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1

Today in Energy - commercial consumption & efficiency  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and efficiency issues and trends.

2028-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

3

Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption Two case studies for commercial vehicle...

4

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

sum to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

5

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Building Type Definitions Building Type Definitions In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), buildings are classified according to principal activity, which is the primary business, commerce, or function carried on within each building. Buildings used for more than one of the activities described below are assigned to the activity occupying the most floorspace at the time of the interview. Thus, a building assigned to a particular principal activity category may be used for other activities in a portion of its space or at some time during the year. In the 1999 and 2003 CBECS, respondents were asked to place their building into a sub-category that was a more specific activity than has been collected in prior surveys. This was done to ensure the quality of the data; after data collection, the subcategories were combined

6

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

7

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

8

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

9

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

10

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

11

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace...

12

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

13

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

14

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

15

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

16

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

17

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

18

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

19

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square...

20

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

22

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

23

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey 2003 - Detailed Tables  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The tables contain information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 2003 Detailed Tables > What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the...

25

Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey Tables  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy use intensities in commercial buildings vary widely and depend on activity and climate, as shown in this data table, which was derived from the Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey.

26

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

27

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

28

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand)...

29

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace...

30

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

31

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

32

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

33

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace...

34

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total...

35

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or fewer than 20 buildings were sampled. NNo responding cases in sample. Notes: Statistics for the "Energy End Uses" category represent total consumption in buildings that...

36

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 67 5,576 83 636 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 18 289 16 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 10 369 35 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8 574 70 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 9 1,399 148 165 Q

37

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Natural Gas Natural Gas Consumption Natural Gas Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion cubic feet) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 2,538 48,473 19.1 2,100 2,037 16,010 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,134 3,175 2.8 257 249 2,227 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 531 3,969 7.5 224 218 1,830 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 500 7,824 15.6 353 343 2,897 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 185 6,604 35.8 278 270 2,054

38

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 8A. District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Thousand Pounds (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 9,470 113.98 108.4 1.31 11.45 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 17,452 118.10 Q Q Q

39

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 465 16,265 35 228 1,644 1,826 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 211 606 3 34 249 292 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 102 736 7 36 262 307 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 66 1,043 16 28 201 238 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 24 895 38 17 124 134 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 25 1,852 76 29 209 229

40

Definition: Commercial Loans | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loans Loans Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Commercial Loans Commercial loans are the traditional debt finance (senior debt) where the source of repayment for creditors is the sponsoring company, backed by its entire balance sheet and not by the project's cash flows alone. For balance sheet owned projects, creditors sill analyze a project loan based on its own merits, but will also take into consideration the financial health of the sponsor's balance sheet and will estimate the net effect of the new project on the overall financial structure of the organization. The two most common examples of commercial loans are construction and mortgage loans.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Commercial Lender Related Terms Loans, Financing References

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the total primary energy consumption in 2000. Furthermore,The Commercial Primary Energy Consumption by Sector GDP

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C13. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Primary Site Total (million dollars) Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings* ............................... 4,404 63,307 14.4 9,168 3,037 890 69,032 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,384 6,346 2.7 1,164 386 113 10,348 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 834 6,197 7.4 790 262 77 7,296 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 727 11,370 15.6 1,229 407 119 10,001

43

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 178 238 104 3,788 7,286 2,521 47.0 32.7 41.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 23 27 11 346 360 218 66.6 75.8 51.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 14 36 Q 321 662 Q 45.1 53.8 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 31 33 Q 796 1,102 604 39.5 29.9 Q

44

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 1A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings ................................ 201 412 431 13,124 31,858 25,200 15.3 12.9 17.1 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... 9 55 45 806 5,378 3,687 11.1 10.2 12.2 Food Sales ..................................... 36 24 Q 747 467 Q 48.8 51.1 Q

45

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings* ............................. 1,488 2,794 1,539 17,685 29,205 17,893 84.1 95.7 86.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 191 290 190 2,146 2,805 1,838 89.1 103.5 103.5 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 131 231 154 1,972 2,917 1,696 66.2 79.2 91.0 10,001 to 25,000 .......................... 235 351 191 3,213 4,976 3,346 73.1 70.5 57.0

46

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings .............................. 454 715 356 378 134 8,486 14,122 8,970 11,796 5,098 53.5 50.6 39.7 32.0 26.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 57 84 35 58 16 666 1,015 427 832 234 84.8 83.1 81.9 69.6 66.6 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 50 57 33 61 17 666 1,030 639 1,243 392 75.2 54.9 51.2 49.2 44.0

47

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 6,523 10,746 3,559 2,100 228 636 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 685 1,185 392 257 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 563 883 293 224 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 899 1,464 485 353 28 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 742 1,199 397 278 17 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 913 1,579 523 277 29 Q

48

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings .............................. 137 254 189 261 202 11,300 18,549 12,374 17,064 10,894 12.1 13.7 15.3 15.3 18.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 19 27 14 32 23 1,210 1,631 923 1,811 903 15.7 16.4 15.0 17.8 25.8 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 12 18 15 27 14 1,175 1,639 1,062 1,855 914 10.2 10.9 14.3 14.3 15.5

49

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 172 234 452 185 13,899 17,725 26,017 12,541 12.4 13.2 17.4 14.7 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 14 30 52 19 1,031 1,742 2,410 1,296 13.5 17.4 21.5 14.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 11 17 37 21 1,128 1,558 2,640 1,319 9.8 10.8 14.0 15.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 22 33 59 28 2,094 3,317 4,746 2,338 10.4 10.0 12.5 12.1

50

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 448 728 511 350 10,162 14,144 15,260 8,907 44.1 51.5 33.5 39.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 50 92 68 40 547 1,086 912 629 90.6 84.6 74.5 63.7 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 39 63 69 46 661 1,064 1,439 806 59.2 59.4 48.1 57.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 58 133 81 70 1,293 2,656 2,332 1,542 45.2 50.1 34.7 45.7

51

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 1A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings ................................ 467 882 688 7,144 21,928 19,401 65.4 40.2 35.5 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... Q 137 101 419 3,629 2,997 53.9 37.6 33.7 Food Sales ..................................... 16 Q Q 339 Q Q 46.6 Q Q

52

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 168 185 165 5,453 3,263 5,644 30.9 56.6 29.2 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 29 18 Q 334 266 363 87.9 68.5 60.2 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 25 Q Q 545 291 514 45.6 62.7 54.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 20 45 26 626 699 844 32.1 63.9 30.6

53

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 66 254 57 5,523 13,837 3,546 12.0 18.3 16.2 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 10 28 7 821 1,233 481 12.4 22.4 15.4 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 7 20 5 681 1,389 386 10.8 14.4 13.3 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 9 31 12 1,204 2,411 842 7.8 12.8 14.1

54

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C8. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 C8. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings* ............................... 436 1,064 309 5,485 12,258 3,393 79.5 86.8 91.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 60 116 36 922 1,207 538 64.9 96.5 67.8 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 44 103 Q 722 1,387 393 60.5 74.0 Q

55

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings ............................... 1,248 2,553 2,721 13,955 32,332 25,371 89.4 79.0 107.3 Principal Building Activity Education ...................................... 63 423 334 808 5,378 3,687 78.3 78.6 90.7 Food Sales ................................... 144 Q Q 765 467 Q 188.5 Q Q

56

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings* ........................... 990 1,761 1,134 1,213 724 10,622 17,335 11,504 15,739 9,584 93.2 101.6 98.5 77.0 75.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................ 143 187 90 170 95 1,313 1,709 1,010 1,915 975 108.7 109.6 88.8 89.0 97.9 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 110 137 91 156 69 1,248 1,725 1,077 2,024 959 88.1 79.3 84.6 77.1 71.7

57

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings* ............................. 1,188 2,208 2,425 13,374 29,260 22,149 88.8 75.5 109.5 Principal Building Activity Education ...................................... 63 423 334 808 5,378 3,687 78.3 78.6 90.7

58

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings* ............................... 575 381 530 7,837 3,675 7,635 73.4 103.8 69.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 87 44 64 788 464 871 110.9 94.7 73.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 60 36 76 879 418 820 68.2 86.7 92.9 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 53 76 73 1,329 831 1,256 40.2 91.7 58.4

59

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 456 1,241 340 5,680 13,999 3,719 80.2 88.7 91.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 60 123 37 922 1,283 547 64.9 96.2 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 45 111 27 738 1,468 420 61.6 75.4 63.2

60

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* ............................. 1,271 1,690 1,948 911 12,905 17,080 23,489 11,310 98.5 98.9 82.9 80.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 118 206 240 108 1,025 1,895 2,533 1,336 115.1 108.5 94.9 80.6 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 102 117 185 112 1,123 1,565 2,658 1,239 90.7 74.7 69.5 90.8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 684 446 617 9,022 4,207 8,613 75.8 106.1 71.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 87 44 64 788 466 871 110.9 94.8 73.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 67 39 84 957 465 878 69.7 84.8 95.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 77 91 89 1,555 933 1,429 49.4 97.2 62.4

62

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 345 1,052 1,343 3,452 10,543 12,424 99.8 99.7 108.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 37 86 147 383 676 986 95.9 127.9 148.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 39 68 83 369 800 939 106.0 85.4 88.2 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 121 187 674 1,448 2,113 Q 83.4 88.4

63

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ............................... 1,522 3,228 1,772 18,031 33,384 20,243 84.4 96.7 87.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 193 300 193 2,168 2,904 1,850 89.0 103.2 104.2 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 134 263 165 2,032 3,217 1,784 66.0 81.9 92.5 10,001 to 25,000 .......................... 241 432 226 3,273 5,679 3,707 73.6 76.1 60.9

64

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings ............................ 1,086 1,929 1,243 1,386 879 11,529 18,808 12,503 17,630 11,189 94.2 102.6 99.4 78.6 78.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................ 143 187 90 170 95 1,313 1,709 1,010 1,915 975 108.7 109.6 88.8 89.0 97.9 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 110 137 91 156 69 1,248 1,725 1,077 2,024 959 88.1 79.3 84.6 77.1 71.7

65

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures per Building (gallons) per Square Foot (gallons) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Gallon (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 3,533 0.10 3.9 0.11 1.11 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,177 0.41 1.4 0.48 1.18 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 2,573 0.36 3.0 0.42 1.17 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 3,045 0.19 3.6 0.23 1.18 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 5,184 0.14 5.6 0.15 1.09 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8,508 0.11 9.3 0.12 1.10 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 12,639 0.09 13.1 0.09 1.03

66

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 141 68 117 8,634 4,165 8,376 16.3 16.3 14.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 17 7 12 696 439 857 24.1 15.7 14.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 12 5 15 865 451 868 13.8 12.1 17.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 16 12 16 1,493 933 1,405 11.0 13.0 11.5

67

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ................................ 162 538 343 17,509 32,945 19,727 9.2 16.3 17.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 24 54 38 2,072 2,767 1,640 11.4 19.4 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 16 41 29 1,919 3,154 1,572 8.2 13.0 18.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 28 69 45 3,201 5,610 3,683 8.7 12.3 12.2

68

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh) Distribution of Building-Level Intensities (kWh/square foot) 25th Per- centile Median 75th Per- centile per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per kWh (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 226 14.9 3.8 8.8 18.1 17.9 1.18 0.079 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 48 17.8 3.8 9.0 20.0 4.4 1.63 0.092 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 96 12.9 4.0 8.2 15.5 9.2 1.23 0.096 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 178 11.4 3.1 7.2 15.0 15.2 0.97 0.086

69

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ............................... 580 986 471 12,407 22,762 13,304 46.8 43.3 35.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................... 86 103 61 1,245 1,271 659 69.0 81.0 92.1 5,001 to 10,000 ............................. 57 101 60 1,154 1,932 883 49.4 52.3 67.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................... 105 174 65 2,452 3,390 1,982 42.6 51.2 32.7

70

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 41 131 168 3,430 10,469 12,202 12.0 12.5 13.8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 5 9 20 369 662 921 12.9 13.9 21.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 3 8 9 360 768 877 8.4 10.4 10.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 16 24 674 1,420 2,113 Q 11.6 11.2

71

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil (million square feet) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .............................. 1,302 172 107 64 6,464 2,909 4,663 2,230 0.20 0.06 0.02 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................ 381 Q Q Q 763 Q 274 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................ 404 63 Q Q 1,806 648 985 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 ............................... 517 21 45 Q 3,894 2,055 3,404 1,780 0.13 0.01 0.01 Q

72

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 6,523 1,342 91.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 685 265 99.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 563 594 80.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 899 1,110 71.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 742 2,843 79.0

73

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 13.9 5,820 1,253 89.8 79.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 2.7 672 263 98.9 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 7.4 516 580 78.3 68.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 15.6 776 1,052 67.3 72.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 35.9 673 2,790 77.6 75.8

74

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 85 364 550 1,861 8,301 10,356 45.4 43.8 53.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q 42 69 Q 427 741 Q 98.4 92.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q 32 49 Q 518 743 Q 62.1 65.5 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 47 102 Q 952 1,860 Q 49.7 54.6

75

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 5,820 9,168 3,037 1,928 222 634 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 672 1,164 386 250 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 516 790 262 209 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 776 1,229 407 309 27 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 673 1,058 350 258 16 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 9,057 759 1,223 405 244 26 Q

76

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Scale window-related energy consumption to account for new

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings* ............................... 155 447 288 17,163 28,766 17,378 9.0 15.5 16.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 23 52 37 2,049 2,668 1,628 11.3 19.6 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 15 35 27 1,859 2,854 1,484 8.1 12.2 18.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 27 55 37 3,141 4,907 3,322 8.5 11.3 11.2

78

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

How Will Buildings Be Selected for the 2012 CBECS? How Will Buildings Be Selected for the 2012 CBECS? Background and Overview Did You Know? In the CBECS, commercial refers to any structure that is neither residential, manufacturing/ industrial, nor agricultural. Building refers to a structure that is totally enclosed by walls that extend from the foundation to the roof. Data collection for the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) will begin in April 2013, collecting data for reference year 2012. The goal of the CBECS is to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The 2003 CBECS estimated that there were 4.9 million commercial buildings in the US. Because it would be completely impractical and prohibitively

79

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China* Nan Zhou, 1whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Expenditures > Publication and Tables and Expenditures > Publication and Tables 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Publication and Tables Figure ES1. Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Sources, 1992 Separater Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader . If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Separater Bar Full Report - Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures, 1992 (file size 1.07 MB) pages: 214 Selected Sections Main Text - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader (file size 193,634 bytes) pages: 28, includes the following: Contacts Contents Executive Summary Introduction Background

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The electricity consumption impacts of commercial energy management systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation of energy management systems (EMS) in large commercial and institutional buildings in North Carolina was undertaken to determine how EMS currently affect electricity consumption and what their potential is for being used to reduce on-peak electricity demand. A survey was mailed to 5000 commercial customers; the 430 responses were tabulated and analyzed; EMS vendors were interviewed, and 30 sites were investigated in detail. The detailed assessments included a site interview and reconstruction of historic billing data to evaluate EMS impact, if any. The results indicate that well-tuned EMS can result in a 10 to 40 percent reduction in billed demand, and smaller reductions in energy.

Buchanan, S.; Taylor, R.; Paulos, S.; Warren, W.; Hay, J.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency ‹ Consumption & Efficiency Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data 2003 1999 1995 1992 Previous Analysis & Projections Maps U. S. Census Regions and Divisions U. S. Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS U. S. Climate Zones for 1979-1999 CBECS How are U.S. Climate Zones defined? U. S. Census Regions and Divisions: U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Map U. S. Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS: U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Map U. S. Climate Zones for 1979-1999 CBECS: U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Map How are U.S. Climate Zones defined? The CBECS climate zones are groups of climate divisions, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which are regions within a state that are as climatically homogeneous as possible. Each NOAA

83

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CBECS Terminology CBECS Terminology NOTE: This glossary is specific to the 1999 and 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Surveys (CBECS). CBECS glossaries for prior years can be found in the appendices of past CBECS reports. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Account Classification: The method in which suppliers of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil classify and bill their customers. Commonly used account classifications are "Commercial," "Industrial," and "Residential." Suppliers' definitions of these terms vary from supplier to supplier and from the definitions used in CBECS. In addition, the same customer may be classified differently by each of its energy suppliers. Activities with Large Amounts of Hot Water: An energy-related space

84

The importance of population growth in future commercial energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper estimates the contribution of population growth to commercial energy consumption, which is considered a major cause of increases in air pollution and greenhouse gases. This paper first summarizes some of the recent estimates of future energy use developed by well-known models. It then develops several alternative scenarios that use different assumptions about population growth and energy use per capita for 122 countries for the years 2020 and 2050. It calculates the relative contribution of population growth to the change in total commercial energy use and demonstrates the sensitivity of the results to different assumptions. Individual country data are separately summed to totals for more-developed countries (MDCs) and less-developed countries (LDCs). Under a business as usual scenario for both MDCs and LDCs, population growth is important, but not the most important factor, in future increases in global energy consumption. Analysis of other scenarios shows that while slower population growth always contributes to a slowing of future global energy consumption, such changes are not as effective as reductions in per capita commercial energy use. Calculations on a global basis are made in two ways: from global aggregates and by summing individual country data. Comparison of the results shows that the first method is misleading because of the heterogeneity of population growth rates and energy consumption rates of individual countries. The tentative conclusions reached in this paper are only small pieces of a much larger puzzle. More work needs to be done to better understand the dynamics of these relationships before the analysis is extended to the broader questions of population growth and environmental change.

Kolsrud, G. [Congress, Washington, DC (United States); Torrey, B.B. [Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 2003 Detailed Tables > What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of a statistically-designed subset of the entire commercial building population in the United States, or a "sample". Consequently, the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to understand: CBECS estimates should not be considered as finite point estimates, but as estimates with some associated error in each direction. The standard error is a measure of the reliability or precision of the survey statistic. The value for the standard error can be used to construct confidence intervals and to perform hypothesis tests by standard statistical methods. Relative Standard Error (RSE) is defined as the standard error (square root of the variance) of a survey estimate, divided by the survey estimate and multiplied by 100.

86

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys The primary purpose of the CBECS is to collect accurate statistics of energy consumption by individual buildings. EIA also collects data on total energy supply (sales). For the information on sales totals, a different reporting system is used for each fuel and the boundaries between the different sectors (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial) are drawn differently for each fuel. Background EIA sales data on the different fuels are compiled in individual fuel reports. Annual electricity sales data are currently collected on Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Utility Report," which is sent to all electric utilities in the United States. Supply data for natural gas are collected on Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas

87

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Public Use Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CBECS Public Use Data CBECS Public Use Data CBECS Public Use Data Public Use Files: yellow indicator arrow 2003 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1999 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1995 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1992 CBECS The Public Use Files are microdata files that contain more than 5,000 records, representing commercial buildings from the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Each record corresponds to a single responding, in-scope sampled building and contains information for that building about the building size, year constructed, types of energy used, energy-using equipment, conservation features, energy consumption and expenditures, and the amount of energy used for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other end uses.

88

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

89

1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ............................................... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel................................................ 130 Table C3. Consumption for Sum of Major Fuels ...................................................... 135 Table C4. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels....................................................... 140 Table C5. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels................................................................................................... 145 Table C6. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels......................... 150 Table C7. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of

90

Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Two case studies for commercial vehicle applications compare a baseline, contemporary vehicle with advanced, future options.

91

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

92

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Part 2. Energy Intensity Data Tables Total Energy Consumption Consumption by Energy Source Background: Site and Primary Energy Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Part 1. Energy Consumption The CBECS collects energy consumption statistics from energy suppliers for four major energy sources—electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat—and collects information from the sampled buildings on the use of the four major sources and other energy sources (e.g., district chilled water, solar, wood). Energy consumed in commercial buildings is a significant fraction of that consumed in all end-use sectors. In 2000, about 17 percent of total energy was consumed in the commercial sector. Total Energy Consumption

93

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption 2003 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for 2003 (Detailed Tables E1-E11 and E1A-E11A) provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, personal computers, office equipment (including servers), and other uses. Although details vary by energy source (Table 1), there are four basic steps in the end-use estimation process: Regressions of monthly consumption on degree-days to establish reference temperatures for the engineering models, Engineering modeling by end use, Cross-sectional regressions to calibrate the engineering estimates and account for additional energy uses, and

94

Energy Consumption Analysis and Energy Conservation Evaluation of a Commercial Building in Shanghai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper presents a model of a commercial building in Shanghai with energy simulation software, and after calibration, the energy consumption of this building is calculated. On the basis of the simulation and calculation, a series of energy saving...

Chen, C.; Pan, Y.; Huang, Z.; Wu, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit (1) Ownership Nongovernment Owned 85.1 72% Owner-Occupied 87.3 35% Nonowner-Occupied 88.4 36%...

96

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background The commercial sector encompasses a vast range of building types-service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as certain buildings that would not be considered "commercial" in a traditional economic sense, such as public and private schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with

97

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Reports & Publications All Reports & Publications Search By: Go Pick a date range: From: To: Go Commercial BuildingsAvailable formats PDF Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Released: August 29, 2013 This report focuses on how EIA models residential and commercial sector distributed generation, including combined heat and power, for the Annual Energy Outlook. PDF Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Released: August 7, 2013 EIA works with technology experts to project the cost and performance of future residential and commercial sector photovoltaic (PV) and small wind installations rather than developing technology projections in-house. These reports have always been available by request. By providing the reports

98

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While China's 11th Five Year Plan called for a reduction of energy intensity by 2010, whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed in a short time has been hotly debated. This research intends to evaluate the impact of a variety of scenarios of GDP growth, energy elasticity and energy efficiency improvement on energy consumption in commercial buildings in China using a detailed China End-use Energy Model. China's official energy statistics have limited information on energy demand by end use. This is a particularly pertinent issue for building energy consumption. The authors have applied reasoned judgments, based on experience of working on Chinese efficiency standards and energy related programs, to present a realistic interpretation of the current energy data. The bottom-up approach allows detailed consideration of end use intensity, equipment efficiency, etc., thus facilitating assessment of potential impacts of specific policy and technology changes on building energy use. The results suggest that: (1) commercial energy consumption in China's current statistics is underestimated by about 44%, and the fuel mix is misleading; (2) energy efficiency improvements will not be sufficient to offset the strong increase in end-use penetration and intensity in commercial buildings; (3) energy intensity (particularly electricity) in commercial buildings will increase; (4) different GDP growth and elasticity scenarios could lead to a wide range of floor area growth trajectories , and therefore, significantly impact energy consumption in commercial buildings.

Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey Tables  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Commercial Building Benchmarks DOE Commercial Building Benchmarks New Construction Energy Use Intensities (EUIs) [kBtu/ft 2 /yr] May 5, 2009 Miami Houston Phoenix Atlanta Los Angeles Las Vegas San Francisco Baltimore Albuquerque Seattle Chicago Denver Minneapolis Helena Duluth Fairbanks 2003 CBECS Avg. Climate Zone 1A 2A 2B 3A 3B 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 6A 6B 7 8 Large Office 39 42 40 39 32 40 34 43 39 37 43 38 47 44 49 62 99 Medium Office 38 44 42 44 35 41 40 51 43 46 53 47 59 54 62 82 94 Small Office 46 48 49 46 36 44 38 53 47 47 61 52 70 62 77 110 80 Warehouse 15 15 15 16 14 16 14 18 17 16 21 20 26 23 27 43 48 Stand-alone Retail 48 46 46 41 34 41 35 45 42 40 48 45 54 51 61 88 70 Strip Mall 46 44 44 44 35 43 38 48 45 42 51 47 60 55 66 99 110 Primary School 65 71 69 69 57 65 71 78 68 65 85 74 99 88 107 147 68

100

The Green Lab: Power Consumption by Commercial Light Bulbs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Going green is a slogan that is very contemporary both with industry and in the political arena. Choosing more energy-efficient devices is one way homeowners can go green. A simple method is to change home lighting from hot incandescent bulbs to compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). But do they really save energy? How do their illuminations compare? Even if the CFLs are more energy efficient they still add to our pollution problem because of the mercury inside them. Light-emitting diodes(LEDs) could be the answer but they are not available at our local stores. Can LEDs be made to screw right into a standard socket? How expensive are they? What are the power consumptions of so-called 60-W and 100-W CFL and LED light bulbs? These are the questions that are answered during this lab activity. Students measure the voltage and current for each of the three types of bulbs and then calculate the electrical power required by each. An optional experiment is to set the light outputs of each bulb so they are equal in intensity and then determine the power consumed. While not practical in the home this experiment gives students an understanding of value for their buck.

James A. Einsporn; Andrew F. Zhou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Title Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-60146 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Apte, Joshua S., and Dariush K. Arasteh Call Number LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

102

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Joshua Apte and Dariush Arasteh, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate

103

A look at commercial buildings in 1995: Characteristics, energy consumption, and energy expenditures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of facilities that would not be considered commercial in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The target population for the 1995 CBECS consisted of all commercial buildings in the US with more than 1,000 square feet of floorspace. Decision makers, businesses, and other organizations that are concerned with the use of energy--building owners and managers, regulators, legislative bodies and executive agencies at all levels of government, utilities and other energy suppliers--are confronted with a buildings sector that is complex. Data on major characteristics (e.g., type of building, size, year constructed, location) collected from the buildings, along with the amount and types of energy the buildings consume, help answer fundamental questions about the use of energy in commercial buildings.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

End-use energy consumption estimates for U.S. commercial buildings, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs of the US Department of Energy, utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1992 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type. The nonlinear SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption (based upon utility billing information). End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 6,751 buildings in the 1992 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for 11 separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock. 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 4% 28% 8% 56% | 6% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 4% 26% 7% 59% | 5% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 3% 26% 5% 61% | 5% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 5% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 4% 26% 4% 61% | 5% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 4% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 3% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 3% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 3% 25% 4% 64% | 4% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 3% 24% 4% 65% | 4% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 3% 26% 3% 65% | 4% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 2% 25% 3% 65% | 3% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 2% 25% 3% 65% | 3% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 2% 25% 2% 67% | 3% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 2% 25% 2% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 2% 26% 3% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 2% 25% 4% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 2% 25% 3% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 2% 24% 3% 67% | 3% 25%

106

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Natural Gas Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 13% 41% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 13% 42% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 14% 39% 18% 3% | 20% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 14% 39% 17% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 14% 40% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 14% 40% 18% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 14% 40% 16% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 14% 41% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 15% 42% 15% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 14% 41% 16% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 4% 19.57 1991 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 20.03 1992 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 20.71 1993 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 48% 3% 21.24 1994 14% 42% 18% 3% | 19% 48% 3% 21.75 1995 14% 42% 19% 3% | 20% 49% 3% 22.71 1996 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 23.14 1997 14% 43% 18% 3% | 20% 49% 3% 23.34 1998 13% 43% 20% 3% | 20% 50% 3% 22.86 1999 14%

107

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Commercial Delivered and Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Year Percent Delivered Energy Consumption Primary Energy Consumption Floorspace Post-2000 Total Consumption per Total Consumption per (million SF) Floorspace (1) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) 1980 50.9 N.A. 5.99 117.7 10.57 207.7 1990 64.3 N.A. 6.74 104.8 13.30 207.0 2000 (2) 68.5 N.A. 8.20 119.7 17.15 250.3 2010 81.1 26% 8.74 107.7 18.22 224.6 2015 84.1 34% 8.88 105.5 18.19 216.2 2020 89.1 43% 9.02 101.2 19.15 214.9 2025 93.9 52% 9.56 101.8 20.06 213.6 2030 98.2 60% 9.96 101.5 20.92 213.1 2035 103.0 68% 10.38 100.8 21.78 211.4 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Consumption Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; DOE for 1980 floorspace; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 1994, Jan. 1994, Table A5, p. 62 for 1990 floorspace; EIA, AEO 2003, Jan. 2003, Table A5, p. 127 for 2000 floorspace; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012,

109

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9 9 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage (1) | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 Health Care 178.1 216.0 135.7 | Education 77.7 88.3 80.6 Inpatient 230.3 255.3 253.8 | Service 62.4 86.0 74.8 Outpatient 91.6 110.4 84.4 | Food Service 145.2 290.1 361.2 Food Sales 205.8 197.6 198.3 | Religious Worship 46.6 39.9 43.3 Lodging 88.2 111.5 88.1 | Public Order & Safety N.A. 101.3 110.6 Office 93.6 94.4 88.0 | Warehouse & Storage N.A. 38.9 33.3 Mercantile 80.4 91.8 94.4 | Public Assembly 61.9 107.6 119.7 Retail (Non-Malls) 74.1 63.7 86.4 | Vacant 21.4 23.1 N.A. Retail (Malls) N.A. 103.9 99.5 | Other 161.3 204.9 125.3 Note(s): Source(s): Consumption (kBtu/SF) Consumption (kBtu/SF) 1) See Table 3.1.3 for primary versus delivered energy consumption.

110

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of a statistically-designed subset of the entire commercial building population in the United States, or a "sample". Consequently, the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to understand: CBECS estimates should not be considered as finite point estimates, but as estimates with some associated error in each direction. The standard error is a measure of the reliability or precision of the survey statistic. The value for the standard error can be used to construct confidence intervals and to perform hypothesis tests by standard

111

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

112

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of Chinasof Chinas total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof Chinas total energy consumption, while others estimate

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABORATORY Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissionscomponent of Chinas total energy consumption mix. However,about 19% of Chinas total energy consumption, while others

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the fraction of total energy consumption attributable toFraction of Total Energy Consumption Background Although thewindow fraction of total energy consumption. We believe that

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 Figure 6 Primary Energy Consumption by End-Use in24 Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel in Commercialbased on total primary energy consumption (source energy),

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

117

Driving factors of non-commercial biomass consumption: a multivariate approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rising global energy requirement, which is driven mainly by population and economic growth, plays a critical role in the world's economic and social development. Different levels and patterns of energy use reflect various developmental stages of countries' economies, including biomass as an important element of the global energy framework. This paper provides an assessment of the relative importance of commercial energy and biomass as elements contributing to overall economic activity. Similarities and differences are identified in the structure of energy use among countries by establishing country groupings using cluster techniques and quantifying the patterns with factor analysis. Multi-dimensional clustering of the countries is presented based on the biomass consumption related parameters such as gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, commercial energy consumption per capita, urbanisation and industrialisation levels. After describing major clusters in 1970 and 1995, the characterisation of clusters identified through the factor analysis is summarised to show the relative importance of various factors within the considered structure. Discussions on the structural changes within the selected period conclude the paper.

Jan Ban; Nadir Guerer

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Label Building Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Usage Form Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed questionnaire is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our company. a. You may submit a single report for the entire building, or if it i s easier, a separate report for each of several accounts in the building. These will then be aggregated by the survey contractor. b. If you are concerned about your individual account information, you may choose to mark

119

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

window related primary energy consumption of the US building= 1.056 EJ. Primary energy consumption includes a site-to-the amount of primary energy consumption required by space

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roughly 2.7% of total US energy consumption. The final tworoughly 1.5% of total US energy consumption. The final twoSpace Conditioning Energy Consumption in US Buildings Annual

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 2003 Commercial Buildings Delivered Energy End-Use Intensities, by Building Activity (Thousand Btu per SF) (1) Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Note(s): Source(s): 43.5 45.2 164.4 20.9 1) Due to rounding, end-uses do not sum to total. EIA, 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey, Energy End-Uses, Oct. 2008, Table E.2A. 0.3 0.6 3.0 N.A. 4.9 4.8 18.9 3.1 1.7 3.5 6.0 N.A. 0.1 0.2 N.A. N.A. 4.4 13.1 34.1 1.7 0.8 N.A. N.A. N.A. 1.4 2.0 6.1 0.4 0.8 0.6 2.1 0.1 26.2 19.3 79.4 14.4 2.9 1.3 10.5 0.6 Religious

122

The empirical relevance of the definition of wealth as applied to the theory of the consumption function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EMPIRICAL RELEVANCE OP THE DEFINITION OP WEALTH AS APPLIED TO THE THEORY OF THE CONSUMPTION FUNCTION A Thesis by ALI AN JEROME HEBERT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Ma l96 9 year Maj or Sub)set Economics THE EMPIRICAL RELEVANCE OF THE DEFINITION OF HEALTH AS APPLIED TO THE THEORY OF THE CONSUMPTION FUNCTION A Thesis by ALLAN JEROME HEBERT Approved as to style and content by: a...

Herbert, Allan Jerome

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Look at Commercial Buldings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DOE/EIA-0625(95) DOE/EIA-0625(95) Distribution Category UC-950 A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures October 1998 En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion Of fice of En ergy Mar kets and End Use U.S. De part ment of En ergy Wash ing ton, DC 20585 This re port was pre pared by the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion, the in de pend ent sta tis ti cal and ana lytic agency within the U.S. De part ment of En ergy. The in for ma tion con tained herein should be at trib uted to the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion and should not be con strued as ad vo cat ing or re flect ing any pol icy po si tion of the De part ment of En ergy or any other or gani za tion. Contacts The En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion (EIA) pre pared this pub li ca tion un der the gen eral di rec tion of W. Cal vin

124

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were used to calculate the energy mix in manufacturing,of Chinas total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof Chinas total energy consumption mix. However, accurately

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Building Type (thousand BtuSF) Consumption | Building Type (thousand BtuSF) Consumption Health Care 345.9 8% | Education 159.0 11% Inpatient 438.8 6% | Service 151.6 4%...

126

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Intensity in the Unites States, http://intensityindicators.pnl.gov/total_commercial.stm [13] McKinsey Global

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Commercial Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total Total(3) 2010-Year 1980 2.63 24.9% 1.31 12.4% 0.12 1.1% 0.02 0.2% 1.91 4.58 6.49 61.4% 1981 2.54 23.9% 1.12 10.5% 0.14 1.3% 0.02 0.2% 2.03 4.76 6.80 64.1% 1982 2.64 24.3% 1.03 9.5% 0.16 1.4% 0.02 0.2% 2.08 4.91 6.99 64.5% 1983 2.48 22.7% 1.16 10.7% 0.16 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.12 4.98 7.09 65.0% 1984 2.57 22.5% 1.22 10.7% 0.17 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.26 5.17 7.43 65.1% 1985 2.47 21.6% 1.08 9.4% 0.14 1.2% 0.02 0.2% 2.35 5.39 7.74 67.6% 1986 2.35 20.3% 1.16 10.0% 0.14 1.2% 0.03 0.2% 2.44 5.47 7.91 68.3% 1987 2.47 20.8% 1.13 9.5% 0.13 1.1% 0.03 0.2% 2.54 5.62 8.16 68.5% 1988 2.72 21.6% 1.09 8.7% 0.13 1.0% 0.03 0.3% 2.68 5.92 8.60 68.4% 1989 2.77 21.0% 1.04 7.9% 0.12 0.9% 0.10 0.8% 2.77 6.39 9.16 69.5% 1990 2.67 20.1%

128

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Commercial Site Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) (1) Growth Rate Wood (2) Solar Thermal (3) Solar PV (3) GHP Total 2010-Year 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 0.110 0.035 0.010 N.A. 0.155 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.154 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.007 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.148 0.6%

129

Sensitivity to electricity consumption in urban business and commercial area buildings according to climatic change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, urban high temperature phenomenon has become a problem which results from human activities, the increase in energy consumption, and land-cover change in urban areas ... is increased and results in the d...

Kang-guk Lee; Sung-bum Kim; Won-hwa Hong

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Indoor Conditions Study and Impact on the Energy Consumption for a Large Commercial Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that were studied using dynamic simulations. The article provides interesting insights of the building indoor conditions (summer/winter comfort), humidity, air temperature, mean operative temperature and energy consumption using hourly climate data. A...

Catalina, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a reduction of energy intensity by 2010, whether and howbuildings; (3) energy intensity (particularly electricity)commercial building, energy intensity, energy efficiency,

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Commercial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Commercial Commercial Industrial Lighting Energy Smart Grocer Program HVAC Program Shell Measures Commercial Kitchen & Food Service Equipment Plug Load New...

133

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential andCommercial Building Stock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

134

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Commercial Water Use by Source (Million Gallons per Day) Year 1980 - - - 1985 5,710 1,230 1990 5,900 2,390 1995 6,690 2,890 2000 (3) 7,202 3,111 2005 (3) 7,102 3,068 Note(s): Source(s): 10,314 10,171 1) Public supply water use: water withdrawn by public and private water suppliers that furnish water to at least 25 people or have a minimum of 15 connections. 2) Self-supply water use: Water withdrawn from a groundwater or surface-water source by a user rather than being obtained from a public supply. 3) USGS did not estimate commercial water use in this year. Estimates are based on available data and percentage breakdown of commercial use in the 1995 survey. U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1985, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1004, 1988; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of

135

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Aggregate Commercial Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) Load (quads) and Percent of Total Load Component Heating Cooling Roof -0.103 12% 0.014 1% Walls (2) -0.174 21% -0.008 - Foundation -0.093 11% -0.058 - Infiltration -0.152 18% -0.041 - Ventilation -0.129 15% -0.045 - Windows (conduction) -0.188 22% -0.085 - Windows (solar gain) 0.114 - 0.386 32% Internal Gains Lights 0.196 - 0.505 42% Equipment (electrical) 0.048 - 0.207 17% Equip. (non-electrical) 0.001 - 0.006 1% People 0.038 - 0.082 7% NET Load -0.442 100% 0.963 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Loads represent the thermal energy losses/gains that, when combined, will be offset by a building's heating/cooling system to maintain a set interior temperature (which equals site energy). 2) Includes common interior walls between buildings. LBNL, Commercial Heating and Cooling Loads Component Analysis, June 1998, Table 24, p. 45 and Figure 3, p. 61

136

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Restaurants in Western United States (1) Fixture/End Use (2) Faucets Dishwashing Toilets/Urinals Ice Making Total Indoor Use (3) (4) (4) Building Size (SF) Seats: Meals: Benchmarking Values for Restaurants (6) N Gal./SF/year 90 Gal./meal 90 Gal./seat/day 90 Gal./employee/day 90 Note(s): Source(s): American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000. 25th Percentile of Users 130 - 331 6 - 9 20 - 31 86 - 122 Familiy-style dine-in establishments. Four restaurants in southern California, one in Phoenix, AZ. 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and

137

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Two California High Schools Fixture/End Use Toilet Urinal Faucet Shower Kitchen Misc. uses (2) Cooling Leaks Swimming Pool Total Use Benchmarking Values for Schools (3) N Indoor Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 142 Indoor Use, Gal./school day/student 141 Cooling Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 35 Note(s): Source(s): 8 - 20 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) One high school. 3) The study derived efficiency benchmarks by analyzing measured data and audit data. The benchmark was set at the lower 25th percentile of users. American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000.

138

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Average Water Use of Commercial and Institutional Establishments (Gallons per Establishment per Day) Average Variation % Total % of CI % Seasonal Daily Use In Use (1) CI Use Customers Use (2) Hotels and Motels 7,113 5.41 5.8% 1.9% 23.1% Laundries/Laundromats 3,290 8.85 4.0% 1.4% 13.4% Car Washes 3,031 3.12 0.8% 0.4% 14.2% Urban Irrigation 2,596 8.73 28.5% 30.2% 86.9% Schools and Colleges 2,117 12.13 8.8% 4.8% 58.0% Hospitals/Medical Offices 1,236 78.5 3.9% 4.2% 23.2% Office Buildings 1,204 6.29 10.2% 11.7% 29.0% Restaurants 906 7.69 8.8% 11.2% 16.1% Food Stores 729 16.29 2.9% 5.2% 19.4% Auto Shops (3) 687 7.96 2.0% 6.7% 27.2% Membership Organizations (4) 629 6.42 2.0% 5.6% 46.2% Total 77.6% 83.3% Note(s): Source(s): 23,538 Estimated from 24 months of water utility billing data in five Western locations: four locations in Southern California and one in Arizona. 1)

139

Natural Gas Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 23,103,793 23,277,008 22,910,078 24,086,797 24,477,425 25,533,448 1949-2012 Alabama 418,512 404,157 454,456 534,779 598,514 666,738 1997-2012 Alaska 369,967 341,888 342,261 333,312 335,458 343,110 1997-2012

140

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2015 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.01 1.01 11.4% | 3.05 3.05 16.7% Space Heating 1.69 0.20 0.06 0.11 0.17 2.23 25.2% | 0.50 2.57 14.1% Space Cooling 0.04 0.51 0.54 6.1% | 1.52 1.56 8.6% Ventilation 0.54 0.54 6.1% | 1.62 1.62 8.9% Refrigeration 0.35 0.35 4.0% | 1.06 1.06 5.8% Electronics 0.32 0.32 3.6% | 0.95 0.95 5.2% Water Heating 0.48 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.63 7.1% | 0.27 0.81 4.5% Computers 0.19 0.19 2.1% | 0.57 0.57 3.1% Cooking 0.19 0.02 0.21 2.4% | 0.07 0.26 1.4% Other (5) 0.33 0.01 0.14 0.05 0.01 0.81 1.35 15.2% | 2.45 2.99 16.4% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.68 0.19 0.63 1.50 16.9% | 1.90 2.77 15.2% Total 3.33 0.43 0.14 0.11 0.15 4.63 8.88 100% | 13.99 18.23 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.35 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (less than 0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2025 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.08 1.08 11.3% | 3.27 3.27 16.3% Space Heating 1.68 0.18 0.06 0.11 0.16 2.20 23.1% | 0.49 2.53 12.6% Ventilation 0.60 0.60 6.2% | 1.80 1.80 9.0% Space Cooling 0.03 0.52 0.55 5.7% | 1.56 1.59 7.9% Electronics 0.40 0.40 4.2% | 1.22 1.22 6.1% Refrigeration 0.34 0.34 3.6% | 1.02 1.02 5.1% Water Heating 0.52 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.67 7.0% | 0.27 0.85 4.2% Computers 0.20 0.20 2.1% | 0.60 0.60 3.0% Cooking 0.21 0.02 0.23 2.4% | 0.07 0.27 1.4% Other (5) 0.48 0.01 0.15 0.05 0.01 1.12 1.82 19.1% | 3.39 4.09 20.3% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.58 0.18 0.69 1.46 15.3% | 2.09 2.85 14.2% Total 3.50 0.41 0.15 0.12 0.15 5.23 9.56 100% | 15.77 20.10 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.33 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (less than 0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are

142

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2035 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.15 1.15 11.1% | 3.40 3.40 15.6% Space Heating 1.65 0.18 0.06 0.11 0.16 2.16 20.8% | 0.48 2.48 11.3% Ventilation 0.65 0.65 6.2% | 1.91 1.91 8.7% Space Cooling 0.03 0.54 0.57 5.5% | 1.59 1.62 7.4% Electronics 0.46 0.46 4.5% | 1.37 1.37 6.3% Refrigeration 0.36 0.36 3.4% | 1.05 1.05 4.8% Water Heating 0.54 0.03 0.04 0.09 0.70 6.8% | 0.25 0.87 4.0% Computers 0.22 0.22 2.1% | 0.64 0.64 2.9% Cooking 0.22 0.02 0.25 2.4% | 0.06 0.29 1.3% Other (5) 0.81 0.01 0.16 0.06 0.01 1.46 2.51 24.2% | 4.30 5.35 24.5% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.40 0.18 0.77 1.36 13.1% | 2.28 2.86 13.1% Total 3.65 0.40 0.16 0.12 0.16 5.89 10.38 100% | 17.33 21.83 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.32 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are assumed

143

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.19 1.19 13.6% | 3.69 3.69 20.2% Space Heating 1.65 0.22 0.06 0.11 0.28 2.33 26.6% | 0.88 2.93 16.0% Space Cooling 0.04 0.84 0.88 10.1% | 2.60 2.64 14.5% Ventilation 0.54 0.54 6.1% | 1.66 1.66 9.1% Refrigeration 0.39 0.39 4.5% | 1.21 1.21 6.6% Water Heating 0.44 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.58 6.7% | 0.28 0.78 4.3% Electronics 0.26 0.26 3.0% | 0.81 0.81 4.4% Computers 0.21 0.21 2.4% | 0.66 0.66 3.6% Cooking 0.18 0.02 0.20 2.3% | 0.07 0.25 1.4% Other (5) 0.30 0.01 0.14 0.05 0.01 0.69 1.20 13.7% | 2.13 2.64 14.5% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.68 0.25 0.02 0.95 10.9% | 0.06 0.99 5.4% Total 3.29 0.52 0.14 0.12 0.14 4.54 8.74 100% | 14.05 18.26 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.43 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are assumed

144

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

145

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

146

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

147

COMMERCIALIZING  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

COMMERCIALIZING TECHNOLOGIES & CREATING JOBS Our location in the SS&TP plays a vital role in our ability to leverage the deep domain expertise of Sandia. Our proximity to the Labs...

148

Commercial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SRC 7439-R3 Energy Edge Impact Evaluation Early Overview, Final Report. R. Diamond, J. Harris, M. Piette, O. deBuen, and B. Nordman. Lawrence Berkeley Lab. (1290). Commercial...

149

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

commercial.gif (5196 bytes) commercial.gif (5196 bytes) The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings, however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

150

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

151

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

152

Impact of Nighttime Shut Down on the Prediction Accuracy of Monthly Regression Models for Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regression models of measured energy use in buildings are widely used as baseline models to determine retrofit savings from measured energy consumption. It is less expensive to determine savings from monthly utility bills when they are available...

Wang, J.; Claridge, D. E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

154

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Number of Consumers Number of Consumers Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Industrial Consumption Natural gas used for heat, power, or chemical feedstock by manufacturing establishments or those engaged in mining or other mineral extraction as well as consumers in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. Also included in industrial consumption are generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the above-mentioned industrial activities.

155

Commercial fertilizers 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compendium of tables on consumption of commercial fertilizers in the USA in 1993, including types of different fertilizers and consumption of each.

Berry, J.T.; Montgomery, M.H.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by End Use Consumption by End Use Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Distribution Use Natural gas used as fuel in the respondent's operations. Electric Power Consumption Gas used as fuel in the electric power sector. Electric Power Sector An energy-consuming sector that consists of electricity-only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public -i.e., North American Industry Classification System code 22 for plants. Combined heat and power plants that identify themselves as primarily in the commercial or industrial sectors are reported in those sectors.

157

Definitions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Below are a few small business procurement definitions as stated by the Small Business Administration and the Federal Acquisition Regulation. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email Get clarity on common terms (and is your business defined by one?) Small business An independently owned and operated entity Not dominant in the field of operation in which it is bidding on government contracts Meets any applicable criteria concerning number of employees or annual receipts established by the Small Business Administration (SBA). Concerns are "affiliates" when one either controls or has the power to control the other or when a third party (or parties) controls or has the power to control both. North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)

158

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Topic: Delivered for the Account of Others Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Delivered for the Account of Others Gas that is not owned by the company that delivers it to the consumer. These deliveries include quantities covered by long-term contracts and gas involved in short-term or spot market sales. Industrial Consumption Natural gas used for heat, power, or chemical feedstock by manufacturing establishments or those engaged in mining or other mineral extraction as well as consumers in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. Also included in industrial consumption are generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the above-mentioned industrial activities.

159

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State Shares of U.S. Deliveries State Shares of U.S. Deliveries Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Delivered (Gas) The physical transfer of natural, synthetic, and/or supplemental gas from facilities operated by the responding company to facilities operated by others or to consumers. Electric Power Consumption Gas used as fuel in the electric power sector. Industrial Consumption Natural gas used for heat, power, or chemical feedstock by manufacturing establishments or those engaged in mining or other mineral extraction as well as consumers in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. Also included in industrial consumption are generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the above-mentioned industrial activities.

160

Commercial Building Performance Monitoring and Evaluation | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Research Projects » Commercial Building Research Projects » Commercial Building Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Commercial Building Performance Monitoring and Evaluation The Building Technologies Office (BTO) uses performance metrics to standardize the measurement and characterization of energy performance in commercial buildings. These metrics help inform the effectiveness of energy efficiency measures in existing buildings and highlight opportunities to improve performance. Various tiers of metrics are available for different users. Performance Metrics Objectives Performance metrics deal with building energy consumption and on-site energy production. To be useful, industry must agree on standard definitions for these metrics and share consistent procedures for collecting and reporting data as well as ensuring data quality.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electricity Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Consumption Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates (million kWh) National Petroleum Council Assumption: The definition of electricity con- sumption and sales used in the NPC 1999 study is the equivalent ofwhat EIA calls "sales by utilities" plus "retail wheeling by power marketers." This A nn u al Gro wth total could also be called "sales through the distribution grid," 2o 99 99 to Sales by Utilities -012% #N/A Two other categories of electricity consumption tracked by EIA cover on site Retail Wheeling Sales by generation for host use. The first, "nonutility onsite direct use," covers the Power Marketen 212.25% #N/A traditional generation/cogeneration facilities owned by industrial or large All Sales Through Distribution

162

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the US EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (2: US commercial building stock energy consumption and floorof time varying energy consumption in the US commercial

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

164

2014-12-22 Issuance: Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Final Rule  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule regarding alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, refrigeration, and water heating equipment , as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on December 22, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

165

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas > Natural Gas Information Query System > Definitions, Sources, & Notes Natural Gas > Natural Gas Information Query System > Definitions, Sources, & Notes Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes The EIA-176 form contains responses submitted from an identified universe of pipelines, local distribution companies, and operators of fields, wells or gas processing plants, who distribute gas to end users or transport gas across State borders; or underground natural gas storage operators. Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities.

166

Commercial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

167

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

169

OpenEI - Energy Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/961 This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the commercial/ref_buildings.html">DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols).  This dataset also includes the consumption/residential/">Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types

170

Consumption & Efficiency - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports All Sectors Change category... All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and

171

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data Background image of CNSTAT logo The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) routinely uses feedback from customers and outside experts to help improve its programs and products. As part of an assessment of its consumption

172

Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated the relationship between electrical power consumption per capita and GDP per capita in 130 countries using the data reported by World Bank. We found that an electrical power consumption per capita...

Aki-Hiro Sato

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residential/commercial primary energy consumption and carbonthe savings in primary energy consumption using factors forsite energy to primary energy consumption. The model uses

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

175

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy

176

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

177

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RECS Terminology RECS Terminology A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ A Account Classification: The method in which suppliers of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil classify and bill their customers. Commonly used account classifications are "Commercial," "Industrial," "Residential," and "Other" Suppliers' definitions of these terms vary from supplier to supplier and from the definitions used in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). In addition, the same customer may be classified differently by each of its energy suppliers. Adequacy of Insulation: The respondent's perception of the adequacy of the housing unit's insulation. Aggregate Ratio: The ratio of two population aggregates (totals). For

178

Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Commercial...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and RD&D Opportunities for Commercial Refrigration This report documents the energy consumption of commercial refrigeration equipment (CRE) in the U.S. and evaluated the energy...

179

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the...

180

Department of Energy and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch Alliance to Reduce Energy Consumption of Buildings Department of Energy and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch Alliance to Reduce...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

182

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

183

Tobacco Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tobacco consumption is the use of tobacco products in different forms such as , , , water-pipes or tobacco products. Cigarettes and tobacco products containing tobacco are highly engineered so as to creat...

Martina Ptschke-Langer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Reports > Trends in Commercial Buildings Trends: Buildings and Floorspace Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Overview: The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector Since 1978, the Energy Information Administration has collected basic statistical information from three of the major end-use sectors— residential, and industrial— periodic energy consumption surveys. Each survey is a snapshot of how energy is used in the year of the survey; the series of surveys in each sector reveals the trends in energy use for the sector. Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects data from a sample of buildings representative of the commercial buildings

185

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. 1 The manufacturing sector is composed of establishments classified in Standard Industrial Classification 20 through 39 of the U.S. economy as defined 2 by the Office of Management and Budget. The manufacturing sector is a part of the industrial sector, which also includes mining; construction; and agriculture, forestry, and fishing. The EIA also conducts energy consumption surveys in the residential, commercial buildings, and residential transportation sectors: the Residential Energy 3 Consumption Survey (RECS); the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS); and, until recently, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

186

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

187

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A4. Census Region and Division, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 A4. Census Region and Division, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings Northeast Midwest South West New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 71,658 3,452 10,543 12,424 5,680 13,999 3,719 9,022 4,207 8,613 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,922 383 676 986 922 1,283 547 788 466 871 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 7,033 369 800 939 738 1,468 420 957 465 878 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 12,659 674 1,448 2,113 1,204 2,443 861 1,555 933 1,429

188

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A6. Building Size, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 A6. Building Size, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings Building Size 1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet 5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet 25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet 50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet 100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet 200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet Over 500,000 Square Feet All Buildings ................................ 71,658 6,922 7,033 12,659 9,382 10,291 10,217 7,494 7,660 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... 9,874 409 399 931 1,756 2,690 2,167 1,420 Q Food Sales ..................................... 1,255 409 356 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ................................. 1,654 544 442 345 Q Q N Q N

189

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A7. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 A7. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings Number of Establishments in Building One Two to Five Six to Ten Eleven to Twenty More than Twenty Currently Unoccupied All Buildings ................................ 4,859 3,754 762 117 47 22 157 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 2,131 338 Q Q N 100 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 720 182 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 590 140 51 13 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 163 54 19 12 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 87 29 8 13 4 Q

190

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Million Btu (dollars) All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 13.9 92,577 19.9 1.43 15.91 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 2.7 12,812 5.0 1.89 19.08 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 7.4 9,398 10.6 1.43 18.22 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 15.6 13,140 17.8 1.14 16.93 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 35.9 10,392 43.1 1.20 15.44

191

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 92,577 69,032 14,525 1,776 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 12,812 10,348 2,155 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 9,398 7,296 1,689 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 13,140 10,001 2,524 232 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 10,392 7,871 1,865 127 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 9,057 11,897 8,717 1,868 203 Q

192

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6A. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 6A. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Expenditures (million dollars) Electricity Expenditures (dollars) per kWh per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 16,907 15,677 31,849 18,350 0.10 0.07 0.07 0.10 1.22 0.88 1.22 1.46 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,685 2,415 4,257 2,190 0.12 0.08 0.08 0.12 1.63 1.39 1.77 1.69 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 1,364 1,347 3,064 2,424 0.12 0.08 0.08 0.12 1.21 0.86 1.16 1.84 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 2,126 2,539 4,651 2,856 0.10 0.08 0.08 0.10 1.02 0.77 0.98 1.22

193

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures (million dollars) Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures (dollars) per Million Btu per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* ............................ 21,344 21,521 31,595 18,118 16.79 12.74 16.22 19.88 1.65 1.26 1.35 1.60 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 2,298 3,235 4,752 2,526 19.47 15.74 19.77 23.48 2.24 1.71 1.88 1.89 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 1,806 1,694 3,368 2,529 17.72 14.50 18.24 22.49 1.61 1.08 1.27 2.04 10,001 to 25,000 ......................... 2,606 3,157 4,530 2,846 17.56 13.85 18.09 19.03 1.32 1.02 1.03 1.36

194

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6A. Natural Gas Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 6A. Natural Gas Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Expenditures (million dollars) Natural Gas Expenditures (dollars) per Thousand Cubic Feet per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 3,883 5,215 4,356 2,557 8.66 7.16 8.53 7.31 0.38 0.37 0.29 0.29 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 489 788 632 318 9.87 8.58 9.30 7.95 0.89 0.73 0.69 0.51 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 358 485 632 356 9.16 7.67 9.14 7.69 0.54 0.46 0.44 0.44 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 576 1,060 760 500 9.85 7.97 9.40 7.10 0.45 0.40 0.33 0.32

195

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A3. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 A3. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings Northeast Midwest South West New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 4,859 252 509 728 577 926 360 587 316 603 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 134 240 372 356 474 217 294 166 333 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 49 106 128 100 200 59 127 62 117 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 46 92 133 78 151 54 103 61 91 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 10 29 48 27 52 16 28 16 34

196

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A5. Building Size, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 A5. Building Size, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings Building Size 1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet 5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet 25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet 50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet 100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet 200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet Over 500,000 Square Feet All Buildings ................................ 4,859 2,586 948 810 261 147 74 26 8 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... 386 162 56 60 48 39 16 5 Q Food Sales ..................................... 226 164 44 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ................................. 297 202 65 23 Q Q N Q N Health Care .................................... 129 56 38 19 5 5 3 2 1

197

Average Natural Gas Consumption per Commercial Consumer  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

568 579 586 585 593 541 1967-2012 568 579 586 585 593 541 1967-2012 Alabama 355 386 359 397 371 321 1967-2012 Alaska 1,399 1,334 1,258 1,225 1,489 1,515 1967-2012 Arizona 572 565 563 564 577 558 1967-2012 Arkansas 463 534 527 592 590 603 1967-2012 California 562 561 561 564 558 572 1967-2012 Colorado 447 455 429 396 383 355 1967-2012 Connecticut 686 699 729 741 815 764 1967-2012 Delaware 686 698 910 948 810 772 1967-2012 District of Columbia 1,946 1,837 1,818 1,877 1,681 1,572 1967-2012 Florida 891 876 846 888 869 861 1967-2012 Georgia 380 406 421 482 458 429 1967-2012 Hawaii 721 696 691 697 691 727 1980-2012 Idaho 423 438 412 390 433 404 1967-2012 Illinois 686 745 757 680 735 633 1967-2012 Indiana 485 540 506 485 471 423 1967-2012

198

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Million Btu (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 107,897 22.2 1.51 16.54 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 13,083 5.1 1.89 19.08 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 10,443 11.0 1.48 18.56 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 15,689 19.4 1.24 17.46 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 11,898 45.6 1.27 16.04

199

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C2A. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 C2A. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 107,897 82,783 16,010 1,826 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 13,083 10,547 2,227 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 10,443 8,199 1,830 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15,689 12,172 2,897 238 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 11,898 9,179 2,054 134 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 15,171 11,694 2,140 229 Q

200

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures (million dollars) Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures (dollars) per Million Btu per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .............................. 24,395 23,398 38,398 21,706 17.47 13.01 16.95 20.42 1.74 1.29 1.44 1.69 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 2,398 3,255 4,899 2,530 19.47 15.75 19.77 23.46 2.26 1.71 1.87 1.89 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 1,978 1,887 3,761 2,816 18.42 14.71 18.44 22.90 1.69 1.13 1.32 2.10 10,001 to 25,000 ......................... 3,015 3,667 5,526 3,482 18.15 14.22 18.72 19.37 1.42 1.11 1.14 1.47

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Average Natural Gas Consumption per Commercial Consumer  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

568 579 586 585 593 541 1967-2012 568 579 586 585 593 541 1967-2012 Alabama 355 386 359 397 371 321 1967-2012 Alaska 1,399 1,334 1,258 1,225 1,489 1,515 1967-2012 Arizona 572 565 563 564 577 558 1967-2012 Arkansas 463 534 527 592 590 603 1967-2012 California 562 561 561 564 558 572 1967-2012 Colorado 447 455 429 396 383 355 1967-2012 Connecticut 686 699 729 741 815 764 1967-2012 Delaware 686 698 910 948 810 772 1967-2012 District of Columbia 1,946 1,837 1,818 1,877 1,681 1,572 1967-2012 Florida 891 876 846 888 869 861 1967-2012 Georgia 380 406 421 482 458 429 1967-2012 Hawaii 721 696 691 697 691 727 1980-2012 Idaho 423 438 412 390 433 404 1967-2012 Illinois 686 745 757 680 735 633 1967-2012 Indiana 485 540 506 485 471 423 1967-2012

202

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Dedicated Servers ... 1,175 36,338 30.9 59,377 50.6 1.63 15.79 Laser Printers ... 1,970 33,012 16.8 47,880 24.3 1.45 15.91...

203

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15,313 13,036 19,117 11,911 16.84 12.69 15.39 20.51 1.88 1.41 1.51 1.89 Laser Printers ... 11,298 10,344 15,714 10,523 16.49 12.40 16.27...

204

Commercial Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

74,196 139,823 135,727 135,963 146,941 202,518 1973-2014 Alabama 1,531 1,158 1,217 1,212 1,172 1,830 1989-2014 Alaska 904 830 NA 760 1,083 1,665 1989-2014 Arizona 2,242 1,915 1,828...

205

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings ......

206

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Q 375 261 764 2,711 1,916 161.3 138.2 136.1 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... Q 141 68 Q 1,019 719 Q 137.9 94.1 Packaged...

207

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

664 14,357 27,349 19,987 4,409 468 2,486 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... 476 8,814 14,249 11,629 1,804 50 Q...

208

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

155 155 164 1,565 973 1,638 99.2 159.0 99.9 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... 49 Q 77 722 333 1,268 68.3 Q 60.8 Packaged...

209

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

664 14,357 1,827 2,813 932 626 60 210 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... 476 8,814 805 1,578 523 224 6 Q Packaged...

210

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

122 364 108 1,197 2,649 942 102.2 137.5 114.7 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... 29 297 48 339 3,677 542 84.5 80.8 89.4...

211

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

422 12,881 30.5 2,813 932 273 19,987 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... 476 8,814 18.5 1,578 523 153 11,629...

212

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Service ... 73 11.0 3.0 6.3 11.8 5.8 0.88 0.080 Warehouse and Storage ... 154 7.6 1.4 3.1 6.2 10.8 0.53 0.070 Other...

213

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 580 961 1,266 679 0.11 0.07 Q 0.09 0.79 0.76 0.95 1.03 Warehouse and Storage ... 763 1,522 1,736 1,013 0.09 0.06 0.07 0.09 0.52 0.53...

214

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,628 Service ... 601 3,982 6.6 451 149 44 3,485 Warehouse and Storage ... 464 9,425 20.3 738 244 72 5,034 Other...

215

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

29 87 Q 56 39 97 Food Sales ... 226 Q Q 43 Q 49 Q Q Q Q Food Service ... 297 Q 27 54 34 61 24 42 Q 34 Health Care...

216

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.92 11.27 Public Assembly ... Q Q Q Q Q Public Order and Safety ... Q Q Q Q Q Religious Worship ... Q Q Q Q Q...

217

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

128 1,441 Public Assembly ... 6 547 89 Q Q Public Order and Safety ... Q Q Q Q Q Religious Worship ... Q Q Q Q Q...

218

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1,001 to 5,000 ... 6,922 383 676 986 922 1,283 547 788 466 871 5,001 to 10,000 ... 7,033 369 800 939 738 1,468 420 957 465...

219

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Q 46.6 Q Q Food Service ... 149 48 N 774 622 N 192.5 77.2 N Health Care ... 12 37 187 233 520 1,792 49.5 70.8 104.4...

220

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Education ... 293 Q Q Q 1.04 Q Q Q 0.31 Q Q Q Health Care... Q Q 19 8 Q 1.06 1.08 1.16 Q Q 0.02 0.03...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Activity Education ... 282 Q Q Q 933 Q Q Q 0.30 Q Q Q Health Care... Q Q 17 7 Q 492 786 262 Q Q 0.02 0.03 Office...

222

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

48.8 51.1 Q Food Service ... 47 16 Q 986 664 Q 47.8 24.5 Q Health Care ... 6 17 50 445 835 1,883 13.1 20.5 26.3...

223

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

188.5 Q Q Food Service ... 318 108 Q 986 664 Q 322.9 163.2 Q Health Care ... 32 104 457 445 835 1,883 71.8 125.1 242.9...

224

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

164 44 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ... 297 202 65 23 Q Q N Q N Health Care ... 129 56 38 19 5 5 3 2 1 Inpatient...

225

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

226 1,255 5.6 2.8 Food Service ... 297 1,654 5.6 3.5 Health Care ... 129 3,163 24.6 6.0 Inpatient...

226

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ... 1,654 544 442 345 Q Q N Q N Health Care ... 3,163 165 280 313 157 364 395 514 973...

227

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

226 203 Q N N Q N Food Service ... 297 270 26 Q N N N Health Care ... 129 91 34 Q Q Q N Inpatient...

228

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table A1. Summary Table for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Square Feet per Building (thousand) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 5.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 2.4 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 7.2 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 15.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 35.0 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 70.2 67.0 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 74 10,217 138.6 130.0 200,001 to 500,000 ........................ 26 7,494 287.6 260.0

229

2014-09-18 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on September 18, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

230

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

231

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

232

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey—Commercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses | End-Use Equipment | Conservation Features and Practices Additional Information on: Survey methods, data limitations, and other information supporting the data The 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) was the seventh in the series begun in 1979. The 1999 CBECS estimated that 4.7 million commercial buildings (± 0.4 million buildings, at the 95% confidence level) were present in the United States in that year. Those buildings comprised a total of 67.3 (± 4.6) billion square feet of floorspace. Additional information on 1979 to 1999 trends

233

Commercial Lighting | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lighting Lighting Commercial Lighting At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Lab developed an occupancy sensor can recognize the presence of human occupants more than 90 percent of the time -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and

234

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Trends in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace The addition of commercial buildings and floorspace from 1995 to 1999 continued the general trends noted since 1979 (Figures 1 and 2). The size of the commercial buildings has grown steadily over the twenty years of CBECS. Each year more buildings are added to the sector (new construction or conversion of pre-existing buildings to commercial activity) than are removed (demolition or conversion to non-commercial activity). The definition for the commercial buildings population was changed for the 1995 CBECS which resulted in a slightly smaller buildings population and accounts for the data break in both Figures 1 and 2 (see report "Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector" for complete details). Figure 1. Total Commercial Buildings, 1979 to 1999

235

ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION 5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Prepared for: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS AND END USE ENERGY END USE DIVISION RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BRANCH WASHINGTON, DC 20585 Prepared by: THE ORKAND CORPORATION 8484 GEORGIA AVENUE SILVER SPRING, MD 20910 October 1986 Contract Number DE-AC01-84EI19658 TABLE OF CONTENTS FRONT MATTER Index to Program Descriptions........................................... vi List of Exhibits ....................................................... viii Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................. ix SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................ 1-1 1.1. Summary ....................................................... 1-1

236

EIA - Natural Gas Consumption Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Consumption by End Use U.S. and State consumption by lease and plant, pipeline, and delivered to consumers by sector (monthly, annual). Number of Consumers Number of sales and transported consumers for residential, commercial, and industrial sectors by State (monthly, annual). State Shares of U.S. Deliveries By sector and total consumption (annual). Delivered for the Account of Others Commercial, industrial and electric utility deliveries; percentage of total deliveries by State (annual). Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed Btu per cubic foot of natural gas delivered to consumers by State (annual) and other components of consumption for U.S. (annual). Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot.

237

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full Report Full Report Energy Information Administration > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Overview of Commercial Buildings Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: ● total nearly 4.9 million buildings ● comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace ● consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) ●

238

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Overview of Commercial Buildings Print Report: PDF Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction | Trends | Major Characteristics Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1)

239

Consumption Behavior in Investment/Consumption Problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter we study the consumption behavior of an agent in the dynamic framework of consumption/investment decision making that allows the presence of a subsistence consumption level and the possibility of ...

E. L. Presman

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

101. Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Consumption 1. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

242

The Commercial Energy Consumer: About Whom Are We Speaking?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Who are commercial sector customers, and how do they make decisions about energy consumption and energy efficiency investment? The energy policy field has not done a thorough job of describing energy consumption in the commercial sector. First, the discussion of the commercial sector itself is dominated by discussion of large businesses/buildings. Second, discussion of this portion of the commercial sectors consumption behavior is driven primarily by theory, with very little field data collected on the way commercial sector decision-makers describe their own options, choices, and reasons for taking action. These limitations artificially constrain energy policy options. This paper reviews the extant literature on commercial sector energy consumption behavior and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, it argues that the primary energy policy model of commercial sector energy consumption is a top-down model that uses macro-level investment data to make conclusions about commercial behavior. Missing from the discussion is a model of consumption behavior that builds up to a theoretical framework informed by the micro-level data provided by commercial decision-makers themselves. Such a bottom-up model could enhance the effectiveness of commercial sector energy policy. In particular, translation of some behavioral models from the residential sector to the commercial sector may offer new opportunities for policies to change commercial energy consumption behavior. Utility bill consumption feedback is considered as one example of a policy option that may be applicable to both the residential and small commercial sector.

Payne, Christopher

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

244

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

245

The Commercial Energy Consumer: About Whom Are We Speaking? Christopher Payne, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In particular, it argues that the primary energy policy model of commercial sector energy consumption is a top energy consumption and energy efficiency investment? The energy policy field has not done a thorough job of describing energy consumption in the commercial sector. First, the discussion of the commercial sector itself

246

Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Project Definition Rating Index (EM-PDRI) is a modification of a commercially developed planning tool that has been tested by an EM team specifically for...

247

Automated demand response applied to a set of commercial facilities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Commercial facility demand response refers to voluntary actions by customers that change their consumption of electric power in response to price signals, incentives, or (more)

Lincoln, Donald F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Automated demand response applied to a set of commercial buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Commercial facility demand response refers to voluntary actions by customers that change their consumption of electric power in response to price signals, incentives, or directions (more)

Lincoln, Donald

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Externality of Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Externalities of consumption exist if one individual's consumption of agood or service has positive... utility of another person. Apositive externality increases ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Department of Energy and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch Alliance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch Alliance to Reduce Energy Consumption of Buildings Department of Energy and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch Alliance to Reduce Energy Consumption of Buildings April 9, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Top executives from 19 commercial real estate companies met with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) officials in New York City today to discuss plans to dramatically reduce the sector's energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. The meeting officially launched DOE's Commercial Real Estate Energy Alliance (CREEA), a partnership of commercial real estate owners and operators who have volunteered to work together with DOE to make lasting change in the energy consumption of commercial real estate buildings in the United States. Currently, commercial buildings

251

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

252

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

253

Population, Consumption & the Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/11/2009 1 Population, Consumption & the Environment Alex de Sherbinin Center for International of carbon in 2001 · The ecological footprint, a composite measure of consumption measured in hectares kind of consumption is bad for the environment? 2. How are population dynamics and consumption linked

Columbia University

254

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Survey Methodology Sampling Error, Standard Errors, and Relative Standard Errors The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of buildings that would not be considered “commercial” in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction.

255

A Real-World, Simple Wireless Sensor Network for Monitoring Electrical Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a simple, commercial WSN for monitoring electrical energy consumption. We discuss WSN characteristics, practical problems, constraints and design decisions which mainly are motivated by our concrete...

Cornelia Kappler; Georg Riegel

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Energy Consumption Analyses of Frequently-used HVAC System Types in High Performance Office Buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The high energy consumption of heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in commercial buildings is a hot topic. Office buildings, a typical building set of (more)

Yan, Liusheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Research on Building Energy Consumption Situation in Shanghai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for building energy-saving. REFERENCES [1] Weiding Long. A consider on strategy of building energy-saving in China. HV&AC, 2005, (35):1-8.(In Chinese) [2] Energy Information Administration, Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. http: //www... for building energy-saving. REFERENCES [1] Weiding Long. A consider on strategy of building energy-saving in China. HV&AC, 2005, (35):1-8.(In Chinese) [2] Energy Information Administration, Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. http: //www...

Yang, X.; Tan, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- About the Commercial Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey About the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national sample survey that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, their energy-related building characteristics, and their energy consumption and expenditures. Commercial buildings include all buildings in which at least half of the floorspace is used for a purpose that is not residential, industrial, or agricultural, so they include building types that might not traditionally be considered "commercial," such as schools, correctional institutions, and buildings used for religious worship. The CBECS was first conducted in 1979; the tenth, and most recent survey, will be fielded starting in April 2013 to provide data for calendar year

259

Natural gas consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

gas consumption gas consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 136, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural gas consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 138.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

260

State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

" Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per...

262

CSV File Documentation: Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain consumption estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are four files that contain estimates for all states and years. Consumption in Physical Units contains the consumption estimates in physical units for all states; Consumption in Btu contains the consumption estimates in billion British thermal units (Btu) for all states. There are two data files for thermal conversion factors: the CSV file contains all of the conversion factors used to convert data between physical units and Btu for all states and the United States, and the Excel file shows the state-level conversion factors for coal and natural gas in six Excel spreadsheets. Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named

263

Commercial Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design solutions, and develop guidelines and tools for building designers so that systems are specified and used in an optimal manner. A special emphasis is placed on the daylighting performance of glazings in commercial buildings since lighting is the single largest energy end use and daylighting can improve both visual performance and the quality of the indoor space as well as saving energy. Technical Approach: This project has two major complementary elements. The first is the exploration and assessment of glazing performance in commercial buildings leading to development of design strategies that reduce unnecessary energy use. The final step is creating design guides and tools that make this design knowledge accessible to practitioners, typically carried out in partnership with others. Although the emphasis is energy impacts, e.g. annual energy use, the performance issues addressed in the guides and tools include all that impact the final glazing selection process, e.g. appearance, glare. The second element is an exploration of daylighting strategies for commercial buildings since lighting energy use is the major energy end use in most buildings. This work develops and evaluates new daylighting devices and designs, assesses performance in commercial buildings, and demonstrates system performance using test cells, test rooms and case study buildings. All energy-related aspects of the design solutions, as well as other critical performance issues, are addressed in this work. Results of this work are integrated into the guides and tools described above. Much of this work has been co-supported by utilities and has been carried on in conjunction with participants in an International Energy Agency Daylighting Task.

264

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power d Biomass e Other f Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/Losses g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Alabama 2,159.7 853.9 404.0 638.5 329.9 106.5 185.0 0.1 -358.2 393.7 270.2 1,001.1 494.7 Alaska 779.1 14.1 411.8 334.8 0.0 15.0 3.3 0.1 0.0 56.4 63.4 393.4 266.0 Arizona 1,436.6 425.4 354.9 562.8 293.1 69.9 8.7 3.6 -281.7 368.5 326.0 231.2 511.0 Arkansas 1,135.9 270.2 228.9 388.3 161.1 36.5 76.0 0.6 -25.7 218.3 154.7 473.9 288.9 California 8,364.6 68.9 2,474.2 3,787.8 315.6 342.2

265

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) June 2011 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2009 2009 Consumption Summary Tables Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,906.8 631.0 473.9 583.9 1,688.8 415.4 272.9 -470.3 0.0 383.2 266.0 788.5 469.2 Alaska 630.4 14.5 344.0 255.7 614.1 0.0 16.3 0.0 (s) 53.4 61.0 325.4 190.6 Arizona 1,454.3 413.3 376.7 520.8 1,310.8 320.7 103.5 -279.9 -0.8 400.8 352.1 207.8 493.6 Arkansas 1,054.8 264.1 248.1 343.1 855.3 158.7 126.5 -85.7 0.0 226.3 167.0 372.5

266

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Energy Consumption per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2011 3. Energy Consumption per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Total Consumption State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu 1 North Dakota 99.8 District of Columbia 193.1 Louisiana 585.8 Alaska 277.3 Wyoming 974.7 2 West Virginia 90.9 Wyoming 119.2 Wyoming 568.2 Wyoming 200.7 Louisiana 886.5 3 Missouri 89.4 North Dakota 106.9 Alaska 435.7 North Dakota 172.8 Alaska 881.3 4 Tennessee 87.8 Alaska 94.1 North Dakota 388.9 Louisiana 158.0 North Dakota 768.4 5 Kentucky 87.4 Montana 78.4 Iowa 243.4 Oklahoma 122.3 Iowa 493.6

267

1992 Commercial Buildings Characteristics -- Overview/Executive Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview Overview Overview Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 Percent of Buildings and Floorspace By Census Region divider line Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

268

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 ENERGY CONSUMPTION

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

270

Reduces electric energy consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption · Reduces nonhazardous solid waste and wastewater generation · Potential annual savings, and recycling. Alcoa provides the packaging, automotive, aerospace, and construction markets with a variety

271

Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption (RTECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses...

272

EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities: 1992- 2003 Released Date: December 2004 Page Last Revised: August 2009 These tables provide estimates of commercial sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1992, 1995, 1999 and 2003 based on the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). They also provide estimates of energy consumption and intensities adjusted for the effect of weather on heating, cooling, and ventilation energy use. Total Site Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) Html Excel PDF bullet By Principal Building Activity (Table 1a) html Table 1a excel table 1a. pdf table 1a. Weather-Adjusted by Principal Building Activity (Table 1b) html table 1b excel table 1b pdf table 1b.

273

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

274

Commercial Building Activities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Activities Building Activities Commercial Building Activities The Building Technologies Office commercial buildings effort researches and deploys advanced technologies and systems to reduce energy consumption in commercial buildings. Industry partners and national laboratories help identify market needs and solutions to accelerate the development of highly energy-efficient buildings. This page outlines some of BTO's key projects. 179d Tax Calculator The 179d Calculator can help determine whether improvements qualify for a Federal tax deduction, and allows owners and managers to estimate energy cost savings of efficiency improvements. Advanced Energy Design Guides These recommendations can help designers achieve between 30% and 50% energy savings in a new commercial building.

275

BEDES Terms and Definitions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Terms and Definitions Terms and Definitions BEDES Terms and Definitions On this page you'll find terms and definitions associated with the Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES). Data Specification, or spec A data spec establishes clear field names, definitions, formats (e.g. number, text) and enumerations (categorical lists) It serves as a guide to ensure that data is consistent among a range of sources and uses. For example, Green Button is a data specification that is used for utility customers' energy consumption information. Data Schema A data schema (or model) describes the structural relationships, hierarchies, and dependencies between data fields. For example, a schema might dictate that energy consumption data should be associated with a meter and a space in a building. A data specification could be used as the

276

Balancing Energy Consumption and Food Quality Loss in Supermarket Refrigeration System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Balancing Energy Consumption and Food Quality Loss in Supermarket Refrigeration System J. Cai and J- tion of commercial refrigeration system, featuring balanced system energy consumption and food quality energy consumption and food quality loss, at varying ambient condition, in a supermarket refrigeration

Skogestad, Sigurd

277

Commercial Norms, Commercial Codes, and International Commercial Arbitration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The article defends the incorporation of commercial norms into commercial codes, through provisions such as statute 1-205 of the Uniform Commercial Code. It finds significant reliance on trade usages in international ...

Drahozal, Christopher R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

279

Market Responses to the Sustainability and Energy Performance of Commercial Property  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy consumption within commercial property is associated with ... Incorporating an assessment of the sustainable use of energy into property valuation and investment appraisals is ... and certification in the ...

A. T. Parkinson; A. J. Cooke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995 “A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures” The report can be downloaded in its entirety, or in sections (all in PDF format): Full report (includes all detailed tables; 402 pages, 5.7 MB) Contents: At A Glance (4 pages, 315 KB) Chapters 1 through 5 (61 pages, 363 KB) 1. Overview 2. Major Characteristics of Commercial Buildings 3. End Uses, Energy Sources, and Energy Consumption 4. End-Use Equipment and Energy Conservation 5. Detailed Tables (introductory text) How to Read the Tables Categories of Data in the Tables

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings characteristics tables-number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy consumption and expenditures tables-energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy end-use tables-total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Guide to the 1992 CBECS Detailed Tables Released: Nov 1999 Column Categories Row Categories The first set of detailed tables for the 1992 CBECS, Tables A1 through A70,

282

OpenEI - consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91/0 en Operational water 91/0 en Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/969 This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions.

License

283

An Overview of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 U.S. OECD Europe Japan South Korea China India Brazil Middle East Africa Russia Energy Intensity GDP per capita Population Howard Gruenspecht, The Central Role of...

284

Table A5. Commercial sector indicators and consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

based on: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Monthly Energy Review, DOEEIA-0035(201309) (Washington, DC, September 2013). 2011 and 2012 degree days based on...

285

Reduction of Water Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooling systems using water evaporation to dissipate waste heat, will require one pound of water per 1,000 Btu. To reduce water consumption, a combination of "DRY" and "WET" cooling elements is the only practical answer. This paper reviews...

Adler, J.

286

Fuel Consumption and Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculating fuel consumption and emissions is a typical offline analysis ... simulations or real trajectory data) and the engine speed (as obtained from gear-shift schemes ... as input and is parameterized by veh...

Martin Treiber; Arne Kesting

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Spermatophore consumption in a cephalopod  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Animal behaviour 1001 14 70 Spermatophore consumption in a cephalopod Benjamin J. Wegener...provide evidence of ejaculate and sperm consumption in a cephalopod. Through labelling...combination of female spermatophore consumption and short-term external sperm storage...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Food consumption trends and drivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...original work is properly cited. Food consumption trends and drivers John Kearney...Government policy. A picture of food consumption (availability) trends and projections...largely responsible for these observed consumption trends are the subject of this review...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A System for Energy Saving in Commercial and Organizational Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy consumption in commercial and organizational buildings with ... these buildings in order to achieve a sustainable energy saving. The method provides a direct control to ... behavior that is essential for e...

Hamid Abdi; Michael Fielding; James Mullins

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Rice consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Agricultural... Economics RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Approved as to style and content by: E, We ey F. Peterson (Chair of Committee) James E. Christiansen (Member) Carl Shaf (Member) Daniel I. Padberg (Head of Department) August 1989...

Lan, Jin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

Analysis of the Effects of the Application of Solar Water Heater in Building Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the development of the economy, civilian construction in the Changjiang River delta region is rapidly expanding. The boom in the construction industry definitely results in that the proportion of building energy consumption to whole energy...

Wang, J.; Li, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) works with the commercial building industry to accelerate the uptake of energy efficiency technologies and techniques in both existing and new commercial buildings. By developing, demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the commercial building sector by at least 1,600 TBtu. Key Tools and Resources Use the guides, case studies, and other tools developed by the DOE

293

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

294

About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program The Building Technologies Office (BTO) works to identify and develop strategies and technologies to dramatically reduce commercial building energy consumption. BTO's commercial building efforts focus on highly innovative, cost-effective, energy saving measures-ones that promise large energy savings at cost-effective levels, but are underutilized by the market. These efforts are carried out in collaboration with researchers at national laboratories and partners within industry with the goal of dramatically reducing new and existing commercial building energy consumption. Aggressive Energy Savings Goals BTO is targeting a 20% energy use reduction in commercial buildings by

295

A Look at Principal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Building Activities Office Education Health Care Retail and Service Food Service Food Sales Lodging Religious Worship Public Assembly Public Order and Safety Warehouse and Storage Vacant Other Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) More information on the: Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey A Look at ... Principal Building Activities in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) When you look at a city skyline, most of the buildings you see are commercial buildings. In the CBECS, commercial buildings include office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and many other types of buildings. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial.

296

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

297

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

298

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

299

Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

300

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

302

Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

303

Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

304

Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

305

Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

306

Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

307

Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

308

Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

309

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

310

Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

311

Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

312

Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

313

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

314

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

315

Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

316

Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

317

Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

318

Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

319

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

320

Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

322

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

323

Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

324

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

325

Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

326

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

327

Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

328

Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

329

Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

330

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

331

Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

332

Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

333

Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

334

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

335

Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

336

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

337

Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

338

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

339

Hawaii Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

340

Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

342

Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

343

Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Florida Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection Local water management districts are required to establish programs and

344

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh, and total electricity generation by sector (e.g. wind, solar, nuclear, coal) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh. Source NREL Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Consumption Electricity Generation States Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 2008 State Electricity Generation and Consumption (format: xls) (xlsx, 56.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

345

Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Cool energy savings opportunities in commercial refrigeration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial sector consumes over 13 quads of primary energy annually. Most of this consumption (two-thirds) meets the energy needs of lighting and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning. The largest consuming group of the remaining one-third is commercial refrigeration at about one quad annually (990 trillion Btu), valued at over $7 billion per year to the commercial sector consumer. Potential energy savings are estimated to be about 266 trillion Btu, with consumer savings valued at about $2 billion. This study provides the first known estimates of these values using a bottom-up approach. The authors evaluated numerous self-contained and engineered commercial refrigeration systems in this study, such as: supermarket central systems, beverage merchandisers, ice machines, and vending machines. Typical physical characteristics of each equipment type were identified at the component level for energy consumption. This information was used to form a detailed database from which they arrived at the estimate of 990 trillion Btu energy consumption for the major equipment types used in commercial refrigeration. Based on the implementation of the most cost-effective technology improvements for the seven major equipment types, they estimated an annual potential energy savings of 266 trillion Btu. Much of the savings can be realized with the implementation of high-efficiency fan motors and compressors. In many cases, payback can be realized within three years.

Westphalen, D.; Brodrick, J.; Zogg, R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 . Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2 California 7,858.4 55.3 2,196.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 383.6 928.5 868.6 20.1 1,516.1 1,556.1 1,785.7 3,000.5 Colorado 1,480.8 368.9 476.5 472.9 1,318.3

348

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the most basic, "How many buildings are lit?" to more detailed questions such as, "How many office buildings have compact

349

Procedure for Measuring and Reporting Commercial Building Energy Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure is intended to provide a standard method for measuring and characterizing the energy performance of commercial buildings. The procedure determines the energy consumption, electrical energy demand, and on-site energy production in existing commercial buildings of all types. The performance metrics determined here may be compared against benchmarks to evaluate performance and verify that performance targets have been achieved.

Barley, D.; Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

351

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1992 -- Overview/End-Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

> Overview > Overview 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. End-Use Estimation Methodology The end-use estimates had two main sources: (1) survey data collected by the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) building energy simulations provided by the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. The CBECS provided data on building characteristics and total energy consumption (i.e., for all end uses) for a national sample of commercial buildings. Using data collected by the CBECS, the FEDS engineering modules were used to produce estimates of energy consumption by end use. The FEDS engineering estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the CBECS total energy consumption.

352

The following organizations recognize that the Commercial Buildings Energy Consu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

following organizations recognize that the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) following organizations recognize that the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) provides critically important information to support programs related to energy efficiency in commercial buildings in the United States. These organizations strongly encourage participation in the 2012 CBECS. A.I.D. Development Group American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) American Hotel & Lodging Association American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) APPA, "Leadership in Educational Facilities" Architecture 2030 ASHRAE Boston Properties Brandywine Realty Trust Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) International CannonDesign Cassidy Turley Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing

353

Top 12 Ways to Decrease the Energy Consumption of Your Data Center | ENERGY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Top 12 Ways to Decrease the Energy Consumption of Your Data Top 12 Ways to Decrease the Energy Consumption of Your Data Center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

354

Is Commercial Culture Popular Culture?: A Question for Popular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

culture--be a topic of future exploration in the journal Popular Com- munication? The commercial form together. Whatever form of culture or communication that is coming out of this centripetal process should, and predictable production pro- cesses of cultural products are involved. By this definition, commercial culture

Maranas, Costas

355

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary 9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary Executive Summary Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line The demand for energy in U.S. stores, offices, schools, hospitals, and other commercial buildings has been increasing. This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and "other." The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand.

356

Analysis of energy consumption and indicators of energy use in Bangladesh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rapid growth in the demand for commercial energy in Bangladesh poses serious development constraints in recent years. Per capita energy consumption of Bangladesh is one of the lowest in the world (252 kgoe in 200...

Joarder Mohammad Abdul Munim; Md. Mahbubul Hakim

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Data Center Power Consumption  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Center Power Consumption Center Power Consumption A new look at a growing problem Fact - Data center power density up 10x in the last 10 years 2.1 kW/rack (1992); 14 kW/rack (2007) Racks are not fully populated due to power/cooling constraints Fact - Increasing processor power Moore's law Fact - Energy cost going up 3 yr. energy cost equivalent to acquisition cost Fact - Iterative power life cycle Takes as much energy to cool computers as it takes to power them. Fact - Over-provisioning Most data centers are over-provisioned with cooling and still have hot spots November 2007 SubZero Engineering An Industry at the Crossroads Conflict between scaling IT demands and energy efficiency Server Efficiency is improving year after year Performance/Watt doubles every 2 years Power Density is Going Up

358

Renewable Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation by Energy Use Electricity Generation by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomass, geothermal, etc.) This data was compiled and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Commercial Electric Power Electricity Generation geothermal Industrial PV Renewable Energy Consumption solar wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Elec_.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 19.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

359

Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Price - Local Distribution Companies Residential Price - Marketers Residential % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Average Commercial Price Commercial Price - Local Distribution Companies Commerical Price - Marketers Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Period: Residential Price - Local Distribution Companies Residential Price - Marketers Residential % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Average Commercial Price Commercial Price - Local Distribution Companies Commerical Price - Marketers Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2010 2011 2012 View History District of Columbia 19.95 16.4 2006-2010 Florida 43.91 40.2 2006-2010 Georgia 20.63 18.3 17.8 17.4 2006-2012 Maryland 30.42 28.9 2006-2010 Michigan 63.99 55.8 2006-2010 New York 49.39 37.2 36.7 33.6 2006-2012 Ohio 35.13 20.6 17.9 13.2 2006-2012

360

Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Price - Local Distribution Companies Residential Price - Marketers Residential % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Average Commercial Price Commercial Price - Local Distribution Companies Commerical Price - Marketers Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Period: Residential Price - Local Distribution Companies Residential Price - Marketers Residential % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Average Commercial Price Commercial Price - Local Distribution Companies Commerical Price - Marketers Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2010 2011 2012 View History District of Columbia 19.95 16.4 2006-2010 Florida 43.91 40.2 2006-2010 Georgia 20.63 18.3 17.8 17.4 2006-2012 Maryland 30.42 28.9 2006-2010 Michigan 63.99 55.8 2006-2010 New York 49.39 37.2 36.7 33.6 2006-2012 Ohio 35.13 20.6 17.9 13.2 2006-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A Measurement-Based Model of Energy Consumption for PLC Modems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Measurement-Based Model of Energy Consumption for PLC Modems Wafae Bakkali(,�), Mohamed Tlich is usually defined as a measure of the aggregate traffic transmitted by this device by time unit. Depending obtained for elec- trical energy consumption measurements on commercial PLC modems. Our contributions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

362

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Speaker(s): William Fisk Date: November 13, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Faulkner Commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are designed primarily to maintain a reasonable level of thermal comfort while limiting first costs and energy consumption. However, research conducted predominately within the last decade suggests that commercial building HVAC significantly influences human outcomes other than thermal comfort, including the health, satisfaction, and work performance of the building's occupants. This presentation will review the relationships of these outcomes with HVAC system type, filtration system efficiency, indoor air temperature, and outside air ventilation rate.

363

List of Portfolio Manager property types, definitions, and use details |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

List of Portfolio Manager property types, definitions, and use List of Portfolio Manager property types, definitions, and use details Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

364

Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Construction Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $5 million per site Program Info Funding Source Government of Quebec State Quebec Program Type Rebate Program Provider Agence de l'efficacité énergétique This program helps heavy oil consumers move toward sustainable development while improving their competitive position by reducing their consumption. Financial assistance is offered to carry out various analyses as well as implement energy efficient measures relating to heavy fuel oil or to switch to other forms of energy containing fewer pollutants, such as natural gas,

365

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2000 Previous slide Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by

366

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS%20analysis/CBECS%20lighting/lighting_pdf.html[4/28/2009 9:20:44 AM] Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the

367

CBECS 1992 - Consumption & Expenditures, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Figure on Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Source, 1992 Divider Line The 49 tables present detailed energy consumption and expenditure data for buildings in the commercial sector. This section provides assistance in reading the tables by explaining some of the headings for the data categories. It will also explain the use of row and column factors to compute both the confidence levels of the estimates given in the tables and the statistical significance of differences between the data in two or more categories. The section concludes with a "Quick-Reference Guide" to the statistics in the different tables. Categories of Data in the Tables After Table 3.1, which is a summary table, the tables are grouped into the major fuel tables (Tables 3.2 through 3.13) and the specific fuel tables (Tables 3.14 through 3.29 for electricity, Tables 3.30 through 3.40 for natural gas, Tables 3.41 through 3.45 for fuel oil, and Tables 3.46 through 3.47 for district heat). Table 3.48 presents energy management and DSM data as reported by the building respondent. Table 3.49 presents data on participation in electric utility-sponsored DSM programs as reported by both the building respondent and the electricity supplier.

368

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

369

Indexes of Consumption and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Source: Energy Information Administration and Federal Reserve Board. History of Shipments This chart presents indices of 14 years (1980-1994) of historical data of manufacturing production indexes and Purchased (Offsite-Produced) Energy consumption, using 1992 as the base year (1992 = 100). Indexing both energy consumption and production best illustrates the trends in output and consumption. Taken separately, these two indices track the relative growth rates within the specified industry. Taken together, they reveal trends in energy efficiency. For example, a steady increase in output, coupled with a decline in energy consumption, represents energy efficiency gains. Likewise, steadily rising energy consumption with a corresponding decline in output illustrates energy efficiency losses.

370

California commercial building energy benchmarking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and hence are reluctant to share their data. The California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), the primary source of data for Cal-Arch, is a unique source of information on commercial buildings in California. It has not been made public; however, it was made available by CEC to LBNL for the purpose of developing a public benchmarking tool.

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Definition: Offshore Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Offshore Wind Offshore Wind (Redirected from Offshore Wind) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Offshore Wind Wind turbine installations built near-shore or further offshore on coastlines for commercial electricity generation.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition View on Reegle Reegle Definition No reegle definition available Related Terms wind turbine, wind farm, near-shore, offshore References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Offshore_wind_power Retrie LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Offshore_Wind&oldid=586583" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

372

Technology Commercialization Fund - EERE Commercialization Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fund The Technology Commercialization Fund (TCF) is designed to complement angel investment or early stage corporate product development. The fund totaled nearly 14.3 million in...

373

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. Complete sets of RSE tables (What is an RSE?) are also available in PDF format 1999 Summary Tables for all principal building activities Summary Tables For All Principal Building Activities Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Age of Building (years)

374

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991--Combined Consumption and Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

< < Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Overview Full Report Tables & Spreadsheets This report presents national-level estimates about energy use and consumption in the manufacturing sector as well as manufacturers' fuel-switching capability. Contact: Stephanie.battle@eia.doe.gov Stephanie Battle Director, Energy Consumption Division Phone: (202) 586-7237 Fax: (202) 586-0018 URL: http://www.eia.gov/emeu/mecs/mecs91/consumption/mecs1a.html File Last Modified: May 25, 1996

375

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

376

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table C6. Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric Power e Biomass Geothermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total g Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total d Wood and Waste f Alabama ............. 0.0 25.5 7.0 (s) 2.7 0.2 0.0 10.0 0.0 0.9 0.0 75.9 112.4 144.8 257.2 Alaska ................. 9.4 16.9 10.1 0.1 0.6 0.7 0.0 11.5 0.0 0.3 0.1 9.7 48.0 20.2 68.2 Arizona ............... 0.0 33.1 6.8 (s) 1.5 0.7 0.0 8.9 0.0 0.5 (s) 100.7 143.2 202.3 345.5 Arkansas ............. 0.0 40.6 3.6 (s) 1.2 0.4 0.0 5.2 0.0 1.3 0.0 41.4 88.6 86.1 174.7 California ............ 0.0 250.9 47.9 0.1 8.7 1.4 0.0 58.1 (s) 17.4 0.7 418.9 746.2 809.9 1,556.1 Colorado ............. 3.2 57.6 5.9 (s) 2.9 0.2 0.0 9.1 0.0 1.2 0.2

377

Notices Definitions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

742 Federal Register 742 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 228 / Tuesday, November 27, 2012 / Notices Definitions ................................................................................................. https://eiaweb.inl.gov/clearance2012/eiaweb-frm886Defs.png Sanctions, Burden & Confidentiality ......................................................... https://eiaweb.inl.gov/clearance2012/eiaweb-frm886Info.png SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This information collection request contains: (1) OMB No. 1905-0191; (2) Information Collection Request Title: Annual Survey of Alternative Fueled Vehicles; (3) Type of Request: Revision of currently approved collection; (4a) Purpose: Form EIA-886 is an annual survey that collects information on the number and type of AFVs and other advanced technology vehicles that

378

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Office 17% 17% 19% Mercantile 16% 14% 18% Retail 6% 9% 5% Enclosed & Strip Malls 10% 4% 13% Education 14% 8% 11% Warehouse and Storage 14% 12% 7% Lodging 7% 3% 7% Service 6% 13% 4% Public Assembly 5% 6% 5% Religious Worship 5% 8% 2% Health Care 4% 3% 8% Inpatient 3% 0% 6% Outpatient 2% 2% 2% Food Sales 2% 5% 5% Food Service 2% 6% 6% Public Order and Safety 2% 1% 2% Other 2% 2% 4% Vacant 4% 4% 1% Total 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Total Floorspace Total Buildings Primary Energy Consumption 1) For primary energy intensities by building type, see Table 3.1.13. Total CBECS 2003 commercial building floorspace is 71.7 billion SF. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table C1A

379

Urine definition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

definition definition Name: durwood Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: What material is urine composed of? Replies: Urine is normally composed of water and wasted products filtered form the body. The kidney produces urine. The other main function of the kidney is to regulate fluid balance in the body. It performs this function by using a selective osmosis system. Basically, the way it works is that electrolytes (dissolved salts like sodium, potassium, calcium, carbonate, chloride) are pumped back into or out of urine and blood so that in the end, just the right amounts of electrolyte and water exit the kidney blood vein. The rest ends up in urine. Interestingly, normal urine is sterile and has no bacteria. psych Urine contains 95% water and 5% solids. More than 1000 different mineral salts and compounds are estimated to be in urine. So far, our scientific community knows of about 200 elements. Some substances are: vitamins, amino acids, antibodies, enzymes, hormones, antigens, interleukins, proteins, immunoglobulins, gastric secretory depressants, tolergens, immunogens, uric acid, urea, proteoses, directin, H-11 (a growth inhibitory factor in human cancer), and urokinase. Believe it or not, scientists have know for years that urine is antibacterial, anti-protozoal, anti-fungal, anti- viral, and anti-tuberculostatic!

380

Manufacturing-Industrial Energy Consumption Survey(MECS) Historical  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

> Historical Publications > Historical Publications Manufacturing Establishments reports, data tables and questionnaires Released: May 2008 The Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) is a periodic national sample survey devoted to measuring energy consumption and related issues in the manufacturing sector. The MECS collects data on energy consumption, purchases and expenditures, and related issues and behaviors. Links to previously published documents are given below. Beginning in 1998, reports were only issued electronically. Additional electronic releases are available on the MECS Homepage. The basic unit of data collection for this survey is the manufacturing establishment. Industries are selected according to definitions found in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), which replace the earlier Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Commercialization | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercialization Commercialization Commercialization See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. Commercialization is the process by which technologies and innovations developed in the lab make their way to market. By licensing patents or using Energy Department facilities, researchers from the private sector and academia are able to take advantage of federal investments into basic science research, while researchers are able to ensure that their discoveries have a life beyond the lab. The Energy Department also helps entrepreneurs, small business owners and

382

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables 28 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 1. In previous MECS, the term "primary energy" was used to denote the "first use" of...

383

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Introduction The market for natural gas has been changing for quite some time. As part of natural gas...

384

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

vehicle aging have an additional but unknown effect on the MPG of individual vehicles. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 27 Of the...

385

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Demand and Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Demand and Consumption Electricity Demand and Consumption Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). The sectors included are: agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial (mining, food processing, wood and paper, chemicals, basic metals, other minor sectors); commercial; and residential. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago)

386

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Showerheads Showerheads Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the water consumption level of showerheads since 1992. A showerhead is a perforated nozzle that distributes water over a large solid angle at point of use, generally overhead of the bather. They are used widely in residential and commercial settings. The current standard will save approximately 6 quads of energy and result in approximately $120 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2013. The standard will avoid about 329.2 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 64.5 million automobiles. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for Plumbing Products Test Procedure.

387

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Faucets Faucets Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the water consumption level of faucets since 1992. This standard covers kitchen faucets and kitchen replacement aerators, lavatory faucets and lavatory replacement aerators, and metering faucets. These faucets are used widely in residential and commercial settings. The current standard will save approximately 0.9 quads of energy and result in approximately $25.2 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2013. The standard will avoid about 49.1 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 9.6 million automobiles. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for Plumbing Products Test Procedure.

388

Residential and commercial buildings data book: Third edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in September, 1986 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; and Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. 12 refs., 59 figs., 118 tabs.

Amols, G.R.; Howard, K.B.; Nicholls, A.K.; Guerra, T.D.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Lattice Definitions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Orbit Stability Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Main Orbit Stability Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Main Parameters Lattice Definitions APS storage ring lattice consists of 40 almost identical sectors. Each sector contains two dipoles, ten quadrupoles, seven sextupoles and also has a 5-m-long straight section for placement of Insertion Devices (IDs) or other equipment. Four of these straight sections are occupied with rf cavities, one straight section is used for injection, all others are available for IDs. Also, each sector contains eight steering magnets with both horizontal and vertical correction coils and 11 beam position monitors (BPMs). Due to some space limitations, there are several sectors that have less steering magnets or BPMs. Simple lattice description - one typical sector (elegant input file)

390

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) consumed 36 percent of energy for space heating and 21 percent for lighting (Figure 2) The CBECS is a national-level sample survey conducted quadrennially of buildings greater than 1,000 square feet in size that devote more than 50

391

Limited Lawn & Limited Commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limited Lawn & Ornamental Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance Review and Exams Limited for Commercial Landscape Maintenance Application: http://www.flaes.org/ pdf/lndspckt.pdf Limited Certification.floridatermitehelp.org or request by phone at 850-921-4177. Limited Lawn & Ornamental/Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance

Watson, Craig A.

392

Limited Lawn & Limited Commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limited Lawn & Ornamental Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance Review and Exams Limited-921-4177. Limited Lawn & Ornamental/Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance: Ornamental and Turf Pest Control (SM 7&O/Structural only). See web locations below for applications. Limited Certification for Commercial Landscape

Jawitz, James W.

393

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF PDF Lighting in Commercial Buildings Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the most basic, "How many buildings are lit?" to more detailed questions such as, "How many office buildings have compact

394

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview > Tables Overview > Tables 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Tables Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. divider line Tables - (file size 31,655 bytes), pages 6. - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader Consumption of All Major Fuels by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for All Major Fuels, 1992 Consumption of Electricity by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for Electricity, 1992

395

SF6432-CS Commercial Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7/31/13 7/31/13 Page 1 of 18 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-CS (07/2013) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COMMERCIAL SERVICES THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE COVER PAGE OR SECTION I. (CTRL+CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO ADVANCE DIRECTLY TO THAT SECTION) ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS (Ts&Cs) APPLICABLE LAW ASSIGNMENT BANKRUPTCY CANCELLATION OR TERMINATION FOR CONVENIENCE CHANGES COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS DEFINITIONS DISPUTES EXCUSABLE DELAYS EXPORT CONTROL ORDER OF PRECEDENCE PAYMENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION PROGRAM

396

World energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical and projected world energy consumption information is displayed. The information is presented by region and fuel type, and includes a world total. Measurements are in quadrillion Btu. Sources of the information contained in the table are: (1) history--Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Annual 1992, DOE/EIA-0219(92); (2) projections--EIA, World Energy Projections System, 1994. Country amounts include an adjustment to account for electricity trade. Regions or country groups are shown as follows: (1) Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), US (not including US territories), which are included in other (ECD), Canada, Japan, OECD Europe, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, other Europe, and other OECD; (2) Eurasia--China, former Soviet Union, eastern Europe; (3) rest of world--Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other countries not included in any other group. Fuel types include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and other. Other includes hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, biomass, wind, and other renewable sources.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices by Sales Type Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices by Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial/Institutional An energy-consuming sector that consists of service-providing facilities and equipment of: businesses; Federal, State, and local governments; and other private and public organizations, such as religious, social, or fraternal groups. The commercial sector includes institutional living quarters. It also includes sewage treatment facilities. Common uses of energy associated with this sector include space heating, water heating, air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, cooking, and running a wide variety of other equipment. Note: This sector includes generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the activities of the above-mentioned commercial establishments.

398

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

No. 2 Distillate Prices by Sales Type, Selected States No. 2 Distillate Prices by Sales Type, Selected States Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial/Institutional An energy-consuming sector that consists of service-providing facilities and equipment of: businesses; Federal, State, and local governments; and other private and public organizations, such as religious, social, or fraternal groups. The commercial sector includes institutional living quarters. It also includes sewage treatment facilities. Common uses of energy associated with this sector include space heating, water heating, air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, cooking, and running a wide variety of other equipment. Note: This sector includes generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the activities of the above-mentioned commercial establishments.

399

Electricity Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Electricity Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_electricity_net_consumption_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 50.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

400

Biofuels Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Consumption Biofuels Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual biofuels consumption and production data by country was compiled by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Data is presented as thousand barrels per day. Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels Biofuels Consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_biofuels_production_2000_2010thousand_barrels_per_day.csv (csv, 9.3 KiB) text/csv icon total_biofuels_consumption_2000_2010thousand_barrels_per_day.csv (csv, 9.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2000 - 2010 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Coal consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal Coal consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_coal_consumption_1980_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 38.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

402

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching (MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey 1994 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Logo Full Report - (file size 5.4 MB) pages:531 Selected Sections (PDF format) Contents (file size 56 kilobytes, 10 pages). Overview (file size 597 kilobytes, 11 pages). Chapters 1-3 (file size 265 kilobytes, 9 pages). Chapter 4 (file size 1,070 kilobytes, 15 pages). Appendix A - Detailed Tables Tables A1 - A8 (file size 1,031 kilobytes, 139 pages). Tables A9 - A23 (file size 746 kilobytes, 119 pages). Tables A24 - A29 (file size 485 kilobytes, 84 pages). Tables A30 - A44 (file size 338 kilobytes, 39 pages). Appendix B (file size 194 kilobytes, 24 pages). Appendix C (file size 116 kilobytes, 16 pages).

403

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Buildings Consortium Commercial Buildings Consortium Sandy Fazeli National Association of State Energy Officials sfazeli@naseo.org; 703-299-8800 ext. 17 April 2, 2013 Supporting Consortium for the U.S. Department of Energy Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Many energy savings opportunities in commercial buildings remain untapped, underserved by the conventional "invest-design-build- operate" approach * The commercial buildings sector is siloed, with limited coordination

404

Commercial Feeding Stuffs, September 1, 1924 to August 31, 1925.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the most reliable data available. Definitions not from A. F. C. 0. are marked with an asterisk (*). COMMERCIAL FEEDING STUFFS 13 and C eno Alfalfa Products Llfalfa Meal is the entire alfalfa hay ground and does not contain an ad- %ure of ground... the most reliable data available. Definitions not from A. F. C. 0. are marked with an asterisk (*). COMMERCIAL FEEDING STUFFS 13 and C eno Alfalfa Products Llfalfa Meal is the entire alfalfa hay ground and does not contain an ad- %ure of ground...

Youngblood, B. (Bonney); Fuller, F. D. (Frederick Driggs); Pearce, S. D.

1925-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor space In Occupied Floor space In Vacant Floor space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4,590 2,600 2,563 37 39 42 8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,532 334 331 3 48 51 6 5,001 to 10,000 946 250 247 3 36 38 6 10,001 to 25,000

406

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Residential - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the MECS About the MECS Survey forms Maps MECS Terminology Archives Features First 2010 Data Press Release 2010 Data Brief Other End Use Surveys Commercial Buildings - CBECS Residential - RECS Transportation DOE Uses MECS Data Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints Associated Analysis Early-release estimates from the 2010 MECS show that energy consumption in the manufacturing sector decreased between 2006 and 2010 MECS 2006-2010 - Release date: March 28, 2012 Energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector fell from 21,098 trillion Btu (tBtu) in 2006 to 19,062 tBtu in 2010, a decline of almost 10 percent, based on preliminary estimates released from the 2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This decline continues the downward trend in manufacturing energy use since the 1998 MECS report.

407

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by 2005, and by 2020 gas use exceeds coal by 29 percent. Oil currently provides a larger share of world energy consumption than any other energy source and is expected to remain in that position

408

Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Commercial Refrigration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report documents the energy consumption of commercial refrigeration equipment (CRE) in the U.S. and evaluated the energy savings potential of various technologies and energy efficiency measures that could be applied to such equipment.

409

A Market-Specific Methodology for a Commercial Building Energy Performance Index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The scaling of energy efficiency initiatives in the commercial building sector ... methodologies that do not adequately model patterns of energy consumption, nor provide accurate measures of relative energy perfo...

Constantine E. Kontokosta

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Lubricant oil consumption effects on diesel exhaust ash emissions using a sulfur dioxide trace technique and thermogravimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detailed experimental study was conducted targeting lubricant consumption effects on ,diesel exhaust ash levels using a model year 2002 5.9L diesel engine, high and low Sulfur commercial lubricants, and clean diesel ...

Plumley, Michael J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Definition: PV module | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: PV module Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png PV module A unit comprised of several PV cells, and the principal unit of a PV array; it is intended to generate direct current power under un-concentrated sunlight.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A solar panel is a set of solar photovoltaic modules electrically connected and mounted on a supporting structure. A photovoltaic module is a packaged, connected assembly of photovoltaic cells. The solar module can be used as a component of a larger photovoltaic system to generate and supply electricity in commercial and residential applications. Each module is rated by its DC output power under standard test conditions (STC), and

412

Definition: Natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Natural gas A hydrocarbon gas obtained from underground sources, often in association with petroleum and coal deposits.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Natural gas is a naturally occurring hydrocarbon gas mixture consisting primarily of methane, but commonly includes varying amounts of other higher alkanes and even a lesser percentage of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and hydrogen sulfide. Natural gas is an energy source often used for heating, cooking, and electricity generation. It is also used as fuel for vehicles and as a chemical feedstock in the manufacture of plastics and other commercially important organic chemicals. Natural gas is found in

413

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Energy Consumption by End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End Use Sector Energy Consumption by End Use Sector International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 25. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 25 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 26. OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 26 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 27. Growth in OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2004 and 2030 Figure 27 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 28. OECD and Non-OECD Commercial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 28 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

414

Commercial Kitchen & Food Service Equipment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Commercial Commercial Industrial Lighting Energy Smart Grocer Program HVAC Program Shell Measures Commercial Kitchen & Food Service Equipment Plug Load New...

415

Lighting in Commercial Buildings (1986 data) -- Executive Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings > Executive Summary 6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings > Executive Summary Executive Summary Lighting represents a substantial fraction of commercial electricity consumption. A wide range of initiatives in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Strategy have focused on commercial lighting as a potential source of energy conservation. This report provides a statistical profile of commercial lighting, to examine the potential for lighting energy conservation in commercial buildings. The principal conclusion from this analysis is that energy use for lighting could be reduced by as much as a factor of four using currently available technology. The analysis is based primarily on the Energy Information Administration's(EIA) 1986 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The more recent 1989 survey had less detail on lighting, for budget reasons. While changes have occurred in the commercial building stock since 1986, the relationships identified by this analysis are expected to remain generally valid. In addition, the analytic approach developed here can be applied to the data that will be collected in the 1992 CBECS.

416

DOETEIAO32l/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

General information about EIA data on energy consumption may be obtained from Wray Smith, Director, Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202- 252-1617); Lynda T. Carlson,...

417

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

418

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

419

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

420

Fuel Consumption | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Road Load Equation Jan 15 2014 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Glen E. Johnson Tennessee Tech University, Cookeville Energy and Transportation Science Division Seminar National Transportation Research Center, Room C-04 CONTACT : Email: Andreas Malikopoulos Phone:865.382.7827 Add to Calendar SHARE Ambitious goals have been set to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions over the next generation. Starting from first principles, we will derive relations to connect fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions to a vehicle's road load equation. The model suggests approaches to facilitate achievement of future fuel and emissions targets. About the speaker: Dr. Johnson is a 1973 Mechanical Engineering graduate of Worcester

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Consumption Fuel consumption is estimated from RTECS data on the vehicle stock (Chapter 2) and miles traveled (Chapter 3), in combination with vehicle fuel efficiency ratings, adjusted to account for individual driving circumstances. The first two sections of this chapter present estimates of household vehicle fuel efficiency and household fuel consumption calculated from these fuel efficiency estimates. These sections also discuss variations in fuel efficiency and consumption based on differences in household and vehicle characteristics. The third section presents EIA estimates of the potential savings from replacing the oldest (and least fuel-efficient) household vehicles with new (and more fuel-efficient) vehicles. The final section of this chapter focuses on households receiving (or eligible to receive) supplemental income under

422

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

423

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

424

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

425

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 17 Table C12. Total Energy Consumption, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Total Energy Consumption Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP State Trillion Btu State Billion Chained (2005) Dollars State Thousand Btu per Chained (2005) Dollar 1 Texas 12,206.6 California 1,735.4 Louisiana 19.7 2 California 7,858.4 Texas 1,149.9 Wyoming 17.5 3 Florida 4,217.1 New York 1,016.4 North Dakota 15.4 4 Louisiana 4,055.3 Florida 661.1 Alaska 14.3 5 Illinois 3,977.8 Illinois 582.1 Mississippi 13.8 6 Ohio 3,827.6 Pennsylvania 500.4 Kentucky 13.5

426

Energy Consumption in Access Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a comparison of energy consumption of access networks. We consider passive optical networks, fiber to the node, point-to-point optical systems and WiMAX. Optical access...

Baliga, Jayant; Ayre, Robert; Sorin, Wayne V; Hinton, Kerry; Tucker, Rodney S

427

The Wealth-Consumption Ratio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive new estimates of total wealth, the returns on total wealth, and the wealth effect on consumption. We estimate the prices of aggregate risk from bond yields and stock returns using a no-arbitrage model. Using these ...

Verdelhan, Adrien Frederic

428

Progressive consumption : strategic sustainable excess  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trends in the marketplace show that urban dwellers are increasingly supporting locally produced foods. This thesis argues for an architecture that responds to our cultures consumptive behaviors. Addressing the effects of ...

Bonham, Daniel J. (Daniel Joseph MacLeod)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Energy consumption of building 39  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MIT community has embarked on an initiative to the reduce energy consumption and in accordance with the Kyoto Protocol. This thesis seeks to further expand our understanding of how the MIT campus consumes energy and ...

Hopeman, Lisa Maria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Energy Consumption Profile for Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

317 Chapter 12 Energy Consumption Profile for Energy Harvested WSNs T. V. Prabhakar, R Venkatesha.............................................................................................318 12.2 Energy Harvesting ...................................................................................318 12.2.1 Motivations for Energy Harvesting...............................................319 12

Langendoen, Koen

431

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S Y M n i 1 y 2 i (W i ) (W i 1) , Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: Methodological Report 1985. Although this report describes 44...

432

Asset Pricing with Countercyclical Household Consumption Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Asset Pricing with Countercyclical Household Consumption Risk George M. Constantinides that shocks to household consumption growth are negatively skewed, persistent, and countercyclical and play that drives the conditional cross-sectional moments of household consumption growth. The estimated model

Sadeh, Norman M.

433

Optimal consumption strategies under model uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal consumption strategies under model uncertainty Christian Burgert, Ludger R of finding optimal consumption strategies in an incomplete semimartingale market model under model uncertainty. The quality of a consumption strategy is measured by not only one probability measure

Rüschendorf, Ludger

434

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption of commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities) during Demand Response (DR. Keywords: demand response, baseline models, load prediction, error analysis, variability, measurement in the past ­ either with relays that interrupt power to air conditioners and water heaters [1], [2

435

Fast Nonconvex Model Predictive Control for Commercial Refrigeration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

its capabil- ity to minimize the total cost of energy for a commercial refrigeration system while multi-zone refrigeration system, consisting of several cooling units that share a common compressor. This corresponds roughly to 2% of the entire electricity consumption in the country. Refrigerated goods constitute

436

Commercial Building Asset Rating Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slides from a Commercial Building Initiative webinar outlining the Commercial Building Asset Rating Program on August 23, 2011.

437

Symbiosis Biofeedstock Conference: Expanding Commercialization...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biofeedstock Conference: Expanding Commercialization of Mutualistic Microbes to Increase Feedstock Production Symbiosis Biofeedstock Conference: Expanding Commercialization of...

438

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

439

Renae Speck Commercialization Manager  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manager Renae Speck, Ph.D is a Commercialization Manager in the Office of Technology Transfer in the Partnership Directorate at the United States Department of Energy's Oak...

440

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Average Commercial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves...

442

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

443

Commercial Marketing Toolkit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial-Marketing-Toolkit Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE Sectors Technology...

444

OpenEI - Electricity Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/877 Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). License

Type of License:  Other (please specify below)
Source of data

445

Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

ARM 12-14-101 - Commercial Use Permitting Requirements: Definitions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

permitting requirements for land within the jurisdiction of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2009 Legal Citation ARM...

447

Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study's scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

Hamby, D.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study`s scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

Hamby, D.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector and Source Consumption by Sector and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

450

Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation...

451

New York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption |...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption New York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The New York State Homes and...

452

Energy Information Administration - Transportation Energy Consumption...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys energy used by vehicles EIA conducts numerous energy-related surveys and other information programs. In general, the...

453

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Trends in Buildings Floorspace Data tables Commercial Buildings Trend—Detail Commercial Floorspace Trend—Detail Background: Adjustment to data Trends in Buildings and Floorspace Each year buildings are added to and removed from the commercial buildings sector. Buildings are added by new construction or conversion of existing buildings from noncommercial to commercial activity. Buildings are removed by demolition or conversion from commercial to noncommercial activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the United States; by 1992, the number increased 27 percent to 4.8 million (an average annual increase of 1.8%) (Figure 1). In 1995, the estimated number declined to 4.6 million buildings, but it is unlikely that there was an actual decline in the number of buildings. To understand the apparent decline, two factors should be considered—the change in the way that the target population of commercial buildings was defined in 1995 and the uncertainty of estimates from sample surveys:

454

Nanotechnology Commercialization in Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanotechnology Commercialization in Oregon February 27, 2012 Portland State University Physics Seminar Robert D. "Skip" Rung President and Executive Director #12;2 Nanotechnology Commercialization on "green" nanotechnology and gap fund portfolio company examples #12;3 Goals of the National Nanotechnology

Moeck, Peter

455

The Impact of Using Derived Fuel Consumption Maps to Predict...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The Impact of Using Derived Fuel Consumption Maps to Predict Fuel Consumption The Impact of Using Derived Fuel Consumption Maps to Predict Fuel Consumption Poster presented at the...

456

Commercial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6

457

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Title Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51860 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Diamond, Richard C., Craig P. Wray, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Duo Wang Start Page Chapter Abstract Previous research suggests that HVAC thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings suffer from thermal losses, such as those caused by duct air leakage and poor duct location. Due to a lack of metrics and data showing the potentially large energy savings from reducing these losses, the California building industry has mostly overlooked energy efficiency improvements in this area. The purpose of this project is to obtain the technical knowledge needed to properly measure and understand the energy efficiency of these systems. This project has three specific objectives: to develop metrics and diagnostics for determining system efficiencies, to develop design and retrofit information that the building industry can use to improve these systems, and to determine the energy impacts associated with duct leakage airflows in an existing large commercial building. The primary outcome of this project is the confirmation that duct leakage airflows can significantly impact energy use in large commercial buildings: our measurements indicate that adding 15% duct leakage at operating conditions leads to an increase in fan power of about 25 to 35%. This finding is consistent with impacts of increased duct leakage airflows on fan power that have been predicted by previous simulations. Other project outcomes include the definition of a new metric for distribution system efficiency, the demonstration of a reliable test for determining duct leakage airflows, and the development of new techniques for duct sealing. We expect that the project outcomes will lead to new requirements for commercial thermal distribution system efficiency in future revisions of California's Title 24.

458

CBECS 1989 - Energy End-use Intensities in Commercial Buildings -- Detailed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication > Detailed Tables Publication > Detailed Tables 1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Detailed Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Table Organization The following 13 tables present detailed energy end-use consumption data from the 1989 CBECS. Summary tables for all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat) appear first, followed by separate tables for each of the four major fuels. Within each energy source’s group of tables, there is a table showing end-use consumption, a table showing end-use intensities (consumption per square foot), and a table (except for fuel oil and district heat) showing the end-use shares of total consumption.

459

Sentinel: Occupancy Based HVAC Actuation using Existing WiFi Infrastructure within Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sentinel: Occupancy Based HVAC Actuation using Existing WiFi Infrastructure within Commercial.agarwal@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT Commercial buildings contribute to 19% of the primary energy consumption in the US, with HVAC systems accounting for 39.6% of this usage. To reduce HVAC energy use, prior studies have pro- posed using

Gupta, Rajesh

460

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Where does RECS square footage data come from? Where does RECS square footage data come from? RECS 2009 - Release date: July 11, 2012 The size of a home is a fixed characteristic strongly associated with the amount of energy consumed within it, particularly for space heating, air conditioning, lighting, and other appliances. As a part of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), trained interviewers measure the square footage of each housing unit. RECS square footage data allow comparison of homes with varying characteristics. In-person measurements are vital because many alternate data sources, including property tax records, real estate listings, and, respondent estimates use varying definitions and under-estimate square footage as defined for the purposes of evaluating residential energy consumption.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Year Constructed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Constructed Year Constructed Year Constructed More than one-third (37 percent) of the floorspace in commercial buildings was constructed since 1980 and more than one-half (55 percent) after 1969 (Figure 1). Less than one-third of floorspace was constructed before 1960. Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Floorspace by Year Constructed, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Floorspace by Year Constructed, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Overall, relatively more buildings than floorspace were represented in the older age categories and more floorspace than buildings in the newer categories (see graphical comparison) because older buildings were smaller than more recently constructed buildings (Figure 2). Buildings constructed prior to 1960 were 11,700 square feet in size on average while those constructed after 1959 were 37 percent larger at 16,000 square feet per building.

462

Commercial Real Estate: Looking for Energy Solutions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Real Estate: Real Estate: Looking for Energy Solutions Turn to an ENERGY STAR ® Service and Product Provider Partner ENERGY STAR Service and Product Providers (SPPs) have the experience and tools to implement energy-efficient strategies that are right for you. Following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidelines for Energy Management, a proven strategy devel- oped from ENERGY STAR partner successes, SPPs can help your organization gain control of energy consumption and costs. Energy Efficiency Benefits the Commercial Real Estate Industry, Your Tenants, and the Environment ENERGY STAR SPPs can help building owners and managers reap the financial and environmental benefits of superior energy efficiency. Energy use is the single largest operating expense in commercial office

463

Technology data characterizing water heating in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial-sector conservation analyses have traditionally focused on lighting and space conditioning because of their relatively-large shares of electricity and fuel consumption in commercial buildings. In this report we focus on water heating, which is one of the neglected end uses in the commercial sector. The share of the water-heating end use in commercial-sector electricity consumption is 3%, which corresponds to 0.3 quadrillion Btu (quads) of primary energy consumption. Water heating accounts for 15% of commercial-sector fuel use, which corresponds to 1.6 quads of primary energy consumption. Although smaller in absolute size than the savings associated with lighting and space conditioning, the potential cost-effective energy savings from water heaters are large enough in percentage terms to warrant closer attention. In addition, water heating is much more important in particular building types than in the commercial sector as a whole. Fuel consumption for water heating is highest in lodging establishments, hospitals, and restaurants (0.27, 0.22, and 0.19 quads, respectively); water heating`s share of fuel consumption for these building types is 35%, 18% and 32%, respectively. At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and refined a base-year data set characterizing water heating technologies in commercial buildings as well as a modeling framework. We present the data and modeling framework in this report. The present commercial floorstock is characterized in terms of water heating requirements and technology saturations. Cost-efficiency data for water heating technologies are also developed. These data are intended to support models used for forecasting energy use of water heating in the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

New Hampshire Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

465

South Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

466

North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

467

District of Columbia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

468

New Jersey Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

469

West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

470

North Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

471

South Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

472

U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total Consumption

473

U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

474

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

475

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

476

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

477

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

478

US ESC TN Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ESC TN ESC TN Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US ESC TN Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Tennessee households consume an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33% higher than the national average and among the highest in the nation, but spending for electricity is closer to average due to relatively low electricity prices. * Tennessee homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of the country.

479

Toolkit Definitions | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Toolkit Definitions The following are definitions for common terms used within the adoption, compliance, and enforcement toolkits. Building code refers to a law or regulation used by state or local governments that establishes specifications for the design and construction of residential or commercial buildings. Building codes help ensure that new and existing residential and commercial structures meet minimum health, safety, and performance standards. In addition, building codes offer a baseline to which structures can be compared. Code adoption refers to the vehicle that establishes code requirements and their administration. Adoption can be mandatory, voluntary, or a combination of the two. The means of adoption vary with respect to the

480

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use Residual Fuel Oil by End Use Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Sales for all other energy-consuming sectors not included elsewhere. Commercial An energy-consuming sector that consists of service-providing facilities and equipment of nonmanufacturing businesses; Federal, State, and local governments; and other private and public organizations, such as religious, social, or fraternal groups. The commercial sector includes institutional living quarters. Common uses of energy associated with this sector include space heating, water heating, air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, cooking and running a wide variety of other equipment. Electric Utility An energy-consuming sector that consists of electricity only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public -- i.e., NAICS 22 plants. Volumes directly imported and used by the electric power companies are included.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "definition commercial consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Energy Consumption by End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 2 - Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector In the IEO2007 projections, end-use energy consumption depends on resource endowment, economic growth, and other political, social, and demographic factors.. One way of looking at the future of world energy markets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transportation sector, which is dominated by petroleum-based liquids products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and political, social,

482

New Zealand Energy Data: Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to oil and other petroleum products. Included here are two oil consumption datasets: quarterly petrol consumption by sector (agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial; commercial; residential; transport industry; and international transport), from 1974 to 2010; and oil consumption by fuel type (petrol, diesel, fuel oil, aviation fuels, LPG, and other), also for the years 1974 through 2010. The full 2010 Energy Data File is available: http://www.med.govt.nz/upload/73585/EDF%202010.pdf. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 02nd, 2010 (4 years ago)

483

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards: Guidance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office Office HOME ABOUT ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE » Building Technologies Office » Appliances & Equipment Standards About Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement Rulemakings & Notices Further Guidance ENERGY STAR® Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions This webpage is designed to provide guidance and answer Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the U.S. Department of Energy's appliance standards program. Guidance types span all covered products and covered equipment and cover such topics as: definitions, scope of coverage, conservation standards, test procedures, certification, Compliance and Certification Management System (CCMS), and enforcement. This website offers users an

484

Fuel consumption model for FREFLO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

above, Biggs and Akcelik (1985) proposed a model of the following form: f = fsito + &Pr + z[apr)o o (5) where, Po = total drag power P, = inertia power a = instantaneous acceleration 8, = fuel consumption per unit power 8, = fuel consumption per... that is additional to S, P, . This component is expressed as SzaP, , where &z is considered to be a secondary efficiency parameter that relates fuel to the product of inertia power and acceleration rate, for positive accelerations. This term allows for the effects...

Rao, Kethireddipalli Srinivas

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Technology Commercialization Program 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in building total energy consumption and related costs (overin building total energy consumption and related costs (overin building total energy consumption and related costs (over

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

US NE MA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

488

Rail Transit and Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Transit and Energy Consumption In a recent issue...D.C. 20418 The Diesel's Advantages It...p. 517). The diesel car, while it has...Other types of engine can be made to meet...catalysts by using leaded fuel because it is 3 to...politically unpopular. The diesel car requires no add-on...

CHARLES A. LAVE

1977-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

489

US NE MA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

490

Commercial Space Activities at Goddard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, environmental verification, and engineering `Best Practices' requirements #12;Commercial Utilization's commercial practices and processes · Brief summary of procurement activities under the three Rapid Catalogs Quantity ­ Leverage commercial practices and processes when possible ­ NASA mission assurance

Waliser, Duane E.

491

PCs and Computer Terminals in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Special Topics and Data Reports > PC's and Computer Terminals Special Topics and Data Reports > PC's and Computer Terminals Picture of a personal computer Personal Computers and Computer Terminals in Commercial Buildings PCs and Computer Terminals in 1995 Changes Between 1992 and 1995 How the Number of PCs and Computer Terminals Were Estimated References and Additional Links Over the past 10 to 15 years, the use of personal computers (PCs) has risen dramatically. The energy consumed by PCs and other types of office equipment has become a significant component of electricity consumption in commercial buildings -- 13 percent (98 billion kWh) of all electricity consumed in 1995. That amount was nearly as much as the amount used to air condition these buildings. The Energy Information Administration's 1999 Annual Energy Outlook[1] forecasts that, for the next two decades, electricity consumption for office equipment (3.2 percent annually) will grow over twice as fast as electricity use as a whole (1.4 percent annually).

492

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years December 20, 2013 Gas furnace efficiency has large implications for residential natural gas use December 5, 2013 EIA publishes state fact sheets on residential energy consumption and characteristics August 19, 2013 All 48 related articles › Other End Use Surveys Commercial Buildings - CBECS Manufacturing - MECS Transportation About the RECS EIA administers the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to a nationally representative sample of housing units. Specially trained interviewers collect energy characteristics on the housing unit, usage

493

Commercial Vehicles Collaboration for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

events (level derived from integrated design and safety analysis) · Protection against fire, depress demonstrated risks to loss of life in human spaceflight) Flight Safety (cont.) Protection Against Fire, Depress) Flight Safety (cont.) Protection Against Fire, Depress, or Toxic Atmosphere #12;Page 9 Definition

Waliser, Duane E.

494

Development of a California commercial building benchmarking database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building energy benchmarking is a useful starting point for commercial building owners and operators to target energy savings opportunities. There are a number of tools and methods for benchmarking energy use. Benchmarking based on regional data can provides more relevant information for California buildings than national tools such as Energy Star. This paper discusses issues related to benchmarking commercial building energy use and the development of Cal-Arch, a building energy benchmarking database for California. Currently Cal-Arch uses existing survey data from California's Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), a largely underutilized wealth of information collected by California's major utilities. Doe's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is used by a similar tool, Arch, and by a number of other benchmarking tools. Future versions of Arch/Cal-Arch will utilize additional data sources including modeled data and individual buildings to expand the database.

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2002-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

495

IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate General: $100,000 per customer per year; may not exceed 50% of the total installed cost of measures New Construction (Whole Building Approach - Owner): $150,000 per year New Construction (Whole Building Approach - Design Team): $30,000 per year New Construction (Systems Approach): $50,000 per year Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Programmable Thermostats: $50/unit

496

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Introduction The market for natural gas has been changing for quite some time. As part of natural gas restructuring, gas pipelines were opened to multiple users. Manufacturers or their representatives could go directly to the wellhead to purchase their natural gas, arrange the transportation, and have the natural gas delivered either by the local distribution company or directly through a connecting pipeline. More recently, the electricity markets have been undergoing change. When Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 1992, requirements were included not only to open access to the ownership of electricity generation, but also to open access to the transmission lines so that wholesale trade in electricity would be possible. Now several States, including California and

497

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. 3. Vehicle Miles Traveled This chapter presents information on household vehicle usage, as measured by the number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). VMT is one of the two most important components used in estimating household vehicle fuel consumption. (The other, fuel efficiency, is discussed in Chapter 4). In addition, this chapter examines differences in driving behavior based on the characteristics of the household and the type of vehicle driven. Trends in household driving patterns are also examined using additional information from the Department of Transportation's Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). Household VMT is a measure of the demand for personal transportation. Demand for transportation may be viewed from either an economic or a social perspective. From the economic point-of-view, the use of a household vehicle represents the consumption of one

498

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C11. Energy Consumption by Source, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum b Retail Electricity Sales State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,695.2 Texas 3,756.9 Texas 5,934.3 Texas 1,283.1 2 Indiana 1,333.4 California 2,196.6 California 3,511.4 California 893.7 3 Ohio 1,222.6 Louisiana 1,502.9 Louisiana 1,925.7 Florida 768.0 4 Pennsylvania 1,213.0 New York 1,246.9 Florida 1,680.3 Ohio 528.0 5 Illinois 1,052.2 Florida 1,236.6 New York 1,304.0 Pennsylvania 507.6 6 Kentucky 1,010.6 Pennsylvania 998.6 Pennsylvania 1,255.6 New York 491.5

499

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Forms Form EIA-846A (4-6-95) U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of the Census Acting as Collecting and Compiling Agent For 1994 MANUFACTURING ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 9 hours per response, including the time of reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to the Energy Information Administration, Office of Statistical Standards, EI-73, 1707 H-Street, NW, Washington, DC 20585; and to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of

500

US WNC MO Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WNC MO WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower residential electricity prices in the state. * Missour