicate that in this time of maximum warmth Pinus pumila likely sheltered in a second, lower-elevation refugium. Paleoclimatic models and modern ecology suggest that shifts in the nature of seasonal transitions and not only seasonal extremes have played important roles in the history of Pinus pumila over the last {approx}21,000 14C yr B.P.

  4. First principles study of metal contacts to monolayer black phosphorous

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanana, Anuja; Mahapatra, Santanu

    2014-11-28

    Atomically thin layered black phosphorous (BP) has recently appeared as an alternative to the transitional metal dichalcogenides for future channel material in a metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor due to its lower carrier effective mass. Investigation of the electronic property of source/drain contact involving metal and two-dimensional material is essential as it impacts the transistor performance. In this paper, we perform a systematic and rigorous study to evaluate the Ohmic nature of the side-contact formed by the monolayer BP (mBP) and metals (gold, titanium, and palladium), which are commonly used in experiments. Employing the Density Functional Theory, we analyse the potential barrier, charge transfer and atomic orbital overlap at the metal-mBP interface in an optimized structure to understand how efficiently carriers could be injected from metal contact to the mBP channel. Our analysis shows that gold forms a Schottky contact with a higher tunnel barrier at the interface in comparison to the titanium and palladium. mBP contact with palladium is found to be purely Ohmic, where as titanium contact demonstrates an intermediate behaviour.

  5. On the nature of volume-phase transitions in photo-cross-linked poly(cyclopropylacrylamide) and poly(N-vinylisobutyramide) coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patra, Leena; Messman, Jamie M; Toomey, Ryan G

    2013-01-01

    Ellipsometry in an inverted configuration was used to characterize the temperature-dependent swelling of thin (100 nm) coatings of photo-cross-linked poly(cyclopropylacrylamide), or poly(CPAAm), and poly(vinylisobutyramide), or poly(NVIBAm). Both polymers contained 3 mole % of methacroylaminobenzophenone (MnBP) as the photo-cross-linking unit. Poly(CPAAm-co-MnBP) showed a continuous, 2nd order deswelling transition between 10 and 70 oC with no hysteresis. Poly(NVIBAm), on the other hand showed a discontinuous, 1st order deswelling transition at 45 oC with a hysteresis in the swelling curve. The differences in the swelling transitions can be interpreted within the context of the cloud-point measurements of the uncross-linked polymers. Whereas poly(NVIBAm-co-MnBP) has a significant off-zero critical point (>10 wt% polymer) at 36oC, poly(CPAAm-co-MnBP) has a critical point at zero concentration and 23 oC. Concurrent measurements of the infrared vibrations of the amide groups in both polymers further revealed that the amide group in poly(CPAAm-co-MnBP) maintains a constant hydrogen-bonding environment throughout the volume-phase transition. Poly(NVIBAm-co-MnBP), on the other hand, has a concentration dependent hydrogen bonding environment around the carbonyl group, which is consistent with an off-zero concentration in the cloud point curve.

  6. Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bockelie, Michael J.

    2015-06-29

    This Final Report summarizes research performed to develop a technology to mitigate the plugging and fouling that occurs in the syngas cooler used in many Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. The syngas cooler is a firetube heat exchanger located downstream of the gasifier. It offers high thermal efficiency, but its’ reliability has generally been lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The buildup of ash deposits that form on the fireside surfaces in the syngas cooler (i.e., fouling) lead to reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs. Our approach to address this problem is that fouling of the syngas cooler cannot be eliminated, but it can be better managed. The research program was funded by DOE using two budget periods: Budget Period 1 (BP1) and Budget Period 2 (BP2). The project used a combination of laboratory scale experiments, analysis of syngas cooler deposits, modeling and guidance from industry to develop a better understanding of fouling mechanisms and to develop and evaluate strategies to mitigate syngas cooler fouling and thereby improve syngas cooler performance. The work effort in BP 1 and BP 2 focused on developing a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to syngas cooler plugging and fouling and investigating promising concepts to mitigate syngas cooler plugging and fouling. The work effort focused on the following: • analysis of syngas cooler deposits and fuels provided by an IGCC plant collaborating with this project; • performing Jet cleaning tests in the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor to determine the bond strength between an ash deposit to a metal plate, as well as implementing planned equipment modifications to the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor and the one ton per day, pressurized Pilot Scale Gasifier; • performing Computational Fluid Dynamic modeling of industrially relevant syngas cooler configurations to develop a better

  7. Effects of the UV filter benzophenone-2 on reproduction in fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrod, Christin J.; Kunz, Petra Y.; Zenker, Armin K. [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gruendenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Fent, Karl [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gruendenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Department of Environmental Sciences, CH-8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: karl.fent@bluewin.ch

    2007-12-15

    The UV filter benzophenone-2 (BP-2) is largely used in personal care products such as cosmetics and in numerous other materials for UV protection. Like other UV filters, BP-2 has been found to be estrogenic in vitro and in vivo, but potential effects on reproduction of fish are unknown. In this study, we evaluate whether BP-2 affects important reproductive parameters such as fecundity, gametogenesis and secondary sex characteristics. After a pre-exposure period of 19 days, reproductively mature fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to 0.002, 0.1, 1.2, 5.0 and 9.7 mg/L BP-2 for 15 days. BP-2 was accumulated in fish up to 3.1 {mu}g/g body weight. In males, a dose-dependent vitellogenin induction and decrease in the number of nuptial tubercles occurred. Moreover, significant dose-related effects on gonads of male and female fish were observed. At concentrations of 1.2 mg/L and higher, spermatocyte and oocyte development was significantly inhibited in male and female fish, respectively. Testes of exposed males had much fewer spermatocytes and ovaries of exposed females had much fewer mature and more atretic follicles. Reproduction was negatively affected in a dose-dependent manner with a decrease in egg production at 5.0 mg/L and a complete cessation of spawning activity at 9.7 mg/L BP-2. Our findings show significant estrogenic effects of the common UV filter BP-2 on vitellogenin induction, secondary sex characteristics, gonadal development, and reproduction in fish.

  8. Hippocampal phosphoproteomics of F344 rats exposed to 1-bromopropane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenlie; Ichihara, Sahoko; Oikawa, Shinji; Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Hu, Shijie; Huang, Hanlin; Ichihara, Gaku

    2015-01-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is neurotoxic in both experimental animals and human. To identify phosphorylated modification on the unrecognized post-translational modifications of proteins and investigate their role in 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity, changes in hippocampal phosphoprotein expression levels were analyzed quantitatively in male F344 rats exposed to 1-BP inhalation at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8 h/day for 1 or 4 weeks. Hippocampal protein extracts were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by Pro-Q Diamond gel staining and SYPRO Ruby staining coupled with two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), respectively, as well as by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) to identify phosphoproteins. Changes in selected proteins were further confirmed by Manganese II (Mn{sup 2+})-Phos-tag SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Bax and cytochrome c protein levels were determined by western blotting. Pro-Q Diamond gel staining combined with 2D-DIGE identified 26 phosphoprotein spots (p < 0.05), and MALDI-TOF/MS identified 18 up-regulated proteins and 8 down-regulated proteins. These proteins are involved in the biological process of response to stimuli, metabolic processes, and apoptosis signaling. Changes in the expression of phosphorylated 14-3-3 θ were further confirmed by Mn{sup 2+}-Phos-tag SDS-PAGE. Western blotting showed overexpression of Bax protein in the mitochondria with down-regulation in the cytoplasm, whereas cytochrome c expression was high in the cytoplasm but low in the mitochondria after 1-BP exposure. Our results suggest that the pathogenesis of 1-BP-induced hippocampal damage involves inhibition of antiapoptosis process. Phosphoproteins identified in this study can potentially serve as biomarkers for 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • 1-BP modified hippocampal phosphoproteome in rat and 23 altered proteins were identified. • 1-BP changed phosphorylation

  9. Pilot Study of the Effects of Simulated Turbine Passage Pressure on Juvenile Chinook Salmon Acclimated with Access to Air at Absolute Pressures Greater than Atmospheric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Abernethy, Cary S.

    2005-04-28

    The impacts of pressure on juvenile salmon who pass through the turbines of hydroelectric dams while migrating downstream on the Columbia and Snake rivers has not been well understood, especially as these impacts relate to injury to the fish's swim bladder. The laboratory studies described here were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District at PNNL's fisheries research laboratories in 2004 to investigate the impacts of simulated turbine passage pressure on fish permitted to achieve neutral buoyancy at pressures corresponding to depths at which they are typically observed during downstream migration. Two sizes of juvenile Chinook salmon were tested, 80-100mm and 125-145mm total length. Test fish were acclimated for 22 to 24 hours in hyperbaric chambers at pressures simulating depths of 15, 30, or 60 ft, with access to a large air bubble. High rates of deflated swim bladders and mortality were observed. Our results while in conclusive show that juvenile salmon are capable of drawing additional air into their swimbladder to compensate for the excess mass of implanted telemetry devices. However they may pay a price in terms of increased susceptibility to injury, predation, and death for this additional air.

  10. A massively parallel fractional step solver for incompressible flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houzeaux, G. Vazquez, M. Aubry, R. Cela, J.M.

    2009-09-20

    This paper presents a parallel implementation of fractional solvers for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using an algebraic approach. Under this framework, predictor-corrector and incremental projection schemes are seen as sub-classes of the same class, making apparent its differences and similarities. An additional advantage of this approach is to set a common basis for a parallelization strategy, which can be extended to other split techniques or to compressible flows. The predictor-corrector scheme consists in solving the momentum equation and a modified 'continuity' equation (namely a simple iteration for the pressure Schur complement) consecutively in order to converge to the monolithic solution, thus avoiding fractional errors. On the other hand, the incremental projection scheme solves only one iteration of the predictor-corrector per time step and adds a correction equation to fulfill the mass conservation. As shown in the paper, these two schemes are very well suited for massively parallel implementation. In fact, when compared with monolithic schemes, simpler solvers and preconditioners can be used to solve the non-symmetric momentum equations (GMRES, Bi-CGSTAB) and to solve the symmetric continuity equation (CG, Deflated CG). This gives good speedup properties of the algorithm. The implementation of the mesh partitioning technique is presented, as well as the parallel performances and speedups for thousands of processors.

  11. Swords into plowshares: Military geology and national security projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    Military geology and national security projects are often comparable, achieving their rai-son d`etre in support of national goals, military operations, and/or systems-all for vital national interests. The application of Geoscience to these ends, especially engineering geology, has occurred from pole to pole and included every conceivable environment and natural condition. In the conduct of such projects, the Geosciences have advanced, and vice versa. Desert trafficability, most notably regarding playa surfaces, is both temporary and variable and not a persistent condition as some early authors believed. Playas in Australia, Iran, and the US show that saline efflorescence is removed following surface water dissolution and subsequent deflation, resulting in very hard crusts. Magadiite, a hydrous sodium silicate and possible precursor of bedded chert, was first discovered in North America at Alkali Lake, OR, during a military project. Pleistocene Lake Trinity, a small and mostly buried evaporate basin in the northern Jornada del Muerto, NM, was discovered during exploratory drilling in support of a military test program.

  12. Ecology of Pacific Northwest coastal sand dunes: a community profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedemann, A.M.

    1984-03-01

    Sand dunes occur in 33 localities along the 950 km of North American Pacific coast between the Straits of Juan de Fuca (49/sup 0/N) and Cape Mendocino (40/sup 0/). The dune landscape is a mosaic of dune forms: transverse ridge, oblique dune, retention ridge, foredune, parabola dune, sand hummock, blowout, sand plain, deflation plain, dune ridge, swale, remnant forest, and ponds and lakes. These forms are the basic morphological units making up the four dune systems: parallel ridge, parabola dune, transverse ridge, and bay dune. Vegetation is well-developed on stabilized dunes. Of the 21 plant communities identified, nine are herbaceous, five are shrub, and seven are forest. A wide variety of vertebrate animals occur in seven distinct habitats: open dunes, grassland and meadow, shrub thicket, forest, marsh, riparian, and lakes and ponds. Urban development, increased rate of stabilization due to the introduction of European beachgrass (Ammophila arenaria (L.) Link), and massive disturbance resulting from heavy off-road vehicle traffic are the greatest threats to the long-term survival and stability of a number of sand dune habitats. Two animals and three plants dependent on dune habitats are listed as rare, threatened, or endangered. 93 references, 52 figures, 13 tables.

  13. Effects of the R and D tax credit on energy R and D expenditures: an econometric analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moe, R.J.; Kee, J.R.; Lackey, K.C.; Cronin, F.J.

    1985-02-01

    Objective of the study was to estimate the effects on industrial energy research and development (R and D) expenditures of the R and D Tax Credit component of the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981. Two tasks were performed. The first task was to collect data on industrial R and D expenditures, sales, oil prices, and price deflators. The R and D expenditure data were obtained from the National Science Foundation; other data were collected from Commerce Department and Department of Energy publications. The second task was to perform an econometric analysis of the effects of the tax credit on industrial R and D expenditures. Equations relating: (1) total; and (2) energy-related R and D expenditures to sales, oil prices, and a variable representing the availability of the tax credit were estimated, using data for each of seven manufacturing industries and eleven years. The analysis showed that the tax credit caused real total industrial R and D expenditures to be 9.1% greater than they would have been without the credit, but caused real energy industrial R and D expenditures to be 13.8% less than they would have been without the tax credit.

  14. Eolian sabkha sandstones in the Nugget Sandstone (Jurassic), Vernal area, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenk, C.J.; Peterson, F. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-06-01

    The Jurassic Nugget Sandstone in the Vernal, Utah, area is characterized by thick (up to 25 m) sets of cross-stratified eolian dune sandstone separated by either erosional planar bounding surfaces or thin (mostly < 3 m) sandstones interpreted as sabkha sandstones. Structures in Nugget sabkha sandstones are predominantly wavy or irregular bedding and thin, remnant sets of dune cross-strata consisting of eolian ripple and avalanche strata. The types of sedimentary structures and erosional features in Nugget sabkha sandstones indicate a close relationship between sand deposition and erosion and fluctuations in the local water table. Thin, remnant eolian dune sets are common in Nugget sabkha sandstones. The remnant sets form when dunes migrating across a sabkha are partially wetted as the water table rises slightly (on a scale of tens of centimeters); the lower part of the dune with wetted sand remains on the sabkha as the rest of the dune continues to migrate. Typically, ripple strata of the dune apron and the toes of avalanche strata are preserved in dune remnants. The avalanche strata, being slightly coarser grained, are preferentially deflated, leaving microtopography. This topography is commonly filled in with ripple strata that form as dry sand again blows across the sabkha. Stacked sets of remnant dunes separated by erosional surfaces illustrate the control of sand deposition on eolian sabkhas by the local water table.

  15. Three-dimensional analysis of eolian systems in Jurassic Wingate sandstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nation, M.J.; Blakey, R.C.

    1989-03-01

    Regional bounding surfaces in ancient eolian sequences aid in establishing lateral profiles not previously obtainable using standard stratigraphic methods. Correlation of detailed measured sections permits three-dimensional analysis of erg dynamics in the Jurassic Wingate Sandstone on the Colorado Plateau. Four periods of erg development marked by contrasting styles of eolian architecture are documented in the Salt Anticline region (in ascending stratigraphic order): (1) discontinuous sand sheets, isolated dunes, and aqueous environments; (2) large compound dunes with decreasing amounts of dune margin material; (3) compound dunes and draas alternating with locally thick sandsheet deposits; and (4) widespread dunes and draas prior to erosion by Kayenta fluvial systems. Regional bounding surface characteristics reflect different mechanisms for erg stabilization, including deflation to the water table, climate change, and negative net sand budget. Lateral reconstruction and correlation of erg sequences indicate significant intrabasinal paleogeographic and tectonic controls on eolian systems. Localities removed from the Salt Anticline region contain much larger compound draa deposits and lack extensive accumulations of sand-sheet material. Regional comparison of these characteristics suggests that the salt uplifts modified eolian processes within the Wingate depositional basin. Existence of additional geographic variations not associated with salt tectonism is indicated by local accumulations of noneolian deposits in northeastern Arizona. The use of regional bounding surfaces to construct lateral profiles is a powerful method to establish three-dimensional models of eolian systems. Analysis of erg dynamics in other ancient eolian formations is possible utilizing the criteria documented in the Wingate Sandstone.

  16. Impact of early diagenesis of Eolian reservoirs, Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krystinik, L.F.; Andrews, S.; Fryberger, S.G.

    1985-02-01

    Dune and associated alluvial and playa deposits at Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado, provide an excellent opportunity to study early diagenetic development of vertical and horizontal permeability barriers in recent eolian deposits (> 10 ka). Cements observed include calcite, aragonite, protodolomite(.), amorphous silica, iron hydroxide, smectite, trona, and halite. Cementation is controlled by the availability of water, with several hydrologic subenvironments producing different cements. Evaporative cementation in dunes adjacent to playas is commonly dominated by trona and halite, but calcite, aragonite, and amorphous silica also bind the sediment. These cements are generally most concentrated in fine laminations where capillary action has pulled water into dunes. Iron hydroxides, calcite, and amorphous silica precipitate at the interface between ground water and streams or lakes, where the pH gradient may exceed 5 pH units (pH 5.7-11.5). Subsequent movement of the ground-water table can result in cross-cutting cement zones. Early cementation in dunes prevents deflation and provides a mechanism for preservation of the reservoir unit. Intense cementation may permanently occlude porosity, or leaching may reestablish well-interconnected porosity. An understanding of the extent and composition of early cement zones can be used to improve hydrodynamic models for production and enhanced recovery.

  17. Airflow-terrain interactions through a mountain gap, with an example of eolian activity beneath an atmospheric hydraulic jump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaylord, D.R.; Dawson, P.J.

    1987-09-01

    The integration of atmospheric soundings from a fully instrumented aircraft with detailed sedimentary and geomorphic analyses of eolian features in the Ferris dune field of south-central Wyoming lends insight into the manner in which topography interacts with airflow to modify eolian activity. Topographically modified airflow results in zones of airflow deceleration, acceleration, and enhanced atmospheric turbulence, all of which influence the surface morphology and sedimentology. Extreme lateral confluence of prevailing airflow produces accelerated, unidirectional winds. These winds correlate with unusually continuous and elongate parabolic dunes that extend into a mountain gap (Windy Gap). Persistently heightened winds produced at the entrance to Windy Gap have resulted in a concentration of active sand dunes that lack slipfaces. Common development of a strongly amplified atmospheric wave analogous to a hydraulic jump in the gap contributes to the formation of a variety of eolian features that mantle the surface of Windy Gap and the Ferris dune field tail. Heightened, unidirectional winds in this zone promote grain-size segregation, the formation of elongated and aligned sand drifts, climbing and falling dunes, elongate scour streaks, and parabolic dunes that have low-angle (< 20/sup 0/) cross-stratification. Deflation of bedrock and loose sediment has been enhanced in the zone of maximum turbulence beneath the hydraulic jump.

  18. Three-dimensional modeling of an aeolian dune/interdune system: Applications to hydrocarbon production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, J.M.; Glennie, K.W.; Williams, B.P.J. (Univ. of Aberdeen, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    1993-09-01

    The Al Liwa region of the northeast Rub Al Khali, United Arab Emirates, comprises compound crescentic draa and subcircular inland sabkhas that are flanked to their north by a sand sea of smaller dunes extending almost to the coast of the Arabian Gulf. This controlled the supply of sand from the north and influenced water-table positions within interdune areas. The draa, up to 170 m high, comprise both fine and coarse sands with a strong carbonate component, and are migrating very slowly to the south-southeast. The evaporite-encrusted interdune sabkhas often are underlain by foreset dune sands that also indicate transport to the south-southeast. The northern fringe of smaller dunes migrates southward more rapidly than the draa, but their northern supply of sand now has been cut off by flooding of the Gulf, initiating the deflation of coastal areas down to the water table. A deep-penetrating radar survey, coupled with large-scale trenching, provides a three-dimensional model of dune/interdune systems. This fieldwork aids a clearer understanding of dune/interdune heterogeneities and interconnectedness, which in turn is providing more realistic reservoir models for interwell simulation studies within the Permian Rotliegende gas fields of northwest Europe.

  19. Geochronology and Geomorphology of the Pioneer Archaeological Site (10BT676), Upper Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keene, Joshua L.

    2015-04-01

    The Pioneer site in southeastern Idaho, an open-air, stratified, multi-component archaeological locality on the upper Snake River Plain, provides an ideal situation for understanding the geomorphic history of the Big Lost River drainage system. We conducted a block excavation with the goal of understanding the geochronological context of both cultural and geomorphological components at the site. The results of this study show a sequence of five soil formation episodes forming three terraces beginning prior to 7200 cal yr BP and lasting until the historic period, preserving one cultural component dated to ~3800 cal yr BP and multiple components dating to the last 800 cal yr BP. In addition, periods of deposition and stability at Pioneer indicate climate fluctuation during the middle Holocene (~7200-3800 cal yr BP), minimal deposition during the late Holocene, and a period of increased deposition potentially linked to the Little Ice Age. In addition, evidence for a high-energy erosion event dated to ~3800 cal yr BP suggest a catastrophic flood event during the middle Holocene that may correlate with volcanic activity at the Craters of the Moon lava fields to the northwest. This study provides a model for the study of alluvial terrace formations in arid environments and their potential to preserve stratified archaeological deposits.

  20. Controlled Sculpture of Black Phosphorus Nanoribbons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Masih Das, Paul; Danda, Gopinath; Cupo, Andrew; Parkin, William M.; Liang, Liangbo; Kharche, Neerav; Ling, Xi; Huang, Shengxi; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Meunier, Vincent; et al

    2016-05-18

    Black phosphorus (BP) is a highly anisotropic allotrope of phosphorus with high promise for fast functional electronics and optoelectronics. We demonstrate that high-resolution and controlled structural modification of few-layer BP along arbitrary crystal direction can be achieved with nanometer-scale precision on a few-minute timescales leading to the formation of sub-nm wide armchair and zigzag BP nanoribbons. The nanoribbons are assembled, along with nanopores and nanogaps, using a combination of mechanical-liquid exfoliation and in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning TEM nanosculpting. Here we report time-dependent structural properties of the one-dimensional systems under electron irradiation and probe their oxidation propertiesmore » with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Finally, we demonstrate the use of STEM to controllably narrow and thin the nanoribbons until they break into nanogaps. The observations are rationalized using density functional theory for transition state calculations and electronic band-structure evolution for the various stages of the narrowing procedure. In particular, we predict that the sub- and few-nm wide BP nanoribbons realized experimentally possess clear one-dimensional quantum confinement, even when the systems are made up of a few layers. We find the demonstration of this procedure is key for the development of BP-based electronic, optoelectronic, thermoelectric, and other applications in reduced dimensions.« less

  1. Environmental assessment of advanced thin film manufacturing process. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, D.W.; Mopas, E.; Skinner, D.; McGuire, L.; Strehlow, M.

    1998-09-01

    This report describes work performed by BP Solar, Inc., to provide an extensive preproduction analysis of waste-stream abatement at its plant in Fairfield, California. During the study, numerous technologies were thoroughly evaluated, which allowed BP Solar to select systems that outperformed the stringent federal and state regulations. The main issues were originally perceived to be controlling cadmium compound releases to both air and wastewater to acceptable levels and adopting technologies for air and water waste streams in an efficient, cost-effective manner. BP Solar proposed high-efficiency, reliable control equipment that would reduce air-contaminant emission levels below levels of concern. Cadmium telluride dust is successfully controlled with high-efficiency (>99.9%) bag-in/bag-out filters. For air abatement, carbon canisters provide efficient VOC reduction, and wastewater pretreatment is required per federal pretreatment standards. BP Solar installed a cadmium-scavenging ion exchange system and electrowinning system capable of removing cadmium to <10 ppb (local publicly-owned-treatment-works limits for cadmium is 30 ppb). BP Solar plans to maximize potential reuse of rinse waters by phasing in additional wastewater treatment technologies. Finally, the work to date has identified the areas that need to be revisited as production scales up to ensure that all health, safety, and environmental goals are met.

  2. 10B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2010LA11 10B(p, α): deduced S(E) E(cm) = 0 - 0.15 1 11/30/2011 1993AN06 10B(p, α): α yield E(cm) = 17 - 134 keV X4 11/07/2011 1993AN09 10B(p, α): absolute fusion σ and S(E) E(cm) = 48 - 159 keV X4 11/07/2011 1972SZ02 10B(p, α): total reaction σ and S(E) 60 - 180 keV 1 X4 03/03/2011 1983WI09 10B(p, γ): γ yield, capture σ(E) 0.07 - 2.2 X4 11/07/2011 2003TO21 10B(pol. p, γ): σ, deduced

  3. 11B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12/17/2015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004RO27, 2004SP03 11B(p, α): deduced σ, S-factor Ecm ~ 0 - 1 X4 11/07/2012 2010LA11 11B(p, α): deduced S-factor E(cm) = 0 - 0.6 1 11/30/2011 2000KE10 11B(pol. p, γ): σ, deduced S-factor < 100 keV X4 11/07/2012 1993AN06 11B(p, α): α yield E(cm) = 17 - 134 keV X4 11/29/2012 1979DA03 11B(p, 3α): σ 35.4 - 1500 keV X4 07/30/2014 1992CE02 11B(p, γ): deduced S-factor 40 - 180 keV X4 03/07/2012

  4. Ultrafast recovery time and broadband saturable absorption properties of black phosphorus suspension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yingwei; Huang, Guanghui; Chen, Jiazhang; Xiao, Si He, Jun; Mu, Haoran; Bao, Qiaoliang; Lin, Shenghuang

    2015-08-31

    As a new type of two-dimensional crystal material, black phosphorus (BP) exhibits excellent electronics and optical performance. Herein, we focus on carrier relaxation dynamics and nonlinear optical properties of BP suspension. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and optical transmission spectrum are employed to characterize the structure and linear optical properties of the BP. Additionally, pump-probe experiments at wavelength of 1550 nm were carried out to study the carrier dynamics in BP suspension, and ultrafast recovery time was observed (τ{sub s} = 24 ± 2 fs). Furthermore, we demonstrate the saturable absorption signals by open aperture Z-scan experiments at wavelengths of 1550 nm, 532 nm, and 680 nm. The results indicate that BP has broadband saturable absorption properties and the nonlinear absorption coefficients were determined to be β{sub 2} = −0.20 ± 0.08 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (532 nm), β{sub 2} = −0.12 ± 0.05 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (680 nm), and β{sub 2} = −0.15 ± 0.09 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (1550 nm)

  5. Eolian evidence for climatic fluctuations during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaylord, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of eolian features, particularly sand dunes, in the Ferris-Lost Solider area of south-central Wyoming demonstrates the dynamic character of late Pleistocene and Holocene climatic fluctuations in a high altitude, intermontane basin. Directly- and indirectly-dated stratigraphic, sedimentary, and geomorphic evidence documents recurrent late Quaternary eolian activity as well as the timing and severity of episodic aridity during the Altithermal. Eolian activity in the Ferris-Lost Solider area began under cool and arid conditions by the late Pleistocene. Radiocarbon-dated dune and interdune strata reveal that Holocene sand dune building at Ferris-Lost Solider peaked between ca. 7660 and 4540 years b.p. The first phase of dune building was the most extensive and lasted until ca. 6460 years b.p. Warm, persistently arid conditions during this time favored active dunes with slipfaces, even in historically well-vegetated locales subject to high water tables. Increased effective moisture from ca. 6460 to 5940 years b.p. promoted dune stabilizing vegetation; but renewed dune building, lasting until ca. 4540 years b.p., followed this climatic moderation. Subsequent dune and interdune deposits reveal a return to climatic conditions where only sporadic and localized dune reactivations have interrupted overall dune stability. The most significant recent reactivation, probably associated with a regional decrease in effective moisture, occurred ca. 290 years b.p.

  6. Development of HELIOS/CAPP code system for the analysis of block type VHTR cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H. C.; Han, T. Y.; Jo, C. K.; Noh, J. M.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the HELIOS/CAPP code system developed for the analysis of block type VHTR cores is presented and verified against several VHTR core configurations. Verification results shows that HELIOS code predicts less negative MTC and RTC than McCARD code does and thus HELIOS code overestimates the multiplication factors at the states with high moderator and reflector temperature especially when the B{sub 4}C BP is loaded. In the depletion calculation for the VHTR single cell fuel element, the error of HELIOS code increases as burnup does. It is ascribed to the fact that HELIOS code treats some fission product nuclides with large resonances as non-resonant nuclides. In the 2-D core depletion calculation, a relatively large reactivity error is observed in the case with BP loading while the reactivity error in the case without BP loading is less than 300 pcm. (authors)

  7. Low-Frequency Interlayer Breathing Modes in Few-Layer Black Phosphorus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ling, Xi; Liang, Liangbo; Huang, Shengxi; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kong, Jing; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2015-05-08

    As a new two-dimensional layered material, black phosphorus (BP) is a very promising material for nanoelectronics and nano-optoelectronics. We use Raman spectroscopy and first-principles theory to characterize and understand low-frequency (LF) interlayer breathing modes (<100 cm-1) in few-layer BP for the first time. Using laser polarization dependence study and group theory analysis the breathing modes are assigned to Ag symmetry. Compared to the high-frequency (HF) Raman modes, the LF breathing modes are considerably more sensitive to interlayer coupling and thus their frequencies show stronger dependence on the number of layers. Hence, they constitute an effective means to probe both themore » crystalline orientation and thickness of few-layer BP. Furthermore, the temperature dependence shows that the breathing modes have a harmonic behavior, in contrast to HF Raman modes which exhibit anharmonicity.« less

  8. A study on periodic solutions for the circular restricted three-body problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, F. B.; Zhang, W. E-mail: gaofabao@gmail.com

    2014-12-01

    For the circular restricted three-body problem (CR3BP) in the inertial frame, we interpret the fact that there is no non-trivial 2π-periodic solution of the problem's homogeneous system. Furthermore, based on Reissig's theory, the existence of periodic solutions for the CR3BP is proved rigorously by using the above fact in conjunction with an a priori estimate. It is significant that the existence of periodic solutions of the CR3BP is mainly influenced by factors such as initial values, primary masses, and selection of the problem's control function. In addition, it is notable that the analytic proof of Poincaré's first class solutions is addressed for all values of the mass parameter in the interval (0, 1), the value of which must be sufficiently small according to previously published literature.

  9. Orbit-product representation and correction of Gaussian belief propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jason K; Chertkov, Michael; Chernyak, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    We present a new interpretation of Gaussian belief propagation (GaBP) based on the 'zeta function' representation of the determinant as a product over orbits of a graph. We show that GaBP captures back-tracking orbits of the graph and consider how to correct this estimate by accounting for non-backtracking orbits. We show that the product over non-backtracking orbits may be interpreted as the determinant of the non-backtracking adjacency matrix of the graph with edge weights based on the solution of GaBP. An efficient method is proposed to compute a truncated correction factor including all non-backtracking orbits up to a specified length.

  10. Low-frequency Interlayer Breathing Modes in Few-layer Black Phosphorus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shengxi; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kong, Jing; Dresselhaus, M; Meunier, V.; Liang, Liangbo; Ling, Xi

    2015-01-01

    As a new two-dimensional layered material, black phosphorus (BP) is a very promising material for nanoelectronics and nano-optoelectronics. We use Raman spectroscopy and first-principles theory to characterize and understand low-frequency (LF) interlayer breathing modes (<100 cm-1) in few-layer BP for the first time. Using laser polarization dependence study and group theory analysis the breathing modes are assigned to Ag symmetry. Compared to the high-frequency (HF) Raman modes, the LF breathing modes are considerably more sensitive to interlayer coupling and thus their frequencies show stronger dependence on the number of layers. Hence, they constitute an effective means to probe both the crystalline orientation and thickness of few-layer BP. Furthermore, the temperature dependence shows that the breathing modes have a harmonic behavior, in contrast to HF Raman modes which exhibit anharmonicity.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakatsu, C. H.; Barabote, Ravi; Thompson, Sue; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Brettin, T.; Han, Cliff F.; Beasley, Federico; Chen, Weimin; Konopka, Allan; Xie, Gary

    2013-09-30

    Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 is a species in the genus Arthrobacter Conn and Dimmick 1947, in the family Micrococcaceae and class Actinobacteria. A number of Arthrobacter genome sequences have been completed because of their important role in soil, especially bioremediation. This isolate is of special interest because it is tolerant to multiple metals and it is extremely resistant to elevated concentrations of chromate. The genome consists of a 4,698,945 bp circular chromosome and three plasmids (96,488, 115,507, and 159,536 bp, a total of 5,070,478 bp), coding 4,536 proteins of which 1,257 are without known function. This genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program.

  12. Low-Frequency Interlayer Breathing Modes in Few-Layer Black Phosphorus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Xi; Liang, Liangbo; Huang, Shengxi; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kong, Jing; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2015-05-08

    As a new two-dimensional layered material, black phosphorus (BP) is a very promising material for nanoelectronics and nano-optoelectronics. We use Raman spectroscopy and first-principles theory to characterize and understand low-frequency (LF) interlayer breathing modes (<100 cm-1) in few-layer BP for the first time. Using laser polarization dependence study and group theory analysis the breathing modes are assigned to Ag symmetry. Compared to the high-frequency (HF) Raman modes, the LF breathing modes are considerably more sensitive to interlayer coupling and thus their frequencies show stronger dependence on the number of layers. Hence, they constitute an effective means to probe both the crystalline orientation and thickness of few-layer BP. Furthermore, the temperature dependence shows that the breathing modes have a harmonic behavior, in contrast to HF Raman modes which exhibit anharmonicity.

  13. Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the Windy Point Wind Energy Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to offer contract terms for interconnection of 250 megawatts (MW) of power to be generated by the proposed Windy Point Wind Energy Project (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). Windy Point Partners, LLC (WPP) propose to construct and operate the proposed Wind Project and has requested interconnection to the FCRTS. The Wind Project will be interconnected at BPA's Rock Creek Substation, which is under construction in Klickitat County, Washington. The Rock Creek Substation will provide transmission access for the Wind Project to BPA's Wautoma-John Day No.1 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. BPA's decision to offer terms to interconnect the Wind Project is consistent with BPA's Business Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (BP EIS) (DOE/EIS-0183, June 1995), and the Business Plan Record of Decision (BP ROD, August 15, 1995). This decision thus is tiered to the BP ROD.

  14. Ethnic and gender differences in boredom proneness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, G.S.; Morales,

    1996-02-01

    Although boredom may exhibit many shared elements, culturally specific attitudes have also been found to exist. The present paper investigated boredom proneness among African-American college students. Data from 120 participants on the Boredom Proneness (BP) Scale was analyzed and compared to cross-cultural participants. African-American females scored significantly higher than African-American males. Scores were presented from two other studies to show a comparative look at boredom proneness in five other ethnic groups. African-American females are the only female ethnic group to score higher on the BP Scale than their male counterparts. Additionally, overall African-Americans, were found to have higher BP scores than their Western counterparts.

  15. Persistent activation of DNA damage signaling in response to complex mixtures of PAHs in air particulate matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, Ian W.H.; Bergvall, Christoffer; Bottai, Matteo; Westerholm, Roger; Stenius, Ulla; Dreij, Kristian

    2013-02-01

    Complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in air particulate matter (PM) and have been associated with many adverse human health effects including cancer and respiratory disease. However, due to their complexity, the risk of exposure to mixtures is difficult to estimate. In the present study the effects of binary mixtures of benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and complex mixtures of PAHs in urban air PM extracts on DNA damage signaling was investigated. Applying a statistical model to the data we observed a more than additive response for binary mixtures of BP and DBP on activation of DNA damage signaling. Persistent activation of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) was observed at significantly lower BP equivalent concentrations in air PM extracts than BP alone. Activation of DNA damage signaling was also more persistent in air PM fractions containing PAHs with more than four aromatic rings suggesting larger PAHs contribute a greater risk to human health. Altogether our data suggests that human health risk assessment based on additivity such as toxicity equivalency factor scales may significantly underestimate the risk of exposure to complex mixtures of PAHs. The data confirms our previous findings with PAH-contaminated soil (Niziolek-Kierecka et al., 2012) and suggests a possible role for Chk1 Ser317 phosphorylation as a biological marker for future analyses of complex mixtures of PAHs. -- Highlights: ? Benzo[a]pyrene (BP), dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and air PM PAH extracts were compared. ? Binary mixture of BP and DBP induced a more than additive DNA damage response. ? Air PM PAH extracts were more potent than toxicity equivalency factor estimates. ? Larger PAHs (> 4 rings) contribute more to the genotoxicity of PAHs in air PM. ? Chk1 is a sensitive marker for persistent activation of DNA damage signaling from PAH mixtures.

  16. Highly Insulating Windows for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reliability in Fenestration Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, David

    2010-11-30

    EverSealed Windows, Inc. (ESW) agreed in early 2006, prior to the contract award, to add three additional deliverables to the Project (new Milestones 30, 31 and 32), and have the results of these three deliverables form the basis of the go/no-go decision for proceeding from BP1 to BP2. ESW completed all three milestones and the DOE agreed in November 2006 to continue the Project. ESW subsequently initiated work on BP2 and its two milestones. These were to (1) Assemble and test glass-to-metal bonded coupons to test the strength of ESW's glass-to-metal bonds (ESW's Test Vehicle 1 or TV1), and (2) to assemble and test the hermeticity of glass and metal packages (ESW's Test Vehicle 2 or TV2). ESW completed both milestones of BP2 in late 2010, demonstrating that its bonds were both strong enough and hermetic enough that vacuum insulating glass units could be assembled and survive a 40+ year service life in any climate in North America. Based on the accomplishments in BP-1, the DOE held a go/no-go meeting in Washington, DC in mid-November 2006 and moved the Project into Budget Period 2 (BP-2). During this go/no-go meeting, the DOE expressed a concern that ESW did not have a back-up plan or process should ESW be unable to make its diffusion bonding process more than adequate for the necessary bond strength and hermeticity of the seal. ESW suggested and volunteered to investigate using a glass frit (i.e., solder glass) as a back-up to its diffusion bonding of glass to oxidized metal.

  17. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  18. Readout of President Obama's Call With Secretary Chu | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretary Chu Readout of President Obama's Call With Secretary Chu May 25, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis President Obama spoke with Energy Secretary Steven Chu tonight by telephone from Air Force One. Secretary Chu briefed the President on his scientific and technical assessment of BP's plans for a possible "top kill" and what the next steps will be if BP's "top kill" fails to stop to leak. At the request of President Obama, Secretary Chu has been leading a team of top scientists

  19. Coal dust contiguity-induced changes in the concentration of TNF- and NF- B p65 on the ocular surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Z.Y.; Hong, J.; Liu, Z.Y.; Jin, X.D.; Gu, C.H.

    2009-07-01

    To observe the influence of coal dust on ocular surface of coal miners and rabbits with coal dust contiguity on expression TNF- and NF- Bp65 and dry eye occurrence. Expression TNF- and NF- Bp65 in ocular surface were determined. Results showed tear production, BUT and lysozyme decreased for coal miners and rabbits with coal dust contiguity. Coal dust exposure was linked to development of xerophthalmia, and induced a higher expression of NF- B p65 and TNF- perhaps as a mechanism to resist coal dust ocular surface injury.

  20. Ambient temperature modelling with soft computing techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertini, Ilaria; Ceravolo, Francesco; Citterio, Marco; Di Pietra, Biagio; Margiotta, Francesca; Pizzuti, Stefano; Puglisi, Giovanni; De Felice, Matteo

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes a hybrid approach based on soft computing techniques in order to estimate monthly and daily ambient temperature. Indeed, we combine the back-propagation (BP) algorithm and the simple Genetic Algorithm (GA) in order to effectively train artificial neural networks (ANN) in such a way that the BP algorithm initialises a few individuals of the GA's population. Experiments concerned monthly temperature estimation of unknown places and daily temperature estimation for thermal load computation. Results have shown remarkable improvements in accuracy compared to traditional methods. (author)

  1. Timeline of Events: 2010 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 Timeline of Events: 2010 May 28, 2010: Chu helps oversee BP's "top kill" efforts May 28, 2010: Chu helps oversee BP's "top kill" efforts Secretary Chu concludes several days in Houston monitoring the "top kill" attempt to stop the oil well leak in the Gulf of Mexico, analyzing the data as it comes in and helping to develop strategies to give it the best chances of success. Read more November 18, 2010: Antimatter Trapped and Stored November 18, 2010: Antimatter

  2. New iodocuprates(I) with N-heterocyclic molecules as the cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jin-Jing; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Yan-Ning; Jia, Hong-Li; Yu, Jie-Hui; Xu, Ji-Qing

    2013-11-15

    Under the hydrothermal conditions, the reactions between CuI, KI and bp/bpp (bp=4,4′-bipiperidine, bpp=1,3-bis(4-piperidyl)propane) in an acidic alcohol solution produced three new organically templated iodocuprates(I) as [H{sub 2}bp]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}I{sub 6}] 1, [tmbp][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}] 2 and [tmbpp] 2 [Cu{sub 4}I{sub 8}]·2H{sub 2}O 3 (tmbp{sup 2+}=N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-4,4′-bipiperidinium; tmbpp{sup 2+}=N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-1,3-bis(4-piperidyl)propane dication). X-ray analysis revealed that (i) tmbp{sup 2+} and tmbpp{sup 2+} in compounds 2 and 3 originated from the complete N-alklation of bp/bpp with CH{sub 3}OH; (ii) templated by H{sub 2}bp{sup 2+}, the inorganic anion [Cu{sub 2}I{sub 6}]{sup 2−} of 1 possesses a dinuclear structure, whereas templated by tmbp{sup 2+}, the inorganic anion [Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}]{sup 2−} of 2 exhibits a one-dimensional (1D) chain structure; (iii) templated by tmbpp{sup 2+}, the inorganic anion [Cu{sub 4}I{sub 8}]{sup 4−} of 3 shows a cubane-like structure modified by four terminal I{sup −} ions. The photoluminescence analysis indicates that compounds 1 and 2 emit blue light, while compound 3 emits green light. - Graphical abstract: By employing hydrothermal in situ N-alkylation of bp/bpp with CH{sub 3}OH, three new organically templated iodocuprates(I) were obtained. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Three new organically templated iodocuprates(I) were reported. • Cations tmbp{sup 2+} and tmbpp{sup 2+} originated from in situ alkylation of bp/bpp with CH{sub 3}OH. • H{sup +} and I{sup −} play a key role in alkylation of bp/bpp with CH{sub 3}OH. • Photoluminescence emission for iodocuprates(I) is related to Cu···Cu interaction.

  3. The Complexes of Bisphosphonate and Magnetite Nanoparticles to Remove Uranyl Ions from Aqueous Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L.; Yang, Z.; Gao, J.; Xu, K.; Gu, H.; Xu, B.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, X.

    2007-03-20

    Using tetraethyl-3-amino-propane-1,1-bisphosphonate (BP) as the functional molecule, we functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles via dopamine (DA) linkage to create a system with an Fe3O4-DA-BP nanostructure, which possesses high specificity for removing uranyl ions from water or blood. This work demonstrates that magnetic nanoparticles, combined with specific receptor-ligand interactions, promise a sensitive and rapid platform for the detection, recovery, and decorporation of radioactive metal toxins from biological environment.

  4. Microsoft Word - chapter FeCrMo_ver2.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Low-Alloy Ferritic Steels: Tempered Fe-Cr-Mo Alloys (code 1211) Prepared by: B.P. Somerday, Sandia National Laboratories Editors C. San Marchi B.P. Somerday Sandia National Laboratories This report may be updated and revised periodically in response to the needs of the technical community; up-to-date versions can be requested from the editors at the address given below or downloaded at http://www.ca.sandia.gov/matlsTechRef/ . The success of this

  5. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH Al\rD SAFETY DlVlSlON

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    em IVIL, u-3 1' 1L, I -' I ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH Al\rD SAFETY DlVlSlON 1956 1. H.# fL22 Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. Sample Nor& 3 Date Collected- 5117 by --Route to CES CES r Location IQJKER-PEMJNS Co- Type of Sample-waternalyzed for F Alpha Remarks -&I GG -- u - Beta Samples of water discharged to river during Steam clean- No, Ra ing of equipment. Oil PH Be Th Sample No. Hour Sample Description (RT Please analyze for gm/U/gal. BP-1 P- RO-Kneader BP-2 K-

  6. Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, Bob; Chandra, Subrato; Baden, Steven; Cummings, Jim; Cummings, Jamie; Beal, David; Chasar, David; Colon, Carlos; Dutton, Wanda; Fairey, Philip; Fonorow, Ken; Gil, Camilo; Gordon, Andrew; Hoak, David; Kerr, Ryan; Peeks, Brady; Kosar, Douglas; Hewes, Tom; Kalaghchy, Safvat; Lubliner, Mike; Martin, Eric; McIlvaine, Janet; Moyer, Neil; Liguori, Sabrina; Parker, Danny; Sherwin, John; Stroer, Dennis; Thomas-Rees, Stephanie; Daniel, Danielle; McIlvaine, Janet

    2010-11-30

    This report summarizes the work conducted by the Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP - www.baihp.org) during the final budget period (BP5) of our contract, January 1, 2010 to November 30, 2010. Highlights from the four previous budget periods are included for context. BAIHP is led by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) of the University of Central Florida. With over 50 Industry Partners including factory and site builders, work in BP5 was performed in six tasks areas: Building America System Research Management, Documentation and Technical Support; System Performance Evaluations; Prototype House Evaluations; Initial Community Scale Evaluations; Project Closeout, Final Review of BA Communities; and Other Research Activities.

  7. CONTROL OF TRACE METAL EMISSIONS DURING COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THOMAS C. HO

    1998-02-18

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor. This final technical report details the work performed, the conclusions obtained, and the accomplishments achieved over the project performance period from July 1, 1994 through December 31, 1997. Specifically, this report consists of the following five chapters: Chapter 1. Executive Summary; Chapter 2. Metal Capture by Various Sorbents; Chapter 3. Simultaneous Metal and Sulfur Capture; Chapter 4. Sorption and Desorption of Mercury on Sorbents; and Chapter 5. Project Conclusions. In summary, the metals involved in the project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury and selenium and the sorbents tested included bauxite, zeolite and calcined limestone. The three sorbents have been found to have various degree of metal capture capability on arsenic, cadmium, chromium and lead

  8. CFD Modeling for Mercury Control Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madsen, J.I.

    2006-12-01

    Compliance with the Clean Air Mercury Rule will require implementation of dedicated mercury control solutions at a significant portion of the U.S. coal-fired utility fleet. Activated Carbon Injection (ACI) upstream of a particulate control device (ESP or baghouse) remains one of the most promising near-term mercury control technologies. The DOE/NETL field testing program has advanced the understanding of mercury control by ACI, but a persistent need remains to develop predictive models that may improve the understanding and practical implementation of this technology. This presentation describes the development of an advanced model of in-flight mercury capture based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The model makes detailed predictions of the induct spatial distribution and residence time of sorbent, as well as predictions of mercury capture efficiency for particular sorbent flow rates and injection grid configurations. Hence, CFD enables cost efficient optimization of sorbent injection systems for mercury control to a degree that would otherwise be impractical both for new and existing plants. In this way, modeling tools may directly address the main cost component of operating an ACI system the sorbent expense. A typical 300 MW system is expected to require between $1 and $2 million of sorbent per year, and so even modest reductions (say 10-20%) in necessary sorbent feed injection rates will quickly make any optimization effort very worthwhile. There are few existing models of mercury capture, and these typically make gross assumptions of plug gas flow, zero velocity slip between particle and gas phase, and uniform sorbent dispersion. All of these assumptions are overcome with the current model, which is based on first principles and includes mass transfer processes occurring at multiple scales, ranging from the large-scale transport in the duct to transport within the porous structure of a sorbent particle. In principle any single one of these processes

  9. Molten Metal Treatment by Salt Fluxing with Low Environmental Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yogeshwar Sahai

    2007-07-31

    Abstract: Chlorine gas is traditionally used for fluxing of aluminum melt for removal of alkali and alkaline earth elements. However this results in undesirable emissions of particulate matter and gases such as HCl and chlorine, which are often at unacceptable levels. Additionally, chlorine gas is highly toxic and its handling, storage, and use pose risks to employees and the local community. Holding of even minimal amounts of chlorine necessitates extensive training for all plant employees. Fugitive emissions from chlorine usage within the plant cause accelerated corrosion of plant equipment. The Secondary Aluminum Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) under the Clean Air Act, finalized in March 2000 has set very tough new limits on particulate matter (PM) and total hydrogen chloride emissions from aluminum melting and holding furnaces. These limits are 0.4 and 0.1 lbs per ton of aluminum for hydrogen chloride and particulate emissions, respectively. Assuming new technologies for meeting these limits can be found, additional requirements under the Clean Air Act (Prevention of Significant Deterioration and New Source Review) trigger Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for new sources with annual emissions (net emissions not expressed per ton of production) over specified amounts. BACT currently is lime coated bag-houses for control of particulate and HCl emissions. These controls are expensive, difficult to operate and maintain, and result in reduced American competitiveness in the global economy. Solid salt fluxing is emerging as a viable option for the replacement of chlorine gas fluxing, provided emissions can be consistently maintained below the required levels. This project was a cooperative effort between the Ohio State University and Alcoa to investigate and optimize the effects of solid chloride flux addition in molten metal for alkali impurity and non-metallic inclusion removal minimizing dust and toxic emissions and maximizing energy

  10. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Bp,the tf.m hdlilph sot to the docrrwsp the hycim&n . . h;Id liuret ."" fZs??aa end the fim ma on. -' t z . . bt lcmt two Pcmdte ixtiiahera, tm2 gallcln m iter pwq, anif . a. cm ...

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - 04-10 DC_Ruhl.ppt [Compatibility Mode...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Saudi announces increases 2 5 -2.0 -1.5 40 60 Oil price (rhs) OPEC announces cuts -3.5 -3.0 -2.5 J 07 J l 07 J 08 J l 08 J 09 J l 09 0 20 Saudi Arabia Kuw ait, UAE Other BP 2010 ...

  12. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Ward, David M.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-03-26

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons.

  14. BPA-2012-00330-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10512011 1004 Daniel C. APLC FA O8 998 8975 P.0011011 DANIEL C. MINUTILLO Professional Law Corporation rED BV BP 941 Blossom Hill Road, Suite 205 FOIL OtFCCE T 1 i i P.O. Box...

  15. Complete genome sequence of Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11, isolated from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Jayashree; Waters, R. Jordan; Skerker, Jeffrey M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Price, Morgan N.; Huang, Jiawen; Chakraborty, Romy; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam

    2015-05-14

    Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11 was isolated from groundwater at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (FRC) site. Here, we report the complete genome sequence and annotation of Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11. The genome contains 8,421,483 bp, 7,661 predicted protein-coding genes, and a total GC content of 64.4%.

  16. 20160307_DraftPEA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Environmental Assessment April 2016 DOE/EA-2006 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION DOE/BP-2006 * April 2016 Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Page i Table of Contents Chapter 1 Purpose of and Need for Action ................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Need

  17. 20160307_DraftPEA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Assessment July 2016 DOE/EA-2006 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION DOE/BP-2006 * July 2016 Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program i Table of Contents Chapter 1 Purpose of and Need for Action ................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Need

  18. Holocene Paleohydrology of the tropical andes from lake records

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, M. B., LLNL

    1997-03-03

    Two century-scale time series in northern Bolivia constrain the ages of abrupt changes in the physical, geochemical, and biological characteristics of sediments obtained from lakes that formed during deglaciation from the late Pleistocene glacial maximum. The watersheds of Laguna Viscachani (16{degrees}12`S, 68{degrees}07`W, 3780m) and Lago Taypi Chaka Kkota (16{degrees}13`S, 68{degrees}21`W, 4300m), located on the eastern and western slopes of the Cordillera Real, respectively, contain small cirque glaciers. A high-resolution chronology of the lake sediments is provided by 23 AMS {sup 14}C dates of discrete macro-fossils. Late Pleistocene glaciers retreated rapidly, exposing the lake basins between 10,700 and 9700 {sup 14}C yr B.P. The sedimentary facies suggest that after 8900 {sup 14}C B.P. glaciers were absent from the watersheds and remained so during the middle Holocene. An increase in the precipitation-evaporation balance is indicated above unconformities dated to about 2300 {sup 14}C yr B.P. in both Lago Taypi Chaka Kkota and Laguna Viscachani. An abrupt increase in sediment accumulation rated after 1400 {sup 14}C yr B.P. signals the onset of Neoglaciation. A possible link exists between the observed millennial-scale shifts in the regional precipitation- evaporation balance and seasonal shifts in tropical insolation.

  19. A=11C (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3. 9Be(3He, n)11C Qm 7.565 See (PO52B, KU53A, MO54B). 4. 10B(p, )11C Qm 8.700 For Ep 0.7 to 3 MeV, the main capture radiation is to the ground state. Weaker radiations, ...

  20. A=10C (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. 10C(+)10B Qm 3.78 The decay is complex. See 10B. 2. 10B(p, n)10C Qm -4.56 At Ep 17.2 MeV, neutron groups are observed corresponding to the ground state (Q0 -4.35 ...

  1. Complete genome sequence of Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11, isolated from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ray, Jayashree; Waters, R. Jordan; Skerker, Jeffrey M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Price, Morgan N.; Huang, Jiawen; Chakraborty, Romy; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam

    2015-05-14

    Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11 was isolated from groundwater at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (FRC) site. Here, we report the complete genome sequence and annotation of Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11. The genome contains 8,421,483 bp, 7,661 predicted protein-coding genes, and a total GC content of 64.4%.

  2. Comparative analysis of discharges into Lake Michigan, Phase I - Southern Lake Michigan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Elcock, D.; Gasper, J. R.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-06-30

    BP Products North America Inc. (BP) owns and operates a petroleum refinery located on approximately 1,700 acres in Whiting, East Chicago, and Hammond, Indiana, near the southern tip of Lake Michigan. BP provided funding to Purdue University-Calumet Water Institute (Purdue) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to conduct studies related to wastewater treatment and discharges. Purdue and Argonne are working jointly to identify and characterize technologies that BP could use to meet the previous discharge permit limits for total suspended solids (TSS) and ammonia after refinery modernization. In addition to the technology characterization work, Argonne conducted a separate project task, which is the subject of this report. In Phase I of a two-part study, Argonne estimated the current levels of discharge to southern Lake Michigan from significant point and nonpoint sources in Illinois, Indiana, and portions of Michigan. The study does not consider all of the chemicals that are discharged. Rather, it is narrowly focused on a selected group of pollutants, referred to as the 'target pollutants'. These include: TSS, ammonia, total and hexavalent chromium, mercury, vanadium, and selenium. In Phase II of the study, Argonne will expand the analysis to cover the entire Lake Michigan drainage basin.

  3. Observation and Modeling of Inner Divertor Re-attachment in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and ITER Physics Expert Group on Divertor Modelling, Nucl. ... Bush, R. Kaita, H.W. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, S.F. Paul, G.D. ... Plasma Phys., 44:262, 2004. 5 H. A. Scott, J. Quant. ...

  4. Genome Sequence of the Historical Clinical Isolate Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    D’haeseleer, Patrik; Johnson, Shannon L.; Davenport, Karen W.; Chain, Patrick S.; Schoeniger, Joe; Ray, Debjit; Sinha, Anupama; Williams, Kelly P.; Peña, José; Branda, Steven S.; et al

    2016-06-30

    We present the draft genome sequence ofBurkholderia pseudomalleiPHLS 6, a virulent clinical strain isolated from a melioidosis patient in Bangladesh in 1960. This draft genome consists of 39 contigs and is 7,322,181 bp long.

  5. Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, Daniel

    2008-10-18

    The Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative to demonstrate an innovative combination of air pollution control technologies that can cost-effectively reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, Hg, acid gases (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF), and particulate matter from smaller coal-fired electric generating units (EGUs). There are about 400 units in the United States with capacities of 50-300 MW that currently are not equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), flue gas desulfurization (FGD), or mercury control systems. Many of these units, which collectively represent more than 55 GW of installed capacity, are difficult to retrofit for deep emission reductions because of space constraints and unfavorable economies of scale, making them increasingly vulnerable to retirement or fuel switching in the face of progressively more stringent environmental regulations. The Greenidge Project sought to confirm the commercial readiness of an emissions control system that is specifically designed to meet the environmental compliance requirements of these smaller coal-fired EGUs by offering a combination of deep emission reductions, low capital costs, small space requirements, applicability to high-sulfur coals, mechanical simplicity, and operational flexibility. The multi-pollutant control system includes a NO{sub x}OUT CASCADE{reg_sign} hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct SCR system for NO{sub x} control and a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubbing system (with a new baghouse) for SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter control. Mercury removal is provided as a co-benefit of the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse, and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, if required. The multi-pollutant control system was installed and tested on the 107-MW{sub e}, 1953-vintage AES Greenidge Unit 4 by a team including

  6. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Arnt mRNA expressed in a circadian manner in mouse pancreatic islets. •Expressions of Dbp and Arnt damped in the islets of a diabetic model mouse. •DBP and E4BP4 regulate Arnt promoter activity by direct binding. •Arnt may have a role in connecting circadian rhythm and metabolism. -- Abstract: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1{sup −/−} A{sup y}/a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the

  7. Using Economic Input/Output Tables to Predict a Countrys Nuclear Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimar, Mark R.; Daly, Don S.; Wood, Thomas W.

    2010-07-15

    Both nuclear power and nuclear weapons programs should have (related) economic signatures which are detectible at some scale. We evaluated this premise in a series of studies using national economic input/output (IO) data. Statistical discrimination models using economic IO tables predict with a high probability whether a country with an unknown predilection for nuclear weapons proliferation is in fact engaged in nuclear power development or nuclear weapons proliferation. We analyzed 93 IO tables, spanning the years 1993 to 2005 for 37 countries that are either members or associates of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The 2009 OECD input/output tables featured 48 industrial sectors based on International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) Revision 3, and described the respective economies in current country-of-origin valued currency. We converted and transformed these reported values to US 2005 dollars using appropriate exchange rates and implicit price deflators, and addressed discrepancies in reported industrial sectors across tables. We then classified countries with Random Forest using either the adjusted or industry-normalized values. Random Forest, a classification tree technique, separates and categorizes countries using a very small, select subset of the 2304 individual cells in the IO table. A nations efforts in nuclear power, be it for electricity or nuclear weapons, are an enterprise with a large economic footprint -- an effort so large that it should discernibly perturb coarse country-level economics data such as that found in yearly input-output economic tables. The neoclassical economic input-output model describes a countrys or regions economy in terms of the requirements of industries to produce the current level of economic output. An IO table row shows the distribution of an industrys output to the industrial sectors while a table column shows the input required of each industrial sector by a given

  8. A deformable head and neck phantom with in-vivo dosimetry for adaptive radiotherapy quality assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, Yan Jiang; Smith, Arthur-Allen; Mcilvena, David; Manilay, Zherrina; Lai, Yuet Kong; Rice, Roger; Mell, Loren; Cerviño, Laura E-mail: steve.jiang@utsouthwestern.edu; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B. E-mail: steve.jiang@utsouthwestern.edu

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Patients’ interfractional anatomic changes can compromise the initial treatment plan quality. To overcome this issue, adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been introduced. Deformable image registration (DIR) is an important tool for ART and several deformable phantoms have been built to evaluate the algorithms’ accuracy. However, there is a lack of deformable phantoms that can also provide dosimetric information to verify the accuracy of the whole ART process. The goal of this work is to design and construct a deformable head and neck (HN) ART quality assurance (QA) phantom with in vivo dosimetry. Methods: An axial slice of a HN patient is taken as a model for the phantom construction. Six anatomic materials are considered, with HU numbers similar to a real patient. A filled balloon inside the phantom tissue is inserted to simulate tumor. Deflation of the balloon simulates tumor shrinkage. Nonradiopaque surface markers, which do not influence DIR algorithms, provide the deformation ground truth. Fixed and movable holders are built in the phantom to hold a diode for dosimetric measurements. Results: The measured deformations at the surface marker positions can be compared with deformations calculated by a DIR algorithm to evaluate its accuracy. In this study, the authors selected a Demons algorithm as a DIR algorithm example for demonstration purposes. The average error magnitude is 2.1 mm. The point dose measurements from the in vivo diode dosimeters show a good agreement with the calculated doses from the treatment planning system with a maximum difference of 3.1% of prescription dose, when the treatment plans are delivered to the phantom with original or deformed geometry. Conclusions: In this study, the authors have presented the functionality of this deformable HN phantom for testing the accuracy of DIR algorithms and verifying the ART dosimetric accuracy. The authors’ experiments demonstrate the feasibility of this phantom serving as an end

  9. Suspension- and current-deposit reservoirs in the Delaware basin: Trends and cycles in siltstones of the Permian Bone Spring Limestone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, J.C. ); Brooks, L.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Cores show that siltstone to very fine-grained sandstone oil reservoirs within the Permian Bone Spring Limestone are composed of submillimeter- to centimeter-thick sedimentation laminae. Blanketing of small-scale topography suggests that the laminae were deposited over wide areas as sediment settled vertical to the sea floor. Superimposed on the event laminae, were (1) background sedimentation of dolomitic, organic-rich, mudstone, (2) invertebrate burrowing, and (3) reworking by gentle bottom currents. Currents produced wispy ripply bedding and starved ripple forms that were draped by later deposits. Paleoflow was subparallel to the basin margin. Several sedimentation patterns occur within the formation. Three clastic intervals 25-50-m thick are interbedded with dolomitic mudstones of similar thickness. The clastic intervals are composed of three to six siltstone beds, each up to 25-m thick. Upsection within the beds increases in event-laminae, thickness, bioturbation, and current reworking. Other reports have suggested that these are turbidite-fan deposits, but locally, paleocurrent orientations and the lack of diagnostic assemblages and sequences of sedimentary structures argue against this interpretation. Rather, some of these deposits compare favorably with the few existing sedimentologic descriptions of Quaternary dust storm deposition in marine basins. The siltstone beds may also record deflation of the exposed adjacent shelf during lowered sea level. Very fine grain size and extensive carbonate cementation produce 5-10 pd permeability and 4-15% porosity. Sedimentary laminations cause significantly reduced vertical permeability where they are not disrupted by bioturbation, but permeability may be enhanced by natural fractures. Some reservoir thickenings are attributed to the formation of giant ripples by bottom currents, dictating a different exploration rationale than the turbidite-fan model.

  10. Lunette dunes and yardangs of the Carson desert, Nevada: Implications for Holocene eolian activity in the northern Great Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, N. (Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Quaternary Sciences Center)

    1993-04-01

    A large complex of lunette dunes consisting of two and locally three ridges up to 40 m high occurs on the northeast margin of the Carson Sink playa. The outer, or north-easterly, ridge consists of a core of fine and coarse and partially cemented by saline clay and silt (Unit 1) with avalanche face cross-beds dipping to the north-east at 25--30[degree], as well as planar sets of wind ripple laminae with dips to both the northeast and west at 2--5[degree]. Overlying this unit on the crest and lee side of the ridge is 2--5 m of mobile poorly sorted, very fine and coarse sand that forms an active avalanche face up to 25 m high on the east side of the ridge (Unit 3). At a number of localities, the indurated core of the larger dune ridge is carved into yardanges, or streamlined small hills with a lemniscate shape that result from wind erosion of homogeneous sediments. The dunes overlie, with an erosional contact, Late Pleistocene saline lacustrine clays of paleolake Lahontan. They represent at least two episodes of mid- to late-Holocene deflation of sediments from the Carson Sink playa. Erosion of the dunes and yardang formation suggests: (1) termination of sediment supply from the playa as a result of reduced sediment supply and runoff from the Carson River, (2) cementation of the dunes by clay and silt accumulation, and (3) modern eolian erosion through flow acceleration on dune windward slopes.

  11. Middle to Late Holocene Fluctuations of C3 and C4 Vegetation in a Northern New England Salt Marsh, Sprague Marsh, Phippsburg Maine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, B J; Moore, K A; Lehmann, C; Bohlen, C; Brown, T A

    2006-05-26

    A 3.1 meter sediment core was analyzed for stable carbon isotope composition of organic matter and higher plant leaf wax (HPLW) lipid biomarkers to determine Holocene shifts in C{sub 3} (higher high marsh) and C{sub 4} (low and/or high marsh) plant deposition at the Sprague River Salt Marsh, Phippsburg, Maine. The carbon isotope composition of the bulk sediment and the HPLW parallel each other throughout most of the core, suggesting that terrestrial plants are an important source of organic matter to the sediments, and diagenetic alteration of the bulk sediments is minimal. The current salt marsh began to form 2500 cal yr BP. Low and/or high C{sub 4} marsh plants dominated deposition at 2000 cal yr BP, 700 cal yr BP, and for the last 200 cal yr BP. Expansion of higher high marsh C{sub 3} plants occurred at 1300 and 600 cal yr BP. These major vegetation shifts result from a combination of changes in relative sea-level rise and sediment accumulation rates. Average annual carbon sequestration rates for the last 2500 years approximate 40 g C yr{sup -1} m{sup -2}, and are in strong agreement with other values published for the Gulf of Maine. Given that Maine salt marshes cover an area of {approx}79 km{sup 2}, they represent an important component of the terrestrial carbon sink. More detailed isotopic and age records from a network of sediment cores at Sprague Marsh are needed to truly evaluate the long term changes in salt marsh plant communities and the impact of more recent human activity, including global warming, on salt marsh vegetation.

  12. Stereochemical determination of carbon partitioning between photosynthesis and photorespiration in C3 plants: use of (3R)-D-(3-3H1, 3-14C)glyceric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, K.R.

    1984-07-01

    When (3R)-D-(3-3H1,3-14C)glyceric acid is supplied in tracer amounts to illuminated tobacco leaf discs, the acid penetrates to the chloroplasts without loss of 3H, and is phosphorylated there. Subsequent metabolism associated with the reductive photosynthetic cycle fully conserves 3H. Oxidation of ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) by RuBP carboxylase-oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39) results in the formation of (2R)-(2-3H1, 14C)glycolic acid which, on oxidation by glycolate oxidase (EC 1.1.3.1), releases 3H to water. Loss of 3H from the combined photosynthetic and photorespiratory systems is, therefore, associated with the oxidative photorespiratory loop. Assuming steady-state conditions and a basic metabolic model, the fraction of RuBP oxidized and the photorespiratory carbon flux relative to gross or net CO2 fixation can be calculated from the fraction of supplied 3H retained in the triose phosphates exported from the chloroplasts. This retention can be determined from the 3H:14C ratio for glucose obtained from isolated sucrose. The dependence of 3H retention upon O2 and CO2 concentrations can be deduced by assuming simple competitive kinetics for RuBP carboxylase-oxygenase. The experimental results confirmed the stereochemical assumptions made. Under conditions of negligible photorespiration 3H retention was essentially complete. The change in 3H retention with O2 and CO2 concentrations were investigated. For leaf discs (upper surface up) in normal air, it was estimated that 39% of the RuBP was oxidized, 32% of the fixed CO2 was photorespired, and the photorespiration rate was 46% of the net photosynthetic CO2 fixation rate. These are minimal estimates, as it is assumed that the only source of photorespired CO2 is glycine decarboxylation.

  13. Climate Change in Lowland Central America During the Late Deglacial and Early Holocene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillesheim, M B; Hodell, D A; Leyden, B W; Brenner, M; Curtis, J H; Anselmetti, F S; Ariztegui, D; Buck, D G; Guilderson, T P; Rosenmeier, M F; Schnurrenberger, D W

    2005-02-08

    The transition from arid glacial to moist early Holocene conditions represented a profound change in northern lowland Neotropical climate. Here we report a detailed record of changes in moisture availability during the latter part of this transition ({approx}11,250 to 7,500 cal yr BP) inferred from sediment cores retrieved in Lake Peten Itza, northern Guatemala. Pollen assemblages demonstrate that a mesic forest had been largely established by {approx}11,250 cal yr BP, but sediment properties indicate that lake level was more than 35 m below modern stage. From 11,250 to 10,350 cal yr BP, during the Preboreal period, lithologic changes in sediments from deep-water cores (>50 m below modern water level) indicate several wet-dry cycles that suggest distinct changes in effective moisture. Four dry events (designated PBE1-4) occurred at 11,200, 10,900, 10,700, and 10,400 cal yr BP and correlate with similar variability observed in the Cariaco Basin titanium record and glacial meltwater pulses into the Gulf of Mexico. After 10,350 cal yr BP, multiple sediment proxies suggest a shift to a more persistently moist early Holocene climate. Comparison of results from Lake Peten Itza with other records from the circum-Caribbean demonstrates a coherent climate response during the entire span of our record. Furthermore, lowland Neotropical climate during the late deglacial and early Holocene period appears to be tightly linked to climate change in the high-latitude North Atlantic. We speculate that the observed changes in lowland Neotropical precipitation were related to the intensity of the annual cycle and associated displacements in the mean latitudinal position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and Azores-Bermuda high-pressure system. This mechanism operated on millennial-to-submillennial timescales and may have responded to changes in solar radiation, glacial meltwater, North Atlantic sea ice, and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC).

  14. Altered cardiovascular reactivity and osmoregulation during hyperosmotic stress in adult rats developmentally exposed to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Ashini; Coburn, Cary G.; Watson-Siriboe, Abena; Whitley, Rebecca; Shahidzadeh, Anoush; Gillard, Elizabeth R.; Nichol, Robert; Leon-Olea, Martha; Gaertner, Mark; Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.

    2011-10-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and the structurally similar chemicals polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) disrupt the function of multiple endocrine systems. PCBs and PBDEs disrupt the secretion of vasopressin (VP) from the hypothalamus during osmotic activation. Since the peripheral and central vasopressinergic axes are critical for osmotic and cardiovascular regulation, we examined whether perinatal PBDE exposure could impact these functions during physiological activation. Rats were perinatally dosed with a commercial PBDE mixture, DE-71. Dams were given 0 (corn oil control), 1.7 (low dose) or 30.6 mg/kg/day (high dose) in corn oil from gestational day (GD) 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21 by oral gavage. In the male offspring exposed to high dose PBDE plasma thyroxine and triiodothyronine levels were reduced at PND 21 and recovered to control levels by PND 60 when thyroid stimulating hormone levels were elevated. At 14-18 months of age, cardiovascular responses were measured in four groups of rats: Normal (Oil, normosmotic condition), Hyper (Oil, hyperosmotic stress), Hyper PBDE low (1.7 mg/kg/day DE-71 perinatally, hyperosmotic stress), and Hyper PBDE high (30.6 mg/kg/day DE-71 perinatally, hyperosmotic stress). Systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, and heart rate (HR) were determined using tail cuff sphygmomanometry and normalized to pretreatment values (baseline) measured under basal conditions. Hyperosmotic treatment yielded significant changes in systolic BP in PBDE exposed rats only. Hyper PBDE low and high dose rats showed 36.1 and 64.7% greater systolic BP responses at 3 h post hyperosmotic injection relative to pretreatment baseline, respectively. No treatment effects were measured for diastolic BP and HR. Hyper and Hyper PBDE rats showed increased mean plasma osmolality values by 45 min after injection relative to normosmotic controls. In contrast to Hyper rats, Hyper PBDE (high) rats showed a further increase in mean plasma osmolality at 3

  15. Pump packages for Colombian crude oil pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-05-01

    The Caterpillar Large Engine Center recently packaged ten engine-driven centrifugal pump packages for British Petroleum Exploration`s crude oil pipeline in South America. The ten sets, which use Ingersoll-Dresser centrifugal pumps, are designed to increase significantly the output of BP`s Central LLanos pipeline located in a remote region near Bogota, Colombia. BP anticipates that the addition of the new pump packages will increase daily volume from the current 100000 barrels to approximately 210000 barrels when the upgrade of the pipeline is completed in September. The ten sets are installed at three separate pumping stations. The stations are designed to operate continuously while unmanned, with only periodic maintenance required. The pump packages are powered by Caterpillar 3612 engines rated 3040 kW at 1000 r/min. The 12-cylinder engines are turbocharged and charge-air cooled and use the pipeline oil as both fuel and a cooling medium for the fuel injectors.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Tsukamurella paurometabola type strain (no. 33T)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Yasawong, Montri; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Tsukamurella paurometabola corrig. (Steinhaus 1941) Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus Tsukamurella, which is the type genus to the family Tsukamurellaceae. The spe- cies is not only of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location, but also because it is a human opportunistic pathogen with some strains of the species reported to cause lung in- fection, lethal meningitis, and necrotizing tenosynovitis. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Tsukamurella and the first genome sequence of a member of the family Tsukamurellaceae. The 4,479,724 bp long genome contains a 99,806 bp long plasmid and a total of 4,335 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes, and is a part of the Ge- nomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. A=10C (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10C) GENERAL: See (TA60L, IN62, GR64C, VO64C). See also Table 10.24 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 10C: From the Q-value of the 10B(p, n)10C reaction (TA61E: Q0 = -4.393 ± 0.025 MeV) and the β+ end-point energy (BA63R: Eβ+(max) = 1.865 ± 0.015 MeV), the mass excess of 10C is 15.658 ± 0.013 MeV, based on 12C ≡ 0 (MA65A). 1. 10C(β+)10B Qm = 3.606 The decay is complex. See 10B. 2. 10B(p, n)10C Qm = -4.388 The ground state threshold

  18. Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Walsh; Giang Tong; Neeles Bhopatkar; Thomas Gale; George Blankenship; Conrad Ingram; Selasi Blavo Tesfamariam Mehreteab; Victor Banjoko; Yohannes Ghirmazion; Heng Ban; April Sibley

    2009-09-14

    scale, burning bituminous coals (Gale, 2006) and blends of bituminous coals with Powder River Basin coal (Gale, 2005). The removal of mercury by fly ash and unburned carbon in the flue gas from combustion of the bituminous coals and blends was reproduced with satisfactory accuracy by the model. The enhancement of mercury capture in the presence of calcium (Gale, 2005) explained a synergistic effect of blending on mercury removal across the baghouse. The extent of mercury oxidation, on the other hand, was not so well described by the simulation, because of oversensitivity of the oxidation process in the model to the concentration of unburned carbon. Combined catalysts and sorbents for oxidation and removal of mercury from flue gas at low temperature were based on surfactant-templated silicas containing a transition metal and an organic functional group. The presence of both metal ions and organic groups within the pore structure of the materials is expected to impart to them the ability to simultaneously oxidize elemental mercury and adsorb the resulting oxidized mercury. Twelve mesoporous organosilicate catalysts/sorbents were synthesized, with and without metals (manganese, titanium, vanadium) and organic functional groups (aminopropyl, chloropropyl, mercaptopropyl). Measurement of mercury oxidation and adsorption by the candidate materials remains for future work.

  19. Evaluation of MerCAP for Power Plant Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl Richardson

    2008-09-30

    This report is submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41993, 'Evaluation of EPRI's MerCAP{trademark} Technology for Power Plant Mercury Control'. This project has investigated the mercury removal performance of EPRI's Mercury Capture by Amalgamation Process (MerCAP{trademark}) technology. Test programs were conducted to evaluate gold-based MerCAP{trademark} at Great River Energy's Stanton Station Unit 10 (Site 1), which fired both North Dakota lignite (NDL) and Power River Basin (PRB) coal during the testing period, and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates Unit 1 (Site 2) [Georgia Power is a subsidiary of The Southern Company] which fires a low sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. Additional tests were carried out at Alabama Power's Plant Miller, which fires Powder River Basin Coal, to evaluate a carbon-based MerCAP{trademark} process for removing mercury from flue gas downstream of an electrostatic precipitator [Alabama Power is a subsidiary of The Southern Company]. A full-scale gold-based sorbent array was installed in the clean-air plenum of a single baghouse compartment at GRE's Stanton Station Unit 10, thereby treating 1/10th of the unit's exhaust gas flow. The substrates that were installed were electroplated gold screens oriented parallel to the flue gas flow. The sorbent array was initially installed in late August of 2004, operating continuously until its removal in July 2006, after nearly 23 months. The initial 4 months of operation were conducted while the host unit was burning North Dakota lignite (NDL). In November 2004, the host unit switched fuel to burn Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal and continued to burn the PRB fuel for the final 19 months of this program. Tests were conducted at Site 1 to evaluate the impacts of flue gas flow rate, sorbent plate spacing, sorbent pre-cleaning and regeneration, and spray dryer operation on Mer

  20. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest iodine number

  1. Greenridge Multi-Pollutant Control Project Preliminary Public Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, Daniel P

    2009-01-12

    The Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project is being conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative to demonstrate an innovative combination of air pollution control technologies that can cost-effectively reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, Hg, acid gases (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF), and particulate matter from smaller coal-fired electrical generating units (EGUs). The multi-pollutant control system includes a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NOx emissions by {ge}60%, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF by {ge}95%. Mercury removal of {ge}90% is also targeted via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The technology is particularly well suited, because of its relatively low capital and maintenance costs and small space requirements, to meet the needs of coal-fired units with capacities of 50-300 MWe. There are about 440 such units in the United States that currently are not equipped with SCR, flue gas desulfurization (FGD), or mercury control systems. These smaller units are a valuable part of the nation's energy infrastructure, constituting about 60 GW of installed capacity. However, with the onset of the Clean Air Interstate Rule, Clean Air Mercury Rule, and various state environmental actions requiring deep reductions in emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury, the continued operation of these units increasingly depends upon the ability to identify viable air pollution control retrofit options for them. The large capital costs and sizable space requirements associated with conventional technologies such as SCR and wet FGD make these technologies unattractive for many smaller units. The Greenidge Project aims to confirm the

  2. JV Task 108 - Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion and Combustion Testing of Turkish Tufanbeyli Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Hajicek; Jay Gunderson; Ann Henderson; Stephen Sollom; Joshua Stanislowski

    2007-08-15

    Two combustion tests were performed at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) using Tufanbeyli coal from Turkey. The tests were performed in a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) and a pulverized coal-fired furnace, referred to as the combustion test facility (CTF). One of the goals of the project was to determine the type of furnace best suited to this coal. The coal is high in moisture, ash, and sulfur and has a low heating value. Both the moisture and the sulfur proved problematic for the CTF tests. The fuel had to be dried to less than 37% moisture before it could be pulverized and further dried to about 25% moisture to allow more uniform feeding into the combustor. During some tests, water was injected into the furnace to simulate the level of flue gas moisture had the fuel been fed without drying. A spray dryer was used downstream of the baghouse to remove sufficient sulfur to meet the EERC emission standards permitted by the North Dakota Department of Health. In addition to a test matrix varying excess air, burner swirl, and load, two longer-term tests were performed to evaluate the fouling potential of the coal at two different temperatures. At the lower temperature (1051 C), very little ash was deposited on the probes, but deposition did occur on the walls upstream of the probe bank, forcing an early end to the test after 2 hours and 40 minutes of testing. At the higher temperature (1116 C), ash deposition on the probes was significant, resulting in termination of the test after only 40 minutes. The same coal was burned in the CFBC, but because the CFBC uses a larger size of material, it was able to feed this coal at a higher moisture content (average of 40.1%) compared to the CTF (ranging from 24.2% to 26.9%). Sulfur control was achieved with the addition of limestone to the bed, although the high calcium-to-sulfur rate required to reduce SO{sub 2} emissions resulted in heat loss (through limestone calcination) and additional ash

  3. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Photovoltaic Manufacturing R&D Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photovoltaic Manufacturing R&D Project Photo of blue solar cells being sorted in a production line. A woman works behind the protective glass in the background. BP Solar's manufacturing capabilities include automatic sorting of solar cells after final testing. NREL's Photovoltaic (PV) Manufacturing Research and Development (R&D) Project was a cost-shared partnership between NREL and a number of private-sector solar companies. The primary project goals were to reduce costs for consumers

  4. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Dean Fry, BP April 3, 2008 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 UNITED STATES Department of Energy Infrastructure Lessons Learned Fueling Station Location and Customer Selection Coordination between the OEM and Hydrogen Station Developer is crucial for optimal selection of sites / customers ISSUE Suboptimal site selection has resulted in low station utilization SOLUTIONS Clear understanding /

  5. Compound-specific effects of diverse neurodevelopmental toxicants on global gene expression in the neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theunissen, P.T.; Robinson, J.F.; Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht; Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht ; Pennings, J.L.A.; Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht ; Herwijnen, M.H. van; Kleinjans, J.C.S.; Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht ; Piersma, A.H.; Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht; Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht

    2012-08-01

    Alternative assays for developmental toxicity testing are needed to reduce animal use in regulatory toxicology. The in vitro murine neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn) was designed as an alternative for neurodevelopmental toxicity testing. The integration of toxicogenomic-based approaches may further increase predictivity as well as provide insight into underlying mechanisms of developmental toxicity. In the present study, we investigated concentration-dependent effects of six mechanistically diverse compounds, acetaldehyde (ACE), carbamazepine (CBZ), flusilazole (FLU), monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), penicillin G (PENG) and phenytoin (PHE), on the transcriptome and neural differentiation in the ESTn. All compounds with the exception of PENG altered ESTn morphology (cytotoxicity and neural differentiation) in a concentration-dependent manner. Compound induced gene expression changes and corresponding enriched gene ontology biological processes (GO–BP) were identified after 24 h exposure at equipotent differentiation-inhibiting concentrations of the compounds. Both compound-specific and common gene expression changes were observed between subsets of tested compounds, in terms of significance, magnitude of regulation and functionality. For example, ACE, CBZ and FLU induced robust changes in number of significantly altered genes (≥ 687 genes) as well as a variety of GO–BP, as compared to MEHP, PHE and PENG (≤ 55 genes with no significant changes in GO–BP observed). Genes associated with developmentally related processes (embryonic morphogenesis, neuron differentiation, and Wnt signaling) showed diverse regulation after exposure to ACE, CBZ and FLU. In addition, gene expression and GO–BP enrichment showed concentration dependence, allowing discrimination of non-toxic versus toxic concentrations on the basis of transcriptomics. This information may be used to define adaptive versus toxic responses at the transcriptome level.

  6. FE Petroleum Reserves News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Reserves News FE Petroleum Reserves News RSS April 9, 2015 Contracts Awarded to Repurchase Oil for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve The U. S. Department of Energy announced the award of contracts for delivery of crude oil to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. BP Products North America, Inc., will deliver 2,197,500 barrels and Noble Americas will deliver 2,000,000 barrels to the Reserve's Bryan Mound site in Freeport, Texas. Deliveries are expected to be completed by July 31, 2015.

  7. Effects of aging and oxidation of palladized iron embedded in activated carbon on the dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyeok Choi; Souhail R. Al-Abed; Shirish Agarwal

    2009-06-15

    Reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron has been developed to effectively treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the environment by coupling adsorption and dechlorination of PCBs. In this study, we addressed the dechlorination reactivity and capacity of RAC toward aqueous 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-ClBP), and its aging and longevity under various oxidizing environments. RAC containing 14.4% Fe and 0.68% Pd used in this study could adsorb 122.6 mg 2-ClBP/g RAC, and dechlorinate 56.5 mg 2-ClBP/g RAC which corresponds to 12% (yield) of its estimated dechlorination capacity. Due to Fe0 oxidation to form oxide passivating layers, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (oxide-water interface) and FeOOH/FeO (oxide-metal interface), RAC reactivity decreased progressively over aging under N{sub 2} < H{sub 2}O + N{sub 2} < H{sub 2}O + O{sub 2} conditions. Considering nanoscale Fe/Pd corrosion chemistry, the decline was quite slow at only 5.6%, 19.5%, and 32.5% over one year, respectively. Dissolved oxygen played a crucial role in enhancing 2-ClBP adsorption but inhibiting its dechlorination. The reactivity change could be explained with the properties of the aged RAC including surface area, Fe0 content, and Fe species. During the aging and oxidation, the RAC showed limited dissolution of Fe and Pd. Finally, implementation issues regarding application of RAC system to contaminated sites are discussed. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerkhoff, Lee; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-15

    Uranium contaminated groundwaters are a legacy concern for the U.S. Department of Energy. Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site have demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduces the ambient soluable uranium concentration, sequestering the radionuclide as uraninite. However, questions remain regarding which microorganism(s) are consuming this acetate and if active groundwater microorganisms are different from active particle-associated bacteria. In this report, 13-C acetate was used to assess the active microbes that synthesize DNA on 3 size fractions [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 micron), groundwater (0.2-8 micron)] over a 24 -day time frame. Results indicated a stronger signal from 13-C acetate associated with the fines fraction compared with smaller amounts of 13-C uptake on the sand fraction and groundwater samples during the SIP incubations. TRFLP analysis of this 13-C-labeled DNA, indicated 31+ 9 OTU's with 6 peaks dominating the active profiles (166, 187, 210, 212, and 277 bp peaks using MnlI). Cloning/sequencing of the amplification products indicated a Geobacter-like group (187, 210, 212 bp) primarily synthesized DNA from acetate in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium (166 bp) primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. (277 bp) utilized much of the 13C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria during field-scale acetate addition and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  9. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inc. | Department of Energy Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain

  10. Complete genome sequence of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum type strain (11018T)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasawong, Montri; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Pukall, Rudiger; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Vulcanisaeta distributa Itoh et al. 2002 belongs to the family Thermoproteaceae in the phylum Crenarchaeota. The genus Vulcanisaeta is characterized by a global distribution in hot and acidic springs. This is the first genome sequence from a member of the genus Vulcanisaeta and seventh genome sequence in the family Thermoproteaceae. The 2,374,137 bp long genome with its 2,544 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. - highlights: • CSE1L is a key player in nucleocytoplasmic traffic by forming complex with Ran. • AKT phosphorylates RanBP3 that regulates the nucleocytoplasmic gradient of Ran. • The activated oncogenic AKT drives the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L. • CSE1L in the nucleus up-regulates genes conveying pro-oncogenic signals. • CSE1L might contribute to tumor progression driven by the activated oncogenic AKT.

  12. Bayesian Proteoform Modeling Improves Protein Quantification of Global Proteomic Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Datta, Susmita; Payne, Samuel H.; Kang, Jiyun; Bramer, Lisa M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Tardiff, Mark F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2014-12-01

    As the capability of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has matured, tens of thousands of peptides can be measured simultaneously, which has the benefit of offering a systems view of protein expression. However, a major challenge is that with an increase in throughput, protein quantification estimation from the native measured peptides has become a computational task. A limitation to existing computationally-driven protein quantification methods is that most ignore protein variation, such as alternate splicing of the RNA transcript and post-translational modifications or other possible proteoforms, which will affect a significant fraction of the proteome. The consequence of this assumption is that statistical inference at the protein level, and consequently downstream analyses, such as network and pathway modeling, have only limited power for biomarker discovery. Here, we describe a Bayesian model (BP-Quant) that uses statistically derived peptides signatures to identify peptides that are outside the dominant pattern, or the existence of multiple over-expressed patterns to improve relative protein abundance estimates. It is a research-driven approach that utilizes the objectives of the experiment, defined in the context of a standard statistical hypothesis, to identify a set of peptides exhibiting similar statistical behavior relating to a protein. This approach infers that changes in relative protein abundance can be used as a surrogate for changes in function, without necessarily taking into account the effect of differential post-translational modifications, processing, or splicing in altering protein function. We verify the approach using a dilution study from mouse plasma samples and demonstrate that BP-Quant achieves similar accuracy as the current state-of-the-art methods at proteoform identification with significantly better specificity. BP-Quant is available as a MatLab and R packages at https://github.com/PNNL-Comp-Mass-Spec/BP-Quant.

  13. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Pelargonium xhortorum: Or ganization and evolution of the largest and most highlyrearranged chloroplast genome of land plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chumley, Timothy W.; Palmer, Jeffrey D.; Mower, Jeffrey P.; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Calie, Patrick J.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen,Robert K.

    2006-01-20

    The chloroplast genome of Pelargonium e hortorum has beencompletely sequenced. It maps as a circular molecule of 217,942 bp, andis both the largest and most rearranged land plant chloroplast genome yetsequenced. It features two copies of a greatly expanded inverted repeat(IR) of 75,741 bp each, and consequently diminished single copy regionsof 59,710 bp and 6,750 bp. It also contains two different associations ofrepeated elements that contribute about 10 percent to the overall sizeand account for the majority of repeats found in the genome. Theyrepresent hotspots for rearrangements and gene duplications and include alarge number of pseudogenes. We propose simple models that account forthe major rearrangements with a minimum of eight IR boundary changes and12 inversions in addition to a several insertions of duplicated sequence.The major processes at work (duplication, IR expansion, and inversion)have disrupted at least one and possibly two or three transcriptionaloperons, and the genes involved in these disruptions form the core of thetwo major repeat associations. Despite the vast increase in size andcomplexity of the genome, the gene content is similar to that of otherangiosperms, with the exceptions of a large number of pseudogenes as partof the repeat associations, the recognition of two open reading frames(ORF56 and ORF42) in the trnA intron with similarities to previouslyidentified mitochondrial products (ACRS and pvs-trnA), the loss of accDand trnT-GGU, and in particular, the lack of a recognizably functionalrpoA. One or all of three similar open reading frames may possibly encodethe latter, however.

  14. Fuel Cell Technical Team Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap Fuel Cell Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 This roadmap is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies - BP America, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66 Company,

  15. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Company Partners in Photovoltaic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manufacturing R&D Company Partners in Photovoltaic Manufacturing R&D More than 40 private-sector companies partnered with NREL on successful efforts within the PV Manufacturing R&D Project. They included manufacturers of crystalline silicon, thin-film, and concentrator solar technologies. The companies are listed below. Advanced Energy Systems Alpha Solarco ASE Americas AstroPower/GE Energy Boeing Aerospace BP Solar Cronar Crystal Systems Dow Corning Energy Conversion Devices

  16. Energy in the Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Provi and BP Energy in the Wind - Exploring Basic Electrical Concepts by Modeling Wind Turbines Curriculum: Wind Power (simple machines, aerodynamics, weather/climatology, leverage, mechanics, atmospheric pressure, and energy resources/transformations) Grade Level: High School Small groups: 2 students Time: Introductory packet will take 2-3 periods. Scientific investigation will take 2-3 periods. (45-50 minute periods) Summary: Students explore basic electrical concepts. Students are introduced

  17. Unlocking Short Read Sequencing for Metagenomics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodrigue, Sébastien; Materna, Arne C.; Timberlake, Sonia C.; Blackburn, Matthew C.; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Alm, Eric J.; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Gilbert, Jack Anthony

    2010-07-28

    We describe an experimental and computational pipeline yielding millions of reads that can exceed 200 bp with quality scores approaching that of traditional Sanger sequencing. The method combines an automatable gel-less library construction step with paired-end sequencing on a short-read instrument. With appropriately sized library inserts, mate-pair sequences can overlap, and we describe the SHERA software package that joins them to form a longer composite read.

  18. Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Introduction Prepared by: C. San Marchi, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore CA Editors C. San Marchi B.P. Somerday Sandia National Laboratories This report may be updated and revised periodically in response to the needs of the technical community; up-to-date versions can be requested from the editors at the address given below or downloaded at http://www.ca.sandia.gov/matlsTechRef/. The content of this report will also be

  19. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (LMI-EFRC) Fall Kickoff at Caltech September 23-24, 2014 [meeting details] The LMI-EFRC team gathered at Caltech to kickoff the renewal with a meeting full of presentations from LMI PIs and students, an in-room poster session, and research group breakout sessions. We welcomed Gregory Wilson from NREL's National Center for Photovoltaics as our keynote speaker, and several members of our External Advisory Board, including Richard King from Spectrolab, David Carlson formerly of BP Solar,

  20. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sein, Dmitry; Zhang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dust cycle responds to insolation-induced climate change and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles in the past which indicates climate variability. In the current study the dust cycle in different climate conditions simulated by ECHAM5-HAM is analyzed. The study is focused on the Southern Hemisphere with emphasis on the Antarctic region. The investigated periods include four interglacial time-slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6,000 years BP), Eemian (126,000 years BP), last glacial inception (115,000 years BP) and one glacial time interval: Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21,000 years BP). This study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles and to understand the quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission, atmospheric transport and precipitation to the total dust deposition in Antarctica. Results suggest increased deposition of mineral dust globally and in Antarctica in the past interglacial periods relative to the preindustrial CTRL simulation. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. One of the major factors responsible for the increase of dust deposition in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. The moderate change of dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. In the LGM simulation, dust deposition over Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times higher Southern Hemisphere dust emissions, 2 times stronger atmospheric transport towards Antarctica, and 30% weaker precipitation over the Southern Ocean. The model is able to reproduce the order of magnitude of dust deposition globally and in Antarctica for the pre-industrial and LGM climate

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium clariflavum DSM 19732

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, Lynne A.; Davenport, Karen W.; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Amy; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Liolios, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; Lynd, Lee R

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium clariflavum is a Cluster III Clostridium within the family Clostridiaceae isolated from thermophilic anaerobic sludge (Shiratori et al, 2009). This species is of interest because of its similarity to the model cellulolytic organism Clostridium thermocellum and for the ability of environmental isolates to break down cellulose and hemicellulose. Here we describe features of the 4,897,678 bp long genome and its annotation, consisting of 4,131 proteincoding and 98 RNA genes, for the type strain DSM 19732.

  2. Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles Revised May 2015 This target explanation is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Fiat Chrysler Automotive, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies -BP America,

  3. Argonne mentors students for the next generation of scientists | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Argonne/ACT-SO High School Research Program Program Co-chairs Jarrad Hampton-Marcell Cristina Moody Sarah Soltau J'Tia Taylor Executive Committee Brooke Brandon Meredith Brouzas Maria Curry-Nkansah, Chair Gemma Cutinello Deon Ettinger Harold Gaines Sharon Knight Mentors Nathan Guisinger Benjamin Jungfleisch Jarrad Hampton-Marcell Jeff Larson Nancy Kariuki Cristina Moody Neil Nowicki , BP Bruce Sauchez Vega Sarah Soltau J'Tia Taylor Stephen Wu Judicael Zounmevo Argonne

  4. Microsoft Word - coverduplexSS_sept08.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2008 Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials High-Alloy Ferritic Steels: Duplex Stainless Steels (code 1600) Prepared by: J.A. Zelinski, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Washington DC C. San Marchi, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore CA Editors C. San Marchi B.P. Somerday Sandia National Laboratories This report may be updated and revised periodically in response to the needs of the technical community; up-to-date versions can be requested from the editors at the

  5. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Type 316 (code 2103) Prepared by: C. San Marchi, Sandia National Laboratories Editors C. San Marchi B.P. Somerday Sandia National Laboratories This report may be updated and revised periodically in response to the needs of the technical community; up-to-date versions can be requested from the editors at the address given below. The success of this reference depends upon feedback from the technical community; please forward your comments, suggestions, criticisms and relevant public- domain data

  6. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    321 Unlimited Release Printed September 2012 Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials C. San Marchi B.P. Somerday Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract

  7. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Austenitic Stainless Steels:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Type 304 & 304L (code 2101) Prepared by: C. San Marchi, Sandia National Laboratories Editors C. San Marchi B.P. Somerday Sandia National Laboratories This report may be updated and revised periodically in response to the needs of the technical community; up-to-date versions can be requested from the editors at the address given below. The success of this reference depends upon feedback from the technical community; please forward your comments, suggestions, criticisms and relevant public-

  8. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Austenitic Stainless Steels:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21-6-9 (code 2202) Prepared by: C. San Marchi, Sandia National Laboratories Editors C. San Marchi B.P. Somerday Sandia National Laboratories This report may be updated and revised periodically in response to the needs of the technical community; up-to-date versions can be requested from the editors at the address given below. The success of this reference depends upon feedback from the technical community; please forward your comments, suggestions, criticisms and relevant public- domain data to:

  9. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Austenitic Stainless Steels:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A-286 (code 2301) Prepared by: C. San Marchi, Sandia National Laboratories Editors C. San Marchi B.P. Somerday Sandia National Laboratories This report may be updated and revised periodically in response to the needs of the technical community; up-to-date versions can be requested from the editors at the address given below. The success of this reference depends upon feedback from the technical community; please forward your comments, suggestions, criticisms and relevant public- domain data to:

  10. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Corporation Docket No. PF14-21-000 BP Alaska LNG, LLC Conoco Phillips Alaska LNG Company ExxonMobil Alaska LNG, LLC TransCanada Alaska Midstream, LP NOTICE OF INTENT TO PREPARE AN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE PLANNED ALASKA LNG PROJECT AND REQUEST FOR COMMENTS ON ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES (March 4, 2015) The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that will discuss the environmental impacts of the Alaska LNG

  11. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SUPPLEMENTAL NOTICE OF PUBLIC SCOPING MEETINGS FOR THE PLANNED ALASKA LNG PROJECT (October 20, 2015) The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) will conduct additional public scoping meetings as part of their preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Alaska LNG Project involving construction and operation of facilities by Alaska Gasline Development Corporation; BP Alaska LNG, LLC; Conoco Phillips Alaska LNG Company; ExxonMobil Alaska LNG, LLC;

  12. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOTICE OF PUBLIC SCOPING MEETINGS FOR THE PLANNED ALASKA LNG PROJECT (October 8, 2015) The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) will conduct public scoping meetings as part of their preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Alaska LNG Project involving construction and operation of facilities by Alaska Gasline Development Corporation; BP Alaska LNG, LLC; Conoco Phillips Alaska LNG Company; ExxonMobil Alaska LNG, LLC; and TransCanada Alaska

  13. Innovative Gasification to Produce Fischer-Tropsch Jet and Diesel Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Gasification to Produce Fischer- Tropsch Jet and Diesel Fuel March 23, 2015 Jerod Smeenk Frontline BioEnergy, LLC This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 1 Acronyms and definitions * BP - budget period (i.e., project phase) * BPD - barrel per day * BTL - biomass-to-liquids * F-76 - military spec diesel fuel * FT - Fischer-Tropsch process * IE - independent engineer engaged by the DOE to monitor and review project details *

  14. Investigation of the Effects of Fuels and Aftertreatment Devices on the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emission Profiles of Trucks and Buses | Department of Energy the Effects of Fuels and Aftertreatment Devices on the Emission Profiles of Trucks and Buses Investigation of the Effects of Fuels and Aftertreatment Devices on the Emission Profiles of Trucks and Buses 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: BP 2002_deer_smith.pdf (2.57 MB) More Documents & Publications Concentrations and Size Distributions of Particulate Matter Emissions from Catalyzed Trap-Equipped Heavy-duty Diesel Vehicles

  15. Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis Meeting Attendees List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting Attendees Name Organization Rajesh Ahluwalia Argonne National Laboratory Bhaskar Balasubramanian Chevron Brian Bonner Air Products and Chemcials, Inc. Dan Casey Chevron Tan-Ping Chen Nexant Maria Curry-Nkansah BP America Jeff Dowd DOE/ EERE Amgad Elgowainy Argonne National Laboratory Jerry Gillette Argonne National Laboratory Jill Gruber DOE Matthew Hooks TIAX LLC Brian James Directed Technologies Inc. James Kegerreis ExxonMobil Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Niko Kydes OnLocation, Inc.

  16. Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 This roadmap is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies -BP America, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66 Company, ExxonMobil Corporation, and Shell Oil

  17. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap May Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 This roadmap is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies -BP America, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66

  18. Carol Battershell | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carol Battershell About Us Carol Battershell - Acting Principal Deputy Director Photo of Carol Battershell Carol joined the Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) after 25 years in the energy industry with Standard Oil and BP. In 2008 and 2009 she led the technical evaluation for the $25 billion Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Program as well as the $2.3 billion Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit initiative. In 2010 she took over management of EERE

  19. Use belowground storage tanks to manage stormwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nedrow, J.

    1996-01-01

    To meet performance and operating requirements under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), BP Oil`s Toledo Refinery installed two 10-million-gallon (MMgal) concrete belowground storage tanks to replace the existing impoundment ponds. Environmental, safety and operating criteria influenced how this older refinery could cost-effectively replace impoundment ponds without interrupting the production schedule. The north stormwater impoundment pond at BP Oil`s Toledo Refinery had received primary sludge, a RCRA-listed hazardous waste and material exceeding the toxic characteristic limit for benzene (0.5 ppm). Because the pond could not be adapted to meet RCRA standards, it had to be replaced by a system that met these standards and New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). Under normal operating conditions, stormwater was commingled with process wastewater and processed at the wastewater treatment unit (WWTU) before final disposal. However, when flow in the sewer system exceeded the capacity of the WWTU, excess flow was stored in an impoundment system. The case history shows how BP Oil`s project engineers, working with a consulting engineering group and a general contractor (GC), cost-effectively replaced the impoundment pond to handle stormwater runoff for the refinery.

  20. Bell-Plesset effects in Rayleigh-Taylor instability of finite-thickness spherical and cylindrical shells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Schmit, P. F.

    2015-12-28

    Bell-Plesset (BP) effects account for the influence of global convergence or divergence of the fluid flow on the evolution of the interfacial perturbations embedded in the flow. The development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in radiation-driven spherical capsules and magnetically-driven cylindrical liners necessarily includes a significant contribution from BP effects due to the time dependence of the radius, velocity, and acceleration of the unstable surfaces or interfaces. An analytical model is presented that, for an ideal incompressible fluid and small perturbation amplitudes, exactly evaluates the BP effects in finite-thickness shells through acceleration and deceleration phases. The time-dependent dispersion equations determining themore » “instantaneous growth rate” are derived. It is demonstrated that by integrating this approximate growth rate over time, one can accurately evaluate the number of perturbation e-foldings during the inward acceleration phase of the implosion. As a result, in the limit of small shell thickness, exact thin-shell perturbationequations and approximate thin-shell dispersion equations are obtained, generalizing the earlier results [E. G. Harris, Phys. Fluids 5, 1057 (1962); E. Ott, Phys. Rev. Lett. 29, 1429 (1972); A. B. Bud'ko et al., Phys. Fluids B 2, 1159 (1990)].« less

  1. Improved Neutronics Treatment of Burnable Poisons for the Prismatic HTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Wang; A. A. Bingham; J. Ortensi; C. J. Permann

    2012-10-01

    In prismatic block High Temperature Reactors (HTR), highly absorbing material such a burnable poison (BP) cause local flux depressions and large gradients in the flux across the blocks which can be a challenge to capture accurately with traditional homogenization methods. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the error associated with spatial homogenization, spectral condensation and discretization and to highlight what is needed for improved neutronics treatments of burnable poisons for the prismatic HTR. A new triangular based mesh is designed to separate the BP regions from the fuel assembly. A set of packages including Serpent (Monte Carlo), Xuthos (1storder Sn), Pronghorn (diffusion), INSTANT (Pn) and RattleSnake (2ndorder Sn) is used for this study. The results from the deterministic calculations show that the cross sections generated directly in Serpent are not sufficient to accurately reproduce the reference Monte Carlo solution in all cases. The BP treatment produces good results, but this is mainly due to error cancellation. However, the Super Cell (SC) approach yields cross sections that are consistent with cross sections prepared on an exact full core calculation. In addition, very good agreement exists between the various deterministic transport and diffusion codes in both eigenvalue and power distributions. Future research will focus on improving the cross sections and quantifying the error cancellation.

  2. Structural influences on charge carrier dynamics for small-molecule organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhiping Shibata, Yosei; Yamanari, Toshihiro; Matsubara, Koji; Yoshida, Yuji; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Zhou, Ying

    2014-07-07

    We investigated the structural influences on the charge carrier dynamics in zinc phthalocyanine/fullerene (ZnPc/C{sub 60}) photovoltaic cells by introducing poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) and 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)-bithiophene (BP2T) between indium tin oxide and ZnPc layers. ZnPc films can be tuned to be round, long fiber-like, and short fiber-like structure, respectively. Time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements reveal that charge carrier lifetime in ZnPc/C{sub 60} bilayer films is considerably affected by the intra-grain properties. Transient photocurrent of ZnPc single films indicated that the charge carriers can transport for a longer distance in the long fiber-like grains than that in the round grains, due to the greatly lessened grain boundaries. By carefully controlling the structure of ZnPc films, the short-circuit current and fill factor of a ZnPc/C{sub 60} heterojunction solar cell with BP2T are significantly improved and the power conversion efficiency is increased to 2.6%, which is 120% larger than the conventional cell without BP2T.

  3. Isolation of laccase gene-specific sequences from white rot and brown rot fungi by PCR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Souza, T.M.; Boominathan, K.; Reddy, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    Degenerate primers corresponding to the consensus sequences of the copper-binding regions in the N-terminal domains of known basidiomycete laccases were used to isolate laccase gene-specific sequences from strains representing nine genera of wood rot fungi. All except three gave the expected PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequences of each of the PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequence of each of the PCR products analyzed as a laccase gene sequence, suggesting the specificity of the primers. PCR products of the white rot fungi Ganoderma lucidum, Phlebia brevispora, and Trametes versicolor showed 65 to 74% nucleotide sequence similarity to each other; the similarity in deduced amino acid sequences was 83 to 91%. The PCR products of Lentinula edodes and Lentinus tigrinus, on the other hand, showed relatively low nucleotide and amino acid similarities (58 to 64 and 62 to 81%, respectively); however, these similarities were still much higher than when compared with the corresponding regions in the laccases of the ascomycete fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa. A few of the white rot fungi, as well as Gloeophyllum trabeum, a brown rot fungus, gave a 144-bp PCR fragment which had a nucleotide sequence similarity of 60 to 71%. Demonstration of laccase activity in G. trabeum and several other brown rot fungi was of particular interest because these organisms were not previously shown to produce laccases. 36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Anisotropic Electron-Photon and Electron-Phonon Interactions in Black Phosphorus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ling, Xi; Huang, Shengxi; Hasdeo, Eddwi; Liang, Liangbo; Parkin, William; Tatsumi, Yuki; Nugraha, Ahmad; Puretzky, Alexander A; Das, Paul; Sumpter, Bobby G; et al

    2016-03-10

    Orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and other layered materials, such as gallium telluride (GaTe) and tin selenide (SnSe), stand out among two-dimensional (2D) materials owing to their anisotropic in-plane structure. This anisotropy adds a new dimension to the properties of 2D materials and stimulates the development of angle-resolved photonics and electronics. However, understanding the effect of anisotropy has remained unsatisfactory to-date, as shown by a number of inconsistencies in the recent literatures. We use angle-resolved absorption and Raman spectroscopies to investigate the role of anisotropy on the electron-photon and electron-phonon interactions in BP. We highlight a non-trivial dependence between anisotropies andmore » flake thickness, photon and phonon energies. We show that once understood, the anisotropic optical absorption appears to be a reliable and simple way to identify the crystalline orientation of BP, which cannot be determined from Raman spectroscopy without the explicit consideration of excitation wavelength and flake thickness, as commonly used previously.« less

  5. Bell-Plesset effects in Rayleigh-Taylor instability of finite-thickness spherical and cylindrical shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Schmit, P. F.

    2015-12-28

    Bell-Plesset (BP) effects account for the influence of global convergence or divergence of the fluid flow on the evolution of the interfacial perturbations embedded in the flow. The development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in radiation-driven spherical capsules and magnetically-driven cylindrical liners necessarily includes a significant contribution from BP effects due to the time dependence of the radius, velocity, and acceleration of the unstable surfaces or interfaces. An analytical model is presented that, for an ideal incompressible fluid and small perturbation amplitudes, exactly evaluates the BP effects in finite-thickness shells through acceleration and deceleration phases. The time-dependent dispersion equations determining the “instantaneous growth rate” are derived. It is demonstrated that by integrating this approximate growth rate over time, one can accurately evaluate the number of perturbation e-foldings during the inward acceleration phase of the implosion. As a result, in the limit of small shell thickness, exact thin-shell perturbationequations and approximate thin-shell dispersion equations are obtained, generalizing the earlier results [E. G. Harris, Phys. Fluids 5, 1057 (1962); E. Ott, Phys. Rev. Lett. 29, 1429 (1972); A. B. Bud'ko et al., Phys. Fluids B 2, 1159 (1990)].

  6. Budget Period 2 Summary Report Part 2: Hywind Maine Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driscoll, Frederick; Platt, Andrew; Sirnivas, Senu

    2015-08-15

    This project was performed under the Work for Others—Funds in Agreement FIA-14-1793 between Statoil and the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, manager and operator of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). To support the development of a 6-MW spar-mounted offshore wind turbine, Statoil funded NREL to perform tasks in the following three categories: 1. Design and analysis 2. Wake modeling 3. Concept resource assessment. This study expands upon the work conducted in Budget Period 1 (BP1) to investigate the influence of the wake generated from an upstream turbine on a downstream turbine using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) high-fidelity modeling tool. Simulator fOr Wind Farms Application (SOWFA) [1] is an NREL high fidelity modeling tool that couples OpenFOAM [2] CFD and NREL’s Aero-Elastic code Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence (FAST)[3]. In BP1 the configuration was based on Hywind-3MW at 140 m water depth in the Gulf of Maine; however this study for Budget Period 2 (BP2) the configuration investigated is based on Hywind-6MW at 220 m water depth off the coast of Boston. The objectives were to perform two-turbines One-Way Coupling (OWC), three-turbines Two-Way Coupling (TWC), and to investigate wind power plant optimization.

  7. Assessing UST corrective action technologies: Lessons learned about in situ air sparging at the Denison Avenue Site, Cleveland, Ohio. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, T.R.; Chaudet, R.E.; Johnson, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    In situ air sparging (IAS) has been used at an increasing number of sites to address groundwater contamination. Because of the lack of substantive performance data, however, the actual effectiveness of the system is not known. The EPA Office of Research and Development Risk reduction Engineering Laboratory (ORD RREL) with the EPA Region 5 Office of Underground Storage Tanks, the Ohio State Fire Marshal, and BP Exploration & Oil, Inc. (BP) participated in a field evaluation of an IAS system at a petroleum leaking UST site in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the study was to provide performance data that will be independently evaluated by EPA to better understand IAS effectiveness. The report presents the site and monitoring data provided by BP over a 2-year period. The chemical data indicated an overall decrease of BTEX concentrations in groundwater to nondetectable levels shortly after startup of the IAS system. Variability in the chemical and process data also precludes making any definitive link between the decrease in contaminant concentrations and IAS performance at this site.

  8. Gas exchange characteristics as indicators of the basic limiting factors in photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharkey, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    Photosynthesis provides essentially all of the primary productivity on Earth. The rate of photosynthesis varies widely between and even within species. The basic processes are similar in most C{sub 3} plant species and so the differences in the rate of photosynthesis must be governed by feedback mechanisms regulating the rate of photosynthesis to meet the needs of the plant. Understanding these feedback mechanisms may allow us to modify them to adapt photosynthesis to the needs of humans. In this research I have concentrated on one feedback mechanism. This feedback mechanism comes into play when the capacity for starch and sucrose synthesis cannot keep pace with the chloroplast's ability to produce triose phosphate. My colleagues and I have demonstrated that this type of feedback can occur under natural conditions and that both electron transport and Rubisco (RuBP) carboxylase are reduced in activity during this feedback. We demonstrated that the reduced activity of RuBP carboxylase is caused by reduced carbamylation. These studies have led us to speculate that the role of RuBP carboxylase decarbamylation (deactivation) is to regulate the pool of free phosphate inside the chloroplast stroma. In these and other ways this research has contributed to our understanding of how the rate of photosynthesis is established in plants and how that rate might be modified in the future.

  9. Association of low-level blood lead and blood pressure in NHANES 1999-2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scinicariello, Franco; Abadin, Henry G.; Edward Murray, H.

    2011-11-15

    This study investigated whether low blood-lead levels ({<=}10 {mu}g/dL) were associated with blood pressure (BP) outcomes. The authors analyzed data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2006 and participants aged 20 years or older. Outcome variables were systolic and diastolic BP measurements, pulse pressure, and hypertension status. Multivariable linear and logistic regressions stratified by race/ethnicity and gender were performed. Blood lead levels (BLL) were significantly correlated with higher systolic BP among black men and women, but not white or Mexican-American participants. BLLs were significantly associated with higher diastolic BPs among white men and women and black men, whereas, a negative association was observed in Mexican-American men that had, also, a wider pulse pressure. Black men in the 90th percentile of blood lead distribution (BLL{>=}3.50 {mu}g/dL) compared to black men in the 10th percentile of blood lead distribution (BLL{<=}0.7 {mu}g/dL) had a significant increase of risk of having hypertension (adjusted POR=2.69; 95% CI: 1.08-6.72). In addition, blood cadmium was significantly associated with hypertension and systolic and diastolic blood. This study found that, despite the continuous decline in blood lead in the U.S. population, lead exposure disparities among race and gender still exist.

  10. TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and

  11. Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and

  12. Investigations of non-linear polymers as high performance lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Joshua W.; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Qu, Jun; Bays, J. Timothy; Cosimbescu, Lelia

    2015-03-22

    Off-the-shelf available engine oils contain an assortment of additives that increase the performance of base oils and maximize the overall efficiency of the machine. With ever increasing requirements for fuel efficiency, the demand for novel materials that outperform older generations is also on the rise. One approach towards increasing overall efficiency is to reduce internal friction and wear in an engine. From an additive approach, this is typically achieved by altering the bulk oil’s viscosity at high temperatures via polymers. In general, the hydrodynamic volume of polymers increase (expand) at elevated temperatures and decrease (contract/deflate) with declining temperatures and this effect is enhanced be carefully designing specific structures and architectures. The natural thinning tendency of base oil with increasing temperatures is in part mitigated by the expansion of the macromolecules added, and the overall effect is decreasing the viscosity losses at high temperatures. Traditional polymer architectures vary from linear to dendritic, where linear polymers of the same chemical composition and molecular weight to its dendritic counterpart will undergo a more significant free volume change in solution with regards to temperature changes. This advantage has been exploited in the literature towards the production of viscosity modifiers. However, one major disadvantage of linear polymers is degradation due to mechanical shear forces and high temperatures causing a shorter additive lifetime. Dendrimers on the other hand are known to demonstrate superior robustness to shear degradation when compared to their respective linear counterparts. An additional advantage of the dendritic architecture is the ability to tailor the peripheral end-groups towards influencing polymer-solvent and/or polymer-surface interactions. Comb-burst hyperbranched polymers are a hybrid of the aforementioned architectures and provide several compromises between the traditional

  13. SU-D-BRE-01: A Realistic Breathing Phantom of the Thorax for Testing New Motion Mitigation Techniques with Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perrin, R; Peroni, M; Bernatowicz, K; Zakova, M; Knopf, A; Safai, S; Parkel, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A prototype breathing phantom (named LuCa) has been developed which simulates the anatomy and motion of a patient thorax.In this work, we describe the results of the first commissioning tests with LuCa. Methods: The phantom provides a close representation of the human thorax. The lungs,contained within a tissue-equivalent ribcage and skin,are made from a polymer foam,which is inflated and deflated using a custommade ventilator. A tumor is simulated using a wooden ball with cutplanes for placing GafChromic films. The ventilator,controlled with Labview software,simulates a full range of breathing motion types.Commissioning tests were performed to assess its performance using imaging (CT and radiographic) and film dosimetry as follows:i)maximum Tumor excursion at acceptable pressure ranges, ii)tumor Motion repeatability between breathing periods,iii)reproducibility between measurement days,iv)tumor-to-surface motion correlation and v)reproducibility of film positioning in phantom. Results: The phantom can generate repeatable motion patterns with sin{sup 4},sin,breath-hold (tumor amplitude repeatability <0.5mm over 10min),aswell as patient-specific motion types. Maximum excursions of the tumor are 20mm and 14mm for the large and small tumor inserts respectively. Amplitude reproducibility (Coefficient of Variation) averaged at 16% for the workable pressure range over 2 months. Good correlation between tumor and surface motion was found with R{sup 2}=0.92. Reproducibility of film positioning within the thorax was within 0.9mm, and maximum 3 error from the coronal plane. Film measurements revealed that the film repositioning error yields relative errors in the mean dose over the planned target volume (PTV) of up to 2.5% and 4.5% for films at the center and on the edge of the PTV respectively. Conclusion: Commissioning tests have shown that the LuCa phantom can produce tumor motion with excellent repeatability. However,a poorer performance in reproducibility of

  14. Diesel exhaust induced pulmonary and cardiovascular impairment: The role of hypertension intervention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Thomas, Ronald F.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Bass, Virginia; Krantz, Q. Todd; King, Charly; Nyska, Abraham; Richards, Judy E.; Andrews, Debora; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2013-04-15

    Exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) and associated gases is linked to cardiovascular impairments; however, the susceptibility of hypertensive individuals is poorly understood. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine cardiopulmonary effects of gas-phase versus whole-DE and (2) to examine the contribution of systemic hypertension in pulmonary and cardiovascular effects. Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated with hydralazine to reduce blood pressure (BP) or L-NAME to increase BP. Spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats were treated with hydralazine to reduce BP. Control and drug-pretreated rats were exposed to air, particle-filtered exhaust (gas), or whole DE (1500 ?g/m{sup 3}), 4 h/day for 2 days or 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Acute and 4-week gas and DE exposures increased neutrophils and ?-glutamyl transferase (?-GT) activity in lavage fluid of WKY and SH rats. DE (4 weeks) caused pulmonary albumin leakage and inflammation in SH rats. Two-day DE increased serum fatty acid binding protein-3 (FABP-3) in WKY. Marked increases occurred in aortic mRNA after 4-week DE in SH (eNOS, TF, tPA, TNF-?, MMP-2, RAGE, and HMGB-1). Hydralazine decreased BP in SH while L-NAME tended to increase BP in WKY; however, neither changed inflammation nor BALF ?-GT. DE-induced and baseline BALF albumin leakage was reduced by hydralazine in SH rats and increased by L-NAME in WKY rats. Hydralazine pretreatment reversed DE-induced TF, tPA, TNF-?, and MMP-2 expression but not eNOS, RAGE, and HMGB-1. ET-1 was decreased by HYD. In conclusion, antihypertensive drug treatment reduces gas and DE-induced pulmonary protein leakage and expression of vascular atherogenic markers. - Highlights: ? Acute diesel exhaust exposure induces pulmonary inflammation in healthy rats. ? In hypertensive rats diesel exhaust effects are seen only after long term exposure. ? Normalizing blood pressure reverses lung protein leakage caused by diesel exhaust. ? Normalizing blood pressure reverses atherogenic effects

  15. Structure and proposed mechanism of α-glycerophosphate oxidase from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elkhal, Callia K.; Kean, Kelsey M.; Parsonage, Derek; Maenpuen, Somchart; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Claiborne, Al; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-03-14

    In this study, the formation of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) by the FAD-dependent α-glycerophosphate oxidase (GlpO), is important for the pathogenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The structurally known GlpO from Streptococcus sp. (SspGlpO) is similar to the pneumococcal protein (SpGlpO) and provides a guide for drug design against that target. However, M. pneumoniae GlpO (MpGlpO), having <20% sequence identity with structurally known GlpOs, appears to represent a second type of GlpO we designate as Type II GlpOs. Here, the recombinant His-tagged MpGlpO structure is described at ~2.5 Å resolution, solved by molecular replacement using as a search model themore » Bordetella pertussis protein 3253 (Bp3253) a protein of unknown function solved by structural genomics efforts. Recombinant MpGlpO is an active oxidase with a turnover number of ~580 min⁻¹ while Bp3253 showed no GlpO activity. No substantial differences exist between the oxidized and dithionite-reduced MpGlpO structures. Although, no liganded structures were determined, a comparison with the tartrate-bound Bp3253 structure and consideration of residue conservation patterns guided the construction of a model for α-glycerophosphate (Glp) recognition and turnover by MpGlpO. The predicted binding mode also appears relevant for the type I GlpOs (such as SspGlpO) despite differences in substrate recognition residues, and it implicates a histidine conserved in type I and II Glp oxidases and dehydrogenases as the catalytic acid/base. This work provides a solid foundation for guiding further studies of the mitochondrial Glp dehydrogenases as well as for continued studies of M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae glycerol metabolism and the development of novel therapeutics targeting MpGlpO and SpGlpO.« less

  16. A novel deletion/insertion mutation in the mRNA transcribed from one {alpha}1(I) collagen allele in a family with dominant type III OI and germline mosaicism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, O.; Masters, C.; Lewis, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    In an 8-year-old girl and her father, both of whom have severe type III OI, we have previously used RNA/RNA hybrid analysis to demonstrate a mismatch in the region of {alpha}1(I) mRNA coding for aa 558-861. We used SSCP to further localize the abnormality to a subregion coding for aa 579-679. This region was subcloned and sequenced. Each patient`s cDNA has a deletion of the sequences coding for the last residue of exon 34, and all of exons 35 and 36 (aa 604-639), followed by an insertion of 156 nt from the 3{prime}-end of intron 36. PCR amplification of leukocyte DNA from the patients and the clinically normal paternal grandmother yielded two fragments: a 1007 bp fragment predicted from normal genomic sequences and a 445 bp fragment. Subcloning and sequencing of the shorter genomic PCR product confirmed the presence of a 565 bp genomic deletion from the end of exon 34 to the middle of intron 36. The abnormal protein is apparently synthesized and incorporated into helix. The inserted nucleotides are in frame with the collagenous sequence and contain no stop codons. They encode a 52 aa non-collagenous region. The fibroblast procollagen of the patients has both normal and electrophoretically delayed pro{alpha}(I) bands. The electrophoretically delayed procollagen is very sensitive to pepsin or trypsin digestion, as predicted by its non-collagenous sequence, and cannot be visualized as collagen. This unique OI collagen mutation is an excellent candidate for molecular targeting to {open_quotes}turn off{close_quotes} a dominant mutant allele.

  17. Structural basis for cargo binding and autoinhibition of Bicaudal-D1 by a parallel coiled-coil with homotypic registry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terawaki, Shin-ichi; Yoshikane, Asuka; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Wakamatsu, Kaori

    2015-05-01

    Bicaudal-D1 (BICD1) is an α-helical coiled-coil protein mediating the attachment of specific cargo to cytoplasmic dynein. It plays an essential role in minus end-directed intracellular transport along microtubules. The third C-terminal coiled-coil region of BICD1 (BICD1 CC3) has an important role in cargo sorting, including intracellular vesicles associating with the small GTPase Rab6 and the nuclear pore complex Ran binding protein 2 (RanBP2), and inhibiting the association with cytoplasmic dynein by binding to the first N-terminal coiled-coil region (CC1). The crystal structure of BICD1 CC3 revealed a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with asymmetry and complementary knobs-into-holes interactions, differing from Drosophila BicD CC3. Furthermore, our binding study indicated that BICD1 CC3 possesses a binding surface for two distinct cargos, Rab6 and RanBP2, and that the CC1-binding site overlaps with the Rab6-binding site. These findings suggest a molecular basis for cargo recognition and autoinhibition of BICD proteins during dynein-dependent intracellular retrograde transport. - Highlights: • BICD1 CC3 is a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with axial asymmetry. • The coiled-coil packing of BICD1 CC3 is adapted to the equivalent heptad position. • BICD1 CC3 has distinct binding sites for two classes of cargo, Rab6 and RanBP2. • The CC1-binding site of BICD1 CC3 overlaps with the Rab6-binding site.

  18. A CHRONOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE HOLOCENE VEGETATIONAL HISTORY OF CENTRAL MINNESOTA: THE STEEL LAKE POLLEN RECORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, H E; Stefanova, I; Tian, J; Brown, T A; Hu, F S

    2003-11-10

    Paleorecords from Minnesota and adjacent areas have often been used to evaluate large-scale climatic processes in the mid-continent of North America. However, most of these records are compromised by chronological flaws, making problematic any comparisons with climatic interpretations based on other records (e.g., GISP2 in Greenland). We report here a high-resolution pollen record with a secure chronology constrained by 26 {sup 14}C dates on terrestrial macrofossils from Steel Lake, central Minnesota. About 11,200 years ago (calibrated yr BP) the late-glacial Picea forest near Steel Lake was succeeded abruptly by Pinus banksiana and/or resinosa. The Pinus forest began to open 9.4 ka cal BP with the expansion of prairie taxa, and a pine parkland or savanna prevailed until about 8 ka cal BP, when Quercus replaced Pinus to become the dominant tree in the prairie areas for 4500 years. The close chronological control permits the correlation of key vegetational changes with those at other reliably dated sites in the eastern Dakotas and in Minnesota, suggesting that the abrupt decline of the spruce forest was time-transgressive from southwest to northeast during 2000 years, and that the development of prairie was time-transgressive in the same direction over 2600 years. Correlation of key pollen horizons at Steel Lake with those in the high-resolution pollen profiles of Elk Lake, ca. 50 km northwest of Steel Lake, suggests that the well-known Elk Lake varve chronology for the early Holocene is about 1000 years too young.

  19. Super-resolution reconstruction for 4D computed tomography of the lung via the projections onto convex sets approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yu E-mail: qianjinfeng08@gmail.com; Wu, Xiuxiu; Yang, Wei; Feng, Qianjin E-mail: qianjinfeng08@gmail.com; Chen, Wufan

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The use of 4D computed tomography (4D-CT) of the lung is important in lung cancer radiotherapy for tumor localization and treatment planning. Sometimes, dense sampling is not acquired along the superior–inferior direction. This disadvantage results in an interslice thickness that is much greater than in-plane voxel resolutions. Isotropic resolution is necessary for multiplanar display, but the commonly used interpolation operation blurs images. This paper presents a super-resolution (SR) reconstruction method to enhance 4D-CT resolution. Methods: The authors assume that the low-resolution images of different phases at the same position can be regarded as input “frames” to reconstruct high-resolution images. The SR technique is used to recover high-resolution images. Specifically, the Demons deformable registration algorithm is used to estimate the motion field between different “frames.” Then, the projection onto convex sets approach is implemented to reconstruct high-resolution lung images. Results: The performance of the SR algorithm is evaluated using both simulated and real datasets. Their method can generate clearer lung images and enhance image structure compared with cubic spline interpolation and back projection (BP) method. Quantitative analysis shows that the proposed algorithm decreases the root mean square error by 40.8% relative to cubic spline interpolation and 10.2% versus BP. Conclusions: A new algorithm has been developed to improve the resolution of 4D-CT. The algorithm outperforms the cubic spline interpolation and BP approaches by producing images with markedly improved structural clarity and greatly reduced artifacts.

  20. Mutations in the PCCA gene encoding the {alpha} subunit of propionyl-CoA carboxylase in patients with propionic acidemia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campeau, E.; Leon-Del-Rio, A.; Gravel, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Propionic acidemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a deficiency of the mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzyme, propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC). PCC has the structure {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 4}, with the {alpha} subunit containing the biotin prosthetic group. This study is concerned with defining the spectrum of mutations occurring in the PCCA gene encoding the {alpha} subunit. Mutations were initially assigned to this gene through complementation experiments done after somatic fusion of patient fibroblasts. The analyses were performed on PCR-amplified reverse transcripts of fibroblast RNA. The mutations were identified by single strand conformational polymorphism analysis and direct sequencing of PCR products. Three candidate disease-causing mutations and one DNA polymorphism were identified in the {alpha} subunit sequence in different patients: (1) a 3 bp deletion {triangle}CTG{sub 2058-2060}, which eliminates Cys687 near the biotin binding site (Lys669); (2) T{sub 611}{r_arrow}A which converts Met204 to Lys in a highly conserved region matching that of an ATP binding site; (3) An {approximately}50 bp deletion near the 3{prime} end of the cDNA which likely corresponds to the loss of an exon due to a splicing defect; and (4) a 3 bp insertion, +CAG{sub 2203}, located downstream of the stop codon, which is likely a DNA polymorphism. In order to determine the effect of the Cys687 deletion on the biotinylation of PCC, we expressed the mutation in a 67 amino acid C-terminal fragment of the PCC {alpha} subunit in E. coli in which biotinylation is directed by the bacterial biotin ligase. While the mutant peptide was expressed at about half-normal levels, the biotinylation of the peptide that was present was reduced to only {approximately}20% normal. We suggest, therefore, that the absence of PCC activity due to {triangle}Cys687 results at least in part from defective biotinylation of an unstable protein.