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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and efficiency issues and trends

2

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

3

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

may not sum to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Form EIA-871A of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

4

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(92) Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 April 1995 Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepared this...

5

TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the technical documentation for the public use data set based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), the national sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted by the Energy Information Administration.

Information Center

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

sum to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

7

Definition: Commercial Loans | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loans Loans Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Commercial Loans Commercial loans are the traditional debt finance (senior debt) where the source of repayment for creditors is the sponsoring company, backed by its entire balance sheet and not by the project's cash flows alone. For balance sheet owned projects, creditors sill analyze a project loan based on its own merits, but will also take into consideration the financial health of the sponsor's balance sheet and will estimate the net effect of the new project on the overall financial structure of the organization. The two most common examples of commercial loans are construction and mortgage loans.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Commercial Lender Related Terms Loans, Financing References

8

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

parking garages. Web Page: For related information, ... "Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey." 6 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, ...

9

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Building Type Definitions Building Type Definitions In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), buildings are classified according to principal activity, which is the primary business, commerce, or function carried on within each building. Buildings used for more than one of the activities described below are assigned to the activity occupying the most floorspace at the time of the interview. Thus, a building assigned to a particular principal activity category may be used for other activities in a portion of its space or at some time during the year. In the 1999 and 2003 CBECS, respondents were asked to place their building into a sub-category that was a more specific activity than has been collected in prior surveys. This was done to ensure the quality of the data; after data collection, the subcategories were combined

10

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8A. District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot...

11

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of...

12

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

13

Commercial Building Electricity Consumption: The Role of Structure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Electricity Consumption: The Role of Structure Quality, Management, and Contract Incentives Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager...

14

Table 2.10 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.10 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure Indicators, Selected Years, 1979-2003: Energy Source and Year: Building Characteristics

15

,"U.S. Natural Gas Average Annual Consumption per Commercial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Average Annual Consumption per Commercial Consumer (Mcf)",1,"Annual",2011...

16

2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 2003 Detailed Tables > What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the...

17

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source, Selected Years, 1979-2003 (Trillion Btu) Energy Source and Year

18

U.S. Natural Gas Average Consumption per Commercial Consumer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Consumer (Thousand Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Average Consumption per Commercial Consumer (Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

19

New Mexico Natural Gas Average Consumption per Commercial Consumer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Consumer (Thousand Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Average Consumption per Commercial Consumer (Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

20

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial). National Energy Consumption Estimates We usedsection entitled “National Energy Consumption Estimates”).section entitled “National Energy Consumption Estimates”).

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Commercial Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 3,012,904 3,152,529 3,118,592...

22

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

23

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C31A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

24

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C25A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

25

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C32A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

26

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C10A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption...

27

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C30A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

28

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C35A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption...

29

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

30

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

31

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

32

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

33

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

34

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

35

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh) Distribution of Building-Level Intensities (kWhsquare foot)...

36

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

37

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

38

Definition: Commercial Scale Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scale Wind Commercial scale wind refers to wind energy projects greater than 100 kW. The electricity that is generated is sold.1 Also Known As Utility-Scale Wind Related Terms...

39

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C12A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of...

40

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C29A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas...

42

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1...

43

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C28A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas...

44

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C27A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Natural Gas...

45

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C9A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3...

46

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C11A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of...

47

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C5A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of...

48

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 8A. District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Thousand Pounds (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 9,470 113.98 108.4 1.31 11.45 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 17,452 118.10 Q Q Q

49

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 465 16,265 35 228 1,644 1,826 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 211 606 3 34 249 292 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 102 736 7 36 262 307 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 66 1,043 16 28 201 238 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 24 895 38 17 124 134 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 25 1,852 76 29 209 229

50

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 67 5,576 83 636 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 18 289 16 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 10 369 35 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8 574 70 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 9 1,399 148 165 Q

51

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Natural Gas Natural Gas Consumption Natural Gas Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion cubic feet) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 2,538 48,473 19.1 2,100 2,037 16,010 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,134 3,175 2.8 257 249 2,227 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 531 3,969 7.5 224 218 1,830 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 500 7,824 15.6 353 343 2,897 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 185 6,604 35.8 278 270 2,054

52

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C13. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Primary Site Total (million dollars) Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings* ............................... 4,404 63,307 14.4 9,168 3,037 890 69,032 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,384 6,346 2.7 1,164 386 113 10,348 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 834 6,197 7.4 790 262 77 7,296 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 727 11,370 15.6 1,229 407 119 10,001

53

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures per Building (gallons) per Square Foot (gallons) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Gallon (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 3,533 0.10 3.9 0.11 1.11 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,177 0.41 1.4 0.48 1.18 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 2,573 0.36 3.0 0.42 1.17 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 3,045 0.19 3.6 0.23 1.18 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 5,184 0.14 5.6 0.15 1.09 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8,508 0.11 9.3 0.12 1.10 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 12,639 0.09 13.1 0.09 1.03

54

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 141 68 117 8,634 4,165 8,376 16.3 16.3 14.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 17 7 12 696 439 857 24.1 15.7 14.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 12 5 15 865 451 868 13.8 12.1 17.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 16 12 16 1,493 933 1,405 11.0 13.0 11.5

55

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ................................ 162 538 343 17,509 32,945 19,727 9.2 16.3 17.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 24 54 38 2,072 2,767 1,640 11.4 19.4 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 16 41 29 1,919 3,154 1,572 8.2 13.0 18.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 28 69 45 3,201 5,610 3,683 8.7 12.3 12.2

56

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh) Distribution of Building-Level Intensities (kWh/square foot) 25th Per- centile Median 75th Per- centile per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per kWh (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 226 14.9 3.8 8.8 18.1 17.9 1.18 0.079 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 48 17.8 3.8 9.0 20.0 4.4 1.63 0.092 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 96 12.9 4.0 8.2 15.5 9.2 1.23 0.096 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 178 11.4 3.1 7.2 15.0 15.2 0.97 0.086

57

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ............................... 580 986 471 12,407 22,762 13,304 46.8 43.3 35.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................... 86 103 61 1,245 1,271 659 69.0 81.0 92.1 5,001 to 10,000 ............................. 57 101 60 1,154 1,932 883 49.4 52.3 67.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................... 105 174 65 2,452 3,390 1,982 42.6 51.2 32.7

58

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 41 131 168 3,430 10,469 12,202 12.0 12.5 13.8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 5 9 20 369 662 921 12.9 13.9 21.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 3 8 9 360 768 877 8.4 10.4 10.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 16 24 674 1,420 2,113 Q 11.6 11.2

59

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil (million square feet) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .............................. 1,302 172 107 64 6,464 2,909 4,663 2,230 0.20 0.06 0.02 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................ 381 Q Q Q 763 Q 274 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................ 404 63 Q Q 1,806 648 985 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 ............................... 517 21 45 Q 3,894 2,055 3,404 1,780 0.13 0.01 0.01 Q

60

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 6,523 1,342 91.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 685 265 99.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 563 594 80.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 899 1,110 71.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 742 2,843 79.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 13.9 5,820 1,253 89.8 79.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 2.7 672 263 98.9 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 7.4 516 580 78.3 68.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 15.6 776 1,052 67.3 72.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 35.9 673 2,790 77.6 75.8

62

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 85 364 550 1,861 8,301 10,356 45.4 43.8 53.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q 42 69 Q 427 741 Q 98.4 92.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q 32 49 Q 518 743 Q 62.1 65.5 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 47 102 Q 952 1,860 Q 49.7 54.6

63

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 5,820 9,168 3,037 1,928 222 634 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 672 1,164 386 250 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 516 790 262 209 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 776 1,229 407 309 27 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 673 1,058 350 258 16 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 9,057 759 1,223 405 244 26 Q

64

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 178 238 104 3,788 7,286 2,521 47.0 32.7 41.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 23 27 11 346 360 218 66.6 75.8 51.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 14 36 Q 321 662 Q 45.1 53.8 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 31 33 Q 796 1,102 604 39.5 29.9 Q

65

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 1A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings ................................ 201 412 431 13,124 31,858 25,200 15.3 12.9 17.1 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... 9 55 45 806 5,378 3,687 11.1 10.2 12.2 Food Sales ..................................... 36 24 Q 747 467 Q 48.8 51.1 Q

66

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings* ............................. 1,488 2,794 1,539 17,685 29,205 17,893 84.1 95.7 86.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 191 290 190 2,146 2,805 1,838 89.1 103.5 103.5 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 131 231 154 1,972 2,917 1,696 66.2 79.2 91.0 10,001 to 25,000 .......................... 235 351 191 3,213 4,976 3,346 73.1 70.5 57.0

67

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings .............................. 454 715 356 378 134 8,486 14,122 8,970 11,796 5,098 53.5 50.6 39.7 32.0 26.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 57 84 35 58 16 666 1,015 427 832 234 84.8 83.1 81.9 69.6 66.6 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 50 57 33 61 17 666 1,030 639 1,243 392 75.2 54.9 51.2 49.2 44.0

68

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 6,523 10,746 3,559 2,100 228 636 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 685 1,185 392 257 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 563 883 293 224 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 899 1,464 485 353 28 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 742 1,199 397 278 17 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 913 1,579 523 277 29 Q

69

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings .............................. 137 254 189 261 202 11,300 18,549 12,374 17,064 10,894 12.1 13.7 15.3 15.3 18.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 19 27 14 32 23 1,210 1,631 923 1,811 903 15.7 16.4 15.0 17.8 25.8 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 12 18 15 27 14 1,175 1,639 1,062 1,855 914 10.2 10.9 14.3 14.3 15.5

70

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 172 234 452 185 13,899 17,725 26,017 12,541 12.4 13.2 17.4 14.7 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 14 30 52 19 1,031 1,742 2,410 1,296 13.5 17.4 21.5 14.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 11 17 37 21 1,128 1,558 2,640 1,319 9.8 10.8 14.0 15.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 22 33 59 28 2,094 3,317 4,746 2,338 10.4 10.0 12.5 12.1

71

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 448 728 511 350 10,162 14,144 15,260 8,907 44.1 51.5 33.5 39.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 50 92 68 40 547 1,086 912 629 90.6 84.6 74.5 63.7 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 39 63 69 46 661 1,064 1,439 806 59.2 59.4 48.1 57.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 58 133 81 70 1,293 2,656 2,332 1,542 45.2 50.1 34.7 45.7

72

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 1A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings ................................ 467 882 688 7,144 21,928 19,401 65.4 40.2 35.5 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... Q 137 101 419 3,629 2,997 53.9 37.6 33.7 Food Sales ..................................... 16 Q Q 339 Q Q 46.6 Q Q

73

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 168 185 165 5,453 3,263 5,644 30.9 56.6 29.2 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 29 18 Q 334 266 363 87.9 68.5 60.2 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 25 Q Q 545 291 514 45.6 62.7 54.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 20 45 26 626 699 844 32.1 63.9 30.6

74

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 66 254 57 5,523 13,837 3,546 12.0 18.3 16.2 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 10 28 7 821 1,233 481 12.4 22.4 15.4 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 7 20 5 681 1,389 386 10.8 14.4 13.3 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 9 31 12 1,204 2,411 842 7.8 12.8 14.1

75

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C8. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 C8. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings* ............................... 436 1,064 309 5,485 12,258 3,393 79.5 86.8 91.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 60 116 36 922 1,207 538 64.9 96.5 67.8 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 44 103 Q 722 1,387 393 60.5 74.0 Q

76

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings ............................... 1,248 2,553 2,721 13,955 32,332 25,371 89.4 79.0 107.3 Principal Building Activity Education ...................................... 63 423 334 808 5,378 3,687 78.3 78.6 90.7 Food Sales ................................... 144 Q Q 765 467 Q 188.5 Q Q

77

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings* ........................... 990 1,761 1,134 1,213 724 10,622 17,335 11,504 15,739 9,584 93.2 101.6 98.5 77.0 75.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................ 143 187 90 170 95 1,313 1,709 1,010 1,915 975 108.7 109.6 88.8 89.0 97.9 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 110 137 91 156 69 1,248 1,725 1,077 2,024 959 88.1 79.3 84.6 77.1 71.7

78

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings* ............................. 1,188 2,208 2,425 13,374 29,260 22,149 88.8 75.5 109.5 Principal Building Activity Education ...................................... 63 423 334 808 5,378 3,687 78.3 78.6 90.7

79

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings* ............................... 575 381 530 7,837 3,675 7,635 73.4 103.8 69.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 87 44 64 788 464 871 110.9 94.7 73.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 60 36 76 879 418 820 68.2 86.7 92.9 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 53 76 73 1,329 831 1,256 40.2 91.7 58.4

80

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 456 1,241 340 5,680 13,999 3,719 80.2 88.7 91.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 60 123 37 922 1,283 547 64.9 96.2 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 45 111 27 738 1,468 420 61.6 75.4 63.2

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81

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* ............................. 1,271 1,690 1,948 911 12,905 17,080 23,489 11,310 98.5 98.9 82.9 80.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 118 206 240 108 1,025 1,895 2,533 1,336 115.1 108.5 94.9 80.6 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 102 117 185 112 1,123 1,565 2,658 1,239 90.7 74.7 69.5 90.8

82

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 684 446 617 9,022 4,207 8,613 75.8 106.1 71.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 87 44 64 788 466 871 110.9 94.8 73.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 67 39 84 957 465 878 69.7 84.8 95.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 77 91 89 1,555 933 1,429 49.4 97.2 62.4

83

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 345 1,052 1,343 3,452 10,543 12,424 99.8 99.7 108.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 37 86 147 383 676 986 95.9 127.9 148.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 39 68 83 369 800 939 106.0 85.4 88.2 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 121 187 674 1,448 2,113 Q 83.4 88.4

84

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ............................... 1,522 3,228 1,772 18,031 33,384 20,243 84.4 96.7 87.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 193 300 193 2,168 2,904 1,850 89.0 103.2 104.2 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 134 263 165 2,032 3,217 1,784 66.0 81.9 92.5 10,001 to 25,000 .......................... 241 432 226 3,273 5,679 3,707 73.6 76.1 60.9

85

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings ............................ 1,086 1,929 1,243 1,386 879 11,529 18,808 12,503 17,630 11,189 94.2 102.6 99.4 78.6 78.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................ 143 187 90 170 95 1,313 1,709 1,010 1,915 975 108.7 109.6 88.8 89.0 97.9 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 110 137 91 156 69 1,248 1,725 1,077 2,024 959 88.1 79.3 84.6 77.1 71.7

86

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings* ............................... 155 447 288 17,163 28,766 17,378 9.0 15.5 16.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 23 52 37 2,049 2,668 1,628 11.3 19.6 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 15 35 27 1,859 2,854 1,484 8.1 12.2 18.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 27 55 37 3,141 4,907 3,322 8.5 11.3 11.2

87

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Study: Window % of Consumption 1. Categorize component loads

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 2003 Commercial Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type Consumption Percent of Total | Consumption Percent of Total Building Type (thousand BtuSF)...

89

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Scale window-related energy consumption to account for new

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

How Will Buildings Be Selected for the 2012 CBECS? How Will Buildings Be Selected for the 2012 CBECS? Background and Overview Did You Know? In the CBECS, commercial refers to any structure that is neither residential, manufacturing/ industrial, nor agricultural. Building refers to a structure that is totally enclosed by walls that extend from the foundation to the roof. Data collection for the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) will begin in April 2013, collecting data for reference year 2012. The goal of the CBECS is to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The 2003 CBECS estimated that there were 4.9 million commercial buildings in the US. Because it would be completely impractical and prohibitively

91

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China* Nan Zhou, 1whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Expenditures > Publication and Tables and Expenditures > Publication and Tables 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Publication and Tables Figure ES1. Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Sources, 1992 Separater Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader . If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Separater Bar Full Report - Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures, 1992 (file size 1.07 MB) pages: 214 Selected Sections Main Text - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader (file size 193,634 bytes) pages: 28, includes the following: Contacts Contents Executive Summary Introduction Background

93

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CBECS Terminology CBECS Terminology NOTE: This glossary is specific to the 1999 and 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Surveys (CBECS). CBECS glossaries for prior years can be found in the appendices of past CBECS reports. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Account Classification: The method in which suppliers of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil classify and bill their customers. Commonly used account classifications are "Commercial," "Industrial," and "Residential." Suppliers' definitions of these terms vary from supplier to supplier and from the definitions used in CBECS. In addition, the same customer may be classified differently by each of its energy suppliers. Activities with Large Amounts of Hot Water: An energy-related space

94

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

‹ Consumption & Efficiency ‹ Consumption & Efficiency Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data 2003 1999 1995 1992 Previous Analysis & Projections Maps U. S. Census Regions and Divisions U. S. Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS U. S. Climate Zones for 1979-1999 CBECS How are U.S. Climate Zones defined? U. S. Census Regions and Divisions: U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Map U. S. Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS: U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Map U. S. Climate Zones for 1979-1999 CBECS: U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Map How are U.S. Climate Zones defined? The CBECS climate zones are groups of climate divisions, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which are regions within a state that are as climatically homogeneous as possible. Each NOAA

95

2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 2003 Detailed Tables > What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of a statistically-designed subset of the entire commercial building population in the United States, or a "sample". Consequently, the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to understand: CBECS estimates should not be considered as finite point estimates, but as estimates with some associated error in each direction. The standard error is a measure of the reliability or precision of the survey statistic. The value for the standard error can be used to construct confidence intervals and to perform hypothesis tests by standard statistical methods. Relative Standard Error (RSE) is defined as the standard error (square root of the variance) of a survey estimate, divided by the survey estimate and multiplied by 100.

96

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys The primary purpose of the CBECS is to collect accurate statistics of energy consumption by individual buildings. EIA also collects data on total energy supply (sales). For the information on sales totals, a different reporting system is used for each fuel and the boundaries between the different sectors (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial) are drawn differently for each fuel. Background EIA sales data on the different fuels are compiled in individual fuel reports. Annual electricity sales data are currently collected on Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Utility Report," which is sent to all electric utilities in the United States. Supply data for natural gas are collected on Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas

97

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Public Use Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CBECS Public Use Data CBECS Public Use Data CBECS Public Use Data Public Use Files: yellow indicator arrow 2003 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1999 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1995 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1992 CBECS The Public Use Files are microdata files that contain more than 5,000 records, representing commercial buildings from the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Each record corresponds to a single responding, in-scope sampled building and contains information for that building about the building size, year constructed, types of energy used, energy-using equipment, conservation features, energy consumption and expenditures, and the amount of energy used for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other end uses.

98

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Vintage Consumption per Year Constructed Square Foot (thousand BtuSF) Prior to 1960 84.4 23% 1960 to 1969 91.5 12% 1970...

99

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

100

1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ............................................... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel................................................ 130 Table C3. Consumption for Sum of Major Fuels ...................................................... 135 Table C4. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels....................................................... 140 Table C5. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels................................................................................................... 145 Table C6. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels......................... 150 Table C7. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

102

Table 2.10 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

parking garages. Note: Data are estimates. Statistics for individual fuels are for all buildings using each fuel. ... "Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption

103

Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... Refrigeration: Office Equipment: Computers: Other 1: Total: ...

104

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4 Beginning in 1995, excludes commercial buildings at multi-building manufacturing facilities, and parking garages. ... excludes electricity system ...

105

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Part 2. Energy Intensity Data Tables Total Energy Consumption Consumption by Energy Source Background: Site and Primary Energy Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Part 1. Energy Consumption The CBECS collects energy consumption statistics from energy suppliers for four major energy sources—electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat—and collects information from the sampled buildings on the use of the four major sources and other energy sources (e.g., district chilled water, solar, wood). Energy consumed in commercial buildings is a significant fraction of that consumed in all end-use sectors. In 2000, about 17 percent of total energy was consumed in the commercial sector. Total Energy Consumption

106

Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refrigeration: Office Equipment: Computers: Other 1: Total: All Buildings. 167: 481: 436: 88: 1,340: 24: 381: 69: 156: 418: 3,559: ... "Commercial ...

107

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption 2003 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for 2003 (Detailed Tables E1-E11 and E1A-E11A) provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, personal computers, office equipment (including servers), and other uses. Although details vary by energy source (Table 1), there are four basic steps in the end-use estimation process: Regressions of monthly consumption on degree-days to establish reference temperatures for the engineering models, Engineering modeling by end use, Cross-sectional regressions to calibrate the engineering estimates and account for additional energy uses, and

108

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background The commercial sector encompasses a vast range of building types-service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as certain buildings that would not be considered "commercial" in a traditional economic sense, such as public and private schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with

109

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

the use of the four major sources and other energy sources (e.g., district chilled water, solar, wood). Energy consumed in commercial buildings is a significant fraction of that...

110

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit (1) Ownership Nongovernment Owned 85.1 72% Owner-Occupied 87.3 35% Nonowner-Occupied 88.4 36%...

111

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Reports & Publications All Reports & Publications Search By: Go Pick a date range: From: To: Go Commercial BuildingsAvailable formats PDF Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Released: August 29, 2013 This report focuses on how EIA models residential and commercial sector distributed generation, including combined heat and power, for the Annual Energy Outlook. PDF Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Released: August 7, 2013 EIA works with technology experts to project the cost and performance of future residential and commercial sector photovoltaic (PV) and small wind installations rather than developing technology projections in-house. These reports have always been available by request. By providing the reports

112

Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey Tables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Commercial Building Benchmarks DOE Commercial Building Benchmarks New Construction Energy Use Intensities (EUIs) [kBtu/ft 2 /yr] May 5, 2009 Miami Houston Phoenix Atlanta Los Angeles Las Vegas San Francisco Baltimore Albuquerque Seattle Chicago Denver Minneapolis Helena Duluth Fairbanks 2003 CBECS Avg. Climate Zone 1A 2A 2B 3A 3B 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 6A 6B 7 8 Large Office 39 42 40 39 32 40 34 43 39 37 43 38 47 44 49 62 99 Medium Office 38 44 42 44 35 41 40 51 43 46 53 47 59 54 62 82 94 Small Office 46 48 49 46 36 44 38 53 47 47 61 52 70 62 77 110 80 Warehouse 15 15 15 16 14 16 14 18 17 16 21 20 26 23 27 43 48 Stand-alone Retail 48 46 46 41 34 41 35 45 42 40 48 45 54 51 61 88 70 Strip Mall 46 44 44 44 35 43 38 48 45 42 51 47 60 55 66 99 110 Primary School 65 71 69 69 57 65 71 78 68 65 85 74 99 88 107 147 68

113

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

While China's 11th Five Year Plan called for a reduction of energy intensity by 2010, whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed in a short time has been hotly debated. This research intends to evaluate the impact of a variety of scenarios of GDP growth, energy elasticity and energy efficiency improvement on energy consumption in commercial buildings in China using a detailed China End-use Energy Model. China's official energy statistics have limited information on energy demand by end use. This is a particularly pertinent issue for building energy consumption. The authors have applied reasoned judgments, based on experience of working on Chinese efficiency standards and energy related programs, to present a realistic interpretation of the current energy data. The bottom-up approach allows detailed consideration of end use intensity, equipment efficiency, etc., thus facilitating assessment of potential impacts of specific policy and technology changes on building energy use. The results suggest that: (1) commercial energy consumption in China's current statistics is underestimated by about 44%, and the fuel mix is misleading; (2) energy efficiency improvements will not be sufficient to offset the strong increase in end-use penetration and intensity in commercial buildings; (3) energy intensity (particularly electricity) in commercial buildings will increase; (4) different GDP growth and elasticity scenarios could lead to a wide range of floor area growth trajectories , and therefore, significantly impact energy consumption in commercial buildings.

Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

While China's 11th Five Year Plan called for a reduction of energy intensity by 2010, whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed in a short time has been hotly debated. This research intends to evaluate the impact of a variety of scenarios of GDP growth, energy elasticity and energy efficiency improvement on energy consumption in commercial buildings in China using a detailed China End-use Energy Model. China's official energy statistics have limited information on energy demand by end use. This is a particularly pertinent issue for building energy consumption. The authors have applied reasoned judgments, based on experience of working on Chinese efficiency standards and energy related programs, to present a realistic interpretation of the current energy data. The bottom-up approach allows detailed consideration of end use intensity, equipment efficiency, etc., thus facilitating assessment of potential impacts of specific policy and technology changes on building energy use. The results suggest that: (1) commercial energy consumption in China's current statistics is underestimated by about 44%, and the fuel mix is misleading; (2) energy efficiency improvements will not be sufficient to offset the strong increase in end-use penetration and intensity in commercial buildings; (3) energy intensity (particularly electricity) in commercial buildings will increase; (4) different GDP growth and elasticity scenarios could lead to a wide range of floor area growth trajectories , and therefore, significantly impact energy consumption in commercial buildings.

Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Title Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-60146 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Apte, Joshua S., and Dariush K. Arasteh Call Number LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

116

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Joshua Apte and Dariush Arasteh, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate

117

Energy Consumption Analysis and Energy Conservation Evaluation of a Commercial Building in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents a model of a commercial building in Shanghai with energy simulation software, and after calibration, the energy consumption of this building is calculated. On the basis of the simulation and calculation, a series of energy saving measures are suggested and their effects are evaluated. The paper verifies the application of computer simulation in building energy analysis and energy saving evaluation.

Chen, C.; Pan, Y.; Huang, Z.; Wu, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

A look at commercial buildings in 1995: Characteristics, energy consumption, and energy expenditures  

SciTech Connect

The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of facilities that would not be considered commercial in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The target population for the 1995 CBECS consisted of all commercial buildings in the US with more than 1,000 square feet of floorspace. Decision makers, businesses, and other organizations that are concerned with the use of energy--building owners and managers, regulators, legislative bodies and executive agencies at all levels of government, utilities and other energy suppliers--are confronted with a buildings sector that is complex. Data on major characteristics (e.g., type of building, size, year constructed, location) collected from the buildings, along with the amount and types of energy the buildings consume, help answer fundamental questions about the use of energy in commercial buildings.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

End-use energy consumption estimates for US commercial buildings, 1989  

SciTech Connect

An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs within the Department of Energy, by utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1989 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Billing data for electricity and natural gas were first decomposed into weather and nonweather dependent loads. Subsequently, Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type with annual data. The SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption. End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 5,876 buildings in the 1989 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for eleven separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock.

Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.; Marsh, T.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

End-use energy consumption estimates for U.S. commercial buildings, 1992  

SciTech Connect

An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs of the US Department of Energy, utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1992 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type. The nonlinear SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption (based upon utility billing information). End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 6,751 buildings in the 1992 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for 11 separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock. 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 4% 28% 8% 56% | 6% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 4% 26% 7% 59% | 5% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 3% 26% 5% 61% | 5% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 5% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 4% 26% 4% 61% | 5% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 4% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 3% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 3% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 3% 25% 4% 64% | 4% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 3% 24% 4% 65% | 4% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 3% 26% 3% 65% | 4% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 2% 25% 3% 65% | 3% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 2% 25% 3% 65% | 3% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 2% 25% 2% 67% | 3% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 2% 25% 2% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 2% 26% 3% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 2% 25% 4% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 2% 25% 3% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 2% 24% 3% 67% | 3% 25%

122

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Natural Gas Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 13% 41% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 13% 42% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 14% 39% 18% 3% | 20% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 14% 39% 17% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 14% 40% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 14% 40% 18% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 14% 40% 16% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 14% 41% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 15% 42% 15% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 14% 41% 16% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 4% 19.57 1991 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 20.03 1992 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 20.71 1993 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 48% 3% 21.24 1994 14% 42% 18% 3% | 19% 48% 3% 21.75 1995 14% 42% 19% 3% | 20% 49% 3% 22.71 1996 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 23.14 1997 14% 43% 18% 3% | 20% 49% 3% 23.34 1998 13% 43% 20% 3% | 20% 50% 3% 22.86 1999 14%

123

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

124

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Miscellaneous equipment in commercial buildings: The inventory, utilization, and consumption by equipment type  

SciTech Connect

The nature of the miscellaneous equipment (devices other than permanently installed lighting and those used for space conditioning) in commercial buildings is diverse, comprising a wide variety of devices that are subject to varied patterns of use. This portion of the commercial load is frequently underestimated, and widely hypothesized to be growing. These properties make it a particularly difficult load to characterize for purposes of demand-side management. In the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), over 100 commercial sites in the Pacific Northwest have been metered at the end-use level for several years. Detailed inspections of the equipment in them have also been conducted. This paper describes how the ELCAP data have been used to estimate three fundamental properties of the various types of equipment in several classes of commercial buildings: (1) the installed capacity per unit floor area, (2) utilization of the equipment relative to the installed capacity, and (3) the resulting energy consumption by building type and for the Pacific Northwest commercial sector as a whole. Applications for the results include assessment of conservation potential, prediction of equipment loads from survey data, estimating equipment loads for energy audits, targeting of conservation technology development, and disaggregating building total or mixed end-use data. 4 tabs., refs.

Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Commercial Delivered and Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Year Percent Delivered Energy Consumption Primary Energy Consumption Floorspace Post-2000 Total Consumption per Total Consumption per (million SF) Floorspace (1) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) 1980 50.9 N.A. 5.99 117.7 10.57 207.7 1990 64.3 N.A. 6.74 104.8 13.30 207.0 2000 (2) 68.5 N.A. 8.20 119.7 17.15 250.3 2010 81.1 26% 8.74 107.7 18.22 224.6 2015 84.1 34% 8.88 105.5 18.19 216.2 2020 89.1 43% 9.02 101.2 19.15 214.9 2025 93.9 52% 9.56 101.8 20.06 213.6 2030 98.2 60% 9.96 101.5 20.92 213.1 2035 103.0 68% 10.38 100.8 21.78 211.4 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Consumption Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; DOE for 1980 floorspace; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 1994, Jan. 1994, Table A5, p. 62 for 1990 floorspace; EIA, AEO 2003, Jan. 2003, Table A5, p. 127 for 2000 floorspace; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012,

127

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage (1) | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 Health Care 178.1 216.0 135.7 | Education 77.7 88.3 80.6 Inpatient 230.3 255.3 253.8 | Service 62.4 86.0 74.8 Outpatient 91.6 110.4 84.4 | Food Service 145.2 290.1 361.2 Food Sales 205.8 197.6 198.3 | Religious Worship 46.6 39.9 43.3 Lodging 88.2 111.5 88.1 | Public Order & Safety N.A. 101.3 110.6 Office 93.6 94.4 88.0 | Warehouse & Storage N.A. 38.9 33.3 Mercantile 80.4 91.8 94.4 | Public Assembly 61.9 107.6 119.7 Retail (Non-Malls) 74.1 63.7 86.4 | Vacant 21.4 23.1 N.A. Retail (Malls) N.A. 103.9 99.5 | Other 161.3 204.9 125.3 Note(s): Source(s): Consumption (kBtu/SF) Consumption (kBtu/SF) 1) See Table 3.1.3 for primary versus delivered energy consumption.

128

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of a statistically-designed subset of the entire commercial building population in the United States, or a "sample". Consequently, the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to understand: CBECS estimates should not be considered as finite point estimates, but as estimates with some associated error in each direction. The standard error is a measure of the reliability or precision of the survey statistic. The value for the standard error can be used to construct confidence intervals and to perform hypothesis tests by standard

129

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

130

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China’sof China’s total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof China’s total energy consumption, while others estimate

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Label Building Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Usage Form Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed questionnaire is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our company. a. You may submit a single report for the entire building, or if it i s easier, a separate report for each of several accounts in the building. These will then be aggregated by the survey contractor. b. If you are concerned about your individual account information, you may choose to mark

132

Indoor Conditions Study and Impact on the Energy Consumption for a Large Commercial Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is focused on the analysis of indoor conditions for a new commercial building that will be constructed in an East-European country. Based on the initial HVAC design parameters the surface of the building was divided in thermal zones that were studied using dynamic simulations. The article provides interesting insights of the building indoor conditions (summer/winter comfort), humidity, air temperature, mean operative temperature and energy consumption using hourly climate data. A dynamic variation of the PMV (Predicted Mean Vote Index) was obtained for different thermal zones of the building (retails stores, mall circulation, corridors) and in most of the cases the acceptable values of plus/minus 0.5 are exceeded. Among the most important energy efficiency measures it is mentioned a decrease of the heating set point temperature, increase of the walls and roof thermal resistance and the use of a heat recovery on the ventilation system. In this work it is demonstrated how simple measures can enhance the indoor conditions and reduce the energy consumption for this kind of construction.

Catalina, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2003 Commercial Buildings Delivered Energy End-Use Intensities, by Building Activity (Thousand Btu per SF) (1) Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Note(s): Source(s): 43.5 45.2 164.4 20.9 1) Due to rounding, end-uses do not sum to total. EIA, 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey, Energy End-Uses, Oct. 2008, Table E.2A. 0.3 0.6 3.0 N.A. 4.9 4.8 18.9 3.1 1.7 3.5 6.0 N.A. 0.1 0.2 N.A. N.A. 4.4 13.1 34.1 1.7 0.8 N.A. N.A. N.A. 1.4 2.0 6.1 0.4 0.8 0.6 2.1 0.1 26.2 19.3 79.4 14.4 2.9 1.3 10.5 0.6 Religious

134

Definitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Below are a few small business procurement definitions as stated by the Small Business Administration and the Federal Acquisition Regulation. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email Get clarity on common terms (and is your business defined by one?) Small business An independently owned and operated entity Not dominant in the field of operation in which it is bidding on government contracts Meets any applicable criteria concerning number of employees or annual receipts established by the Small Business Administration (SBA). Concerns are "affiliates" when one either controls or has the power to control the other or when a third party (or parties) controls or has the power to control both. North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)

135

A Look at Commercial Buldings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DOE/EIA-0625(95) DOE/EIA-0625(95) Distribution Category UC-950 A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures October 1998 En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion Of fice of En ergy Mar kets and End Use U.S. De part ment of En ergy Wash ing ton, DC 20585 This re port was pre pared by the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion, the in de pend ent sta tis ti cal and ana lytic agency within the U.S. De part ment of En ergy. The in for ma tion con tained herein should be at trib uted to the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion and should not be con strued as ad vo cat ing or re flect ing any pol icy po si tion of the De part ment of En ergy or any other or gani za tion. Contacts The En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion (EIA) pre pared this pub li ca tion un der the gen eral di rec tion of W. Cal vin

136

A Simple Method to Continuous Measurement of Energy Consumption of Tank Less Gas Water Heaters for Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy consumptions of hot water supply in restaurants or residential houses are large amount, guidelines for optimal design are not presented. measurements of energy consumption of tank less gas water heaters very difficult unless gas flow meters were installed. however a gas flow meters is hardly installed for individual heater. in this study, a simple method to estimate gas consumption of such appliances form temperature of exhaust gas and electric current was presented. experiments of japanese major hot water gas heaters were conducted change under conditions of various water flow rate at constant output temperature. the empirical equations, which related gas consumption to exhaust gas temperature and operative current, were obtained for each type of water heaters, each manufacturer and overall heaters. verification of the method was conducted at a commercial building. some thresholds to decide status of operation, such as anti-freeze operation, were set, and sufficient accuracy of around 10 % error was achieved.

Yamaha, M.; Fujita, M.; Miyoshi, T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Table 1a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Site Energy Consumption b  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 1a

138

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

component of China’s total energy consumption mix. However,China-specific factors were used to calculate the energy mix

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Table 2.1c Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 1949 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 See "Primary Energy Consumption" in Glossary. 9 Wind electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat rate—see Table A6).

140

Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 • Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth • Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade • Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards • The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s • U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Commercial Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total Total(3) 2010-Year 1980 2.63 24.9% 1.31 12.4% 0.12 1.1% 0.02 0.2% 1.91 4.58 6.49 61.4% 1981 2.54 23.9% 1.12 10.5% 0.14 1.3% 0.02 0.2% 2.03 4.76 6.80 64.1% 1982 2.64 24.3% 1.03 9.5% 0.16 1.4% 0.02 0.2% 2.08 4.91 6.99 64.5% 1983 2.48 22.7% 1.16 10.7% 0.16 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.12 4.98 7.09 65.0% 1984 2.57 22.5% 1.22 10.7% 0.17 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.26 5.17 7.43 65.1% 1985 2.47 21.6% 1.08 9.4% 0.14 1.2% 0.02 0.2% 2.35 5.39 7.74 67.6% 1986 2.35 20.3% 1.16 10.0% 0.14 1.2% 0.03 0.2% 2.44 5.47 7.91 68.3% 1987 2.47 20.8% 1.13 9.5% 0.13 1.1% 0.03 0.2% 2.54 5.62 8.16 68.5% 1988 2.72 21.6% 1.09 8.7% 0.13 1.0% 0.03 0.3% 2.68 5.92 8.60 68.4% 1989 2.77 21.0% 1.04 7.9% 0.12 0.9% 0.10 0.8% 2.77 6.39 9.16 69.5% 1990 2.67 20.1%

142

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Commercial Site Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) (1) Growth Rate Wood (2) Solar Thermal (3) Solar PV (3) GHP Total 2010-Year 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 0.110 0.035 0.010 N.A. 0.155 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.154 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.007 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.148 0.6%

143

Table 1a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Site Energy Consumption by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3 Laboratory buildings are included in the "Other" category. ... For questions about the "Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Tables," please contact: Behjat Hojjati

144

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential andCommercial Building Stock  

SciTech Connect

We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

Comparison of the prediction accuracy of daily and monthly regression models for energy consumption in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The measured energy savings from retrofits in commercial buildings are generally determined as the difference between the energy consumption predicted using a baseline model and the measured energy consumption during the post retrofit period. Most baseline models are developed by regressing the daily energy consumption versus the daily average temperature (daily models) or by regressing the monthly energy consumption versus the monthly average temperature (monthly models). Since the post-retrofit weather is generally different from the weather used for model development, the prediction error of the baseline model may be different from the fitting error. Daily and monthly baseline models were developed for a midsize commercial building with (i) dual-duct CAV and VAV systems, (ii) office and university occupancy schedules, and (iii) different operating practices using the weather of a mild weather year. The prediction errors were identified as the difference between the energy use predicted by the regression models and the values simulated by a calibrated simulation program when both models use weather from a year very different from the weather year used to develop the regression model. The major results are summarized below: 1. When the AHUs operate 24 hours per day, annual energy prediction errors of daily regression models were found to be less than 1.4%. The errors of monthly regression models were found to be in the same range as the error of the daily models. 2. When the AHUs were shut down during unoccupied periods, annual prediction errors for both daily and monthly regression models were as high as 15%. However, the prediction error of daily regression models can be decreased to a range of 2% to 3% if the daily average energy consumption is regressed versus the average temperature during the operation period. Based on these findings, we suggest use of daily or monthly regression models when the AHUs are operated 24 hours per day. When shut-down is performed during unoccupied hours, daily energy consumption should be regressed versus the average ambient temperature during operating hours to develop the baseline model.

Wang, Jinrong

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Price Average Commercial Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

147

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Commercial Water Use by Source (Million Gallons per Day) Year 1980 - - - 1985 5,710 1,230 1990 5,900 2,390 1995 6,690 2,890 2000 (3) 7,202 3,111 2005 (3) 7,102 3,068 Note(s): Source(s): 10,314 10,171 1) Public supply water use: water withdrawn by public and private water suppliers that furnish water to at least 25 people or have a minimum of 15 connections. 2) Self-supply water use: Water withdrawn from a groundwater or surface-water source by a user rather than being obtained from a public supply. 3) USGS did not estimate commercial water use in this year. Estimates are based on available data and percentage breakdown of commercial use in the 1995 survey. U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1985, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1004, 1988; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of

148

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Aggregate Commercial Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) Load (quads) and Percent of Total Load Component Heating Cooling Roof -0.103 12% 0.014 1% Walls (2) -0.174 21% -0.008 - Foundation -0.093 11% -0.058 - Infiltration -0.152 18% -0.041 - Ventilation -0.129 15% -0.045 - Windows (conduction) -0.188 22% -0.085 - Windows (solar gain) 0.114 - 0.386 32% Internal Gains Lights 0.196 - 0.505 42% Equipment (electrical) 0.048 - 0.207 17% Equip. (non-electrical) 0.001 - 0.006 1% People 0.038 - 0.082 7% NET Load -0.442 100% 0.963 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Loads represent the thermal energy losses/gains that, when combined, will be offset by a building's heating/cooling system to maintain a set interior temperature (which equals site energy). 2) Includes common interior walls between buildings. LBNL, Commercial Heating and Cooling Loads Component Analysis, June 1998, Table 24, p. 45 and Figure 3, p. 61

149

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Restaurants in Western United States (1) Fixture/End Use (2) Faucets Dishwashing Toilets/Urinals Ice Making Total Indoor Use (3) (4) (4) Building Size (SF) Seats: Meals: Benchmarking Values for Restaurants (6) N Gal./SF/year 90 Gal./meal 90 Gal./seat/day 90 Gal./employee/day 90 Note(s): Source(s): American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000. 25th Percentile of Users 130 - 331 6 - 9 20 - 31 86 - 122 Familiy-style dine-in establishments. Four restaurants in southern California, one in Phoenix, AZ. 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and

150

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Two California High Schools Fixture/End Use Toilet Urinal Faucet Shower Kitchen Misc. uses (2) Cooling Leaks Swimming Pool Total Use Benchmarking Values for Schools (3) N Indoor Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 142 Indoor Use, Gal./school day/student 141 Cooling Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 35 Note(s): Source(s): 8 - 20 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) One high school. 3) The study derived efficiency benchmarks by analyzing measured data and audit data. The benchmark was set at the lower 25th percentile of users. American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000.

151

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Number of Consumers Number of Consumers Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Industrial Consumption Natural gas used for heat, power, or chemical feedstock by manufacturing establishments or those engaged in mining or other mineral extraction as well as consumers in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. Also included in industrial consumption are generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the above-mentioned industrial activities.

152

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

153

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

154

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

155

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Average Water Use of Commercial and Institutional Establishments (Gallons per Establishment per Day) Average Variation % Total % of CI % Seasonal Daily Use In Use (1) CI Use Customers Use (2) Hotels and Motels 7,113 5.41 5.8% 1.9% 23.1% Laundries/Laundromats 3,290 8.85 4.0% 1.4% 13.4% Car Washes 3,031 3.12 0.8% 0.4% 14.2% Urban Irrigation 2,596 8.73 28.5% 30.2% 86.9% Schools and Colleges 2,117 12.13 8.8% 4.8% 58.0% Hospitals/Medical Offices 1,236 78.5 3.9% 4.2% 23.2% Office Buildings 1,204 6.29 10.2% 11.7% 29.0% Restaurants 906 7.69 8.8% 11.2% 16.1% Food Stores 729 16.29 2.9% 5.2% 19.4% Auto Shops (3) 687 7.96 2.0% 6.7% 27.2% Membership Organizations (4) 629 6.42 2.0% 5.6% 46.2% Total 77.6% 83.3% Note(s): Source(s): 23,538 Estimated from 24 months of water utility billing data in five Western locations: four locations in Southern California and one in Arizona. 1)

156

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2015 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.01 1.01 11.4% | 3.05 3.05 16.7% Space Heating 1.69 0.20 0.06 0.11 0.17 2.23 25.2% | 0.50 2.57 14.1% Space Cooling 0.04 0.51 0.54 6.1% | 1.52 1.56 8.6% Ventilation 0.54 0.54 6.1% | 1.62 1.62 8.9% Refrigeration 0.35 0.35 4.0% | 1.06 1.06 5.8% Electronics 0.32 0.32 3.6% | 0.95 0.95 5.2% Water Heating 0.48 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.63 7.1% | 0.27 0.81 4.5% Computers 0.19 0.19 2.1% | 0.57 0.57 3.1% Cooking 0.19 0.02 0.21 2.4% | 0.07 0.26 1.4% Other (5) 0.33 0.01 0.14 0.05 0.01 0.81 1.35 15.2% | 2.45 2.99 16.4% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.68 0.19 0.63 1.50 16.9% | 1.90 2.77 15.2% Total 3.33 0.43 0.14 0.11 0.15 4.63 8.88 100% | 13.99 18.23 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.35 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (less than 0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are

157

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2025 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.08 1.08 11.3% | 3.27 3.27 16.3% Space Heating 1.68 0.18 0.06 0.11 0.16 2.20 23.1% | 0.49 2.53 12.6% Ventilation 0.60 0.60 6.2% | 1.80 1.80 9.0% Space Cooling 0.03 0.52 0.55 5.7% | 1.56 1.59 7.9% Electronics 0.40 0.40 4.2% | 1.22 1.22 6.1% Refrigeration 0.34 0.34 3.6% | 1.02 1.02 5.1% Water Heating 0.52 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.67 7.0% | 0.27 0.85 4.2% Computers 0.20 0.20 2.1% | 0.60 0.60 3.0% Cooking 0.21 0.02 0.23 2.4% | 0.07 0.27 1.4% Other (5) 0.48 0.01 0.15 0.05 0.01 1.12 1.82 19.1% | 3.39 4.09 20.3% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.58 0.18 0.69 1.46 15.3% | 2.09 2.85 14.2% Total 3.50 0.41 0.15 0.12 0.15 5.23 9.56 100% | 15.77 20.10 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.33 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (less than 0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are

158

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2035 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.15 1.15 11.1% | 3.40 3.40 15.6% Space Heating 1.65 0.18 0.06 0.11 0.16 2.16 20.8% | 0.48 2.48 11.3% Ventilation 0.65 0.65 6.2% | 1.91 1.91 8.7% Space Cooling 0.03 0.54 0.57 5.5% | 1.59 1.62 7.4% Electronics 0.46 0.46 4.5% | 1.37 1.37 6.3% Refrigeration 0.36 0.36 3.4% | 1.05 1.05 4.8% Water Heating 0.54 0.03 0.04 0.09 0.70 6.8% | 0.25 0.87 4.0% Computers 0.22 0.22 2.1% | 0.64 0.64 2.9% Cooking 0.22 0.02 0.25 2.4% | 0.06 0.29 1.3% Other (5) 0.81 0.01 0.16 0.06 0.01 1.46 2.51 24.2% | 4.30 5.35 24.5% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.40 0.18 0.77 1.36 13.1% | 2.28 2.86 13.1% Total 3.65 0.40 0.16 0.12 0.16 5.89 10.38 100% | 17.33 21.83 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.32 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are assumed

159

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.19 1.19 13.6% | 3.69 3.69 20.2% Space Heating 1.65 0.22 0.06 0.11 0.28 2.33 26.6% | 0.88 2.93 16.0% Space Cooling 0.04 0.84 0.88 10.1% | 2.60 2.64 14.5% Ventilation 0.54 0.54 6.1% | 1.66 1.66 9.1% Refrigeration 0.39 0.39 4.5% | 1.21 1.21 6.6% Water Heating 0.44 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.58 6.7% | 0.28 0.78 4.3% Electronics 0.26 0.26 3.0% | 0.81 0.81 4.4% Computers 0.21 0.21 2.4% | 0.66 0.66 3.6% Cooking 0.18 0.02 0.20 2.3% | 0.07 0.25 1.4% Other (5) 0.30 0.01 0.14 0.05 0.01 0.69 1.20 13.7% | 2.13 2.64 14.5% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.68 0.25 0.02 0.95 10.9% | 0.06 0.99 5.4% Total 3.29 0.52 0.14 0.12 0.14 4.54 8.74 100% | 14.05 18.26 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.43 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are assumed

160

Consumption & Efficiency - Analysis & Projections - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency. Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and efficiency ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

commercial.gif (5196 bytes) commercial.gif (5196 bytes) The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings, however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

162

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by End Use Consumption by End Use Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Distribution Use Natural gas used as fuel in the respondent's operations. Electric Power Consumption Gas used as fuel in the electric power sector. Electric Power Sector An energy-consuming sector that consists of electricity-only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public -i.e., North American Industry Classification System code 22 for plants. Combined heat and power plants that identify themselves as primarily in the commercial or industrial sectors are reported in those sectors.

163

Natural Gas Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 23,103,793 23,277,008 22,910,078 24,086,797 24,477,425 25,533,448 1949-2012 Alabama 418,512 404,157 454,456 534,779 598,514 666,738 1997-2012 Alaska 369,967 341,888 342,261 333,312 335,458 343,110 1997-2012

164

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

165

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

166

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Topic: Delivered for the Account of Others Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Delivered for the Account of Others Gas that is not owned by the company that delivers it to the consumer. These deliveries include quantities covered by long-term contracts and gas involved in short-term or spot market sales. Industrial Consumption Natural gas used for heat, power, or chemical feedstock by manufacturing establishments or those engaged in mining or other mineral extraction as well as consumers in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. Also included in industrial consumption are generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the above-mentioned industrial activities.

167

Trends in the size distribution, highway use, and consumption of gasoline and diesel fuels of the U.S. Commercial Truck Fleet, 1977-2002.  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on various major long-range (1977-2002, 1982-2002) U.S. commercial trucking trends by using U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census Vehicle/Truck Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS/TIUS) data from this period, as well as selected 1977-2002 data from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Highway Statistics. Analyses are made of (1) overall passenger vehicle versus truck consumption patterns of gasoline and diesel fuel and (2) the population growth and fuels used by all commercial truck classes and selected truck types (single unit and combination). Selected vehicle miles traveled, gallons per vehicle miles traveled, and gallons per cargo ton-miles traveled trends, as well as the effect of cargo tons per truck on fuel consumption, are also assessed. In addition, long-range trends of related factors (such as long-haul mileages driven by heavy trucks) and their impacts on both reducing fuel consumption per cargo-ton-mile and the relative shares of total commercial fuel use among truck classes were examined. Results of these trends on U.S. petroleum consumption are identified. The effects of basic engineering design and performance, national Interstate highway construction legislation, national demographic trends (such as suburbanization), and changes in U.S. corporate operational requirements are discussed. Their impacts on both the long-distance hauling and shorter-distance urban and suburban delivery markets of the commercial trucking industry are highlighted.

Bertram, K. M.; Santini, D. J.; Anderson, J. L.; Vyas, A. D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

169

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State Shares of U.S. Deliveries State Shares of U.S. Deliveries Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Delivered (Gas) The physical transfer of natural, synthetic, and/or supplemental gas from facilities operated by the responding company to facilities operated by others or to consumers. Electric Power Consumption Gas used as fuel in the electric power sector. Industrial Consumption Natural gas used for heat, power, or chemical feedstock by manufacturing establishments or those engaged in mining or other mineral extraction as well as consumers in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. Also included in industrial consumption are generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the above-mentioned industrial activities.

170

Lighting in Commercial Buildings, 1986  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings Lighting in Commercial Buildings --1986 Overview Full Report and Tables Detailed analysis of energy consumption for lighting for U.S. commercial...

171

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas > Natural Gas Information Query System > Definitions, Sources, & Notes Natural Gas > Natural Gas Information Query System > Definitions, Sources, & Notes Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes The EIA-176 form contains responses submitted from an identified universe of pipelines, local distribution companies, and operators of fields, wells or gas processing plants, who distribute gas to end users or transport gas across State borders; or underground natural gas storage operators. Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities.

172

Impact of Nighttime Shut Down on the Prediction Accuracy of Monthly Regression Models for Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regression models of measured energy use in buildings are widely used as baseline models to determine retrofit savings from measured energy consumption. It is less expensive to determine savings from monthly utility bills when they are available than to install hourly metering equipment. However, little is known about the impact of nighttime shut off on the accuracy of savings determined from monthly data. This paper reports a preliminary investigation of this question by comparing the heating and cooling energy use predicted by regression models based on monthly data against the predictions of calibrated hourly simulation models when applied to a medium-sized university building in Texas with (i) DDCAV system operating 24 hours per day, (ii) DDCAV system with nighttime shut down, (iii) DDVAV system operating 24 hours per day, and (iv) DDVAV system with nighttime shut down. The results of the four cases studied indicate : 1) when the AHUs are operated 24 hours/day, the annual prediction error of the cooling regression models is less than 0.5% of the annual cooling energy consumption; however, 2) when the AHUs are operated with nighttime shut down, the annual prediction error of the cooling models becomes as high as 6% of annual energy consumption. It should be noted that the cases considered here include only single end-uses of energy and have not investigated energy-use data which includes multiple end-uses. Modified regression models are therefore recommended when AHUs are not operated 24 hours per day and the temperature pattern is significantly different between pre and post retrofit years.

Wang, J.; Claridge, D. E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

> Special Reports > Trends in Commercial Buildings Trends: Buildings and Floorspace Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Overview: The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption...

174

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data. ... Commercial Buildings - CBECS. Manufacturing - MECS.

175

Commercial Building Performance Monitoring and Evaluation | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Projects » Commercial Building Research Projects » Commercial Building Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Commercial Building Performance Monitoring and Evaluation The Building Technologies Office (BTO) uses performance metrics to standardize the measurement and characterization of energy performance in commercial buildings. These metrics help inform the effectiveness of energy efficiency measures in existing buildings and highlight opportunities to improve performance. Various tiers of metrics are available for different users. Performance Metrics Objectives Performance metrics deal with building energy consumption and on-site energy production. To be useful, industry must agree on standard definitions for these metrics and share consistent procedures for collecting and reporting data as well as ensuring data quality.

176

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal.

177

Commercial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

178

Table F28: Wind Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F28: Wind Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 State Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total

179

Electricity Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumption Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates (million kWh) National Petroleum Council Assumption: The definition of electricity con- sumption and sales used in the NPC 1999 study is the equivalent ofwhat EIA calls "sales by utilities" plus "retail wheeling by power marketers." This A nn u al Gro wth total could also be called "sales through the distribution grid," 2o 99 99 to Sales by Utilities -012% #N/A Two other categories of electricity consumption tracked by EIA cover on site Retail Wheeling Sales by generation for host use. The first, "nonutility onsite direct use," covers the Power Marketen 212.25% #N/A traditional generation/cogeneration facilities owned by industrial or large All Sales Through Distribution

180

Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

Not Available

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... State Energy Data System: Noncombustible Renewable Energy for 2011 ...

182

Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

183

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Survey Methodology Sampling Error, Standard Errors, and Relative Standard Errors The...

184

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey ... and energy-using equipment types (heating, cooling, refrigeration, water ...

185

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline ... representing a variety of industries ... Following the suspension of the 2011 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption ...

186

Iowa Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption 293,274 325,772 315,186...

187

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The gross output for the petroleum and coal products subsector grew by about 3 percent, ... Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey, MECS Definition of Fuel Use, ...

188

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey website.Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 2003of the total end-use energy consumption of such buildings;

Blum, Helcio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human and Socialfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008,...

192

California Energy Commission - Natural Gas Consumption by Utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Energy Commission - Natural Gas Consumption by Utility (1990-2009) California Energy Commission natural gas consumption data by Utility company for Commercial,...

193

OpenEI - Energy Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/961 This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the commercial/ref_buildings.html">DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols).  This dataset also includes the consumption/residential/">Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types

194

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

195

Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Project Definition Rating Index (EM-PDRI) is a modification of a commercially developed planning tool that has been tested by an EM team specifically for...

196

Review of California and National Methods for Energy Performance Benchmarking of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey – Surveytheir building’s energy consumption to that of similarfor evaluating building energy consumption and can lead to

Matson, Nance E.; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Consumption & Efficiency - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports All Sectors Change category... All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and

198

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

199

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data Background image of CNSTAT logo The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) routinely uses feedback from customers and outside experts to help improve its programs and products. As part of an assessment of its consumption

200

Estimated U.S. gasoline consumption low compared to five-year ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA ... Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plumbing System Upgrade ... Building Newer than 1980 ... 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: ...

202

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... New 2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) ...

203

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data; ... The major users are residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, and electric power generators.

204

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by Utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility (1990-2009) Electricity consumption by Utility company for Commercial, Residential, Ag & Water Pump, Streetlight, Industry, Mining & Construction and Total...

205

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by Planning...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Planning Area (1990-2009) Electricity consumption data from the California Energy Commission by planning area for Commercial, Residential, Ag & Water Pump, Streetlight,...

206

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the...

207

Department of Energy and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Energy and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch Alliance to Reduce Energy Consumption of Buildings Department of Energy and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch Alliance...

208

EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These tables provide estimates of commercial sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1992, 1995, 1999 and 2003 based on the Commercial ...

209

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Reports > Trends in Commercial Buildings Trends: Buildings and Floorspace Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Overview: The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector Since 1978, the Energy Information Administration has collected basic statistical information from three of the major end-use sectors— residential, and industrial— periodic energy consumption surveys. Each survey is a snapshot of how energy is used in the year of the survey; the series of surveys in each sector reveals the trends in energy use for the sector. Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects data from a sample of buildings representative of the commercial buildings

210

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

211

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

212

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey—Commercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses | End-Use Equipment | Conservation Features and Practices Additional Information on: Survey methods, data limitations, and other information supporting the data The 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) was the seventh in the series begun in 1979. The 1999 CBECS estimated that 4.7 million commercial buildings (± 0.4 million buildings, at the 95% confidence level) were present in the United States in that year. Those buildings comprised a total of 67.3 (± 4.6) billion square feet of floorspace. Additional information on 1979 to 1999 trends

213

Lattice Definitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Orbit Stability Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Main Parameters Lattice Definitions APS storage ring lattice consists of 40 almost identical sectors. Each sector contains...

214

Priority Definitions:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Definitions: Critical - Operation-hindering issue impacting more than 1 person Examples: Application unavailability, network printer issue when no comparable printer is in same...

215

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Trends in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace The addition of commercial buildings and floorspace from 1995 to 1999 continued the general trends noted since 1979 (Figures 1 and 2). The size of the commercial buildings has grown steadily over the twenty years of CBECS. Each year more buildings are added to the sector (new construction or conversion of pre-existing buildings to commercial activity) than are removed (demolition or conversion to non-commercial activity). The definition for the commercial buildings population was changed for the 1995 CBECS which resulted in a slightly smaller buildings population and accounts for the data break in both Figures 1 and 2 (see report "Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector" for complete details). Figure 1. Total Commercial Buildings, 1979 to 1999

216

Commercial Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey ... space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The market segment ...

217

Energy Efficiency Report-Chapter 4: Commercial Buildings Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) The CBECS ... water heating, refrigeration, powering office equipment, and other uses.

218

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, ÂŤEnergy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsÂŽ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

219

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, ÂŤEnergy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsÂŽ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

220

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Laboratory: 25: 455: 108: 203: Lodging: 158: 3,618: 461: 839 ... Source: 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Energy Information Administration.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Saving Electrical Energy in Commercial Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the commercial and institutional building sectors using approximately 29% and 34% of all electrical energy consumption in Canada and the United States, respectively, saving… (more)

Case, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Commercial Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Lighting Commercial Lighting At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Lab developed an occupancy sensor can recognize the presence of human occupants more than 90 percent of the time -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and

223

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RECS Terminology RECS Terminology A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ A Account Classification: The method in which suppliers of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil classify and bill their customers. Commonly used account classifications are "Commercial," "Industrial," "Residential," and "Other" Suppliers' definitions of these terms vary from supplier to supplier and from the definitions used in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). In addition, the same customer may be classified differently by each of its energy suppliers. Adequacy of Insulation: The respondent's perception of the adequacy of the housing unit's insulation. Aggregate Ratio: The ratio of two population aggregates (totals). For

224

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A3. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 A3. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings Northeast Midwest South West New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 4,859 252 509 728 577 926 360 587 316 603 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 134 240 372 356 474 217 294 166 333 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 49 106 128 100 200 59 127 62 117 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 46 92 133 78 151 54 103 61 91 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 10 29 48 27 52 16 28 16 34

225

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A5. Building Size, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 A5. Building Size, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings Building Size 1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet 5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet 25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet 50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet 100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet 200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet Over 500,000 Square Feet All Buildings ................................ 4,859 2,586 948 810 261 147 74 26 8 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... 386 162 56 60 48 39 16 5 Q Food Sales ..................................... 226 164 44 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ................................. 297 202 65 23 Q Q N Q N Health Care .................................... 129 56 38 19 5 5 3 2 1

226

Average Natural Gas Consumption per Commercial Consumer  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

568 579 586 585 593 541 1967-2012 568 579 586 585 593 541 1967-2012 Alabama 355 386 359 397 371 321 1967-2012 Alaska 1,399 1,334 1,258 1,225 1,489 1,515 1967-2012 Arizona 572 565 563 564 577 558 1967-2012 Arkansas 463 534 527 592 590 603 1967-2012 California 562 561 561 564 558 572 1967-2012 Colorado 447 455 429 396 383 355 1967-2012 Connecticut 686 699 729 741 815 764 1967-2012 Delaware 686 698 910 948 810 772 1967-2012 District of Columbia 1,946 1,837 1,818 1,877 1,681 1,572 1967-2012 Florida 891 876 846 888 869 861 1967-2012 Georgia 380 406 421 482 458 429 1967-2012 Hawaii 721 696 691 697 691 727 1980-2012 Idaho 423 438 412 390 433 404 1967-2012 Illinois 686 745 757 680 735 633 1967-2012 Indiana 485 540 506 485 471 423 1967-2012

227

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Million Btu (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 107,897 22.2 1.51 16.54 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 13,083 5.1 1.89 19.08 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 10,443 11.0 1.48 18.56 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 15,689 19.4 1.24 17.46 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 11,898 45.6 1.27 16.04

228

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C2A. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 C2A. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 107,897 82,783 16,010 1,826 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 13,083 10,547 2,227 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 10,443 8,199 1,830 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15,689 12,172 2,897 238 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 11,898 9,179 2,054 134 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 15,171 11,694 2,140 229 Q

229

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures (million dollars) Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures (dollars) per Million Btu per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .............................. 24,395 23,398 38,398 21,706 17.47 13.01 16.95 20.42 1.74 1.29 1.44 1.69 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 2,398 3,255 4,899 2,530 19.47 15.75 19.77 23.46 2.26 1.71 1.87 1.89 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 1,978 1,887 3,761 2,816 18.42 14.71 18.44 22.90 1.69 1.13 1.32 2.10 10,001 to 25,000 ......................... 3,015 3,667 5,526 3,482 18.15 14.22 18.72 19.37 1.42 1.11 1.14 1.47

230

Average Natural Gas Consumption per Commercial Consumer  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

568 579 586 585 593 541 1967-2012 568 579 586 585 593 541 1967-2012 Alabama 355 386 359 397 371 321 1967-2012 Alaska 1,399 1,334 1,258 1,225 1,489 1,515 1967-2012 Arizona 572 565 563 564 577 558 1967-2012 Arkansas 463 534 527 592 590 603 1967-2012 California 562 561 561 564 558 572 1967-2012 Colorado 447 455 429 396 383 355 1967-2012 Connecticut 686 699 729 741 815 764 1967-2012 Delaware 686 698 910 948 810 772 1967-2012 District of Columbia 1,946 1,837 1,818 1,877 1,681 1,572 1967-2012 Florida 891 876 846 888 869 861 1967-2012 Georgia 380 406 421 482 458 429 1967-2012 Hawaii 721 696 691 697 691 727 1980-2012 Idaho 423 438 412 390 433 404 1967-2012 Illinois 686 745 757 680 735 633 1967-2012 Indiana 485 540 506 485 471 423 1967-2012

231

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ... 456 1,241 340 5,680 13,999 3,719 80.2 88.7 91.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to...

232

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings ... 4,859 71,658 107,897 82,783 16,010...

233

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table A1. Summary Table for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Square Feet per Building (thousand) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 5.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 2.4 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 7.2 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 15.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 35.0 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 70.2 67.0 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 74 10,217 138.6 130.0 200,001 to 500,000 ........................ 26 7,494 287.6 260.0

234

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A4. Census Region and Division, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 A4. Census Region and Division, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings Northeast Midwest South West New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 71,658 3,452 10,543 12,424 5,680 13,999 3,719 9,022 4,207 8,613 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,922 383 676 986 922 1,283 547 788 466 871 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 7,033 369 800 939 738 1,468 420 957 465 878 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 12,659 674 1,448 2,113 1,204 2,443 861 1,555 933 1,429

235

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A6. Building Size, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 A6. Building Size, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings Building Size 1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet 5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet 25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet 50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet 100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet 200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet Over 500,000 Square Feet All Buildings ................................ 71,658 6,922 7,033 12,659 9,382 10,291 10,217 7,494 7,660 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... 9,874 409 399 931 1,756 2,690 2,167 1,420 Q Food Sales ..................................... 1,255 409 356 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ................................. 1,654 544 442 345 Q Q N Q N

236

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A7. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 A7. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings Number of Establishments in Building One Two to Five Six to Ten Eleven to Twenty More than Twenty Currently Unoccupied All Buildings ................................ 4,859 3,754 762 117 47 22 157 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 2,131 338 Q Q N 100 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 720 182 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 590 140 51 13 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 163 54 19 12 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 87 29 8 13 4 Q

237

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Million Btu (dollars) All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 13.9 92,577 19.9 1.43 15.91 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 2.7 12,812 5.0 1.89 19.08 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 7.4 9,398 10.6 1.43 18.22 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 15.6 13,140 17.8 1.14 16.93 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 35.9 10,392 43.1 1.20 15.44

238

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 92,577 69,032 14,525 1,776 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 12,812 10,348 2,155 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 9,398 7,296 1,689 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 13,140 10,001 2,524 232 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 10,392 7,871 1,865 127 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 9,057 11,897 8,717 1,868 203 Q

239

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6A. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 6A. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Expenditures (million dollars) Electricity Expenditures (dollars) per kWh per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 16,907 15,677 31,849 18,350 0.10 0.07 0.07 0.10 1.22 0.88 1.22 1.46 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,685 2,415 4,257 2,190 0.12 0.08 0.08 0.12 1.63 1.39 1.77 1.69 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 1,364 1,347 3,064 2,424 0.12 0.08 0.08 0.12 1.21 0.86 1.16 1.84 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 2,126 2,539 4,651 2,856 0.10 0.08 0.08 0.10 1.02 0.77 0.98 1.22

240

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures (million dollars) Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures (dollars) per Million Btu per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* ............................ 21,344 21,521 31,595 18,118 16.79 12.74 16.22 19.88 1.65 1.26 1.35 1.60 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 2,298 3,235 4,752 2,526 19.47 15.74 19.77 23.48 2.24 1.71 1.88 1.89 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 1,806 1,694 3,368 2,529 17.72 14.50 18.24 22.49 1.61 1.08 1.27 2.04 10,001 to 25,000 ......................... 2,606 3,157 4,530 2,846 17.56 13.85 18.09 19.03 1.32 1.02 1.03 1.36

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6A. Natural Gas Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 6A. Natural Gas Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Expenditures (million dollars) Natural Gas Expenditures (dollars) per Thousand Cubic Feet per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 3,883 5,215 4,356 2,557 8.66 7.16 8.53 7.31 0.38 0.37 0.29 0.29 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 489 788 632 318 9.87 8.58 9.30 7.95 0.89 0.73 0.69 0.51 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 358 485 632 356 9.16 7.67 9.14 7.69 0.54 0.46 0.44 0.44 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 576 1,060 760 500 9.85 7.97 9.40 7.10 0.45 0.40 0.33 0.32

242

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Education ... 386 9,874 820 1,121 371 268 47 134 Food Sales ... 226 1,255 251 629 208 39 Q N Food Service...

243

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Re-Configuration ... 109 287 515 1,181 3,222 4,115 92.2 89.1 125.2 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 114 431 611 1,175 4,662 4,931 97.4 92.5 123.9 Lighting...

244

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4,296 3,448 2,812 2,575 16.20 11.71 14.00 17.09 1.73 1.33 1.45 1.71 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 5,929 4,223 3,914 2,832 17.53 11.44 14.10 16.51 1.96 1.27...

245

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wall Re-Configuration ... 378 534 N 4,191 4,327 N 90.1 123.3 N HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 510 646 N 5,436 5,332 N 93.9 121.2 N Lighting Upgrade...

246

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A6. Building Size, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings Building Size 1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet 5,001 to...

247

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

used in this table. Both can be accessed from the CBECS web site http:www.eia.govconsumptioncommercial. QData withheld because the Relative Standard Error (RSE) was greater...

248

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A4. Census Region and Division, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings Northeast Midwest South West New England...

249

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

table. Both can be accessed from the CBECS web site - http:www.eia.govconsumptioncommercial. QData withheld because the Relative Standard Error (RSE) was greater than 50...

250

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A3. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings Northeast Midwest South West New England...

251

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A7. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings Number of Establishments in...

252

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A5. Building Size, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings Building Size 1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet 5,001 to...

253

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A8. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings Number of Establishments in...

254

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to the Tables" or "Glossary" for further explanations of the terms used in this table. Both can be accessed from the CBECS web site http:www.eia.govconsumptioncommercial. Q...

255

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 261 899 1,121 2,311 8,736 9,424 112.8 102.9 119.0 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... Q 350 356 429 2,573 2,835 Q 135.9 125.7...

256

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 512 333 488 5,836 3,065 6,282 87.7 108.8 77.8 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 197 117 178 1,834 857 2,170 107.6 136.6...

257

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2,581 51,163 5,170 8,161 2,703 1,659 196 612 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 252 15,630 1,782 2,881 954 477 31 320...

258

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 336 959 261 3,704 9,547 2,258 90.7 100.4 115.5 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 103 331 80 965 3,426 542 107.2 96.6 148.5...

259

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 2,581 51,163 81,328 60,420 12,356 1,565 6,987 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 252 15,630 27,646 20,451 3,318 241 3,636...

260

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maintenance ... 2,581 51,163 19.8 5,170 2,003 101.1 81.3 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 252 15,630 62.0 1,782 7,068 114.0 82.4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Commercial Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

478,097 427,588 392,853 246,851 167,899 135,974 1973-2013 Alabama 3,309 3,157 3,091 1,467 1,294 1,243 1989-2013 Alaska 2,303 NA 2,055 1,505 1,068 495 1989-2013 Arizona 4,632 3,909...

262

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

14.67 Cosmetic Improvements ... 741 13,119 17.7 19,621 26.5 1.50 14.90 Wall or Roof Replacement ... 370 8,070 21.8 11,653 31.5 1.44 14.99 Interior Wall...

263

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

307 418 304 196 93 2,780 3,719 3,124 2,449 1,047 110.5 112.3 97.2 80.0 88.7 Wall or Roof Replacement ...... 182 233 211 97 54 1,723 2,178 2,280 1,316 573 105.7 107.1 92.5...

264

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 419 426 285 188 3,952 3,879 3,105 2,183 106.1 109.8 91.7 85.9 Wall or Roof Replacement ... 260 230 171 115 2,676 2,238 1,863 1,294 97.2 103.0 92.0 89.2...

265

Gas consumption shrinks in commercial laundry plant  

SciTech Connect

The submerged-exhaust water-heating system with heat-recovery economizer operates above 90% efficiency compared to the 60% efficiency of the plant's old system. The system will require 3,936 therms/week compared to 5,887 with the old generator. Bubbles from the submerged downcomer tube rise through the surrounding bath, transferring heat through the gas-liquid interface as they rise to the surface. Heat transfer to the liquid bath is immediate and efficiency is high.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Commercial Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

267

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Site Total (million dollars) Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings* ... 4,404 63,307 14.4 9,168 3,037 890...

268

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Total Electricity Expenditures (million dollars) Electricity Expenditures (dollars) per kWh per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West...

269

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Site Total (million dollars) Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings ... 4,617 70,181 15.2 10,746 3,559 1,043...

270

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy

271

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

272

Commercial Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design...

273

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

275

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

276

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full Report Full Report Energy Information Administration > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Overview of Commercial Buildings Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: â—Ź total nearly 4.9 million buildings â—Ź comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace â—Ź consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) â—Ź

277

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Overview of Commercial Buildings Print Report: PDF Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction | Trends | Major Characteristics Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1)

278

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. 1 The manufacturing sector is composed of establishments classified in Standard Industrial Classification 20 through 39 of the U.S. economy as defined 2 by the Office of Management and Budget. The manufacturing sector is a part of the industrial sector, which also includes mining; construction; and agriculture, forestry, and fishing. The EIA also conducts energy consumption surveys in the residential, commercial buildings, and residential transportation sectors: the Residential Energy 3 Consumption Survey (RECS); the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS); and, until recently, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

279

List of Portfolio Manager property types, definitions, and use...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

types, definitions, and use details Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new...

280

BEDES Terms and Definitions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Terms and Definitions Terms and Definitions BEDES Terms and Definitions On this page you'll find terms and definitions associated with the Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES). Data Specification, or spec A data spec establishes clear field names, definitions, formats (e.g. number, text) and enumerations (categorical lists) It serves as a guide to ensure that data is consistent among a range of sources and uses. For example, Green Button is a data specification that is used for utility customers' energy consumption information. Data Schema A data schema (or model) describes the structural relationships, hierarchies, and dependencies between data fields. For example, a schema might dictate that energy consumption data should be associated with a meter and a space in a building. A data specification could be used as the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

282

The Commercial Energy Consumer: About Whom Are We Speaking?  

SciTech Connect

Who are commercial sector customers, and how do they make decisions about energy consumption and energy efficiency investment? The energy policy field has not done a thorough job of describing energy consumption in the commercial sector. First, the discussion of the commercial sector itself is dominated by discussion of large businesses/buildings. Second, discussion of this portion of the commercial sectors consumption behavior is driven primarily by theory, with very little field data collected on the way commercial sector decision-makers describe their own options, choices, and reasons for taking action. These limitations artificially constrain energy policy options. This paper reviews the extant literature on commercial sector energy consumption behavior and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, it argues that the primary energy policy model of commercial sector energy consumption is a top-down model that uses macro-level investment data to make conclusions about commercial behavior. Missing from the discussion is a model of consumption behavior that builds up to a theoretical framework informed by the micro-level data provided by commercial decision-makers themselves. Such a bottom-up model could enhance the effectiveness of commercial sector energy policy. In particular, translation of some behavioral models from the residential sector to the commercial sector may offer new opportunities for policies to change commercial energy consumption behavior. Utility bill consumption feedback is considered as one example of a policy option that may be applicable to both the residential and small commercial sector.

Payne, Christopher

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

283

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

284

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

285

Notices Definitions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

742 Federal Register 742 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 228 / Tuesday, November 27, 2012 / Notices Definitions ................................................................................................. https://eiaweb.inl.gov/clearance2012/eiaweb-frm886Defs.png Sanctions, Burden & Confidentiality ......................................................... https://eiaweb.inl.gov/clearance2012/eiaweb-frm886Info.png SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This information collection request contains: (1) OMB No. 1905-0191; (2) Information Collection Request Title: Annual Survey of Alternative Fueled Vehicles; (3) Type of Request: Revision of currently approved collection; (4a) Purpose: Form EIA-886 is an annual survey that collects information on the number and type of AFVs and other advanced technology vehicles that

286

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ...

287

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... Manufacturing energy consumption data show large reductions in both manufacturing energy use and the energy intensity ...

288

Floorspace, Energy Consumption, and Energy-Related Carbon ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tabulation of changes in the amount of floorspace, energy consumption, and energy-related carbon emissions of U.S. commercial buildings, 1979-1995.

289

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ...

290

Table F24: Wood and Biomass Waste Consumption Estimates, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F24: Wood and Biomass Waste Consumption Estimates, 2011 State Wood Wood and Biomass Waste a Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power ...

291

Table F17: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F17: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports of Coal Coke, 2011 State Coal Coal Coke Residential a Commercial Industrial Electric ...

292

Urine definition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

definition definition Name: durwood Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: What material is urine composed of? Replies: Urine is normally composed of water and wasted products filtered form the body. The kidney produces urine. The other main function of the kidney is to regulate fluid balance in the body. It performs this function by using a selective osmosis system. Basically, the way it works is that electrolytes (dissolved salts like sodium, potassium, calcium, carbonate, chloride) are pumped back into or out of urine and blood so that in the end, just the right amounts of electrolyte and water exit the kidney blood vein. The rest ends up in urine. Interestingly, normal urine is sterile and has no bacteria. psych Urine contains 95% water and 5% solids. More than 1000 different mineral salts and compounds are estimated to be in urine. So far, our scientific community knows of about 200 elements. Some substances are: vitamins, amino acids, antibodies, enzymes, hormones, antigens, interleukins, proteins, immunoglobulins, gastric secretory depressants, tolergens, immunogens, uric acid, urea, proteoses, directin, H-11 (a growth inhibitory factor in human cancer), and urokinase. Believe it or not, scientists have know for years that urine is antibacterial, anti-protozoal, anti-fungal, anti- viral, and anti-tuberculostatic!

293

ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION 5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Prepared for: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS AND END USE ENERGY END USE DIVISION RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BRANCH WASHINGTON, DC 20585 Prepared by: THE ORKAND CORPORATION 8484 GEORGIA AVENUE SILVER SPRING, MD 20910 October 1986 Contract Number DE-AC01-84EI19658 TABLE OF CONTENTS FRONT MATTER Index to Program Descriptions........................................... vi List of Exhibits ....................................................... viii Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................. ix SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................ 1-1 1.1. Summary ....................................................... 1-1

294

EIA - Natural Gas Consumption Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Consumption by End Use U.S. and State consumption by lease and plant, pipeline, and delivered to consumers by sector (monthly, annual). Number of Consumers Number of sales and transported consumers for residential, commercial, and industrial sectors by State (monthly, annual). State Shares of U.S. Deliveries By sector and total consumption (annual). Delivered for the Account of Others Commercial, industrial and electric utility deliveries; percentage of total deliveries by State (annual). Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed Btu per cubic foot of natural gas delivered to consumers by State (annual) and other components of consumption for U.S. (annual). Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot.

295

Lattice Definitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Orbit Stability Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Main Orbit Stability Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Main Parameters Lattice Definitions APS storage ring lattice consists of 40 almost identical sectors. Each sector contains two dipoles, ten quadrupoles, seven sextupoles and also has a 5-m-long straight section for placement of Insertion Devices (IDs) or other equipment. Four of these straight sections are occupied with rf cavities, one straight section is used for injection, all others are available for IDs. Also, each sector contains eight steering magnets with both horizontal and vertical correction coils and 11 beam position monitors (BPMs). Due to some space limitations, there are several sectors that have less steering magnets or BPMs. Simple lattice description - one typical sector (elegant input file)

296

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0555(94)/2 Distribution Category UC-950 Energy Consumption Series Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings September 1994 Energy Information ...

297

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Commercial...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and...

298

How much energy is consumed in residential and commercial ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much energy is consumed in residential and commercial buildings in the United States? Nearly 40% of total U.S. energy consumption in 2012 was consumed in ...

299

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Commercial...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. For the three major commercial sector...

300

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 Distribution Category UC-950 Energy Consumption Series Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings September 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy Efficiency and Commercial-Mortgage Valuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that benchmarks for the energy consumption of o?ce buildingswe benchmark the existing energy e?ciency of buildings byto benchmark commercial o?ce buildings in california, Energy

Jaffee, Dwight; Stanton, Richard; Wallace, Nancy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Department of Energy and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch Alliance to Reduce Energy Consumption of Buildings Department of Energy and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch Alliance to Reduce Energy Consumption of Buildings April 9, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Top executives from 19 commercial real estate companies met with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) officials in New York City today to discuss plans to dramatically reduce the sector's energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. The meeting officially launched DOE's Commercial Real Estate Energy Alliance (CREEA), a partnership of commercial real estate owners and operators who have volunteered to work together with DOE to make lasting change in the energy consumption of commercial real estate buildings in the United States. Currently, commercial buildings

303

101. Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Consumption 1. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

304

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

305

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Survey Methodology Sampling Error, Standard Errors, and Relative Standard Errors The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of buildings that would not be considered “commercial” in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction.

306

Commercial Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design solutions, and develop guidelines and tools for building designers so that systems are specified and used in an optimal manner. A special emphasis is placed on the daylighting performance of glazings in commercial buildings since lighting is the single largest energy end use and daylighting can improve both visual performance and the quality of the indoor space as well as saving energy. Technical Approach: This project has two major complementary elements. The first is the exploration and assessment of glazing performance in commercial buildings leading to development of design strategies that reduce unnecessary energy use. The final step is creating design guides and tools that make this design knowledge accessible to practitioners, typically carried out in partnership with others. Although the emphasis is energy impacts, e.g. annual energy use, the performance issues addressed in the guides and tools include all that impact the final glazing selection process, e.g. appearance, glare. The second element is an exploration of daylighting strategies for commercial buildings since lighting energy use is the major energy end use in most buildings. This work develops and evaluates new daylighting devices and designs, assesses performance in commercial buildings, and demonstrates system performance using test cells, test rooms and case study buildings. All energy-related aspects of the design solutions, as well as other critical performance issues, are addressed in this work. Results of this work are integrated into the guides and tools described above. Much of this work has been co-supported by utilities and has been carried on in conjunction with participants in an International Energy Agency Daylighting Task.

307

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997 CONSUMPTION AND ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

308

Definition: Offshore Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Offshore Wind Offshore Wind (Redirected from Offshore Wind) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Offshore Wind Wind turbine installations built near-shore or further offshore on coastlines for commercial electricity generation.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition View on Reegle Reegle Definition No reegle definition available Related Terms wind turbine, wind farm, near-shore, offshore References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Offshore_wind_power Retrie LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Offshore_Wind&oldid=586583" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

309

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- About the Commercial Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey About the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national sample survey that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, their energy-related building characteristics, and their energy consumption and expenditures. Commercial buildings include all buildings in which at least half of the floorspace is used for a purpose that is not residential, industrial, or agricultural, so they include building types that might not traditionally be considered "commercial," such as schools, correctional institutions, and buildings used for religious worship. The CBECS was first conducted in 1979; the tenth, and most recent survey, will be fielded starting in April 2013 to provide data for calendar year

310

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

311

Factors of material consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

Silva Díaz, Pamela Cristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

List of Portfolio Manager property types, definitions, and use details |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List of Portfolio Manager property types, definitions, and use List of Portfolio Manager property types, definitions, and use details Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

313

All Consumption Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2010 Consumption Summary Tables. Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2010 (Trillion Btu) ... Ranked by State, 2010

314

1992 Commercial Buildings Characteristics -- Overview/Executive Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview Overview Overview Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 Percent of Buildings and Floorspace By Census Region divider line Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

315

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

316

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

317

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

318

Commercial Building Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Activities Building Activities Commercial Building Activities The Building Technologies Office commercial buildings effort researches and deploys advanced technologies and systems to reduce energy consumption in commercial buildings. Industry partners and national laboratories help identify market needs and solutions to accelerate the development of highly energy-efficient buildings. This page outlines some of BTO's key projects. 179d Tax Calculator The 179d Calculator can help determine whether improvements qualify for a Federal tax deduction, and allows owners and managers to estimate energy cost savings of efficiency improvements. Advanced Energy Design Guides These recommendations can help designers achieve between 30% and 50% energy savings in a new commercial building.

319

Basic definitions of uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Glossary. The following definitions are given in the ISO Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. Many additional ...

320

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices by Sales Type Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices by Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial/Institutional An energy-consuming sector that consists of service-providing facilities and equipment of: businesses; Federal, State, and local governments; and other private and public organizations, such as religious, social, or fraternal groups. The commercial sector includes institutional living quarters. It also includes sewage treatment facilities. Common uses of energy associated with this sector include space heating, water heating, air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, cooking, and running a wide variety of other equipment. Note: This sector includes generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the activities of the above-mentioned commercial establishments.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

No. 2 Distillate Prices by Sales Type, Selected States No. 2 Distillate Prices by Sales Type, Selected States Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial/Institutional An energy-consuming sector that consists of service-providing facilities and equipment of: businesses; Federal, State, and local governments; and other private and public organizations, such as religious, social, or fraternal groups. The commercial sector includes institutional living quarters. It also includes sewage treatment facilities. Common uses of energy associated with this sector include space heating, water heating, air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, cooking, and running a wide variety of other equipment. Note: This sector includes generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the activities of the above-mentioned commercial establishments.

322

Definition: PV module | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: PV module Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png PV module A unit comprised of several PV cells, and the principal unit of a PV array; it is intended to generate direct current power under un-concentrated sunlight.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A solar panel is a set of solar photovoltaic modules electrically connected and mounted on a supporting structure. A photovoltaic module is a packaged, connected assembly of photovoltaic cells. The solar module can be used as a component of a larger photovoltaic system to generate and supply electricity in commercial and residential applications. Each module is rated by its DC output power under standard test conditions (STC), and

323

Definition: Natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Natural gas A hydrocarbon gas obtained from underground sources, often in association with petroleum and coal deposits.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Natural gas is a naturally occurring hydrocarbon gas mixture consisting primarily of methane, but commonly includes varying amounts of other higher alkanes and even a lesser percentage of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and hydrogen sulfide. Natural gas is an energy source often used for heating, cooking, and electricity generation. It is also used as fuel for vehicles and as a chemical feedstock in the manufacture of plastics and other commercially important organic chemicals. Natural gas is found in

324

Consumption Technical Notes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

as street lighting and public services; and the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey covers only manufacturing establishments,

325

EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities: 1992- 2003 Released Date: December 2004 Page Last Revised: August 2009 These tables provide estimates of commercial sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1992, 1995, 1999 and 2003 based on the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). They also provide estimates of energy consumption and intensities adjusted for the effect of weather on heating, cooling, and ventilation energy use. Total Site Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) Html Excel PDF bullet By Principal Building Activity (Table 1a) html Table 1a excel table 1a. pdf table 1a. Weather-Adjusted by Principal Building Activity (Table 1b) html table 1b excel table 1b pdf table 1b.

326

Microsoft Word - BSA_Commercial_Items_Rev13_Apr_2013.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3; (Apr-13) 1 of 12 BROOKHAVEN SCIENCE ASSOCIATES, LLC GENERAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COMMERCIAL ITEMS AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Table of Contents Article 1 DEFINITIONS...

327

Fuel Consumption - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), 1994 Fuel Consumption

328

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and ...

329

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of ...

330

Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion ...

331

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 ...

332

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T19:02:48Z 2011-08-04T15:59:26Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

333

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T18:48:13Z 2011-08-31T17:26:50Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

334

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East North...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.

2011-08-01T18:53:34Z 2011-08-23T22:30:24Z...

335

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T19:00:44Z 2011-08-04T16:01:41Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

336

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T19:10:42Z 2011-08-04T15:37:20Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

337

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T18:55:30Z 2011-08-23T22:29:34Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

338

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T19:04:37Z 2011-08-04T15:57:20Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

339

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T18:57:56Z 2011-08-04T18:09:40Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

340

A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995 “A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures” The report can be downloaded in its entirety, or in sections (all in PDF format): Full report (includes all detailed tables; 402 pages, 5.7 MB) Contents: At A Glance (4 pages, 315 KB) Chapters 1 through 5 (61 pages, 363 KB) 1. Overview 2. Major Characteristics of Commercial Buildings 3. End Uses, Energy Sources, and Energy Consumption 4. End-Use Equipment and Energy Conservation 5. Detailed Tables (introductory text) How to Read the Tables Categories of Data in the Tables

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings characteristics tables-number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy consumption and expenditures tables-energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy end-use tables-total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Guide to the 1992 CBECS Detailed Tables Released: Nov 1999 Column Categories Row Categories The first set of detailed tables for the 1992 CBECS, Tables A1 through A70,

342

Technology Commercialization & Partnerships | BNL  

Brookhaven National Laboratory's Office of Technology Commercialization and Partnerships manages and advances the commercialization of cutting-edge discoveries ...

343

Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

Patinkin, L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies, U.S. DepartmentProspective Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for2. US Residential and Commercial Primary Energy Consumption

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1c. U.S. Commercial Buildings Primary ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Commercial Buildings Primary Energy Consumption by Principal Building Activity and Census Region. ... 3 Laboratory buildings are included in the "Other" category.

346

Definition of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of...

347

Base unit definitions: Second  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... two energy levels of an atom or a molecule, could be realized and reproduced much more precisely. Considering that a very precise definition of ...

348

UK Energy Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists of five spreadsheets: "overall data tables" plus energy consumption data for each of the following...

349

Natural gas consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

gas consumption gas consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 136, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural gas consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 138.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

350

State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Summary of Prinicpal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Age (years) Average Hours Open per Week Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) All Commercial Buildings 30.5 62 5,321 69,618 Building...

352

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6% 25% South 5% 18% 14% 37% West 3% 9% 5% 18% 100% Source(s): EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, Oct. 2006, Table A2, p. 3-4...

353

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

that are larger than 100,000 square feet. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, Oct. 2006, Table A1, p. 1-2. 2,586 948 810...

354

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

to 2003 9% Total 100% Source(s): Percent of Total Floorspace EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, Oct. 2006, Table A1, p. 1-...

355

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) works with the commercial building industry to accelerate the uptake of energy efficiency technologies and techniques in both existing and new commercial buildings. By developing, demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the commercial building sector by at least 1,600 TBtu. Key Tools and Resources Use the guides, case studies, and other tools developed by the DOE

356

Connected Consumption: The hidden networks of consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the Connected Consumption Network (CCN) that allows a community of consumers to collaboratively sense the market from a mobile device, enabling more informed financial decisions in geo-local ...

Reed, David P.

357

A Look at Principal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Building Activities Office Education Health Care Retail and Service Food Service Food Sales Lodging Religious Worship Public Assembly Public Order and Safety Warehouse and Storage Vacant Other Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) More information on the: Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey A Look at ... Principal Building Activities in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) When you look at a city skyline, most of the buildings you see are commercial buildings. In the CBECS, commercial buildings include office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and many other types of buildings. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial.

358

About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program The Building Technologies Office (BTO) works to identify and develop strategies and technologies to dramatically reduce commercial building energy consumption. BTO's commercial building efforts focus on highly innovative, cost-effective, energy saving measures-ones that promise large energy savings at cost-effective levels, but are underutilized by the market. These efforts are carried out in collaboration with researchers at national laboratories and partners within industry with the goal of dramatically reducing new and existing commercial building energy consumption. Aggressive Energy Savings Goals BTO is targeting a 20% energy use reduction in commercial buildings by

359

Toolkit Definitions | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Toolkit Definitions The following are definitions for common terms used within the adoption, compliance, and enforcement toolkits. Building code refers to a law or regulation used by state or local governments that establishes specifications for the design and construction of residential or commercial buildings. Building codes help ensure that new and existing residential and commercial structures meet minimum health, safety, and performance standards. In addition, building codes offer a baseline to which structures can be compared. Code adoption refers to the vehicle that establishes code requirements and their administration. Adoption can be mandatory, voluntary, or a combination of the two. The means of adoption vary with respect to the

360

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use Residual Fuel Oil by End Use Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Sales for all other energy-consuming sectors not included elsewhere. Commercial An energy-consuming sector that consists of service-providing facilities and equipment of nonmanufacturing businesses; Federal, State, and local governments; and other private and public organizations, such as religious, social, or fraternal groups. The commercial sector includes institutional living quarters. Common uses of energy associated with this sector include space heating, water heating, air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, cooking and running a wide variety of other equipment. Electric Utility An energy-consuming sector that consists of electricity only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public -- i.e., NAICS 22 plants. Volumes directly imported and used by the electric power companies are included.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Energy Consumption per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2011 3. Energy Consumption per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Total Consumption State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu 1 North Dakota 99.8 District of Columbia 193.1 Louisiana 585.8 Alaska 277.3 Wyoming 974.7 2 West Virginia 90.9 Wyoming 119.2 Wyoming 568.2 Wyoming 200.7 Louisiana 886.5 3 Missouri 89.4 North Dakota 106.9 Alaska 435.7 North Dakota 172.8 Alaska 881.3 4 Tennessee 87.8 Alaska 94.1 North Dakota 388.9 Louisiana 158.0 North Dakota 768.4 5 Kentucky 87.4 Montana 78.4 Iowa 243.4 Oklahoma 122.3 Iowa 493.6

362

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power d Biomass e Other f Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/Losses g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Alabama 2,159.7 853.9 404.0 638.5 329.9 106.5 185.0 0.1 -358.2 393.7 270.2 1,001.1 494.7 Alaska 779.1 14.1 411.8 334.8 0.0 15.0 3.3 0.1 0.0 56.4 63.4 393.4 266.0 Arizona 1,436.6 425.4 354.9 562.8 293.1 69.9 8.7 3.6 -281.7 368.5 326.0 231.2 511.0 Arkansas 1,135.9 270.2 228.9 388.3 161.1 36.5 76.0 0.6 -25.7 218.3 154.7 473.9 288.9 California 8,364.6 68.9 2,474.2 3,787.8 315.6 342.2

363

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) June 2011 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2009 2009 Consumption Summary Tables Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,906.8 631.0 473.9 583.9 1,688.8 415.4 272.9 -470.3 0.0 383.2 266.0 788.5 469.2 Alaska 630.4 14.5 344.0 255.7 614.1 0.0 16.3 0.0 (s) 53.4 61.0 325.4 190.6 Arizona 1,454.3 413.3 376.7 520.8 1,310.8 320.7 103.5 -279.9 -0.8 400.8 352.1 207.8 493.6 Arkansas 1,054.8 264.1 248.1 343.1 855.3 158.7 126.5 -85.7 0.0 226.3 167.0 372.5

364

Towards an understanding of campus-scale power consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial buildings are significant consumers of electricity. In this paper, we collect and analyze six weeks of data from 39 power meters in three buildings of a campus of a large company. We use an unsupervised anomaly detection technique based on ... Keywords: anomaly detection, commercial buildings, occupancy modeling, power consumption

Gowtham Bellala; Manish Marwah; Martin Arlitt; Geoff Lyon; Cullen E. Bash

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Oklahoma Natural Gas Average Consumption per Commercial Consumer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

652 632 565 641 742 750 913 1980's 620 517 552 513 508 464 415 369 552 447 1990's 434 456 404 462 417 449 514 499 488 489 2000's 535 513 503 470 467 500 451 435 433 439 2010's...

366

Table 2.1c Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R=Revised. P=Preliminary. NA=Not available. - =No data reported. (s)=Less than 0.5 trillion Btu. 6 Conventional hydroelectricity net generation (converted to Btu ...

367

U.S. Commercial Buildings Primary Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Midwest 2,630 2,623 2,846 3,413 Education 323 264 295 360 Food Sales 90 Q Q 181 Food Service 163 155 210192 Health Care 215 234 226291 Lodging ...

368

Public Use Files Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

D5H Fan-coil units used (heating) FNCLHT4 37- 37 $YESNO. D5I Steam/hot water baseboards used BBDRAD4 39- 39 $YESNO. D5J Other heating equipment used ...

369

Table 2.3 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

e Conventional hydroelectric power. f Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by electric utilities and, beginning in 1996, other energy service ...

370

CSV File Documentation: Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain consumption estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are four files that contain estimates for all states and years. Consumption in Physical Units contains the consumption estimates in physical units for all states; Consumption in Btu contains the consumption estimates in billion British thermal units (Btu) for all states. There are two data files for thermal conversion factors: the CSV file contains all of the conversion factors used to convert data between physical units and Btu for all states and the United States, and the Excel file shows the state-level conversion factors for coal and natural gas in six Excel spreadsheets. Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named

371

Average Commercial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History District of Columbia 13.69 13.90 12.99...

372

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the most basic, "How many buildings are lit?" to more detailed questions such as, "How many office buildings have compact

373

Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Price - Local Distribution Companies Residential Price - Marketers Residential % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Average Commercial Price Commercial Price - Local Distribution Companies Commerical Price - Marketers Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Period: Residential Price - Local Distribution Companies Residential Price - Marketers Residential % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Average Commercial Price Commercial Price - Local Distribution Companies Commerical Price - Marketers Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2010 2011 2012 View History District of Columbia 19.95 16.4 2006-2010 Florida 43.91 40.2 2006-2010 Georgia 20.63 18.3 17.8 17.4 2006-2012 Maryland 30.42 28.9 2006-2010 Michigan 63.99 55.8 2006-2010 New York 49.39 37.2 36.7 33.6 2006-2012 Ohio 35.13 20.6 17.9 13.2 2006-2012

374

Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Price - Local Distribution Companies Residential Price - Marketers Residential % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Average Commercial Price Commercial Price - Local Distribution Companies Commerical Price - Marketers Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Period: Residential Price - Local Distribution Companies Residential Price - Marketers Residential % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Average Commercial Price Commercial Price - Local Distribution Companies Commerical Price - Marketers Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2010 2011 2012 View History District of Columbia 19.95 16.4 2006-2010 Florida 43.91 40.2 2006-2010 Georgia 20.63 18.3 17.8 17.4 2006-2012 Maryland 30.42 28.9 2006-2010 Michigan 63.99 55.8 2006-2010 New York 49.39 37.2 36.7 33.6 2006-2012 Ohio 35.13 20.6 17.9 13.2 2006-2012

375

Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy consumption in commerical buildings: a comparison with BEPS budgets  

SciTech Connect

Metered energy consumption data have been collected on existing commercial buildings to help establish the proposed Building Energy Performance Standards (BEPS). The search has identified 84 buildings whose metered energy consumption is equal to or less than that proposed for their BEPS budgets and another 7 buildings whose metered consumption is less than 20% above their BEPS budgets. The methodology used to identify the buildings and to collect their metered energy consumption data are described. The data are analyzed and summarized and conclusions are drawn.

1980-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

377

EERE: Commercialization & Deployment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

marketplace. Commercialization Commercialization initiatives help bridge the gap between technology R&D and venture capital funding and marketing. Energy Innovation Portal...

378

consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

379

Revisions in Natural Gas Monthly Consumption and Price Data, 2004 - 2007  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report summarizes the method in which natural gas consumption data are collected and processed for publication and details the most notable revisions in natural gas consumption data for the period 2004 to 2007. It is intended to assist data users in evaluating the quality of the monthly consumption and price data for residential, commercial, and industrial consumers of natural gas.

Information Center

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Procedure for Measuring and Reporting Commercial Building Energy Performance  

SciTech Connect

This procedure is intended to provide a standard method for measuring and characterizing the energy performance of commercial buildings. The procedure determines the energy consumption, electrical energy demand, and on-site energy production in existing commercial buildings of all types. The performance metrics determined here may be compared against benchmarks to evaluate performance and verify that performance targets have been achieved.

Barley, D.; Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

I. Definition and Scope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Smart Grid RFI Page 2 November 1, 2010 - Smart Grid RFI Page 2 November 1, 2010 I. Definition and Scope I.1. We invite comment however on whether this [Title XIII] is the best way to define the smart grid. What significant policy challenges are likely to remain unaddressed if we employ Title XIII's definition? If the definition is overly broad, what policy risks emerge as a result? * While Title XIII starts framing the necessary committee's and organizations needed to start outlining the Smart Grid discussion, it is lacking in the clear definition of the objectives that the Department of Energy (DOE) should be trying to convey to the public and industry. * Policy challenges will always continue to exist with a topic with the breadth and depth of Smart Grid. However, by steering the discussion towards what the objectives of Smart

382

Definition: Hydroprobe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Hydroprobe Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Hydroprobe An exploratory drilling technique...

383

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

384

Commercialization Home Page - EERE Commercialization Office  

The Commercialization Team of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) works to bridge the gap between research and development ...

385

Commercialization Home Page - EERE Commercialization Office  

The Commercialization Team of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) works to bridge the gap between research and development (R&D), and venture ...

386

The following organizations recognize that the Commercial Buildings Energy Consu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

following organizations recognize that the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) following organizations recognize that the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) provides critically important information to support programs related to energy efficiency in commercial buildings in the United States. These organizations strongly encourage participation in the 2012 CBECS. A.I.D. Development Group American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) American Hotel & Lodging Association American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) APPA, "Leadership in Educational Facilities" Architecture 2030 ASHRAE Boston Properties Brandywine Realty Trust Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) International CannonDesign Cassidy Turley Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing

387

Purifying mixed-use electrical consumption data  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes several analytical techniques for obtaining pure end-use load information from mixed end-use consumption data. This process is frequently necessary to make metered data useful to those involved in electric utility load forecasting and conservation assessment. Analyses based on traditional thermal models can be greatly augmented by these data sets if the measured entities correspond to those for which modeled estimates are necessary. We present two scenarios in which greater end-use resolution was needed than was available in existing data. The first involves segregating measured total HVAC consumption data into its heating, cooling, and ventilation constituents. The second discusses a technique to separate measurements of mixed equipment consumption into equipment type categories. These techniques were successfully applied to a large number of metered commercial buildings. We conclude with suggestions for extending these techniques to applications involving high-time-resolution building total data. 3 refs., 8 figs.

Taylor, Z.T.; Pratt, R.G.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary 9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary Executive Summary Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line The demand for energy in U.S. stores, offices, schools, hospitals, and other commercial buildings has been increasing. This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and "other." The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand.

389

Residential/commercial market for energy technologies  

SciTech Connect

The residential/commercial market sector, particularly as it relates to energy technologies, is described. Buildings account for about 25% of the total energy consumed in the US. Market response to energy technologies is influenced by several considerations. Some considerations discussed are: industry characteristics; market sectors; energy-consumption characeristics; industry forecasts; and market influences. Market acceptance may be slow or nonexistent, the technology may have little impact on energy consumption, and redesign or modification may be necessary to overcome belatedly perceived market barriers. 7 figures, 20 tables.

Glesk, M.M.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1992 -- Overview/End-Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

> Overview > Overview 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. End-Use Estimation Methodology The end-use estimates had two main sources: (1) survey data collected by the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) building energy simulations provided by the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. The CBECS provided data on building characteristics and total energy consumption (i.e., for all end uses) for a national sample of commercial buildings. Using data collected by the CBECS, the FEDS engineering modules were used to produce estimates of energy consumption by end use. The FEDS engineering estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the CBECS total energy consumption.

391

Definition of Energy Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Users Energy Efficiency Page Energy Efficiency Definition Energy Users Energy Efficiency Page Energy Efficiency Definition Energy Efficiency: Definition Stairs) "Take the Stairs--Be More Energy Efficient" Person A interprets the sign as the "true" definition of energy efficiency. To Person A, the elevator is not being used. He is still getting to where he wants to go and using less energy in doing so. Person B considers the fact that she is not getting to where she is going with the same ease. She does not believe that she is being energy efficient, but instead she believes that she is "conserving energy" at a reduced level of service-she has to walk instead of ride. When it comes to trying to define "to be energy efficient" or "energy efficiency", there does not seem to be a single commonly-accepted definition of energy efficiency. Along the lines of Person B's thinking, it is generally thought that an increase in energy efficiency is when either energy inputs are reduced for a given level of service, or there are increased or enhanced services for a given amount of energy inputs.

392

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Speaker(s): William Fisk Date: November 13, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Faulkner Commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are designed primarily to maintain a reasonable level of thermal comfort while limiting first costs and energy consumption. However, research conducted predominately within the last decade suggests that commercial building HVAC significantly influences human outcomes other than thermal comfort, including the health, satisfaction, and work performance of the building's occupants. This presentation will review the relationships of these outcomes with HVAC system type, filtration system efficiency, indoor air temperature, and outside air ventilation rate.

393

California commercial building energy benchmarking  

SciTech Connect

Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and hence are reluctant to share their data. The California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), the primary source of data for Cal-Arch, is a unique source of information on commercial buildings in California. It has not been made public; however, it was made available by CEC to LBNL for the purpose of developing a public benchmarking tool.

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CL COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION STANDBY External power suppliesTV, refrigerator, fans, standby, air conditioner, electricConditioner Diff 3.59E-04 The standby power consumption of

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View...

396

Commercialization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercialization Commercialization Commercialization See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. Commercialization is the process by which technologies and innovations developed in the lab make their way to market. By licensing patents or using Energy Department facilities, researchers from the private sector and academia are able to take advantage of federal investments into basic science research, while researchers are able to ensure that their discoveries have a life beyond the lab. The Energy Department also helps entrepreneurs, small business owners and

397

OpenEI - consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91/0 en Operational water 91/0 en Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/969 This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions.

License

398

Energy-consumption modelling  

SciTech Connect

A highly sophisticated and accurate approach is described to compute on an hourly or daily basis the energy consumption for space heating by individual buildings, urban sectors, and whole cities. The need for models and specifically weather-sensitive models, composite models, and space-heating models are discussed. Development of the Colorado State University Model, based on heat-transfer equations and on a heuristic, adaptive, self-organizing computation learning approach, is described. Results of modeling energy consumption by the city of Minneapolis and Cheyenne are given. Some data on energy consumption in individual buildings are included.

Reiter, E.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

400

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

402

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

403

Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

404

Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

405

Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

406

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

407

Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

408

Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

409

Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

410

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

411

Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

412

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

413

Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

414

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

415

Hawaii Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

416

Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

417

Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

418

Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

419

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

420

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

422

Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

423

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

424

Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

425

Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

426

Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

427

Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

428

Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

429

Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

430

Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

431

Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

432

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

433

Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

434

Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

435

Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

436

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

437

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

438

Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

439

Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

440

Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

442

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

443

Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

444

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

445

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

446

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential and Commercial Prices by Local Distributors & Marketers Residential and Commercial Prices by Local Distributors & Marketers Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Price The price of gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services such as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; and gas used by local, State and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Local Distribution Company (LDC) A legal entity engaged primarily in the retail sale and/or delivery of natural gas through a distribution system that includes mainlines (that is, pipelines designed to carry large volumes of gas, usually located under roads or other major right-of-ways) and laterals (that is, pipelines of smaller diameter that connect the end user to the mainline). Since the restructuring of the gas industry, the sale of gas and/or delivery arrangements may be handled by other agents, such as producers, brokers, and marketers that are referred to as "non-LDC."

447

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS%20analysis/CBECS%20lighting/lighting_pdf.html[4/28/2009 9:20:44 AM] Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the

448

Fuel choice and aggregate energy demand in the commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a fuel choice and aggregate-demand model of energy use in the commercial sector of the United States. The model structure is dynamic with short-run fuel-price responses estimated to be close to those of the residential sector. Of the three fuels analyzed, electricity consumption exhibits a greater response to its own price than either natural gas or fuel oil. In addition, electricity price increases have the largest effect on end-use energy conservation in the commercial sector. An improved commercial energy-use data base is developed which removes the residential portion of electricity and natural gas use that traditional energy-consumption data sources assign to the commercial sector. In addition, household and commercial petroleum use is differentiated on a state-by-state basis.

Cohn, S.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

SF6432-CS Commercial Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/31/13 7/31/13 Page 1 of 18 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-CS (07/2013) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COMMERCIAL SERVICES THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE COVER PAGE OR SECTION I. (CTRL+CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO ADVANCE DIRECTLY TO THAT SECTION) ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS (Ts&Cs) APPLICABLE LAW ASSIGNMENT BANKRUPTCY CANCELLATION OR TERMINATION FOR CONVENIENCE CHANGES COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS DEFINITIONS DISPUTES EXCUSABLE DELAYS EXPORT CONTROL ORDER OF PRECEDENCE PAYMENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION PROGRAM

450

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Butane (C4H10) A normally gaseous straight-chain or branch-chain hydrocarbon extracted from natural gas or refinery gas streams. It includes isobutane and normal butane and is designated in ASTM Specification D1835 and Gas Processors Association Specifications for commercial butane.

451

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Butane (C4H10) A normally gaseous straight-chain or branch-chain hydrocarbon extracted from natural gas or refinery gas streams. It includes isobutane and normal butane and is designated in ASTM Specification D1835 and Gas Processors Association Specifications for commercial butane.

452

Definition: Base Load | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Load Load Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Base Load The minimum amount of electric power delivered or required over a given period at a constant rate.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Baseload (also base load, or baseload demand) is the minimum amount of power that a utility or distribution company must make available to its customers, or the amount of power required to meet minimum demands based on reasonable expectations of customer requirements. Baseload values typically vary from hour to hour in most commercial and industrial areas. Related Terms electricity generation, power, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An in Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from

453

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries Definitions Key Terms Definition Alkylate The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Aromatics Hydrocarbons characterized by unsaturated ring structures of carbon atoms. Commercial petroleum aromatics are benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX). Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton.

454

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heating Oil & Propane Prices Heating Oil & Propane Prices Definitions Key Terms Definition No. 2 Fuel Oil (Heating Oil) A distillate fuel oil for use in atomizing type burners for domestic heating or for use medium capacity commercial-industrial burner units, with distillation temperatures between 540-640 degrees Fahrenheit at the 90-percent recovery point; and the kinematic viscosities between 1.9-3.4 centistokes at 100 degrees Fahrenheit as defined in ASTM Specification D396-92. Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD): PADD 1 (East Coast): PADD 1A (New England): Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont. PADD 1B (Central Atlantic): Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania. PADD 1C (Lower Atlantic): Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia.

455

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices Prices Definitions Key Terms Definition Citygate A point or measuring station at which a distributing gas utility receives gas from a natural gas pipeline company or transmission system. Commercial Price The price of gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services such as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; and gas used by local, State and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Electric Power Price The price of gas used by electricity generators (regulated utilities and non-regulated power producers) whose line of business is the generation of power. Exports Natural Gas deliveries out of the Continental United States and Alaska to foreign countries.

456

Definition: Available Transfer Capability | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transfer Capability Transfer Capability Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Available Transfer Capability A measure of the transfer capability remaining in the physical transmission network for further commercial activity over and above already committed uses. It is defined as Total Transfer Capability less existing transmission commitments (including retail customer service), less a Capacity Benefit Margin, less a Transmission Reliability Margin.[1] Related Terms transfer capability, transmission lines, transmission line, capacity benefit margin, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Available_Transfer_Capability&oldid=502496

457

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 11.34 12.23 10.06 9.47 8.92 8.13...

458

Technology Commercialization and Partnerships |  

Staff Directory; BNL People Technology Commercialization & Partnerships. Home; For BNL Inventors; ... a nonprofit applied science and technology organization. ...

459

Contacts - EERE Commercialization Office  

Contacts. For more information about the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition, or about other commercialization initiatives, please contact ...

460

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. Complete sets of RSE tables (What is an RSE?) are also available in PDF format 1999 Summary Tables for all principal building activities Summary Tables For All Principal Building Activities Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Age of Building (years)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EIA Average Energy Consumption 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table US8. Average Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units per Household Fuels Used (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel)

462

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents information about household end use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

Information Center

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

464

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

J Related EIA Publications on Energy Consumption Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 526 Appendix J Related EIA Publications on Energy...

465

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Energy Consumption in the Manufacturing Sector, 1991 In 1991, the amount of energy consumed in the manufacturing sector was as follows: * Primary Consumption of Energy for All...

466

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

5HVLGHQWLDO (QHUJ\\ &RQVXPSWLRQ 6XUYH\\V 1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables Appliances Consumption Tables (17 pages, 60 kb) Contents Pages CE5-1c.

467

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Faucets Faucets Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the water consumption level of faucets since 1992. This standard covers kitchen faucets and kitchen replacement aerators, lavatory faucets and lavatory replacement aerators, and metering faucets. These faucets are used widely in residential and commercial settings. The current standard will save approximately 0.9 quads of energy and result in approximately $25.2 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2013. The standard will avoid about 49.1 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 9.6 million automobiles. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for Plumbing Products Test Procedure.

468

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Showerheads Showerheads Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the water consumption level of showerheads since 1992. A showerhead is a perforated nozzle that distributes water over a large solid angle at point of use, generally overhead of the bather. They are used widely in residential and commercial settings. The current standard will save approximately 6 quads of energy and result in approximately $120 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2013. The standard will avoid about 329.2 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 64.5 million automobiles. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for Plumbing Products Test Procedure.

469

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Consortium Commercial Buildings Consortium Sandy Fazeli National Association of State Energy Officials sfazeli@naseo.org; 703-299-8800 ext. 17 April 2, 2013 Supporting Consortium for the U.S. Department of Energy Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Many energy savings opportunities in commercial buildings remain untapped, underserved by the conventional "invest-design-build- operate" approach * The commercial buildings sector is siloed, with limited coordination

470

Elements of consumption: an abstract visualization of household consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To promote sustainability consumers must be informed about their consumption behaviours. Ambient displays can be used as an eco-feedback technology to convey household consumption information. Elements of Consumption (EoC) demonstrates this by visualizing ... Keywords: a-life, eco-feedback, household consumption, sustainability

Stephen Makonin; Philippe Pasquier; Lyn Bartram

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Florida Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection Local water management districts are required to establish programs and

472

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh, and total electricity generation by sector (e.g. wind, solar, nuclear, coal) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh. Source NREL Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Consumption Electricity Generation States Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 2008 State Electricity Generation and Consumption (format: xls) (xlsx, 56.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

473

Constraints on the commercialization of oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problems and prospects for the commercialization of oil shale from surface retorting are examined. Commercialization refers to the process of private sector adoption of a technology for general use after most of the technological uncertainties have been resolved. Three categories of constraints and uncertainties can be identified: technical constraints relating to the performance characteristics of the technology; economic constraints on the ability of the technology to yield an acceptable rate of return to investors; and institutional constraints that arise from the organizational and political context in which commercialization takes place. Because surface retorting involves relatively well understood technologies, this study deals almost exclusively with economic and institutional constraints. At the present time, a government commercialization effort for oil shale surface retorting would not be likely to result in a viable industry in this century. Alternative oil shale technologies such as modified in situ processes offer prospects of lower shale oil costs, but are less well developed. Data on modified in situ processes are not abundant enough as yet to permit serious estimates of commercial-scale costs. Consequently, government decisions regarding the commercialization of modified in situ technologies should await the completion of further technical tests and an independent definitive plant design.

Merrow, E.W.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Notes and Definitions  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

Notes and Definitions Notes and Definitions This report tracks U.S. natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities. The weekly stocks generally are the volumes of working gas as of the report date. Changes in reported stock levels reflect all events affecting working gas in storage, including injections, withdrawals, and reclassifications between base and working gas. Totals may not match sum of components because of independent rounding. The complete documentation of EIA's estimation methodology is available in the report, Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates. Information about the method used to prepare weekly data to compute the 5-year averages, maxima, minima, and year-ago values for the weekly report can be found in Computing the 5-year Averages, Maxima, Minima, and Year-Ago

475

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Office 17% 17% 19% Mercantile 16% 14% 18% Retail 6% 9% 5% Enclosed & Strip Malls 10% 4% 13% Education 14% 8% 11% Warehouse and Storage 14% 12% 7% Lodging 7% 3% 7% Service 6% 13% 4% Public Assembly 5% 6% 5% Religious Worship 5% 8% 2% Health Care 4% 3% 8% Inpatient 3% 0% 6% Outpatient 2% 2% 2% Food Sales 2% 5% 5% Food Service 2% 6% 6% Public Order and Safety 2% 1% 2% Other 2% 2% 4% Vacant 4% 4% 1% Total 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Total Floorspace Total Buildings Primary Energy Consumption 1) For primary energy intensities by building type, see Table 3.1.13. Total CBECS 2003 commercial building floorspace is 71.7 billion SF. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table C1A

476

Commercial Price - Local Distribution Companies  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2010 2011 View History...

477

Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI) Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI) Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI) The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Project Definition Rating Index (EM-PDRI) is a modification of a commercially developed planning tool that has been tested by an EM team specifically for EM's projects. EM-PDRI Team members represent a number of EM sites, and have already used this project planning tool successfully. The EM-PDRI examines a wide range of project factors related to cost, scope, and schedule, and develops a numerical score as a measure of how well these factors are defined. It applies to all of EM's projects including Traditional/Construction; Environmental Remediation; and Facility Disposition (including Transition, Deactivation, and Decommissioning). If you have questions about the EM-PDRI, please

478

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) consumed 36 percent of energy for space heating and 21 percent for lighting (Figure 2) The CBECS is a national-level sample survey conducted quadrennially of buildings greater than 1,000 square feet in size that devote more than 50

479

Selective Enumeration A Formal Definition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selective Enumeration A Formal Definition Craig A. Damon January, 1998 CMU­CS­98­104 School, specification checking, constraint satisfaction. #12; Abstract Selective enumeration is a method for reducing. This paper gives a formal definition of selective enumeration and using that definition, proves soundness

480

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 . Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2 California 7,858.4 55.3 2,196.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 383.6 928.5 868.6 20.1 1,516.1 1,556.1 1,785.7 3,000.5 Colorado 1,480.8 368.9 476.5 472.9 1,318.3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Amtrak fuel consumption study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a study of fuel consumption on National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) trains and is part of an effort to determine effective ways of conserving fuel on the Amtrak system. The study was performed by the Transportation Systems Center (TSC). A series of 26 test runs were conducted on Amtrak trains operating between Boston, Massachusetts, and New Haven, Connecticut, to measure fuel consumption, trip time and other fuel-use-related parameters. The test data were analyzed and compared with results of the TSC Train Performance Simulator replicating the same operations.

Hitz, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

483

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

484

Top 12 Ways to Decrease the Energy Consumption of Your Data Center | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Top 12 Ways to Decrease the Energy Consumption of Your Data Top 12 Ways to Decrease the Energy Consumption of Your Data Center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

485

Commercialization Info 080611  

sponsors of the research that led to the Invention; the inventors of the Licensed Patents; and their ... of funding for the development and commercialization:

486

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

487

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

488

Commercial New Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Vermont offers support to encourage energy efficient design for new construction. Efficiency Vermont will provide support for new commercial buildings, including technical assistance at...

489

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and...

490

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distillate by End Use Distillate by End Use Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Sales for all other energy-consuming sectors not included elsewhere. Commercial An energy-consuming sector that consists of service-providing facilities and equipment of nonmanufacturing businesses; Federal, State, and local governments; and other private and public organizations, such as religious, social, or fraternal groups. The commercial sector includes institutional living quarters. Common uses of energy associated with this sector include space heating, water heating, air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, cooking and running a wide variety of other equipment. Distillate Fuel Oil A general classification for one of the petroleum fractions produced in conventional distillation operations. It includes diesel fuels and fuel oils. Products known as No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 diesel fuel are used in on-highway diesel engines, such as those in trucks and automobiles, as well as off-highway engines, such as those in railroad locomotives and agricultural machinery. Products known as No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 fuel oils are used primarily for space heating and electric power generation.

491

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by End Use by End Use Definitions Key Terms Definition Adjusted Sales Distillate fuel oil sales estimates have been adjusted at the PADD district level to equal published EIA volume estimates of petroleum products supplied in the U.S. marketplace. The kerosene and residual fuel oil sales estimates have been adjusted at the national level. The products supplied estimates can be found in the Petroleum Supply Annual for the appropriate year. In addition, electric power generation data and on-highway diesel data are used in lieu of adjusted survey results. For details, see Technical Note 3 in the Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales report. All Other Sales for all other energy-consuming sectors not included elsewhere. Commercial An energy-consuming sector that consists of service-providing facilities and equipment of nonmanufacturing businesses; Federal, State, and local governments; and other private and public organizations, such as religious, social, or fraternal groups. The commercial sector includes institutional living quarters. Common uses of energy associated with this sector include space heating, water heating, air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, cooking and running a wide variety of other equipment.

492

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distillate by End Use Distillate by End Use Definitions Key Terms Definition Adjusted Sales Distillate fuel oil sales estimates have been adjusted at the PADD district level to equal published EIA volume estimates of petroleum products supplied in the U.S. marketplace. The kerosene and residual fuel oil sales estimates have been adjusted at the national level. The products supplied estimates can be found in the Petroleum Supply Annual for the appropriate year. In addition, electric power generation data and on-highway diesel data are used in lieu of adjusted survey results. For details, see Technical Note 3 in the Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales report. All Other Sales for all other energy-consuming sectors not included elsewhere. Commercial An energy-consuming sector that consists of service-providing facilities and equipment of nonmanufacturing businesses; Federal, State, and local governments; and other private and public organizations, such as religious, social, or fraternal groups. The commercial sector includes institutional living quarters. Common uses of energy associated with this sector include space heating, water heating, air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, cooking and running a wide variety of other equipment.

493

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kerosene by End Use Kerosene by End Use Definitions Key Terms Definition Adjusted Sales Distillate fuel oil sales estimates have been adjusted at the PADD district level to equal published EIA volume estimates of petroleum products supplied in the U.S. marketplace. The kerosene and residual fuel oil sales estimates have been adjusted at the national level. The products supplied estimates can be found in the Petroleum Supply Annual for the appropriate year. In addition, electric power generation data and on-highway diesel data are used in lieu of adjusted survey results. For details, see Technical Note 3 in the Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales report. All Other Sales for all other energy-consuming sectors not included elsewhere. Commercial An energy-consuming sector that consists of service-providing facilities and equipment of nonmanufacturing businesses; Federal, State, and local governments; and other private and public organizations, such as religious, social, or fraternal groups. The commercial sector includes institutional living quarters. Common uses of energy associated with this sector include space heating, water heating, air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, cooking and running a wide variety of other equipment.

494

Advanced Gasifier Pilot Plant Concept Definition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results from definition of a preferred commercial-scale advanced gasifier configuration and concept definition for a gasification pilot plant incorporating those preferred technologies. The preferred commercial gasifier configuration was established based on Cost Of Electricity estimates for an IGCC. Based on the gasifier configuration trade study results, a compact plug flow gasifier, with a dry solids pump, rapid-mix injector, CMC liner insert and partial quench system was selected as the preferred configuration. Preliminary systems analysis results indicate that this configuration could provide cost of product savings for electricity and hydrogen ranging from 15%-20% relative to existing gasifier technologies. This cost of product improvement draws upon the efficiency of the dry feed, rapid mix injector technology, low capital cost compact gasifier, and >99% gasifier availability due to long life injector and gasifier liner, with short replacement time. A pilot plant concept incorporating the technologies associated with the preferred configuration was defined, along with cost and schedule estimates for design, installation, and test operations. It was estimated that a 16,300 kg/day (18 TPD) pilot plant gasifier incorporating the advanced gasification technology and demonstrating 1,000 hours of hot-fire operation could be accomplished over a period of 33 months with a budget of $25.6 M.

Steve Fusselman; Alan Darby; Fred Widman

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

495

Reduced power consumption in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a potential energy savings of over $30 Billion/year. This new approach is demanded by the exponentiallyBenefits Reduced power consumption in IC devices; hence potential energy savings of 300 Billion KWh://www.sia- online.org) CuRIE Interconnect Technology for Improved Energy Efficiency in IC Chips ARPA-E Technology

496

& CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which is enough to meet the needs of 28.3 million consumers. Hydropower accounts for over 90% of all electricity the NAO. ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION IN NORWAY AND THE NAO The demand for heating oil in Norway

497

Reduction of Water Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling systems using water evaporation to dissipate waste heat, will require one pound of water per 1,000 Btu. To reduce water consumption, a combination of "DRY" and "WET" cooling elements is the only practical answer. This paper reviews the various options available: WET-DRY towers, or DRY-WET, or combination WET and DRY towers!

Adler, J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Crisis and Consumption Smoothing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dramatic impact of the current crisis on performance of businesses across sectors and economies has been headlining the business press for the past several months. Extant reconciliations of these patterns in the popular press rely on ad hoc reasoning. ... Keywords: consumer behavior, consumption smoothing, crisis, econometrics, marketing strategy

Pushan Dutt; V. Padmanabhan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF PDF Lighting in Commercial Buildings Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the most basic, "How many buildings are lit?" to more detailed questions such as, "How many office buildings have compact

500

Figure 7. U.S. dry natural gas consumption by sector, 2005-2040 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 7. U.S. dry natural gas consumption by sector, 2005-2040 (trllion cubic feet) Residential Commercial Transportation Gas to liquids