Sample records for defense pad dis

  1. Padding with Compressed Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beals, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We commonly find plants using padding to transport liquids or light solids short distances from tankers into storage tanks. Padding can wreck havoc in compressed air systems with limited storage, undersized cleanup equipment (dryers and filters...

  2. Defense Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defense Gallery Inside the Museum Exhibitions Norris Bradbury Museum Lobby Defense Gallery Research Gallery History Gallery TechLab Virtual Exhibits invisible utility element...

  3. Conditions on (dis)harmony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nevins, Andrew

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) Chapter 4 turns to microvariation within the (dis)harmony system of a single language, examining transparency variation in Hungarian front vowels, and distance-based variation in Hungarian neutral vowel sequences, ...

  4. Examining the Impact of Pad Flexibility on the Rotordynamic Coefficients of Rocker-Pivot-Pad Tilting-Pad Journal Bearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaines, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Measured and predicted static and dynamic load characteristics are provided for a three-pad, rocker-pivot, tilting-pad journal bearing in the load-between-pad orientation. The bearing has the following characteristics: 3 pads, .50 pad pivot offset...

  5. Notes 16. Analysis of tilting pad bearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NOTES 16. STATIC AND DYNAMIC FORCED PERFORMANCE OF TILTING PAD BEARINGS: ANALYSIS INCLUDING PIVOT STIFFNESS Dr. Luis San Andr?s Mast-Childs Professor August 2010 SUMMARY Work in progress ? still a lot of be done Introduction... Figure 1 shows a tilting pad journal bearing comprised of four pads. Each pad tilts about its pivot making a hydrodynamic film that generates a pressure reacting to the static load applied on the spinning journal. This type of bearing is typically...

  6. Review of Power Corrections in DIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Kluge

    2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is given of analyses in DIS at HERA which confront the predictions of power corrections with measured data. These include mean values and distributions of 2-jet as well as 3-jet event shape variables and jet rates.

  7. Nuclear correction factors from neutrino DIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Kovarik

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering on nuclei is an essential process to constrain the strange quark parton distribution functions in the proton. The critical component on the way to using the neutrino DIS data in a proton PDF analysis is understanding the nuclear effects in parton distribution functions. We parametrize these effects by nuclear parton distribution functions and we use this framework to analyze the consistency of neutrino DIS data with other nuclear data.

  8. Static characteristics and rotordynamic coefficients of a four-pad tilting-pad journal bearing with ball-in-socket pivots in load-between-pad configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Joel Mark

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Static characteristics and rotordynamic coefficients were experimentally determined for a four-pad tilting-pad journal bearing with ball-in-socket pivots in loadbetween- pad configuration. A frequency-independent [M]-[C]-[K] model fit...

  9. Sandia Energy - Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Test Pad (ESTP) Home Energy Permalink Gallery Evaluating Powerful Batteries for Modular Electric Grid Energy Storage Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy...

  10. Measured and predicted rotordynamic coefficients and static performance of a rocker-pivot, tilt pad bearing in load-on-pad and load-between-pad configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Clint Ryan

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the static and dynamic performance data for a 5 pad tilting pad bearing in both the load-on-pad (LOP) and the load-between-pad (LBP) configurations over a variety of different loads and speeds. The bearing tested was an Orion...

  11. Measurement of rotordynamic coefficients for a high-speed flexure pivot tilting-pad bearing(load between pad) configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghasem, Adnan Mahmoud

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the dynamic and static forced performance of a flexure-pivot tilting-pad bearing load between pad (LBP) configuration for different rotor speeds and bearing unit loadings. The bearing has the following design parameters: 4 pads...

  12. SEP Success Story: "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy Small Businesses SEP Success Story: "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy Small Businesses May 24, 2012 - 5:10pm Addthis Green...

  13. Measurements Versus Predictions for the Static and Dynamic Characteristics of a Four-pad Rocker-pivot, Tilting-pad Journal Bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tschoepe, David 1987-

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Measured and predicted static and dynamic characteristics are provided for a four-pad, rocker-pivot, tilting-pad journal bearing in the load-on-pad and load-between-pad orientations. The bearing has the following characteristics: 4 pads, .57 pad...

  14. SEP Success Story: Green Launching Pad Taps Six More Companies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Green Launching Pad Taps Six More Companies for Take-off SEP Success Story: Green Launching Pad Taps Six More Companies for Take-off April 29, 2011 - 9:58am Addthis Yesterday, U.S....

  15. Architecture Implications of Pads as a Scarce Resource: Extended Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    , despite their integral role in the PDN, power/ground pads can be aggressively reduced (by conversion though reducing power/ground pads significantly increases the number of voltage emergen- cies.3 Validation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4 Simulation Setup

  16. Cyber Defense Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    infrastructure. New threats demand new defenses Page-3 SPIDERS Program Summary CAMP SMITH ENERGY ISLAND * Entire Installation Smart Microgrid * Islanded Installation * High...

  17. UNCLASSIFIHED DEFENSE DOCUMENTATION CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Marco

    UNCLASSIFIHED AD 463473 DEFENSE DOCUMENTATION CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL INFORMATION .... John Barton Head OR Analysis Group R. H. Krolick Manager Applied Science Laboratory Prepared for the .J

  18. Department of Defense INSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of the Inspector General of the Department of Defense (IG DoD automated export license system. 2. APPLICABILITY. This Instruction: a. Applies to Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Joint

  19. The Smith plan, Texas frontier defense in the 1850's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frysinger, Victor Francis

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - bat the Indians from the annexation of Texas in 1845 up until the departure of General Persifor F . Smith in April, 1856. The early years of statehood were filled with confusion, dis- organization, and disunity as far as frontier defense.... General Smith in Texas, 1851-1856 IV. Aftermath and Evaluation 24 85 Appendix: Status of Forces in Texas, 1851-1856 . 93 Bibliography 105 Vita 113 LIST OF MAPS Map 1 ACTIVE MILITARY POSTS IN TEXAS, 1849 2 THE SMITH PLAN COMPLETED& 1852 3 ACT1VE...

  20. DIS 2007, DIFF 8/SPIN 7, Munich, 18/04/07 Andreas Mussgiller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Longitudinal Target Spin Asymmetry (LTSA) #12; The HERMES Spectrometer A. Mussgiller, DIS 2007, Munich, 18

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) Evaluating Powerful Batteries for Modular Electric Grid Energy Storage On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems,...

  2. China's Defense Electronics and Information Technology Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RAGLAND, LeighAnn; MCREYNOLDS, Joe; GEARY, Debra

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2013 China’s Defense Electronics and Information Technologythe Chinese defense electronics and information technology (is moving the defense electronics and IT industry toward

  3. Rotordynamic and thermal analyses of compliant flexure pivot tilting pad gas bearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Kyu-Ho

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rotordynamic and thermal analyses of compliant flexure pivot tilting pad gas bearings were performed. First, compliant flexure pivot tilting pad gas bearings with pad radial compliance (CFTPBs) were introduced and designed for high-speed oil...

  4. Rotordynamic coefficients for a load-between-pad, flexible-pivot tilting pad bearing at high loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensley, John Eric

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamic and static performance of a flexure-pivot tilting pad bearing is presented at a load between pad configuration for various load and speed combinations. A similar work performed on the same bearing at lower loads ranging from 0-1 MPa (0...

  5. Brian Foster -DIS01 -Bologna HERA II Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V2 Q2 = 200 GeV2 Q2 = 2000 GeV2 #12;Brian Foster - DIS01 - Bologna 8 Active Filter Calorimeter ZEUS 6 systematics plus precision electron tagger. "Standard" Pb/scintillator calorimeter plus "active filter" of aerogel. Dipole spectrometer to measure converting e+e- pairs. "6m tagger" W/fibre to measure the energy

  6. Defense on the Move: Ant-Based Cyber Defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Glenn A.; Haack, Jereme N.; McKinnon, Archibald D.; Fulp, Errin W.

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many common cyber defenses (like firewalls and IDS) are as static as trench warfare allowing the attacker freedom to probe them at will. The concept of Moving Target Defense (MTD) adds dynamism to the defender side, but puts the systems to be defended themselves in motion, potentially at great cost to the defender. An alternative approach is a mobile resilient defense that removes attackers’ ability to rely on prior experience without requiring motion in the protected infrastructure itself. The defensive technology absorbs most of the cost of motion, is resilient to attack, and is unpredictable to attackers. The Ant-Based Cyber Defense (ABCD) is a mobile resilient defense providing a set of roaming, bio-inspired, digital-ant agents working with stationary agents in a hierarchy headed by a human supervisor. The ABCD approach provides a resilient, extensible, and flexible defense that can scale to large, multi-enterprise infrastructures like the smart electric grid.

  7. CAREERS & the disABLED Magazine's Career Expo for People with...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CAREERS & the disABLED Magazine's Career Expo for People with Disabilities CAREERS & the disABLED Magazine's Career Expo for People with Disabilities November 22, 2013 1:00PM EST...

  8. Experimental Investigation of the Padding Tower for Air Dehumidifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Liu, J.; Li, C.; Zhang, G.; An, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and solar power as the heat source for regeneration. Hence, this system has a great latent potential for energy savings and environmental protection. The system chooses the padding tower as a dehumidifier and regenerator, which are often used...

  9. The evaluation of add-on mouse pads using electromyography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Varghese

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EVALUATION OF ADD-ON NIOUSE PADS USING ELECTROMYOGRAPHY A Thesis by VARGHESE THOMAS Submitted to the office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1993 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering THE EVALUATION OF ADD-ON MOUSE PADS USING ELECTROMYOGRAPHY A Thesis by VARGHESE THOMAS Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  10. Measured and Predicted Rotor-Pad Transfer Functions for a Rocker-Pivot Tilting-Pad Journal Bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkes, Jason Christopher

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Many researchers have compared predicted stiffness and damping coefficients for tilting-pad journal bearings (TPJBs) to measurements. Most have found that direct damping is consistently overpredicted. The thrust of this research is to explain...

  11. Experimental frequency-dependent rotordynamic coefficients for a load-on-pad, high-speed, flexible-pivot tilting-pad bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez Colmenares, Luis Emigdio

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis provides experimental frequency dependent stiffness and damping coefficient results for a high-speed, lightly loaded, flexible-pivot tilting-pad bearing, with a load-on-pad configuration. Test conditions include four shaft speeds (6000...

  12. Thesis / Dissertation Defense Announcement and Scheduling Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Thesis / Dissertation Defense Announcement and Scheduling Form Completed form must be received of the following: Thesis Defense Dissertation Defense Public Seminar Only Thesis/Dissertation Associate Dean Only Thesis/Dissertation/Seminar location and time listed above is: Confirmed

  13. Security & Defense Licenses Available | Tech Transfer | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security and Defense SHARE Security and Defense 200401423 Synthesis Method for Stable Colloids of "Naked" Metal Nanocrystals 200501549 Enhanced Detection of Toxic Agents 200501614...

  14. The use of elastomeric pads as bearings for steel beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairbanks, Hardy Ewald

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Neoprene Pad Behavior II. REVIEW OP LITERATURE 10 III. OBZaCTIVES IV. TESTS 14 15 A. General B. Phase I C. Phase II V, RESULTS OF THE INVESTIGATION A. Phase I B. Phase II VI. DISCUSSION AND INTERPRETATION OP RESULTS A. Stresses in the Steel... Beam B. The Behavior of the Neoprene Pad 15 15 17 26 26 27 53 53 55 VII. CONCLUSIONS VIII. RRCOHNKSkTIONS FOR RESICN IZ, NESIQN EZANPIRS k. Exsaple I R. Exsaple II Z. RECONRR4ATIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCN A. Properties of Neopreae Rubber...

  15. Toward directed energy planetary defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubin, Philip

    Asteroids and comets that cross Earth’s orbit pose a credible risk of impact, with potentially severe disturbances to Earth and society. We propose an orbital planetary defense system capable of heating the surface of ...

  16. Timber + TouchPads: How Education Will Make or Break

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Timber + TouchPads: How Education Will Make or Break BC's Emerging Smart Economy Vancouver Board the health of the soil and human health and survival. Right here at home, Business in Vancouver founder Peter-wide collective of farmers' markets. The BC government just announced $2 million dollars in funding for local food

  17. Measurements of static loading characteristics of a Flexurepivot Tilt Pad Hydrodynamic Bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, Nicholas Van Edward

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation examining the static loading characteristics of a four-pad, KMC FLEXUREPIVOT Tilt Pad Hydrodynamic Bearing is presented. Tests are conducted on the TRACE Fluid Film Bearing Element Test Rig for journal speeds ranging...

  18. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 559: T Tunnel Compressor/Blower Pad, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 559, T-Tunnel Compressor/Blower Pad. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 559 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): • 12-25-13, Oil Stained Soil and Concrete The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure in place with use restrictions for CAU 559.

  19. DIS 2001, Bologna, 29. 04. 2001Ana Dubak, MPI for Physics, Munich MPI for Physics Munich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIS 2001, Bologna, 29. 04. 2001Ana Dubak, MPI for Physics, Munich Ana Dubak MPI for Physics Munich& ¤& ¥ & #12;DIS 2001, Bologna, 29. 04. 2001Ana Dubak, MPI for Physics, Munich H1 Luminosity: (98/99): LL == 16 2001, Bologna, 29. 04. 2001Ana Dubak, MPI for Physics, Munich LAr calorimeter: High granularity 45000

  20. Residual stresses in dielectrics caused by metallization lines and pads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, M.Y.; Lipkin, J.; Clarke, D.R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.] [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.; Evans, A.G. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Div. of Applied Sciences] [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Div. of Applied Sciences; Tenhover, M. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States)] [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual stresses in dielectrics and semiconductors induced by metal lines, pads and vias can have detrimental effects on the performance of devices and electronic packages. Analytical and numerical calculations of these stresses have been performed for two purposes. (1) To illustrate how these stresses relate to the residual stress in the metallization and its geometry; (2) to calibrate a piezo-spectroscopic method for measuring these stresses with high spatial resolution. The results of the calculations have been presented using non-dimensional parameters that both facilitate scaling and provide connections to the stresses in the metal, with or without yielding. Preliminary experimental results obtained for Au/Ge eutectic pads illustrate the potential of the method and the role of the stress analysis.

  1. China’s Defense Electronics Industry: Innovation, Adaptation, and Espionage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulvenon, James; Luce, Matthew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010 China’s Defense Electronics Industry: Innovation,of the Chinese defense electronics sector can be attributedAdvanced defense electronics components and systems play a

  2. Rotordynamic Performance of a Flexure Pivot Pad Bearing with Active and Locked Integral Squeeze Film Damper Including Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnew, Jeffrey Scott

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests are performed on a flexure-pivot-pad tilting-pad bearing with a series integral squeeze film damper in load-between-pads configuration, with both active and locked damper. The damper effects are negated when locked, resulting in a flexure-pivot-pad...

  3. Production of spin-3 mesons in diffractive DIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Caporale; I. P. Ivanov

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the amplitudes of J^{PC}=3^{--} meson production in diffractive DIS within the k_t-factorization approach, with a particular attention paid to the rho_3(1690) meson. We find that at all Q^2 the rho_3(1690) production cross section is 2-5 times smaller than the rho(1700) production cross section, which is assumed to be a pure D-wave state. Studying sigma_L and sigma_T separately, we observe domination of rho_3 in sigma_L and domination of rho(1700) in sigma_T and offer an explanation of this behavior in simple terms. We also find very strong contributions -- sometimes even domination -- of the s-channel helicity violating amplitudes. The typical color dipole sizes probed in rho_3 production are shown to be larger than those in the ground state rho production, and the energy dependence of rho_3 cross section turns out to be much flatter than the rho production cross section. All the conclusions about the relative behavior of rho_3(1690) and rho(1700) mesons are numerically stable against variations of input parameters.

  4. The 1-Jettiness DIS event shape: NNLL + NLO results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong-Bo Kang; Xiaohui Liu; Sonny Mantry

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the complete NNLL+NLO (~ \\alpha_s) 1-jettiness (\\tau_1) event shape distribution for single jet (J) production in electron-nucleus (N_A) collisions e^- + N_A \\to e^- + J + X, in the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) region where the hard scale is set by the jet transverse momentum P_{J_T}. These results cover the entire \\tau_1-spectrum including the resummation (\\tau_1generating the numerical results, is flexible enough to incorporate different jet algorithms for the fixed-order calculation. We also perform a jet shape analysis, defined within the 1-jettiness framework, which allows one to control the amount of radiation included in the definition of the final state jet. This formalism can allow for detailed studies of jet energy-loss mechanisms and nuclear medium effects. The analysis presented here can be used for precision studies of QCD and as a probe of nuclear dynamics using data collected at HERA and in proposed future electron-ion colliders such as the EIC and the LHeC.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Defense Mission (S&T)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tagged with: BATLab * batteries * Batteries & Energy Storage * Batteries and Energy Storage * Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory * Defense Mission * Department of Defense *...

  6. Homeland Security and Defense Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Homeland Security and Defense Applications personnel are the best in the world at detecting and locating dirty bombs, loose nukes, and other radiological sources. The site trains the Nation's emergency responders, who would be among the first to confront a radiological or nuclear emergency. Homeland Security and Defense Applications highly training personnel, characterize the threat environment, produce specialized radiological nuclear detection equipment, train personnel on the equipment and its uses, test and evaluate the equipment, and develop different kinds of high-tech equipment to defeat terrorists. In New York City for example, NNSS scientists assisted in characterizing the radiological nuclear environment after 9/11, and produced specialized radiological nuclear equipment to assist local officials in their Homeland Security efforts.

  7. Homeland Security and Defense Applications

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Homeland Security and Defense Applications personnel are the best in the world at detecting and locating dirty bombs, loose nukes, and other radiological sources. The site trains the Nation's emergency responders, who would be among the first to confront a radiological or nuclear emergency. Homeland Security and Defense Applications highly training personnel, characterize the threat environment, produce specialized radiological nuclear detection equipment, train personnel on the equipment and its uses, test and evaluate the equipment, and develop different kinds of high-tech equipment to defeat terrorists. In New York City for example, NNSS scientists assisted in characterizing the radiological nuclear environment after 9/11, and produced specialized radiological nuclear equipment to assist local officials in their Homeland Security efforts.

  8. Secure direct communication with a quantum one-time pad

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng Fuguo [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory For Quantum Information and Measurements, Beijing 100084 (China); Long Guilu [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory For Quantum Information and Measurements, Beijing 100084 (China); Center for Atomic and Molecular NanoSciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Center For Quantum Information, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum secure direct communication is the direct communication of secret messages without first producing a shared secret key. It may be used in some urgent circumstances. Here we propose a quantum secure direct communication protocol using single photons. The protocol uses batches of single photons prepared randomly in one of four different states. These single photons serve as a one-time pad which is used directly to encode the secret messages in one communication process. We also show that it is unconditionally secure. The protocol is feasible with present-day technique.

  9. Verde iPad app | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt ManagementVera Irrigation District Jump to:VercipiaiPad

  10. Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    table. 56 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon...

  11. Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 401 Table A1. RefinerReseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District and State, 1984-Present (Cents per Gallon...

  12. Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table A1. RefinerReseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District and State, 1984-Present (Cents per Gallon...

  13. Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    table. 56 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon...

  14. Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    table. 56 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon...

  15. Table 40. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sales Type, PAD District...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 191 Table 40. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States (Cents per Gallon...

  16. Table 40. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sales Type, PAD District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 191 Table 40. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States (Cents per Gallon...

  17. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  18. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  19. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 245 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  20. Thermal Neutron Detectors with Discrete Anode Pad Readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu,B.; Schaknowski, N.A., Smith, G.C., DeGeronimo, G., Vernon, E.O.

    2008-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A new two-dimensional thermal neutron detector concept that is capable of very high rates is being developed. It is based on neutron conversion in {sup 3}He in an ionization chamber (unity gas gain) that uses only a cathode and anode plane; there is no additional electrode such as a Frisch grid. The cathode is simply the entrance window, and the anode plane is composed of discrete pads, each with their own readout electronics implemented via application specific integrated circuits. The aim is to provide a new generation of detectors with key characteristics that are superior to existing techniques, such as higher count rate capability, better stability, lower sensitivity to background radiation, and more flexible geometries. Such capabilities will improve the performance of neutron scattering instruments at major neutron user facilities. In this paper, we report on progress with the development of a prototype device that has 48 x 48 anode pads and a sensitive area of 24cm x 24cm.

  1. defense

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A en6/%2A en2/%2A

  2. DISPLAY OF FRICTION IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS BASED ON HUMAN FINGER PAD CHARACTERISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollerbach, John M.

    DISPLAY OF FRICTION IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS BASED ON HUMAN FINGER PAD CHARACTERISTICS A. Nahvi, J City, UT 84112 ABSTRACT A friction display system is proposed for virtual environ- ments. Since a user the frictional properties of the human finger pad on 9 subjects by simultaneously recording force and movement

  3. Speciation of Sb in airborne particulate matter, vehicle brake linings, and brake pad wear residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Speciation of Sb in airborne particulate matter, vehicle brake linings, and brake pad wear residues: XAS XANES EXAFS Antimony Particulate matter Brake linings a b s t r a c t Insights into the speciation of Sb in samples of brake linings, brake pad wear residues, road dust, and atmospheric particulate

  4. 1 / 0 Pad Assignment based on the Circuit Structure* Massoud Pedram, Kamal Chaudhary, Ernest S. Kuh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    structure and path delay constraints, uses linear placement, goal-programming, linear-sum assignment and 11 / 0 Pad Assignment based on the Circuit Structure* Massoud Pedram, Kamal Chaudhary, Ernest S. Kuh for assigning off-chip 1/0 pads for a logic circuit. The technique which is based on the analysis of the circuit

  5. Dynamic defense workshop : from research to practice.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason J.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  6. Civil defense implications of nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Broyles, A.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Possible effects of Nuclear Winter on the world's population are summarized. The implications of these effects for strategic weapons planning and civil defense measures are discussed. (ACR)

  7. Foundations of a defense digital platform : business systems governance in the Department of Defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegler, Dustin P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010, the United States Department of Defense (DoD) spent more than $35 billion on information systems development and sustainment, with nearly $7 billion to defense business systems investments alone. It is not surprising ...

  8. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 224 is comprised of the nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: 02-04-01, Septic Tank (Buried); 03-05-01, Leachfield; 05-04-01, Septic Tanks (4)/Discharge Area; 06-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (3); 06-05-01, Leachfield; 06-17-04, Decon Pad and Wastewater Catch; 06-23-01, Decon Pad Discharge Piping; 11-04-01, Sewage Lagoon; and 23-05-02, Leachfield. Corrective Action Sites 06-05-01, 06-23-01, and 23-05-02 were identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECo) inventory (1991). The remaining sites were identified during review of various historical documents. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating and selecting a corrective action alternative for each CAS. The CAI will include field inspections, radiological and geological surveys, and sample collection. Data will also be obtained to support investigation-derived waste (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

  9. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Drip pads (40 cfr parts 264/265, subpart w) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990, EPA promulgated listings for wastes from wood preserving processes. Many of these wastes are generated by allowing preservative to drip from wood onto concrete pads, called drip pads. To facilitate proper handling of these wastes, EPA developed design and operating standards for drip pads used to manage hazardous wastes. This module explains these standards. It defines a drip pad and summarizes the design and operating standards for drip pads. It describes the relationship between generator accumulation provisions and drip pads.

  10. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Drip pads (40 CFR parts 264/265, subpart W) updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990, EPA promulgated listings for wastes from wood preserving processes. Many of these wastes are generated by allowing preservative to drip from wood onto concrete pads, called drip pads. To facilitate proper handling of these wastes, EPA developed design and operating standards for drip pads used to manage hazardous wastes. This module defines a drip pad, summarizes the design and operating standards for drip pads and describes the relationship between generator accumulation provisions and drip pads.

  11. Dynamic and Static Characteristics of a Rocker-Pivot, Tilting-Pad Bearing with 50% and 60% Offsets.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulhanek, Chris David

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Static performance and rotordynamic coefficients are provided for a rocker-pivot, tilting-pad journal bearing with 50 and 60 percent offset pads in a load-between-pad configuration. The bearing uses leading-edge-groove lubrication and has...

  12. Research Associate Position Defense Analysis Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in analyzing social network data as well as geospatial, temporal, and standard statistical analysis of largeResearch Associate Position Defense Analysis Department Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA Research Associate The Department of Defense Analysis is home to the CORE (Common Operational Research

  13. Historical Material Analysis of DC745U Pressure Pads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz-Acosta, Denisse [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Enhance Surveillance mission, it is the goal to provide suitable lifetime assessment of stockpile materials. This report is an accumulation of historical publication on the DC745U material and their findings. It is the intention that the B61 LEP program uses this collection of data to further develop their understanding and potential areas of study. DC745U is a commercially available silicone elastomer consisting of dimethyl, methyl-phenyl, and methyl-vinyl siloxane repeat units. Originally, this material was manufactured by Dow Corning as Silastic{reg_sign} DC745U at their manufacturing facility in Kendallville, IN. Recently, Dow Corning shifted this material to the Xiameter{reg_sign} brand product line. Currently, DC745U is available through Xiameter{reg_sign} or Dow Corning's distributor R. D. Abbott Company. DC745U is cured using 0.5 wt% vinyl-specific peroxide curing agent known as Luperox 101 or Varox DBPH-50. This silicone elastomer is used in numerous parts, including two major components (outer pressure pads and aft cap support) in the W80 and as pressure pads on the B61. DC745U is a proprietary formulation, thus Dow Corning provides limited information on its composition and properties. Based on past experience with Dow Corning, DC745U is at risk of formulation changes without notification to the costumer. A formulation change for DC745U may have a significant impact because the network structure is a key variable in determining material properties. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of historical DC745U studies and identify gaps that need to be addressed in future work. Some of the previous studies include the following: 1. Spectroscopic characterization of raw gum stock. 2. Spectroscopic, thermal, and mechanical studies on cured DC745U. 3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and solvent swelling studies on DC745U with different crosslink densities. 4. NMR, solvent swelling, thermal, and mechanical studies on thermally aged DC745U. 5. NMR, solvent swelling, thermal, and mechanical studies on radiolytically aged DC745U. Each area is reviewed and further work is suggested to improve our understanding of DC745U for systems engineering, surveillance, aging assessments, and lifetime assessment.

  14. SIMULATION OF ENERGY SELECTIVE X-RAY IMAGES FOR MATERIAL DIS-CRIMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    SIMULATION OF ENERGY SELECTIVE X-RAY IMAGES FOR MATERIAL DIS- CRIMINATION Rune S Thing1 , Syen J Carlo model is presented to evaluate the clinical benefits of optimal energy bins in spectral X-ray imaging, using the BEAMnrc code system. While energy resolving photon counting detectors have been

  15. DisProt: the Database of Disordered Proteins Megan Sickmeier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obradovic, Zoran

    suggested to depend on, or have been experimentally demonstrated to depend on, proteins that lack fixed 3D that lack the relatively fixed structure of enzymes and other globular proteins have been calledDisProt: the Database of Disordered Proteins Megan Sickmeier1 , Justin A. Hamilton1 , Tanguy Le

  16. DisQo : A user needs analysis method for smart home Jolle Coutaz, Emeric Fontaine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DisQo : A user needs analysis method for smart home Joëlle Coutaz, Emeric Fontaine Grenoble the services that they might expect from their smart home when they have little to no knowledge about novel-User composition, smart artifacts coupling, smart home, ubiquitous computing, service-oriented computing. ACM

  17. Linton Brooks Assumes Post as Deputy Administrator for NNSA Defense...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administrator for NNSA Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Office Press Release Oct 30, 2001 Linton Brooks Assumes Post as Deputy Administrator for NNSA Defense Nuclear...

  18. Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at Eight Military Installations Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at...

  19. Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Update - Dale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Update - Dale Govan, Departmental Representative to the DNFSB Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Update - Dale Govan,...

  20. Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in...

  1. article defense department: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Description The Department of Defense (DoD) announces the Fiscal Year 2012 Defense University Research Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). Funding Opportunity Title...

  2. Defense, Interior Departments Pursue Renewable Energy on Federal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Defense, Interior Departments Pursue Renewable Energy on Federal Lands Defense, Interior Departments Pursue Renewable Energy on Federal Lands August 8, 2012 - 1:22pm Addthis Solar...

  3. Analysis of flexure pivot tilting pad gas bearings with different damper configurations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rimpel, Aaron Michael

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrodynamic flexure pivot tilting pad gas bearings (FPTPGBs) can enable successful operation of oil-free microturbomachinery. This work presents the experimental and analytical study of such bearings with different damper configurations. A test rig...

  4. Micro-scale scratching by soft pad asperities in chemical-mechanical polishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sanha, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the manufacture of integrated circuits (IC) and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) is widely used for providing local and global planarization. In the CMP process, polishing pads, ...

  5. A Novel Computational Model for Tilting Pad Journal Bearings with Soft Pivot Stiffnesses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Yujiao 1988-

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel tilting pad journal bearing model including pivot flexibility as well as temporal fluid inertia effects on the thin film fluid flow aims to accurately predict the bearing forced performance. The predictive model also accounts for the thermal...

  6. An alternative to constant rate link padding for the prevention of traffic analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Bryan Wayne

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approach to prevent traffic analysis has always been constant rate link padding. However, the effectiveness of this method when an adversary has access to advanced monitoring equipment and knowledge of statistical analysis has not been addressed...

  7. Lift-off performance in flexure pivot pad and hybrid bearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mertz, David Hunter

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three flexure pivot pad bearings (FPBs) with different preloads are evaluated for use in high performance applications by comparing them to a hybrid hydrostatic bearing (HHB). One application of these bearings is in turbopumps for liquid rocket...

  8. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    45.5 49.2 W W 44.5 45.4 See footnotes at end of table. 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State Energy Information Administration Petroleum...

  9. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    55.1 47.1 W W 55.1 46.2 See footnotes at end of table. 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State Energy Information Administration Petroleum...

  10. Doctoral Defense "Thermal-hydro-mechanical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Doctoral Defense "Thermal-hydro-mechanical model for freezing and thawing soils" Yao Zhang Date been implemented in a finite element system, with a thermal-hydro- mechanical framework being used

  11. A Dynamic Defense Force for Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TAKAHASHI, Sugio

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan Self-Defense Forces (SDF). Along with the new NDPG,set a direction for the SDF in the post-9/11 inter- nationalsituation also requires the SDF take on these “dynamic”

  12. Static, Rotordynamic, and Thermal Characteristics of a Four Pad Spherical-Seat Tilting Pad Journal Bearing with Four Methods of Directed Lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coghlan, David

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Static, dynamic, and thermal characteristics (measured and predicted) are presented for a 4-pad, spherical-seat, TPJB with 0.5 pivot offset, 0.6 L/D, 101.6 mm nominal diameter, and 0.3 preload in the LBP orientation. One bearing is tested four...

  13. EFFECTS OF AN iPAD iBOOK ON READING COMPREHENSION, ELECTRODERMAL ACTIVITY, AND ENGAGEMENT FOR ADOLESCENTS WITH DISABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLLITT, DANIEL THOMAS

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an iPad iBook for adolescents with disabilities. With its release in 2012, the iBooks Author software for the Apple iPad allows classroom teachers to create accessible and engaging...

  14. Using Secure Real-time Padding Protocol to Secure Voice-over-IP from Traffic Analysis Attacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saswat

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    utilize the length of the encrypted packets to infer the language and spoken phrases of the conversation. Secure Real-time Padding Protocol (SRPP) is a new RTP profile which pads all VoIP sessions in a unique way to thwart traffic analysis attacks...

  15. Wire-Bonding on Inkjet-Printed Silver Pads Reinforced by Electroless Plating for Chip on Flexible Board Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with pads that are suitable for wire-bonding in electronic packaging. Electroless nickel platingWire-Bonding on Inkjet-Printed Silver Pads Reinforced by Electroless Plating for Chip on Flexible processing. Here, a 1.7 µm thick nickel layer is deposited on top of 600 nm thick printed and sintered silver

  16. The DIS(chi) Scheme for Heavy Quark Production at Small x.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, C D

    , Cambridge, CB3 0HE, UK, E-mail: cdw24@hep.phy.cam.ac.uk In order to successfully describe DIS data, one must take heavy quark mass ef- fects into account. This is often achieved using so called variable flavour number schemes, in which a parton distribution... for the heavy quark species is defined above a suitable matching scale. At small x, one must also potentially include high energy corrections to this framework arising from the BFKL equation. We outline the definition of a variable flavour scheme which allows...

  17. An alternative to present United States defense strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony, William Wallace

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - hower. Secretary of Defense McNamara adopted this strategio nuclear defense policy because the Dulles policy included brinkmanship, and did. not contain any flexibility in response. The McNamara plan was based on controlled escalation and response...

  18. Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Natural Resources Defense Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Natural Resources Defense Council December 9 Coalition [Nancy Hirsh] Renewable Northwest Project[Rachel Shimshak] Natural Resources Defense Council Power Administration in Power Supply The Northwest Energy Coalition, Renewable Northwest Project, Sierra

  19. Japan’s Approaches to DefenseTransparency: Perspectivesfrom the Japanese and Chinese Defense Establishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fei, John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japanese Self Defense Forces (SDF). Features of the Japaneseissues arise—such as the deployment of the SDF forces toIraq or Maritime SDF to the In- dian Ocean—an ad hoc

  20. Japan’s Defense White Paper as a Tool for Promoting Defense Transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUKEGAWA, Yasushi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and activities of the MOD/SDF (Part III). It is one of theof the Self-Defense Forces (SDF) came to be in- cluded inits coverage to include the SDF’s disaster respons- es and

  1. Overview of Space Business Space & Integrated Defense Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview of Space Business Space & Integrated Defense Systems Mitsubishi Corporation August 26 in Rio de Janeiro and Belo Horizonte #12;MC's Space Business Involved with aerospace business more than 40 years, covering civil/commercial space business, defense related space business and defense

  2. Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    71.6 92.3 78.2 101.8 83.6 87.5 74.7 See footnotes at end of table. A1. RefinerReseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District, and State, 1984-Present 452 Energy Information...

  3. Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    82.4 77.1 68.9 62.6 71.6 92.3 89.9 82.6 72.7 - 78.2 See footnotes at end of table. 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 56 Energy Information...

  4. Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    82.5 75.1 68.6 62.0 70.7 92.7 90.7 81.5 72.8 - 78.0 See footnotes at end of table. 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 56 Energy Information...

  5. The OffPAD: Requirements and Usage Kent Are Varmedal1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The OffPAD: Requirements and Usage Kent Are Varmedal1 , Henning Klevjer1 , Joakim Hovlandsv°ag1 by descriptions of different applications that can be implemented with contemporary technology. Finally platform". This certainly provides great flexibility and support for many new business models, but it also

  6. 1 Copyright 2014 by ASME LABORATORY AND FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THE RAIL PAD ASSEMBLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    investigation has the potential to improve the current best practices in fastening system design@illinois.edu ABSTRACT To achieve the performance demands due to growing heavy-haul freight operations and increased high pad assemblies, the components responsible for attenuating loads and protecting the concrete crosstie

  7. Out-of-Semester Dissertation Defenses In order for a student to have a dissertation defense between semesters (or when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Out-of-Semester Dissertation Defenses In order for a student to have a dissertation defense between semesters (or when the University is not in session), the student who is defending the dissertation must certain that all of the members on the dissertation committee agree to attend the defense on the agreed

  8. Quark helicity flip and the transverse spin dependence of inclusive DIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei Afanasev; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusive DIS with unpolarized beam exhibits a subtle dependence on the transverse target spin, arising from the interference of one-photon and two-photon exchange amplitudes in the cross section. We argue that this observable probes mainly the quark helicity-flip amplitudes induced by the non-perturbative vacuum structure of QCD (spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking). This conjecture is based on (a) the absence of significant Sudakov suppression of the helicity-flip process if soft gluon emission in the quark subprocess is limited by the chiral symmetry breaking scale mu^2_{chiral} >> Lambda^2_{QCD}; (b) the expectation that the quark helicity-conserving twist-3 contribution is small. The normal target spin asymmetry is estimated to be of the order 10^{-4} in the kinematics of the planned Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment.

  9. Abstract Microgrids are a new concept for future energy dis-tribution systems that enable renewable energy integration and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Emmanuel

    1 Abstract ­ Microgrids are a new concept for future energy dis- tribution systems that enable renewable energy integration and improved energy management capability. Microgrids consist of multiple power quality and power distribution reliability, microgrids need to operate in both grid

  10. Toward a defense-dominated world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maintaining the large-scale peace in a defense-dominated world necessarily will require not only passive but also active defenses against large-scale aggression that are technically feasible, practical and easy to employ -- and robust against perversion into support of aggression. Such peace maintenance tool-sets will feature means for effectively rebuking aggression as well as providing timely and very widely available seaming of aggression underway anywhere. This report discusses the technology base which currently exists to provide world-wide, high-quality imagery at moderate (5--10 meter) spatial resolution or imagery of 1% of the Earth`s land surface at high ({le} 1 meter) resolution no less frequently than daily, at a total cost of the order of $1 B, with operational capability in the later `90s. Such systems could provide timely warning of aggressive actions anywhere. Similarly, space-based means of defeating aggression conducted with even quite short-range ballistic missiles anywhere in the world could be brought into existence by the end of the `90s for a total cost of about $10 B, and small high-altitude, long flight-duration robotic aircraft carrying high-performance sensors and interceptor missilery could provide both seaming and active defenses against attacks conducted with very short range ballistic missiles, as well as attacks launched with air-breathing threats such as bombers and cruise missiles, for a cost per defended area of the order of $10/km{sup 2}. It appears that all of the associated sensors can find apt dual-use as high-performance systems for monitoring physical aspects of the human environment.

  11. ARM - Defensive Shotgun - Remington 870 Operator's Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m Documentation DataDatastreamsxsaprhsrhi Documentation DataAlaskaDefensive Shotgun -

  12. Biofuels in Defense, Aviation, and Marine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10 wt%in Defense, Aviation, and

  13. Sandia Energy - Defense Waste Management Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInApplied &ClimateContact Us HomeDefense

  14. The Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand WaterThe FutureRiskSalt Defense Disposal

  15. Detector with a profile-based cathode and a two-coordinate pad-strip readout system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Kuchinskiy; V. A. Baturitskii; N. P. Kravchuk; A. S. Korenchenko; N. V. Khomutov; V. S. Smirnov; V. A. Chekhovskii; S. A. Movchan; F. E. Zyazyulya

    2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector with a profile-based cathode and a pad-strip cathode readout system is experimentally investigated. Cathode pads arranged along each anode wire are diagonally interconnected and form strips that cross the detector at an angle with respect to the anode wire. Two coordinates from the cathodes and one from the anode wire allow identification of tracks in high multiplicity events with a single detector plane.

  16. NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for...

  17. NA 70 - Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 70 - Associate Administrator for Defense ... NA 70 - Associate Administrator...

  18. Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LM visited 84 defense-related legacy uranium mine sites located within 11 uranium mining districts in 6 western states. At these sites, photographs and global positioning...

  19. Energy and Defense Departments Announce Agreement to Enhance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Agreement to Enhance Cooperation on Clean Energy and Strengthen Energy Security Energy and Defense Departments Announce Agreement to Enhance Cooperation on Clean Energy and...

  20. air defense warfare: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for FORCEnet Cruise Missile Defense by Juan G. Camacho; Lawrence F. Guest; Belen M. Hernandez; Thomas M in Systems Engineering (MSSE) Cohort 5 from the Naval Surface Warfare...

  1. Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds Defense Programs Goals During...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds Defense Programs ... Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds...

  2. DOE weapons laboratories' contributions to the nation's defense technology base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecker, S.S.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The question of how the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons laboratories can contribute to a stronger defense technology base is addressed in testimony before the Subcommittee on Defense Industry and Technology of the Senate Armed Services Committee. The importance of the defense technology base is described, the DOE technology base is also described, and some technology base management and institutional issues are discussed. Suggestions are given for promoting a more stable, long-term relationship between the DOE weapons laboratories and the Department of Defense. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  3. antibacterial host defense: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and to sustain a healthy pregnancy 2. Recent of these defenses by pathogens can lead to pregnancy complications such as preterm labor or vertical transmission Bakardjiev,...

  4. antimicrobial host defense: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and to sustain a healthy pregnancy 2. Recent of these defenses by pathogens can lead to pregnancy complications such as preterm labor or vertical transmission Bakardjiev,...

  5. A Systematic Approach to Developing and Evaluating Website Fingerprinting Defenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Ian

    A Systematic Approach to Developing and Evaluating Website Fingerprinting Defenses Xiang Cai1 security, or both. This paper (1) systematically analyzes existing attacks and de- fenses to understand-based analysis provides clear directions to defense designers on which features need to be hidden. Our lower

  6. Deception used for Cyber Defense of Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne F. Boyer; Miles A. McQueen

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control system cyber security defense mechanisms may employ deception to make it more difficult for attackers to plan and execute successful attacks. These deceptive defense mechanisms are organized and initially explored according to a specific deception taxonomy and the seven abstract dimensions of security previously proposed as a framework for the cyber security of control systems.

  7. Defense of Trust Management Vulnerabilities in Distributed Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yan Lindsay

    Defense of Trust Management Vulnerabilities in Distributed Networks Yan (Lindsay) Sun , Zhu Han into distributed networks, the vulnerabilities in trust establishment methods, and the defense mechanisms. Five networks inherently rely on cooper- ation among distributed entities. However, coopera- tion is fragile

  8. EIS-0082: Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Defense Waste and Byproducts Management developed this EIS to provide environmental input into both the selection of an appropriate strategy for the permanent disposal of the high-level radioactive waste currently stored at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) and the subsequent decision to construct and operate a Defense Waste Processing Facility at the SRP site.

  9. Second Line of Defense Spares Program Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Dale L.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) is part of the Department of Energy‘s (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The SLD Program accomplishes its critical global security mission by forming cooperative relationships with partner countries to install passive radiation detection systems that augment traditional inspection and law enforcement measures by alerting border officials to the presence of special nuclear or other radiological materials in cross-border traffic. An important tenet of the program is to work collaboratively with these countries to establish the necessary processes, procedures, infrastructure and conditions that will enable them to fully assume the financial and technical responsibilities for operating the equipment. As the number of operational deployments grows, the SLD Program faces an increasingly complex logistics process to promote the timely and efficient supply of spare parts.

  10. History of Hanford Site Defense Production (Brief)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M S

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper acquaints the audience with the history of the Hanford Site, America's first full-scale defense plutonium production site. The paper includes the founding and basic operating history of the Hanford Site, including World War II construction and operations, three major postwar expansions (1947-55), the peak years of production (1956-63), production phase downs (1964-the present), a brief production spurt from 1984-86, the end of the Cold War, and the beginning of the waste cleanup mission. The paper also delineates historical waste practices and policies as they changed over the years at the Hanford Site, past efforts to chemically treat, ''fractionate,'' and/or immobilize Hanford's wastes, and resulting major waste legacies that remain today. This paper presents original, primary-source research into the waste history of the Hanford Site. Finally, the paper places the current Hanford Site waste remediation endeavors in the broad context of American and world history.

  11. Building Stakeholder Trust: Defensible Government Decisions - 13110

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin, Victor A. [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Bldg. 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Bldg. 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administrative decisions must be grounded in reasonable expectations, founded on sound principles, and bounded by societal norms. Without these first principles, attaining and retaining public trust is a Herculean task. Decisions made by governmental administrators must be both transparent and defensible: without the former the agency will lose the public's trust and support (possibly prompting a legal challenge to the decision) and without the latter the decision may fail to withstand judicial scrutiny. This presentation and accompanying paper delves into the process by which governmental decisions can achieve both defensibility and openness through building stakeholder trust with transparency. Achieving and maintaining stakeholder trust is crucial, especially in the environs of nuclear waste management. Proving confidence, stability, and security to the surrounding citizenry as well as those throughout the country is the goal of governmental nuclear waste remediation. Guiding administrative decision-making processes and maintaining a broad bandwidth of communication are of incalculable importance to all those charged with serving the public, but are especially essential to those whose decisional impacts will be felt for millennia. A strong, clear, and concise administrative record documenting discrete decisions and overarching policy choices is the strongest defense to a decisional challenge. However, this can be accomplished using transparency as the fundamental building block. This documentation allows the decision-makers to demonstrate the synthesis of legal and technical challenges and fortifies the ground from which challenges will be defended when necessary. Further, administrative actions which capture the public's interest and captivate that interest throughout the process will result in a better-informed, more deeply-involved, and more heavily-invested group of interested parties. Management of information, involvement, and investment on the front-end of the process reaps rewards far more efficiently than attempts to assuage and mitigate the concerns of those parties after the fact and there are a number of tools Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has deployed that render transparency an ally in this context. The makers, applicators, and beneficiaries of policies and decisions will all benefit from strong administrative records which document decisional choices in an open and transparent manner and from timely, up-front management of concerns of interested parties. The strongest defense to decisional challenges is an ability to demonstrate the basis of the decision and the reason(s) that the decision was chosen over other alternatives. Providing a sound basis for defending challenges rather than avoiding or fighting over them allows the deciding entity the greatest opportunity to produce value for its customer. Often, a transparent process that invites public participation and is open for public review and comment will thwart challenge genesis. An entity that has to devote resources to defending its choices obviously cannot utilize those resources to further its mission. (authors)

  12. The 1-Jettiness DIS Spectrum: Factorization, Resummation, and Jet Algorithm Dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Mantry, Sonny; Qiu, Jianwei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1-Jettiness (tau_1) event shape for Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS), allows for a quantitative and global description of the pattern of QCD radiation for single jet (J) production in electron-nucleus (N_A) collisions e^- + N_A \\to e^- + J + X. It allows for precision studies of QCD and is a sensitive probe of nuclear structure and dynamics. The large transverse momentum (P_{J_T}) of the final state jet $J$, characterizes the hard scale in the problem. The region of phase space where tau_1 radiation (E~ P_{J_T}) is only along either the single jet direction or the beam direction with only soft radiation (E ~ \\tau_1 <

  13. The 1-Jettiness DIS Spectrum: Factorization, Resummation, and Jet Algorithm Dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong-Bo Kang; Xiaohui Liu; Sonny Mantry; Jianwei Qiu

    2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1-Jettiness (tau_1) event shape for Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS), allows for a quantitative and global description of the pattern of QCD radiation for single jet (J) production in electron-nucleus (N_A) collisions e^- + N_A \\to e^- + J + X. It allows for precision studies of QCD and is a sensitive probe of nuclear structure and dynamics. The large transverse momentum (P_{J_T}) of the final state jet $J$, characterizes the hard scale in the problem. The region of phase space where tau_1 radiation (E~ P_{J_T}) is only along either the single jet direction or the beam direction with only soft radiation (E ~ \\tau_1 radiation are allowed. The \\tau_1-distribution depends on the jet algorithm used to find the leading jet in the region tau_1 ~ P_{J_T}, unlike the resummation region where this dependence is power suppressed in tau_1/P_{J_T} nuclear and QCD dynamics at future electron-ion colliders and by analyzing existing HERA data.

  14. Transverse target spin asymmetry in inclusive DIS with two-photon exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei Afanasev; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the transverse target spin dependence of the cross section for the inclusive electron-nucleon scattering with unpolarized beam. Such dependence is absent in the one-photon exchange approximation (Christ-Lee theorem) and arises only in higher orders of the QED expansion, from the interference of one-photon and absorptive two-photon exchange amplitudes as well as from real photon emission (bremsstrahlung). We demonstrate that the transverse spin-dependent two-photon exchange cross section is free of QED infrared and collinear divergences. We argue that in DIS kinematics the transverse spin dependence should be governed by a "parton-like" mechanism in which the two-photon exchange couples mainly to a single quark. We calculate the normal spin asymmetry in an approximation where the dominant contribution arises from quark helicity flip due to interactions with non-perturbative vacuum fields (constituent quark picture) and is proportional to the quark transversity distribution in the nucleon. Such helicity-flip processes are not significantly Sudakov-suppressed if the infrared scale for gluon emission in the photon-quark subprocess is of the order of the chiral symmetry breaking scale, mu^2_chiral>>Lambda^2_QCD. We estimate the asymmetry in the kinematics of the planned Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment to be of the order 10^-4, with different sign for proton and neutron. We also comment on the spin dependence in the limit of soft high-energy scattering.

  15. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

  16. Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S. Vehicle FuelFoot,Effective PAD

  17. Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S. Vehicle FuelFoot,Effective PAD

  18. Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S. Vehicle FuelFoot,Effective PAD

  19. Green Launching Pad Taps Six More Companies for Take-off | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneral GuidanceEnergy Launching Pad Taps Six More

  20. Dissertation Defense Checklist Student: Schedule Prospectus Meeting. This should be done 4-6 months prior to defense.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    Dissertation Defense Checklist Student: Schedule Prospectus Meeting. This should be done 4-6 months prior to defense. Take Approval of Dissertation Prospectus form to meeting. Date of meeting_____________ Student: Submit Approval of Dissertation Prospectus form to SAA Office. SAA Office submits Dissertation

  1. Network protocol changes can improve DisCom WAN performance : evaluating TCP modifications and SCTP in the ASC tri-lab environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Hu, Tan Chang

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Distance Computing (DisCom) Wide Area Network (WAN) is a high performance, long distance network environment that is based on the ubiquitous TCP/IP protocol set. However, the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the algorithms that govern its operation were defined almost two decades ago for a network environment vastly different from the DisCom WAN. In this paper we explore and evaluate possible modifications to TCP that purport to improve TCP performance in environments like the DisCom WAN. We also examine a much newer protocol, SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol) that claims to provide reliable network transport while also implementing multi-streaming, multi-homing capabilities that are appealing in the DisCom high performance network environment. We provide performance comparisons and recommendations for continued development that will lead to network communications protocol implementations capable of supporting the coming ASC Petaflop computing environments.

  2. Sintered Silver Joint Strength Dependence on Substrate Topography and Attachment Pad Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL; Liang, Zhenxian [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sum of chemical and mechanical bonding limits the adhesive strength of die-attach and substrate-attach layers. This is also true for sintered silver joints whose development and employment are underway in the electronic packaging community. Chemical bonding is dictated by numerous parameters associated with the compatibility of the metallurgical bond of the two mating surfaces and the processing history that brings them together. However, the efficacy of mechanical bonding is likely affected by the topographies (e.g., roughness) of the two adjoined surfaces and also perhaps the shape of the attachment layer itself (e.g., circles, squares, and sizes thereof). In this study the mechanical bonding component is examined through the modification of the copper cladding surface on direct bonded copper (DBC) substrates, the shape of the silver pad attachment bonded to it, and the use of a joined 'DBC sandwich' that facilitates their study. It was found that simple employment of both surface topography control and printed pad geometry can affect and improve shear strength of silver sintered joints, and that there is logic to perhaps hybridize their effects. This is an important observation as more future attention is devoted to joining constituents with larger areas (> 100 mm2) in electronic packages.

  3. Quantum Cryptography II: How to re-use a one-time pad safely even if P=NP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles H. Bennett; Gilles Brassard; Seth Breidbart

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    When elementary quantum systems, such as polarized photons, are used to transmit digital information, the uncertainty principle gives rise to novel cryptographic phenomena unachievable with traditional transmission media, e.g. a communications channel on which it is impossible in principle to eavesdrop without a high probability of being detected. With such a channel, a one-time pad can safely be reused many times as long as no eavesdrop is detected, and, planning ahead, part of the capacity of these uncompromised transmissions can be used to send fresh random bits with which to replace the one-time pad when an eavesdrop finally is detected. Unlike other schemes for stretching a one-time pad, this scheme does not depend on complexity-theoretic assumptions such as the difficulty of factoring.

  4. Defense Special Case Transuranic Waste Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, G.D. (Rockwell International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Joint Integration Office) [Rockwell International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Joint Integration Office; Carson, P.H. (Stoller (S.M.) Corp., Boulder, CO (United States)) [Stoller (S.M.) Corp., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Special Case Implementation Plan (SCIP) is to establish a comprehensive plan for the efficient long-term management and disposal of defense special case (SC) transuranic (TRU) waste. To fulfill this purpose, a review of SC waste management strategies (at both the site-specific and TRU program levels), waste characteristics and inventories, processing and transportation options, and disposal requirements was made. This review provides a plan for implementing policy decisions and useful information for making those decisions. The SCIP is intended to provide a baseline plant to which alternate plans can be compared. General potential alternatives are provided for future consideration when data concerning facility availability and costs are better defined. Milestones for the SC Implementation Plan are included which summarize each SC waste site. The cost of implementing the SC program has an upper limit of $89 million for the worst case scenario. The actual cost of implementation could be dramatically lower than the worst case figure. 15 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Nuclear winter: the implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally believed possible for some range of heavy nuclear attacks directed against cities that significant but not lethal climate alteration will ensue for at least a few weeks. Three-dimensional global circulation models being developed and used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the National Center for Atmospheric Research for a reasonable attack size seem to be converging on a temperature depression of the order of 10 to 15/degree/C, averaged over all land areas of the temperate region of the northern hemisphere. Temperature depressions as large as 25/degree/C are predicted in the interiors of continents for attacks in the summertime. Winter wars produce temperature depressions of only a few degrees. The authors have drawn the following implications for civil defense of the possibility of nuclear winter: (1) Neither cold nor drought is likely to be a direct threat to human survival. (2) The principal threat of nuclear winter is to agriculture. (3) Nuclear winter does not present an entirely new threat from nuclear war to the United States or the Soviet Union. (4) The consequences of nuclear winter would fall more heavily on the Soviet Union.

  6. Second Line of Defense Spares Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Dale L.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.; Thorsen, Darlene E.

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    During Fiscal Year 2012, a team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an assessment and analysis of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Sustainability spare parts program. Spare parts management touches many aspects of the SLD Sustainability Program including contracting and integration of Local Maintenance Providers (LMP), equipment vendors, analyses and metrics on program performance, system state of health, and maintenance practices. Standardized spares management will provide better data for decisions during site transition phase and will facilitate transition to host country sustainability ownership. The effort was coordinated with related SLD Sustainability Program initiatives, including a configuration items baselining initiative, a metrics initiative, and a maintenance initiative. The spares study has also led to pilot programs for sourcing alternatives that include regional intermediate inventories and partnering agreements that leverage existing supply chains. Many partners from the SLD Sustainability program contributed to and were consulted in the course of the study. This document provides a description of the findings, recommendations, and implemented solutions that have resulted from the study.

  7. Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash., December 16, 2005, Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP CX) working to reduce injuries at selected (DoD)...

  8. Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the Department of Defense. Cancels DOE O 452.6.

  9. National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005, Information...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005" (Public Law 108-375 Oct. 28 2004) Transition20082009EMAdditionalMaterialMACopy.pdf PUBLIC LAW 108-375-OCT. 28, 2004...

  10. U.S. Department of Defense's Rebates and Incentives Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the U.S. Department of Defense's (DoD's) statuatory authority and financial management regulation for rebates and incentives.

  11. Identifying Enterprise Leverage Points in Defense Acquisition Program Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Major Robb

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    *The views expressed in this talk are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, the Department of Defense (DoD), or the U.S. Government.

  12. Identifying enterprise leverage points in Defense Acquisition Program performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Joseph Robert, 1970-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large, complex systems development programs in the Department of Defense are finding it more difficult to deliver desired capabilities to the end user on time and on budget than ever before. Evidence exists that almost all ...

  13. Defense Energy Support Center: Installation Energy Commodity Business Unit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Defense Energy Support Center's (DESC's) Installation Energy Commodity Business Unit (CBU) including its intent, commitment, pilot project, lessons learned, and impending barriers.

  14. Psillos and Laudan Psillos's Defense of Scientific Realism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    defense of realism' (EDR), which argues that the best explanation of the empirical success of scientific theories is that they are approximately true. The EDR takes the NMA to represent an abductive inference

  15. Interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual defines the process DOE will use to interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and its staff. Canceled by DOE M 140.1-1A. Does not cancel other directives.

  16. Interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual presents the process the Department of Energy will use to interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) and its staff. Cancels DOE M 140.1-1.

  17. Interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual presents the process the Department of Energy will use to interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) and its staff. Cancels DOE M 140.1-1A.

  18. The Office of Environmental Management Non-Defense Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Microsoft Word - PSRP Updates 6-25-10v2 The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Defense Environmental Cleanup The Office of Environmental Management Uranium Enrichment D&D...

  19. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 224 is located in Areas 02, 03, 05, 06, 11, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is situated approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 224 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as Decon Pad and Septic Systems and is comprised of the following nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 02-04-01, Septic Tank (Buried); CAS 03-05-01, Leachfield; CAS 05-04-01, Septic Tanks (4)/Discharge Area; CAS 06-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (3); CAS 06-05-01, Leachfield; CAS 06-17-04, Decon Pad and Wastewater Catch; CAS 06-23-01, Decon Pad Discharge Piping; CAS 11-04-01, Sewage Lagoon; and CAS 23-05-02, Leachfield. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 02-04-01, 03-05-01, 06-03-01, 11-04-01, and 23-05-02 is no further action. As a best management practice, the septic tanks and distribution box were removed from CASs 02-04-01 and 11-04-01 and disposed of as hydrocarbon waste. The NDEP-approved correction action alternative for CASs 05-04-01, 06-05-01, 06-17-04, and 06-23-01 is clean closure. Closure activities for these CASs included removing and disposing of radiologically and pesticide-impacted soil and debris. CAU 224 was closed in accordance with the NDEP-approved CAU 224 Corrective Action Plan (CAP). The closure activities specified in the CAP were based on the recommendations presented in the CAU 224 Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2005). This Closure Report documents CAU 224 closure activities. During closure activities, approximately 60 cubic yards (yd3) of mixed waste in the form of soil and debris; approximately 70 yd{sup 3} of sanitary waste in the form of soil, liquid from septic tanks, and concrete debris; approximately 10 yd{sup 3} of hazardous waste in the form of pesticide-impacted soil; approximately 0.5 yd{sup 3} of universal waste in the form of fluorescent light bulbs; and approximately 0.5 yd{sup 3} of low-level waste in the form of a radiologically impacted fire hose rack were generated, managed, and disposed of appropriately. Waste minimization techniques, such as the utilization of laboratory analysis and field screening to guide the extent of excavations, were employed during the performance of closure work.

  20. Department of Defense Benchmarks VPP in Visit to Hanford

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP-CX) are working to meet a safety and health goal established by Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld to reduce injuries at DoD sites nationwide. In order to accomplish this goal, DoD visited the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State on December 12, 2005, to learn about its exemplary safety programs and benchmark the site's VPP effort.

  1. 105Lunar Crater Frequency Distributions This image of the 800-meter x 480-meter region near the Apollo-11 landing pad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Apollo-11 landing pad (arrow) was taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). It reveals hundreds of craters covering the landing area with sizes as small as 5 meters. The Apollo-11 landing pad is near and gives the surface density of craters near the Apollo-11 landing site in terms of craters per kilometer 2

  2. Heat transfer in ice hockey halls: measurements, energy analysis and analytical ice pad temperature profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Ferrantelli; Klaus Viljanen

    2015-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider heat transfer processes in an ice hockey hall, during operating conditions, with a bottom-up approach based upon on-site measurements. Detailed temperature data of both the ice pad and the air above the ice rink are used for a heat balance calculation in the steady-state regime, which quantifies the impact of each single heat source. We solve the heat equation in the ice slab in transient regime, and obtain a general analytical formula for the temperature profile. This solution is then applied to the resurfacing process by using our measurements as (time-dependent) boundary conditions (b.c.), and compared to an analogous numerical computation with good agreement. Our analytical formula is given with implicit initial condition and b.c., therefore it can be used not only in ice halls, but in a large variety of engineering applications.

  3. Heat transfer in ice hockey halls: measurements, energy analysis and analytical ice pad temperature profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrantelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider heat transfer processes in an ice hockey hall, during operating conditions, with a bottom-up approach based upon on-site measurements. Detailed temperature data of both the ice pad and the air above the ice rink are used for a heat balance calculation in the steady-state regime, which quantifies the impact of each single heat source. We solve the heat equation in the ice slab in transient regime, and obtain a general analytical formula for the temperature profile. This solution is then applied to the resurfacing process by using our measurements as (time-dependent) boundary conditions (b.c.), and compared to an analogous numerical computation with good agreement. Our analytical formula is given with implicit initial condition and b.c., therefore it can be used not only in ice halls, but in a large variety of engineering applications.

  4. ANALYSIS OF THE SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF RAIL PAD ASSEMBLIES AS A COMPONENT OF THE CONCRETE SLEEPER FASTENING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Fastening System RAIL PAD ASSEMBLY LATERAL DISPLACEMENT FAILURE MODE AND EFFECT ANALYSIS (FMEA) INTRODUCTION life · FMEA is used to define, identify, evaluate and eliminate potential failures from the system · FMEA was used to guide the process of answering questions related to the component behavior and also

  5. This page shows how to use the My Pitt Video (Panopto) iOS application on an iPad. To log into the My Pitt Video (Panopto) iOS App, tap "Sign In" in the top left corner.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    iPad App iPad App This page shows how to use the My Pitt Video (Panopto) iOS application on an iPad. Login To log into the My Pitt Video (Panopto) iOS App, tap "Sign In" in the top left corner. In the Sign name and tap "Record a new video" to begin recording. Page 9 of 17 #12;iPad App Once you are finished

  6. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herr, M.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is likely to generate dusts, mists, fumes, or small particulates. A beryllium exposure control program should minimize airborne concentrations, the potential for and spread of contamination, the number of times individuals are exposed to beryllium, and the number of employees who may be potentially exposed.

  7. The science, technology, and politics of ballistic missile defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, Philip E. [Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    America's missile defense systems are deployed at home and abroad. This includes the Groundbased Missile Defense (GMD) system in Alaska and California, the Phased Adaptive Approach in Europe (EPAA), and regional systems in the Middle East and Asia. Unfortunately these systems lack workable architectures, and many of the required elements either don't work or are missing. Major review and reconsideration is needed of all elements of these systems. GMD performance in tests has gotten worse with time, when it ought to be getting better. A lack of political support is not to blame as the DoD spends about $10 billion per year, and proposes to add about $5 billion over the next five years. Russia objects to the EPAA as a threat to its ICBM forces, and to the extensive deployment of U.S. military forces in countries such as Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania, once part of the Soviet Union. Going forward the U.S. should keep working with Russia whose cooperation will be key to diplomatic gains in the Middle East and elsewhere. Meanwhile, America's missile defenses face an enduring set of issues, especially target discrimination in the face of attacks designed to overwhelm the defenses, stage separation debris, chaff, decoys, and stealth. Dealing with target discrimination while also replacing, upgrading, or adding to the many elements of U.S. missiles defenses presents daunting budget priorities. A new look at the threat is warranted, and whether the U.S. needs to consider every nation that possesses even short-range missiles a threat to America. The proliferation of missiles of all sizes around the world is a growing problem, but expecting U.S. missile defenses to deal with all those missiles everywhere is unrealistic, and U.S. missile defenses, effective or not, are justifying more and more offensive missiles.

  8. MEMS packaging with etching and thinning of lid wafer to form lids and expose device wafer bond pads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chanchani, Rajen; Nordquist, Christopher; Olsson, Roy H; Peterson, Tracy C; Shul, Randy J; Ahlers, Catalina; Plut, Thomas A; Patrizi, Gary A

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In wafer-level packaging of microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices a lid wafer is bonded to a MEMS wafer in a predermined aligned relationship. Portions of the lid wafer are removed to separate the lid wafer into lid portions that respectively correspond in alignment with MEMS devices on the MEMS wafer, and to expose areas of the MEMS wafer that respectively contain sets of bond pads respectively coupled to the MEMS devices.

  9. Are three-dimensional spider webs defensive adaptations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackledge, Todd

    LETTER Are three-dimensional spider webs defensive adaptations? Todd A. Blackledge1 *, Jonathan A-mail: tab42@cornell.edu Abstract Spider webs result from complex behaviours that have evolved under many selective pressures. Webs have been primarily considered to be foraging adaptations, neglecting

  10. Doctoral Defense "Low-Temperature Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Doctoral Defense "Low-Temperature Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor for Energy Recovery from Domestic such as anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) are emerging as one option to recover energy during domestic highlighting microbial community shifts in the bioreactor and biofilm during changes in membrane fouling

  11. School of Industrial Engineering and Management Doctoral Dissertation Defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    School of Industrial Engineering and Management Doctoral Dissertation Defense Objectives methodology and the results. · Provide the advisory committee with a means for assuring that the dissertation dissertation proposal. · Provide the advisory committee with a final data point for verification of the student

  12. BETAVOLTAIC BATTERIES Long-Life Power for Defense & Medical Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BETAVOLTAIC BATTERIES Long-Life Power for Defense & Medical Markets NREL Industry Growth Forum Jonathan W. Greene, CEO November 2, 2009 #12;·! Patented Betavoltaics ­ tiny, long life batteries targeting electronic and isotope powered batteries MS - 14 yrs management and engineering ·!Expert in patent

  13. RISK MANAGEMENT AND TORT DEFENSE Sub-Chapter 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    1 #12;2 RISK MANAGEMENT AND TORT DEFENSE 2.6.203 Sub-Chapter 2 State Vehicle Use 2.6.201 INTRODUCTION (1) The following rules define acceptable uses for state-owned or leased motor pool vehicles guidelines, policies, insurance coverage exclusions, or regulations for vehicle/equipment fleet operations

  14. analyses defense nuclear: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analyses defense nuclear First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Global Analyses of Nuclear...

  15. Towards Attack-Agnostic Defenses David Brumley and Dawn Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brumley, David

    Towards Attack-Agnostic Defenses David Brumley and Dawn Song Carnegie Mellon University {dbrumley,dawnsong}@cs.cmu.edu Abstract Internet attackers control hundreds of thousands to per- haps millions of computers, which they can use for a va- riety of different attacks. Common attacks include spam delivery, phishing, and DDo

  16. Embedded Electrical and Computer Engineering MASTER ORAL DEFENSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmoodi, Hamid

    of this research is to design a low power integrated system that can be used in vivo for scanning the electrode. A model created in Python provides input vectors and output comparison for the verification processEmbedded Electrical and Computer Engineering MASTER ORAL DEFENSE TITLE: Low Power Scanner for High

  17. A Cooperative Cyber Defense for Securing Critical Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulp, Errin W.

    .g., the numerous private companies that make up North America's electrical power grids) that share computationalA Cooperative Cyber Defense for Securing Critical Infrastructures Glenn A. Fink glenn networked relationships. At electrical substations, it is common to find equipment from several companies

  18. On Clinical Trials in Psychiatry In Defense of the Traditional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On Clinical Trials in Psychiatry In Defense of the Traditional EÆcacy Trial The randomized controlled clinical trial is still a relatively new technology for as- sessing the value of therapeutic interven- tions, yet innovations in the design and analysis of clinical trials in psychiatry have lagged

  19. Iran J Arthropod-Borne Dis, 2010, 4(2): 5660 A Nasiri et al.: Tick Infestation Rate of ... Short Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Iran J Arthropod-Borne Dis, 2010, 4(2): 56­60 A Nasiri et al.: Tick Infestation Rate of ... 56 Province, Iran, 2007-2008 A Nasiri1 , *Z Telmadarraiy1 , H Vatandoost1 , S Chinikar2 , M Moradi2 , MA of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran 2 Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran

  20. Inhabiting cycles of maritime obsolescence : redirecting the National Defense Reserve Fleet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polansky, Nicholas W. (Nicholas Wilkes)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Defense is in a state of obsolescence. The metrics of risk have changed from threat of military invasion to that of weather. Infrastructure is in a state of transition. The Maritime Administration's National Defense Reserve ...

  1. Practical matters for defense contractors converting DoD technology to commercial markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting, Carina Maria

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis asks if and how the defense contractor can profitably transfer the technology and institutional learning obtained from DoD funded R&D to commercial markets. There are numerous examples of very successful defense ...

  2. Study of Medical Students’ Malpractice Fear and Defensive Medicine: A “Hidden Curriculum?”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, William; Rodriguez, Robert; Suarez, David; Fortman, Jonathan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Emergency Medicine Volume XV, NO . 3 : May 2014WM, et al. Defensive medicine among high-risk specialist293:2609-2617. 3. Defensive Medicine and Medical Practice.

  3. DEFENSE THREAT REDUCTION AGENCY 8725 JOHN J . KINGMAN ROAD, STOP 620 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    DEFENSE THREAT REDUCTION AGENCY 8725 JOHN J . KINGMAN ROAD, STOP 620 1 FORT BELVOIR, VA 22060-6201 February 28, 2013 Industry and Academia Partners of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and U.S. Strategic of unceltainty for the entire Department of Defense. The Def1 ns Threat Reduction Agency and U. S. Strategic

  4. A Taxonomy of DDoS Attack and DDoS Defense Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ruby B.

    A Taxonomy of DDoS Attack and DDoS Defense Mechanisms Jelena Mirkovic 449 Smith Hall Computer the attacks and the defense approaches is overwhelming. This paper presents two taxonomies for classifying attacks and defenses, and thus provides researchers with a better understanding of the problem

  5. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE LUNG CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2013 STRATEGIC PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE LUNG CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2013 STRATEGIC PLAN The Fiscal Year 2013 (FY13) Defense Appropriations Act provides for $10.5 million to the Department of Defense Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP) to support innovative, high- impact lung cancer research. This program

  6. MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL ANNOUNCEMENT OF PUBLIC DEFENSE OF THE DISSERTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Matthew

    MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL ANNOUNCEMENT OF PUBLIC DEFENSE OF THE DISSERTATION This form obligates you, your Dissertation Director, and your committee to a public defense of your dissertation community. The dissertation defense schedule is published on the Graduate School's Web site. You are solely

  7. Testing a Collaborative DDoS Defense in a Red Team/Blue Team Exercise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Testing a Collaborative DDoS Defense in a Red Team/Blue Team Exercise Jelena Mirkovic, Member, IEEE, and performed October 2002 to May 2003. The goal of the exercise was to evaluate a collaborative DDoS defense in DDoS defense systems (e.g., avoiding reliance on timing mechanisms), and taught us many lessons about

  8. Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

  9. Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

  10. Sequential Defense Against Random and Intentional Attacks in Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Pin-Yu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Network robustness against attacks is one of the most fundamental researches in network science as it is closely associated with the reliability and functionality of various networking paradigms. However, despite the study on intrinsic topological vulnerabilities to node removals, little is known on the network robustness when network defense mechanisms are implemented, especially for networked engineering systems equipped with detection capabilities. In this paper, a sequential defense mechanism is firstly proposed in complex networks for attack inference and vulnerability assessment, where the data fusion center sequentially infers the presence of an attack based on the binary attack status reported from the nodes in the network. The network robustness is evaluated in terms of the ability to identify the attack prior to network disruption under two major attack schemes, i.e., random and intentional attacks. We provide a parametric plug-in model for performance evaluation on the proposed mechanism and valida...

  11. Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order prescribes how the Department of Energy participates with the Department of Defense (DoD) to ensure the surety (safety, security and control) of military nuclear weapon systems deployed around the world. The Order establishes National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the DoD. Cancels DOE O 5610.13. Canceled by DOE O 452.6A.

  12. Defenses against Covert-Communications in Multimedia and Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jainsky, Julien Sebastien 1981-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    subversive communications to a much greater extent. 3 Furthermore, the acquisition of highly correlated multimedia provides fertile ground for advanced steganographic approaches. Covert communications in multimedia networks is of special concern...DEFENSES AGAINST COVERT-COMMUNICATIONS IN MULTIMEDIA AND SENSOR NETWORKS A Dissertation by JULIEN SEBASTIEN JAINSKY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  13. Defense against common mode failures in protection system design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyman, R.H.; Johnson, G.L.

    1997-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of digital instrumentation and control into reactor safety systems creates a heightened concern about common-mode failure. This paper discusses the concern and methods to cope with the concern. Common-mode failures have been a ``fact-of-life`` in existing systems. The informal introduction of defense-in-depth and diversity (D-in-D&D)-coupled with the fact that hardware common-mode failures are often distributed in time-has allowed systems to deal with past common-mode failures. However, identical software operating in identical redundant systems presents the potential for simultaneous failure. Consequently, the use of digital systems raises the concern about common-mode failure to a new level. A more methodical approach to mitigating common-mode failure is needed to address these concerns. Purposeful introduction of D-in-D&D has been used as a defense against common-mode failure in reactor protection systems. At least two diverse systems are provided to mitigate any potential initiating event. Additionally, diverse displays and controls are provided to allow the operator to monitor plant status and manually initiate engineered safety features. A special form of conimon-mode failure analysis called ``defense-in-depth and diversity analysis`` has been developed to identify possible conimon-mode failure vulnerabilities in digital systems. An overview of this analysis technique is provided.

  14. Semi-inclusive DIS Experiments Using Transversely Polarized Targets in Hall-A: Current Results and Future Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalyan Allada

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of single (SSA) and double spin asymmetries (DSA) in semi-inclusive DIS reactions using polarized targets provide a powerful method to probe transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs). In particular, the experimentally measured SSA on nucleon targets can help in extracting the transversity and Sivers distribution functions of u and d-quarks. Similarly, the measured DSA are sensitive to the quark spin-orbital correlations, and provide an access to the TMD parton distribution function (g{sub 1T} ). A recent experiment conducted in Hall-A Jefferson Lab using transversely polarized {sup 3}He provide first such measurements on neutron target. The measurement was performed using 5.9 GeV beam from CEBAF and measured the target SSA/DSA in the SIDIS reaction {sup 3}He{sup {dagger}}(e,e'{pi}{sup {+/-}} )X. The kinematical range, x = 0.19 ~ 0.34, at Q{sup 2} = 1.77 ~ 2.73 (GeV/c){sup 2} , was focused on the valence quark region. The results from this measurement along with our plans for future high precision measurements in Hall-A are presented.

  15. How to reuse a one-time pad and other notes on authentication, encryption, and protection of quantum information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oppenheim, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Theoretical Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Gdansk (Poland); Horodecki, Michal [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Gdansk (Poland)

    2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum information is a valuable resource which can be encrypted in order to protect it. We consider the size of the one-time pad that is needed to protect quantum information in a number of cases. The situation is dramatically different from the classical case: we prove that one can recycle the one-time pad without compromising security. The protocol for recycling relies on detecting whether eavesdropping has occurred, and further relies on the fact that information contained in the encrypted quantum state cannot be fully accessed. We prove the security of recycling rates when authentication of quantum states is accepted, and when it is rejected. We note that recycling schemes respect a general law of cryptography which we introduce relating the size of private keys, sent qubits, and encrypted messages. We discuss applications for encryption of quantum information in light of the resources needed for teleportation. Potential uses include the protection of resources such as entanglement and the memory of quantum computers. We also introduce another application: encrypted secret sharing and find that one can even reuse the private key that is used to encrypt a classical message. In a number of cases, one finds that the amount of private key needed for authentication or protection is smaller than in the general case.

  16. Meeting Department of Defense non-hazardous solid waste goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eakes, W.S.; Comstock, J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will discuss the previous and present Department of Defense (DOD) non-hazardous solid waste goals and how Navy and Marine Corps installation collect solid waste data and measure the goals. The installation and central data collection systems used, data collection problems and solutions, data quality, and the yearly measure. The paper will also discuss the original solid waste reduction and diversion goal and how the Navy and Marine Corps performed. The new DOD landfill and incineration diversion goal will be discussed and some techniques the Navy will use to meet the new goals.

  17. Ike Skelton Defense Authorization Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas:ITCSolidIdaho‎ |Idylwood,Ike Skelton Defense

  18. Defense Programs: the mission | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortal Decision Support forDeep Insights from8,Defense

  19. National Defense University (NDU) Application | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForum | Department of EnergyInnovationNational Defense

  20. Toward US-Russian strategic defense: Ban the ABM Treaty now

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savelyev, A.

    1992-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Boris Yeltsin and George Bush agreed on June 17 to develop and deploy a jointly controlled global protection system against ballistic missile strikes. Three teams of Russian and American experts now are studying the Bush-Yeltsin idea, called the Joint Defense Program (JDP). The drive to develop a U.S.-Russian defense system, however, faces a formidable obstacle-the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty, which prohibits not only the deployment of territorial defenses against strategic missiles but the creation of an infrastructure (or `base`) for such a defense. If America and Russia hope to build a common defense against ballistic missiles, they first will have to remove ABM Treaty obstacles to expanded U.S.-Russian cooperation and missile defense.

  1. An army for the people : the self- defense forces and society in postwar Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    saiban kankei shiry?. SDF-related Newspapers Akashiya.Containing Protest: Anti-SDF Litigation and the Defensethe Self-Defense Forces (SDF), established close ideological

  2. Defense Program Equivalencies for Technical Qualification Standard Competencies12/12/1995

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Defense Programs has undertaken an effort to compare the competencies in the GeneralTechnical Base Qualification Standard and the Functional Area Qualification Standards withvarious positions in...

  3. Defense Science and Technology Innovation Teams: Mechanisms and Indicators for Indigenous Innovation in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WRIGHT, Darren J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STUDY OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY IN CHINA RESEARCH BRIEFThe Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is aDefense Science and Technology Innovation Teams: Mechanisms

  4. ALERTEES PAR LA MORT CELLULAIRE, NOS DEFENSES ANTIVIRALES METTENT LE TURBO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loewith, Robbie

    MORT CELLULAIRE, NOS DEFENSES ANTIVIRALES METTENT LE TURBO Genève, le 9 février 2012 SOUS EMBARGO JUSQU

  5. An army for the people : the self- defense forces and society in postwar Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    purpose of defense. ” Judge Fukushima, however, stated thatof the base. Judge Fukushima Shigeo argued that tree fellingfiled their lawsuit. Judge Fukushima Shigeo, the same judge

  6. Tomato-Potato Aphid Interactions: Insights into Plant Defense and the Aphid Pest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atamian, Hagop Sarkis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    induced defenses in tomato on the potato aphid, Macrosiphumin arbuscular mycorrhizal potato root colonization. Funct.and behavior of the potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae.

  7. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, J.E. (compiler)

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

  8. Defense waste vitrification studies during FY-1981. Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorklund, W.J. (comp.)

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both simulated alkaline defense wastes and simulated acidic defense wastes (formed by treating alkaline waste with formic acid) were successfully vitrified in direct liquid-fed melter experiments. The vitrification process was improved while using the formate-treated waste. Leach resistance was essentially the same. Off-gas entrainment was the primary mechanism for material exiting the melter. When formate waste was vitrified, the flow behavior of the off gas from the melter changed dramatically from an erratic surging behavior to a more quiet, even flow. Hydrogen and CO were detectable while processing formate feed; however, levels exceeding the flamability limits in air were never approached. Two types of melter operation were tested during the year, one involving boost power. Several boosting methods located within the melter plenum were tested. When lid heating was being used, water spray cooling in the off gas was required. Countercurrent spray cooling was more effective than cocurrent spray cooling. Materials of construction for the off-gas system were examined. Inconel-690 is preferred in the plenum area. Inspection of the pilot-scale melter found that corrosion of the K-3 refractory and Inconel-690 electrodes was minimal. An overheating incident occurred with the LFCM in which glass temperatures up to 1480/sup 0/C were experienced. Lab-scale vitrification tests to study mercury behavior were also completed this year. 53 figures, 63 tables.

  9. Unmanned and Unattended Response Capability for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENNETT, PHIL C.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis was conducted of the potential for unmanned and unattended robotic technologies for forward-based, immediate response capabilities that enables access and controlled task performance. The authors analyze high-impact response scenarios in conjunction with homeland security organizations, such as the NNSA Office of Emergency Response, the FBI, the National Guard, and the Army Technical Escort Unit, to cover a range of radiological, chemical and biological threats. They conducted an analysis of the potential of forward-based, unmanned and unattended robotic technologies to accelerate and enhance emergency and crisis response by Homeland Defense organizations. Response systems concepts were developed utilizing new technologies supported by existing emerging threats base technologies to meet the defined response scenarios. These systems will pre-position robotic and remote sensing capabilities stationed close to multiple sites for immediate action. Analysis of assembled systems included experimental activities to determine potential efficacy in the response scenarios, and iteration on systems concepts and remote sensing and robotic technologies, creating new immediate response capabilities for Homeland Defense.

  10. 388 Federal Funds--Continued ENVIRONMENTAL AND OTHER DEFENSE ACTIVITIES--Continued

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will be responsible for the management and implemen- tation of the Department's National Spent Fuel Program, which final dis- position of all Departmental spent nuclear fuel. In addition, the program will be responsible for management of the For- eign Research Reactor Spent Fuel Acceptance Program, in- cluding the planning

  11. Fan and Pad Greenhouse Evaporative Cooling Systems1 R. A. Bucklin, J. D. Leary, D. B. McConnell, and E. G. Wilkerson2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR1135 Fan and Pad Greenhouse Evaporative Cooling Systems1 R. A. Bucklin, J. D. Leary, D. B. Mc systems. Such high temperatures reduce crop quality and worker productivity. Evaporative cooling temperatures are important when dealing with evaporative cooling systems ­ dry bulb temperature and wet bulb

  12. An Archaeological Survey of the Proposed Famcor Oil, Inc. Well Pads and Pipeline in the Sam Houston National Forest, San Jacinto County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William; Bradle, Michael

    2015-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An archaeological survey of four proposed well pads (each one acre in size except B-3 which is 1.44 acres and C-3 which is 1.72 acres), 2549.86 meters of pipeline, and 1158.1 meters of access roads was conducted by Brazos Valley Research Associates...

  13. An approach to determine a defensible spent fuel ratio.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sabotage of spent nuclear fuel casks remains a concern nearly forty years after attacks against shipment casks were first analyzed and has a renewed relevance in the post-9/11 environment. A limited number of full-scale tests and supporting efforts using surrogate materials, typically depleted uranium dioxide (DUO2), have been conducted in the interim to more definitively determine the source term from these postulated events. In all the previous studies, the postulated attack of greatest interest was by a conical shape charge (CSC) that focuses the explosive energy much more efficiently than bulk explosives. However, the validity of these large-scale results remain in question due to the lack of a defensible Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), defined as the amount of respirable aerosol generated by an attack on a mass of spent fuel compared to that of an otherwise identical DUO2 surrogate. Previous attempts to define the SFR have resulted in estimates ranging from 0.42 to 12 and include suboptimal experimental techniques and data comparisons. Different researchers have suggested using SFR values of 3 to 5.6. Sound technical arguments exist that the SFR does not exceed a value of unity. A defensible determination of the SFR in this lower range would greatly reduce the calculated risk associated with the transport and dry storage of spent nuclear fuel. Currently, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in possession of several samples of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that were used in the original SFR studies in the 1980's and were intended for use in a modern effort at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 2000's. A portion of these samples are being used for a variety of research efforts. However, the entirety of SNF samples at ORNL is scheduled for disposition at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by approximately the end of 2015. If a defensible SFR is to be determined for use in storage and transportation security analyses, the need to begin this effort is urgent in order to secure the only known available SNF samples with a clearly defined path to disposal.

  14. Comments of the Renewable Northwest Project And the Natural Resources Defense Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comments of the Renewable Northwest Project And the Natural Resources Defense Council, 2004 The Renewable Northwest Project (RNP) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) appreciate to the recommendations on renewable resources. We agree with many of the comments submitted by the NW Energy coalition

  15. Cross-Layer Attack and Defense in Cognitive Radio Networks Wenkai Wang and Yan (Lindsay) Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yan Lindsay

    Cross-Layer Attack and Defense in Cognitive Radio Networks Wenkai Wang and Yan (Lindsay) Sun ECE research on security issues in cognitive radio networks mainly focuses on attack and defense in individual network layers. However, the attackers do not necessarily restrict themselves within the boundaries

  16. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense-in-Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Fabro

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: • Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems • Access to facilities via remote data link or modem • Public facing services for customer or corporate operations • A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  17. Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kuipers; Mark Fabro

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  18. Defense programs industrial partnerships at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freese, K.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Industrial Partnership Office

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s Defense Programs face unprecedented challenges of stewardship for an aging nuclear stockpile, cessation of nuclear testing, reduced federal budgets, and a smaller manufacturing complex. Partnerships with industry are essential in developing technology, modernizing the manufacturing complex, and maintaining the safety and reliability of the nation`s nuclear capability. The past decade of federal support for industrial partnerships has promoted benefits to US industrial competitiveness. Recent shifts in government policy have re-emphasized the importance of industrial partnerships in accomplishing agency missions. Nevertheless, abundant opportunities exist for dual-benefit, mission-driven partnerships between the national laboratories and industry. Experience at Los Alamos National Laboratory with this transition is presented.

  19. SECURITY MODELING FOR MARITIME PORT DEFENSE RESOURCE ALLOCATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S.; Dunn, D.

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Redeployment of existing law enforcement resources and optimal use of geographic terrain are examined for countering the threat of a maritime based small-vessel radiological or nuclear attack. The evaluation was based on modeling conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory that involved the development of options for defensive resource allocation that can reduce the risk of a maritime based radiological or nuclear threat. A diverse range of potential attack scenarios has been assessed. As a result of identifying vulnerable pathways, effective countermeasures can be deployed using current resources. The modeling involved the use of the Automated Vulnerability Evaluation for Risks of Terrorism (AVERT{reg_sign}) software to conduct computer based simulation modeling. The models provided estimates for the probability of encountering an adversary based on allocated resources including response boats, patrol boats and helicopters over various environmental conditions including day, night, rough seas and various traffic flow rates.

  20. Active, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technologies for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James L. Jones

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active, non-intrusive inspection or interrogation technologies have been used for 100 years - with the primary focus being radiographic imaging. During the last 50 years, various active interrogation systems have been investigated and most have revealed many unique and interesting capabilities and advantages that have already benefited the general public. Unfortunately, except for medical and specific industrial applications, these unique capabilities have not been widely adopted, largely due to the complexity of the technology, the overconfident reliance on passive detection systems to handle most challenges, and the unrealistic public concerns regarding radiation safety issues for a given active inspection deployment. The unique homeland security challenges facing the United States today are inviting more "out-of-the-box" solutions and are demanding the effective technological solutions that only active interrogation systems can provide. While revolutionary new solutions are always desired, these technology advancements are rare, and when found, usually take a long time to fully understand and implement for a given application. What's becoming more evident is that focusing on under-developed, but well-understood, active inspection technologies can provide many of the needed "out-of-the-box" solutions. This paper presents a brief historical overview of active interrogation. It identifies some of the major homeland defense challenges being confronted and the commercial and research technologies presently available and being pursued. Finally, the paper addresses the role of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and its partner, the Idaho Accelerator Center at Idaho State University, in promoting and developing active inspection technologies for homeland defense.

  1. Ed. D Dissertation Defense Report Recommendation for Award of the Doctor of Education (Ed.D) Degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Ed. D Dissertation Defense Report And Recommendation for Award of the Doctor of Education (Ed: ______________________ Concentration (Check One): Ed.D ­ Curriculum Studies Ed.D ­ Educational Administration Dissertation Defense Date: _______________________________________ Members of the Dissertation Committee

  2. Defensive Investments and the Demand for Air Quality: Evidence from the NOx Budget Program and Ozone Reductions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deschênes, Olivier

    Willingness to pay for air quality is a function of health and the costly defensive investments that contribute to health, but there is little research assessing the empirical importance of defensive investments. The setting ...

  3. Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aas, Christopher A.; Lenhart, James E.; Bray, Olin H.; Witcher, Christina Jenkin

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories was tasked with developing the Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS) with the sponsorship of NA-125.3 and the concurrence of DOE/NNSA field and area offices. The purpose of IIIMS was to modernize nuclear materials management information systems at the enterprise level. Projects over the course of several years attempted to spearhead this modernization. The scope of IIIMS was broken into broad enterprise-oriented materials management and materials forecasting. The IIIMS prototype was developed to allow multiple participating user groups to explore nuclear material requirements and needs in detail. The purpose of material forecasting was to determine nuclear material availability over a 10 to 15 year period in light of the dynamic nature of nuclear materials management. Formal DOE Directives (requirements) were needed to direct IIIMS efforts but were never issued and the project has been halted. When restarted, duplicating or re-engineering the activities from 1999 to 2003 is unnecessary, and in fact future initiatives can build on previous work. IIIMS requirements should be structured to provide high confidence that discrepancies are detected, and classified information is not divulged. Enterprise-wide materials management systems maintained by the military can be used as overall models to base IIIMS implementation concepts upon.

  4. Environmental management requirements/defensible costs project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) used a systems engineering approach to develop the first formal requirements baseline for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Management (EM) Programs. The recently signed Settlement Agreement with the State of Idaho (Batt Agreement), along with dramatically reduced EM funding targets from Department of Energy (DOE) headquarters, drove the immediacy of this effort. Programs have linked top-level requirements to work scope to cost estimates. All EM work, grouped by decision units, was scrubbed by INEL EM programs and by an independent {open_quotes}Murder Board.{close_quotes} Direct participation of upper level management from LITCO and the DOE-Idaho Operations Office ensured best information and decisions. The result is a scrubbed down, defensible budget tied to top-level requirements for use in the upcoming DOE-Headquarters` budget workout, the Internal Review Board, the FY98 Activity Data Sheets submittal, and preparation of the FY97 control accounts and out-year plans. In addition to the remarkable accomplishments during the past eight weeks, major issues were identified and documented and follow-on tasks are underway which will lead to further improvements in INEL EM program management.

  5. China's Second Ballistic Missile Defense Test: A Search for Strategic Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLLPETER, Kevin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of_Conduct.pdf. Study of Innovation and Technology in Chinabut preliminary step in China’s missile defense program.Warning Satellites. ” 18 “China Warns of Response to U.S.

  6. Demonstration of Natural Gas Engine Driven Air Compressor Technology at Department of Defense Industrial Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, M.; Aylor, S. W.; Van Ormer, H.

    Recent downsizing and consolidation of Department of Defense (DOD) facilities provides an opportunity to upgrade remaining facilities with more efficient and less polluting equipment. Use of air compressors by the DOD is widespread and the variety...

  7. Rejuvenating the Chinese Defense Economy: Present Developments and Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEUNG, Tai Ming

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is aon the Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC),defense science, technology, and innovation system pursues a

  8. The J-20 Fighter Aircraft and the State of China's Defense Science, Technology, and Innovation Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEUNG, Tai Ming

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC),The Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is as Defense Science, Technology, and Innovation Potential Tai

  9. The Chinese Defense Economy’s Long March from Imitation to Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Tai Ming

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC),The Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is as defense science, technology, and innovation (DSTI) system

  10. Design for affordability in defense and aerospace systems using tradespace-based methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Marcus Shihong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program failures have plagued the defense and aerospace industry for decades, as unanticipated cost and schedule overruns have rendered the development of systems ineffective in terms of time and cost considerations. This ...

  11. Defense acquisition program manager as program leader : improving program outcomes through key competencies and relationship management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, B. Marc

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US defense acquisition system is a massive enterprise charged with developing and acquiring state-of-the-art military technology and systems. For the past 65 years, many broad-reaching studies and commissions have ...

  12. Methodology for technology selection for Department of Defense research and development programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Michael L. (Michael Lawrie), 1979-

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, many of the Department of Defense's major acquisition programs have experienced significant budget overruns and schedule delays. Closer examination of these programs reveals that in many cases, technologies ...

  13. Feasibility of very deep borehole disposal of US nuclear defense wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Frances Elizabeth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyzes the feasibility of emplacing DOE-owned defense nuclear waste from weapons production into a permanent borehole repository drilled ~4 km into granite basement rock. Two canister options were analyzed ...

  14. Mechanistic origins of bombardier beetle (Brachinini) explosion-induced defensive spray pulsation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arndt, Eric Michael

    Bombardier beetles (Brachinini) use a rapid series of discrete explosions inside their pygidial gland reaction chambers to produce a hot, pulsed, quinone-based defensive spray. The mechanism of brachinines’ spray pulsation ...

  15. Thermal phase stability of some simulated Defense waste glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, R.P.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three simulated defense waste glass compositions developed by Savannah River Laboratories were studied to determine viscosity and compositional effects on the comparative thermal phase stabilities of these glasses. The glass compositions are similar except that the 411 glasses are high in lithium and low in sodium compared to the 211 glass, and the T glasses are high in iron and low in aluminum compared to the C glass. Specimens of these glasses were heat treated using isothermal anneals as short as 10 min and up to 15 days over the temperature range of 450/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C. Additionally, a specimen of each glass was cooled at a constant cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour from an 1100/sup 0/C melt down to 500/sup 0/C where it was removed from the furnace. The following were observed. The slow cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour is possible as a canister centerline cooling rate for large canisters. Accordingly, it is important to note that a short range diffusion mechanism like cooperative growth phenomena can result in extensive devitrification at lower temperatures and higher yields than a long-range diffusion mechanism can; and can do it without the growth of large crystals that can fracture the glass. Refractory oxides like CeO/sub 2/ and (Ni, Mn, Fe)/sub 2/O/sub 4/ form very rapidly at higher temperatures than silicates and significant yields can be obtained at sufficiently high temperatures that settling of these dense phases becomes a major microstructural feature during slow cooling of some glasses. These annealing studies further show that below 500/sup 0/C there is but little devitrification occurring implying that glass canisters stored at 300/sup 0/C may be kinetically stable despite not being thermodynamically so.

  16. Defense Waste Processing Facility wasteform and canister description: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, R.G.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the reference wasteform and canister for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The principal changes include revised feed and glass product compositions, an estimate of glass product characteristics as a function of time after the start of vitrification, and additional data on glass leaching performance. The feed and glass product composition data are identical to that described in the DWPF Basic Data Report, Revision 90/91. The DWPF facility is located at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and it is scheduled for construction completion during December 1989. The wasteform is borosilicate glass containing approximately 28 wt % sludge oxides, with the balance consisting of glass-forming chemicals, primarily glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its stability toward reaction with potential repository groundwaters, its relatively high ability to incorporate nuclides found in the sludge into the solid matrix, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains approximately 71% SiO/sub 2/, 12% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 10% Na/sub 2/O. Tests to quantify the stability of DWPF waste glass have been performed under a wide variety of conditions, including simulations of potential repository environments. Based on these tests, DWPF waste glass should easily meet repository criteria. The canister is filled with about 3700 lb of glass which occupies 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approximately 690 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and precipitate from 15-year-old supernate. The radionuclide activity of the canister is about 233,000 curies, with an estimated radiation level of 5600 rad/hour at the canister surface. 14 figs., 28 tabs.

  17. Defense programs business practices re-engineering QFD exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, C.; Halbleib, L.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The end of the cold war has resulted in many changes for the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). We now work in a smaller complex, with reduced resources, a smaller stockpile, and no new phase 3 weapons development programs. This new environment demands that we re-evaluate the way we design and produce nuclear weapons. The Defense Program (DP) Business Practices Re-engineering activity was initiated to improve the design and production efficiency of the DP Sector. The activity had six goals: (1) to identify DP business practices that are exercised by the Product Realization Process (PRP); (2) to determine the impact (positive, negative, or none) of these practices on defined, prioritized customer criteria; (3) to identify business practices that are candidates for elimination or re-engineering; (4) to select two or three business practices for re-engineering; (5) to re-engineer the selected business practices; and (6) to exercise the re-engineered practices on three pilot development projects. Business practices include technical and well as administrative procedures that are exercised by the PRP. A QFD exercise was performed to address (1)-(4). The customer that identified, defined, and prioritized the criteria to rate the business practices was the Block Change Advisory Group. Five criteria were identified: cycle time, flexibility, cost, product performance/quality, and best practices. Forty-nine business practices were identified and rated per the criteria. From this analysis, the group made preliminary recommendations as to which practices would be addressed in the re-engineering activity. Sixteen practices will be addressed in the re-engineering activity. These practices will then be piloted on three projects: (1) the Electronic Component Assembly (ECA)/Radar Project, (2) the B61 Mod 11, and (3) Warhead Protection Program (WPP).

  18. The release of technetium from defense waste processing facility glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, W.L.; Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory tests are being, conducted using two radionuclide-doped Defense Waste Processing, Facility (DWPF) glasses (referred to as SRL 13IA and SRL 202A) to characterize the effects of the glass surface area/solution volume (SN) ratio on the release and disposition of {Tc} and several actinide elements. Tests are being conducted at 90{degrees}C in a tuff ground water solution at SN ratios of 10, 2000, and 20,000 m{sup {minus}1} and have been completed through 1822 days. The formation of certain alteration phases in tests at 2000 and 20,000 m{sup {minus}1} results in an increase in the dissolution rates of both classes. The release of {Tc} parallels that of B and Na under most test conditions and its release increases when alteration phases form. However, in tests with SRL 202A glass at 20,000 ,{sup {minus}1}, the {Tc} concentration in solution decreases coincidentally with an increase in the nitrite/nitrate ratio that indicates a decrease in the solution Eh. This may have occurred due to radiolysis, glass dissolution, the formation of alteration phases, or vessel interactions. Technetium that was reduced from {Tc}(VII) to {Tc}(IV) may have precipitated, thou-h the amount of {Tc} was too low to detect any {Tc}-bearing phases. These results show the importance of conducting long-term tests with radioactive glasses to characterize the behavior of radionuclides, rather than relying on the observed behavior of nonradioactive surrogates.

  19. Beyond Collins and Sivers: further measurements of the target transverse spin-dependent azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive DIS from COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aram Kotzinian

    2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In semi-inclusive DIS of polarized leptons on a transversely polarized target eight azimuthal modulations appear in the cross-section. Within QCD parton model four azimuthal asymmetries can be interpreted at leading order, two of them being the already measured Collins and Sivers asymmetries. The other two leading twist asymmetries, related to different transverse momentum dependent quark distribution functions, and also additional four asymmetries which can be interpreted as twist-three contributions have been measured for the first time at COMPASS, using a 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized ($P_{beam}\\simeq -0.8$) muon beam and a transversely polarized $^6LiD$ target. We present here the preliminary results from the 2002-2004 data.

  20. Outline c and b Production in pp c and b Production in DIS Photoproduction of c and b b Production at HERA Conclusions Heavy Flavor Production at HERA and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outline c and b Production in p¯p c and b Production in DIS Photoproduction of c and b b Production at HERA Conclusions Heavy Flavor Production at HERA and the Tevatron Bruce Straub, University of Oxford Physics in Collision, Buzios, Brazil , 5-9 July 2006 Heavy Flavor Production at HERA and the Tevatron

  1. Network attack detection and defense – Manifesto of the Dagstuhl Perspective Workshop, March 2nd–6th, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carle, Georg; Dressler, Falko; Kemmerer, Richard A.; Koenig, Hartmut; Kruegel, Christopher; Laskov, Pavel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    y REGULÄRE BEITRÄGE Network attack detection and defense –Perspective Workshop Network Attack Detection and Defensefor the detection of network attacks, should more strongly

  2. A systems-based approach to the design, management and integration of enterprise-level change in defense shipbuilding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bond, Andrew S., 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continually declining Navy surface combatant acquisitions, the war on terror, shifting Congressional priorities and a consolidated shipbuilding industrial base are forcing fundamental changes in the defense shipbuilding ...

  3. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 600-243 Petroleum-Contaminated Soil Bioremediation Pad, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-033

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The 600-243 waste site consisted of a bioremediation pad for petroleum-contaminated soils resulting from the 1100 Area Underground Storage Tank (UST) upgrades in 1994. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  4. Native-species establishment on an oil-drill pad site in the Uintah Mountains, Utah: effects of introduced grass density and fertilizer. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambers, J.C.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined the effects of introduced grass seeding density and fertilizer on native-species establishment on an oil drill-pad site in the Uintah Mountains, UT. Differences in first-year seeding density and 3-year standing crop biomass among treatments were evaluated for seeded introduced grasses and native species and for unseeded colonizers. Aerial cover was measured all 3 years and the effects of fertilization on soil NO/sub 3/(2-), N, available P, and exchangeable K were examined 2 years after application. Recommendations for reclamation of similar sites are given.

  5. Class 1 Permit Modification Notification Addition of Structures within Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11, Dome 375 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, July 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lechel, Robert A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this letter is to notify the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of a Class 1 Permit Modification to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) in November 2010. The modification adds structures to the container storage unit at Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, Pad 11. Permit Section 3.1(3) requires that changes to the location of a structure that does not manage hazardous waste shall be changed within the Permit as a Class 1 modification without prior approval in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 (40 CFR), {section}270.42(a)(1). Structures have been added within Dome 375 located at TA-54, Area G, Pad 11 that will be used in support of waste management operations within Dome 375 and the modular panel containment structure located within Dome 375, but will not be used as waste management structures. The Class 1 Permit Modification revises Figure 36 in Attachment N, Figures; and Figure G.12-1 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Descriptions of the structures have also been added to Section A.4.2.9 in Attachment A, TA - Unit Descriptions; and Section 2.0 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Full description of the permit modification and the necessary changes are included in Enclosure 1. The modification has been prepared in accordance with 40 CFR {section}270.42(a)(l). This package includes this letter and an enclosure containing a description of the permit modification, text edits of the Permit sections, and the revised figures (collectively LA-UR-12-22808). Accordingly, a signed certification page is also enclosed. Three hard copies and one electronic copy of this submittal will be delivered to the NMED-HWB.

  6. Commercial nuclear fuel from U.S. and Russian surplus defense inventories: Materials, policies, and market effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear materials declared by the US and Russian governments as surplus to defense programs are being converted into fuel for commercial nuclear reactors. This report presents the results of an analysis estimating the market effects that would likely result from current plans to commercialize surplus defense inventories. The analysis focuses on two key issues: (1) the extent by which traditional sources of supply, such as production from uranium mines and enrichment plants, would be displaced by the commercialization of surplus defense inventories or, conversely, would be required in the event of disruptions to planned commercialization, and (2) the future price of uranium considering the potential availability of surplus defense inventories. Finally, the report provides an estimate of the savings in uranium procurement costs that could be realized by US nuclear power generating companies with access to competitively priced uranium supplied from surplus defense inventories.

  7. TESLA-Based Defense Against Pollution Attacks in P2P Systems with Network Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markopoulou, Athina

    TESLA-Based Defense Against Pollution Attacks in P2P Systems with Network Coding Anh Le, Athina and time asymmetry (as in TESLA [1]) to provide source authentication for the detection scheme and non; pollution; detection; identification; TESLA; homomorphic MAC. I. INTRODUCTION Peer-to-peer (P2P) systems

  8. RateGuard: A Robust Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) Defense System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Jonathan

    , USA chao@poly.edu Abstract--One of the major threats to cyber security is the Distributed Denial-Rate TCP Attacks. I. INTRODUCTION One of the major threats to cyber security is the Distributed DenialRateGuard: A Robust Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) Defense System Huizhong Sun ECE

  9. Dissection of defense responses of skl, an ethylene insensitive mutant of Medicago truncatula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro, Uribe Mejia

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ..............................................................................................................................176 xi LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1 Ethylene signal transduction pathway................................................................16 2 Proposed plant defense responses to pathogens and insects .............................. 21 3... gene expression......................................................... 119 25 In silica analysis of Actin homologue TC85697. ............................................. 122 26 In silica analysis of His H3, TC85197...

  10. Fiscal Year 1985 Congressional budget request. Volume 1. Atomic energy defense activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents include: summaries of estimates by appropriation, savings from management initiatives, staffing by subcommittee, staffing appropriation; appropriation language; amounts available for obligation; estimates by major category; program overview; weapons activities; verification and control technology; materials production; defense waste and by-products management; nuclear safeguards and security; security investigations; and naval reactors development.

  11. Doctoral Defense "Carbon Dioxide Capture on Elastic Layered Metal-Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Doctoral Defense "Carbon Dioxide Capture on Elastic Layered Metal-Organic Framework Adsorbents requires drastic modifications to the current energy infrastructure. Thus, carbon capture and sequestration for use as carbon capture adsorbents. Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) estimates of CO2 selectivity

  12. Stopping the Insider Threat: the case for implementing integrated autonomic defense mechanisms in computing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Stopping the Insider Threat: the case for implementing integrated autonomic defense mechanisms that are inseparable from the systems that are being defended. 1. Introduction Threats to the security of an information system may be initiated from either outside or from within an organization. Detecting such threats

  13. CBF: A Packet Filtering Method for DDoS Attack Defense in Cloud Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    CBF: A Packet Filtering Method for DDoS Attack Defense in Cloud Environment Qi Chen, Wenmin Lin-of-Service attack (DDoS) is a major threat for cloud environment. Traditional defending approaches cannot be easily, in this paper. Concretely speaking, the method is deployed by two periods, i.e., non-attack period and attack

  14. SMASHUP: Secure Mashup for Defense Transformation and Net-Centric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heileman, Gregory L.

    SMASHUP: Secure Mashup for Defense Transformation and Net- Centric Systems Mark D. Heileman., 709 S. Harbor City Blvd., Suite 400, Melbourne, FL 32901; b University of New Mexico, Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Albuquerque, NM 87131; c Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RIEBB, Rome

  15. Ecology Letters, (2003) 6: 13-18 Are three-dimensional spider webs defensive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LETTER Ecology Letters, (2003) 6: 13-18 Are three-dimensional spider webs defensive adaptations? Abstract Spider webs result from complex behaviours that have evolved under many selective pressures. Webs risk in the evolution of web architecture. The ecological success of spiders has been attributed to key

  16. Adaptations of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) for defense against herbivores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    Adaptations of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) for defense against herbivores Richard L 2013 Keywords: Aspen decline Fire Herbivory Phytochemistry Plant­animal interactions Populus tremuloides a b s t r a c t Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) is a quintessential ``foundation species

  17. The Pollution Attack in P2P Live Video Streaming: Measurement Results and Defenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxena, Nitesh

    The Pollution Attack in P2P Live Video Streaming: Measurement Results and Defenses Prithula Dhungel in the recent years. In this paper, we examine the stream pollution attack, for which the attacker mixes polluted chunks into the P2P distribu- tion, degrading the quality of the rendered media at the receivers

  18. Pollution Attacks and Defenses in Wireless Inter-flow Network Coding Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtmola, Reza

    1 Pollution Attacks and Defenses in Wireless Inter-flow Network Coding Systems Jing Dong, Reza Abstract--We study data pollution attacks in wireless inter-flow network coding systems. Although several the existing systems, and use it to analyze the impact of pollution attacks. Our analysis shows

  19. Defense Transuranic Waste Program. Transuranic waste transportation assessment and guidance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Assessment and Guidance Report (TAGR) is designed to provide DOE-managed defense sites with guidance and citable analyses addressing National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements for qualifying and transporting transuranic (TRU) wastes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico.

  20. Inhibition of pulmonary antibacterial defense by interferon-g during recovery from influenza infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inhibition of pulmonary antibacterial defense by interferon-g during recovery from influenza infection Keer Sun & Dennis W Metzger Secondary bacterial infection often occurs after pulmonary virus burden, and leads to enhanced susceptibility to secondary pneumococcal infection, which can be prevented

  1. Negative regulation of defense responses in plants by a conserved MAPKK kinase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Innes, Roger

    for review August 22, 2000) The enhanced disease resistance 1 (edr1) mutation of Arabidopsis confers by the edr1 mutation is correlated with induction of several defense responses, including host cell death. Double mutant analysis revealed that all edr1-associated phenotypes are suppressed by mutations

  2. Implementation of Section 1072 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice provides guidance for implementing the mandates of Section 1072 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008, commonly referred to as the Bond Amendment. Extended until 9-28-11 by DOE N 251.90 dated 9-28-10. Canceled by DOE O 472.2. Does not cancel other directives.

  3. A Game-Theoretic Framework for Bandwidth Attacks and Statistical Defenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundaram, Ravi

    , a common form of distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. In particular, our traffic injection game statistical methods for creating defense mechanisms that can detect a DDoS attack and that even when--changing the source address of IP packets-- has been used in DDoS attacks on popular websites (Ya- hoo!) and root DNS

  4. Relationship between morphologies and orientations of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} grains in Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu solder joints on different Cu pads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Yanhong, E-mail: tianyh@hit.edu.cn; Zhang, Rui; Hang, Chunjin; Niu, Lina; Wang, Chunqing

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The morphologies and orientations of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic compounds in the Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu solder joints both on polycrystalline and single crystal Cu pads under different peak reflow temperatures and times above liquids were investigated. The relationship between Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} grain orientations and morphologies was clarified. At the interface of Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/polycrystalline Cu pad, scalloped Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic compounds formed at 250 °C and roof shape Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} formed at 300 °C. Both scalloped Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} and roof shape Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} had a preferred orientation of (0001) plane being parallel to polycrystalline Cu pad surface. Besides, the percentage of large angle grain boundaries increased as the peak reflow temperature rose. At the interface of Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/(111) single crystal Cu pad, the Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic compounds were mainly scallop-type at 250 °C and were prism type at 300 °C. The prismatic Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} grains grew along the three preferred directions with the inter-angles of 60° on (111) single crystal Cu pad while along two perpendicular directions on (100) single crystal Cu pad. The orientation relationship between Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} grains and the single crystal Cu pads was investigated by electron backscatter diffraction technology. In addition, two types of hollowed Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic compounds were found inside the joints of polycrystalline Cu pads. The long hexagonal Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} strips were observed in the joints reflowing at 250 °C while the hollowed Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} strips with the ‘?’ shape cross-sections appeared at 300 °C, which was attributed to the different grain growth rates of different Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} crystal faces. - Highlights: • The orientation of interfacial Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} grains was obtained by EBSD technology. • Two types of hollowed Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} strips were found at different temperatures. • The formation mechanism of hollowed Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} was elaborated based on Bravais law. • The relationship between Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} grain orientations and morphologies was clarified.

  5. 2014 Secretary of Defense Environmental Awards For more information about the DoD Environmental Program, please visit www.denix.osd.mil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    six subject areas: natural resources conservation; environmental quality; sustainability Secretary of Defense Environmental Awards For more information about the DoD Environmental Program, please visit www.denix.osd.mil 2014 Secretary of Defense Environmental Awards Cultural Resources Management

  6. Cosmic bombardment V: Threat object-dispersing approaches to active planetary defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teller, E.; Wood, L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ishikawa, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hyde, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth-impacting comets and asteroids with diameters {approx}0.03 - 10 km pose the greatest threats to the terrestrial biosphere in terms of impact frequency-weighted impact consequences, and thus are of most concern to designers of active planetary defenses. Specific gravitational binding energies of such objects range from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -2} J/gm, and are small compared with the specific energies of 1x10{sup 3} to 3x10{sup 3} J/gm required to vaporize objects of typical composition or the specific energies required to pulverize them, which are 10{sup -1} to 10 J/gm. All of these are small compared to the specific kinetic energy of these objects in the Earth- centered frame, which is 2x10{sup 5} to 2x10{sup 6} J/gm. The prospect naturally arises of negating all such threats by deflecting, pulverizing or vaporizing the objects. Pulverization-with-dispersal is an attractive option of reasonable defensive robustness. Examples of such equipments - which employ no explosives of any type - are given. Vaporization is the maximally robust defensive option, and may be invoked to negate threat objects not observed until little time is left until Earth-strike, and pulverization-with-dispersal has proven inadequate. Physically larger threats may be vaporized with nuclear explosives. No contemporary technical means of any kind appear capable of directly dispersing the -100 km diameter scale Charon- class cometary objects recently observed in the outer solar system, although such objects may be deflected to defensively useful extents. Means of implementing defenses of each of these types are proposed for specificity, and areas for optimization noted. Biospheric impacts of threat object debris are briefly considered, for bounding purposes. Experiments are suggested on cometary and asteroidal objects.

  7. Instructions for Dissertation Defense Report Note: This is a fillable form that eliminates the need to print-out and write-in your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Instructions for Dissertation Defense Report Note: This is a fillable form that eliminates the need to the results of the defense and print the form. 2. Submit to Dissertation Supervisor who will record the results of the defense and the Committee's recommendations. 3. Acquire (typically done by Dissertation

  8. CASE STUDY -- LEAN 94-02: A Case Study of Self-Directed Work Teams at Boeing Defense and Space Group - Corinth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Janice

    1994-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Boeing Defense & Space Group - Corinth (BD&SG-C) is a self-directed team based unionized facility in the defense and commercial aircraft industry. The plant was a greenfield start-up in 1987. Due to the nature of the defense ...

  9. Joint probability safety assessment for NPP defense infrastructure against extreme external natural hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilin, L. [College of Engineering, Ocean Univ. ot China, Yushan Road No. 5, Qingdao 266003 (China); Defu, L. [Disaster Prevention Research Inst., Ocean Univ. ot China, Yushan Road No. 5, Qingdao 266003 (China); Huajun, L. [College of Engineering, Ocean Univ. ot China, Yushan Road No. 5, Qingdao 266003 (China); Fengqing, W. [Disaster Prevention Research Inst., Ocean Univ. of China, Songling Road No.238, Qingdao 266100 (China); Tao, Z. [College of Engineering, Ocean Univ. of China, Songling Road No.238, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing tendency of natural hazards, the typhoon, hurricane and tropical Cyclone induced surge, wave, precipitation, flood and wind as extreme external loads menacing Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) in coastal and inland provinces of China. For all of planned, designed And constructed NPP the National Nuclear Safety Administration of China and IAEA recommended Probable Maximum Hurricane /Typhoon/(PMH/T), Probable Maximum Storm Surge (PMSS), Probable Maximum Flood (PMF), Design Basis Flood (DBF) as safety regulations for NPP defense infrastructures. This paper discusses the joint probability analysis of simultaneous occurrence typhoon induced extreme external hazards and compare with IAEA 2006-2009 recommended safety regulation design criteria for some NPP defense infrastructures along China coast. (authors)

  10. Progress of the High Level Waste Program at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13178

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bricker, Jonathan M.; Fellinger, Terri L.; Staub, Aaron V.; Ray, Jeff W.; Iaukea, John F. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site treats and immobilizes High Level Waste into a durable borosilicate glass for safe, permanent storage. The High Level Waste program significantly reduces environmental risks associated with the storage of radioactive waste from legacy efforts to separate fissionable nuclear material from irradiated targets and fuels. In an effort to support the disposition of radioactive waste and accelerate tank closure at the Savannah River Site, the Defense Waste Processing Facility recently implemented facility and flowsheet modifications to improve production by 25%. These improvements, while low in cost, translated to record facility production in fiscal years 2011 and 2012. In addition, significant progress has been accomplished on longer term projects aimed at simplifying and expanding the flexibility of the existing flowsheet in order to accommodate future processing needs and goals. (authors)

  11. Broad Overview of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Opportunities for Department of Defense Installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, E.; Antkowiak, M.; Butt, R.; Davis, J.; Dean, J.; Hillesheim, M.; Hotchkiss, E.; Hunsberger, R.; Kandt, A.; Lund, J.; Massey, K.; Robichaud, R.; Stafford, B.; Visser, C.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strategic Environmental Research and Developmental Program (SERDP)/Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) is the Department of Defense?s (DOD) environmental science and technology program focusing on issues related to environment and energy for the military services. The SERDP/ESTCP Office requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide technical assistance with strategic planning by evaluating the potential for several types of renewable energy technologies at DOD installations. NREL was tasked to provide technical expertise and strategic advice for the feasibility of geothermal resources, waste-to-energy technology, photovoltaics (PV), wind, microgrids, and building system technologies on military installations. This technical report is the deliverable for these tasks.

  12. Preliminary technical data summary No. 3 for the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landon, L.F. (comp.)

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents an update on the best information presently available for the purpose of establishing the basis for the design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility. Objective of this project is to provide a facility to fix the radionuclides present in Savannah River Plant (SRP) high-level liquid waste in a high-integrity form (glass). Flowsheets and material balances reflect the alternate CAB case including the incorporation of low-level supernate in concrete. (DLC)

  13. A Case Study of the Defense Support of Civil Authorities Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Suzanne 1963-

    2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    and Improvement ............. 147 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Background of the Study The Department of Defense (DOD) has struggled with its role in a national crisis since the attacks on 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. Although most disasters... and other federal agencies ?in the planning, coordination, and execution of the response to catastrophic events including hurricanes, tornadoes, and acts of terror? (DSCA, n.d.). The DSCA program educates military and civilian personnel in the proper...

  14. Introduction New currents in DIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for precision measurement of the scattered lepton ZEUS Depleted Uranium Calorimeter Optimised for precision

  15. Similarities of host defense mechanisms against pulmonary infectious disease in animals and man

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, G.M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence linking exposure to air pollutants with increased susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans comes from epidemiological, clinical, and experimental laboratory studies. The data suggest that the most common, and perhaps the most sensitive, index of the pulmonary effect of air pollutant exposure is on post upper respiratory infection, prolonged cough, phlegm, and purulent sputum. Experimental models of these relationships for extrapolation to humans should be able to measure such minor changes in symptomatology and physiology rather than require major lethal events. The bacterial aerosol model for quantifying nonspecific defense mechanisms of the bronchopulmonary tree utilizing nonpathogenic organisms fulfills this criterion. The function of the six major components of pulmonary antimicrobial defense mechanisms - including aerodynamic filtration, secretory respiratory tract fluid, fluid transport at the alveolar and bronchial levels, the phagocytic function of alveolar macrophages, the augmenting mechanisms of blood-derived inflammatory cells, and the secretory and cellular-specific immune mechanisms and their mediator products - can all be quantified by this experimental animal model system. The defensive functions are remarkably similar across animal species, and available human data suggest that findings obtained using the model may be extrapolatred to humans.

  16. Final Report for Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Glenn A.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report records the work and contributions of the NITRD-funded Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies project performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory under the technical guidance of the National Security Agency’s R6 division. The project has incorporated a number of bio-inspired cyber defensive technologies within an elastic framework provided by the Digital Ants. This project has created the first scalable, real-world prototype of the Digital Ants Framework (DAF)[11] and integrated five technologies into this flexible, decentralized framework: (1) Ant-Based Cyber Defense (ABCD), (2) Behavioral Indicators, (3) Bioinformatic Clas- sification, (4) Moving-Target Reconfiguration, and (5) Ambient Collaboration. The DAF can be used operationally to decentralize many such data intensive applications that normally rely on collection of large amounts of data in a central repository. In this work, we have shown how these component applications may be decentralized and may perform analysis at the edge. Operationally, this will enable analytics to scale far beyond current limitations while not suffering from the bandwidth or computational limitations of centralized analysis. This effort has advanced the R6 Cyber Security research program to secure digital infrastructures by developing a dynamic means to adaptively defend complex cyber systems. We hope that this work will benefit both our client’s efforts in system behavior modeling and cyber security to the overall benefit of the nation.

  17. 60169Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 189 / Monday, September 30, 2013 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 48 CFR Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Interim rule. SUMMARY: DoD, GSA, and NASA are issuing

  18. EIS-0113: Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Waste, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to examine the potential environmental impacts of final disposal options for legacy and future radioactive defense wastes stored at the Hanford Site.

  19. A Comparison Study of Collaborative Strategies for Distributed Defense against Internet Worms based on Small-World Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu

    based on Small-World Modeling Hao Chen, Yu Chen* Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, SUNY threats to the network infrastructure. Distributed defense collaborating with single- point.0 vulnerability, mobile malware, industrial espionage, and attacks from organized crime. Malicious activities

  20. Defense Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3 | NationalSUBSCRIBE: PrintGallery

  1. defense programs

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A en6/%2A en2/%2A3/%2A

  2. DESIGN ANALYSIS FOR THE DEFENSE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Radulesscu; J.S. Tang

    2000-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of ''Design Analysis for the Defense High-Level Waste Disposal Container'' analysis is to technically define the defense high-level waste (DHLW) disposal container/waste package using the Waste Package Department's (WPD) design methods, as documented in ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' (CRWMS M&O [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor] 2000a). The DHLW disposal container is intended for disposal of commercial high-level waste (HLW) and DHLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms), placed within disposable canisters. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-managed spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a DHLW disposal container along with HLW forms. The objective of this analysis is to demonstrate that the DHLW disposal container/waste package satisfies the project requirements, as embodied in Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description Document (SDD) (CRWMS M&O 1999a), and additional criteria, as identified in Waste Package Design Sensitivity Report (CRWMS M&Q 2000b, Table 4). The analysis briefly describes the analytical methods appropriate for the design of the DHLW disposal contained waste package, and summarizes the results of the calculations that illustrate the analytical methods. However, the analysis is limited to the calculations selected for the DHLW disposal container in support of the Site Recommendation (SR) (CRWMS M&O 2000b, Section 7). The scope of this analysis is restricted to the design of the codisposal waste package of the Savannah River Site (SRS) DHLW glass canisters and the Training, Research, Isotopes General Atomics (TRIGA) SNF loaded in a short 18-in.-outer diameter (OD) DOE standardized SNF canister. This waste package is representative of the waste packages that consist of the DHLW disposal container, the DHLW/HLW glass canisters, and the DOE-managed SNF in disposable canisters. The intended use of this analysis is to support Site Recommendation reports and to assist in the development of WPD drawings. Activities described in this analysis were conducted in accordance with the Development Plan ''Design Analysis for the Defense High-Level Waste Disposal Container'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c) with no deviations from the plan.

  3. Self-Defense: What's a Jury Got to Do with It?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilles Phillips, Jean K.; Cateforis, Elizabeth

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 93, 117 (1936). Raymond finds evidence for the strict liability concept as late as 1118. Id. at 95. Quoting from a group of Anglo- Saxon laws, Raymond writes: “It is the law: one who does wrong unknowingly must suffer for it knowingly... homicide. Id. Green does caution that the statistics should be loosely relied on as it is impossible to tell the frequency of acquittal when self-defense was not alleged. Id. 123. Sir Henry Bracton was a cleric and judge whose writings heavily...

  4. Tank 42 sludge-only process development for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.P.

    2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested the development of a sludge-only process for Tank 42 sludge since at the current processing rate, the Tank 51 sludge has been projected to be depleted as early as August 1998. Testing was completed using a non-radioactive Tank 42 sludge simulant. The testing was completed under a range of operating conditions, including worst case conditions, to develop the processing conditions for radioactive Tank 42 sludge. The existing Tank 51 sludge-only process is adequate with the exception that 10 percent additional acid is recommended during sludge receipt and adjustment tank (SRAT) processing to ensure adequate destruction of nitrite during the SRAT cycle.

  5. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Jinrong; Stacey, Gary; Stacey, Minviluz; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  6. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Jinrong (Columbia, MO); Stacey, Gary (Columbia, MO); Stacey, Minviluz (Columbia, MO); Zhang, Xuecheng (Columbia, MO)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  7. Defense Production Act of 1950 in U.S.C. | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0and Transparency,8-9612-985-2007SupplementalDanielDay 1:EnergyDefense

  8. Microsoft Word - Defense Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress-FINAL

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 atthe DistrictIndependent Research Assessment of1-13) AllDefense-

  9. DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility) canister impact testing and analyses for the Transportation Technology Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Mishima, J.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A legal weight truck cask design has been developed for the US Department of Energy by GA Technologies, Inc. The cask will be used to transport defense high-level waste canisters produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant. The development of the cask required the collection of impact data for the DWPF canisters. The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) performed this work under the guidance of the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) at Sandia National Laboratories. Two full-scale DWPF canisters filled with nonradioactive borosilicate glass were impacted under ''normal'' and ''hypothetical'' accident conditions. Two canisters, supplied by the DWPF, were tested. Each canister was vertically dropped on the bottom end from a height of either 0.3 m or 9.1 m (for normal or hypothetical accident conditions, respectively). The structural integrity of each canister was then examined using helium leak and dye penetrant testing. The canisters' diameters and heights, which had been previously measured, were then remeasured to determine how the canister dimensions had changed. Following structural integrity testing, the canisters were flaw leak tested. For transportation flaw leak testing, four holes were fabricated into the shell of canister A-27 (0.3 m drop height). The canister was then transported a total distance of 2069 miles. During transport, the waste form material that fell from each flaw was collected to determine the amount of size distribution of each flaw release. 2 refs., 8 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for fiscal year 1993. Appendix II research laboratories and facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summaries of the research facilities that support the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for FY 1993. The nine program elements are aggregated into three program clusters as follows: (1) Advanced materials sciences and technologies; chemistry and materials, explosives, special nuclear materials (SNM), and tritium. (2) Design sciences and advanced computation; physics, conceptual design and assessment, and computation and modeling. (3) Advanced manufacturing technologies and capabilities; system engineering science and technology, and electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components. Section I gives a brief summary of 23 major defense program (DP) research and technology facilities and shows how these major facilities are organized by program elements. Section II gives a more detailed breakdown of the over 200 research and technology facilities being used at the Laboratories to support the Defense Programs mission.

  11. U.S. second line of defense: preventing nuclear smuggling across Russia's borders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, D. Y.

    1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Preventing the theft of weapons-usable highly enriched uranium and plutonium in Russia is one of the central security concerns facing the US today. The dissolution of the highly centralized USSR and the resulting societal crisis has endangered Russia's ability to protect its more than 200 metric tons of plutonium and 1000 tons of highly enriched uranium (roughly 8 kg Pu or 25 kg HEU is sufficient to make a bomb). Producing this fissile material is the most difficult and expensive part of nuclear weapons production and the US must make every effort to ensure that fissile material (and nuclear-related technologies) does not reach the hands of terrorist groups, rogue states or other potential proliferators. In response to this concern, the US has undertaken a number of initiatives in partnership with Russia and other FSU states to prevent the theft of fissile material. The Material Protection, Control and Accounting Program (MPC&A) was begun in 1993 to prevent the theft of nuclear materials from Russian civilian complexes, that is facilities not under control of the Ministry of Defense, which is largely responsible for possession and oversight of nuclear weapons. The MPC&A program is considered the first line of defense against theft of nuclear material because its goal is to prevent theft of material at production and storage facilities. This year the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new program called the Second Line of Defense (SLD), the goal of which is to assist Russia in preventing the smuggling of nuclear material and weapons at its borders, either by land, sea or air. The SLD program represents an important phase in the overall effort to ensure the security of nuclear material and weapons in Russia. However, as the US engages Russian customs officials in this important project, Americans should keep in mind that providing equipment--even indigenous equipment--is insufficient by itself; material aid must be accompanied by rigorous inspection and accounting procedures. In addition, the equipment must be assessed according to international standards to ensure a high degree of confidence in its nuclear detection capability.

  12. Instructions for Request for Dissertation Defense Note: This is a fillable form that eliminates the need to print-out and write-in your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Instructions for Request for Dissertation Defense Note: This is a fillable form that eliminates SCHOOL THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON REQUEST FOR DISSERTATION DEFENSE (Notice of Acceptance of the Doctoral Dissertation for the Purpose of Giving the Final Oral Examination on the Dissertation

  13. 2014 Secretary of Defense Environmental Awards For more information about the DoD Environmental Program, please visit www.denix.osd.mil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    visit www.denix.osd.mil 2014 Secretary of Defense Environmental Awards Natural Resources Conservation winners of the nine categories that cover six subject areas: natural resources conservation; environmental Secretary of Defense Environmental Awards For more information about the DoD Environmental Program, please

  14. Design and construction of the defense waste processing facility project at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, R G

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Du Pont Company is building for the Department of Energy a facility to vitrify high-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) near Aiken, South Carolina. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will solidify existing and future radioactive wastes by immobilizing the waste in Processing Facility (DWPF) will solidify existing and future radioactives wastes by immobilizing the waste in borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters. The canisters will be sealed, decontaminated and stored, prior to emplacement in a federal repository. At the present time, engineering and design is 90% complete, construction is 25% complete, and radioactive processing in the $870 million facility is expected to begin by late 1989. This paper describes the SRP waste characteristics, the DWPF processing, building and equipment features, and construction progress of the facility.

  15. A cognitive and economic decision theory for examining cyber defense strategies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bier, Asmeret Brooke

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyber attacks pose a major threat to modern organizations. Little is known about the social aspects of decision making among organizations that face cyber threats, nor do we have empirically-grounded models of the dynamics of cooperative behavior among vulnerable organizations. The effectiveness of cyber defense can likely be enhanced if information and resources are shared among organizations that face similar threats. Three models were created to begin to understand the cognitive and social aspects of cyber cooperation. The first simulated a cooperative cyber security program between two organizations. The second focused on a cyber security training program in which participants interact (and potentially cooperate) to solve problems. The third built upon the first two models and simulates cooperation between organizations in an information-sharing program.

  16. OVERVIEW OF TESTING TO SUPPORT PROCESSING OF SLUDGE BATCH 4 IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, C

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site began processing of its third sludge batch in March 2004. To avoid a feed outage in the facility, the next sludge batch will have to be prepared and ready for transfer to the DWPF by the end of 2006. The next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 4 (SB4), will consist of a significant volume of HM-type sludge. HM-type sludge is very high in aluminum compared to the mostly Purex-type sludges that have been processed to date. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with Liquid Waste Operations to define the sludge preparation plans and to perform testing to support qualification and processing of SB4. Significant challenges have arisen during SB4 preparation and testing to include poor sludge settling behavior and lower than desired projected melt rates. An overview of the testing activities is provided.

  17. Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan Colon Container Terminal (CCT) Panama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newhouse, Robert N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report on the Operational Testing and Evaluation to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the Second Line of Defense (SLD) mission requirements. An SLD system is defined as the detection technology and associated equipment, the system operators from the host country, the standard operating procedures (SOPs), and other elements such as training and maintenance which support long-term system sustainment. To this end, the activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports System can be operated effectively in real-time by Panama Direccion General de Aduanas (DGA Panama Customs) personnel to the standards of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA).

  18. Supply Chain Management Series Presenter Mike O'Donnell, Iowa State University, worked in the defense industry for six years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Supply Chain Management Series Presenter Mike O'Donnell, Iowa State University, worked in the defense industry for six years in a variety of manufacturing, project and program management roles various posi- tions, his focus has been on operations management and process/quality improvement in all as

  19. Host-defense peptides isolated from the skin secretions of the Northern red-legged frog Rana aurora aurora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Carlos

    Host-defense peptides isolated from the skin secretions of the Northern red-legged frog Rana aurora aurora J. Michael Conlona,*, Agnes Sonnevendb , Carlos Davidsonc , Anni Demandtd , Thierry Jouennee-stimulated skin secretions of the Northern red-legged frog Rana aurora aurora and their primary structures

  20. Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Sierra Club Natural Resources Defense Council Citizens' Utility Board of Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Sierra Club Natural Resources Defense and renewable resources will be acquired and by whom. Strong accountability for results through measurement; second to renewable resources..." [16 U.S. Code section 839b(e)(1)] BPA's utility customers have released

  1. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 6, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2007 1 Distance-Bounding Based Defense Against

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    -Bounding Based Defense Against Relay Attacks in Wireless Networks Caimu Tang, Member, IEEE, and Dapeng Oliver Wu invulnerable to the relay attack. We propose to use the order statistic for the detection of relay attackers outlier test. I. INTRODUCTION RECENT years have witnessed the urgent needs to secure networks of low power

  2. NU to partner in major defense research effort OCTOBER 11, 2012 2:45 PM BY KEVIN ABOUREZK /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    years, and the university anticipates additional future funding. "The UARC is good for the university of the Diocles project. The university has increased its funding from the Department of Defense from $7.3 million / LINCOLN JOURNAL STAR OMAHA -- The University of Nebraska has won an $84 million contract with the United

  3. A functional role in plant defense mechanism and a predicted structure of the U-box domain combined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sjölander, Kimmen

    1 A functional role in plant defense mechanism and a predicted structure of the U-box domain of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley *For correspondence email hrazavi@uclink.berkeley.edu Abstract-terminus. To predict function, tools such as BLAST, PSI-BLAST, SAM HMM software and FlowerPower were used. Because

  4. Regulation of plant defense responses in Arabidopsis by EDR2, a PH and START domain-containing protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Innes, Roger

    Regulation of plant defense responses in Arabidopsis by EDR2, a PH and START domain resistance (edr2) to the biotrophic powdery mildew pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum. Inhibition of fungal growth on edr2 mutant leaves occurred at a late stage of the infection process and coincided

  5. EIS-0063: Waste Management Operations, Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High Level Radioactive Waste Storage, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the existing tank design and consider additional specific design and safety feature alternatives for the thirteen tanks being constructed for storage of defense high-level radioactive liquid waste at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This statement supplements ERDA-1538, "Final Environmental Statement on Waste Management Operation."

  6. PADS FY 2010 Annual Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    VERMONT (VT) 2 141,238 VIRGINIA (VA) 193 362,276,817 WASHINGTON (WA) 128 83,004,854 WEST VIRGINIA (WV) 92 298,711,497 WISCONSIN (WI) 6 831,049 WYOMING (WY) 56 11,296,029 48...

  7. Transcriptional regulation in cowpea bruchid guts during adaptation to a plant defense protease inhibitor and screening of mutants that are altered in jasmonate-regulated signal transduction pathways using Arabidopsis thaliana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Jaewoong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To study the interaction between plants and insects I performed the experiments to find out the counter-defense mechanism of insects when insects were attacked by the defense protein of plants. Jasmonate (JA) is one of the ...

  8. "Defense-in-Depth" Laser Safety and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J J

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest and most energetic laser in the world contained in a complex the size of a football stadium. From the initial laser pulse, provided by telecommunication style infrared nanoJoule pulsed lasers, to the final 192 laser beams (1.8 Mega Joules total energy in the ultraviolet) converging on a target the size of a pencil eraser, laser safety is of paramount concern. In addition to this, there are numerous high-powered (Class 3B and 4) diagnostic lasers in use that can potentially send their laser radiation travelling throughout the facility. With individual beam paths of up to 1500 meters and a workforce of more than one thousand, the potential for exposure is significant. Simple laser safety practices utilized in typical laser labs just don't apply. To mitigate these hazards, NIF incorporates a multi layered approach to laser safety or 'Defense in Depth.' Most typical high-powered laser operations are contained and controlled within a single room using relatively simplistic controls to protect both the worker and the public. Laser workers are trained, use a standard operating procedure, and are required to wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as Laser Protective Eyewear (LPE) if the system is not fully enclosed. Non-workers are protected by means of posting the room with a warning sign and a flashing light. In the best of cases, a Safety Interlock System (SIS) will be employed which will 'safe' the laser in the case of unauthorized access. This type of laser operation is relatively easy to employ and manage. As the operation becomes more complex, higher levels of control are required to ensure personnel safety. Examples requiring enhanced controls are outdoor and multi-room laser operations. At the NIF there are 192 beam lines and numerous other Class 4 diagnostic lasers that can potentially deliver their hazardous energy to locations far from the laser source. This presents a serious and complex potential hazard to personnel. Because of this, a multilayered approach to safety is taken. This paper presents the philosophy and approach taken at the NIF in the multi-layered 'defense-in-depth' approach to laser safety.

  9. FRIT OPTIMIZATION FOR SLUDGE BATCH PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

  10. RECOMMENDED FRIT COMPOSITION FOR INITIAL SLUDGE BATCH 5 PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

    2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

  11. In Defense of the National Labs and Big-Budget Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, J R

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to present the unofficial and unsanctioned opinions of a Visiting Scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the values of LLNL and the other National Labs. The basic founding value and goal of the National Labs is big-budget scientific research, along with smaller-budget scientific research that cannot easily be done elsewhere. The most important example in the latter category is classified defense-related research. The historical guiding light here is the Manhattan Project. This endeavor was unique in human history, and might remain so. The scientific expertise and wealth of an entire nation was tapped in a project that was huge beyond reckoning, with no advance guarantee of success. It was in many respects a clash of scientific titans, with a large supporting cast, collaborating toward a single well-defined goal. Never had scientists received so much respect, so much money, and so much intellectual freedom to pursue scientific progress. And never was the gap between theory and implementation so rapidly narrowed, with results that changed the world, completely. Enormous resources are spent at the national or international level on large-scale scientific projects. LLNL has the most powerful computer in the world, Blue Gene/L. (Oops, Los Alamos just seized the title with Roadrunner; such titles regularly change hands.) LLNL also has the largest laser in the world, the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has the most powerful microscope in the world. Not only is it beyond the resources of most large corporations to make such expenditures, but the risk exceeds the possible rewards for those corporations that could. Nor can most small countries afford to finance large scientific projects, and not even the richest can afford largess, especially if Congress is under major budget pressure. Some big-budget research efforts are funded by international consortiums, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) in Cadarache, France, a magnetic-confinement fusion research project. The postWWII histories of particle and fusion physics contain remarkable examples of both international competition, with an emphasis on secrecy, and international cooperation, with an emphasis on shared knowledge and resources. Initiatives to share sometimes came from surprising directions. Most large-scale scientific projects have potential defense applications. NIF certainly does; it is primarily designed to create small-scale fusion explosions. Blue Gene/L operates in part in service to NIF, and in part to various defense projects. The most important defense projects include stewardship of the national nuclear weapons stockpile, and the proposed redesign and replacement of those weapons with fewer, safer, more reliable, longer-lived, and less apocalyptic warheads. Many well-meaning people will consider the optimal lifetime of a nuclear weapon to be zero, but most thoughtful people, when asked how much longer they think this nation will require them, will ask for some time to think. NIF is also designed to create exothermic small-scale fusion explosions. The malapropos 'exothermic' here is a convenience to cover a profusion of complexities, but the basic idea is that the explosions will create more recoverable energy than was used to create them. One can hope that the primary future benefits of success for NIF will be in cost-effective generation of electrical power through controlled small-scale fusion reactions, rather than in improved large-scale fusion explosions. Blue Gene/L also services climate research, genomic research, materials research, and a myriad of other computational problems that become more feasible, reliable, and precise the larger the number of computational nodes employed. Blue Gene/L has to be sited within a security complex for obvious reasons, but its value extends to the nation and the world. There is a duality here between large-scale scientific research machines and the supercomputers used

  12. INSTALLATION OF BUBBLERS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITED DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.; Iverson, D.

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC assumed the liquid waste contract at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the summer of 2009. The main contractual agreement was to close 22 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks in eight years. To achieve this aggressive commitment, faster waste processing throughout the SRS liquid waste facilities will be required. Part of the approach to achieve faster waste processing is to increase the canister production rate of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) from approximately 200 canisters filled with radioactive waste glass per year to 400 canisters per year. To reach this rate for melter throughput, four bubblers were installed in the DWPF Melter in the late summer of 2010. This effort required collaboration between SRR, SRR critical subcontractor EnergySolutions, and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, including the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The tasks included design and fabrication of the bubblers and related equipment, testing of the bubblers for various technical issues, the actual installation of the bubblers and related equipment, and the initial successful operation of the bubblers in the DWPF Melter.

  13. Potential for substitution of geothermal energy at domestic defense installations and White Sands Missile Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakewell, C.A.; Renner, J.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal resources that might provide substitute energy at any of 76 defense installations are identified and evaluated. The geologic characteristics and related economics of potential geothermal resources located at or near the 76 installations were estimated. The geologic assessment identified 18 installations with possible geothermal resources and 4 Atlantic Coastal Plain resource configurations that represented the alternatives available to East Coast bases. These 18 locations and 4 resource configurations, together with 2 possible resources at the White Sands Missile Range and a potential resource at Kings Bay, Georgia, were examined to determine the relative economics of substituting potential geothermal energy for part or all of the existing oil, gas, and electrical energy usage. Four of the military installations - Mountain Home, Norton, Hawthorne, and Sierra - appear to be co-located with possible geothermal resources which, if present, might provide substitute energy at or below current market prices for oil. Six additional locations - Ellsworth, Luke, Williams, Bliss, Fallon, and Twentynine Palms - could become economically attractive under certain conditions. No geothermal resource was found to be economically competitive with natural gas at current controlled prices. Generation of electric power at the locations studied is estimated to be uneconomic at present.

  14. An Analysis of Department of Defense Instruction 8500.2 'Information Assurance (IA) Implementation.'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Philip LaRoche

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Defense (DoD) provides its standard for information assurance in its Instruction 8500.2, dated February 6, 2003. This Instruction lists 157 'IA Controls' for nine 'baseline IA levels.' Aside from distinguishing IA Controls that call for elevated levels of 'robustness' and grouping the IA Controls into eight 'subject areas' 8500.2 does not examine the nature of this set of controls, determining, for example, which controls do not vary in robustness, how this set of controls compares with other such sets, or even which controls are required for all nine baseline IA levels. This report analyzes (1) the IA Controls, (2) the subject areas, and (3) the Baseline IA levels. For example, this report notes that there are only 109 core IA Controls (which this report refers to as 'ICGs'), that 43 of these core IA Controls apply without variation to all nine baseline IA levels and that an additional 31 apply with variations. This report maps the IA Controls of 8500.2 to the controls in NIST 800-53 and ITGI's CoBIT. The result of this analysis and mapping, as shown in this report, serves as a companion to 8500.2. (An electronic spreadsheet accompanies this report.)

  15. THE DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-BASED TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Sarma V. Pisupati; Chunshan Song; Ronald S. Wasco; Ronald T. Wincek; Xiaochun Xu; Alan W. Scaroni; Richard Hogg; Subhash Chander; M. Thaddeus Ityokumbul; Mark S. Klima; Peter T. Luckie; Adam Rose; Richard L. Gordon; Jeffrey Lazo; A. Michael Schaal

    2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The third phase of a three-phase project investigating the development of coal-based technologies for US Department of Defense (DOD) facilities was completed. The objectives of the project were to: decrease DOD's dependence on foreign oil and increase its use of coal; promote public and private sector deployment of technologies for utilizing coal-based fuels in oil-designed combustion equipment; and provide a continuing environment for research and development of coal-based fuel technologies for small-scale applications at a time when market conditions in the US are not favorable for the introduction of coal-fired equipment in the commercial and industrial capacity ranges. The Phase III activities were focused on evaluating deeply-cleaned coals as fuels for industrial boilers and investigating emissions control strategies for providing ultra-low emissions when firing coal-based fuels. This was addressed by performing coal beneficiation and preparation studies, and bench- to demonstration-scale emissions reduction studies. In addition, economic studies were conducted focused on determining cost and market penetration, selection of incentives, and regional economic impacts of coal-based technologies.

  16. ANION ANALYSES BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY FOR THE ALTERNATE REDUCTANT DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, D.

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Process Science Analytical Laboratory (PSAL) at the Savannah River National Laboratory was requested by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to develop and demonstrate an Ion Chromatography (IC) method for the analysis of glycolate, in addition to eight other anions (fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate and phosphate) in Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples. The method will be used to analyze anions for samples generated from the Alternate Reductant Demonstrations to be performed for the DWPF at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL). The method is specific to the characterization of anions in the simulant flowsheet work. Additional work will be needed for the analyses of anions in radiological samples by Analytical Development (AD) and DWPF. The documentation of the development and demonstration of the method fulfills the third requirement in the TTQAP, SRNL-RP-2010-00105, 'Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for Glycolic-Formic Acid Flowsheet Development, Definition and Demonstrations Tasks 1-3'.

  17. IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

  18. National cyber defense high performance computing and analysis : concepts, planning and roadmap.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Keliiaa, Curtis M.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a national cyber dilemma that threatens the very fabric of government, commercial and private use operations worldwide. Much is written about 'what' the problem is, and though the basis for this paper is an assessment of the problem space, we target the 'how' solution space of the wide-area national information infrastructure through the advancement of science, technology, evaluation and analysis with actionable results intended to produce a more secure national information infrastructure and a comprehensive national cyber defense capability. This cybersecurity High Performance Computing (HPC) analysis concepts, planning and roadmap activity was conducted as an assessment of cybersecurity analysis as a fertile area of research and investment for high value cybersecurity wide-area solutions. This report and a related SAND2010-4765 Assessment of Current Cybersecurity Practices in the Public Domain: Cyber Indications and Warnings Domain report are intended to provoke discussion throughout a broad audience about developing a cohesive HPC centric solution to wide-area cybersecurity problems.

  19. Trust Management Considerations For the Cooperative Infrastructure Defense Framework: Trust Relationships, Evidence, and Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiden, Wendy M.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooperative Infrastructure Defense (CID) is a hierarchical, agent-based, adaptive, cyber-security framework designed to collaboratively protect multiple enclaves or organizations participating in a complex infrastructure. CID employs a swarm of lightweight, mobile agents called Sensors designed to roam hosts throughout a security enclave to find indications of anomalies and report them to host-based Sentinels. The Sensors’ findings become pieces of a larger puzzle, which the Sentinel puts together to determine the problem and respond per policy as given by the enclave-level Sergeant agent. Horizontally across multiple enclaves and vertically within each enclave, authentication and access control technologies are necessary but insufficient authorization mechanisms to ensure that CID agents continue to fulfill their roles in a trustworthy manner. Trust management fills the gap, providing mechanisms to detect malicious agents and offering more robust mechanisms for authorization. This paper identifies the trust relationships throughout the CID hierarchy, the types of trust evidence that could be gathered, and the actions that the CID system could take if an entity is determined to be untrustworthy.

  20. Predictive Fallout Composition Modeling: Improvements and Applications of the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, David A [ORNL; Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL; Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Monterial, Mateusz [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines several improvements to the Particle Activity Module of the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). The modeling of each phase of the fallout process is discussed within DELFIC to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations with the code for modeling and simulation. Expansion of the DELFIC isotopic library to include actinides and light elements is shown. Several key features of the new library are demonstrated, including compliance with ENDF/B-VII standards, augmentation of hardwired activated soil and actinide decay calculations with exact Bateman calculations, and full physical and chemical fractionation of all material inventories. Improvements to the radionuclide source term are demonstrated, including the ability to specify heterogeneous fission types and the ability to import source terms from irradiation calculations using the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code. Additionally, the dose, kerma, and effective dose conversion factors are revised. Finally, the application of DELFIC for consequence management planning and forensic analysis is presented. For consequence management, DELFIC is shown to provide disaster recovery teams with simulations of real-time events, including the location, composition, time of arrival, activity rates, and dose rates of fallout, accounting for site-specific atmospheric effects. The results from DELFIC are also demonstrated for use by nuclear forensics teams to plan collection routes (including the determination of optimal collection locations), estimate dose rates to collectors, and anticipate the composition of material at collection sites. These capabilities give mission planners the ability to maximize their effectiveness in the field while minimizing risk to their collectors.

  1. IMPACT OF THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS ON THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY - 12112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Fox, K.; Stone, M.

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating the deployment of a parallel technology to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, presently under construction) to accelerate high activity salt waste processing. The proposed technology combines large waste tank strikes of monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and actinides with two ion exchange columns packed with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin to sorb cesium. The new process was designated Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX), since the ion exchange columns were sized to fit within a waste storage tank riser. Loaded resins are to be combined with high activity sludge waste and fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for incorporation into the current glass waste form. Decontaminated salt solution produced by SCIX will be fed to the SRS Saltstone Facility for on-site immobilization as a grout waste form. Determining the potential impact of SCIX resins on DWPF processing was the basis for this study. Accelerated salt waste treatment is projected to produce a significant savings in the overall life cycle cost of waste treatment at SRS.

  2. Modeling of batch operations in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, F.G.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model is in development to provide a dynamic simulation of batch operations within the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The DWPF will chemically treat high level waste materials from the site tank farm and vitrify the resulting slurry into a borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The DWPF consists of three major processing areas: Salt Processing Cell (SPC), Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and the Melt Cell. Separate models have been developed for each of these process units using the SPEEDUP{trademark} software from Aspen Technology. Except for glass production in the Melt Cell, all of the chemical operations within DWPF are batch processes. Since the SPEEDUP software is designed for dynamic modeling of continuous processes, considerable effort was required to devise batch process algorithms. This effort was successful and the models are able to simulate batch operations and the dynamic behavior of the process. In this paper, we will describe the SPC model in some detail and present preliminary results from a few simulation studies.

  3. Basic Data Report -- Defense Waste Processing Facility Sludge Plant, Savannah River Plant 200-S Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amerine, D.B.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Basic Data Report for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)--Sludge Plant was prepared to supplement the Technical Data Summary. Jointly, the two reports were intended to form the basis for the design and construction of the DWPF. To the extent that conflicting information may appear, the Basic Data Report takes precedence over the Technical Data Summary. It describes project objectives and design requirements. Pertinent data on the geology, hydrology, and climate of the site are included. Functions and requirements of the major structures are described to provide guidance in the design of the facilities. Revision 9 of the Basic Data Report was prepared to eliminate inconsistencies between the Technical Data Summary, Basic Data Report and Scopes of Work which were used to prepare the September, 1982 updated CAB. Concurrently, pertinent data (material balance, curie balance, etc.) have also been placed in the Basic Data Report. It is intended that these balances be used as a basis for the continuing design of the DWPF even though minor revisions may be made in these balances in future revisions to the Technical Data Summary.

  4. Potential Collaborative Research topics with Korea’s Agency for Defense Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, Charles R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D. [Univ. of California, San Diego

    2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides a high level summary of current research activities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)-University of California Jacobs School of Engineering (UCSD) Engineering Institute that will be presented at Korea's Agency for Defense Development (ADD). These research activities are at the basic engineering science level with different level of maturity ranging from initial concepts to field proof-of-concept demonstrations. We believe that all of these activities are appropriate for collaborative research activities with ADD subject to approval by each institution. All the activities summarized herein have the common theme that they are multi-disciplinary in nature and typically involved the integration of high-fidelity predictive modeling, advanced sensing technologies and new development in information technology. These activities include: Wireless Sensor Systems, Swarming Robot sensor systems, Advanced signal processing (compressed sensing) and pattern recognition, Model Verification and Validation, Optimal/robust sensor system design, Haptic systems for large-scale data processing, Cyber-physical security for robots, Multi-source energy harvesting, Reliability-based approaches to damage prognosis, SHMTools software development, and Cyber-physical systems advanced study institute.

  5. Annual Report To Congress. Department of Energy Activities Relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (Department) submits an Annual Report to Congress each year detailing the Department’s activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board), which provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy (Secretary) regarding public health and safety issues at the Department’s defense nuclear facilities. In 2003, the Department continued ongoing activities to resolve issues identified by the Board in formal recommendations and correspondence, staff issue reports pertaining to Department facilities, and public meetings and briefings. Additionally, the Department is implementing several key safety initiatives to address and prevent safety issues: safety culture and review of the Columbia accident investigation; risk reduction through stabilization of excess nuclear materials; the Facility Representative Program; independent oversight and performance assurance; the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP); executive safety initiatives; and quality assurance activities. The following summarizes the key activities addressed in this Annual Report.

  6. Process of Integrating Screening and Detailed Risk-based Modeling Analyses to Ensure Consistent and Scientifically Defensible Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, John W.; McDonald, John P.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To support cleanup and closure of these tanks, modeling is performed to understand and predict potential impacts to human health and the environment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a screening tool for the United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection that estimates the long-term human health risk, from a strategic planning perspective, posed by potential tank releases to the environment. This tool is being conditioned to more detailed model analyses to ensure consistency between studies and to provide scientific defensibility. Once the conditioning is complete, the system will be used to screen alternative cleanup and closure strategies. The integration of screening and detailed models provides consistent analyses, efficiencies in resources, and positive feedback between the various modeling groups. This approach of conditioning a screening methodology to more detailed analyses provides decision-makers with timely and defensible information and increases confidence in the results on the part of clients, regulators, and stakeholders.

  7. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the tenth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department's defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department's defense nuclear facilities. During 1999, Departmental activities resulted in the closure of nine Board recommendations. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with three Board recommendations. One new Board recommendation was received and accepted by the Department in 1999, and a new implementation plan is being developed to address this recommendation. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, opening of a repository for long-term storage of transuranic wastes, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  8. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the ninth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy (Department) activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The locations of the major Department facilities are provided. During 1998, Departmental activities resulted in the proposed closure of one Board recommendation. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with four other Board recommendations. Two new Board recommendations were received and accepted by the Department in 1998, and two new implementation plans are being developed to address these recommendations. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, a renewed effort to increase the technical capabilities of the federal workforce, and a revised plan for stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  9. An Assessment of the Degree of Implementation of the Lean Aerospace Initiative Principles and Practices within the US Aerospace and Defense Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Thomas E.

    This report is a formal documentation of the results of an assessment of the degree to which Lean Principles and Practices have been implemented in the US Aerospace and Defense Industry. An Industry Association team prepared ...

  10. Formic Acid Free Flowsheet Development To Eliminate Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In The Defense Waste Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, Dan P.; Stone, Michael E.; Newell, J. David; Fellinger, Terri L.; Bricker, Jonathan M.

    2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during production of plutonium and tritium demanded by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass canisters is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. Testing was initiated to determine whether the elimination of formic acid from the DWPF's chemical processing flowsheet would eliminate catalytic hydrogen generation. Historically, hydrogen is generated in chemical processing of alkaline High Level Waste sludge in DWPF. In current processing, sludge is combined with nitric and formic acid to neutralize the waste, reduce mercury and manganese, destroy nitrite, and modify (thin) the slurry rheology. The noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Elimination of formic acid by replacement with glycolic acid has the potential to eliminate the production of catalytic hydrogen. Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet as an alternative to the nitric-formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be reduced and removed by steam stripping in DWPF with no catalytic hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Ten DWPF tests were performed with nonradioactive simulants designed to cover a broad compositional range. No hydrogen was generated in testing without formic acid.

  11. Mercury Reduction and Removal from High Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 12511

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrouzi, Aria [Savannah River Remediation, LLC (United States); Zamecnik, Jack [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site during production of enriched uranium and plutonium required by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. One of the constituents in the nuclear waste is mercury, which is present because it served as a catalyst in the dissolution of uranium-aluminum alloy fuel rods. At high temperatures mercury is corrosive to off-gas equipment, this poses a major challenge to the overall vitrification process in separating mercury from the waste stream prior to feeding the high temperature melter. Mercury is currently removed during the chemical process via formic acid reduction followed by steam stripping, which allows elemental mercury to be evaporated with the water vapor generated during boiling. The vapors are then condensed and sent to a hold tank where mercury coalesces and is recovered in the tank's sump via gravity settling. Next, mercury is transferred from the tank sump to a purification cell where it is washed with water and nitric acid and removed from the facility. Throughout the chemical processing cell, compounds of mercury exist in the sludge, condensate, and off-gas; all of which present unique challenges. Mercury removal from sludge waste being fed to the DWPF melter is required to avoid exhausting it to the environment or any negative impacts to the Melter Off-Gas system. The mercury concentration must be reduced to a level of 0.8 wt% or less before being introduced to the melter. Even though this is being successfully accomplished, the material balances accounting for incoming and collected mercury are not equal. In addition, mercury has not been effectively purified and collected in the Mercury Purification Cell (MPC) since 2008. A significant cleaning campaign aims to bring the MPC back up to facility housekeeping standards. Two significant investigations are being undertaken to restore mercury collection. The SMECT mercury pump has been removed from the tank and will be functionally tested. Also, research is being conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory to determine the effects of antifoam addition on the behavior of mercury. These path forward items will help us better understand what is occurring in the mercury collection system and ultimately lead to an improved DWPF production rate and mercury recovery rate. (authors)

  12. Qualification of the Nippon Instrumentation for use in Measuring Mercury at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.; Mahannah, R.

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system installed in 221-S M-14 has been qualified for use. The qualification was a side-by-side comparison of the Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system with the currently used Bacharach Mercury Analyzer. The side-by-side testing included standards for instrument calibration verifications, spiked samples and unspiked samples. The standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The side-by-side work included the analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples. With the qualification of the Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system in M-14, the DWPF lab will be able to perform a head to head comparison of a second Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system once the system is installed. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analyzes receipt and product samples from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) to determine the mercury (Hg) concentration in the sludge slurry. The SRAT receipt is typically sampled and analyzed for the first ten SRAT batches of a new sludge batch to obtain an average Hg concentration. This average Hg concentration is then used to determine the amount of steam stripping required during the concentration/reflux step of the SRAT cycle to achieve a less than 0.6 wt% Hg in the SRAT product solids. After processing is complete, the SRAT product is sampled and analyzed for mercury to ensure that the mercury concentration does not exceed the 0.45 wt% limit in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The DWPF Laboratory utilizes Bacharach Analyzers to support these Hg analyses at this facility. These analyzers are more than 10 years old, and they are no longer supported by the manufacturer. Due to these difficulties, the Bacharach Analyzers are to be replaced by new Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 systems. DWPF issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) for the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist in the qualification of the new systems. SRNL prepared a task technical and quality assurance (TT&QA) plan that outlined the activities that are necessary and sufficient to meet the objectives of the TTR. In addition, TT&QA plan also included a test plan that provided guidance to the DWPF Lab in collecting the data needed to qualify the new Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 systems.

  13. Elimination Of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In Defense Waste Processing Facility Slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D. C.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on lab-scale simulations of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) slurry chemistry, the addition of sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide to waste slurries at concentrations sufficient to take the aqueous phase into the alkaline region (pH > 7) with approximately 500 mg nitrite ion/kg slurry (assuming <25 wt% total solids, or equivalently 2,000 mg nitrite/kg total solids) is sufficient to effectively deactivate the noble metal catalysts at temperatures between room temperature and boiling. This is a potential strategy for eliminating catalytic hydrogen generation from the list of concerns for sludge carried over into the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) or Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). These conclusions are drawn in large part from the various phases of the DWPF catalytic hydrogen generation program conducted between 2005 and 2009. The findings could apply to various situations, including a solids carry-over from either the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) into the SMECT with subsequent transfer to the RCT, as well as a spill of formic acid into the sump system and transfer into an RCT that already contains sludge solids. There are other potential mitigating factors for the SMECT and RCT, since these vessels are typically operated at temperatures close to the minimum temperatures that catalytic hydrogen has been observed to occur in either the SRAT or SME (pure slurry case), and these vessels are also likely to be considerably more dilute in both noble metals and formate ion (the two essential components to catalytic hydrogen generation) than the two primary process vessels. Rhodium certainly, and ruthenium likely, are present as metal-ligand complexes that are favored under certain concentrations of the surrounding species. Therefore, in the SMECT or RCT, where a small volume of SRAT or SME material would be significantly diluted, conditions would be less optimal for forming or sustaining the catalytic ligand species. Such conditions are likely to adversely impact the ability of the transferred mass to produce hydrogen at the same rate (per unit mass SRAT or SME slurry) as in the SRAT or SME vessels.

  14. Second Line of Defense, Port of Buenos Aires and Exolgan Container Terminal Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Bryan W.

    2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Megaports project team for Argentina will conduct operational testing and evaluation (OT&E) at Exolgan Container Terminal at the Port of Dock Sud from July 16-20, 2012; and at the Port of Buenos Aires from September 3-7, 2012. SLD is installing radiation detection equipment to screen export, import, and transshipment containers at these locations. The purpose of OT&E is to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the SLD mission and to ensure the system continues to perform as expected in an operational environment with Argentina Customs effectively adjudicating alarms.

  15. Technical papers presented at the Defense Nuclear Agency Global Effects Review. Held at Moffett Field, California on 25-27 February 1986. Volume 3. Technical report, 25 February-12 May 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains technical papers presented at the Defense Nuclear Agency Review of Global Effects held at NASA Ames Research Center 25-027 February 1986.

  16. Technical papers presented at the Defense Nuclear Agency Global Effects Review. Held at Moffett Field, California on 25-29 February 1986. Volume 2. Technical report, 25 February-12 May 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains technical papers presented at the defense Nuclear Agency Review of Global Effects held at NASA Ames Research Center 25-27 February 1986.

  17. Transgenic Expression of the Dicotyledonous Pattern Recognition Receptor EFR in Rice Leads to Ligand-Dependent Activation of Defense Responses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schwessinger, Benjamin; Bahar, Ofir; Thomas, Nicolas; Holton, Nicolas; Nekrasov, Vladimir; Ruan, Deling; Canlas, Patrick E.; Daudi, Arsalan; Petzold, Christopher J.; Singan, Vasanth R.; et al

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant plasma membrane localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) detect extracellular pathogen-associated molecules. PRRs such as Arabidopsis EFR and rice XA21 are taxonomically restricted and are absent from most plant genomes. Here we show that rice plants expressing EFR or the chimeric receptor EFR::XA21, containing the EFR ectodomain and the XA21 intracellular domain, sense both Escherichia coli- and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo)-derived elf18 peptides at sub-nanomolar concentrations. Treatment of EFR and EFR::XA21 rice leaf tissue with elf18 leads to MAP kinase activation, reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression. Although expression of EFR does not lead to robust enhanced resistancemore »to fully virulent Xoo isolates, it does lead to quantitatively enhanced resistance to weakly virulent Xoo isolates. EFR interacts with OsSERK2 and the XA21 binding protein 24 (XB24), two key components of the rice XA21-mediated immune response. Rice-EFR plants silenced for OsSERK2, or overexpressing rice XB24 are compromised in elf18-induced reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression indicating that these proteins are also important for EFR-mediated signaling in transgenic rice. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential feasibility of enhancing disease resistance in rice and possibly other monocotyledonous crop species by expression of dicotyledonous PRRs. Our results also suggest that Arabidopsis EFR utilizes at least a subset of the known endogenous rice XA21 signaling components.« less

  18. PROBCON-HDW: A probability and consequence system of codes for long-term analysis of Hanford defense wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepho, M.G.; Nguyen, T.H.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PROBCON-HDW (PROBability and CONsequence analysis for Hanford defense waste) computer code system calculates the long-term cumulative releases of radionuclides from the Hanford defense wastes (HDW) to the accessible environment and compares the releases to environmental release limits as defined in 40 CFR 191. PROBCON-HDW takes into account the variability of input parameter values used in models to calculate HDW release and transport in the vadose zone to the accessible environment (taken here as groundwater). A human intrusion scenario, which consists of drilling boreholes into the waste beneath the waste sites and bringing waste to the surface, is also included in PROBCON-HDW. PROBCON-HDW also includes the capability to combine the cumulative releases according to various long-term (10,000 year) scenarios into a composite risk curve or complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF). The system structure of the PROBCON-HDW codes, the mathematical models in PROBCON-HDW, the input files, the input formats, the command files, and the graphical output results of several HDW release scenarios are described in the report. 3 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deforest, Thomas J.; VanDyke, Damon S.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica was written for the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The purpose of the Operational Testing and Evaluation (OT&E) phase of the project is to prepare for turnover of the Megaports system supplied by U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) located at the Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) of the Port of Kingston, Jamaica to the Government of Jamaica (GOJ). Activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports system can be operated effectively in real time by Jamaica Customs and KCT personnel to the satisfaction of the DOE/NNSA. These activities will also determine if the Megaports system, as installed and accepted, is performing according to the Megaports Program objectives such that the system is capable of executing the mission of the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The OT&E phase of the project also provides an opportunity to consider potential improvements to the system and to take remedial action if performance deficiencies are identified during the course of evaluation. Changes to the system should be considered under an appropriate change-control process. DOE/NNSA will determine that OT&E is complete by examining whether the Megaports system is performing as intended and that the GOJ is fully capable of operating the system independently without continued onsite support from the U.S. team.

  20. Qualification of the First ICS-3000 ION Chromatograph for use at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T; Mahannah, R.

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The ICS-3000 Ion Chromatography (IC) system installed in 221-S M-13 has been qualified for use. The qualification was a head to head comparison of the ICS-3000 with the currently used DX-500 IC system. The crosscheck work included standards for instrument calibration and calibration verifications and standards for individual anion analysis, where the standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In addition the crosscheck work included the analysis of simulated Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples, along with radioactive Sludge Batch 5 material from the SRAT and SME tanks. Based upon the successful qualification of the ICS-3000 in M-13, it is recommended that this task proceed in developing the data to qualify, by a head to head comparison of the two ICS-3000 instruments, a second ICS-3000 to be installed in M-14. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requires the analysis of specific anions at various stages of its processing of high level waste (HLW). The anions of interest to the DWPF are fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate, and phosphate. The anion analysis is used to evaluate process chemistry including formic acid/nitric acid additions to establish optimum conditions for mercury stripping, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) chemistry for the melter, nitrite destruction, organic acid constituents, etc. The DWPF Laboratory (Lab) has been using Dionex DX-500 ion chromatography (IC) systems since 1998. The vendor informed DWPF in 2006 that the instruments would no longer be supported by service contracts after 2008. DWPF purchased three new ICS-3000 systems in September of 2006. The ICS-3000 instruments are (a) designed to be more stable using an eluent generator to make eluent, (b) require virtually no daily chemical handling by the analysts, (c) require less line breaks in the hood, and (d) generally require less maintenance due to the pump configuration only using water versus the current system where the pump uses various hydroxide concentrations. The ICS-3000 instruments also allow the DWPF to maintain current service contracts, which support routine preventive maintenance and emergency support for larger problems such as component failure. One of the three new systems was set up in the DWPF Lab trailers in January of 2007 to be used for the development of methods and procedures. This system will continue to be used for training, new method development and potential improvements to current methods. The qualification of the other two ICS-3000 instruments is to be a phased effort. This effort is to be supported by the Applied Computational Engineering and Statistical (ACES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as authorized by the Technical Task Request (TTR) and as directed by the corresponding Task Technical and Quality Assurance (TT&QA) plan. The installation of the first 'rad' system into the M-13 Lab module required modifications to both the Lab module and to the radiohood. The installation was completed in July 2008. The testing of this system was conducted as directed by the TT&QA plan. The purpose of this technical report is to provide a review of the data generated by these tests that will lead to the recommendation for the qualification of the M-13 ICS-3000 instrument. With the successful qualification of this first ICS-3000, plans will be developed for the installation of the second 'rad' system in the M-14 Lab module later in fiscal year 2009. When the second 'rad' ICS-3000 system is installed, the DX-500 systems will be removed and retired from service.

  1. EVALUATION OF A TURBIDITY METER FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahannah, R.; Edwards, T.

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation’s (SRR’s) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a “peanut” vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 weight percent (wt%). A “go/no-go” decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a “go” decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a “no-go” determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. Subsequent to the issuance of the initial version of this report but under the scope of the original request for technical assistance, WSE asked for this report to be revised to include the “go/no-go” CU value corresponding to 0.28 wt% solids. It was this request that led to the preparation of Revision 1 of the report. The results for the 0.28 wt% solids value were developed following the same approach as that utilized for the 0.14 wt% solids value. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a “go/no-go” CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the “go/no-go” decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the “go/no-go” criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from the sludge batch, Sludge Batch 7b, being processed at the time of this testing. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

  2. Evaluation Of A Turbidity Meter For Use At The Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahannah, R. N.; Edwards, T. B.

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation's (SRR's) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a ''peanut'' vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 wt%. A ''go/no-go'' decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a ''go'' decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a ''no-go'' determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a ''go/no-go'' CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the ''go/no-go'' decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the ''go/no-go'' criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), the sludge batch currently being processed. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

  3. SUMMARY OF FY11 SULFATE RETENTION STUDIES FOR DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of studies related to the incorporation of sulfate in high level waste (HLW) borosilicate glass produced at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A group of simulated HLW glasses produced for earlier sulfate retention studies was selected for full chemical composition measurements to determine whether there is any clear link between composition and sulfate retention over the compositional region evaluated. In addition, the viscosity of several glasses was measured to support future efforts in modeling sulfate solubility as a function of predicted viscosity. The intent of these studies was to develop a better understanding of sulfate retention in borosilicate HLW glass to allow for higher loadings of sulfate containing waste. Based on the results of these and other studies, the ability to improve sulfate solubility in DWPF borosilicate glasses lies in reducing the connectivity of the glass network structure. This can be achieved, as an example, by increasing the concentration of alkali species in the glass. However, this must be balanced with other effects of reduced network connectivity, such as reduced viscosity, potentially lower chemical durability, and in the case of higher sodium and aluminum concentrations, the propensity for nepheline crystallization. Future DWPF processing is likely to target higher waste loadings and higher sludge sodium concentrations, meaning that alkali concentrations in the glass will already be relatively high. It is therefore unlikely that there will be the ability to target significantly higher total alkali concentrations in the glass solely to support increased sulfate solubility without the increased alkali concentration causing failure of other Product Composition Control System (PCCS) constraints, such as low viscosity and durability. No individual components were found to provide a significant improvement in sulfate retention (i.e., an increase of the magnitude necessary to have a dramatic impact on blending, washing, or waste loading strategies for DWPF) for the glasses studied here. In general, the concentrations of those species that significantly improve sulfate solubility in a borosilicate glass must be added in relatively large concentrations (e.g., 13 to 38 wt % or more of the frit) in order to have a substantial impact. For DWPF, these concentrations would constitute too large of a portion of the frit to be practical. Therefore, it is unlikely that specific additives may be introduced into the DWPF glass via the frit to significantly improve sulfate solubility. The results presented here continue to show that sulfate solubility or retention is a function of individual glass compositions, rather than a property of a broad glass composition region. It would therefore be inappropriate to set a single sulfate concentration limit for a range of DWPF glass compositions. Sulfate concentration limits should continue to be identified and implemented for each sludge batch. The current PCCS limit is 0.4 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass, although frit development efforts have led to an increased limit of 0.6 wt % for recent sludge batches. Slightly higher limits (perhaps 0.7-0.8 wt %) may be possible for future sludge batches. An opportunity for allowing a higher sulfate concentration limit at DWPF may lay lie in improving the laboratory experiments used to set this limit. That is, there are several differences between the crucible-scale testing currently used to define a limit for DWPF operation and the actual conditions within the DWPF melter. In particular, no allowance is currently made for sulfur partitioning (volatility versus retention) during melter processing as the sulfate limit is set for a specific sludge batch. A better understanding of the partitioning of sulfur in a bubbled melter operating with a cold cap as well as the impacts of sulfur on the off-gas system may allow a higher sulfate concentration limit to be established for the melter feed. This approach would have to be taken carefully to ensure that a

  4. DISEASES OF AQUATIC ORGANISMS Dis Aquat Org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Erica Bree

    2009 at 7 ponds in the Palouse region and quantified Bd zoospores for each sample using quantitative

  5. DISEASES OF AQUATIC ORGANISMS Dis Aquat Org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of host species (Kautsky 1982, Price et al. 1986, Esch et al. 1990, Calvo-Ugarteburu & McQuaid 1998, such as the host's prey, predators or competitors (Anderson 1978, Ander- son & May 1978, Price et al. 1986, Calvo the relative inaccessibility of the deep sea and the low biomass and abundance of the organisms living there

  6. DISEASES OF AQUATIC ORGANISMS Dis Aquat Org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    , Broderick & Godley 1999, Fossette et al. 2008, Sherrill-Mix & James 2008). During a study (Reich et al. 2008 identical environ- © Inter-Research 2010 · www.int-res.com*Email: bjorndal@ufl.edu NOTE Effect of repeated

  7. DISEASES OF AQUATIC ORGANISMS Dis Aquat Org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allam, Bassem

    Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Place Copernic, Technopole Brest

  8. DISEASES OF AQUATIC ORGANISMS Dis Aquat Org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    trade of amphibians for pets, research, bait and consumption has the potential to spread ranaviruses

  9. DISEASES OF AQUATIC ORGANISMS Dis Aquat Org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizet, Victor

    ), and hybrid striped bass (Evans et al. 2000). Clinical symptoms of S. iniae infection in fish include loss from the freshwater dolphin Inia geoffrensis (Pier & Madin 1976), S. iniae infects a wide range of fish infection in humans who have handled diseased fish (Weinstein et al. 1997). Despite the need for novel

  10. Feature Job-DIS | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Division at Argonne National Laboratory is looking for a part-time Computer Science (Co-op Student). The prospective co-op student is required to have: Enrollment in...

  11. DIS2001 Bologna 2701 May 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PDFs Herwig5.9: * MRSA for the proton * SaS1D­LO parametrization of #3; PDFs * GRV­LO parametrization(#22; 2 =Q 2 ) non­pQCD #24; Q -4 Lepto: * MRSA for the proton * direct photons only ­ Dorian Kcira

  12. Recent results in DIS from Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Gaskell

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results in Deep Inelastic processes measured at Jefferson Lab are presented. In addition to the inclusive reactions typically discussed in the context of Deep Inelastic (electron) Scattering, particular emphasis is given to Deep Exclusive and semi#19;inclusive reactions. Jefferson Lab has made significant contributions to the understanding of the partonic structure of the nucleon at large x, and with its first dedicated measurements is already providing important contributions to understanding the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon via constraints on Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) and Transverse Momentum Distributions (TMDs).

  13. Running heavy-quark masses in DIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Alekhin; S. -O. Moch

    2011-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on determinations of the running mass for charm quarks from deep-inelastic scattering reactions. The method provides complementary information on this fundamental parameter from hadronic processes with space-like kinematics. The obtained values are consistent with but systematically lower than the world average as published by the PDG. We also address the consequences of the running mass scheme for heavy-quark parton distributions in global fits to deep-inelastic scattering data.

  14. Careers & the disABLED Career Expo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location: Ronald Reagan Bldg, Washington, DCAttendees:  Terri Sosa (Science)POC:  Donna FriendWebsite: http://bit.ly/1tlHhNr

  15. DISEASES OF AQUATIC ORGANISMS Dis Aquat Org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Anderson2,*, John S. Wood3 , Joyce E. Longcore4 , Mary A. Voytek1 1 US Geological Survey, MS 430, 12201

  16. DISEASES OF AQUATIC ORGANISMS Dis Aquat Org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaustein, Andrew R.

    . 2006). Changes in temperature, cloud cover, precipita- tion patterns and changes in stratospheric ozone-B (UV-B) radiation increases mortality and results in various sub-lethal effects for many amphibian spe that there are complex dynamics contributing to species loss, studies often focus on the direct effects of single factors

  17. Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of borosilicate glass defense high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable specifically to the normal borosilicate glass product of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). They provide preliminary numerical values for the defense high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses, and regulatory requirements become available.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF A PRECIPITATE REACTOR FEED TANK (PRFT) SAMPLE FROM THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C.; Bannochie, C.

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample of from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Precipitate Reactor Feed Tank (PRFT) was pulled and sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in June of 2013. The PRFT in DWPF receives Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/ Monosodium Titanate (MST) material from the 512-S Facility via the 511-S Facility. This 2.2 L sample was to be used in small-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing in the Shielded Cells Facility of SRNL. A 1L sub-sample portion was characterized to determine the physical properties such as weight percent solids, density, particle size distribution and crystalline phase identification. Further chemical analysis of the PRFT filtrate and dissolved slurry included metals and anions as well as carbon and base analysis. This technical report describes the characterization and analysis of the PRFT sample from DWPF. At SRNL, the 2.2 L PRFT sample was composited from eleven separate samples received from DWPF. The visible solids were observed to be relatively quick settling which allowed for the rinsing of the original shipping vials with PRFT supernate on the same day as compositing. Most analyses were performed in triplicate except for particle size distribution (PSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PRFT slurry samples were dissolved using a mixed HNO3/HF acid for subsequent Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analyses performed by SRNL Analytical Development (AD). Per the task request for this work, analysis of the PRFT slurry and filtrate for metals, anions, carbon and base were primarily performed to support the planned chemical process cell testing and to provide additional component concentrations in addition to the limited data available from DWPF. Analysis of the insoluble solids portion of the PRFT slurry was aimed at detailed characterization of these solids (TGA, PSD, XRD and SEM) in support of the Salt IPT chemistry team. The overall conclusions from analyses performed in this study are that the PRFT slurry consists of 0.61 Wt.% insoluble MST solids suspended in a 0.77 M [Na+] caustic solution containing various anions such as nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, carbonate and oxalate. The corresponding measured sulfur level in the PRFT slurry, a critical element for determining how much of the PRFT slurry gets blended into the SRAT, is 0.437 Wt.% TS. The PRFT slurry does not contain insoluble oxalates nor significant quantities of high activity sludge solids. The lack of sludge solids has been alluded to by the Salt IPT chemistry team in citing that the mixing pump has been removed from Tank 49H, the feed tank to ARP-MCU, thus allowing the sludge solids to settle out. ? The PRFT aqueous slurry from DWPF was found to contain 5.96 Wt.% total dried solids. Of these total dried solids, relatively low levels of insoluble solids (0.61 Wt.%) were measured. The densities of both the filtrate and slurry were 1.05 g/mL. ? Particle size distribution of the PRFT solids in filtered caustic simulant and XRD analysis of washed/dried PRFT solids indicate that the PRFT slurry contains a bimodal distribution of particles in the range of 1 and 6 ?m and that the particles contain sodium titanium oxide hydroxide Na2Ti2O4(OH)2 crystalline material as determined by XRD. These data are in excellent agreement with similar data obtained from laboratory sampling of vendor supplied MST. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) combined with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of washed/dried PRFT solids shows the particles to be like previous MST analyses consisting of irregular shaped micron-sized solids consisting primarily of Na and Ti. ? Thermogravimetric analysis of the washed and unwashed PRFT solids shows that the washed solids are very similar to MST solids. The TGA mass loss signal for the unwashed solids shows similar features to TGA performed on cellulose nitrate filter paper indicating significant presence of the deteriorated filter

  19. Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  20. Improving central heating plant performance at the defense construction supply center (DCSC): Advanced operation and maintenance methods. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savoie, M.J.; Standerfer, J.; Schmidt, C.M.; Gostich, J.; Mignacca, J.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1987 air pollution emissions test done by the U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (USAEHA) identified several problems with the central heating plant (CHP) at the Defense Construction Supply Center (DCSC), Columbus, OH. Though DCSC repaired the specified problems, improved coal specifications, and tried to reduce air infiltration, CHP performance remained at unacceptable levels. Consequently, DCSC contracted the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) to apply advanced operation and maintenance procedures to improve its combustion system. This study employed a system-wide approach to evaluate the CHP 5 fuel storage, combustion, heat distribution, and the control of air emissions. Many short-term improvements to the CHP were identified and tested. Subsequent combustion and air emissions tests revealed that the recommended improvements successfully increased CHP efficiency. Long-term improvements were also recommended to help maintain the short-term improvements.

  1. MvirDB: Microbial Database of Protein Toxins, Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Resistance Genes for Bio-Defense Applications

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zhou, C. E.; Smith, J.; Lam, M.; Zemla, M. D.; Slezak, T.

    MvirDB is a cenntralized resource (data warehouse) comprising all publicly accessible, organized sequence data for protein toxins, virulence factors, and antibiotic resistance genes. Protein entries in MvirDB are annotated using a high-throughput, fully automated computational annotation system; annotations are updated periodically to ensure that results are derived using current public database and open-source tool releases. Tools provided for using MvirDB include a web-based browser tool and BLAST interfaces. MvirDB serves researchers in the bio-defense and medical fields. (taken from page 3 of PI's paper of same title published in Nucleic Acids Research, 2007, Vol.35, Database Issue (Open Source)

  2. Reevaluation of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria for Potential Cost Savings at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13598

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, J.W. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation (United States); Marra, S.L.; Herman, C.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form. (authors)

  3. Silicate Based Glass Formulations for Immobilization of U.S. Defense Wastes Using Cold Crucible Induction Melters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Gary L.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Marra, James C.; Lang, Jesse B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Crawford, Charles L.; Vienna, John D.

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) is an alternative technology to the currently deployed liquid-fed, ceramic-lined, Joule-heated melter for immobilizing of U.S. tank waste generated from defense related reprocessing. In order to accurately evaluate the potential benefits of deploying a CCIM, glasses must be developed specifically for that melting technology. Related glass formulation efforts have been conducted since the 1990s including a recent study that is first documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to summarize the silicate base glass formulation efforts for CCIM testing of U.S. tank wastes. Summaries of phosphate based glass formulation and phosphate and silicate based CCIM demonstration tests are reported separately (Day and Ray 2013 and Marra 2013, respectively). Combined these three reports summarize the current state of knowledge related to waste form development and process testing of CCIM technology for U.S. tank wastes.

  4. Confirmation of Dissertation/ Executive Position Paper Committee DIRECTIONS: Prior to the defense, complete required information and print the form. Send the original copy with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    of Dissertation/ Executive Position Paper Committee DIRECTIONS: Prior to the defense, complete required of Graduate and Professional Education when Dissertation/Executive Position Paper Committee has been finalized. (Form revised: Feb 2007) DISSERTATION/EXECUTIVE POSITION PAPER COMMITTEE COMPOSITION: Each dissertation

  5. The Board is a discretionary Federal advisory committee and shall provide independent advice to the Secretary of Defense through the Secretary of the Navy and other Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the Secretary of Defense through the Secretary of the Navy and other Navy Component Heads as determined by the Secretary of the Navy on matters relating to the Naval Postgraduate School and the Naval War College, facilities, and other matters of interest. The Board shall report to the Secretary of the Navy, through

  6. EIS-0074: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Idaho National Engineering Lab, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this statement to analyze the environmental implications of the proposed selection of a strategy for long- term management of the high- level radioactive wastes generated as part of the national defense effort at the Department's Idaho Chemical Processing Plant a t the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.

  7. International Conference on Dependable Systems & Networks: Florence, Italy, 28 June -01 July 2004 A Defense-Centric Taxonomy Based on Attack Manifestations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxion, Roy

    A Defense-Centric Taxonomy Based on Attack Manifestations Kevin S. Killourhy, Roy A. Maxion and Kymie M. C classifications of attacks have been tendered, often in taxonomic form. A common basis of these taxonomies is that they have been framed from the perspective of an at- tacker ­ they organize attacks with respect

  8. EIS-0023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes (Research and Development Program for Immobilization), Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental impact statement (EIS) analyzes the environmental implications of the proposed continuation of a large Federal research and development (R&D) program directed toward the immobilization of the high-level radioactive wastes resulting from chemical separations operations for defense radionuclides production at the DOE Savannah River Plant (SRP) near Aiken, South Carolina.

  9. Contemporary Terrorist Organizations and the Threat to Michael Walzer’s Defense of a Supreme Emergency Exemption from Jus in Bello

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Thomas H.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    to present two cases for the adoption of his "supreme emergency" defense by the terrorist organizations Al Qaeda and Hamas. I will show that both of these cases may ultimately fail under closer scrutiny, but will conclude that the ability for two such cases...

  10. OsWRKY62 is a negative regulator of basal and Xa21-mediated defense against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in rice.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    genes. The OsWRKY62.2 protein lacks a 39 amino acid segmentRecep- tor-like proteins (RLPs) that lack intracellularprotein may regulate OsWRKY62.1 function in defense response, possibly by interacting with other regulatory molecules, whereas OsWRKY62.2 may lack

  11. Proposed Use of a Constructed Wetland for the Treatment of Metals in the S-04 Outfall of the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, T.

    1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The DWPF is part of an integrated waste treatment system at the SRS to treat wastes containing radioactive contaminants. In the early 1980s the DOE recognized that there would be significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the radioactive waste in a stable solid form. The Defense Waste Processing Facility was designed and constructed to accomplish this task.

  12. Guidelines for assessment PhD dissertation and public defense The assessment committee assesses the academic quality of the PhD dissertation in question.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1of5 Guidelines for assessment ­ PhD dissertation and public defense The assessment committee assesses the academic quality of the PhD dissertation in question. Prior to the submission that the PhD process has been satisfactory and that all formal requirements have been met

  13. Audit Report on "Work for Others Performed by the Department of Energy for the Department of Defense"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and the Economy Act of 1932, the Department of Energy and its semi-autonomous National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) provide research and technical assistance to other Federal agencies on a reimbursable, full cost recovery basis through the Work for Others (WFO) program. For the vast majority of WFO technical projects, Department Federal officials furnish administrative project oversight while the actual detailed scientific or technical work is completed by the Department's 'management and operating' contractors. These contractors are awarded a special contract type specifically created under the Federal Acquisition Regulation to manage and operate Department sites and facilities, including sophisticated laboratories and technical centers, on a government-owned, contractor-operated basis. With annual expenditures exceeding $1 billion, the Department of Defense (DoD) is one of the Department's largest WFO customers. Work performed for DoD at the Department's national laboratories and other facilities includes highly technical research in areas such as nuclear weapons systems, counter-terrorism, and in-theater troop support. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year (FY) 2009, required the Inspectors General of the DoD and the Department to review procurement methods to determine whether the Department complied with DoD procurement requirements and/or whether alternative procurement policies were in place. In response, we focused our review on projects performed by NNSA because it completes the vast majority (approximately $900 million in FY 2008) of the Department's work for DoD. As part of this effort, and, at the specific request of the DoD Office of Inspector General (DoD OIG), we identified the universe of WFO technical projects that received new funding in the fourth quarter of FY 2008 at NNSA sites. We independently reviewed a judgmental sample of 11 projects selected by the DoD OIG to meet the objectives of this audit. Our review revealed that NNSA managed DoD WFO technical projects in a manner consistent with requirements of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the Federal Acquisition Regulation, and the Department's implementing guidance, the Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation. Because of the very nature of the Department's management and operating contracting model, WFO projects may not be technically compliant with DoD procurement regulations in certain instances. We found that NNSA did not let new contracts or task orders for the DoD WFO technical projects we reviewed and instead managed them under its existing internal control process as part of its management and operating contract structure. In one instance, we noted that the Department had, at DoD's request, supplemented its control structure to incorporate specific DoD procurement requirements. Senior Department of Energy procurement officials acknowledged that neither the Department nor NNSA modified their existing prime contracts to incorporate specific defense procurement requirements because such modifications would be inappropriate, costly, and inefficient. In short, they informed us that the Department had developed and implemented a series of controls designed to monitor overall contractor performance, including WFO technical projects. Department and NNSA officials noted, however, that they were willing to incorporate DoD specific requirements into work orders should DoD request and fund such efforts. Additional details regarding management of WFO technical projects are discussed in the body of this report.

  14. RECENT PROCESS AND EQUIPMENT IMPROVEMENTS TO INCREASE HIGH LEVEL WASTE THROUGHPUT AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odriscoll, R; Allan Barnes, A; Jim Coleman, J; Timothy Glover, T; Robert Hopkins, R; Dan Iverson, D; Jeff Leita, J

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began stabilizing high level waste (HLW) in a glass matrix in 1996. Over the past few years, there have been several process and equipment improvements at the DWPF to increase the rate at which the high level waste can be stabilized. These improvements have either directly increased waste processing rates or have desensitized the process to upsets, thereby minimizing downtime and increasing production. Improvements due to optimization of waste throughput with increased HLW loading of the glass resulted in a 6% waste throughput increase based upon operational efficiencies. Improvements in canister production include the pour spout heated bellows liner (5%), glass surge (siphon) protection software (2%), melter feed pump software logic change to prevent spurious interlocks of the feed pump with subsequent dilution of feed stock (2%) and optimization of the steam atomized scrubber (SAS) operation to minimize downtime (3%) for a total increase in canister production of 12%. A number of process recovery efforts have allowed continued operation. These include the off gas system pluggage and restoration, slurry mix evaporator (SME) tank repair and replacement, remote cleaning of melter top head center nozzle, remote melter internal inspection, SAS pump J-Tube recovery, inadvertent pour scenario resolutions, dome heater transformer bus bar cooling water leak repair and new Infra-red camera for determination of glass height in the canister are discussed.

  15. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Technical progress report, September 1995 - March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Scaroni, A.W. [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE. Activities this reporting period are summarized by phase. During this reporting period, the Phase I final report was completed. Work in Phase II focused on emissions reductions, coal beneficiation/preparation studies, and economic analyses of coal use. Emissions reductions investigations included completing a study to identify appropriate SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control technologies for coal-fired industrial boilers. In addition, work continued on the design of a ceramic filtering device for installation on the demonstration boiler. The ceramic filtering device will be used to demonstrate a smaller and more efficient filtering device for retrofit applications. Work related to coal preparation and utilization, and the economic analysis was primarily focused on preparing the final report. Work in Phase III focused on coal preparation studies and economic analyses of coal use. Coal preparation studies were focused on continuing activities on particle size control, physical separations, surface-based separation processes, and dry processing. The economic study focused on community sensitivity to coal usage, regional economic impacts of new coal utilization technologies, and constructing a national energy portfolio.

  16. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities: Phase 1 final report. Volume 1: Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.G.; Morrison, J.L.; Pisupati, S.V. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Energy and Fuels Research Center] [and others

    1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The first phase of a three-phase project investigating the development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities has been completed. The objectives of the project are to: decrease DOD`s dependence on foreign oil and increase its use of coal; promote public and private sector deployment of technologies for utilizing coal-based fuels in oil-designed combustion equipment; and provide a continuing environment for research and development of coal-based fuel technologies for small-scale applications at a time when market conditions in the US are not favorable for the introduction of coal-fired equipment in the commercial and industrial capacity ranges. The Phase 1 activities were focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water mixtures (MCWMs) and dry, micronized coal (DMC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. The specific objective in Phase 1 was to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil-designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWM or DMC. This was achieved through a project consisting of fundamental, pilot-sale, and demonstration-scale activities investigating coal beneficiation and preparation, and MCWM and DMC combustion performance. In addition, detailed engineering designs and an economic analysis were conducted for a boiler located at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, near Crane, Indiana. Results are reported on MCWM and DMC combustion performance evaluation; engineering design; and cost/economic analysis.

  17. VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY'S (DWPF) PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Click, D.; Edwards, T.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO{sub 3} acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestions of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples. The SB7a SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constituates the SB7a Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), to form the Sb7a Blend composition.

  18. Theoretische Physik Data-nDIS[events]Data-nDIS[events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V] Etb [GeV] nch,b 1 - Eout,b / Ein,b QCDINS (default) QCDINS ( x'>0.325) H1 preliminary Q' 2 rec ][GeV2 Physik ,,Feuerballs" (Etb) verringern sich stark [DESY 00- 172], wenn auch in den Daten die theoretisch

  19. A review of "Self-Defense and Religious Strife in Early Modern Europe. England and Germany 1530-1630." by Robert von Friedeburg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul M. Dover

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Self-Defense and Religious Strife in Early Modern Europe. England and Germany 1530-1630. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2002. xii + 278 pp. $99.95. Review by PAUL M. DOVER, KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY. With the advent of the religious controversies..., strong governmental authority, and a rigid social hierarchy, active resistance raised many dilemmas. It exercised the minds of intellectuals and common- ers alike in both Germany and the British Isles in the early modern period. Open resistance...

  20. Distribution of volatile organic compounds in soil vapor in the vicinity of a defense fuel supply point, Hanahan, South Carolina. Water resources investigations report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, J.F.; Aelion, C.M.; Vroblesky, D.A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes the results of a reconnaissance study to identify areas of potential contamination of the water table aquifer by volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) beneath a Defense Fuel Supply Point and adjacent properties near Hanahan, S.C. Six areas in and around the DFSP facility were investigated with soil-vapor techniques. The northern boundary area has been studied extensively and was, therefore, not included in the investigation.

  1. Gray, W. D. (2003). Cognitive factors in homeland defense: The role of human factors in the novel intelligence from massive data (NIMD) project, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (pp. 1017-1018). Santa Monica, CA: Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Wayne

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    intelligence from massive data (NIMD) project, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (pp. 1017-1018). Santa Monica, CA: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. COGNITIVE FACTORS IN HOMELAND DEFENSE: THE ROLE

  2. Analyses by the Defense Waste Processing Facility Laboratory of Thorium Glasses from the Sludge Batch 6 Variability Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.; Click, D.; Feller, M.

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with Frit 418. At times during the processing of this glass system, thorium is expected to be at concentrations in the final wasteform that make it a reportable element for the first time since startup of radioactive operations at the DWPF. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) supported the qualification of the processing of this glass system at the DWPF. A recommendation from the SRNL studies was the need for the DWPF Laboratory to establish a method to measure thorium by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES). This recommendation led to the set of thorium-bearing glasses from the SB6 Variability Study (VS) being submitted to the DWPF Laboratory for chemical composition measurement. The measurements were conducted by the DWPF Laboratory using the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method routinely employed for analysis of samples from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). These measurements are presented and reviewed in this report. The review indicates that the measurements provided by the DWPF Laboratory are comparable to those provided by Analytical Development's laboratory at SRNL for these same glasses. As a result, the authors of this report recommend that the DWPF Laboratory begin using its routine peroxide fusion dissolution method for the measurement of thorium in SME samples of SB6. The purpose of this technical report is to present the measurements generated by the DWPF Laboratory for the SB6 VS glasses and to compare the measurements to the targeted compositions for these VS glasses as well as to SRNL's measurements (both sets, targeted and measured, of compositional values were reported by SRNL in [2]). The goal of these comparisons is to provide information that will lead to the qualification of peroxide fusion dissolution as a method for the measurement by the DWPF Laboratory of thorium in SME glass samples.

  3. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose.

  4. Notices DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Energy NorthB O N N789 Federal23

  5. defense nuclear security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A en6/%2A en2/%2A3/%2A en

  6. second line of defense

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich57/%2A0/%2A1/%2A en Office of

  7. Protections = Defenses in Depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 HgPromisingProtecting your personal informationProtections

  8. Environmental evaluation of alternatives for long-term management of Defense high-level radioactive wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the selection of a strategy for the long-term management of the defense high-level wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). This report describes the environmental impacts of alternative strategies. These alternative strategies include leaving the calcine in its present form at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), or retrieving and modifying the calcine to a more durable waste form and disposing of it either at the INEL or in an offsite repository. This report addresses only the alternatives for a program to manage the high-level waste generated at the ICPP. 24 figures, 60 tables.

  9. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Semiannual technical progress report, March 28, 1994--September 27, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.G.; Bartley, D.A.; Morrison, J.L. [and others

    1995-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE and the first two phases of the program are underway. Activities this reporting period included performing coal beneficiation/preparation studies, conducting combustion performance evaluations, preparing retrofit engineering designs, determining retrofit economics, and installing a micronized coal-water mixture (MCWM) circuit.

  10. Program Management at the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Defense Nuclear Security: A Review of Program Management Documents and Underlying Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, Michael S.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this paper is to review the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) program management documents and to examine the underlying processes. The purpose is to identify recommendations for improvement and to influence the rewrite of the DNS Program Management Plan (PMP) and the documentation supporting it. As a part of this process, over 40 documents required by DNS or its stakeholders were reviewed. In addition, approximately 12 other documents produced outside of DNS and its stakeholders were reviewed in an effort to identify best practices. The complete list of documents reviewed is provided as an attachment to this paper.

  11. Relative risk-relative ranking in Defense and Energy Department cleanup programs: Comparison of methods, results, and role in priority setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turkeltaub, R. [Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense, Washington, DC (United States); Treichel, L.C. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Environmental Restoration; Rowe, W.D. Jr.; Strohl, A.R. [Booz Allen and Hamilton, McLean, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper demonstrates how the Department of Energy (DOE) enhanced their Environmental Restoration Program by modifying the Department of Defense (DoD) Cleanup Program`s Relative Risk Site Evaluation Primer in order to create their own framework, the Relative Ranking Evaluation Framework for EM-40 Release Sites, Facilities and Buildings. In addition, this paper discusses and compares the two frameworks and presents the results of relative risk/relative ranking site evaluations for both agencies through July 1996. The status of agency efforts to implement their respective frameworks also is discussed along with plans for strengthening these initiatives in the coming year.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR WASTE USING HAZARDOUS WASTE GUIDANCE. APPLICATIONS TO HANFORD SITE ACCELERATED HIGH-LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL MISSION0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, William; Huffman, Lori; Lerchen, Megan; Wiemers, Karyn

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal hazardous waste regulations were developed for management of industrial waste. These same regulations are also applicable for much of the nation's defense nuclear wastes. At the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State, one of the nation's largest inventories of nuclear waste remains in storage in large underground tanks. The waste's regulatory designation and its composition and form constrain acceptable treatment and disposal options. Obtaining detailed knowledge of the tank waste composition presents a significant portion of the many challenges in meeting the regulatory-driven treatment and disposal requirements for this waste. Key in applying the hazardous waste regulations to defense nuclear wastes is defining the appropriate and achievable quality for waste feed characterization data and the supporting evidence demonstrating that applicable requirements have been met at the time of disposal. Application of a performance-based approach to demonstrating achievable quality standards will be discussed in the context of the accelerated high-level waste treatment and disposal mission at the Hanford Site.

  13. Petroleum supply monthly with data for December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents statistical data on the production, imports, exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States.

  14. Electro-Mechanical Manipulator for Use in the Remote Equipment Decontamination Cell at the Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Site - 12454

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambrecht, Bill; Dixon, Joe [Par Systems, Shoreview, Minnesota, 55126 (United States); Neuville, John R. [Savannah River Remediation, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the legacies of the cold war is millions of liters of radioactive waste. One of the locations where this waste is stored is at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. A major effort to clean up this waste is on-going at the defense waste processing facility (DWPF) at SRS. A piece of this effort is decontamination of the equipment used in the DWPF to process the waste. The remote equipment decontamination cell (REDC) in the DWPF uses electro-mechanical manipulators (EMM) arms manufactured and supplied by PaR Systems to decontaminate DWPF process equipment. The decontamination fluid creates a highly corrosive environment. After 25 years of operational use the original EMM arms are aging and need replacement. To support continued operation of the DWPF, two direct replacement EMM arms were delivered to the REDC in the summer of 2011. (authors)

  15. U.S. Department of Energy Space and Defense Power Systems Program Ten-Year Strategic Plan, Volume 1 and Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwight, Carla

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Space and Defense Power Systems program provides a unique capability for supplying power systems that function in remote or hostile environments. This capability has been functioning since the early 1960s and counts the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as one of its most prominent customers. This enabling technology has assisted the exploration of our solar system including the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, Neptune, and soon Pluto. This capability is one-of-kind in the world in terms of its experience (over five decades), breadth of power systems flown (over two dozen to date) and range of power levels (watts to hundreds of watts). This document describes the various components of that infrastructure, work scope, funding needs, and its strategic plans going forward.

  16. Office of Graduate and Professional Education, 234 Hullihen Hall,University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716-1501, USA, Ph: (302)831-2129, Fax: (302)831-8745, www.udel.edu/gradoffice Certification of Doctoral Dissertation Defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    , Ph: (302)831-2129, Fax: (302)831-8745, www.udel.edu/gradoffice Certification of Doctoral Dissertation examination upon completion of the dissertation. The examination will consist of a defense of the dissertation on _________________________________________________________________________________ DATE DISSERTATION COMMITTEE COMPOSITION: Each dissertation/executive position paper committee shall

  17. Analysis of environment, safety, and health (ES{ampersand}H) management systems for Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neglia, A. V., LLNL

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary analysis and comparison of various environment, safety, and health (ES&H) management systems required of, or suggested for use by, the Departrnent of Energy Defense Programs` sites. The summary analysis is provided by means of a comparison matrix, a set of Vean diagrams that highlights the focus of the systems, and an `End Gate` filter diagram that integrates the three Vean diagrams. It is intended that this paper will act as a starting point for implementing a particular system or in establishing a comprehensive site-wide integrated ES&H management system. Obviously, the source documents for each system would need to be reviewed to assure proper implementation of a particular system. The matrix compares nine ES&H management systems against a list of elements generated by identifying the unique elements of all the systems. To simplify the matrix, the elements are listed by means of a brief title. An explanation of the matrix elements is provided in Attachment 2 entitled, `Description of System Elements.` The elements are categorized under the Total Quality Management (TQM) `Plan, Do, Check, Act` framework with the added category of `Policy`. (The TQM concept is explained in the `DOE Quality Management implementation Guidelines,` July 1997 (DOE/QM- 0008)). The matrix provides a series of columns and rows to compare the unique elements found in each of the management systems. A `V` is marked if the element is explicitly identified as part of the particular ES&H management system. An `X` is marked if the element is not found in the particular ES&H management system, or if it is considered to be inadequately addressed. A `?` is marked if incorporation of the element is not clear. Attachment I provides additional background information which explains the justification for the marks in the matrix cells. Through the Vean diagrams and the `End Gate` filter in Section 3, the paper attempts to pictorially display the focus of each system with respect to ES&H, the hazard of concern, and any limitations with respect to the TQM categories. A summary evaluation and explanation of each of the systems is provided in Section 4 of the paper. Several other ES&H systems were reviewed in preparation of the paper, but were not specifically included as a system in this matrix. Only those ES&H management systems that are potentially applicable to DOE Defense Program sites were included as part of the matrix comparison. A description of other ES&H management systems that were evaluated, but not specifically incorporated in this matrix comparison, are provided in Attachment 3 entitled, `Other ES&H Management Systems Reviewed.` In the past, it has been difficult integrating ES&H into work planning for several reasons. One barrier to this integration has been the complexity caused by the existence of several `stove pipe` ES&H systems. By analyzing the unique elements of the various ES&H systems, as well as their strengths and limitations, and their similarities and differences, it is envisioned that this paper will aid in facilitating the integration of ES&H into work planning. This paper was developed by the Office of Defense Programs (DP-45) and all questions or comments should be directed to Anthony Neglia of that office at (301) 903-3531 or Anthony.Neglia@dp.doe.gov.

  18. Facultad de Informtica http://dis.um.es/~domingo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giménez, Domingo

    Direccionamiento global #12;4 Librería BLACS (Basic Linear Algebra Communication Subprograms) "Basic Linear Algebra Communication Subprograms" Hace uso de los paquetes software de paso de mensajes. Proporciona facilidad de uso y portabilidad para la comunicación en problemas de álgebra lineal. #12;5 Librería BLACS

  19. News from the proton - recent DIS results from HERA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, K. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from the two large general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS at HERA (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) are presented. Emphasis is given to the analysis of deep inelastic scattering defined by the observation of the scattered electron or positron in the main calorimeters. Results on purely inclusive cross sections lead to a determination of the charged (quarks) parton distribution F{sub 2}(x, Q{sup 2}). Access to the electrically neutral parton content (gluons) is obtained indirectly by an analysis of the expected scaling violation behavior of F{sub 2} or directly from multijet rates originating from well-defined initial parton configurations. Finally, the recently uncovered subclass of large rapidity gap (LRG) events has been analyzed in terms of F{sub 2}. The result supports the concept of a color neutral object (Pomeron IP) being probed by a hard scattering electron. Evidence for factorization of the Pomeron radiation process as well as for scaling in the inclusive IP structure functions has been found.

  20. Institutes and Centers.DIS 1 Weizmann Institute of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Ehud

    Center for the Biology of Aging Prof Head, The Carl and Micaela Einhorn-Dominic Center for Brain Research and Immunological Disorders Prof Head, The Murray H. & Meyer Grodetsky Center for Research of High Brain Functions Center for Brain Imaging Prof Head, The Willner Family Center for Vascular Biology Prof #12;Institutes

  1. Deuteron Spin Structure Functions in the Resonance and DIS Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Kulagin; W. Melnitchouk

    2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive relations between spin-dependent nuclear and nucleon g_1 and g_2 structure functions, valid at all Q^2, and in both the resonance and deep inelastic regions. We apply the formalism to the specific case of the deuteron, which is often used as a source of neutron structure information, and compare the size of the nuclear corrections calculated using exact kinematics and using approximations applicable at large Q^2.

  2. NSLS Celebrating the Accomplishments After 32 years of dis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Predict Storm Electrical Outages Brookhaven recently received $250,000 from the New York State Energy to speed restoration of electric utility systems during and after significant weather events. One of seven, the project's goal is to increase the overall resiliency of the electric grid managed by two New York State

  3. Hadron Formation in DIS in a nuclear environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeria Muccifora; on behalf of the HERMES Collaboration

    2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the nuclear medium on the production of charged hadrons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering has been studied by the HERMES experiment at DESY using 27.5 GeV positrons. A substantial reduction of the multiplicity of charged hadrons and identified charged pions from nuclei relative to that from deuterium has been measured as function of the relevant kinematic variables. The preliminary results on krypton show a larger reduction of the multiplicity ratio $R_M^{h}$ with respect to the one previously measured on nitrogen and suggest a possible modification of the quark fragmentation process in the nuclear environment.

  4. Momentum space dipole amplitude for DIS and inclusive hadron production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basso, E. A.; Gay Ducati, M. B. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Caixa Postal 15051, 91501-970 - Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); De Oliveira, E. G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how the AGBS model, originally developed for deep inelastic scattering applied to HERA data on the proton structure function, can also describe the RHIC data on single inclusive hadron yield for d+Au and p+p collisions through a new simultaneous fit. The single inclusive hadron production is modeled through the color glass condensate, which uses the quark(and gluon) condensate amplitudes in momentum space. The AGBS model is also a momentum space model based on the asymptotic solutions of the BK equation, although a different definition of the Fourier transform is used. This description entirely in transverse momentum of both processes arises for the first time. The small difference between the simultaneous fit and the one for HERA data alone suggests that the AGBS model describes very well both kind of processes and thus emerges as a good tool to investigate the inclusive hadron production data. We use this model for predictions at LHC energies, which agree quite well with available experimental data.

  5. Containing (Dis)order: A Cultural Geography of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    , Museum of London, Docklands; Matei Bejenaru; staff at The National Maritime Museum Library the formations of late capitalist modernity, particularly its role as a specific, but networked space between at UCA Library always facilitated my requests for various journal articles. In particular I would like

  6. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1992--March 27, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W.; Hogg, R. [and others

    1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE and the first phase of the program is underway. Phase I activities are focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water mixtures (MCWMs) and dry, micronized coal (MC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. Phase II research and development activities will continue to focus on industrial boiler retrofit technologies by addressing emissions control and pre-combustion (i.e., slagging combustion and/or gasification) strategies for the utilization of high ash and high sulfur coals. Phase III activities will examine coal-based fuel combustion systems that cofire wastes. Each phase includes an engineering cost analysis and technology assessment. The activities and status of Phase I are described below. The objective in Phase I is to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil- designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWM or MC. This will be achieved through a program consisting of the following five tasks: (1) Coal Beneficiation and Preparation; (2) Combustion Performance Evaluation; (3) Engineering Design; (4) Engineering and Economic Analysis; (5) Final Report/Submission of Design Package.

  7. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1993--March 27, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.G.; Morrison, J.L.; Sharifi, R.; Shepard, J.F.; Scaroni, A.W.; Hogg, R.; Chander, S.; Cho, H.; Ityokumbul, M.T.; Klima, M.S. [and others

    1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE and the first two phases of the program are underway. To achieve the objectives of the program, a team of researchers was assembled. Phase I activities are focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water slurry fuels (MCWSFS) and dry, micronized coal (DMC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. Phase II research and development activities will continue to focus on industrial boiler retrofit technologies by addressing emissions control and precombustion (i.e., slagging combustion and/or gasification) strategies for the utilization of high ash, high sulfur coals. Phase III activities will examine coal-based fuel combustion systems that cofire wastes. Each phase includes an engineering cost analysis and technology assessment. The activities and status of Phases I and II are described below. The objective in Phase I is to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil-designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWSF or DMC. This will be achieved through a program consisting of the following five tasks: (1) Coal Beneficiation and Preparation; (2) Combustion Performance Evaluation; (3) Engineering Design; (4) Engineering and Economic Analysis; and (5) Final Report/Submission of Design Package.

  8. Development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense Facilities. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1996--March 27, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.G.; Miller, S.F.; Pisupati, S.V. [and others

    1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of developing technologies which can potentially decrease DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE. Work in Phase II focused on emissions reductions, coal beneficiation/preparation studies, and economic analyses of coal use. Work in Phase III focused on coal preparation studies, pilot-scale NO{sub x} reduction studies, economic analyses of coal use, and evaluation of deeply-cleaned coal as boiler fuel. Coal preparation studies were focused on continuing activities on particle size control, physical separations, surface-based separation processes, and dry processing. Preliminary pilot-scale NO{sub x} reduction catalyst tests were conducted when firing natural gas in Penn State`s down-fired combustor. This is the first step in the scale-up of bench-scale results obtained in Phase II to the demonstration boiler scale when firing coal. The economic study focused on community sensitivity to coal usage, regional/national economic impacts of new coal utilization technologies, and constructing a national energy portfolio. The evaluation of deeply-cleaned coal as boiler fuel included installing a ribbon mixer into Penn State`s micronized coal-water mixture circuit for reentraining filter cake. In addition, three cleaned coals were received from CQ Inc. and three cleaned coals were received from Cyprus-Amax.

  9. MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

  10. Defense Experimentation and Stockpile Stewardship

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary mission of the site is to help ensure that the nation's nuclear weapon stockpile remains safe, secure and reliable. The stockpile stewardship program, working with the national weapons laboratories conducts a wide range of experiments using advanced diagnostic technologies, many of which were developed right here at the NNSS.

  11. Cybersecurity Your Best Defense Against

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    Corporate and Governmental Chief Information Security Officers (CISO) are under increased scrutiny Training Centers Corporate and Governmental Chief Information Security Officers (CISO) are under increased

  12. Input Validation Errors and Defenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekar, R.

    = "gpg -r $send_to_list 2>&1" popen($command) · Attack: user fills in the following information-independent policies are preferable Example: SquirrelMail Command Injection Incoming Request (Untrusted input) $command="gpg popen($command) $send_to_list = $_GET[`sendto'] $command = "gpg -r $send_to_list 2>&1" Outgoing Request

  13. Listing of Defense Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plant Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, including the Oxnard Facility Savannah River Site Los Alamos National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore...

  14. MECHANICALENGINEERING M.S.DEFENSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the electrical properties of chemical vapor deposition graphene and micromechanical exfoliated graphene the same trend, and defects of CVD graphene as well as the micromechanical exfoliate ones, follow certain

  15. Defense Experimentation and Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary mission of the site is to help ensure that the nation's nuclear weapon stockpile remains safe, secure and reliable. The stockpile stewardship program, working with the national weapons laboratories conducts a wide range of experiments using advanced diagnostic technologies, many of which were developed right here at the NNSS.

  16. A defense of theistic activism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haugen, Christopher Allen

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of affairs is a way things could have been. It is the case that George W. Bush was elected President of the United States; but it could have been the case that George W. Bush was not elected. For instance, the state of affairs Al Gore 's heing elected... the President of the United States of America" could have been the case. However, George W Bush 's heing elected President of the United States of America is the case. If a state of affairs is the case, then that state of affairs is actual, or that state...

  17. Defense Technical Information Center thesaurus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickert, J.H. [ed.] [comp.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This DTIC Thesaurus provides a basic multidisciplinary subject term vocabulary used by DTIC to index and retrieve scientific and technical information from its various data bases and to aid DTIC`s users in their information storage and retrieval operations. It includes an alphabetical posting term display, a hierarchy display, and a Keywork Out of Context (KWOC) display.

  18. Quadrennial Defense Review February 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and processes to better support the urgent needs of the warfighter; buy weapons that are usable, affordable-Access Environments 31 Prevent Proliferation and Counter Weapons of Mass Destruction 34 Operate Effectively Reforming How We Buy 75 Institutionalizing Rapid Acquisition Capability 80 Strengthening the Industrial

  19. SUSTAINABILITY REPORTING NATURAL RESOURCES DEFENSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    GLOBAL REPORTING INITIATIVE (GRI) 12 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION (ISO) 15 REPORTING EXAMPLES FROM NGOS 24 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UK 24 CERES 26 OXFAM INTERNATIONAL 29 NRDC STANDARDS MATRIX 45 APPENDIX B: COMPARISON OF PERFORMANCE STANDARDS WITH GRI REPORTING TEMPLATE 47

  20. MS Thesis Defense Rangika Perera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    veneer MDF Pallets Particle boards Shelving 19.0% 12.0% 12.0% 12.0% 9.5% 8.2% 6.0% 4.4% 3.8% 2.5% 2.5% 2

  1. Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Strachan

    2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the development of a model for calculating the release rate for radionuclides and other key elements from high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glasses under exposure conditions relevant to the performance of the repository. Several glass compositions are planned for the repository, some of which have yet to be identified (i.e., glasses from Hanford and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). The mechanism for glass dissolution is the same for these glasses and the glasses yet to be developed for the disposal of DOE wastes. All of these glasses will be of a quality consistent with the glasses used to develop this report.

  2. Doctoral Defense "Sustainable Wastewater Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Medications and Wastewater Solids" Sherri Cook Date: May 22, 2014 Time: 11:00 AM Location: 2355 GGB Chair with treatment technology assessments and applied it to two key wastewater treatment sustainability issues associated with the direct disposal of medication to a wastewater treatment plant, to a household trashcan

  3. Listing of Defense Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy and EmissionsDepartment ofEnergy3 Listing

  4. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of OrderSUBCOMMITTEE of theOctoberNuclear Security

  5. NNSA and Defense Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate1, IssueThailand | National Nuclear Securityand

  6. Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortal Decision Support forDeep Insights from8, 2014

  7. Department of Defense Programs | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortalTo help ensure that\.Randall Luthi,

  8. defense | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian NuclearNational5/%2A en Office| National Nuclear

  9. EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF) LABORATORY GERMANIUM OXIDE USE ON RECYCLE TRANSFERS TO THE H-TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.; Laurinat, J.

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    When processing High Level Waste (HLW) glass, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. Therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream feed stream, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. This strategy is known as 'feed forward statistical process control.' The DWPF depends on chemical analysis of the feed streams from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) where the frit plus adjusted sludge from the SRAT are mixed. The SME is the last vessel in which any chemical adjustments or frit additions can be made. Once the analyses of the SME product are deemed acceptable, the SME product is transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and onto the melter. The SRAT and SME analyses have been analyzed by the DWPF laboratory using a 'Cold Chemical' method but this dissolution did not adequately dissolve all the elemental components. A new dissolution method which fuses the SRAT or SME product with cesium nitrate (CsNO{sub 3}), germanium (IV) oxide (GeO{sub 2}) and cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) into a cesium germanate glass at 1050 C in platinum crucibles has been developed. Once the germanium glass is formed in that fusion, it is readily dissolved by concentrated nitric acid (about 1M) to solubilize all the elements in the SRAT and/or SME product for elemental analysis. When the chemical analyses are completed the acidic cesium-germanate solution is transferred from the DWPF analytic laboratory to the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) where the pH is increased to {approx}12 M to be released back to the tank farm and the 2H evaporator. Therefore, about 2.5 kg/yr of GeO{sub 2}/year will be diluted into 1.4 million gallons of recycle. This 2.5 kg/yr of GeO{sub 2} may increase to 4 kg/yr when improvements are implemented to attain an annual canister production goal of 400 canisters. Since no Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) exists for germanium in the Tank Farm, the Effluent Treatment Project, or the Saltstone Production Facility, DWPF has requested an evaluation of the fate of the germanium in the caustic environment of the RCT, the 2H evaporator, and the tank farm. This report evaluates the effect of the addition of germanium to the tank farm based on: (1) the large dilution of Ge in the RCT and tank farm; (2) the solubility of germanium in caustic solutions (pH 12-13); (3) the potential of germanium to precipitate as germanium sodalites in the 2H Evaporator; and (4) the potential of germanium compounds to precipitate in the evaporator feed tank. This study concludes that the impacts of transferring up to 4 kg/yr germanium to the RCT (and subsequently the 2H evaporator feed tank and the 2H evaporator) results in <2 ppm per year (1.834 mg/L) which is the maximum instantaneous concentration expected from DWPF. This concentration is insignificant as most sodium germanates are soluble at the high pH of the feed tank and evaporator solutions. Even if sodium aluminosilicates form in the 2H evaporator, the Ge will likely substitute for some small amount of the Si in these structures and will be insignificant. It is recommended that the DWPF continue with their strategy to add germanium as a laboratory chemical to Attachment 8.2 of the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan (WCP).

  10. PADS FY 2010 Annual Reports FY 2010 Obligations to Facilities...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    MONTANA (MT) 12 1,692,758 COLORADO (CO) 233 155,184,318 NEVADA (NV) 40 113,898,279 WEST VIRGINIA (WV) 92 298,711,497 NEW MEXICO (NM) 175 170,555,341 MICHIGAN (MI) 8...

  11. Interferometric array design: optimizing the locations of the antenna pads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Boone

    2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of an interferometric array should allow optimal instrumental response regarding all possible source positions, times of integration and scientific goals. It should also take into account constraints such as forbidden regions on the ground due to impracticable topography. The complexity of the problem requires one to proceed by steps. A possible approach is to first consider a single observation and a single scientific purpose. A new algorithm is introduced to solve efficiently this particular problem called the configuration problem. It is based on the computation of pressure forces related to the discrepancies between the model (as determined by the scientific purpose) and the actual distribution of Fourier samples. The flexibility and rapidity of the method are well adapted to the full array design. A software named APO that can be used for the design of new generation interferometers such as ALMA and ATA has been developed.

  12. Prices by Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    107.9 77.0 81.7 84.1 83.5 88.2 70.6 February ... 105.1 74.5 79.1 81.9 82.0 84.8 67.2 March ... 101.6 69.3 73.0 76.5 76.4...

  13. Prices by Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    94.6 63.7 67.5 69.9 69.6 75.2 57.3 February ... 95.9 65.0 68.8 70.7 70.6 75.6 59.1 March ... 99.1 68.4 73.1 75.1 74.7 78.1...

  14. Prices by Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    92.5 59.3 61.6 66.0 65.5 69.6 51.0 February ... 91.6 57.4 59.9 63.2 63.3 67.4 49.4 March ... 89.6 54.8 57.4 61.1 61.7 64.2...

  15. Prices by Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    80.5 46.8 48.8 51.7 50.8 57.6 37.6 February ... 80.0 45.3 48.1 50.5 50.8 55.5 35.8 March ... 81.0 50.9 53.6 55.2 55.8 59.2...

  16. Calibration Pad Assignments for Spectral Gamma (November 1985) | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJuneWaste To Wisdom: Utilizing ForestProject |Februaryof

  17. Prices by Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Year JanThousand

  18. Prices by Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Year JanThousand94.6 63.7 67.5

  19. Prices by Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Year JanThousand94.6 63.7 67.507.9

  20. Prices by Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Year JanThousand94.6 63.7

  1. Prices by Sales Type, PAD District, and Selected States

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Year JanThousand94.6 63.780.5 46.8

  2. Table 4. Estimation Results for PAD District Regions

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 Estimation Results for

  3. Paducah Site Annual Site Environmental Report PAD-REG-1021

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Order (DOE) 231.1B. The data and information contained in this report were collected in accordance with the Paducah Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (LATA...

  4. Paducah Site Annual Site Environmental Report PAD-REG-1021

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHA Administrative Judge issuedEnergy MayPacificMay 2015May 2003

  5. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Pipeline between PAD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4Consumption TheX

  6. MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM-PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

    2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that comes in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter offgas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

  7. Efficient natural defense mechanisms against Listeria monocytogenes in T and B cell-deficient allogeneic bone marrow radiation chimeras. Preactivated macrophages are the main effector cells in an early phase after bone marrow transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roesler, J.; Groettrup, E.B.; Baccarini, M.; Lohmann-Mattes, M.L. (Fraunhofer-Institut ITA, Hannover (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation chimeras in the early phase after bone marrow transplantation are a good model to study the efficiency of the body's nonspecific defense system represented by macrophages (M phi), polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), and NK cells. These cell types are present in large numbers in spleen and liver at that time, whereas the specific immune system represented by T and B cells is functionally deficient. We previously reported enhanced activities in vitro of M phi (and PMN) from recipient animals in an early phase after allogeneic bone marrow transfer. We here demonstrate that these activities result in enhanced spontaneous resistance against Listeria monocytogenes in vivo: CFU of L. monocytogenes in spleen and liver 48 h after infection were about 1 or 2 to 4 log steps less than in untreated control mice of donor or host haplotype. This enhanced resistance decreased over the 4-mo period after marrow transfer. Preactivated M phi were identified as the most important effector cells. Isolated from spleen and peritoneal cavity, they performed enhanced killing of phagocytosed Listeria. Such preactivated M phi occurred in recipient animals after transfer of allogeneic but not of syngeneic bone marrow. The precise mechanism of M phi activation in the allogeneic radiation chimera in the complete absence of any detectable T cell function is not clear at present. However, these preactivated M phi display an important protective effect against L. monocytogenes: chimeras could eliminate Listeria without acquisition of positive delayed-type sensitivity when infected with 10(3) bacteria. An inoculum of 5 . 10(3) L. monocytogenes resulted either in prolonged survival compared with normal mice of the recipient haplotype or in definitive survival accompanied by a positive delayed-type sensitivity.

  8. USACE Defense Base Act Insurance Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    .305) BUILDING STRONG®3 #12;Which Contracts Require DBA Insurance?q All construction and service contract

  9. Doctoral Thesis Defense Speaker: Naseem Ibrahim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doedel, Eusebius

    these challenges. They do not realize the essential relationship between the service contract and the conditions for specifying services, contracts, and compositions. Without a formal basis it is not possible to justify

  10. Master Thesis Defense Speaker: Shridhar Mohandoss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doedel, Eusebius

    .309 ABSTRACT Three dimensional models (3D) are becoming popular due to different fields like 3D printing, games

  11. 17.460 Defense Politics, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapolsky, Harvey M.

    This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military ...

  12. Spam Value Chain : : Defensive Intervention Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitsillidis, Andreas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Russia After selecting an item to purchase and clicking on “Checkout”, the store- front redirects the user to a payment portal

  13. PHD DISSERTATION DEFENSE MR. BENJAMIN W. JACOBS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayres, Virginia

    with zinc-blende and wurtzite crystalline domains that grew simultaneously in the longitudinal direction-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to identify the presence of both the zinc-blende and wurtzite measurements identified unique band gaps for both the zinc-blend and wurtzite phases in an individual nanowire

  14. Master Thesis Defense Speaker: Flora Taheri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doedel, Eusebius

    for multimedia conferencing applications, although they are key to efficiency in the resource usage. Cloud a pay-per-use model. Cloud-based conferencing services can inherent several benefits such as resource relies on a recently proposed business model for cloud-based conferencing. The model has the following

  15. Cloud structures from defense meteorological satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, John Frederick

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    McAlester, OK OKC Oklahoma City, OK PNC Ponca City, OK PNX Perrin AFB, TX SPS Sheppard AFB, TX TUL Tulsa, OK CHA? 6 aR I INTRODUCTORY RE~ In -arly 1947, at Nhite Sands I'roving Ground, New Mexico, techni- cians mounted a camera on a captured... meteorological tool, Crowson may not have been aware of a report issued in 1946 by Project RAND arguing strongly in favor of developing an Earth orbiting satel- lite, "both as a scientific tool and for it's psychological impact on 6 ' 9' ' 1 1' 6" IG1 1 19699...

  16. Economics of Defense in a Globalized World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MCGUIRE, MARTIN C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be influenced by economic incentives --- economic carrots orto identify the economic and strategic incentives by whicheconomic insight that this system is driven by incentives,

  17. FACULTY OF INFORMATICS MASTER THESES DEFENSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, Rolf

    Paolo Calciati A Taxonomy of Layouts for Software Visualization Supervisor: Prof. Fernando Pedone Francesco Rigotti Concurrent visualization of concurrent software evolution Supervisor: Prof. Mariagiovanna. Mariagiovanna Sami Cosupervisor: Dr. Alberto Ferrante Examiner: Prof. Michele Lanza Olga Jesic Implementation

  18. Power Grid Defense Against Malicious Cascading Failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakarian, Paulo; Lindelauf, Roy

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An adversary looking to disrupt a power grid may look to target certain substations and sources of power generation to initiate a cascading failure that maximizes the number of customers without electricity. This is particularly an important concern when the enemy has the capability to launch cyber-attacks as practical concerns (i.e. avoiding disruption of service, presence of legacy systems, etc.) may hinder security. Hence, a defender can harden the security posture at certain power stations but may lack the time and resources to do this for the entire power grid. We model a power grid as a graph and introduce the cascading failure game in which both the defender and attacker choose a subset of power stations such as to minimize (maximize) the number of consumers having access to producers of power. We formalize problems for identifying both mixed and deterministic strategies for both players, prove complexity results under a variety of different scenarios, identify tractable cases, and develop algorithms f...

  19. Economics of Defense in a Globalized World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MCGUIRE, MARTIN C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kahn, H. (1959), On Thermonuclear War (Princeton Universityless grave than thermonuclear annihilation. That is, anfrom the threat of thermonuclear war deserves emphasis. Even

  20. Master Thesis Defense Speaker: Hossein Afshar Fotouhi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doedel, Eusebius

    -based Static Content Date: Wednesday, April 25, 2012 Time: 10:00 Place: EV 3.309 ABSTRACT Web development is an essential aspect of today's internet services. A web page is normally designed by means of HyperText Markup Language (HTML) as the web publishing language. Designing an HTML-based web-page can be done in various

  1. Maritime strategy in the defense of NATO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, J.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this book the author addresses the new strategic realities - the Asian economic revolution, changing patterns of raw material dependency, development of a Soviet bluewater navy, and the decline of U.S. industrial capacity - and advances the importance of technology in maintaining a sufficient naval capacity.

  2. Scanning the Technology Energy Infrastructure Defense Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    , and algorithmic develop- ments. Keywords--Critical infrastructure protection, electric power grid, emergency, the United Kingdom, and Italy in 2003 underscored electricity infrastructure's vulnerabilities [1 infrastructures and increased demand for high-quality and reliable electricity for our digital economy is becoming

  3. Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three...

  4. Second Line of Defense Master Spares Catalog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Dale L.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This catalog is intended to be a comprehensive listing of repair parts, components, kits, and consumable items used on the equipment deployed at SLD sites worldwide. The catalog covers detection, CAS, network, ancillary equipment, and tools. The catalog is backed by a Master Parts Database which is used to generate the standard report views of the catalog. The master parts database is a relational database containing a record for every part in the master parts catalog along with supporting tables for normalizing fields in the records. The database also includes supporting queries, database maintenance forms, and reports.

  5. Attack, Defense and Contagion in Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Sanjeev; Vigier, Adrien

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    compromise user privacy and jeopardize the functioning of the entire system.1 As energy, communication, travel, consumer interaction increasingly adopt digital networks, cybersecurity has emerged as a major priority.2 At the heart of these developments... the United States, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is responsible for cybersecurity. Its mission statement reads,“Our daily life, economic vitality, and national security depend on a stable, safe, and resilient cyberspace. We rely on this vast array...

  6. Cloud structures from defense meteorological satellite data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, John Frederick

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    McAlester, OK OKC Oklahoma City, OK PNC Ponca City, OK PNX Perrin AFB, TX SPS Sheppard AFB, TX TUL Tulsa, OK CHA? 6 aR I INTRODUCTORY RE~ In -arly 1947, at Nhite Sands I'roving Ground, New Mexico, techni- cians mounted a camera on a captured... meteorological tool, Crowson may not have been aware of a report issued in 1946 by Project RAND arguing strongly in favor of developing an Earth orbiting satel- lite, "both as a scientific tool and for it's psychological impact on 6 ' 9' ' 1 1' 6" IG1 1 19699...

  7. Defense nuclear agency - global effects program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auton, D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable progress has been made in the determination and analysis of fuel inventories and their distribution. Nonurban inventories are reasonably well documented and probably sufficient for most global effects analyses. Urban inventories are now in good shape for the United States. Work remains to be completed for European and Soviet urban areas. The largest single uncertainty and driving force for all subsequent analyses is the scenario. Knowing the fuel inventories and their distribution is critical and allows scenario assumptions to be played against the fuel bed data. The second largest uncertainty areas is the amount of smoke that would be produced for any given scenario. Much research is under way that contributes to resolving this issue, but there remain the following nagging problems: (1) dynamics of fire spreading and fire zone behavior; (2) scaling from laboratory and small-field measurements; and (3) relatability of materials burned in item 2 to the real case of interest.

  8. Nuclear Winter: Implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to the cooling hypothesized to occur in the Northern Hemisphere following a nuclear war as the result of the injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the paper was published in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. Three-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling---15 to 25/degree/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought is likely to be a direct threat to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures. The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and this could present problems to third parties who are without food reserves. Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor an unexpected threat from nuclear war to the United States and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the United States due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year.

  9. Nuclear Winter: The implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to hypothesized cooling in the northern hemisphere following a nuclear war due to injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the original paper in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. The widespread use of 3-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling; 15 to 25/sup 0/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought are likely to be direct threats to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures; The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and could present problems to third parties without food reserves; and Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor unexpected threat from nuclear war to the US and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the US due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year. 6 refs.

  10. Defense Board Recommendation 2014-1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: William Froh, Fire Protection Engineer, NNSA Associate Administrator for Emergency Operations (NA?41)

  11. QER- Comment of National Resource Defense Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please accept this paper as a comment into the QER record on siting energy and transmission resources.

  12. Doctoral Thesis Defense Speaker: Christine Houry Kehyayan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doedel, Eusebius

    :00 Place: EV 1.162 ABSTRACT With the rapid development of genome sequencing technologies, complete genomes experimentally characterized enzymes from fungal genomes in the mycoCLAP database. Our study shows that the MCLAPhy, a novel approach for clustering proteins by leveraging the global context of complete genomes

  13. Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to:EmminolEntergy ArkansasEnvironmental Credit

  14. Defense Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3 | NationalSUBSCRIBE:

  15. Defense Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3 | NationalSUBSCRIBE:| National

  16. OFFICE OF THE UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No. EA-212-AOAHU2014) | DepartmentOE's3

  17. Department of Defense Net Assessment Summer 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy :

  18. Natural Resources Defense Council | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNationalNatural0-2002 JanuaryNatural

  19. Protection Programming Defensive Planning for Fixed Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |of EnergySelectedof EnergyNOT MEASUREMENT

  20. Recommended Practice: Defense-in-Depth

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition toDOEDepartment

  1. NREL: Department of Defense Energy Programs - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNREL NRELChemicalIndustryIssue 3Energy Projects

  2. NREL: Department of Defense Energy Programs - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNREL NRELChemicalIndustryIssue 3Energy

  3. NREL: Department of Defense Energy Programs - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNREL NRELChemicalIndustryIssue 3EnergyWebmaster

  4. Natural Resources Defense Council | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to: navigation, search RetrievedBusinessNRDC Jump

  5. Environmental Defense Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest,EnergySerranopolisEnviroMission Ltd JumpFund Place: New York, New

  6. defense nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian NuclearNational5/%2A en Office ofcontractingcyber

  7. defense programs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian NuclearNational5/%2A en Office

  8. Nature Macmillan Publishers Ltd 1997 ill man-made climate change dis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    for a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide; Manabe and Stouffer4 found that after a quadrupling of carbon. But there is a well-defined critical threshold -- a saddle-node bifurcation, in mathematical terms -- beyond which dioxide, the deep circulation in their model ground to a completehalt. Such models would require more

  9. ANL/DIS-11-1 Revised Financial Analysis of Experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    by United States Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration #12;ii FOREWORD This report releases from the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Western Area Power of Reclamation. The facilities known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects include dams

  10. Wanderl[o]st: Lost Identities and Losing Place in the New World (Dis)Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitney, Kendall Abbott

    2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    in the margins as lost subjects. The battle that they wage is with their ideals that, in turn, are the cause of their struggles with society. In this sense, I use the term ?loser? endearingly, because failure is infinitely more provocative than success while.... The consequences of being lost are dire but it does not appear that the lost subjects and losers make great efforts to ?find? themselves or ?win.? I hypothesize that one big reason for the desire?or the lust?for wandering, getting lost, is the desire to lose one...

  11. Achieving Energy Performance in spite of complex systems and dis-jointed design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardren, C.; Bannister, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , through careful and thorough commissioning and tuning. The existing two storey 5,000m2 sandstone building was completely gutted and brought to a new life as a head office for one of Australia's federal government departments. The building was stripped back...

  12. How to perform QCD analysis of DIS in Analytic Perturbation Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesar Ayala; S. V. Mikhailov

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply (Fractional) Analytic Perturbation Theory (FAPT) to the QCD analysis of the nonsinglet nucleon structure function $F_2(x,Q^2)$ in deep inelastic scattering up to the next leading order and compare the results with ones obtained within the standard perturbation QCD. Based on a popular parameterization of the corresponding parton distribution we perform the analysis within the Jacobi Polynomial formalism and under the control of the numerical inverse Mellin transform. To reveal the main features of the FAPT two-loop approach, we consider a wide range of momentum transfer from high $Q^2\\sim 100 {\\rm GeV}^2$ to low $Q^2\\sim 0.3 {\\rm GeV}^2$ where the approach still works.

  13. Provas 2013.2 Perodo Cdigo da Dis ProfessorDisciplina Turma G1 G2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FARIESTAGIO SUPERVISIONADO I 2HX 19/10 30/11 01º Perí SOC 1205 ALESSANDRA MAIAPOLITICA ITEORIA POLITICA 2HA 30 CONDEPOLITICA ITEORIA POLITICA 2HB 26/09 05/12 01º Perí SOC 1205 ANA PAULA CONDEPOLITICA ITEORIA POLITICA 2HX 17

  14. Dis/locating audience : transnational media flows and the online circulation of East Asian television drama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiaochang, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is commonly accepted that media and communication technologies play pivotal roles in the complex processes of what is broadly termed "globalization." The increasing speed, volume, and scale of transnational circulation ...

  15. Check-in by DIS to UGC re: WE ois@truman.edu February 25, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    COURSES WE2: Section-specific WE courses (WE2) continue to be phased out of the curriculum. o As programs are reviewed, a decision should be made about WE2 courses. o In some cases, two course numbers should

  16. Peripheral (Dis)Unity: The Italian Influences on Corsican Linguistic and Cultural Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliva, Cedric J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paris: Edition L’Harmattan, 2005). [My own translation -Polynomie (Paris: l’Harmattan, 2003). 19. Alexandra Jaffe,Polynomie (Paris: l’Harmattan, 2003), 113. [My own

  17. Higher twists in polarized DIS and the size of the constituent quark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander Sidorov; Christian Weiss

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry implies the presence of a short-distance scale in the QCD vacuum, which phenomenologically may be associated with the ''size'' of the constituent quark, rho {approx} 0.3 fm. We discuss the role of this scale in the matrix elements of the twist-4 and 3 quark-gluon operators determining the leading power (1/Q{sup 2}-) corrections to the moments of the nucleon spin structure functions. We argue that the flavor-nonsinglet twist-4 matrix element, f{sub 2}{sup u-d}, has a sizable negative value of the order rho{sup -2}, due to the presence of sea quarks with virtualities {approx} rho{sup -2} in the proton wave function. The twist-3 matrix element, d{sub 2}, is not related to the scale rho{sup -2}. Our arguments support the results of previous calculations of the matrix elements in the instanton vacuum model. We show that this qualitative picture is in agreement with the phenomenological higher-twist correction extracted from an NLO QCD fit to the world data on g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 1}{sup n}, which include recent data from the Jefferson Lab Hall A and COMPASS experiments. We comment on the implications of the short-distance scale rho for quark-hadron duality and the x-dependence of higher-twist contributions.

  18. Introduction More than 50 years ago, Weigle made the pivotal dis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Michael M.

    and Molecular Biology, 2010; 45(3): 171­184 Address for Correspondence: Myron F. Goodman, Departments M. Cox3 , and Myron F. Goodman1 1 Departments of Biological Sciences and Chemistry, University

  19. Comparison of NNLO DIS scheme splitting functions with results from exact gluon kinematics at small x.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, C D; Thorne, Robert S

    ? x) + 94680.9 + 423522x? 62541.01x2 ? 569436x3 + 120946x4 + 1149.99x?1 + 18.9631L40 + 660.814L 3 0 + [24297.9L1 + 5133.55]L 2 0 + [1099250L21 ? 175012L1 + 220.737x?1 + 40461.3]L0 ? 24.8889L41 + [2062.11x? 1913.21]L31 +[?1093524x+ 1093454]L21 + [?22404... + [?666832+ 658887x]L21 + [16626.4? 32060.8x]L1 + nf (935.1848D0 ? 550.4791D1 ? 56.29637D2 + 25.28401D3 + 2589.9531?(1? x) + 35445 + 73884x ? 11203x2 ? 127979x3 + 27317x4 + 350.55x?1 + 4.7407L40 + 312.26L30 + [9521.1L1 + 108.6x + 2357.5]L20 + [99.282x ?1...

  20. 244 http://infection.thelancet.com Vol 8 April 2008 Lancet Infect Dis 2008;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blower, Sally

    in communities of men who have sex with men. The reasons for these outbreaks include changing sexual and social sets of syphilis. Today, syphilis in western Europe and the USA is characterised by low-level endemicity with concentration among population subgroups with high rates of partner change, poor access