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1

Final Technical Report; Geothermal Resource Evaluation and Definitioni (GRED) Program-Phases I, II, and III for the Animas Valley, NM Geothermal Resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a detailed summary of a methodical and comprehensive assessment of the potential of the Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal resource leasehold owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. Work described herein was completed under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC04-00AL66977, Geothermal Resource Evaluation and Definition (GRED) Program, and the work covers the time span from June 2001 through June 2004. Included in this new report are detailed results from the GRED Program, including: geophysical and geochemical surveys, reflection seismic surveys, aeromagnetic surveys, gravity and electrical resistivity surveys, soil thermal ion and soil carbon dioxide flux surveys, four temperature gradient holes, and one deep exploratory well.

Cunniff, Roy A.; Bowers, Roger L.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Final Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I, Ii, And Iii For The Animas Valley, Nm Geothermal Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Final Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I, Ii, And Iii For The Animas Valley, Nm Geothermal Resource Details Activities (9) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This report contains a detailed summary of a methodical and comprehensive assessment of the potential of the Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal resource leasehold owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. Work described herein was completed under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC04-00AL66977, Geothermal Resource

3

Phase I Report U.S. DOE GRED II Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase I Report U.S. DOE GRED II Program Phase I Report U.S. DOE GRED II Program Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Phase I Report U.S. DOE GRED II Program Abstract Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded

4

Phase I Report, US DOE GRED II Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded a maximum temperature of 144.7 C (292.5 F). Noramex Corporation will now drill a second slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, designated DEEP BLUE No.2. The hole will be drilled under a cost-share program with the DOE, under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition II (GRED II) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297). This report comprises Phase I of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297 of the GRED II program. The report provides an update on the status of resource confirmation at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, incorporating the results from DEEP BLUE No.1, and provides the technical background for a second test hole. The report also outlines the proposed drilling program for slim geothermal observation test hole DEEP BLUE No.2.

Fairbank Engineering Ltd.

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

5

Phase I Report, Us Doe Gred Ii Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Report, Us Doe Gred Ii Program Report, Us Doe Gred Ii Program Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Phase I Report, Us Doe Gred Ii Program Details Activities (9) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded

6

New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology is investigating a Known Geothermal Resource Area in Socorro NM in attempts at locating a low temperature (65-100 °C) geothermal reservoir for direct-use heating on campus. The KGRA is positioned near the Socorro Peak mountain block, a Basin and Range normal-fault terrain superimposed by an Oligocene caldera margin. Preexisting evidence of this geothermal resource includes heat gradients upwards of 490mW/m2 from thermal-gradient wells, tepid spring

7

GRED STUDIES AND DRILLING OF AMERICULTURE STATE 2, AMERICULTURE TILAPIA FARM LIGHTNING DOCK KGRA, ANIMAS VALLEY, NM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the GRED drilling operations in the AmeriCulture State 2 well with an overview of the preliminary geologic and geothermal findings, from drill cuttings, core, geophysical logs and water geochemical sampling.

Witcher, James

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Aeromagnetic Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In October 2001, TerraCon, Inc. (2001) of Arlington, Texas conducted the highresolution aeromagnetic survey that was designed to explore the known, shallow geothermal resource and surrounding area. Shallow-subsurface Tertiary volcanic rocks were used as a magnetic basis for mapping structures References Roy A. Cunniff, Roger L. Bowers (2005) Final Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I, Ii,

9

Definition: Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dispersion Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples and analyses of ions by an enzyme leach process done by commercial laboratories. The method utilizes the property of elements to be dissolved, transported, or deposited depending on the temperature of the thermal waters.{{#tag:ref|[[Final Technical Report}}[1][2][3][4] Also Known As enzyme leach References ↑ Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I ↑ Ii ↑ And Iii For The Animas Valley ↑ Nm Geothermal Resource]] {{#set:Reference URI={{#explode:{{#replace:[[Final Technical Report|[|}}|

10

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The two gradient holes were sited on federal geothermal leases owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. and both were drilled into lakebed sediments some distance from the intense shallow geothermal anomaly located in the eastern half of Section 7, Township 25 South, Range 19 West. References Roy A. Cunniff, Roger L. Bowers (2005) Final Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I, Ii, And Iii For The Animas Valley, Nm Geothermal Resource Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Lightning_Dock_Area_(Cunniff_%26_Bowers,_2005)&oldid=387460"

11

CIM: A Reliable Metric for Evaluating Program Phase Classifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CIM: A Reliable Metric for Evaluating Program Phase Classifications Sreekumar V. Kodakara, Jinpyo Interval of estimated Mean (CIM), a metric based on statistical sampling theory, to evaluate the quality of estimated Mean (CIM) correctly estimates the quality of phase classification with a meaningful statistical

Minnesota, University of

12

Complexity-based program phase analysis and classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling and analysis of program behavior are at the foundation of computer system design and optimization. As computer systems become more adaptive, their efficiency increasingly depends on program dynamic characteristics. Previous studies have revealed ... Keywords: computer architecture, performance modeling, program phase, wavelet

Chang-Burm Cho; Tao Li

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Westinghouse BWR Fuel Performance Program--Phase 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Fuel Reliability Program (FRP) joined the Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB (WES) Fuel Performance Program Phase 2 to investigate the performance of ultra-high-burnup fuel to assess the potential for extending Westinghouse fuel burnups in the BWR fleet. Fuel rods irradiated in the Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt (KKL) reactor in Switzerland for up to nine annual cycles were examined in the spent fuel pool as well as in two hot cells (Paul Scherer Institute in Switzerl...

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

14

Final Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc. Work described herein was completed under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC04-00AL66977, Geothermal Resource Evaluation and...

15

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Medical Screening Program, Phase I: Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Medical Screening Program Phase I: Needs Assessment Presented to the Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support, Office of Health, Safety, and Security U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by Queens College, City University of New York United Steelworkers Original Draft: August 22, 2011 Updated Version: May 1, 2012 Table of Contents Summary.............................................................................3 I. Background on the Former Worker Program................................4 II. History of the WIPP Facility......................................................4 III. Scope of this Report.................................................................7 IV. Exposure Characterization........................................................8

16

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- GRED STUDIES AND DRILLING OF...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STATE 2, AMERICULTURE TILAPIA FARM LIGHTNING DOCK KGRA, ANIMAS VALLEY, NM Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

17

GRED III Final Report Clifton Hot Springs Geothermal Greenlee County, AZ  

SciTech Connect

Black & Veatch Corporation has prepared this report for Arizona Public Service Company, Salt River Project, and Tucson Electric Power Company (APS/SRP/TEP). The purpose of this report is to assess the prospects for significant renewable energy development in Arizona. The scope of the study is limited to Arizona projects that would export power to the grid (that is, not distributed energy projects). This study includes a review of the current status of renewable energy in Arizona, characterization of renewable power generation technologies, assessment of Arizona''s renewable resources, and an assessment of key risk factors. This section summarizes the key findings in these areas.

Brown, David E.

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. Phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii`s Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

Kinoshita, C.M. [ed.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ocean Margins Programs, Phase I research summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 1992, the DOE restructured its regional coastal-ocean programs into a new Ocean Margins Program (OMP), to: Quantify the ecological and biogeochemical processes and mechanisms that affect the cycling, flux, and storage of carbon and other biogenic elements at the land/ocean interface; Define ocean-margin sources and sinks in global biogeochemical cycles, and; Determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or export to the interior ocean. Currently, the DOE Ocean Margins Program supports more than 70 principal and co-principal investigators, spanning more than 30 academic institutions. Research funded by the OMP amounted to about $6.9M in FY 1994. This document is a collection of abstracts summarizing the component projects of Phase I of the OMP. This phase included both research and technology development, and comprised projects of both two and three years duration. The attached abstracts describe the goals, methods, measurement scales, strengths and limitations, and status of each project, and level of support. Keywords are provided to index the various projects. The names, addresses, affiliations, and major areas of expertise of the investigators are provided in appendices.

Verity, P. [ed.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

ESMERALDA ENERGY COMPANY FINAL SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT, January 2008, EMIGRANT SLIMHOLE DRILLING PROJECT, DOE GRED III (DE-FC36-04GO14339)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project (ESDP) was a highly successful, phased resource evaluation program designed to evaluate the commercial geothermal potential of the eastern margin of the northern Fish Lake Valley pull-apart basin in west-central Nevada. The program involved three phases: (1) Resource evaluation; (2) Drilling and resource characterization; and (3) Resource testing and assessment. Efforts included detailed geologic mapping; 3-D modeling; compilation of a GIS database; and production of a conceptual geologic model followed by the successful drilling of the 2,938 foot deep 17-31 slimhole (core hole), which encountered commercial geothermal temperatures (327? F) and exhibits an increasing, conductive, temperature gradient to total depth; completion of a short injection test; and compilation of a detailed geologic core log and revised geologic cross-sections. Results of the project greatly increased the understanding of the geologic model controlling the Emigrant geothermal resource. Information gained from the 17-31 core hole revealed the existence of commercial temperatures beneath the area in the Silver Peak Core Complex which is composed of formations that exhibit excellent reservoir characteristics. Knowledge gained from the ESDP may lead to the development of a new commercial geothermal field in Nevada. Completion of the 17-31 core hole also demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of deep core drilling as an exploration tool and the unequaled value of core in understanding the geology, mineralogy, evolutional history and structural aspects of a geothermal resource.

John Deymonaz, Jeffrey G. Hulen, Gregory D. Nash, Alex Schriener

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definitioni gred program-phases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hawaii alternative fuels utilization program. Phase 3, final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Alternative Fuels Utilization Program originated as a five-year grant awarded by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) to the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The overall program included research and demonstration efforts aimed at encouraging and sustaining the use of alternative (i.e., substitutes for gasoline and diesel) ground transportation fuels in Hawaii. Originally, research aimed at overcoming technical impediments to the widespread adoption of alternative fuels was an important facet of this program. Demonstration activities centered on the use of methanol-based fuels in alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). In the present phase, operations were expanded to include flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) which can operate on M85 or regular unleaded gasoline or any combination of these two fuels. Additional demonstration work was accomplished in attempting to involve other elements of Hawaii in the promotion and use of alcohol fuels for ground transportation in Hawaii.

Kinoshita, C.M.; Staackmann, M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Flammability Assessment Methodology Program Phase I: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Flammability Assessment Methodology Program (FAMP) was established to investigate the flammability of gas mixtures found in transuranic (TRU) waste containers. The FAMP results provide a basis for increasing the permissible concentrations of flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in TRU waste containers. The FAMP results will be used to modify the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (TRUPACT-II SARP) upon acceptance of the methodology by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Implementation of the methodology would substantially increase the number of drums that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without repackaging or treatment. Central to the program was experimental testing and modeling to predict the gas mixture lower explosive limit (MLEL) of gases observed in TRU waste containers. The experimental data supported selection of an MLEL model that was used in constructing screening limits for flammable VOC and flammable gas concentrations. The MLEL values predicted by the model for individual drums will be utilized to assess flammability for drums that do not meet the screening criteria. Finally, the predicted MLEL values will be used to derive acceptable gas generation rates, decay heat limits, and aspiration time requirements for drums that do not pass the screening limits. The results of the program demonstrate that an increased number of waste containers can be shipped to WIPP within the flammability safety envelope established in the TRUPACT-II SARP.

C. A. Loehr; S. M. Djordjevic; K. J. Liekhus; M. J. Connolly

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Advanced Turbine System Program Phase 2 cycle selection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ABB`s GT24-ATS can meet or exceed the ATS program goals with minimal risk. It requires only minor modifications to the GT24 EV/SEV combustors to meet NOx goals, without steam cooling, variable geometry, or moving parts.

Latcovich, J.A. Jr.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase I, final report - overview  

SciTech Connect

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a multiyear, multiphase program whose overall objective is to develop improved methods for seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants, using a probabilistic computational procedure. The program is being carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Phase I of the SSMRP was successfully completed in January 1981: A probabilistic computational procedure for the seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated. The methodology is implemented by three computer programs: HAZARD, which assesses the seismic hazard at a given site, SMACS, which computes in-structure and subsystem seismic responses, and SEISIM, which calculates system failure probabilities and radioactive release probabilities, given (1) the response results of SMACS, (2) a set of event trees, (3) a family of fault trees, (4) a set of structural and component fragility descriptions, and (5) a curve describing the local seismic hazard. The practicality of this methodology was demonstrated by computing preliminary release probabilities for Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant north of Chicago, Illinois. Studies have begun aimed at quantifying the sources of uncertainty in these computations. Numerous side studies were undertaken to examine modeling alternatives, sources of error, and available analysis techniques. Extensive sets of data were amassed and evaluated as part of projects to establish seismic input parameters and to produce the fragility curves. 66 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

Smith, P.D.; Dong, R.G.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Bohn, M.P.; Chuang, T.Y.; Cummings, G.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Wells, J.E.

1981-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

25

Sodium Heat Engine Development Program. Phase 1, Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sodium Heat Engine (SHE) is an efficient thermoelectric conversion device which directly generates electricity from a thermally regenerative electrochemical cell that relies on the unique conduction properties of {beta}{double_prime}-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). Laboratory models of a variety of SHE devices have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the system, engineering development of large prototype devices has been slowed by a series of materials and fabrication problems. Failure of the electrolyte tubes has been a recurring problem and a number of possible causes have been postulated. To address these issues, a two-phase engineering development program was undertaken. This report summarizes the final results of the first phase of the program, which included extensive materials characterization activities, a study of applicable nondestructive evaluation methods, an investigation of possible stress states that would contribute to fracture, and certain operational issues associated with the electromagnetic pumps used in the SHE prototype. Mechanical and microstructural evaluation of commercially obtained BASE tubes revealed that they should be adequate for SHE applications and that sodium exposure produced no appreciable deleterious strength effects. Processing activities to produce a more uniform and smaller grain size for the BASE tubes were completed using isostatic pressing, extrusion, and slip casting. Green tubes were sintered by conventional and microwave plasma methods. Of particular interest is the residual stress state in the BASE tubes, and both analysis and nondestructive evaluation methods were employed to evaluate these stresses. X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments were performed to determine the bulk residual stresses in commercially fabricated BASE tubes; however, tube-to-tube variations and variations among the various methods employed did not allow formulation of a definitive definition of the as-fabricated stress state.

Singh, J.P.; Kupperman, D.S.; Majumdar, S.; Dorris, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Jaross, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.; Gregar, J.S.; Poeppel, R.B.; Raptis, A.C.; Valentin, R.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Phase 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) Program is an advanced gas turbine research and development program whose goal is to accelerate the commercial availability, to within the turn of the century, of high efficiency aeroderivative gas turbines for electric power generating applications. In the first project phase, research was conducted to prove or disprove the research hypothesis that advanced aeroderivative gas turbine systems can provide a promising technology alternative, offering high efficiency and good environmental performance characteristics in modular sizes, for utility applications. This $5 million, Phase 1 research effort reflects the collaborative efforts of a broad and international coalition of industries and organizations, both public and private, that have pooled their resources to assist in this research. Included in this coalition are: electric and gas utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Gas Research Institute and the principal aircraft engine manufacturers. Additionally, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission have interacted with the CAGT on both technical and executive levels as observers and sources of funding. The three aircraft engine manufacturer-led research teams participating in this research include: Rolls-Royce, Inc., and Bechtel; the Turbo Power and Marine Division of United Technologies and Fluor Daniel; and General Electric Power Generation, Stewart and Stevenson, and Bechtel. Each team has investigated advanced electric power generating systems based on their high-thrust (60,000 to 100,000 pounds) aircraft engines. The ultimate goal of the CAGT program is that the community of stakeholders in the growing market for natural-gas-fueled, electric power generation can collectively provide the right combination of market-pull and technology-push to substantially accelerate the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency aeroderivative technologies.

Hollenbacher, R.; Kesser, K.; Beishon, D.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Steam generator tube integrity program: Phase II, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program (SGTIP) was a three phase program conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The first phase involved burst and collapse testing of typical steam generator tubing with machined defects. The second phase of the SGTIP continued the integrity testing work of Phase I, but tube specimens were degraded by chemical means rather than machining methods. The third phase of the program used a removed-from-service steam generator as a test bed for investigating the reliability and effectiveness of in-service nondestructive eddy-current inspection methods and as a source of service degraded tubes for validating the Phase I and Phase II data on tube integrity. This report describes the results of Phase II of the SGTIP. The object of this effort included burst and collapse testing of chemically defected pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing to validate empirical equations of remaining tube integrity developed during Phase I. Three types of defect geometries were investigated: stress corrosion cracking (SCC), uniform thinning and elliptical wastage. In addition, a review of the publicly available leak rate data for steam generator tubes with axial and circumferential SCC and a comparison with an analytical leak rate model is presented. Lastly, nondestructive eddy-current (EC) measurements to determine accuracy of defect depth sizing using conventional and alternate standards is described. To supplement the laboratory EC data and obtain an estimate of EC capability to detect and size SCC, a mini-round robin test utilizing several firms that routinely perform in-service inspections was conducted.

Kurtz, R.J.; Bickford, R.L.; Clark, R.A.; Morris, C.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Wheeler, K.R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

High Frequency Program: Phase 1 Seismic Test Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant resulting from the March 11, 2011, Great Tohoku Earthquake and subsequent tsunami, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) to conduct a systematic review of NRC processes and regulations. The NTTF was also tasked with determining if the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system.BackgroundThe NTTF developed a set of ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

29

NRC/EPRI Welding Residual Stress Validation Program (Phase III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC/EPRI weld residual stress (WRS) program currently consists of four phases, with each phase increasing in complexity from lab size specimens to...

30

Near-term electric vehicle program: Phase I, final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A final report is given for an Energy Research and Development Administration effort aimed at a preliminary design of an energy-efficient electric commuter car. An electric-powered passenger vehicle using a regenerative power system was designed to meet the near-term ERDA electric automobile goals. The program objectives were to (1) study the parameters that affect vehicle performance, range, and cost; (2) design an entirely new electric vehicle that meets performance and economic requirements; and (3) define a program to develop this vehicle design for production in the early 1980's. The design and performance features of the preliminary (baseline) electric-powered passenger vehicle design are described, including the baseline power system, system performance, economic analysis, reliability and safety, alternate designs and options, development plan, and conclusions and recommendations. All aspects of the baseline design were defined in sufficient detail to verify performance expectations and system feasibility.

Rowlett, B. H.; Murry, R.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Greenbelt Homes Pilot Energy Efficiency Program Phase 1 Summary: Existing Conditions and Baseline Energy Use  

SciTech Connect

A multi-year pilot energy efficiency retrofit project has been undertaken by Greenbelt Homes, Inc, (GHI) a 1,566 co-operative of circa 1930 and '40 homes. The three predominate construction methods of the townhomes in the community are materials common to the area and climate zone including 8" CMU block, wood frame with brick veneer and wood frame with vinyl siding. GHI has established a pilot project that will serve as a basis for decision making for the roll out of a decade-long community upgrade program that will incorporate energy efficiency to the building envelope and equipment with the modernization of other systems like plumbing, mechanical equipment, and cladding.

Wiehagen, J.; Del Bianco, M.; Wood, A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

On-grid PV implementation program. Phase I report, August 1994--January 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern California Edison Company (Edison) is finalizing a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop high value On-Grid applications for electricity from Photovoltaics (PV). Edison`s efforts are the result of Edison`s long-standing commitment to the pursuit of Renewable Energy. Edison has been a world leader in the development and use of PV. As the technology becomes more commercial, Edison has been actively seeking more applications for PV. After strenuous effort, Edison has now received approval to offer off-grid PV packages within its service territory. In addition, Edison has been very interested in finding high-value on-grid PV applications that may have the potential to become cost effective as PV applications increase and prices decline. Such high-value applications at Edison and other utilities will accelerate the price reductions, which in turn will increase the number of cost-effective applications, driving towards a market competitive with traditional sources of energy. Edison`s efforts build upon the work done by Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) at their Kerman substation, but goes much further than that effort. Edison submitted its original proposal to the DOE on June 30, 1993. A revised proposal was submitted on February 1, 1994, in response to a letter from the DOE`s Director of Solar Energy, Robert H. Annan. In a letter dated March 30, 1994, from Paul K. Kearns, Head of Contracting Activity for the DOE`s Golden Field Office, the DOE conditionally approved certain pre-award contract costs. The Cooperative Agreement with DOE was executed on August 16, 1994.

NONE

1994-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

33

Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program. Phase III. Final report and third update  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the USDOE EEDB Program is to provide periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel and operating and maintenance) information of significance to the US Department of Energy. This information is intended to be used by USDOE in evauating and monitoring US civilian nuclear power programs, and to provide them with a consistent means of evaluating the nuclear option and proposed alternatives. The data tables, which make up the bulk of the report, are updated to January 1, 1980. The data in these tables and in the backup data file supercede the information presented in the Second Update (1979). Where required, new descriptive information is added in the text to supplement the data tables.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Near-term electric vehicle program. Phase II. Operation and maintenance manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed description of the design, operation, and maintenance of the Integrated Test Vehicle (ITV) including instruments and controls, economy, safety and security, troubleshooting, and specifications is given. The ITV employs a dc traction motor and 18 lead-acid batteries which provide a nominal voltage of 108 Vdc. A microcomputer controls many vehicle electrical functions. The ITV is a four-passenger subcompact weighing 3320 lb curb weight with the capacity of carrying a 600 lb payload. The driving range is 75 miles on urban cycle, and the vehicle is equipped with a regenerative braking system. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Near term hybrid passenger vehicle development program. Phase I. Appendices C and D. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The derivation of and actual preliminary design of the Near Term Hybrid Vehicle (NTHV) are presented. The NTHV uses a modified GM Citation body, a VW Rabbit turbocharged diesel engine, a 24KW compound dc electric motor, a modified GM automatic transmission, and an on-board computer for transmission control. The following NTHV information is presented: the results of the trade-off studies are summarized; the overall vehicle design; the selection of the design concept and the base vehicle (the Chevrolet Citation), the battery pack configuration, structural modifications, occupant protection, vehicle dynamics, and aerodynamics; the powertrain design, including the transmission, coupling devices, engine, motor, accessory drive, and powertrain integration; the motor controller; the battery type, duty cycle, charger, and thermal requirements; the control system (electronics); the identification of requirements, software algorithm requirements, processor selection and system design, sensor and actuator characteristics, displays, diagnostics, and other topics; environmental system including heating, air conditioning, and compressor drive; the specifications, weight breakdown, and energy consumption measures; advanced technology components, and the data sources and assumptions used. (LCL)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Roadway Powered Electric Vehicle Project Track Construction And Testing Program Phase 3D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lines show energy flow during regenerative braking. Theregenerative braking, the motor (acting as a generator) is supplying as much energyregenerative braking above the base speed of 12 mph. The energy

Systems Control Technology, Inc.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The Effect on Electricity Consumption of the Commonwealth Edison Customer Applications Program: Phase 2 Final Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the final Phase 2 analysis of the effects on residential customers' energy consumption patterns of Commonwealth Edison's (ComEd's) Customer Application Program (CAP).

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

38

Near term hybrid passenger vehicle development program. Phase I. Appendices A and B. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report vehicle use patterns or missions are defined and studied. The three most promising missions were found to be: all-purpose city driving which has the maximum potential market penetration; commuting which requires mainly a two-passenger car; and family and civic business driving which have minimal range requirements. The mission selection process was based principally on an analysis of the travel patterns found in the Nationwide Transportation Survey and on the Los Angeles and Washington, DC origin-destination studies data presented by General Research Corporation in Volume II of this report. Travel patterns in turn were converted to fuel requirements for 1985 conventional and hybrid cars. By this means the potential fuel savings for each mission were estimated, and preliminary design requirements for hybrid vehicles were derived.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project IV. Structural building response; Structural Building Response Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Phase I effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) being performed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the basic objective of Subtask IV.1 (Structural Building Response Review) is to review and summarize current methods and data pertaining to seismic response calculations particularly as they relate to the objectives of the SSMRP. This material forms one component in the development of the overall computational methodology involving state of the art computations including explicit consideration of uncertainty and aimed at ultimately deriving estimates of the probability of radioactive releases due to seismic effects on nuclear power plant facilities.

Healey, J.J.; Wu, S.T.; Murga, M.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Near-term electric-vehicle program. Phase II. Mid-term review summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The general objective of the Near-Term Electric Vehicle Program is to confirm that, in fact, the complete spectrum of requirements placed on the automobile (e.g., safety, producibility, utility, etc.) can still be satisfied if electric power train concepts are incorporated in lieu of contemporary power train concepts, and that the resultant set of vehicle characteristics are mutually compatible, technologically achievable, and economically achievable. The focus of the approach to meeting this general objective involves the design, development, and fabrication of complete electric vehicles incorporating, where necessary, extensive technological advancements. A mid-term summary is presented of Phase II which is a continuation of the preliminary design study conducted in Phase I of the program. Information is included on vehicle performance and performance simulation models; battery subsystems; control equipment; power systems; vehicle design and components for suspension, steering, and braking; scale model testing; structural analysis; and vehicle dynamics analysis. (LCL)

Not Available

1978-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definitioni gred program-phases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Diesel Emission Control-- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program-- Phase II Summary Report: NOx Adsorber Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The investigations performed in this project demonstrated the ability to develop a NO{sub x} regeneration strategy including both an improved lean/rich modulation cycle and rich engine calibration, which resulted in a high NO{sub x} conversion efficiency over a range of operating temperatures. A high-temperature cycle was developed to desulfurize the NO{sub x} absorber catalyst. The effectiveness of the desulfurization process was demonstrated on catalysts aged using two different sulfur level fuels. The major findings of this project are as follows: (1) The improved lean/rich engine calibration achieved as a part of this test project resulted in NO{sub x} conversion efficiencies exceeding 90% over a catalyst inlet operating temperature window of 300 C-450 C. This performance level was achieved while staying within the 4% fuel economy penalty target defined for the regeneration calibration. (2) The desulfurization procedure developed showed that six catalysts, which had been exposed to fuel sulfur levels of 3-, 16-, and 30-ppm for as long as 250 hours, could be recovered to greater than 85% NO{sub x} conversion efficiency over a catalyst inlet operating temperature window of 300 C-450 C, after a single desulfurization event. This performance level was achieved while staying within the 4% fuel economy penalty target defined for the regeneration calibration. (3) The desulfurization procedure developed has the potential to meet in-service engine operating conditions and provide acceptable driveability conditions. (4) Although aging with 78-ppm sulfur fuel reduced NO{sub x} conversion efficiency more than aging with 3-ppm sulfur fuel as a result of sulfur contamination, the desulfurization events restored the conversion efficiency to nearly the same level of performance. However, repeatedly exposing the catalyst to the desulfurization procedure developed in this program caused a continued decline in the catalyst's desulfurized performance. Additional work will be necessary to identify the cause of this performance decline. (5) The rate of sulfur contamination during aging with 78-ppm sulfur fuel increased with repeated aging/desulfurization cycles (from 10% per ten hours to 18% per ten hours). This was not observed with the 3-ppm fuel, where the rate of decline during aging was fairly constant at approximately 2% per ten hours.

None

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

HIGH INTENSITY DISCHARGE (HID) SOLID STATE BALLAST PROGRAM PHASE I FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1-T- 1''-'-'-l l% Lamp Volts (ri! VGII >! IH! At ()fvolt (maximum) pulse 1 usee wide atRMS voltage is 215 Volts. For complete specifications write

Ailing, W.R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

An Overview of Residential Ventilation Activities in the Building America Program (Phase I)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of issues involved in residential ventilation; provides an overview of the various ventilation strategies being evaluated by the five teams, or consortia, currently involved in the Building America Program; and identifies unresolved technical issues.

Barley, D.

2001-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

44

Test Plan for Heat Cycle Research Program, Phase I Supercritical Cycle Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 60 kW Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) provides a means of examining different concepts and components associated with the generation of electrical power from a geothermal resource using a binary power cycle. In this power cycle the heat or energy in a hot geothermal fluid is transferred to a secondary working fluid. This working fluid is vaporized in the heat exchange process and the vapor is in turn expanded through a turbine which drives a generator producing electrical power. the heat or energy in the vapor leaving the turbine is transferred to a circulating cooling water in the condenser where the working fluid is condensed to a liquid which can be pumped back to the heaters, completing the cycle. This waste heat load in the condenser is in turn transferred from the cooling water to the atmosphere in a cooling tower. The HCRF allows the different components described in the cycle above to be tested as well as the basic cycle itself. This cycle may vary in that the heaters, condenser, cooling system, pumps, etc. may differ in number and type, however the basic cycle does not change significantly. During this sequence of tests, the HCRF is operated using a supercritical vapor generator and a vertical condenser where the condensation occurs inside of the tubes as opposed to the shell side more commonly used in these applications. In addition to providing the data to be used to evaluate the design of these heat exchangers, these supercritical tests provide cycle and component performance data with both single component working fluids and working fluids comprised of different mixtures of hydrocarbons. The use of these mixtures promises to improve cycle performance, in terms of watt-hours per pound of geothermal fluid, provided the countercurrent flow paths can be maintained between the fluids in both the condenser and the heaters. The supercritical heaters and the condenser to be used in this series of tests were designed to provide the desired countercurrent flow paths.

Mines, Greg L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Phase I, Final report. Appendix D: sensitivity analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report on the Sensitivity of Mission Analysis and Trade-off Studies provides an analysis of the sensitivity of the results of previous mission analysis and performance specification studies to the possible variations of the values of significant parameters as projected to the year 1985. These parameters include vehicle usage by purpose, driving cycles, trip lengths, ownership projections, and life-cycle costs. Tabulated data are included from calculations with variations in these parameters. (LCL)

Traversi, M.

1979-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

46

HIGH INTENSITY DISCHARGE (HID) SOLID STATE BALLAST PROGRAM PHASE I FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quite expensive. Cost projections based on these unitsmeaningless, however, cost projections can be made based onsavings and benefit projections to the end user. Luminoptics

Ailing, W.R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Roadway Powered Electric Vehicle Project Track Construction And Testing Program Phase 3D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with remaining battery capacity Total range *Based on 201with remaining battery capacity (km) Total range (km) *Basedincluding battery voltage and capacity, motor current limit,

Systems Control Technology, Inc.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Effect on Electricity Consumption of the Commonwealth Edison Customer Application Program: Phase 2 Supplemental Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides appendices that support EPRI report 1023644, which describes the Phase 2 (final) analysis of residential customers' response to Commonwealth Edison's Customer Application Program (CAP). The report contains technical materials that describe in detail the methods employed in conducting the Phase 2 analysis and presents the results of the application of additional data and methods in Phase 2.

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

Du Pont Lanxide composites DMO CFCC program. Phase I final report  

SciTech Connect

In July of 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy embarked on a new and challenging research program aimed at developing continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) for wide spread commercialization in industrial applications. It was the DOE`s intention to provide funding to the advanced composites industry to support the research and development efforts already underway to commercialize CFCC materials. The strategy was to {open_quotes}team{close_quotes} composite manufacturers with original equipment manufacturers such that the research and development activities addressed the performance needs of the intended end-use applications and stayed focused on a path to commercialization. Applications are directed towards gas turbines, hot gas filters, and heat exchangers.

Rocazella, M.A.; Fareed, A.S.; Shah, A.C.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Phase I, Final report. Appendix C: preliminary design data package. Volume II. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix to the final report on the Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program contans data on Na-S batteries, Ni-Zn batteries; vehicle body design; tire characteristics; and results of computer simulations of vehicle yaw, pitch, and roll under various driving and aerodynamic conditions. (LCL)

Piccolo, R.

1979-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

51

Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Phase I, Final report. Appendix B: trade-off studies. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Trade-off studies of Near Term Hybrid Vehicle (NTHV) design elements were performed to identify the most promising design concept in terms of achievable petroleum savings. The activities in these studies are described. The results are presented as preliminary NTHV body design, expected fuel consumption as a function of vehicle speed, engine requirements, battery requirements, and vehicle reliability and cost. (LCL)

Traversi, M.; Piccolo, R.

1979-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Phase I, Final report. Appendix C: preliminary design data package. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The assumptions made, analysis methods used, and preliminary results of research to determine the design specifications for a hybrid electric-powered and internal combustion engine-powered vehicle that would optimize the fuel economy of passenger automobiles are described. Information is included on body and component design, selection of spark-ignition engine and Ni-Zn batteries, life-cycle costs and life-cycle fuel consumption. (LCL)

Piccolo, R.

1979-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 4: Diesel Particulate Filters -- Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This is the fourth and final report for the DPF test program and covers the effect of diesel sulfur level on: a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF), and a continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CR-DPF).

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 2: NO{sub x} Adsorber Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report discusses the results of the DECSE test program that demonstrates the potential of NOx adsorber catalyst technology across the range of diesel engine operation with a fuel economy penalty less than 4%.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Property:DOEFunding | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOEFunding DOEFunding Jump to: navigation, search Property Name DOEFunding Property Type String Description DOE Funding Pages using the property "DOEFunding" Showing 5 pages using this property. C Conceptual Model At Salt Wells Area (Faulds, Et Al., 2011) + ARRA (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) + D Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) + GRED II + F Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) + GRED II + G Geothermal Literature Review At Salt Wells Area (Faulds, Et Al., 2011) + ARRA (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) + S SWIR at Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Kruse 2012) + none + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:DOEFunding&oldid=473811#SMWResults" Categories: Properties Exploration Activity

56

Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Projects Definition Projects Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition (GRED) projects are cooperative Department of Energy (DOE)/industry projects to find, evaluate, and define additional geothermal resources throughout the western United States. The ultimate goal is to increase electrical power generation from geothermal resources in the United States and facilitate reductions in the cost of geothermal energy through applications of new technology. DOE initiated GRED in April 2000 with a solicitation for industry participation, and this solicitation resulted in seven successful

57

Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

And Definition Projects And Definition Projects Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Details Activities (40) Areas (10) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition (GRED) projects are cooperative Department of Energy (DOE)/industry projects to find, evaluate, and define additional geothermal resources throughout the western United States. The ultimate goal is to increase electrical power generation from geothermal resources in the United States and facilitate reductions in the cost of geothermal energy through applications of new technology. DOE initiated GRED in April 2000 with a solicitation for industry participation, and this solicitation resulted in seven successful

58

Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Phase I, Final report. Appendix A: mission analysis and performance specification studies. Volume II. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These appendices to the mission analysis report for the Near Term Hybrid Vehicle program contain data on passenger vehicle usage by purpose, trip length, travel speed, vehicle age, vehicle ownership and fuel economy, and US demographics. (LCL)

Traversi, M.; Barbarek, L.A.C.

1979-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

59

Toughened Silcomp composites for gas turbine engine applications. Continuous fiber ceramic composites program: Phase I final report, April 1992--June 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The two main factors driving the development of new industrial gas turbine engine systems are fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. One method of providing improvements in both areas is to reduce the cooling air requirements of the hot gas path components. For this reason ceramic components are becoming increasingly attractive for gas turbine applications because of their greater refractoriness and oxidation resistance. Among the ceramics being considered, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are leading candidates because they combine the high temperature stability of ceramics with the toughness and damage tolerance of composites. The purpose of this program, which is part of DOE`s CFCC initiative, is to evaluate the use of CFCC materials as gas turbine engine components, and to demonstrate the feasibility of producing such components from Toughened Silcomp composites. Toughened silcomp is a CFCC material made by a reactive melt infiltration process, and consists of continuous SiC reinforcing fibers, with an appropriate fiber coating, in a fully dense matrix of SiC and Si. Based on the material physical properties, the material/process improvements realized in Phase 1, and the preliminary design analyses from Task 1, they feel the feasibility of fabricating Toughened Silcomp with the requisite physical and mechanical properties for the intended applications has been demonstrated. Remaining work for Phase 2 is to further improve the system for enhanced oxidation resistance, incorporate additional process controls to enhance the reproducibility of the material, transition the fabrication process to the selected vendors for scale-up, develop a more complete material property data base, including long-term mechanical behavior, and fabricate and test preliminary ``representative part`` specimens.

Corman, G.S.; Luthra, K.L.; Brun, M.K.; Meschter, P.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program Phase I: Clean Air Partners 0.5 g/hp-h NOx Engine Concept; Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details work done by Clean Air Partners to develop 0.5 g/hp-h NOx natural gas engine exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technology for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program.

Wong, H. C.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definitioni gred program-phases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Environmental, Health and Safety Assessment: ATS 7H Program (Phase 3R) Test Activities at the GE Power Systems Gas Turbine Manufacturing Facility, Greenville, SC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International Technology Corporation (IT) was contracted by General Electric Company (GE) to assist in the preparation of an Environmental, Health and Safety (HI&3) assessment of the implementation of Phase 3R of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) 7H program at the GE Gas Turbines facility located in Greenville, South Carolina. The assessment was prepared in accordance with GE's contractual agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (GE/DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC3 1176) and supports compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970. This report provides a summary of the EH&S review and includes the following: General description of current site operations and EH&S status, Description of proposed ATS 7H-related activities and discussion of the resulting environmental, health, safety and other impacts to the site and surrounding area. Listing of permits and/or licenses required to comply with federal, state and local regulations for proposed 7H-related activities. Assessment of adequacy of current and required permits, licenses, programs and/or plans.

None

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Phase I, Final report. Appendix A: mission analysis and performance specification studies. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies are described which were performed for the Near Term Hybrid Vehicle program to determine passenger car usage patterns and to correlate these trip mission characteristics with vehicle design and performance specifications. (LCL)

Traversi, M.; Barbarek, L.A.C.

1979-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

63

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Date Report No. 3: Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on Particulate Matter Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report covers the effects of diesel fuel sulfur level on particulate matter emissions for four technologies.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Materials Reliability Program: Phase II Work Plan for Developing a Risk-Informed Approach for Calculating Reactor Pressure Vessel He atup and Cooldown Operating Curves (MRP-195)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current procedures for calculating pressure-temperature (P/T) limits for normal reactor heatup and cooldown are defined by the deterministic fracture mechanics methodology in Appendix G (in both Section XI and Section III) of the ASME Code. The recent pressurized thermal shock (PTS) reevaluation effort used a very thorough probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) evaluation to develop a technical basis to increase the PTS screening criteria. This same PFM methodology can be applied for evaluating norma...

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

SNAP-21 program, Phase II. Deep sea radioisotope-fueled thermoelectric generator power supply system. Final design description, 10-watt system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SNAP-21 10-W system provides electrical power for use under the surface of the sea. It functions by converting the heat from a decaying radioisotope fuel into useful electrical energy. This heat energy is converted into electrical energy by a thermoelectric generator. Semiconductor-type thermoelectric materials, maintained in a temperature gradient, accomplish the conversion. The isotopic fuel supplies heat to the thermoelectric materials and sea water acts as the heat sink to maintain the temperature gradient. Other components are employed to increase efficiency and condition the electrical output to the desired form. The components performing these functions are enclosed in a pressure vessel which protects them from sea water pressure and exposure. No external inputs are required to maintain operation of the system. With this type of mechanically-static, unsupported operation, long life with no maintenance is achieved.

Wickenberg, R.F.; Harris, W.W.

1969-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Restoration of Democracy and Peoples Empowerment in Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or spirilllal, who has credibility. The majority or the p~uplc have almost lost faith in the bureaucrats and politicians. ilnd corruption and gre~d havc becomc a big problem to Nepal's devc.;lnpmcllt. The prolonged economic and social stagnation is having its...

Pyakuryal, Kailash N

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Esmeralda Energy Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008, Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008, Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project, Doe Gred Iii (De-Fc36-04Go14339) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Esmeralda Energy Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008, Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project, Doe Gred Iii (De-Fc36-04Go14339) Details Activities (10) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project ('ESDP') was a highly successful, phased resource evaluation program designed to evaluate the commercial geothermal potential of the eastern margin of the northern Fish Lake Valley pull-apart basin in west-central Nevada. The program involved three phases: (1) Resource evaluation; (2) Drilling and resource characterization; and (3) Resource testing and assessment. Efforts included

69

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding GRED II Notes Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects Raft River (GRED II): Re-assessment and testing of previously abandoned production wells. The objective of the U.S. Geothermal effort is to re-access the available wellbores, assess their condition, perform extensive testing of the reservoir to determine its productive capacity, and perform a resource utilization assessment. At the time of this paper, all five wells had been

70

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding GRED II Notes Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects Raft River (GRED II): Re-assessment and testing of previously abandoned production wells. The objective of the U.S. Geothermal effort is to re-access the available wellbores, assess their condition, perform extensive testing of the reservoir to determine its productive capacity, and perform a resource utilization assessment. At the time of this paper, all five wells had been

71

High-Temperature-Turbine Technology Program: Phase II. Technology test and support studies. Design and development of the liquid-fueled high-temperature combustor for the Turbine Spool Technology Rig  

SciTech Connect

The concept selected by Curtiss-Wright for this DOE sponsored High Temperature Turbine Technology (HTTT) Program utilizes transpiration air-cooling of the turbine subsystem airfoils. With moderate quantities of cooling air, this method of cooling has been demonstrated to be effective in a 2600 to 3000/sup 0/F gas stream. Test results show that transpiration air-cooling also protects turbine components from the aggressive environment produced by the combustion of coal-derived fuels. A new single-stage, high work transpiration air-cooled turbine has been designed and fabricated for evaluation in a rotating test vehicle designated the Turbine Spool Technology Rig (TSTR). The design and development of the annular combustor for the TSTR are described. Some pertinent design characteristics of the combustor are: fuel, Jet A; inlet temperature, 525/sup 0/F; inlet pressure, 7.5 Atm; temperature rise, 2475/sup 0/F; efficiency, 98.5%; exit temperature pattern, 0.25; and exit mass flow, 92.7 pps. The development program was conducted on a 60/sup 0/ sector of the full-round annular combustor. Most design goals were achieved, with the exception of the peak gas exit temperature and local metal temperatures at the rear of the inner liner, both of which were higher than the design values. Subsequent turbine vane cascade testing established the need to reduce both the peak gas temperature (for optimum vane cooling) and the inner liner metal temperature (for combustor durability). Further development of the 60/sup 0/ combustor sector achieved the required temperature reductions and the final configuration was incorporated in the TSTR full-annular burner.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project Details Activities (23) Areas (8) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition (GRED) project is a cooperative DOEhdustry project to find, evaluate, and define additional geothermal resources throughout the western United States. The ultimate goal is to aid in the development of geographically diverse geothermal resources and increase electrical power generation from geothermal resources in the continental United States. The project was initiated in April 2000 with a solicitation for industry participation in the project, and this solicitation resulted in seven successful awards in

73

A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description With prior support from the Department of Energy (GRED III Program), New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NM Tech) has established that this resource likely has sufficient permeability (3000 Darcies) and temperatures (80-112 oC) to develop a campus-wide district heating system.

74

Ground Gravity Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff Ground Gravity Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Two separate gravity surveys were conducted by LDG as part of this GRED Cooperative Agreement. The first survey was conducted in April 2001 and consisted of 77 stations in the north half of Section 7 and south half of Section 6, both sections being in Township 25 South, Range 19 West. A second and much larger survey was conducted in October 2001. This survey consisted of 227 new stations in nine linear traverses that covered more than one hundred (100) square kilometers centered on the known resource area in Section 7 (figure 3).

75

Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2009) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fairbank Engineering, 2009) Fairbank Engineering, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes DEEP BLUE No.1, the first slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, was drilled under a cost-share program between the DOE and Noramex, under the DOE's Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition (GRED) program, (Noramex Corp., 2002). The hole was sited to test an area of projected high temperature at depth from gradients measured in shallow holes drilled in the central part of the lease area (Figure 3.1), and to test an area of low apparent resistivity interpreted to reflect possible

76

Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Pre-existing evidence includes heat gradients of upwards of 490mW/m2 from thermal-gradient wells, tepid spring waters (32oC) and silica geochemistry indicating thermal waters with a minimum of 82oC at depth References Lara Owens, Richard Baars, David Norman, Harold Tobin (2005) New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Socorro_Mountain_Area_(Owens,_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=389518

77

Magnetotellurics At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Owens, Et Al., 2005) Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes magneto-telluric surveys are pending for the near future when geochemical and surface geophysical surveys are complete. Results of this survey should verify the occurrence of low-resisitivity fluids and alteration at depth. References Lara Owens, Richard Baars, David Norman, Harold Tobin (2005) New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Magnetotellurics_At_Socorro_Mountain_Area_(Owens,_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=388765

78

Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some

79

Geothermal Literature Review At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deymonaz, Et Al., Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes (1) Assembly and review of relevant published and proprietary literature and previous geothermal investigations in the region; References John Deymonaz, Jeffrey G. Hulen, Gregory D. Nash, Alex Schriener (2008) Esmeralda Energy Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008, Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project, Doe Gred Iii (De-Fc36-04Go14339) Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Fish_Lake_Valley_Area_(Deymonaz,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=510804"

80

Field Mapping At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes (2) detailed geologic mapping of the Emigrant Miocene sedimentary basin and surrounding Paleozoic basement rocks; References John Deymonaz, Jeffrey G. Hulen, Gregory D. Nash, Alex Schriener (2008) Esmeralda Energy Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008, Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project, Doe Gred Iii (De-Fc36-04Go14339) Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Field_Mapping_At_Fish_Lake_Valley_Area_(Deymonaz,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=510737"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definitioni gred program-phases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE. Author(s): William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 2008 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Compound and Elemental Analysis At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008)

82

Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Pre-existing evidence includes heat gradients of upwards of 490mW/m2 from thermal-gradient wells, tepid spring waters (32oC) and silica geochemistry indicating thermal waters with a minimum of 82 degrees C at depth References Lara Owens, Richard Baars, David Norman, Harold Tobin (2005) New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Retrieved from

83

Small Business Innovation Research Project Phase I Release 2 Solicitations Awards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

List of awards announced on February 5, 2013 for the SBIR Programs Phase I Release 2 solicitations.

84

Diversity in U.S. Medical Schools: Revitalizing Efforts to Increase Diversity in a Changing Context, 1960s-2000s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conducted Education and Training Programs. Available at:Conducted Education and Training Programs. Notice. JanuaryMinority Research and Training Programs. Phase 3. Committee

Lee, Philip R.; Franks, Patricia E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Effects of Thermo-Mechanical Treatments on Deformation Behavior ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NRC/EPRI Welding Residual Stress Validation Program (Phase III) On the Microstructure of Alloy 600 SCC Cracks Observed by TEM on PWR SG Pulled Tubes...

86

SCC Behavior of Alloy 52M/182 Weld Overlay in a PWR Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NRC/EPRI Welding Residual Stress Validation Program (Phase III) On the Microstructure of Alloy 600 SCC Cracks Observed by TEM on PWR SG Pulled Tubes...

87

Research and Evaluation of Low Temperature Crack Propagation of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NRC/EPRI Welding Residual Stress Validation Program (Phase III) On the Microstructure of Alloy 600 SCC Cracks Observed by TEM on PWR SG Pulled Tubes...

88

Neutron Dose Rate Effect on Radiation Hardening of Type 316L ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NRC/EPRI Welding Residual Stress Validation Program (Phase III) On the Microstructure of Alloy 600 SCC Cracks Observed by TEM on PWR SG Pulled Tubes...

89

Comparison of the Oxidation Behavior of the 14CrODS Alloy in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NRC/EPRI Welding Residual Stress Validation Program (Phase III) On the Microstructure of Alloy 600 SCC Cracks Observed by TEM on PWR SG Pulled Tubes...

90

Development of the Extremely Low Probability of Rupture (xLPR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NRC/EPRI Welding Residual Stress Validation Program (Phase III) On the Microstructure of Alloy 600 SCC Cracks Observed by TEM on PWR SG Pulled Tubes...

91

Relations between Meteorology and Ozone in the Lake Michigan Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field program phase of the Lake Michigan Ozone Study (LMOS) took place during the summer of 1991. Observed ozone concentrations and weather variables have been analyzed for the Lake Michigan region and the eastern United States for four 1991 ...

Steven R. Hanna; Joseph C. Chang

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

CX-010194: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Integration Program Phase II Field Trial: Site One - Eagle Ford Shale CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 04152013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy...

93

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500 deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400 encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105 but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500 deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400 encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105 but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Predicting locality phases for dynamic memory optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic data, cache, and memory adaptation can significantly improve program performance when they are applied on long continuous phases of execution that have dynamic but predictable locality. To support phase-based adaptation, this paper defines the ... Keywords: Dynamic optimization, Locality analysis and optimization, Phase hierarchy, Program phase prediction, Reconfigurable architecture

Xipeng Shen; Yutao Zhong; Chen Ding

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Locality phase prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As computer memory hierarchy becomes adaptive, its performance increasingly depends on forecasting the dynamic program locality. This paper presents a method that predicts the locality phases of a program by a combination of locality profiling and run-time ... Keywords: dynamic optimization, locality analysis and optimization, phase hierarchy, program phase analysis and prediction, reconfigurable architecture

Xipeng Shen; Yutao Zhong; Chen Ding

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE MINUTES SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 2:00 PM 206 TAPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the Center Drive bus shelter. #12; New LED Signs ­ Solar-powered LED signs were donated to help control seeking approval for Programming Phase. The committee raised concerns about ADA spaces that must, Project Manager with Facilities Planning and Construction, sought approval of allowing the 45-space (10

Watson, Craig A.

98

Y-12 and ORNL Production Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory Medical Surveillance Program Phase I: Needs Assessment Queens College, City University of New York Atomic Trades & Labor Council PACE International Union Creative Pollution Solutions, Inc. February 12, 2004 Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-FCO3-96SF21260 1-12 and Oak Ridge National Laboratory Medical Surveillance Program Phase I: Needs Assessment Steven Markowitz, MD Queens College, City University of New York Carl Scarbrough Atomic Trades & Labor Council Sylvia Kieding PACE International Union Mark Griffon, MS Creative Pollution Solutions, Inc. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Number Executive Summary Part I: OVERVIEW Section I. Introduction 1 Section II. Methods 3 Section ifi. Principal Findings 6 Section IV. Need for Medical Surveillance and Risk Communication

99

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Power Electronics International, Inc. Arkansas Power Electronics International, Inc. DOE Peer Review November 2-3, 2006 Marcelo Schupbach, Ph.D. Senior Engineer APEI, Inc. 535 Research Center Blvd. Fayetteville, AR 72701 Phone: (479)-443-5759 Email: marcelo@apei.net Website: www.apei.net High Temperature and High Power Density SiC Power Electronic Converters Energy Storage Systems Program 2 Overview * APEI, Inc. Corporate Status * Broader Impact of SiC-based Power Converter * DOE Energy Storage System Program Phase I SBIR - SBIR Topic: Wide Band Gap Power Converter Application - APEI's Goals - Phase I Accomplishments * DOE Energy Storage System Program Phase II SBIR - APEI's Goals - Research Team and Partners - Project Status Energy Storage Systems Program 3 APEI, Inc. Mission Statement We are a small business dedicated to

100

Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs - Phase 2 (July/August 2013) Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs - Phase 2 (July/August 2013) DOE has recognized that the electricity industry needs workforce development resources that can aid in the accelerating need for Secure Power Systems Professionals, while at the same time identifying capabilities and competencies to protect and enable the modernized grid currently being built. In the spring of 2011 a project was initiated to identify those capabilities and competencies along with assessing the need and qualifications for a certification program for Secure Power Systems

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definitioni gred program-phases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A fine-grained component-level power measurement method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ever growing energy consumption of computer systems have become a more and more serious problem in the past few years. Power profiling is a fundamental way for us to better understand where, when and how energy is consumed. This paper presents a ... Keywords: energy efficiency, fine-grained component-level power measurement method, computer system energy consumption, power profiling, direct measurement method, power dissipation synchronization, program phase, SPEC CPU2006 benchmarks, fine time granularity, memory management, architecture design

Zehan Cui; Yan Zhu; Yungang Bao; Mingyu Chen

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Performance monitoring for new phase dynamic optimization of instruction dispatch cluster configuration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a processor having multiple clusters which operate in parallel, the number of clusters in use can be varied dynamically. At the start of each program phase, the configuration option for an interval is run to determine the optimal configuration, which is used until the next phase change is detected. The optimum instruction interval is determined by starting with a minimum interval and doubling it until a low stability factor is reached.

Balasubramonian, Rajeev (Sandy, UT); Dwarkadas, Sandhya (Rochester, NY); Albonesi, David (Ithaca, NY)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

103

Multi-cluster processor operating only select number of clusters during each phase based on program statistic monitored at predetermined intervals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a processor having multiple clusters which operate in parallel, the number of clusters in use can be varied dynamically. At the start of each program phase, the configuration option for an interval is run to determine the optimal configuration, which is used until the next phase change is detected. The optimum instruction interval is determined by starting with a minimum interval and doubling it until a low stability factor is reached.

Balasubramonian, Rajeev (Sandy, UT); Dwarkadas, Sandhya (Rochester, NY); Albonesi, David (Ithaca, NY)

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada, U.S.A  

SciTech Connect

The report documents the drilling of well Deep Blue No.2, the second deep geothermal test hole at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The well was drilled by Noramex Corp, a Nevada company, with funding support from the US Department of Energy, under the DOEs GRED II Program. Deep Blue No.2 was drilled as a step-out hole from Deep Blue No.1, to further evaluate the commercial potential of the geothermal resource. Deep Blue No.2 was designed as a vertical, slim observation test hole to a nominal target depth of 1000 meters (nominal 3400 feet). The well tests an area of projected high temperatures at depth, from temperature gradients measured in a group of shallow drill holes located approximately one kilometer to the northeast of observation hole Deep Blue No.1. The well is not intended for, or designed as, a commercial well or a production well. Deep Blue No.2 was spudded on March 25, 2004 and completed to a total depth of 1127.76m (3700 ft) on April 28, 2004. The well was drilled using conventional rotary drilling techniques to a depth of 201.17 m (660 ft), and continuously cored from 201.17m (660 ft) to 1127.76m (3700 ft). A brief rig-on flow-test was conducted at completion to determine basic reservoir parameters and obtain fluid samples. A permeable fracture zone with measured temperatures of 150 to 167C (302 to 333F) occurs between 500 to 750m (1640 to 2461ft). The well was left un-lined in anticipation of the Phase III - Flow and Injection Testing. A further Kuster temperature survey was attempted after the well had been shut in for almost 3 weeks. The well appears to have bridged off at 439m (1440ft) as the Kuster tool was unable to descend past this point. Several attempts to dislodge the obstruction using tube jars were unsuccessful. Deep Blue No.2 encountered variably fractured and veined, fine-grained rocks of the Singas Formation, and intruded by minor strongly altered fine-grained felsic dikes, and less altered fineto medium-grained felsic to intermediate dikes. Widespread open fractures and extensive of quartz veining in many intervals of the core indicate a high degree of fracturing and flow of silica-bearing fluids, almost certainly hotter than 200C (392F), at some time, but these fractures are now partially sealed. Intervals of soft shaly mudstone, common clay gouge, and rocks with generally low permeability (few veins and fractures) may also form a seal or cap above the main high temperature reservoir at Blue Mountain. The encouraging results from Deep Blue No.2 support further drilling at Blue Mountain. Higher temperature fluids can be expected where fractures providing channels for the circulation of hot water from depth have not been sealed extensively by silica deposition.

Ted Fitzpatrick, Brian D. Fairbank

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Phase 2 and 3 Slim Hole Drilling and Testing at the Lake City, California Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Phases 2 and 3 of the Lake City GRED II project two slim holes were cored to depths of 1728 and 4727 ft. Injection and production tests with temperature and pressure logging were performed on the OH-1 and LCSH-5 core holes. OH-1 was permanently modified by cementing an NQ tubing string in place below a depth of 947 ft. The LCSH-1a hole was drilled in Quaternary blue clay to a depth of 1727 ft and reached a temperature of 193 oF at a depth of 1649 ft. This hole failed to find evidence of a shallow geothermal system east of the Mud Volcano but the conductive temperature profile indicates temperatures near 325 oF could be present below depth of 4000 ft. The LCSH-5 hole was drilled to a depth of 4727 ft and encountered a significant shallow permeability between depths of 1443 and 1923 ft and below 3955 ft. LCSH-5 drilled impermeable Quaternary fanglomerate to a depth of 1270 ft. Below 1270 ft the rocks consist primarily of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The most significant formation deep in LCSH-5 appears to be a series of poikoilitic mafic lava flows below a depth of 4244 ft that host the major deep permeable fracture encountered. The maximum static temperature deep in LCSH-5 is 323 oF and the maximum flowing temperature is 329 oF. This hole extended the known length of the geothermal system by of a mile toward the north and is located over mile north of the northernmost hot spring. The OH-1 hole was briefly flow tested prior to cementing the NQ rods in place. This flow test confirmed the zone at 947 ft is the dominant permeability in the hole. The waters produced during testing of OH-1 and LCSH-5 are generally intermediate in character between the deep geothermal water produced by the Phipps #2 well and the thermal springs. Geothermometers applied to deeper fluids tend to predict higher subsurface temperatures with the maximum being 382 oF from the Phipps #2 well. The Lake City geothermal system can be viewed as having shallow (elevation > 4000 ft and temperatures of 270 to 310 oF), intermediate (elevation 2800 to 3700 ft and temperatures 270 to 320 oF ) and deep (elevations < 1000 ft and temperatures 323 to 337 oF) components. In the south part of the field, near Phipps #2 the shallow and deep components are present. In the central part of the field, near OH-1 the shallow and intermediate components are present and presumably the deep component is also present. In the north part of the field, the intermediate and deep components are present. Most or all of the fractures in the core have dips between 45 degrees and vertical and no strong stratigraphic control on the resource has yet been demonstrated. Conceptually, the Lake City geothermal resource seems to be located along the north-south trending range front in a relatively wide zone of fractured rock. The individual fractures do not seem to be associated with any readily identifiable fault. In fact, no major hydraulically conductive faults were identified by the core drilling.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell; Joe Moore; Colin Goranson

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

106

Microsoft Word - 4_21_04 JFD ATS P III Final Report Document.pdf.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Advanced Turbine Systems Program Phase III Technical Progress Final Report Prepared for: US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Prepared by: Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation Orlando, Florida 32826-2399 Date Issued: April 21, 2004 DOE Contract Nos. DE-AC21-93MC30247 DE-FC21-95MC32267 i DISCLAIMER "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United Sates Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their

107

Pressurized Water Reactor Steam Generator Lay-up: Corrosion Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report summarizes work completed to date for a project to develop improved lay-up guidance for PWR Steam Generators (SG). Phase 1 of this project included a detailed literature review and a gap analysis of additional work needed to quantify the corrosion behavior of SG materials under wet lay-up conditions. As a result of the gap analysis, EPRI designed a corrosion test program (Phase 2) to measure general corrosion rates of steam generator materials under lay-up conditions. This report summ...

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

Technical review of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

US DOE`s ATS program has the goals of increased efficiency of natural gas-fired power generation plants, decreased cost of electricity, and a decrease in harmful emissions. The Westinghouse ATS plant is based on an advanced gas turbine design combined with an advanced steam turbine and a high efficiency generator. Objectives of the ATS Program Phase 2 are to select the ATS cycle and to develop technologies required to achieve ATS Program goals: combustion, cooling, aerodynamics, leakage control, coatings, materials. This paper describes progress on each.

Diakunchak, I.S.; Bannister, R.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

General Electric ATS Program technical review Phase 2 activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program Phase 2 objectives are to select a cycle, and to identify and resolve technical issues required to realize the ATS Program goals of 60% net combined cycle efficiency, single digit NOx, and a 10% electric power cost reduction, compared to current technology. The Phase 2 efforts have showns that the ATS Program goals are achievable. The GE Power Generation advanced gas turbine will use closed-loop steam cooling in the first two turbine stages and advanced coatings, seals and cooling designs to meet ATS performance and cost of electricity goals.

Chance, T. [General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (United States). Power Generation Div.; Smith, D. [General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (United States). Corporate Research and Development Center

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Free electron laser designs for laser amplification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques. With wiggler magnetic field strength B.sub.w and wavelength .lambda..sub.w =2.pi./k.sub.w regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B.sub.w /k.sub.w or k.sub.w or B.sub.w and k.sub.w (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space "bucket" area.

Prosnitz, Donald (Walnut Creek, CA); Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Free-electron-laser design for laser amplification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques is described. With wiggler magnetic field strength B/sub w/ and wavelength lambda/sub w/ = 2..pi../k/sub w/ regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B/sub w//k/sub w/ or k/sub w/ or B/sub w/ and k/sub w/ (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space bucket area.

Prosnitz, D.; Szoke, A.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

Heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) for high-speed aircraft propulsion. Phase 2 (feasibility) final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos), and CCS Associates are conducting the Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC) for High-Speed Aircraft Propulsion program to determine the advantages and demonstrate the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This innovative approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from adjacent external surfaces. HPRC is viewed as an alternative (or complementary) cooling technique to the use of pumped cryogenic or endothermic fuels to provide regenerative fuel or air cooling of the hot surfaces. The HPRC program has been conducted through two phases, an applications phase and a feasibility phase. The applications program (Phase 1) included concept and assessment analyses using hypersonic engine data obtained from US engine company contacts. The applications phase culminated with planning for experimental verification of the HPRC concept to be pursued in a feasibility program. The feasibility program (Phase 2), recently completed and summarized in this report, involved both analytical and experimental studies.

Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Silverstein, C.C. [CCS Associates, Bethel Park, PA (United States)

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

113

CX-006201: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01: Categorical Exclusion Determination 01: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tennessee Energy Efficient Schools Initiative Schools Initiative Ground Source Heat Pump Program (Phase 2 and 3 for Lawrence Public and South Lawrence) CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 06/28/2011 Location(s): Tennessee Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Tennessee Energy Efficient Schools Initiative Ground Source Heat Pump Program proposes to install a series of Ground Source Heat Pumps which will service: Brainerd High School, South Lawrence Elementary, Lawrence Public High School, Bolivar High School. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006201.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-001199: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006844: Categorical Exclusion Determination

114

University of California Davis West Village: The Largest Planned Net Zero Energy Community in the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UC Davis West Village UC Davis West Village The largest planned "zero net energy" community in the United States CRED Webinar October 16, 2012 CENTRAL SOUTH WEST WEST VILLAGE Program Phase 1 Phase 2 Total Acres 130 acres 75 acres 205 acres Faculty/Staff Housing 343 units 132 units 475 units Student Housing Beds (including beds over mixed use) 1,980 beds 1,158 beds 3,000 beds Retail/Office Space up to 42,500 sf 0 up to 45,000 sf Los Rios Community College District 20,000 sf 0 60,000 sf Recreation Fields 7.61 acres 14.29 acres 21.90 acres Phasing Plan For-sale Faculty/Staff Housing (343 homes) Student Housing (1,980 beds) Mixed-Use (45,000 sf retail + apartment units above) Community College (60,000 sf) Site for Day Care/Preschool Water management & open space

115

CX-002928: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Categorical Exclusion Determination 8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002928: Categorical Exclusion Determination Enhanced Geothermal Systems - Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho (non-American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B5.1 Date: 07/02/2010 Location(s): Cassia County, Idaho Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office University of Utah (U of U) proposes to use Department of Energy and cost share funding to develop and demonstrate the techniques required to form and sustain Enhanced Geothermal Systems reservoirs at United States Geothermal's (USG) Raft River geothermal field in Cassia County, Idaho, and employ a staged stimulation program. Phase I of this project was previously approved. Subsequently, other tasks (1.3.1 Pipeline Installation, 1.3.2

116

Study on reduction of accessory horsepower requirements. Fourth quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program objective is to evolve and define an accessory drive system that will minimize system power consumption of driven accessories on an internal combustion engine in a passenger automobile. The initial three program phases established concept feasibility, determined potential fuel savings, and selected a drive system design for concept mechanization. During this quarter the major program accomplishments were: selection of candidate belt-drive concepts; completion of Phase III baseline vehicle drive systems physical and operational envelopes; completion of analysis for a mechanically controlled direct-operated belt drive with input programming; and completion of design layout and analysis for a hydromechanically controlled, servo-operated belt drive with output-speed sensing. (LLL)

Not Available

1975-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Whole Building Design Approach | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Approach Design Approach Whole Building Design Approach October 16, 2013 - 5:17pm Addthis Picture of a Spanish-style building with xeriscape, including palm trees. Camp Pendleton's temporary lodging facility was constructed from 20% recycled materials and will be 100% recyclable upon its distant demolition. The four-story South Mesa Lodge also received one of the U.S. Green Building Council's highest energy efficiency ratings, saving more than 30% percent of water, lighting, and overall utility usage. As defined by the Whole Building Design Guide, the goal of whole building design is to create a successful high-performance building by applying an integrated design and team approach to the project during the planning and programming phases. Whole building design has proven to help:

118

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 4160 of 29,416 results. 51 - 4160 of 29,416 results. Download CX-010191: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Arc Flash Electrical Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B2.5 Date: 04/16/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010191-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010194: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technology Integration Program Phase II Field Trial: Site One - Eagle Ford Shale CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 04/15/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010194-categorical-exclusion-determination Page Guidance on Reading the Scorecard The Site-level Regulatory Scorecard comprises three interrelated tables: (i) an aggregate red-yellow-green site summary, (ii) detailed text on

119

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 3050 of 31,917 results. 41 - 3050 of 31,917 results. Download CX-004371: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kapstone Kraft Paper Company #3 Paper Machine Steam Efficiency Improvements CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/02/2010 Location(s): North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004371-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Energy Management and Financing This Tuesday Webcast for Industry covers how to become a Certified Energy Manager and Certified Practitioner in Energy Management Systems http://energy.gov/eere/downloads/energy-management-and-financing Download Small Business Innovation Research Project Phase I Release 2 Solicitations Awards List of awards announced on February 5, 2013 for the SBIR Program's Phase

120

48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Fact Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Fact Sheet Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Fact Sheet The 48C Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit program was initiated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to support investments in projects that establish, expand or re-equip clean energy manufacturing facilities. Funded at $2.3 billion, a 30% investment tax credit was made available to 183 domestic clean energy manufacturing facilities during Phase I of the program. Phase II was launched to utilize $150 million in tax credits that were not used by awardees from the first round. The Department of Energy (DOE) assessed projects based on the following criteria: commercial viability, domestic job creation, technological innovation, speed to project completion, and potential

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definitioni gred program-phases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Design-Build Project Delivery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design-Build Project Delivery Design-Build Project Delivery Design-Build Project Delivery October 16, 2013 - 4:46pm Addthis Renewable energy must be integrated into each of the design phases. Noting that any agency may have specific processes during the development of a construction project, this section discusses key issues in the following phases of the design-build process: Planning and Programming Request for Qualifications Request for Proposal Construction Contract Design and Build Integrating renewable energy into design-bid-build strategy involves a few different approaches, which are covered in the main building design section of this guide. Planning and Programming The planning and programming phase should look the same regardless of whether the project is design-bid-build or design-build. An early team is

122

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 820 of 28,905 results. 11 - 820 of 28,905 results. Download CX-006855: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rocket Centrifuge Removal (Eastern Side of TA-II) CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 09/12/2011 Location(s): Albuquerque, New Mexico Office(s): NNSA-Headquarters, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006855-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site- July 2011 Review of Nevada National Security Site Device Assembly Facility Justification for Continued Operations for Inoperable HEPA-Filtered Ventilation System [HIAR-NNSS-2011-07-08] http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/independent-activity-report-nevada-national-security-site-july-2011-0 Download CX-010194: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technology Integration Program Phase II Field Trial: Site One - Eagle Ford

123

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Geological Sequestration CO 2 Capture Project - Phase 2: Breaking the technology mould Gardiner Hill May 2-5, 2005, Hilton Alexandria Mark Center, Alexandria Virginia CO 2 Capture Project - Phase 2: Breaking the technology mould Outline of talk * CCP program outline * CCP2 project objectives * Who is involved? * Project structure * Technology program - Capture technology - SMV - Policy - Communications * Breaking the technology mould * Summary & concluding remarks CCP project outline * Multi-phase program * Phase 1 - 2001-2004 completed * Identification/selection/initial development * Phase 2 - 2005-2007 just started * developing and refining technology performance * Phase 3 - 2008-2012 * demonstration CCP2 project objectives * Undertake additional research, development and pilot testing to

124

NETL: Advanced Research - Ultrasupercritical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Materials > Ultrasupercritical High Performance Materials > Ultrasupercritical Advanced Research High Performance Materials Ultrasupercritical Increasing the temperature and pressure of steam improves the efficiency of boilers and turbines that use steam as the working fluid. These higher efficiency boilers and turbines require less coal and produce less greenhouse gases. Identifying materials that can operate for long periods of time at extreme temperatures and pressures is a major goal of NETL's Advanced Research Materials Program. Phase diagram of water Figure 1: Phase diagram of water To understand the terminology of boilers and turbines, it is first necessary to understand the basics of the water/steam phase diagram (see Figure 1). The normal boiling point (nbp) of water occurs at 1 atmosphere

125

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 21350 of 29,416 results. 41 - 21350 of 29,416 results. Download CX-006201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tennessee Energy Efficient Schools Initiative Schools Initiative Ground Source Heat Pump Program (Phase 2 and 3 for Lawrence Public and South Lawrence) CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 06/28/2011 Location(s): Tennessee Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006201-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006204: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vermont Biofuels Initiative: Green Mountain Spark CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/27/2011 Location(s): Burlington, Vermont Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006204-categorical-exclusion-determination

126

48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Fact Sheet |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Fact Program Fact Sheet 48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Fact Sheet The 48C Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit program was initiated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to support investments in projects that establish, expand or re-equip clean energy manufacturing facilities. Funded at $2.3 billion, a 30% investment tax credit was made available to 183 domestic clean energy manufacturing facilities during Phase I of the program. Phase II was launched to utilize $150 million in tax credits that were not used by awardees from the first round. 48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Fact Sheet.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the Senate Finance Subcommittee on Energy, Natural Resources and

127

Blast furnace granular coal injection project. Annual report, January--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This initial annual report describes the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection project being implemented at Bethlehem Steel Corporation`s (BSC) Burns Harbor, Indiana, plant. This installation will be the first in the United States to employ British Steel technology that uses granular coal to provide part of the fuel requirement of blast furnaces. The project will demonstrate/assess a broad range of technical/economic issues associated with the use of coal for this purpose. These include: coal grind size, coal injection rate, coal source (type) and blast furnace conversion method. Preliminary Design (Phase 1) began in 1991 with detailed design commencing in 1993. Construction at Burns Harbor (Phase 2) began in August 1993. Construction is expected to complete in the first quarter of 1995 which will be followed by the demonstration test program (Phase 3). Progress is described.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Case Study of Retro Commissioning in a Standard Commercial Office Building in Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes retro commissioning of a standard commercial office building in Japan. The owner's expectations for retro commissioning are realization of energy and cost savings, and controlling the increase in electric power demand, while continuing use of most existing equipment, and maintenance of high efficiency operation. First, the performance of the existing equipment was checked using the BEMS during retro commissioning program phase. Next, optimal selection of a system and heat source equipment was performed using the simulation in the design phase. Furthermore, the verification of the performance of the refrigeration machine installed was carried out as a Functional Performance Test. And the economic effect by a repair work was verified during the operation phase. The simple payback of the project was about six years.

Kamitani, K.; Shimazu, M.; Inomata, N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Safety implications from 20 years of operating experience at EBR-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EBR-II recently passed a major milestone in its operating history, 20 years of operation on August 13, 1984. The plant has gone through three major program phases during this time and is now entering a fourth. Those are: (1) demonstration of the feasibility of a complete LMFBR power plant, including on-site reprocessing of metal fuel, (2) irradiation testing of fuels and materials to support core and fuel design for CRBR and FFTF, (3) operational-safety testing to establish and demonstrate the inherent safety of LMFBRs and now, (4) the integration of this technology into demonstration of the integral fast reactor (IFR) concept. As EBR-II has progressed through these phases, much has been learned that is relevant to fast-reactor safety.

Sackett, J.I.; Buschman, H.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Photovoltaic module certification/laboratory accreditation criteria development: Implementation handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document covers the second phase of a two-part program. Phase I provided an overview of the structure and function of typical product certification/laboratory accreditation programs. This report (Phase H) provides most of the draft documents that will be necessary for the implementation of a photovoltaic (PV) module certification/laboratory accreditation program. These include organizational documents such as articles of incorporation, bylaws, and rules of procedure, as well as marketing and educational program documents. In Phase I, a 30-member criteria development committee was established to guide, review and reach a majority consensus regarding criteria for a PV certification/laboratory accreditation program. Committee members represented PV manufacturers, end users, standards and codes organizations, and testing laboratories. A similar committee was established for Phase II; the criteria implementation committee consisted of 29 members. Twenty-one of the Phase I committee members also served on the Phase II committee, which helped to provide program continuity during Phase II.

Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Hammond, R.L.; Wood, B.D.; Backus, C.E.; Sears, R.L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zerlaut, G.A. [SC-International, Inc., Tempe, AZ (United States); D`Aiello, R.V. [RD Associates, Tempe, AZ (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Superconducting coil protection  

SciTech Connect

The protection system is based on a two-phase construction program. Phase I is the development of a reliable hardwired relay control system with a digital loop utilizing firmware and a microprocessor controller. Phase II is an expansion of the digital loop to include many heretofore unmonitored coil variables. These new monitored variables will be utilized to establish early quench detection and to formulate confirmation techniques of the quench detection mechanism. Established quench detection methods are discussed and a new approach to quench detection is presented. The new circuit is insensitive to external pulsed magnetic fields and the associated induced voltages. Reliability aspects of the coil protection system are discussed with respect to shutdowns of superconducting coil systems. Redundance and digital system methods are presented as related topics. (auth)

Woods, E.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Geothermal resource data base: Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a compilation of geothermal well and spring information in Arizona up to 1993. This report and data base are a part of a larger congressionally-funded national effort to encourage and assist geothermal direct-use. In 1991, the US Department of Energy, Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) began a Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program. Phase 1 of this program includes updating the inventory of wells and springs of ten western states and placing these data into a digital format that is universally accessible to the PC. The Oregon Institute of Technology GeoHeat Center (OIT) administers the program and the University of Utah Earth Sciences and Resources Institute (ESRI) provides technical direction. In recent years, the primary growth in geothermal use in Arizona has occurred in aquaculture. Other uses include minor space heating and supply of warm mineral waters for health spas.

Witcher, J.C. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 horsepower range. Volume 2. Program plan  

SciTech Connect

A plan for implementing the proposed state-of-the-art design described in Volume I has been developed. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a large coal-fired Stirling engine and thus shorten the lead time to commercialization. The demonstration engine will be based on the concepts developed in the first phase of this program, as detailed in Volume I of this report. Thus the proposed program plan is based on the U-4 engine concept fired by a fluidized bed combustor with a two-stage gravity-assisted heat pipe. The plan is divided into five phases and an ongoing supporting technology program. Phase I, Conceptual Design, has been completed. The remaining phases are: Preliminary Design; Final Design; Fabrication; and Testing and Demonstration. The primary target is to begin testing the large coal-fired engine by the fifth year (1985) after the start of Preliminary Design.

Not Available,

1980-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Establishing Design Requirements for Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establishing Design Requirements for Energy Establishing Design Requirements for Energy Establishing Design Requirements for Energy October 16, 2013 - 5:14pm Addthis Programming defines details about the project, including square footage, types of building space, and use. The team should make decisions to define the energy needs of the building. Beyond traditional project goals and criteria, the team should also define energy-specific requirements and provisions for integrating renewable energy into the building. Federal energy requirements should be considered during programming to establish design criteria that meet those requirements. Overall, the programming phase is the time to establish design requirements and criteria that make sure building design meets the agency's energy efficiency and renewable energy use needs. It is also the time to establish selection

135

48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Fact Sheet |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Fact 48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Fact Sheet 48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Fact Sheet The 48C Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit program was initiated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to support investments in projects that establish, expand or re-equip clean energy manufacturing facilities. Funded at $2.3 billion, a 30% investment tax credit was made available to 183 domestic clean energy manufacturing facilities during Phase I of the program. Phase II was launched to utilize $150 million in tax credits that were not used by awardees from the first round. 48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Fact Sheet.pdf More Documents & Publications

136

Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners Title Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-63204 Year of Publication 2007 Authors McNeil, Michael A., and Maithili Iyer Date Published 03/2007 Keywords India Air Conditioner Efficiency Standards Abstract The Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) finalized its first set of efficiency standards and labels for room air conditioners in July of 2006. These regulations followed soon after the publication of levels for frost-free refrigerators in the same year. As in the case of refrigerators, the air conditioner program introduces Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) and comparative labels simultaneously, with levels for one to five stars. Also like the refrigerator program, BEE defined several successive program phases of increasing stringency.

137

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DE-AC26-07NT42677 DE-AC26-07NT42677 RPSEA FE Multiple SCNGO FY13-15/36 months Gary Covatch LaSalle County, TX Technology Integration Program Phase II Field Trial: Site One - Eagle Ford Shale (SUMMARY CX) Field activity photography and videography, field data collection, air quality analysis, comparison of water treatment technologies, mitigation of vehicle traffic site impacts, and site/project management. Gary L. Covatch Digitally signed by Gary L. Covatch DN: cn=Gary L. Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2013.03.21 09:48:47 -04'00' 03 21 2013 Pierina Fayish Digitally signed by Pierina Fayish DN: cn=Pierina Fayish, o, ou, email=pierina.fayish@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2013.04.15 09:12:23 -04'00' 04 15 2013 List of prime and subcontractors for this location supplied to NCO. DE-AC26-07NT42677 Ultra-Deepwater

138

Cadmium telluride photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Annual subcontract report, 7 January 1994--6 January 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by Golden Photon, Inc. (GPI), to conduct research under the PVMaT program, Phase 2B. The objective of the research is to advance GPI`s manufacturing technology, reduce module production costs, increase average module performance, and identify ways to expand production capacity. More specifically, the tasks established for Phase I were to design and install leasehold improvements for the 2-MW production line; to improve and develop product design, efficiency, and marketability; to ensure uninterrupted qualified supplies and raw materials for production; to address environmental, health, and safety issues encountered during production of photovoltaic modules; and to reduce the cost of manufacturing modules. During the first half of this reporting period, the development, design, and debugging of cell interconnection equipment critical to start-up was completed. During the second and third quarters, the primary focus was on the substrate deposition steps (tin oxide, cadmium sulfide, and cadmium telluride) and cell interconnection steps (division). In general, process development, engineering, and quality teams continued to focus on identifying, baselining, and improving (through redesign) actual process equipment operation parameters to meet the required PV panel specifications and improve process throughput rates and yields.

Weisiger, D.; Albright, S.P.; Brines, J.; Thompson, R. [Photon Energy, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

M-C Power`s product design and improvement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sole mission of M-C Power is the development and subsequent commercialization of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) stacks. These MCFC stacks are based on the Internally Manifolded Heat EXchanger plate design developed by the Institute of Gas Technology. Integration of the MCFC stack into a commercially viable power plant is the mission of the IMHEX{sup {reg_sign}} team. The team is composed of leaders in the packaging and design of power generation equipment, including fuel cell technology, and includes Stewart & Stevenson, Bechtel, The Institute of Gas Technology and M-C Power. In an effort to succeed in their respective missions, M-C Power and the IMHEX{sup {reg_sign}} team have developed a commercialization program. At the present time, the team is making the transition from Phase I (Technology Development) to Phase II (Product Design & Improvement) of the program. Phase II`s objective is a commercially viable (cost effective and technologically reliable) MCFC power plant ready for market by the turn of the century.

Scroppo, J.A.; Laurens, R.M.; Petraglia, V.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

A progress report on DOE`s advanced hydropower turbine systems program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent hydropower research within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has focused on the development of new turbine designs that can produce hydroelectricity without such adverse environmental affects as fish entrainment/impingement or degradation of water quality. In partnership with the hydropower industry, DOE`s advanced turbine program issued a Request for Proposals for conceptual designs in October 1994. Two contracts were awarded for this initial program phase, work on which will be complete this year. A technical advisory committee with representatives from industry, regulatory agencies, and natural resource agencies was also formed to guide the DOE turbine research. The lack of quantitative biological performance criteria was identified by the committee as a critical knowledge gap. To fill this need, a new literature review was completed on the mechanisms of fish mortality during turbine passage (e.g., scrape/strike, shear, press change, etc.), ways that fish behavior affects their location and orientation in turbines, and how these turbine passage stresses can be measured. Thus year, new Laboratory tests will be conducted on fish response to shear, the least-well understood mechanism of stress. Additional testing of conceptual turbine designs depends on the level of federal funding for this program.

Sale, M.J.; Cada, G.F.; Rinehart, B.E. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definitioni gred program-phases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Frequency scaling of linear super-colliders  

SciTech Connect

The development of electron-positron linear colliders in the TeV energy range will be facilitated by the development of high-power rf sources at frequencies above 2856 MHz. Present S-band technology, represented by the SLC, would require a length in excess of 50 km per linac to accelerate particles to energies above 1 TeV. By raising the rf driving frequency, the rf breakdown limit is increased, thereby allowing the length of the accelerators to be reduced. Currently available rf power sources set the realizable gradient limit in an rf linac at frequencies above S-band. This paper presents a model for the frequency scaling of linear colliders, with luminosity scaled in proportion to the square of the center-of-mass energy. Since wakefield effects are the dominant deleterious effect, a separate single-bunch simulation model is described which calculates the evolution of the beam bunch with specified wakefields, including the effects of using programmed phase positioning and Landau damping. The results presented here have been obtained for a SLAC structure, scaled in proportion to wavelength.

Mondelli, A.; Chernin, D.; Drobot, A.; Reiser, M.; Granatstein, V.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Radiological Control Technician: Standardized technician Qualification Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Qualification Standard states and defines the knowledge and skill requirements necessary for successful completion of the Radiological Control Technician Training Program. The standard is divided into three phases: Phase I concerns RCT Academic training. There are 13 lessons associated with the core academics program and 19 lessons associated with the site academics program. The staff member should sign the appropriate blocks upon successful completion of the examination for that lesson or group of lessons. In addition, facility specific lesson plans may be added to meet the knowledge requirements in the Job Performance Measures (JPM) of the practical program. Phase II concerns RCT core/site practical (JPMs) training. There are thirteen generic tasks associated with the core practical program. Both the trainer/evaluator and student should sign the appropriate block upon successful completion of the JPM. In addition, facility specific tasks may be added or generic tasks deleted based on the results of the facility job evaluation. Phase III concerns the oral examination board successful completion of the oral examination board is documented by the signature of the chairperson of the board. Upon completion of all of the standardized technician qualification requirements, final qualification is verified by the student and the manager of the Radiological Control Department and acknowledged by signatures on the qualification standard. The completed Qualification Standard shall be maintained as an official training record.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Personal Fuel Appliance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made in Phase I of Stuart's Personal Fueling Appliance Program. Phase I concluded in March 2002 with the demonstration and deployment of several working models. As proposed in the original project plan, working models of the PFA were built to prove feasibility and technically market the concept. Future follow up phases of the project, Phase II and III, will take the concept through prototyping development to pre-production of commercially viable product. The Phase I program successfully demonstrate a home fueling system capable of running on a household circuit, 220V/40 Amp/single phase or equivalent. Connected to a source of ''drinking water'' the system has all the functions necessary to convert water and electricity to high-pressure hydrogen fuel. Pressures of up to 3600 psig were achieved on demonstration systems and higher pressures up to 5000 psig were achieved in the lab. The development program spanned building 3 series of prototypes: White Box (1 unit built 1998), PFA Series 100 (4 units built 1999-2000), and Series 200 (6 units built 2000-02). Advanced in controls and process learned in the PFA program have been embodied in Stuart's larger fuel appliances.

Stuart Energy

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

A geothermal resource data base: New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a compilation of geothermal well and spring information in New Mexico up to 1993. Economically important geothermal direct-use development in New Mexico and the widespread use of personal computers (PC) in recent years attest to the need for an easily used and accessible data base of geothermal data in a digital format suitable for the PC. This report and data base are a part of a larger congressionally-funded national effort to encourage and assist geothermal direct-use. In 1991, the US Department of Energy, Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) began a Low Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program. Phase 1 of this program includes updating the inventory of wells and springs of ten western states and placing these data into a digital format that is universally accessible to the PC. The Oregon Institute of Technology GeoHeat Center (OIT) administers the program and the University of Utah Earth Sciences and Resources Institute (ESRI) provides technical direction.

Witcher, J.C. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Environmental, health, and safety issues of fuel cells in transportation. Volume 1: Phosphoric acid fuel-cell buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Phosphoric Acid Fuel-Cell (PAFC) Bus Program to demonstrate the feasibility of fuel cells in heavy-duty transportation systems. As part of this program, PAFC- powered buses are being built to meet transit industry design and performance standards. Test-bed bus-1 (TBB-1) was designed in 1993 and integrated in March 1994. TBB-2 and TBB-3 are under construction and should be integrated in early 1995. In 1987 Phase I of the program began with the development and testing of two conceptual system designs- liquid- and air-cooled systems. The liquid-cooled PAFC system was chosen to continue, through a competitive award, into Phase H, beginning in 1991. Three hybrid buses, which combine fuel-cell and battery technologies, were designed during Phase III. After completing Phase II, DOE plans a comprehensive performance testing program (Phase HI) to verify that the buses meet stringent transit industry requirements. The Phase III study will evaluate the PAFC bus and compare it to a conventional diesel bus. This NREL study assesses the environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues that may affect the commercialization of the PAFC bus. Because safety is a critical factor for consumer acceptance of new transportation-based technologies the study focuses on these issues. The study examines health and safety together because they are integrally related. In addition, this report briefly discusses two environmental issues that are of concern to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first issue involves a surge battery used by the PAFC bus that contains hazardous constituents. The second issue concerns the regulated air emissions produced during operation of the PAFC bus.

Ring, S.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Development of ceramic matrix composites for application in Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engine program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the program are to develop an advanced toughened silicon nitride composite and a process for near net shape part fabrication. This program was initiated in 1985. The initial phase of the program considered particulate and whisker-reinforced composites and examined the effect of TiC and SiC dispersoids on fracture toughness of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The best results were obtained with whisker reinforcements. Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was selected for further development. A predictive model that relates microstructure-fracture toughness dependence developed and scrutinized in the course of these studies has shown that fracture toughness of polycrystalline ceramics could be affected by changes of grain size and shape as well as strength of intergranular bond. Accordingly, it was shown that a deflection/debonding mechanism could utilize Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} whiskers to toughen Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} body. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-SiC composites offer a number of distinct advantages over ``monolith,`` which in addition to their improved thermal shock and wear resistance (due particularly to improved conductivity and hardness), Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-SiC composites are tailorable with respect to high-temperature properties. It was considered that in heat engine applications, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-SiC whisker composites, due to their higher hardness, thermal conductivity, thermal shock, and wear resistance, have a definite advantage and warrant further development. In the current program (Phase 11), 1987--1989, the properties were further improved to achieve nearly two times higher fracture toughness and considerably improved elevated temperature (1400{degrees}C) strength of the composite. These improvements were obtained through optimization of processing and modifications of composite phase assembly, primarily intergranular phase.

Buljan, S.T.; Baldoni, J.G.; Huckabee, M.L.; Neil, J.; Hefter, J. [GTE Labs., Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Development of ceramic matrix composites for application in Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engine program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the program are to develop an advanced toughened silicon nitride composite and a process for near net shape part fabrication. This program was initiated in 1985. The initial phase of the program considered particulate and whisker-reinforced composites and examined the effect of TiC and SiC dispersoids on fracture toughness of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The best results were obtained with whisker reinforcements. Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was selected for further development. A predictive model that relates microstructure-fracture toughness dependence developed and scrutinized in the course of these studies has shown that fracture toughness of polycrystalline ceramics could be affected by changes of grain size and shape as well as strength of intergranular bond. Accordingly, it was shown that a deflection/debonding mechanism could utilize Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} whiskers to toughen Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} body. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-SiC composites offer a number of distinct advantages over monolith,'' which in addition to their improved thermal shock and wear resistance (due particularly to improved conductivity and hardness), Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-SiC composites are tailorable with respect to high-temperature properties. It was considered that in heat engine applications, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-SiC whisker composites, due to their higher hardness, thermal conductivity, thermal shock, and wear resistance, have a definite advantage and warrant further development. In the current program (Phase 11), 1987--1989, the properties were further improved to achieve nearly two times higher fracture toughness and considerably improved elevated temperature (1400{degrees}C) strength of the composite. These improvements were obtained through optimization of processing and modifications of composite phase assembly, primarily intergranular phase.

Buljan, S.T.; Baldoni, J.G.; Huckabee, M.L.; Neil, J.; Hefter, J. (GTE Labs., Inc., Waltham, MA (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Integration Strategy for DB-MHR TRISO Fuel production in conjunction with MOX Fuel production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the nuclear power options for the future involves the evolution of gas cooled reactors to support the likely high temperature operations needed for commercial scale hydrogen production. One such proposed option is to use a Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor fueled with uranium based TRISO (coated particle) fuel. It has also been suggested that such a MHR could be operated in a ''Deep Burn'' manner fueled with TRISO fuel produced from recycle spent nuclear fuel. This concept known as a DBMHR must withstand significant development and fuel fabrication cost to be economically viable. The purpose of this report is to consider and propose a strategy where synergy with a parallel MOX fuel to LWR program provides economic or other advantage for either or both programs. A strategy involving three phases has been envisioned with potential for economic benefit relative to a stand-alone TRISO/DBMHR program. Such a strategy and related timing will ultimately be driven by economics, but is offered here for consideration of value to the total AFCI program. Phase I Near-term. Conventional spent fuel aqueous processing, MOX fuel fabrication, and use of present and future LWR/ALWR's with objective of a ''Continuous Recycle'' mode of fuel cycle management. Phase II Intermediate. Augmentation of LWR/ALWR industry with MHR deployment as justified by hydrogen economy and/or electrical demand. Phase III Long-term. Introduction of DBMHR's to offer alternative method for transuranic destruction and associated repository benefits, in addition to Phase II benefits. The basic philosophy of this strategy appears sound. However, the details of the technology plans and economic evaluations should receive additional detail and evaluation in the next fiscal year as funding can support.

MCGUIRE, DAVID

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Development of a process for high capacity arc heater production of silicon for solar arrays. Low-cost solar array project, silicon materials task. Quarterly technical report, January--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program has been established at Westinghouse to develop a high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant will be injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction is expected to occur and proceed essentially to completion, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection of the molten silicon will be developed using standard engineering approaches, and the salt vapor will later be electrolytically separated into its elemental constituents for recycle. Preliminary technical evaluations and economic projections indicate not only that this process appears to be feasible, but that it also has the advantages of rapid, high capacity production of good quality molten silicon at a nominal cost. The program consists of a four-phase effort directed to the development and implementation of this technology. The initial phase of the program, Phase I, was an eleven-month study funded by JPL which was completed in September, 1977. Phase I was defined as a comprehensive feasibility and engineering review of the reaction process, and a formulation of the design for a test system to experimentally verify the high temperature reaction. Phase II, currently underway, involves a multi-task approach including (1) a detailed engineering analysis of the entire process; (2) design, fabrication, and assembly of the experimental system; (3) experimental testing of the reduction reaction to produce silicon and (4) complementary research programs to augment the experimental system design. The Phase II effort was initiated in October, 1977, and work is described in detail on the various stages of this effort.

Reed, W.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Development of a direct-injected natural gas engine system for heavy-duty vehicles: Final report phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of Phase 2 of this contract. The authors completed four tasks under this phase of the subcontract. (1) They developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a 3500 direct injected natural gas (DING) engine gas injection/combustion system and used it to identify DING ignition/combustion system improvements. The results were a 20% improvement in efficiency compared to Phase 1 testing. (2) The authors designed and procured the components for a 3126 DING engine (300 hp) and finished assembling it. During preliminary testing, the engine ran successfully at low loads for approximately 2 hours before injector tip and check failures terminated the test. The problems are solvable; however, this phase of the program was terminated. (3) They developed a Decision & Risk Analysis model to compare DING engine technology with various other engine technologies in a number of commercial applications. The model shows the most likely commercial applications for DING technology and can also be used to identify the sensitivity of variables that impact commercial viability. (4) MVE, Inc., completed a preliminary design concept study that examines the major design issues involved in making a reliable and durable 3,000 psi LNG pump. A primary concern is the life of pump seals and piston rings. Plans for the next phase of this program (Phase 3) have been put on indefinite hold. Caterpillar has decided not to fund further DING work at this time due to limited current market potential for the DING engine. However, based on results from this program, the authors believe that DI natural gas technology is viable for allowing a natural gas-fueled engine to achieve diesel power density and thermal efficiency for both the near and long terms.

Cox, G.B.; DelVecchio, K.A.; Hays, W.J.; Hiltner, J.D.; Nagaraj, R.; Emmer, C.

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

151

Design, development and testing of a solar-powered multi-family residential-size prototype turbocompressor heat pump  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental program was conducted to further define, improve and demonstrate the performance characteristics and operational features of an existing 18-ton solar-powered prototype heat pump. The prototype heat pump is nominally sized for multi-family residential applications and provides both space heating and cooling. It incorporates a turbocompressor specially designed to operate at peak temperatures consistent with medium concentration collectors. The major efforts in this program phase included modification and improvement of the instrumentation sensors, the laboratory simulation equipment and selected heat pump components. After implementing these modifications, performance testing was conducted for a total operating time of approximately 250 hours. Experimental test results compared favorably with performance data calculated using the UTRC computer prediction program for the same boundary conditions. A series of tests was conducted continuously over a 12-h period to simulate operation (in the cooling mode) of the prototype heat pump under conditions typical of an actual installation. The test demonstrated that the heat pump could match the cooling load profile of a multi-family residential building. During the system performance testing, sufficient data were taken to identify the performance of each of the major components (e.g. turbine, compressor, heat exchangers, R11 pump). Component performance is compared with that calculated using the UTRC computer predict program and with data supplied by their manufacturers. The performance capabilities of the prototype heat pump system have been documented and recommendations are made for further design improvements which could be included in a MOD-2 configuration. The MOD-2 configuration would incorporate features that would improve system performance, reduce capital cost and most importantly improve system reliability.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Industrial advanced turbine systems: Development and demonstration. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program for advanced turbine systems (ATS) that will serve industrial power generation markets. The objective of the cooperative agreements granted under the program is to join the DOE with industry in research and development that will lead to commercial offerings in the private sector. The ATS will provide ultra-high efficiency, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness. The ATS will foster (1) early market penetration that enhances the global competitiveness of US industry, (2) public health benefits resulting from reduced exhaust gas emissions of target pollutants, (3) reduced cost of power used in the energy-intensive industrial marketplace, and (4) the retention and expansion of the skilled US technology base required for the design, development and maintenance of state-of-the-art advanced turbine products. The Industrial ATS Development and Demonstration program is a multi-phased effort. Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar) has participated in Phases 1 and 2 of the program. On September 14, 1995 Solar was awarded a Cooperative Agreement for Phases 3 and 4 of the program. Phase 3 of the work is separated into two subphases: Phase 3A entails Component Design and Development; Phase 3B will involve Integrated Subsystem Testing. Phase 4 will cover Host Site Testing. As of the end of the reporting period work on the program is 29.1% complete (24.7% last quarter). Work on the Mercury 50 development and ATS technology development portions of the program (WBS 10000 et seq) is 48.9% complete (41.6% last quarter). Estimates of percent complete are based upon milestones completed. In order to maintain objectivity in assessing schedule progress, Solar uses a 0/100 percent complete assumption for milestones rather than subjectively estimating progress toward completion of milestones. Cost and schedule variance information is provided in Section 4.0 Program Management.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

CHEM2D. 2-D, 3-Phase Chemical Flood Simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CHEM2D is a two-dimensional, three-phase, nine component, finite difference chemical flood simulator. It can model primary depletion, waterfloods, polymer floods, and micellar/polymer floods using heterogeneous one or two-dimensional (areal or cross-sectional) reservoir descriptions. This includes the ability to model primary depletion and waterflooding of an undersaturated oil reservoir and a polymer flood in which gels are injected with polymer or cross-linking chemicals are injected. One injection well and up to four production wells are available. The user may specify well performance as either rate or pressure constrained, and both a constant time-step size and a variable time-step size based on extrapolation of concentration changes are available as options. The major physical phenomena modeled in CHEM2D are: adsorption, capillary pressure, capillary trapping, cation exchange, dilution, dispersion, interfacial tension, binary and ternary phase behavior, relative permeability, specific densities, and polymer properties (inaccessible pore volume, non-Newtonian viscosity and shear thinning, and permeability reduction). Components include water, oil, surfactant, polymer, total nonsorbing anions, calcium, alcohol, calcium-surfactant complex, and sodium. Components may partition amongst the aqueous, oleic, and microemulsion phases. An auxiliary program, PHASE, is included to provide the CHEM2D user with a tool for looking directly at the phase behavior of a system. PHASE is the phase behavior calculation of CHEM2D coupled with a driving program for generating ternary phase behavior input data and for writing out tabular results. It can be used to compute phase concentrations and saturations as a function of effective salinity and total component concentrations and phase saturations (relative volumes) as a function of effective salinity for a fixed set of total component concentrations.

Burtch, F.W. [USDOE Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, OK (United States)

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Structure-based methods for the phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal RNA molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) molecules form highly conserved secondary and tertiary structures via rRNA-rRNA and rRNA-protein interactions that collectively comprise the macromolecule that is the ribosome. Because of their cellular universality, rRNA molecules are commonly used for phylogeny estimations spanning all divergences of life. In this dissertation, I elucidate the structure of several rRNAs by analyzing multiply aligned sequences for basepair covariation and conserved higher order structural motifs. Specifically, I predict novel structures for expansion segments D2 and D3 of the nuclear large subunit rRNA (28S) and variable regions V4-V9 of the nuclear small subunit rRNA (18S) from from 249 galerucine leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). I describe a novel means for characterizing regions of alignment ambiguity that improves methods for retaining phylogenetic information without violating nucleotide positional homology. In the program PHASE, I explore a variety of RNA maximum likelihood models using the 28S rRNA dataset and discuss the utitilty of these models in light of their performance under Bayesian analysis. I conclude that seven-state models are likely the best models to use for phylogenetic estimation, although I cannot determine with confidence which of the two seven-state models (7A or 7D) is better. Evaluation of the unpaired sites within both rRNAs in Modeltest provided a similar model of evolution for these non-pairing regions (TrN+ I+G). In addition, a sequenced region of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI) from the galerucines was evaluated in Modeltest, with each codon position modeled separately (GTR+I+G for positions 1 and 2, GTR+G for position 3). The combined galerucine dataset (28S+18S rRNA helices, 28S+18S rRNA unpaired sites, COI 1st, 2nd and 3rd positions) provided for two mixedmodel Bayesian analysis of five discretely-modeled partitions (using 7A and 7D). The results of these analyses are compared with those obtained from equally weighted parsimony to provide a robust phylogenetic estimate of the Galerucinae and related leaf beetle taxa. Finally, the odd characteristics of strepsipteran 18S rRNA are evaluated through comparison of 12 strepsipterans with 163 structurally-aligned arthropod sequences. Among other interesting results, I identify errors in previously published strepsipteran sequences and predict structures not previously known from metazoan rRNA.

Gillespie, Joseph James

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

10 kW SOFC Power System Commercialization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins Power Generation (CPG) as the prime contractor and SOFCo-EFS Holdings LLC (SOFCo), as their subcontractor, teamed under the Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program to develop 3-10kW solid oxide fuel cell systems for use in recreational vehicles, commercial work trucks and stand-by telecommunications applications. The program goal is demonstration of power systems that meet commercial performance requirements and can be produced in volume at a cost of $400/kW. This report summarizes the team's activities during the seventh six-month period (July-December 2005) of the four-year Phase I effort. While there has been significant progress in the development of the SOFC subsystems that can support meeting the program Phase 1 goals, the SOFCo ceramic stack technology has progressed significantly slower than plan and CPG consider it unlikely that the systemic problems encountered will be overcome in the near term. SOFCo has struggled with a series of problems associated with inconsistent manufacturing, inadequate cell performance, and the achievement of consistent, durable, low resistance inter-cell connections with reduced or no precious materials. A myriad of factors have contributed to these problems, but the fact remains that progress has not kept pace with the SECA program. A contributing factor in SOFCo's technical difficulties is attributed to their significantly below plan industry cost share spending over the last four years. This has resulted in a much smaller SOFC stack development program, has contributed to SOFCo not being able to aggressively resolve core issues, and clouds their ability to continue into a commercialization phase. In view of this situation, CPG has conducted an independent assessment of the state-of-the-art in planar SOFC's stacks and have concluded that alternative technology exists offering the specific performance, durability, and low cost needed to meet the SECA objectives. We have further concluded that there is insufficient evidence to reliably predict that SOFCo will be able to achieve the SECA performance and cost goals on a schedule consistent with SECA or CPG commercialization goals. CPG believes SOFCo have made a good faith effort consistent with the available resources, but have repeatedly fallen short of achieving the programs scheduled targets. CPG has therefore initiated a process of application for extension of Phase 1 of our SECA program with the intent of transitioning to an alternative stack supplier with more mature SOFC technology, and demonstrating a system meeting the SECA Phase 1 goals by the end of calendar 2006. We have identified an alternative supplier and will be reporting the progress on transition and program planning in monthly technical reports, reviews, and in the next semiannual report.

Dan Norrick; Brad Palmer; Charles Vesely; Eric Barringer; John Budge; Cris DeBellis; Rich Goettler; Milind Kantak; Steve Kung; Zhien Liu; Tom Morris; Keith Rackers; Gary Roman; Greg Rush; Liang Xue

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Continued Development and Improvement of Pneumatic Heavy Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this applied research effort led by Georgia Tech Research Institute is the application of pneumatic aerodynamic technology previously developed and patented by us to the design of an appropriate Heavy Vehicle (HV) tractor-trailer configuration, and experimental confirmation of this pneumatic configuration's improved aerodynamic characteristics. In Phases I to IV of our previous DOE program (Reference 1), GTRI has developed, patented, wind-tunnel tested and road-tested blown aerodynamic devices for Pneumatic Heavy Vehicles (PHVs) and Pneumatic Sports Utility Vehicles (PSUVs). To further advance these pneumatic technologies towards HV and SUV applications, additional Phase V tasks were included in the first year of a continuing DOE program (Reference 2). Based on the results of the Phase IV full-scale test programs, these Phase V tasks extended the application of pneumatic aerodynamics to include: further economy and performance improvements; increased aerodynamic stability and control; and safety of operation of Pneumatic HVs. Continued development of a Pneumatic SUV was also conducted during the Phase V program. Phase V was completed in July, 2003; its positive results towards development and confirmation of this pneumatic technology are reported in References 3 and 4. The current Phase VI of this program was incrementally funded by DOE in order to continue this technology development towards a second fuel economy test on the Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle. The objectives of this current Phase VI research and development effort (Ref. 5) fall into two categories: (1) develop improved pneumatic aerodynamic technology and configurations on smaller-scale models of the advanced Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle (PHV); and based on these findings, (2) redesign, modify, and re-test the modified full-scale PHV test vehicle. This second objective includes conduct of an on-road preliminary road test of this configuration to prepare it for a second series of SAE Type-U fuel economy evaluations, as described in Ref. 5. Both objectives are based on the pneumatic technology already developed and confirmed for DOE OHVT/OAAT in Phases I-V. This new Phase VI effort was initiated by contract amendment to the Phase V effort using carryover FY02 funds. This were conducted under a new and distinct project number, GTRI Project A-6935, separate from the Phase I-IV program. However, the two programs are closely integrated, and thus Phase VI continues with the previous program and goals.

Robert J. Englar

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for RoomAir Conditioners  

SciTech Connect

The Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) finalized its first set of efficiency standards and labels for room air conditioners in July of 2006. These regulations followed soon after the publication of levels for frost-free refrigerators in the same year. As in the case of refrigerators, the air conditioner program introduces Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) and comparative labels simultaneously, with levels for one to five stars. Also like the refrigerator program, BEE defined several successive program phases of increasing stringency. In support of BEE's refrigerator program, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) produced an analysis of national impacts of standards in collaboration with the Collaborative Labeling and Standards Program (CLASP). That analysis drew on LBNL's experience with standards programs in the United States, as well as many other countries. Subsequently, as part of the process for setting optimal levels for air conditioner regulations, CLASP commissioned LBNL to provide support to BEE in the form of a techno-economic evaluation of air conditioner efficiency technologies. This report describes the methodology and results of this techno-economic evaluation. The analysis consists of three components: (1) Cost effectiveness to consumers of efficiency technologies relative to current baseline. (2) Impacts on the current market from efficiency regulations. (3) National energy and financial impacts. The analysis relied on detailed and up-to-date technical data made available by BEE and industry representatives. Technical parameters were used in conjunction with knowledge about air conditioner use patterns in the residential and commercial sectors, and prevailing marginal electricity prices, in order to give an estimate of per-unit financial impacts. In addition, the overall impact of the program was evaluated by combining unit savings with market forecasts in order to yield national impacts. LBNL presented preliminary results of these analyses in May 2006, at a meeting of BEEs Technical Committee for Air Conditioners. This meeting was attended by a wide array of stakeholder, including industry representatives, engineers and consumer advocates. Comments made by stakeholders at this meeting are incorporated into the final analysis presented in this report. The current analysis begins with the Rating Plan drafted by BEE in 2006, along with an evaluation of the market baseline according to test data submitted by manufacturers. MEPS, label rating levels, and baseline efficiencies are presented in Section 2. First, we compare Indian MEPS with current standards in other countries, and assess their relative stringency. Baseline efficiencies are then used to estimate the fraction of models likely to remain on the market at each phase of the program, and the impact on market-weighted efficiency levels. Section 3 deals with cost-effectiveness of higher efficiency design options. The cost-benefit analysis is grounded in technical parameters provided by industry representatives in India. This data allows for an assessment of financial costs and benefits to consumers as a result of the standards and labeling program. A Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation is used to evaluate the impacts of the program at the unit level, thus providing some insight into the appropriateness of the levels chosen, and additional opportunities for further ratcheting. In addition to LCC, we also calculate payback periods, cost of conserved energy (CCE), and return on investment (ROI). Finally, Section 4 covers national impacts. This is an extension of unit level estimates in the two previous sections. Extrapolation to the national level depends on a forecast of air conditioner purchases (shipments), which we describe here. Following the cost-benefit analysis, we construct several efficiency scenarios including the BEE plan, but also considering further potential for efficiency improvement. These are combined with shipments through a stock accounting model in order to forecast air conditioner energy consumption

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Final work plan : phase II investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri (Figure 1.1). During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of statewide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]) described as being approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. The identified concentrations in these two wells were above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) and the Missouri risk-based corrective action default target level (MRBCA DTL) values of 5.0 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride in water used for domestic purposes (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b, 2006). Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an investigation to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the potential risks to human health, public welfare, and the environment posed by the contamination. This work is being performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency of the USDA and the MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The site characterization at Savannah is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The investigation at Savannah is being conducted in phases. This approach is being used by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, with the approval of the MoDNR, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the investigation can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. Phase I of the Savannah program was conducted in October-November 2007 and January 2008 (Argonne 2007a, 2008). This site-specific Work Plan provides a brief summary of the Phase I findings and the results of groundwater level monitoring that has been ongoing since completion of the Phase I study and also outlines technical objectives, investigation tasks, and investigation methods for Phase II of the site characterization at Savannah.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

159

Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences  

SciTech Connect

The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

160

A Novel High-Heat Transfer Low-NO{sub x} Natural Gas Combustion System. Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel high-heat transfer low NO(sub x) natural gas combustion system. The objectives of this program are to research, develop, test, and commercialize a novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system for oxygen-, oxygen-enriched air, and air-fired furnaces. This technology will improve the process efficiency (productivity and product quality) and the energy efficiency of high-temperature industrial furnaces by at least 20%. GTI's high-heat transfer burner has applications in high-temperature air, oxygen-enriched air, and oxygen furnaces used in the glass, metals, cement, and other industries. Development work in this program is focused on using this burner to improve the energy efficiency and productivity of glass melting furnaces that are major industrial energy consumers. The following specific project objectives are defined to provide a means of achieving the overall project objectives. (1) Identify topics to be covered, problems requiring attention, equipment to be used in the program, and test plans to be followed in Phase II and Phase III. (2) Use existing codes to develop models of gas combustion and soot nucleation and growth as well as a thermodynamic and parametric description of furnace heat transfer issues. (3) Conduct a parametric study to confirm the increase in process and energy efficiency. (4) Design and fabricate a high-heat transfer low-NOx natural gas burners for laboratory, pilot- and demonstration-scale tests. (5) Test the high-heat transfer burner in one of GTI's laboratory-scale high-temperature furnaces. (6) Design and demonstrate the high-heat transfer burner on GTI's unique pilot-scale glass tank simulator. (7) Complete one long term demonstration test of this burner technology on an Owens Corning full-scale industrial glass melting furnace. (8) Prepare an Industrial Adoption Plan. This Plan will be updated in each program Phase as additional information becomes available. The Plan will include technical and economic analyses, energy savings and waste reduction predictions, evaluation of environmental effects, and outline issues concerning manufacturing, marketing, and financing. Combustion Tec, Owens Corning, and GTI will all take active roles in defining this Plan. During Phase I, the first three objectives were addressed and completed along with the design component of the fourth objective. In Phase II, the fabrication component of the fourth objective was completed along with objectives five and six. Results of the Phase I work were reported in the Phase I Final Report and are summarized in this Final Technical Report. Work for Phase II was divided in four specific Tasks. Results of the Phase II work were reported in the Phase II Final Report and are also summarized in this Final Technical Report. No Phase III Final Report was prepared, so this Final Technical Report presents the results of Phase III commercial demonstration efforts. A description of each Task in Phases I, II, and III is presented in this report.

Abbasi, H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

ADVANCED GASIFICATION-BASED FUEL CONVERSION AND ELECTRIC ENERGY PRODUCTION SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development and commercial demonstration of an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system at Boise Cascade Corporation's pulp and paper mill in DeRidder, Louisiana. The advanced power generation system is intended to meet the immediate needs of the forest products industry for highly efficient and environmentally friendly electricity and steam generation systems utilizing existing wood waste as the primary fuel resource. The novel system is based on three advanced technology components: GTI's RENUGAS{reg_sign} and 3-stage solid fuels combustion technologies coupled with one of the power generation approaches used in DOE's HIPPS program. Phase 1 of the project is a technical and economic evaluation of the system at the DeRidder site. A Continuation Application will be submitted at the conclusion of Phase 1 for authorization to proceed to testing and design in Phase 2. Phase 2 includes pilot-scale verification of selected system components and preparation of a detailed engineering design and cost estimate for retrofit of the advanced power system at the DeRidder mill. Phase 3 will complete procurement and construction of the system at the DeRidder site along with all required permitting activities. Phase 4 of the project will included plant commissioning, startup and demonstration operations. Design information for the Gasification Island was completed during the quarter. Two vendor quotations were received for the bark/hog fuel dryers. A final layout plan for the major equipment was developed and submitted to DeRidder for review and approval. The Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST) completed a subcontract for a laboratory study on VOC emissions from wood waste drying using bark from the DeRidder mill. Samples of DeRidder's lime mud and green liquor dregs were collected and analyzed in GTI's laboratory. It was determined that lime mud is far too fine to be utilized as inert bed material in the fluidized bed gasifier. Results for the green liquor dregs are currently being reviewed. Design analysis for the in-furnace HPHT Air Heater was completed and the external Syngas Cooler/Air Heater was begun. Materials were received for the air heater tube testing system to be installed in Boiler No. 2 at DeRidder. A refractory interference problem with the original testing system design was discovered and resolved. Analyses of the externally recuperated gas turbine cycles (air heater and booster combustor in parallel or series) were continued including the effects of steam cooling and inlet air humidification on power output and operating cost. Discussions were continued with turbine manufacturers regarding the technical, time and cost requirements for developing an externally recuperated turbine engine suitable for use in the project. A 5-month no-cost time extension was requested and received for the project to accommodate design and evaluation of externally recuperated gas turbines using HPHT air as the working fluid.

Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the time that enhanced AC was injected, the average mercury removal for the month long test was approximately 74% across the test baghouse module. ACI was interrupted frequently during the month long test because the test baghouse module was bypassed frequently to relieve differential pressure. The high air-to-cloth ratio of operations at this unit results in significant differential pressure, and thus there was little operating margin before encountering differential pressure limits, especially at high loads. This limited the use of sorbent injection as the added material contributes to the overall differential pressure. This finding limits sustainable injection of AC without appropriate modifications to the plant or its operations. Handling and storage issues were observed for the TOXECON ash-AC mixture. Malfunctioning equipment led to baghouse dust hopper plugging, and storage of the stagnant material at flue gas temperatures resulted in self-heating and ignition of the AC in the ash. In the hoppers that worked properly, no such problems were reported. Economics of mercury control at Big Brown were estimated for as-tested scenarios and scenarios incorporating changes to allow sustainable operation. This project was funded under the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory project entitled 'Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program--Phase II'.

John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

164

AFFORDABLE MULTI-LAYER CERAMIC (MLC) MANUFACTURING FOR POWER SYSTEMS (AMPS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is attempting to develop high-performance, cost-competitive solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems. Recognizing the challenges and limitations facing the development of SOFC stacks comprised of electrode-supported cells and metallic interconnects, McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) has chosen to pursue an alternate path to commercialization. MTI is developing a multi-layer, co-fired, planar SOFC stack that will provide superior performance and reliability at reduced costs relative to competing designs. The MTI approach combines state-of-the-art SOFC materials with the manufacturing technology and infrastructure established for multi-layer ceramic (MLC) packages for the microelectronics industry. The rationale for using MLC packaging technology is that high quality, low-cost manufacturing has been demonstrated at high volumes. With the proper selection of SOFC materials, implementation of MLC fabrication methods offers unique designs for stacks (cells and interconnects) that are not possible through traditional fabrication methods. The MTI approach eliminates use of metal interconnects and ceramic-metal seals, which are primary sources of stack performance degradation. Co-fired cells are less susceptible to thermal cycling stresses by using material compositions that have closely matched coefficients of thermal expansion between the cell and the interconnect. The development of this SOFC stack technology was initiated in October 1999 under the DOE cosponsored program entitled ''Affordable Multi-layer Ceramic Manufacturing for Power Systems (AMPS)''. The AMPS Program was conducted as a two-phase program: Phase I--Feasibility Assessment (10/99--9/00); and Phase II--Process Development for Co-fired Stacks (10/00-3/02). This report provides a summary of the results from Phase I and a more detailed review of the results for Phase II. Phase I demonstrated the feasibility for fabricating multi-layer, co-fired cells and interconnects and resulted in selection of the most promising configuration for high-performance, low-cost SOFC stacks. During Phase II, the MTI Team successfully refined the fabrication processes and achieved low-rate production of cells and interconnects (about 100 per month). Short stacks (3-10 cells) using co-fired cells and interconnects were assembled and tested to validate the MTI multi-layer SOFC design. The team successfully demonstrated co-fired repeat units, comprised of a cell and the interconnect layers. Development of co-fired cells and multi-layer interconnects based on the new stack design was completed; all component fabrication and stack testing efforts were redirected to the new design toward the end of Phase II. Finally, low-cost alternate materials for the interconnect body and conductors within the interconnect were identified. At the end of Phase II, the MTI Team successfully transitioned the multi-layer SOFC stack development effort to the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program.

E.A. Barringer, Ph.D.

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z