Sample records for defense activities security

  1. Security & Defense Licenses Available | Tech Transfer | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security and Defense SHARE Security and Defense 200401423 Synthesis Method for Stable Colloids of "Naked" Metal Nanocrystals 200501549 Enhanced Detection of Toxic Agents 200501614...

  2. Homeland Security and Defense Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Homeland Security and Defense Applications personnel are the best in the world at detecting and locating dirty bombs, loose nukes, and other radiological sources. The site trains the Nation's emergency responders, who would be among the first to confront a radiological or nuclear emergency. Homeland Security and Defense Applications highly training personnel, characterize the threat environment, produce specialized radiological nuclear detection equipment, train personnel on the equipment and its uses, test and evaluate the equipment, and develop different kinds of high-tech equipment to defeat terrorists. In New York City for example, NNSS scientists assisted in characterizing the radiological nuclear environment after 9/11, and produced specialized radiological nuclear equipment to assist local officials in their Homeland Security efforts.

  3. Homeland Security and Defense Applications

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Homeland Security and Defense Applications personnel are the best in the world at detecting and locating dirty bombs, loose nukes, and other radiological sources. The site trains the Nation's emergency responders, who would be among the first to confront a radiological or nuclear emergency. Homeland Security and Defense Applications highly training personnel, characterize the threat environment, produce specialized radiological nuclear detection equipment, train personnel on the equipment and its uses, test and evaluate the equipment, and develop different kinds of high-tech equipment to defeat terrorists. In New York City for example, NNSS scientists assisted in characterizing the radiological nuclear environment after 9/11, and produced specialized radiological nuclear equipment to assist local officials in their Homeland Security efforts.

  4. A Cooperative Cyber Defense for Securing Critical Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulp, Errin W.

    .g., the numerous private companies that make up North America's electrical power grids) that share computationalA Cooperative Cyber Defense for Securing Critical Infrastructures Glenn A. Fink glenn networked relationships. At electrical substations, it is common to find equipment from several companies

  5. Fiscal Year 1985 Congressional budget request. Volume 1. Atomic energy defense activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents include: summaries of estimates by appropriation, savings from management initiatives, staffing by subcommittee, staffing appropriation; appropriation language; amounts available for obligation; estimates by major category; program overview; weapons activities; verification and control technology; materials production; defense waste and by-products management; nuclear safeguards and security; security investigations; and naval reactors development.

  6. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense-in-Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Fabro

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: • Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems • Access to facilities via remote data link or modem • Public facing services for customer or corporate operations • A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  7. Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kuipers; Mark Fabro

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  8. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Nevada National Security...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to observe the Nevada National Security Site Field Office presentations for the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board annual visit. The presentations included briefings on...

  9. Active, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technologies for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James L. Jones

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active, non-intrusive inspection or interrogation technologies have been used for 100 years - with the primary focus being radiographic imaging. During the last 50 years, various active interrogation systems have been investigated and most have revealed many unique and interesting capabilities and advantages that have already benefited the general public. Unfortunately, except for medical and specific industrial applications, these unique capabilities have not been widely adopted, largely due to the complexity of the technology, the overconfident reliance on passive detection systems to handle most challenges, and the unrealistic public concerns regarding radiation safety issues for a given active inspection deployment. The unique homeland security challenges facing the United States today are inviting more "out-of-the-box" solutions and are demanding the effective technological solutions that only active interrogation systems can provide. While revolutionary new solutions are always desired, these technology advancements are rare, and when found, usually take a long time to fully understand and implement for a given application. What's becoming more evident is that focusing on under-developed, but well-understood, active inspection technologies can provide many of the needed "out-of-the-box" solutions. This paper presents a brief historical overview of active interrogation. It identifies some of the major homeland defense challenges being confronted and the commercial and research technologies presently available and being pursued. Finally, the paper addresses the role of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and its partner, the Idaho Accelerator Center at Idaho State University, in promoting and developing active inspection technologies for homeland defense.

  10. NA 70 - Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 70 - Associate Administrator for Defense ... NA 70 - Associate Administrator...

  11. Personnel Security Activities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes objectives, requirements and responsibilities for the Personnel Security Program and Personnel Security Assurance Program. Cancels DOE O 472.1B

  12. Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three...

  13. SMASHUP: Secure Mashup for Defense Transformation and Net-Centric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heileman, Gregory L.

    SMASHUP: Secure Mashup for Defense Transformation and Net- Centric Systems Mark D. Heileman., 709 S. Harbor City Blvd., Suite 400, Melbourne, FL 32901; b University of New Mexico, Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Albuquerque, NM 87131; c Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RIEBB, Rome

  14. Defense Programs: the mission | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortal Decision Support forDeep Insights from8,Defense

  15. SECURITY MODELING FOR MARITIME PORT DEFENSE RESOURCE ALLOCATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S.; Dunn, D.

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Redeployment of existing law enforcement resources and optimal use of geographic terrain are examined for countering the threat of a maritime based small-vessel radiological or nuclear attack. The evaluation was based on modeling conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory that involved the development of options for defensive resource allocation that can reduce the risk of a maritime based radiological or nuclear threat. A diverse range of potential attack scenarios has been assessed. As a result of identifying vulnerable pathways, effective countermeasures can be deployed using current resources. The modeling involved the use of the Automated Vulnerability Evaluation for Risks of Terrorism (AVERT{reg_sign}) software to conduct computer based simulation modeling. The models provided estimates for the probability of encountering an adversary based on allocated resources including response boats, patrol boats and helicopters over various environmental conditions including day, night, rough seas and various traffic flow rates.

  16. Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site -...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Security Site - December 2012 December 2012 Nevada National Security Site Operational Awareness Visit HIAR NNSS-2012-12-03 This Independent Activity Report documents an...

  17. NA 70 - Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis andB - H, Page iSecurity

  18. Independent Oversight Activity Report, National Nuclear Security...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Contractor Transition Activities for the National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office IAR-NPO-2014-03-10 This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight...

  19. A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in the Energy Sector (October 2005) A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in the Energy Sector...

  20. Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector Presentation-given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working...

  1. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  2. Program Management at the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Defense Nuclear Security: A Review of Program Management Documents and Underlying Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, Michael S.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this paper is to review the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) program management documents and to examine the underlying processes. The purpose is to identify recommendations for improvement and to influence the rewrite of the DNS Program Management Plan (PMP) and the documentation supporting it. As a part of this process, over 40 documents required by DNS or its stakeholders were reviewed. In addition, approximately 12 other documents produced outside of DNS and its stakeholders were reviewed in an effort to identify best practices. The complete list of documents reviewed is provided as an attachment to this paper.

  3. active planetary defense: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    activity, and renamed the combined organization the DoD Human Resources Activity. In FY 1999, DHRA assumed responsibility for the Office of the Chancellor for Education and...

  4. Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the Department of Defense. Cancels DOE O 452.6.

  5. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Nevada National Security...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Report, Nevada National Security Site - March 3-6, 2014 March 2014 Operational Awareness Oversight of the Nevada National Security Site HIAR NNSS-2014-03-03 This...

  6. Doctoral Dissertation Defense "Informal Mathematics Activities and the Beliefs of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    American Center 105 Recent educational reforms have called for greater incorporation of informal (i; NCTM, 2000). In spite of such reforms, mathematics education research indicates the continuance for the use of such activities as agents of educational reform in elementary school teacher preparation

  7. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROM: SUBJECT: USIUK Memorandum of Understanding between National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security (AADNS)...

  8. The Data and Application Security and Privacy (DASPY) Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    Computer security Information security = Computer security + Communications security Information Computer security Information security = Computer security + Communications security Information Cyber security (defensive) goals have evolved Computer security Information security = Computer

  9. Cosmic bombardment V: Threat object-dispersing approaches to active planetary defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teller, E.; Wood, L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ishikawa, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hyde, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth-impacting comets and asteroids with diameters {approx}0.03 - 10 km pose the greatest threats to the terrestrial biosphere in terms of impact frequency-weighted impact consequences, and thus are of most concern to designers of active planetary defenses. Specific gravitational binding energies of such objects range from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -2} J/gm, and are small compared with the specific energies of 1x10{sup 3} to 3x10{sup 3} J/gm required to vaporize objects of typical composition or the specific energies required to pulverize them, which are 10{sup -1} to 10 J/gm. All of these are small compared to the specific kinetic energy of these objects in the Earth- centered frame, which is 2x10{sup 5} to 2x10{sup 6} J/gm. The prospect naturally arises of negating all such threats by deflecting, pulverizing or vaporizing the objects. Pulverization-with-dispersal is an attractive option of reasonable defensive robustness. Examples of such equipments - which employ no explosives of any type - are given. Vaporization is the maximally robust defensive option, and may be invoked to negate threat objects not observed until little time is left until Earth-strike, and pulverization-with-dispersal has proven inadequate. Physically larger threats may be vaporized with nuclear explosives. No contemporary technical means of any kind appear capable of directly dispersing the -100 km diameter scale Charon- class cometary objects recently observed in the outer solar system, although such objects may be deflected to defensively useful extents. Means of implementing defenses of each of these types are proposed for specificity, and areas for optimization noted. Biospheric impacts of threat object debris are briefly considered, for bounding purposes. Experiments are suggested on cometary and asteroidal objects.

  10. defense nuclear security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A en6/%2A en2/%2A3/%2A en

  11. Annual Report To Congress. Department of Energy Activities Relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (Department) submits an Annual Report to Congress each year detailing the Department’s activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board), which provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy (Secretary) regarding public health and safety issues at the Department’s defense nuclear facilities. In 2003, the Department continued ongoing activities to resolve issues identified by the Board in formal recommendations and correspondence, staff issue reports pertaining to Department facilities, and public meetings and briefings. Additionally, the Department is implementing several key safety initiatives to address and prevent safety issues: safety culture and review of the Columbia accident investigation; risk reduction through stabilization of excess nuclear materials; the Facility Representative Program; independent oversight and performance assurance; the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP); executive safety initiatives; and quality assurance activities. The following summarizes the key activities addressed in this Annual Report.

  12. Defense Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defense Gallery Inside the Museum Exhibitions Norris Bradbury Museum Lobby Defense Gallery Research Gallery History Gallery TechLab Virtual Exhibits invisible utility element...

  13. Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order prescribes how the Department of Energy participates with the Department of Defense (DoD) to ensure the surety (safety, security and control) of military nuclear weapon systems deployed around the world. The Order establishes National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the DoD. Cancels DOE O 5610.13. Canceled by DOE O 452.6A.

  14. Program Activities | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriorityPetroleumNotActivities | National

  15. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the tenth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department's defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department's defense nuclear facilities. During 1999, Departmental activities resulted in the closure of nine Board recommendations. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with three Board recommendations. One new Board recommendation was received and accepted by the Department in 1999, and a new implementation plan is being developed to address this recommendation. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, opening of a repository for long-term storage of transuranic wastes, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  16. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the ninth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy (Department) activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The locations of the major Department facilities are provided. During 1998, Departmental activities resulted in the proposed closure of one Board recommendation. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with four other Board recommendations. Two new Board recommendations were received and accepted by the Department in 1998, and two new implementation plans are being developed to address these recommendations. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, a renewed effort to increase the technical capabilities of the federal workforce, and a revised plan for stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  17. CMC Participation in the Regional Centre for Strategic Studies (RCSS) Workshop: Defense, Technology and Cooperative Security in South Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biringer, K.L.; Olsen, J.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As an ongoing part of the collaborative efforts between the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) at Sandia National Laboratories, the United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA), and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), staff from the CMC served as faculty in conducting a workshop in Shanghai, China. Sponsor of the workshop was the Regional Centre for Strategic Studies (RCSS) based in Colombo, Sri Lanka. The workshop included participants from throughout South Asia and China. The CMC presented four sessions related to the role of monitoring technologies in promoting regional security and building confidence among nations. Participation in these workshops supports U.S. efforts to further regional cooperation and promote arms control, nonproliferation and other cooperative securily measures and supplements efforts funded by DOE and ACDA over the past four years. The RCSS Shanghai meeting permitted a continued CMC involvement in regionally conducted training for anew generation of leaders in government, the military, and academia throughout South Asia and China. Nuclear issues are clearly a dominant South Asian concern since the nuclear tests of May 1998. However, there remains a strong interest in identifying opportunities for increased trade and reduced tensions in other areas. The RCSS and other regional organizations are enthusiastic about continued CMC involvement in future regional courses.

  18. Transgenic Expression of the Dicotyledonous Pattern Recognition Receptor EFR in Rice Leads to Ligand-Dependent Activation of Defense Responses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schwessinger, Benjamin; Bahar, Ofir; Thomas, Nicolas; Holton, Nicolas; Nekrasov, Vladimir; Ruan, Deling; Canlas, Patrick E.; Daudi, Arsalan; Petzold, Christopher J.; Singan, Vasanth R.; et al

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant plasma membrane localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) detect extracellular pathogen-associated molecules. PRRs such as Arabidopsis EFR and rice XA21 are taxonomically restricted and are absent from most plant genomes. Here we show that rice plants expressing EFR or the chimeric receptor EFR::XA21, containing the EFR ectodomain and the XA21 intracellular domain, sense both Escherichia coli- and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo)-derived elf18 peptides at sub-nanomolar concentrations. Treatment of EFR and EFR::XA21 rice leaf tissue with elf18 leads to MAP kinase activation, reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression. Although expression of EFR does not lead to robust enhanced resistancemore »to fully virulent Xoo isolates, it does lead to quantitatively enhanced resistance to weakly virulent Xoo isolates. EFR interacts with OsSERK2 and the XA21 binding protein 24 (XB24), two key components of the rice XA21-mediated immune response. Rice-EFR plants silenced for OsSERK2, or overexpressing rice XB24 are compromised in elf18-induced reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression indicating that these proteins are also important for EFR-mediated signaling in transgenic rice. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential feasibility of enhancing disease resistance in rice and possibly other monocotyledonous crop species by expression of dicotyledonous PRRs. Our results also suggest that Arabidopsis EFR utilizes at least a subset of the known endogenous rice XA21 signaling components.« less

  19. A Model of OASIS Role-Based Access Control and its Support for Active Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    A Model of OASIS Role-Based Access Control and its Support for Active Security Walt Yao University.bacon@cl.cam.ac.uk ABSTRACT OASIS is a role-based access control architecture for achiev- ing secure interoperation rule associated with its activation becomes false. OASIS does not use role delegation but instead

  20. A Model of OASIS RoleBased Access Control and its Support for Active Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    A Model of OASIS Role­Based Access Control and its Support for Active Security Walt Yao University.bacon@cl.cam.ac.uk ABSTRACT OASIS is a role-based access control architecture for achiev- ing secure interoperation rule associated with its activation becomes false. OASIS does not use role delegation but instead de#12

  1. Deception used for Cyber Defense of Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne F. Boyer; Miles A. McQueen

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control system cyber security defense mechanisms may employ deception to make it more difficult for attackers to plan and execute successful attacks. These deceptive defense mechanisms are organized and initially explored according to a specific deception taxonomy and the seven abstract dimensions of security previously proposed as a framework for the cyber security of control systems.

  2. Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  3. Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site- July 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of Nevada National Security Site Device Assembly Facility Justification for Continued Operations for Inoperable HEPA-Filtered Ventilation System [HIAR-NNSS-2011-07-08

  4. Independent Activity Report, Y-12 National Security Complex- June 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Lead Orientation Visit to the Y-12 Site Office and Y-12 National Security Complex [HIAR-Y-12-2011-06-23

  5. defense | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian NuclearNational5/%2A en Office| National Nuclear

  6. Defense Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3 | NationalSUBSCRIBE:

  7. defense nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian NuclearNational5/%2A en Office ofcontractingcyber

  8. Energy and Defense Departments Announce Agreement to Enhance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Agreement to Enhance Cooperation on Clean Energy and Strengthen Energy Security Energy and Defense Departments Announce Agreement to Enhance Cooperation on Clean Energy and...

  9. Research With Students My principal research activities lie in information systems security with particular emphasis on access control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of security, and secure transaction processing. My recent research has expanded beyond information systemsResearch With Students My principal research activities lie in information systems security and mining, semantic web and multimedia delivery. 1 Major Results · Security solutions for workflow systems

  10. active computing security: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 HANDLING COMPUTER SECURITY INCIDENTS Engineering Websites Summary: the potential to seriously damage...

  11. ShadowNet: An Active Defense Infrastructure for Insider Cyber Attack Prevention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL; Beaver, Justin M [ORNL; Treadwell, Jim N [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ShadowNet infrastructure for insider cyber attack prevention is comprised of a tiered server system that is able to dynamically redirect dangerous/suspicious network traffic away from production servers that provide web, ftp, database and other vital services to cloned virtual machines in a quarantined environment. This is done transparently from the point of view of both the attacker and normal users. Existing connections, such as SSH sessions, are not interrupted. Any malicious activity performed by the attacker on a quarantined server is not reflected on the production server. The attacker is provided services from the quarantined server, which creates the impression that the attacks performed are successful. The activities of the attacker on the quarantined system are able to be recorded much like a honeypot system for forensic analysis.

  12. Enhance your Cyber Security Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enhance your Cyber Security Knowledge About NPS CS FUNDAMENTALS: Create a strong foundational by increasing the effectiveness of the armed forces of the United States and its allies. Cyber Security-4015 About CISR #12;Cyber Security Adversarial Techniques Cyber Security Defense Cyber Security Fundamentals

  13. Secure Learning and Learning for Security: Research in the Intersection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Benjamin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Alissa Dill. 2008 CISO priorities: The right objectivesbased reactive defense. The CISO risk management problem isSecurity Officer (CISO) to manage the enterprise’s

  14. Active Network Approach to the Design of Secure Online Auction Systems Basem Shihada and Sampalli Srinivas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    to perform computations up to the application layer. The result is a more flexible and powerful networkActive Network Approach to the Design of Secure Online Auction Systems Basem Shihada and Sampalli} @cs.dal.ca ABSTRACT Online auction systems require high-speed bid transmission, large bandwidth

  15. International Journal of Network Security, Vol.4, No.2, PP.227-234, Mar. 2007 227 Pulsing RoQ DDoS Attack and Defense Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeung, Dit-Yan

    Q attacks. In this paper, we study in detail congestion-based RoQ DDoS attacks in mobile ad-hoc networks study congestion-based RoQ DDoS attacks in MANETs. To the best of our knowledge, our paper is the firstInternational Journal of Network Security, Vol.4, No.2, PP.227-234, Mar. 2007 227 Pulsing RoQ DDoS

  16. Information Security Group IY5512 Computer Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Chris

    Information Security Group IY5512 Computer Security Part 7b: Windows securityPart 7b: Windows security Chris Mitchell me@chrismitchell.net http://www.chrismitchell.net 1 Information Security Group) of Windows machines. 2 Information Security Group Objectives II · Focus on Active Directory, authentication

  17. Disposal Activities and the Unique Waste Streams at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, P.

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This slide show documents waste disposal at the Nevada National Security Site. Topics covered include: radionuclide requirements for waste disposal; approved performance assessment (PA) for depleted uranium disposal; requirements; program approval; the Waste Acceptance Review Panel (WARP); description of the Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program (RWAP); facility evaluation; recent program accomplishments, nuclear facility safety changes; higher-activity waste stream disposal; and, large volume bulk waste streams.

  18. A Systematic Approach to Developing and Evaluating Website Fingerprinting Defenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Ian

    A Systematic Approach to Developing and Evaluating Website Fingerprinting Defenses Xiang Cai1 security, or both. This paper (1) systematically analyzes existing attacks and de- fenses to understand-based analysis provides clear directions to defense designers on which features need to be hidden. Our lower

  19. Proceedings Second Annual Cyber Security and Information Infrastructure Research Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL; Krings, Axel [ORNL; Yoo, Seong-Moo [ORNL; Mili, Ali [ORNL; Trien, Joseph P [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The workshop theme is Cyber Security: Beyond the Maginot Line Recently the FBI reported that computer crime has skyrocketed costing over $67 billion in 2005 alone and affecting 2.8M+ businesses and organizations. Attack sophistication is unprecedented along with availability of open source concomitant tools. Private, academic, and public sectors invest significant resources in cyber security. Industry primarily performs cyber security research as an investment in future products and services. While the public sector also funds cyber security R&D, the majority of this activity focuses on the specific mission(s) of the funding agency. Thus, broad areas of cyber security remain neglected or underdeveloped. Consequently, this workshop endeavors to explore issues involving cyber security and related technologies toward strengthening such areas and enabling the development of new tools and methods for securing our information infrastructure critical assets. We aim to assemble new ideas and proposals about robust models on which we can build the architecture of a secure cyberspace including but not limited to: * Knowledge discovery and management * Critical infrastructure protection * De-obfuscating tools for the validation and verification of tamper-proofed software * Computer network defense technologies * Scalable information assurance strategies * Assessment-driven design for trust * Security metrics and testing methodologies * Validation of security and survivability properties * Threat assessment and risk analysis * Early accurate detection of the insider threat * Security hardened sensor networks and ubiquitous computing environments * Mobile software authentication protocols * A new "model" of the threat to replace the "Maginot Line" model and more . . .

  20. Abstract--Security in physical environments has become increasingly important in the wake of terror and criminal activity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biuk-Aghai, Robert P.

    of terror and criminal activity, particularly over the past decade. One of the challenges is to identify, RFID, security. I. INTRODUCTION n the wake of increased terrorist and criminal activity over the past, and this technology is being adopted by governments and private agencies around the world. This research was sponsored

  1. Security as a Dimension of Quality of Service in Active Service Environments Cynthia Irvine, Tim Levin, Evie Spyropoulou and Bruce Allen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Security as a Dimension of Quality of Service in Active Service Environments Cynthia Irvine, Tim; supporting user requirements for performance and security; and providing support for tasks to adapt.g. total throughput. The notion of security variability has been discussed before. A Quality of Protection

  2. Information Security for Libraries (1) INFORMATION SECURITY FOR LIBRARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newby, Gregory B.

    Information Security for Libraries (1) INFORMATION SECURITY FOR LIBRARIES Gregory B. Newby School an active role in information security. INTRODUCTION By most accounts, the proliferation of the Internet of information security, making concrete recommendations for safeguarding information and information access

  3. Cyber Defense Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    infrastructure. New threats demand new defenses Page-3 SPIDERS Program Summary CAMP SMITH ENERGY ISLAND * Entire Installation Smart Microgrid * Islanded Installation * High...

  4. UNCLASSIFIHED DEFENSE DOCUMENTATION CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Marco

    UNCLASSIFIHED AD 463473 DEFENSE DOCUMENTATION CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL INFORMATION .... John Barton Head OR Analysis Group R. H. Krolick Manager Applied Science Laboratory Prepared for the .J

  5. Defense Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3 | NationalSUBSCRIBE:| National

  6. defense programs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian NuclearNational5/%2A en Office

  7. Survey of US Department of Defense Manufacturing Technology Program activities applicable to civilian manufacturing industries. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azimi, S.A.; Conrad, J.L.; Reed, J.E.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intent of the survey was to identify and characterize activities potentially applicable to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in the civilian manufacturing industries. The civilian industries emphasized were the general manufacturing industries (including fabricated metals, glass, machinery, paper, plastic, textile, and transportation equipment manufacturing) and the primary metals industries (including primary aluminum, copper, steel, and zinc production). The principal steps in the survey were to: develop overview taxonomies of the general manufacturing and primary metals industries as well as specific industry taxonomies; identify needs and opportunities for improving process energy efficiency and productivity in the industries included; identify federal programs, capabilities, and special technical expertise that might be relevant to industry's needs and opportunities; contact federal laboratories/facilities, through visits and other forms of inquiry; prepare formatted profiles (descriptions) potentially applicable work efforts; review findings with industry; and compile and evaluate industry responses.

  8. Department of Defense INSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of the Inspector General of the Department of Defense (IG DoD automated export license system. 2. APPLICABILITY. This Instruction: a. Applies to Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Joint

  9. Barriers to creating a secure MPI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brightwell, R.; Greenberg, D.S.; Matt, B.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Davida, G.I. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Computer Sciences

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores some of the many issues in developing security enhanced MPI for embedded real-time systems supporting the Department of Defense`s Multi-level Security policy (DoD MLS) are presented along with the preliminary design for such an MPI variant. In addition some of the many issues that need to be addressed in creating security enhanced versions of MPI for other domains are discussed. 19 refs.

  10. DoD, Energy Security and Technological Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DoD, Energy Security and Technological Innovation Dorothy Robyn Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Installations & Environment) SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Technology Forum...

  11. Japan’s Defense White Paper as a Tool for Promoting Defense Transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUKEGAWA, Yasushi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and activities of the MOD/SDF (Part III). It is one of theof the Self-Defense Forces (SDF) came to be in- cluded inits coverage to include the SDF’s disaster respons- es and

  12. MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

  13. A defense of theistic activism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haugen, Christopher Allen

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of affairs is a way things could have been. It is the case that George W. Bush was elected President of the United States; but it could have been the case that George W. Bush was not elected. For instance, the state of affairs Al Gore 's heing elected... the President of the United States of America" could have been the case. However, George W Bush 's heing elected President of the United States of America is the case. If a state of affairs is the case, then that state of affairs is actual, or that state...

  14. Unmanned and Unattended Response Capability for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENNETT, PHIL C.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis was conducted of the potential for unmanned and unattended robotic technologies for forward-based, immediate response capabilities that enables access and controlled task performance. The authors analyze high-impact response scenarios in conjunction with homeland security organizations, such as the NNSA Office of Emergency Response, the FBI, the National Guard, and the Army Technical Escort Unit, to cover a range of radiological, chemical and biological threats. They conducted an analysis of the potential of forward-based, unmanned and unattended robotic technologies to accelerate and enhance emergency and crisis response by Homeland Defense organizations. Response systems concepts were developed utilizing new technologies supported by existing emerging threats base technologies to meet the defined response scenarios. These systems will pre-position robotic and remote sensing capabilities stationed close to multiple sites for immediate action. Analysis of assembled systems included experimental activities to determine potential efficacy in the response scenarios, and iteration on systems concepts and remote sensing and robotic technologies, creating new immediate response capabilities for Homeland Defense.

  15. Personnel Security Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed requirements and procedures to supplement DOE O 472.1B, Personnel Security Activities, which establishes the overall objectives, requirements, and responsibilities for implementation and operation of the Personnel Security Program and the Personnel Security Assurance Program in the Department of Energy (DOE). This Manual addresses only the Personnel Security Program.

  16. Personnel Security Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    provides detailed requirements and procedures to supplement DOE O 472.1B, PERSONNEL SECURITY ACTIVITIES, which establishes the overall objectives, requirements, and responsibilities for implementation and operation of the Personnel Security Program and the Personnel Security Assurance Program in the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Cancels DOE M 472.1-1

  17. Cross-Layer Attack and Defense in Cognitive Radio Networks Wenkai Wang and Yan (Lindsay) Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yan Lindsay

    Cross-Layer Attack and Defense in Cognitive Radio Networks Wenkai Wang and Yan (Lindsay) Sun ECE research on security issues in cognitive radio networks mainly focuses on attack and defense in individual network layers. However, the attackers do not necessarily restrict themselves within the boundaries

  18. Cyber Assessment Methods for SCADA Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 brought to light threats and vulnerabilities that face the United States. In response, the U.S. Government is directing the effort to secure the nation's critical infrastructure by creating programs to implement the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace (1). One part of this effort involves assessing Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. These systems are essential to the control of critical elements of our national infrastructure, such as electric power, oil, and gas production and distribution. Since their incapacitation or destruction would have a debilitating impact on the defense or economic security of the United States, one of the main objectives of this program is to identify vulnerabilities and encourage the public and private sectors to work together to design secure control systems that resolve these weaknesses. This paper describes vulnerability assessment methodologies used in ongoing research and assessment activities designed to identify and resolve vulnerabilities so as to improve the security of the nation's critical infrastructure.

  19. Cyber Assessment Methods For SCADA Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May Robin Permann; Kenneth Rohde

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 brought to light threats and vulnerabilities that face the United States. In response, the U.S. Government is directing the effort to secure the nation's critical infrastructure by creating programs to implement the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace (1). One part of this effort involves assessing Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. These systems are essential to the control of critical elements of our national infrastructure, such as electric power, oil, and gas production and distribution. Since their incapacitation or destruction would have a debilitating impact on the defense or economic security of the United States, one of the main objectives of this program is to identify vulnerabilities and encourage the public and private sectors to work together to design secure control systems that resolve these weaknesses. This paper describes vulnerability assessment methodologies used in ongoing research and assessment activities designed to identify and resolve vulnerabilities so as to improve the security of the nation's critical infrastructure.

  20. DP Awards | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Social Media DP Awards DP Awards Congrats to the Nat'l Security Campus teams that won Defense Program awards for work supporting stockpilestewardship http:1.usa.gov1rEZg2r...

  1. China's Defense Electronics and Information Technology Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RAGLAND, LeighAnn; MCREYNOLDS, Joe; GEARY, Debra

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2013 China’s Defense Electronics and Information Technologythe Chinese defense electronics and information technology (is moving the defense electronics and IT industry toward

  2. Security Patterns: Comparing Modeling Approaches Armstrong NHLABATSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurjens, Jan

    Security Patterns: Comparing Modeling Approaches Armstrong NHLABATSI ** , Arosha BANDARA the challenges of developing secure software systems remains an active research area in software engineering. Current research efforts have resulted in the documentation of recurring security problems as security

  3. Putting Security in Context: Visual Correlation of Network Activity with Real-World Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pike, William A.; Scherrer, Chad; Zabriskie, Sean J.

    2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    To effectively identify and respond to cyber threats, computer security analysts must understand the scale, motivation, methods, source, and target of an attack. Central to developing this situational awareness is the analyst’s world knowledge that puts these attributes in context. What known exploits or new vulnerabilities might an anomalous traffic pattern suggest? What organizational, social, or geopolitical events help forecast or explain attacks and anomalies? Few visualization tools support creating, maintaining, and applying this knowledge of the threat landscape. Through a series of formative workshops with practicing security analysts, we have developed a visualization approach inspired by the human process of contextualization; this system, called NUANCE, creates evolving behavioral models of network actors at organizational and regional levels, continuously monitors external textual information sources for themes that indicate security threats, and automatically determines if behavior indicative of those threats is present on a network.

  4. Second Line of Defense Spares Program Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Dale L.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) is part of the Department of Energy‘s (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The SLD Program accomplishes its critical global security mission by forming cooperative relationships with partner countries to install passive radiation detection systems that augment traditional inspection and law enforcement measures by alerting border officials to the presence of special nuclear or other radiological materials in cross-border traffic. An important tenet of the program is to work collaboratively with these countries to establish the necessary processes, procedures, infrastructure and conditions that will enable them to fully assume the financial and technical responsibilities for operating the equipment. As the number of operational deployments grows, the SLD Program faces an increasingly complex logistics process to promote the timely and efficient supply of spare parts.

  5. Defense on the Move: Ant-Based Cyber Defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Glenn A.; Haack, Jereme N.; McKinnon, Archibald D.; Fulp, Errin W.

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many common cyber defenses (like firewalls and IDS) are as static as trench warfare allowing the attacker freedom to probe them at will. The concept of Moving Target Defense (MTD) adds dynamism to the defender side, but puts the systems to be defended themselves in motion, potentially at great cost to the defender. An alternative approach is a mobile resilient defense that removes attackers’ ability to rely on prior experience without requiring motion in the protected infrastructure itself. The defensive technology absorbs most of the cost of motion, is resilient to attack, and is unpredictable to attackers. The Ant-Based Cyber Defense (ABCD) is a mobile resilient defense providing a set of roaming, bio-inspired, digital-ant agents working with stationary agents in a hierarchy headed by a human supervisor. The ABCD approach provides a resilient, extensible, and flexible defense that can scale to large, multi-enterprise infrastructures like the smart electric grid.

  6. Information Security Advisory Committee Report on Committee Activities in 2012-2013 Academic Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    it is the responsibility of the President and the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) to ensure that the mandate a list of questions that were posed to the campus CISO on February 22, 2013. Responses to these questions were requested within two weeks. The CISO's responses were received on March 4, 2013. Based on its

  7. RateGuard: A Robust Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) Defense System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Jonathan

    , USA chao@poly.edu Abstract--One of the major threats to cyber security is the Distributed Denial-Rate TCP Attacks. I. INTRODUCTION One of the major threats to cyber security is the Distributed DenialRateGuard: A Robust Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) Defense System Huizhong Sun ECE

  8. Information Security Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information Security Guide For Government Executives Pauline Bowen Elizabeth Chew Joan Hash #12; Table of Contents Introduction 1 Why do I need to invest in information security? 2 Where do I need to focus my attention in accomplishing critical information security goals? 4 What are the key activities

  9. Personnel Security Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed requirements and procedures to supplement DOE O 472.1B, Personnel Security Activities, which establishes the overall objectives, requirements, and responsibilities for implementation and operation of the Personnel Security Program and the Personnel Security Assurance Program in the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Extended until 7-7-06 by DOE N 251.64, dated 7-7-05 Cancels: DOE M 472.1-1A.

  10. A quantitative man-machine model for cyber security efficiency analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Sung-Oh

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of security defense processes is of utmost importance in the management of various cyber-security attacks, which are increasing in scope and rapidity. Organizations need to optimize their resources based on a sound understanding...

  11. National Security Technology Incubation Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This strategic plan contains information on the vision, mission, business and technology environment, goals, objectives, and incubation process of the National Security Technology Incubation Program (NSTI) at Arrowhead Center. The development of the NSTI is a key goal of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP). Objectives to achieve this goal include developing incubator plans (strategic, business, action, and operations), creating an incubator environment, creating a support and mentor network for companies in the incubator program, attracting security technology businesses to the region, encouraging existing business to expand, initiating business start-ups, evaluating products and processes of the incubator program, and achieving sustainability of the incubator program. With the events of 9/11, the global community faces ever increasing and emerging threats from hostile groups determined to rule by terror. According to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Strategic Plan, the United States must be able to quickly respond and adapt to unanticipated situations as they relate to protection of our homeland and national security. Technology plays a key role in a strong national security position, and the private business community, along with the national laboratories, academia, defense and homeland security organizations, provide this technology. Fostering innovative ideas, translated into relevant technologies answering the needs of NNSA, is the purpose of the NSTI. Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University is the operator and manager of the NSTI. To develop the NSTI, Arrowhead Center must meet the planning, development, execution, evaluation, and sustainability activities for the program and identify and incubate new technologies to assist the NNSA in meeting its mission and goals. Technology alone does not give a competitive advantage to the country, but the creativity and speed with which it is employed does. For a company to succeed, it must have sustainable competitive advantages in seven key areas: geography, products and businesses, distribution, sales and service culture, efficiency, brand, and most important, people. The four strategic goals of the plan are to: 1. Identify and recruit small businesses with technology applications for national security. 2. Design and implement a national security incubator program that provides incubator services and physical space for the targeted businesses. 3. Provide business assistance and technical leadership to NSTI clients to assist in bringing their products to market. 4. Construct a new multi-tenant facility with dedicated physical space for businesses with technology applications for national security.

  12. Cybersecurity Your Best Defense Against

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    Corporate and Governmental Chief Information Security Officers (CISO) are under increased scrutiny Training Centers Corporate and Governmental Chief Information Security Officers (CISO) are under increased

  13. Security Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Security Policy analyzes, develops and interprets safeguards and security policy governing national security functions and the protection of related critical assets entrusted to the...

  14. Lessons Learned at the Nevada National Security Site Implementing the EFCOG Activity-level Work Planning and Control Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Steele Coddington, Work Planning Manager, National Security Technologies, Nevada National Security Site. Lessons Learned Implementing Work Planning & Control. 6 Step Process for improving WP&C.

  15. The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    technical support and know-how to National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Defense Nuclear, and other national priorities. Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC, (B&W Y-12) is the NNSA employees of B&W Y-12, NNSA, Wackenhut Services (NNSA's security services contractor), other DOE contractors

  16. The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of technical support to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, and other national priorities. Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) is the NNSA,000 people work on site, including employees of B&W Y-12, NNSA, Wackenhut Services (NNSA's security services

  17. The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Program; · provision of fuel & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) is the NNSA's management and operating contractor of B&W Y-12, NNSA, Wackenhut Services (NNSA's security services contractor), other DOE contractors

  18. Thesis / Dissertation Defense Announcement and Scheduling Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Thesis / Dissertation Defense Announcement and Scheduling Form Completed form must be received of the following: Thesis Defense Dissertation Defense Public Seminar Only Thesis/Dissertation Associate Dean Only Thesis/Dissertation/Seminar location and time listed above is: Confirmed

  19. Accumulating Automata and Cascaded Equations Automata for Communicationless Information Theoretically Secure Multi-Party Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    number 428/11), Cabarnit Cyber Security MAGNET Consortium, Grant from the Institute for Future Defense;1 Introduction Secure multi-party computation (MPC) is a powerful concept in secure distributed computing Theoretically Secure Multi-Party Computation (Preliminary Report) Shlomi Dolev1 and Niv Gilboa2 and Ximing Li1 1

  20. Economic Incentives of Providing Network Security Services Journal of Information Technology Management 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Economic Incentives of Providing Network Security Services Journal of Information Technology Management 1 THE ECONOMIC INCENTIVES OF PROVIDING NETWORK SECURITY SERVICES ON THE INTERNET INFRASTRUCTURE Li in the economic incentives inherent in providing the defenses as well as uncertainty in current defenses. We

  1. Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan Colon Container Terminal (CCT) Panama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newhouse, Robert N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report on the Operational Testing and Evaluation to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the Second Line of Defense (SLD) mission requirements. An SLD system is defined as the detection technology and associated equipment, the system operators from the host country, the standard operating procedures (SOPs), and other elements such as training and maintenance which support long-term system sustainment. To this end, the activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports System can be operated effectively in real-time by Panama Direccion General de Aduanas (DGA Panama Customs) personnel to the standards of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA).

  2. Mitigating container security risk using real-time monitoring with active Radio Frequency Identification and sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlesinger, Adam Ian

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global village in which we live enables increased trade and commerce across regions but also brings a complicated new set of challenges such as terrorist activity, human and drug smuggling and theft in foreign or ...

  3. Toward directed energy planetary defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubin, Philip

    Asteroids and comets that cross Earth’s orbit pose a credible risk of impact, with potentially severe disturbances to Earth and society. We propose an orbital planetary defense system capable of heating the surface of ...

  4. Potential Collaborative Research topics with Korea’s Agency for Defense Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, Charles R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D. [Univ. of California, San Diego

    2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides a high level summary of current research activities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)-University of California Jacobs School of Engineering (UCSD) Engineering Institute that will be presented at Korea's Agency for Defense Development (ADD). These research activities are at the basic engineering science level with different level of maturity ranging from initial concepts to field proof-of-concept demonstrations. We believe that all of these activities are appropriate for collaborative research activities with ADD subject to approval by each institution. All the activities summarized herein have the common theme that they are multi-disciplinary in nature and typically involved the integration of high-fidelity predictive modeling, advanced sensing technologies and new development in information technology. These activities include: Wireless Sensor Systems, Swarming Robot sensor systems, Advanced signal processing (compressed sensing) and pattern recognition, Model Verification and Validation, Optimal/robust sensor system design, Haptic systems for large-scale data processing, Cyber-physical security for robots, Multi-source energy harvesting, Reliability-based approaches to damage prognosis, SHMTools software development, and Cyber-physical systems advanced study institute.

  5. Information Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Security Program and set forth policies, procedures and responsibilities for the protection and control of classified and sensitive information. The Information Security Program is a system of elements which serve to deter collection activities, This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 471.2 of 9-28-1995.

  6. Cyber Security

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Associate CIO for Cyber Security (IM-30) Rod Turk Deputy Associate CIO for Cyber Security (IM-30) Michael Maraya Incident Management Division (IM-32) Rob Ciochon Director Policy,...

  7. information security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty listing for "information security" ... 1167; Phone: +1 765 49-46022; Email: wagstaff@purdue.edu; Research Interests: number theory, information security.

  8. Security Informatics Research Challenges for Mitigating Cyber Friendly Fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Thomas E.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses cognitive implications and research needs surrounding the problem of cyber friendly re (FF). We dene cyber FF as intentional o*ensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission e*ectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. We describe examples of cyber FF and discuss how it ts within a general conceptual framework for cyber security failures. Because it involves human failure, cyber FF may be considered to belong to a sub-class of cyber security failures characterized as unintentional insider threats. Cyber FF is closely related to combat friendly re in that maintaining situation awareness (SA) is paramount to avoiding unintended consequences. Cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system and its nodes, the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive and o*ensive countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. We describe a test bed designed to support empirical research on factors a*ecting cyber FF. Finally, we discuss mitigation strategies to combat cyber FF, including both training concepts and suggestions for decision aids and visualization approaches.

  9. Toward a defense-dominated world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maintaining the large-scale peace in a defense-dominated world necessarily will require not only passive but also active defenses against large-scale aggression that are technically feasible, practical and easy to employ -- and robust against perversion into support of aggression. Such peace maintenance tool-sets will feature means for effectively rebuking aggression as well as providing timely and very widely available seaming of aggression underway anywhere. This report discusses the technology base which currently exists to provide world-wide, high-quality imagery at moderate (5--10 meter) spatial resolution or imagery of 1% of the Earth`s land surface at high ({le} 1 meter) resolution no less frequently than daily, at a total cost of the order of $1 B, with operational capability in the later `90s. Such systems could provide timely warning of aggressive actions anywhere. Similarly, space-based means of defeating aggression conducted with even quite short-range ballistic missiles anywhere in the world could be brought into existence by the end of the `90s for a total cost of about $10 B, and small high-altitude, long flight-duration robotic aircraft carrying high-performance sensors and interceptor missilery could provide both seaming and active defenses against attacks conducted with very short range ballistic missiles, as well as attacks launched with air-breathing threats such as bombers and cruise missiles, for a cost per defended area of the order of $10/km{sup 2}. It appears that all of the associated sensors can find apt dual-use as high-performance systems for monitoring physical aspects of the human environment.

  10. Stopping the Insider Threat: the case for implementing integrated autonomic defense mechanisms in computing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Stopping the Insider Threat: the case for implementing integrated autonomic defense mechanisms that are inseparable from the systems that are being defended. 1. Introduction Threats to the security of an information system may be initiated from either outside or from within an organization. Detecting such threats

  11. Energy Security | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through these relationships that will transition into technologies that address DOE Roadmap challenges. R&D Activities: Real-time digital simulator Advanced security...

  12. A Method for Estimating the Financial Impact of Cyber Information Security Breaches Utilizing the Common Vulnerability Scoring System and Annual Loss Expectancy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Michael B.

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Information security is relatively new field that is experiencing rapid growth in terms of malicious attack frequency and the amount of capital that firms must spend on attack defense. This rise in security expenditures has prompted corporate...

  13. China’s Defense Electronics Industry: Innovation, Adaptation, and Espionage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulvenon, James; Luce, Matthew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010 China’s Defense Electronics Industry: Innovation,of the Chinese defense electronics sector can be attributedAdvanced defense electronics components and systems play a

  14. Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deforest, Thomas J.; VanDyke, Damon S.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica was written for the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The purpose of the Operational Testing and Evaluation (OT&E) phase of the project is to prepare for turnover of the Megaports system supplied by U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) located at the Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) of the Port of Kingston, Jamaica to the Government of Jamaica (GOJ). Activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports system can be operated effectively in real time by Jamaica Customs and KCT personnel to the satisfaction of the DOE/NNSA. These activities will also determine if the Megaports system, as installed and accepted, is performing according to the Megaports Program objectives such that the system is capable of executing the mission of the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The OT&E phase of the project also provides an opportunity to consider potential improvements to the system and to take remedial action if performance deficiencies are identified during the course of evaluation. Changes to the system should be considered under an appropriate change-control process. DOE/NNSA will determine that OT&E is complete by examining whether the Megaports system is performing as intended and that the GOJ is fully capable of operating the system independently without continued onsite support from the U.S. team.

  15. A Historical Evaluation of the U16a Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Roberrt C [DRI; Drollinger, Harold [DRI

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U16a Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U16a Tunnel was used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Shoshone Mountain in Area 16 of the Nevada National Security Site. Six nuclear tests were conducted in the U16a Tunnel from 1962 to 1971. These tests are Marshmallow, Gum Drop, Double Play, Ming Vase, Diamond Dust, and Diamond Mine. The U.S. Department of Defense Threat Reduction Agency, with participation from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Las Alamos National Laboratory, sponsored the tests. Fifteen high explosives tests were also conducted at the tunnel. Two were calibration tests during nuclear testing and the remaining were U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency tunnel defeat tests. The U16a Tunnel complex is on the top and slopes of Shoshone Mountain, encompassing an area of approximately 16.7 hectares (41.1 acres). Major modifications to the landscape are a result of three principal activities, road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, and site preparation for activities related to testing. Forty-seven cultural features were recorded at the portal and on the slopes of Shoshone Mountain. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general every day operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, equipment pads, and rail lines. Features on the slopes above the tunnel relate to tunnel ventilation, borehole drilling, and data recording. Feature types include soil-covered bunkers, concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, and ventilation shafts. The U16a Tunnel complex is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under criteria a and c, consideration g of 36 CFR Part 60.4 as a historic landscape. Scientific research conducted at the tunnel has made significant contributions to the broad patterns of our history, particularly in regard to the Cold War era that was characterized by competing social, economic, and political ideologies between the former Soviet Union and the United States. The tunnel also possesses distinctive construction and engineering methods for conducting underground nuclear tests. The Desert Research Institute recommends that the U16a Tunnel area be left in place in its current condition and that the U16a Tunnel historic landscape be included in the Nevada National Security Site monitoring program and monitored on a regular basis.

  16. A Historical Evaluation of the U16a Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, robert C [DRI; Drollinger, Harold [DRI; Bullard, Thomas F [DRI; Ashbaugh, Laurence J [DRI; Griffin, Wayne R [DRI

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U16a Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U16a Tunnel was used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Shoshone Mountain in Area 16 of the Nevada National Security Site. Six nuclear tests were conducted in the U16a Tunnel from 1962 to 1971. These tests are Marshmallow, Gum Drop, Double Play, Ming Vase, Diamond Dust, and Diamond Mine. The U.S. Department of Defense Threat Reduction Agency, with participation from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Las Alamos National Laboratory, sponsored the tests. Fifteen high explosives tests were also conducted at the tunnel. Two were calibration tests during nuclear testing and the remaining were U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency tunnel defeat tests. The U16a Tunnel complex is on the top and slopes of Shoshone Mountain, encompassing an area of approximately 16.7 hectares (41.1 acres). Major modifications to the landscape are a result of three principal activities, road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, and site preparation for activities related to testing. Forty-seven cultural features were recorded at the portal and on the slopes of Shoshone Mountain. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general every day operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, equipment pads, and rail lines. Features on the slopes above the tunnel relate to tunnel ventilation, borehole drilling, and data recording. Feature types include soil-covered bunkers, concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, and ventilation shafts. The U16a Tunnel complex is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under criteria a and c, consideration g of 36 CFR Part 60.4 as a historic landscape. Scientific research conducted at the tunnel has made significant contributions to the broad patterns of our history, particularly in regard to the Cold War era that was characterized by competing social, economic, and political ideologies between the former Soviet Union and the United States. The tunnel also possesses distinctive construction and engineering methods for conducting underground nuclear tests. The Desert Research Institute recommends that the U16a Tunnel area be left in place in its current condition and that the U16a Tunnel historic landscape be included in the Nevada National Security Site monitoring program and monitored on a regular basis.

  17. National Center for Nuclear Security: The Nuclear Forensics Project (F2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klingensmith, A. L.

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    These presentation visuals introduce the National Center for Nuclear Security. Its chartered mission is to enhance the Nation’s verification and detection capabilities in support of nuclear arms control and nonproliferation through R&D activities at the NNSS. It has three focus areas: Treaty Verification Technologies, Nonproliferation Technologies, and Technical Nuclear Forensics. The objectives of nuclear forensics are to reduce uncertainty in the nuclear forensics process & improve the scientific defensibility of nuclear forensics conclusions when applied to nearsurface nuclear detonations. Research is in four key areas: Nuclear Physics, Debris collection and analysis, Prompt diagnostics, and Radiochemistry.

  18. Metaphors for cyber security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Judy Hennessey; Parrott, Lori K.; Karas, Thomas H.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is based upon a workshop, called 'CyberFest', held at Sandia National Laboratories on May 27-30, 2008. Participants in the workshop came from organizations both outside and inside Sandia. The premise of the workshop was that thinking about cyber security from a metaphorical perspective could lead to a deeper understanding of current approaches to cyber defense and perhaps to some creative new approaches. A wide range of metaphors was considered, including those relating to: military and other types of conflict, biological, health care, markets, three-dimensional space, and physical asset protection. These in turn led to consideration of a variety of possible approaches for improving cyber security in the future. From the proposed approaches, three were formulated for further discussion. These approaches were labeled 'Heterogeneity' (drawing primarily on the metaphor of biological diversity), 'Motivating Secure Behavior' (taking a market perspective on the adoption of cyber security measures) and 'Cyber Wellness' (exploring analogies with efforts to improve individual and public health).

  19. second line of defense | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development ofrluyendiNeedModeling2010second line of

  20. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » Contact Us Contact UsEnergyOak7.2Energy Cyber

  1. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel visits Sandia | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3 | NationalSUBSCRIBE:|

  2. 2013 NNSA Defense Programs Science Council | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,EnrichedSupplemental DirectivesWorkNNSA News â—‹

  3. 2015 NNSA Defense Programs Science Council | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,EnrichedSupplemental DirectivesWorkNNSA News

  4. Defense Programs lecture series continue | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office of

  5. NPO recognized by Defense Programs | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERAL EMPLOYEEAdministration

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Defense Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratorySoftware100LifeAnnouncementsLocationsand

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Defense Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratorySoftware100LifeAnnouncementsLocationsandand

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Defense Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear

  9. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013 Sanyo:March 2013) 1Department ofReserveEnergy

  10. Security & Defense Licenses Available | Tech Transfer | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is Taking OverEvaluating ' M M

  11. Technical cooperation on nuclear security between the United States and China : review of the past and opportunities for the future.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States and China are committed to cooperation to address the challenges of the next century. Technical cooperation, building on a long tradition of technical exchange between the two countries, can play an important role. This paper focuses on technical cooperation between the United States and China in the areas of nonproliferation, arms control and other nuclear security topics. It reviews cooperation during the 1990s on nonproliferation and arms control under the U.S.-China Arms Control Exchange, discusses examples of ongoing activities under the Peaceful Uses of Technology Agreement to enhance security of nuclear and radiological material, and suggests opportunities for expanding technical cooperation between the defense nuclear laboratories of both countries to address a broader range of nuclear security topics.

  12. Personnel Security Activities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes requirements to ensure that individuals are processed for, granted, and maintain a DOE access authorization only when their official duties require such access. Cancels DOE O 472.1

  13. Personnel Security Activities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes requirements to ensure that individuals are processed for, granted, and retain a DOE access authorization only when required. DOE N 251.47, dated 08/14/02, extends this directive until 05/14/03. Cancels DOE 472.1A and DOE 472.1 Chg 1.

  14. Information Security: Coordination of Federal Cyber Security...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Security: Coordination of Federal Cyber Security Research and Development Information Security: Coordination of Federal Cyber Security Research and Development GAO recommends that...

  15. Evaluation Report on "The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry experts report that security challenges and threats are continually evolving as malicious activity has become more web-based and attackers are able to rapidly adapt their attack methods. In addition, the number of data breaches continues to rise. In an effort to mitigate and address threats and protect valuable information, the Department of Energy anticipated spending about $275 million in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 to implement cyber security measures necessary to protect its information technology resources. These systems and data are designed to support the Department's mission and business lines of energy security, nuclear security, scientific discovery and innovation, and environmental responsibility. The Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 (FISMA) provides direction to agencies on the management and oversight of information security risks, including design and implementation of controls to protect Federal information and systems. As required by FISMA, the Office of Inspector General conducts an annual independent evaluation to determine whether the Department's unclassified cyber security program adequately protects its information systems and data. This memorandum and the attached report present the results of our evaluation for FY 2009. The Department continued to make incremental improvements in its unclassified cyber security program. Our evaluation disclosed that most sites had taken action to address weaknesses previously identified in our FY 2008 evaluation report. They improved certification and accreditation of systems; strengthened configuration management of networks and systems; performed independent assessments; and, developed and/or refined certain policies and procedures. In addition, the Department instituted a centralized incident response organization designed to eliminate duplicative efforts throughout the Department. As we have noted in previous reports, the Department continued to maintain strong network perimeter defenses against malicious intruders and other externals threats. These are positive accomplishments. However, in our judgment, additional action is required to further enhance the Department's unclassified cyber security program and help reduce risks to its systems and data. For example, our current review identified opportunities for improvements in areas such as security planning and testing, systems inventory, access controls, and configuration management. In particular, we issued a number of findings at sites managed by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). We also identified weaknesses across various Department program elements. Issues that warrant further attention include: (1) Weaknesses such as outdated security plans and not completing annual security control self-assessments were identified at several sites; (2) The Department had not yet resolved systems inventory issues and had yet to deploy a complex-wide automated asset management tool to help track information technology resources and identify interfaces between systems or networks; (3) Although certain improvements had been made to enhance access controls, we noted deficiencies such as a lack of periodic account reviews and inadequate password management at a number of sites; and (4) Previously identified weaknesses in configuration management had been corrected, however, we found problems related to weak administrator account settings and failure to install software patches, as well as incomplete implementation of the Federal Desktop Core Configuration. These internal control weaknesses existed, at least in part, because certain cyber security roles and responsibilities were not clearly delineated. Program officials also had not effectively performed monitoring and review activities essential for evaluating the adequacy of cyber security performance. In some cases, officials had not ensured that weaknesses discovered during audits and other evaluations were recorded and tracked to resolution in the organizations' Plans of Action and Milestones. Our testing disclosed that about 39 p

  16. Building Stakeholder Trust: Defensible Government Decisions - 13110

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin, Victor A. [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Bldg. 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Bldg. 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administrative decisions must be grounded in reasonable expectations, founded on sound principles, and bounded by societal norms. Without these first principles, attaining and retaining public trust is a Herculean task. Decisions made by governmental administrators must be both transparent and defensible: without the former the agency will lose the public's trust and support (possibly prompting a legal challenge to the decision) and without the latter the decision may fail to withstand judicial scrutiny. This presentation and accompanying paper delves into the process by which governmental decisions can achieve both defensibility and openness through building stakeholder trust with transparency. Achieving and maintaining stakeholder trust is crucial, especially in the environs of nuclear waste management. Proving confidence, stability, and security to the surrounding citizenry as well as those throughout the country is the goal of governmental nuclear waste remediation. Guiding administrative decision-making processes and maintaining a broad bandwidth of communication are of incalculable importance to all those charged with serving the public, but are especially essential to those whose decisional impacts will be felt for millennia. A strong, clear, and concise administrative record documenting discrete decisions and overarching policy choices is the strongest defense to a decisional challenge. However, this can be accomplished using transparency as the fundamental building block. This documentation allows the decision-makers to demonstrate the synthesis of legal and technical challenges and fortifies the ground from which challenges will be defended when necessary. Further, administrative actions which capture the public's interest and captivate that interest throughout the process will result in a better-informed, more deeply-involved, and more heavily-invested group of interested parties. Management of information, involvement, and investment on the front-end of the process reaps rewards far more efficiently than attempts to assuage and mitigate the concerns of those parties after the fact and there are a number of tools Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has deployed that render transparency an ally in this context. The makers, applicators, and beneficiaries of policies and decisions will all benefit from strong administrative records which document decisional choices in an open and transparent manner and from timely, up-front management of concerns of interested parties. The strongest defense to decisional challenges is an ability to demonstrate the basis of the decision and the reason(s) that the decision was chosen over other alternatives. Providing a sound basis for defending challenges rather than avoiding or fighting over them allows the deciding entity the greatest opportunity to produce value for its customer. Often, a transparent process that invites public participation and is open for public review and comment will thwart challenge genesis. An entity that has to devote resources to defending its choices obviously cannot utilize those resources to further its mission. (authors)

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Defense Mission (S&T)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tagged with: BATLab * batteries * Batteries & Energy Storage * Batteries and Energy Storage * Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory * Defense Mission * Department of Defense *...

  18. Utility Security & Resiliency: Working Together

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—discusses Edison Electric Institute (EEI), including its key security objectives, key activities, cybersecurity activities, and spare transformer equipment program (STEP).

  19. Cyber Security & Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the impacts of long-term power shortages from the destruction of critical electric infrastructure. ? A Hitachi factory north of Tokyo that makes 60% of the world?s supply of airflow sensors was shut down. This caused General Motors to shut a plant... at The University of Texas at Dallas ? Next Generation Control Systems ? Trustworthy Cyber Infrastructure for the Power Grid ? Active Defense Systems ? System Vulnerability Assessments ? Grid Test Bed ? Integrated Risk Analysis ? Modeling and Simulation...

  20. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers’ Council

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level radioactive waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures.

  1. defense

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A en6/%2A en2/%2A

  2. Final Report for Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Glenn A.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report records the work and contributions of the NITRD-funded Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies project performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory under the technical guidance of the National Security Agency’s R6 division. The project has incorporated a number of bio-inspired cyber defensive technologies within an elastic framework provided by the Digital Ants. This project has created the first scalable, real-world prototype of the Digital Ants Framework (DAF)[11] and integrated five technologies into this flexible, decentralized framework: (1) Ant-Based Cyber Defense (ABCD), (2) Behavioral Indicators, (3) Bioinformatic Clas- sification, (4) Moving-Target Reconfiguration, and (5) Ambient Collaboration. The DAF can be used operationally to decentralize many such data intensive applications that normally rely on collection of large amounts of data in a central repository. In this work, we have shown how these component applications may be decentralized and may perform analysis at the edge. Operationally, this will enable analytics to scale far beyond current limitations while not suffering from the bandwidth or computational limitations of centralized analysis. This effort has advanced the R6 Cyber Security research program to secure digital infrastructures by developing a dynamic means to adaptively defend complex cyber systems. We hope that this work will benefit both our client’s efforts in system behavior modeling and cyber security to the overall benefit of the nation.

  3. Optimal Resource Allocation for Security in Reliability Systems M. N. Azaiez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    systems, about protecting nuclear power plants against terrorist attacks or sabotage, or about ensuring, the threat is usually assumed to be static, rather than responding in an adaptive way to the defenses to defense against intentional threats to security have dealt either with components in isolation (Major

  4. Abstract--Network security against possible attacks involves making decisions under uncertainty. Not only may one be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ], security in wireless networks [12], [13] and cyber-security [14], [15], [16]. In [17] the readers can find1 Abstract--Network security against possible attacks involves making decisions under uncertainty for a further DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) botnet attack on servers). Due to limited defense

  5. The climate change and energy security nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Marcus Dubois [George Washington University; Gulledge, Jay [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the impacts of climate change on national and interna-tional security has grown as a research field, particularly in the last five years. Within this broad field, academic scholarship has concentrated primarily on whether climate change is, or may become, a driver of violent conflict. This relationship remains highly contested. However, national security policy and many non-governmental organizations have identified climate change as a threat multiplier in conflict situations. The U.S. Department of Defense and the United Kingdom's Ministry of Defense have incorporated these findings into strategic planning documents such as the Quadrennial Defense Review and the Strategic Defence and Security Review. In contrast to the climate-conflict nexus, our analysis found that academic scholarship on the climate change and energy security nexus is small and more disciplinarily focused. In fact, a search of social science litera-ture found few sources, with a significant percentage of these works attribut-able to a single journal. Assuming that policymakers are more likely to rely on broader social science literature than technical or scientific journals, this leaves a limited foundation. This then begged the question: what are these sources? We identified a body of grey literature on the nexus of climate change and energy security of a greater size than the body of peer-reviewed social science literature. We reviewed fifty-eight recent reports, issue briefs, and transcripts to better understand the nexus of climate change and energy security, as well as to gain insight about the questions policymakers need answered by those undertaking the research. In this article, we describe the nature of the sources reviewed, highlight possible climate change and energy security linkages found within those sources, identify emerging risks, and offer conclusions that can guide further research.

  6. Dynamic defense workshop : from research to practice.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason J.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  7. Civil defense implications of nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Broyles, A.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Possible effects of Nuclear Winter on the world's population are summarized. The implications of these effects for strategic weapons planning and civil defense measures are discussed. (ACR)

  8. Foundations of a defense digital platform : business systems governance in the Department of Defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegler, Dustin P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010, the United States Department of Defense (DoD) spent more than $35 billion on information systems development and sustainment, with nearly $7 billion to defense business systems investments alone. It is not surprising ...

  9. Defense Experimentation and Stockpile Stewardship

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary mission of the site is to help ensure that the nation's nuclear weapon stockpile remains safe, secure and reliable. The stockpile stewardship program, working with the national weapons laboratories conducts a wide range of experiments using advanced diagnostic technologies, many of which were developed right here at the NNSS.

  10. Defense Experimentation and Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary mission of the site is to help ensure that the nation's nuclear weapon stockpile remains safe, secure and reliable. The stockpile stewardship program, working with the national weapons laboratories conducts a wide range of experiments using advanced diagnostic technologies, many of which were developed right here at the NNSS.

  11. Verifying the secure setup of Unix client/servers and detection of network intrusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feingold, R.; Bruestle, H.R.; Bartoletti, T.; Saroyan, A.; Fisher, J.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes our technical approach to developing and delivering Unix host- and network-based security products to meet the increasing challenges in information security. Today`s global ``Infosphere`` presents us with a networked environment that knows no geographical, national, or temporal boundaries, and no ownership, laws, or identity cards. This seamless aggregation of computers, networks, databases, applications, and the like store, transmit, and process information. This information is now recognized as an asset to governments, corporations, and individuals alike. This information must be protected from misuse. The Security Profile Inspector (SPI) performs static analyses of Unix-based clients and servers to check on their security configuration. SPI`s broad range of security tests and flexible usage options support the needs of novice and expert system administrators alike. SPI`s use within the Department of Energy and Department of Defense has resulted in more secure systems, less vulnerable to hostile intentions. Host-based information protection techniques and tools must also be supported by network-based capabilities. Our experience shows that a weak link in a network of clients and servers presents itself sooner or later, and can be more readily identified by dynamic intrusion detection techniques and tools. The Network Intrusion Detector (NID) is one such tool. NID is designed to monitor and analyze activity on an Ethernet broadcast Local Area Network segment and produce transcripts of suspicious user connections. NID`s retrospective and real-time modes have proven invaluable to security officers faced with ongoing attacks to their systems and networks.

  12. Global security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, Patrick

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Patrick Lynch helps technical staff, academic leaders and governments around the world improve the safety and security of their nuclear power programs.

  13. Global security

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lynch, Patrick

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Patrick Lynch helps technical staff, academic leaders and governments around the world improve the safety and security of their nuclear power programs.

  14. AP1000 Design for Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, L.B. [Southern Nuclear Operating Company, 40 Inverness Center Parkway, Birmingham, AL 35242 (United States); Cummins, W.E.; Winters, J.W. [Westinghouse Electric Company, 4350 Northern Pike, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power plants are protected from potential security threats through a combination of robust structures around the primary system and other vital equipment, security systems and equipment, and defensive strategy. The overall objective for nuclear power plant security is to protect public health and safety by ensuring that attacks or sabotage do not challenge the ability to safely shutdown the plant or protect from radiological releases. In addition, plants have systems, features and operational strategies to cope with external conditions, such as loss of offsite power, which could be created as part of an attack. Westinghouse considered potential security threats during design of the AP1000 PWR. The differences in plant configuration, safety system design, and safe shutdown equipment between existing plants and AP1000 affect potential vulnerabilities. This paper provides an evaluation of AP1000 with respect to vulnerabilities to security threats. The AP1000 design differs from the design of operating PWRs in the US in the configuration and the functional requirements for safety systems. These differences are intentional departures from conventional PWR designs which simplify plant design and enhance overall safety. The differences between the AP1000 PWR and conventional PWRs can impact vulnerabilities to security threats. The NRC addressed security concerns as part of their reviews for AP1000 Design Certification, and did not identify any security issues of concern. However, much of the detailed security design information for the AP1000 was deferred to the combined Construction and Operating License (COL) phase as many of the security issues are site-specific. Therefore, NRC review of security issues related to the AP1000 is not necessarily complete. Further, since the AP1000 plant design differs from existing PWRs, it is not obvious that the analyses and assessments prepared for existing plants also apply to the AP1000. We conclude that, overall, the AP1000 is less vulnerable to security threats such as malevolent use of vehicles (land, water or air), than are conventional PWRs. Further, the AP1000 is less vulnerable to external events (e.g., loss of transmission) than conventional PWRs. For some of the threats evaluated the AP1000 is comparable to conventional PWRs, while for other threats the AP1000 is inherently less vulnerable. (authors)

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 6, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2007 1 Distance-Bounding Based Defense Against

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    -Bounding Based Defense Against Relay Attacks in Wireless Networks Caimu Tang, Member, IEEE, and Dapeng Oliver Wu invulnerable to the relay attack. We propose to use the order statistic for the detection of relay attackers outlier test. I. INTRODUCTION RECENT years have witnessed the urgent needs to secure networks of low power

  16. Research Associate Position Defense Analysis Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in analyzing social network data as well as geospatial, temporal, and standard statistical analysis of largeResearch Associate Position Defense Analysis Department Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA Research Associate The Department of Defense Analysis is home to the CORE (Common Operational Research

  17. Control System Applicable Use Assessment of the Secure Computing Corporation - Secure Firewall (Sidewinder)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Mark D.; Clements, Samuel L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle’s National Security & Defense objective is, “applying unmatched expertise and unique facilities to deliver homeland security solutions. From detection and protection against weapons of mass destruction to emergency preparedness/response and protection of critical infrastructure, we are working with industry and government to integrate policy, operational, technological, and logistical parameters that will secure a safe future”. In an ongoing effort to meet this mission, engagements with industry that are intended to improve operational and technical attributes of commercial solutions that are related to national security initiatives are necessary. This necessity will ensure that capabilities for protecting critical infrastructure assets are considered by commercial entities in their development, design, and deployment lifecycles thus addressing the alignment of identified deficiencies and improvements needed to support national cyber security initiatives. The Secure Firewall (Sidewinder) appliance by Secure Computing was assessed for applicable use in critical infrastructure control system environments, such as electric power, nuclear and other facilities containing critical systems that require augmented protection from cyber threat. The testing was performed in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) Electric Infrastructure Operations Center (EIOC). The Secure Firewall was tested in a network configuration that emulates a typical control center network and then evaluated. A number of observations and recommendations are included in this report relating to features currently included in the Secure Firewall that support critical infrastructure security needs.

  18. National cyber defense high performance computing and analysis : concepts, planning and roadmap.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Keliiaa, Curtis M.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a national cyber dilemma that threatens the very fabric of government, commercial and private use operations worldwide. Much is written about 'what' the problem is, and though the basis for this paper is an assessment of the problem space, we target the 'how' solution space of the wide-area national information infrastructure through the advancement of science, technology, evaluation and analysis with actionable results intended to produce a more secure national information infrastructure and a comprehensive national cyber defense capability. This cybersecurity High Performance Computing (HPC) analysis concepts, planning and roadmap activity was conducted as an assessment of cybersecurity analysis as a fertile area of research and investment for high value cybersecurity wide-area solutions. This report and a related SAND2010-4765 Assessment of Current Cybersecurity Practices in the Public Domain: Cyber Indications and Warnings Domain report are intended to provoke discussion throughout a broad audience about developing a cohesive HPC centric solution to wide-area cybersecurity problems.

  19. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  20. Security Assessment Simulation Toolkit (SAST) Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meitzler, Wayne D.; Ouderkirk, Steven J.; Hughes, Chad O.

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Defense Technical Support Working Group (DoD TSWG) investment in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Security Assessment Simulation Toolkit (SAST) research planted a technology seed that germinated into a suite of follow-on Research and Development (R&D) projects culminating in software that is used by multiple DoD organizations. The DoD TSWG technology transfer goal for SAST is already in progress. The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), the Defense-wide Information Assurance Program (DIAP), the Marine Corps, Office Of Naval Research (ONR) National Center For Advanced Secure Systems Research (NCASSR) and Office Of Secretary Of Defense International Exercise Program (OSD NII) are currently investing to take SAST to the next level. PNNL currently distributes the software to over 6 government organizations and 30 DoD users. For the past five DoD wide Bulwark Defender exercises, the adoption of this new technology created an expanding role for SAST. In 2009, SAST was also used in the OSD NII International Exercise and is currently scheduled for use in 2010.

  1. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  2. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  3. Transportation Security | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Security SHARE Global Threat Reduction Initiative Transportation Security Cooperation Secure Transport Operations (STOP) Box Security of radioactive material while...

  4. Linton Brooks Assumes Post as Deputy Administrator for NNSA Defense...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administrator for NNSA Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Office Press Release Oct 30, 2001 Linton Brooks Assumes Post as Deputy Administrator for NNSA Defense Nuclear...

  5. Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at Eight Military Installations Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at...

  6. Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Update - Dale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Update - Dale Govan, Departmental Representative to the DNFSB Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Update - Dale Govan,...

  7. Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in...

  8. article defense department: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Description The Department of Defense (DoD) announces the Fiscal Year 2012 Defense University Research Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). Funding Opportunity Title...

  9. Defense, Interior Departments Pursue Renewable Energy on Federal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Defense, Interior Departments Pursue Renewable Energy on Federal Lands Defense, Interior Departments Pursue Renewable Energy on Federal Lands August 8, 2012 - 1:22pm Addthis Solar...

  10. Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

  11. Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

  12. Supervisory Control Strategies for Enhancing System Security and Privacy Christoforos N. Hadjicostis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadjicostis, Christoforos

    cyber-infrastructures (ranging from defense and banking to health care and power distribution sys- temsSupervisory Control Strategies for Enhancing System Security and Privacy Christoforos N. Hadjicostis Abstract-- Enhancing the security and reliability of auto- mated systems that control vital

  13. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of OrderSUBCOMMITTEE of theOctoberNuclear Security

  14. Security Conditions

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice ensures that DOE uniformly meets the requirements of the Homeland Security Advisory System outlined in Homeland Security Presidential Directive-3, Threat Conditions and Associated Protective Measures, dated 3-11-02, and provides responses specified in Presidential Decision Directive 39, U.S. Policy on Counterterrorism (U), dated 6-21-95. It cancels DOE N 473.8, Security Conditions, dated 8-7-02. Extended until 7-7-06 by DOE N 251.64, dated 7-7-05 Cancels DOE N 473.8

  15. Nevada National Security Site Wraps Up 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LAS VEGAS – As 2013 activities come to a close, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) reports several noteworthy accomplishments for the year.

  16. Security Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The position is located in the Office of Environmental Management (EM),Office of Safeguards, Security and Emergency Preparedness (EM-44). The mission of EM-44 is to develop and oversee the...

  17. Personnel Security

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual establishes the overall objectives and requirements for the Department of Energy Personnel Security Program. Cancels DOE M 472.1-1B. Canceled by DOE O 472.2.

  18. Personnel Security

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements for a successful, efficient and cost-effective personnel security program to ensure accurate, timely and equitable determinations of individuals’ eligibility for access to classified information and fitness for placement or retention in national security positions. Cancels DOE M 470.4-5, DOE N 470.4 and DOE N 470.5. Admin Chg 1, 10-8-13.

  19. Information Security

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The protection and control of classified information is critical to our nation’s security. This Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for Department of Energy (DOE) Departmental Elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), to protect and control classified information as required by statutes, regulation, Executive Orders, government-wide policy directives and guidelines, and DOE policy and directives. Cancels DOE M 470.4-4A Chg except for Section D.

  20. An approach to determine a defensible spent fuel ratio.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sabotage of spent nuclear fuel casks remains a concern nearly forty years after attacks against shipment casks were first analyzed and has a renewed relevance in the post-9/11 environment. A limited number of full-scale tests and supporting efforts using surrogate materials, typically depleted uranium dioxide (DUO2), have been conducted in the interim to more definitively determine the source term from these postulated events. In all the previous studies, the postulated attack of greatest interest was by a conical shape charge (CSC) that focuses the explosive energy much more efficiently than bulk explosives. However, the validity of these large-scale results remain in question due to the lack of a defensible Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), defined as the amount of respirable aerosol generated by an attack on a mass of spent fuel compared to that of an otherwise identical DUO2 surrogate. Previous attempts to define the SFR have resulted in estimates ranging from 0.42 to 12 and include suboptimal experimental techniques and data comparisons. Different researchers have suggested using SFR values of 3 to 5.6. Sound technical arguments exist that the SFR does not exceed a value of unity. A defensible determination of the SFR in this lower range would greatly reduce the calculated risk associated with the transport and dry storage of spent nuclear fuel. Currently, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in possession of several samples of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that were used in the original SFR studies in the 1980's and were intended for use in a modern effort at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 2000's. A portion of these samples are being used for a variety of research efforts. However, the entirety of SNF samples at ORNL is scheduled for disposition at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by approximately the end of 2015. If a defensible SFR is to be determined for use in storage and transportation security analyses, the need to begin this effort is urgent in order to secure the only known available SNF samples with a clearly defined path to disposal.

  1. Climate Change and National Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is increasingly recognized as having national security implications, which has prompted dialogue between the climate change and national security communities – with resultant advantages and differences. Climate change research has proven useful to the national security community sponsors in several ways. It has opened security discussions to consider climate as well as political factors in studies of the future. It has encouraged factoring in the stresses placed on societies by climate changes (of any kind) to help assess the potential for state stability. And it has shown that, changes such as increased heat, more intense storms, longer periods without rain, and earlier spring onset call for building climate resilience as part of building stability. For the climate change research community, studies from a national security point of view have revealed research lacunae, for example, such as the lack of usable migration studies. This has also pushed the research community to consider second- and third-order impacts of climate change, such as migration and state stability, which broadens discussion of future impacts beyond temperature increases, severe storms, and sea level rise; and affirms the importance of governance in responding to these changes. The increasing emphasis in climate change science toward research in vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation also frames what the intelligence and defense communities need to know, including where there are dependencies and weaknesses that may allow climate change impacts to result in security threats and where social and economic interventions can prevent climate change impacts and other stressors from resulting in social and political instability or collapse.

  2. Doctoral Defense "Thermal-hydro-mechanical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Doctoral Defense "Thermal-hydro-mechanical model for freezing and thawing soils" Yao Zhang Date been implemented in a finite element system, with a thermal-hydro- mechanical framework being used

  3. A Dynamic Defense Force for Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TAKAHASHI, Sugio

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan Self-Defense Forces (SDF). Along with the new NDPG,set a direction for the SDF in the post-9/11 inter- nationalsituation also requires the SDF take on these “dynamic”

  4. A Comparison Study of Collaborative Strategies for Distributed Defense against Internet Worms based on Small-World Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu

    based on Small-World Modeling Hao Chen, Yu Chen* Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, SUNY threats to the network infrastructure. Distributed defense collaborating with single- point.0 vulnerability, mobile malware, industrial espionage, and attacks from organized crime. Malicious activities

  5. Taxation and Social Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplow, Louis

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Re: Taxation and Social Security Attached is draft chapter11 TAXATION AND SOCIAL SECURITY A substantial fraction ofaspects of social security schemes in a setting in which

  6. Security and Elections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt; Peisert, Sean

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World Conf. Information Security Education, 2007, pp. 17–24;Security andElections IEEE Security & Privacy, 10(5):64–67, Sept. -

  7. CAMPUS SECURITY REPORT 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAMPUS SECURITY REPORT 2009 San Francisco State University University Police Department 1600 & Procedure Concerning Security, Access & Maintenance of Campus Facilities & Weapons Policies........................................................... 6 g. Safety & Security

  8. Best Practices for the Security of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coulter, D.T.; Musolino, S.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is funded under a grant provided by the US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control. The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) awarded a contract to Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop best practices guidance for Office of Radiological Health (ORH) licensees to increase on-site security to deter and prevent theft of radioactive materials (RAM). The purpose of this document is to describe best practices available to manage the security of radioactive materials in medical centers, hospitals, and research facilities. There are thousands of such facilities in the United States, and recent studies suggest that these materials may be vulnerable to theft or sabotage. Their malevolent use in a radiological-dispersion device (RDD), viz., a dirty bomb, can have severe environmental- and economic- impacts, the associated area denial, and potentially large cleanup costs, as well as other effects on the licensees and the public. These issues are important to all Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Agreement State licensees, and to the general public. This document outlines approaches for the licensees possessing these materials to undertake security audits to identify vulnerabilities in how these materials are stored or used, and to describe best practices to upgrade or enhance their security. Best practices can be described as the most efficient (least amount of effort/cost) and effective (best results) way of accomplishing a task and meeting an objective, based on repeatable procedures that have proven themselves over time for many people and circumstances. Best practices within the security industry include information security, personnel security, administrative security, and physical security. Each discipline within the security industry has its own 'best practices' that have evolved over time into common ones. With respect to radiological devices and radioactive-materials security, industry best practices encompass both physical security (hardware and engineering) and administrative procedures. Security regimes for these devices and materials typically use a defense-in-depth- or layered-security approach to eliminate single points of failure. The Department of Energy, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Defense, the American Society of Industrial Security (ASIS), the Security Industry Association (SIA) and Underwriters Laboratory (UL) all rovide design guidance and hardware specifications. With a graded approach, a physical-security specialist can tailor an integrated security-management system in the most appropriate cost-effective manner to meet the regulatory and non-regulatory requirements of the licensee or client.

  9. Safety and Security on Campus 2013 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for the Minneapolis and St. Paul Campuses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Safety and Security on Campus 2013 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for the Minneapolis, active place. Safety and security are important for the thousands of us who live, work, and study here the Twin Cities. But looking out for our safety and security includes us, too. We all have a role to play

  10. Tag: Security | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Tag: Security Displaying 1 - 6 of 6... Category: Security Sheltering in Place If you are advised to shelter-in-place by local news or our website, please follow these...

  11. Information Security

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes security requirements for the protection and control of information and matter required to be classified or controlled by statutes, regulations, or Department of Energy directives. Section E, Technical Surveillance Countermeasures Program, is Official Use Only. Please contact the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security at 301-903-0292 if your official duties require you to have access to this part of the directive. Cancels: DOE M 471.2-1B, DOE M 471.2-1C, DOE M 471.2-4, and DOE O 471.2A

  12. Information Security

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes security requirements for the protection and control of information and matter required to be classified or controlled by statutes, regulations, or Department of Energy directives. Attachment E, Technical Surveillance Countermeasures Program, is for Official Use Only. Contact the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance at 301-903-3653 if your official duties require you to have access to this part of the directive. Cancels: DOE M 471.2-1B, DOE M 471.2-1C, DOE M 471.2-4, and DOE O 471.2A.

  13. Security Rulemaking

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergy SmallImplementingSecurity SymposiumSecuring the Nation's509Department2

  14. Faculty Information Security Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    Faculty Information Security Guide Dartmouth Your information is vitally important to your teaching protect your information. THE DARTMOUTH INFORMATION SECURITY COMMITTEE The Dartmouth Information Security Committee (DISC) meets monthly to assess vulnerabilities of information security, and to develop and revise

  15. SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 2004 SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY PRODUCTS Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology Information technology security prod ucts are essential to better secure infor mation technology (IT) systems

  16. The Smith plan, Texas frontier defense in the 1850's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frysinger, Victor Francis

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - bat the Indians from the annexation of Texas in 1845 up until the departure of General Persifor F . Smith in April, 1856. The early years of statehood were filled with confusion, dis- organization, and disunity as far as frontier defense.... General Smith in Texas, 1851-1856 IV. Aftermath and Evaluation 24 85 Appendix: Status of Forces in Texas, 1851-1856 . 93 Bibliography 105 Vita 113 LIST OF MAPS Map 1 ACTIVE MILITARY POSTS IN TEXAS, 1849 2 THE SMITH PLAN COMPLETED& 1852 3 ACT1VE...

  17. The changing face of Hanford security 1990--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thielman, J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meltdown of the Cold War was a shock to the systems built to cope with it. At the DOE`s Hanford Site in Washington State, a world-class safeguards and security system was suddenly out of step with the times. The level of protection for nuclear and classified materials was exceptional. But the cost was high and the defense facilities that funded security were closing down. The defense mission had created an umbrella of security over the sprawling Hanford Site. Helicopters designed to ferry special response teams to any trouble spot on the 1,456 square-kilometer site made the umbrella analogy almost literally true. Facilities were grouped into areas, fenced off like a military base, and entrance required a badge check for everyone. Within the fence, additional rings of protection were set up around security interests or targets. The security was effective, but costly to operate and inconvenient for employees and visitors alike. Moreover, the umbrella meant that virtually all employees needed a security clearance just to get to work, whether they worked on classified or unclassified projects. Clearly, some fundamental rethinking of safeguards and security was needed. The effort to meet that challenge is the story of transition at Hanford and documented here.

  18. Personnel Security

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes requirements that will enable DOE to operate a successful, efficient, cost-effective personnel security program that will ensure accurate, timely and equitable determinations of individuals’ eligibility for access to classified information and Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Admin Chg 1, 10-8-13.

  19. Information Security

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for Department of Energy (DOE) Departmental Elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), to protect and control classified information as required by statutes, regulation, Executive Orders, government-wide policy directives and guidelines, and DOE policy and directives. Admin Chg 2, dated 5-15-15, cancels Admin Chg 1.

  20. Security Conditions

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure that DOE uniformly meets the protection requirements specified in Presidential Decision Directive 39, "U.S. Policy on Counterterrorism (U)." Attachment 2 is no longer available online. Please e-mail your request for the Attachment to: Security.Directives@hq.doe.gov. DOE N 251.44, dated 05/06/02, extends this directive until 12/31/02.

  1. Transmission Line Security Monitor: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Svoboda

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Transmission Line Security Monitor System Operational Test is a project funded by the Technical Support Working Group (TSWG). TSWG operates under the Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office that functions under the Department of Defense. The Transmission Line Security Monitor System is based on technology developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The technology provides a means for real-time monitoring of physical threats and/or damage to electrical transmission line towers and conductors as well as providing operational parameters to transmission line operators to optimize transmission line operation. The end use is for monitoring long stretches of transmission lines that deliver electrical power from remote generating stations to cities and industry. These transmission lines are generally located in remote transmission line corridors where security infrastructure may not exist. Security and operational sensors in the sensor platform on the conductors take power from the transmission line and relay security and operational information to operations personnel hundreds of miles away without relying on existing infrastructure. Initiated on May 25, 2007, this project resulted in pre-production units tested in realistic operational environments during 2010. A technology licensee, Lindsey Manufacturing of Azusa California, is assisting in design, testing, and ultimately production. The platform was originally designed for a security monitoring mission, but it has been enhanced to include important operational features desired by electrical utilities.

  2. Broad Overview of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Opportunities for Department of Defense Installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, E.; Antkowiak, M.; Butt, R.; Davis, J.; Dean, J.; Hillesheim, M.; Hotchkiss, E.; Hunsberger, R.; Kandt, A.; Lund, J.; Massey, K.; Robichaud, R.; Stafford, B.; Visser, C.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strategic Environmental Research and Developmental Program (SERDP)/Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) is the Department of Defense?s (DOD) environmental science and technology program focusing on issues related to environment and energy for the military services. The SERDP/ESTCP Office requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide technical assistance with strategic planning by evaluating the potential for several types of renewable energy technologies at DOD installations. NREL was tasked to provide technical expertise and strategic advice for the feasibility of geothermal resources, waste-to-energy technology, photovoltaics (PV), wind, microgrids, and building system technologies on military installations. This technical report is the deliverable for these tasks.

  3. Information Security Advisory Information Security, Computing and Information Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    Information Security Advisory Information Security, Computing and Information Services security's IT Security Procedures require that non-public University information, including social security numbers and professional information in a secure and appropriate manner. #12;

  4. Successful Characterization Strategies for the Active High Risk Y-12 National Security Complex 9201-5 (Alpha-5) Facility, Oak Ridge, TN - 12164

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birchfield, Joseph W. III [Link Technologies (United States); Albrecht, Linda [Alliant Corporation (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building 9201-5 (Alpha 5) was completed in May 1944 and served as a production facility for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Y-12 Weapons Plant. During the Manhattan Project, it functioned as a uranium enrichment facility. The facility was renovated and altered over the years, converting the calutrons to support other missions. Alpha 5 consists of 4 floors and a basement measuring approximately 600,000 square feet. The facility contains various pieces of equipment remaining from legacy operations. A significant amount (approximately 200,000 kgs) of mercury (Hg) has been spilled in the facility over the operational history of the building. To further complicate matters, beryllium (Be) contamination in 9201-5 is found throughout approximately sixty percent of the facility. Concentrations varying from very low (< 0.2 micrograms (?g)/100 cm{sup 2}) to areas where concentrations are relatively high, approximately 600 ?g/100 cm{sup 2}, in regulated beryllium areas. The primary site related contaminants (SRCs) for the waste in this facility are enriched uranium, depleted uranium, beryllium and mercury. This facility represents the highest environmental risk for DOE-ORO EM and NNSA at Y-12 and must be quickly addressed to minimize impacts to future Y-12 missions, as well as human health and the environment. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), approximately 700,000 cubic feet of legacy material was removed in 2010 and 2011. In addition, characterization of the 9201-5 facility was scheduled in the winter and spring of 2011. This activity was initiated in January 2011 and was completed in July 2011. Heavy schedule pressure was further complicated by the fact that this building has active utility, security and process systems. Given these complex variables, a unique, out of the box characterization strategy was forged in an effort to bound radiological and chemical contaminants, as well as providing the appropriate level of quality to ensure that this data could be used to develop waste profiles when deactivation, decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities are authorized at a future date. The characterization strategy involved a hybrid model of statistically-based and biased sampling events. To achieve the desired results, traditional intrusive sampling and laboratory analysis, as well as a number of field-based characterization methodologies (e.g., X-ray Fluorescence [XRF], Lumex and Non-Destructive Assay [NDA]) were utilized. Results were captured and synthesized into meaningful, usable conclusions in a facility characterization report that will more accurately aid D and D cost estimates for future remedial actions. This massive characterization campaign involved over 1,200 separate sample locations using 4 separate characterization methods and was successfully completed to meet a performance-based milestone within 8 months of initiation. (authors)

  5. INSTITUTE FOR CYBER SECURITY Security Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    INSTITUTE FOR CYBER SECURITY 1 Security Models: Past, Present and Future Prof. Ravi Sandhu Executive Director and Endowed Chair Institute for Cyber Security University of Texas at San Antonio July 2010 ravi.sandhu@utsa.edu www.profsandhu.com © Ravi Sandhu #12;INSTITUTE FOR CYBER SECURITY 2 THE BIG

  6. INSTITUTE FOR CYBER SECURITY Security Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    INSTITUTE FOR CYBER SECURITY 1 Security Models: Past, Present and Future Prof. Ravi Sandhu Executive Director and Endowed Chair Institute for Cyber Security University of Texas at San Antonio July 2009 ravi.sandhu@utsa.edu www.profsandhu.com © Ravi Sandhu #12;INSTITUTE FOR CYBER SECURITY 2 THE BIG

  7. Security Procedures Caltech Campus Security Dispatch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Security Procedures Caltech Campus Security Dispatch: 5000 (from any Caltech phone) or (626) 395-5000 (from any phone) When emergencies arise, contact Caltech Campus Security MEDICAL If someone experiences a medical emergency: · Remain calm · Notify Campus Security Dispatch · Do NOT move victim EARTHQUAKE When

  8. Security rules versus Security properties Mathieu Jaume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Security rules versus Security properties Mathieu Jaume SPI ­ LIP6 ­ University Pierre & Marie components of security policies can be expressed, and we identify their role in the de- scription of a policy, of a system and of a secure system. In this setting, we formally describe two approaches to define policies

  9. T-592: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Secure Access Control System...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    92: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Secure Access Control System Unauthorized Password Change Vulnerability T-592: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Secure Access Control System...

  10. Using Operational Security (OPSEC) to Support a Cyber Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Using Operational Security (OPSEC) to Support a Cyber Security Culture in Control Systems Environments Using Operational Security (OPSEC) to Support a Cyber Security Culture in...

  11. V-186: Drupal Login Security Module Security Bypass and Denial...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    186: Drupal Login Security Module Security Bypass and Denial of Service Vulnerability V-186: Drupal Login Security Module Security Bypass and Denial of Service Vulnerability June...

  12. Security seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gobeli, Garth W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Security for a package or verifying seal in plastic material is provided by a print seal with unique thermally produced imprints in the plastic. If tampering is attempted, the material is irreparably damaged and thus detectable. The pattern of the imprints, similar to "fingerprints" are recorded as a positive identification for the seal, and corresponding recordings made to allow comparison. The integrity of the seal is proved by the comparison of imprint identification records made by laser beam projection.

  13. Sandia Energy - Installation Energy Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Installation Energy Security Home Stationary Power Grid Modernization Resilient Electric Infrastructures Military Installation Energy Security Installation Energy SecurityTara...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programs provides scientific analyses and programmatic advice to the U.S. Department of Energy in support of defense waste management challenges. Defense waste encompasses...

  15. An alternative to present United States defense strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony, William Wallace

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - hower. Secretary of Defense McNamara adopted this strategio nuclear defense policy because the Dulles policy included brinkmanship, and did. not contain any flexibility in response. The McNamara plan was based on controlled escalation and response...

  16. Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Natural Resources Defense Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Natural Resources Defense Council December 9 Coalition [Nancy Hirsh] Renewable Northwest Project[Rachel Shimshak] Natural Resources Defense Council Power Administration in Power Supply The Northwest Energy Coalition, Renewable Northwest Project, Sierra

  17. Japan’s Approaches to DefenseTransparency: Perspectivesfrom the Japanese and Chinese Defense Establishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fei, John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japanese Self Defense Forces (SDF). Features of the Japaneseissues arise—such as the deployment of the SDF forces toIraq or Maritime SDF to the In- dian Ocean—an ad hoc

  18. Overview of Space Business Space & Integrated Defense Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview of Space Business Space & Integrated Defense Systems Mitsubishi Corporation August 26 in Rio de Janeiro and Belo Horizonte #12;MC's Space Business Involved with aerospace business more than 40 years, covering civil/commercial space business, defense related space business and defense

  19. Office of Secure Transportation Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and Oil ResearchEnergy Office of Oil2 -One-Year6th, 2012

  20. Security Perimeter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook TwitterSearch-Comments Sign InNuclear SecurityUnder Budget

  1. Safety, Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR EMaterialsSafety, Security

  2. Computer Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCHHydrosilylationComputer Security All JLF

  3. A cognitive and economic decision theory for examining cyber defense strategies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bier, Asmeret Brooke

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyber attacks pose a major threat to modern organizations. Little is known about the social aspects of decision making among organizations that face cyber threats, nor do we have empirically-grounded models of the dynamics of cooperative behavior among vulnerable organizations. The effectiveness of cyber defense can likely be enhanced if information and resources are shared among organizations that face similar threats. Three models were created to begin to understand the cognitive and social aspects of cyber cooperation. The first simulated a cooperative cyber security program between two organizations. The second focused on a cyber security training program in which participants interact (and potentially cooperate) to solve problems. The third built upon the first two models and simulates cooperation between organizations in an information-sharing program.

  4. Research and Development | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,Enriched UraniumPhysical Security Systems(PA)About| |AboutDefense

  5. INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY & ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY & ENERGY RESTORATION OFFICE of ELECTRICITY DELIVERY & ENERGY RELIABILITY Delivery and Energy Reliability #12;INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY & ENERGY RESTORATION OFFICE of ELECTRICITY Federal agencies to support waivers and specific response legal authorities #12;INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY

  6. CAMPUS SECURITY CARD REQUISITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAMPUS SECURITY CARD REQUISITION DEPARTMENT LAST NAME GIVEN NAME(S) SFU ID NUMBER CARD NUMBER CAMPUS SECURITY OFFICE USE ONLY SERVICE CHARGE: ___________________________ DEPOSIT be reported or returned to Campus Security TC 050 (291-5448). CARDHOLDER SIGNATURE DATE: #12;

  7. Designing security into software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chang Tony

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When people talk about software security, they usually refer to security applications such as antivirus software, firewalls and intrusion detection systems. There is little emphasis on the security in the software itself. ...

  8. Out-of-Semester Dissertation Defenses In order for a student to have a dissertation defense between semesters (or when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Out-of-Semester Dissertation Defenses In order for a student to have a dissertation defense between semesters (or when the University is not in session), the student who is defending the dissertation must certain that all of the members on the dissertation committee agree to attend the defense on the agreed

  9. FOILFEST :community enabled security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Judy Hennessey; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Whitley, John B.; Drayer, Darryl Donald; Cummings, John C., Jr. (.,; .)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Concepts Group of Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop, ''FOILFest: Community Enabled Security'', on July 18-21, 2005, in Albuquerque, NM. This was a far-reaching look into the future of physical protection consisting of a series of structured brainstorming sessions focused on preventing and foiling attacks on public places and soft targets such as airports, shopping malls, hotels, and public events. These facilities are difficult to protect using traditional security devices since they could easily be pushed out of business through the addition of arduous and expensive security measures. The idea behind this Fest was to explore how the public, which is vital to the function of these institutions, can be leveraged as part of a physical protection system. The workshop considered procedures, space design, and approaches for building community through technology. The workshop explored ways to make the ''good guys'' in public places feel safe and be vigilant while making potential perpetrators of harm feel exposed and convinced that they will not succeed. Participants in the Fest included operators of public places, social scientists, technology experts, representatives of government agencies including DHS and the intelligence community, writers and media experts. Many innovative ideas were explored during the fest with most of the time spent on airports, including consideration of the local airport, the Albuquerque Sunport. Some provocative ideas included: (1) sniffers installed in passage areas like revolving door, escalators, (2) a ''jumbotron'' showing current camera shots in the public space, (3) transparent portal screeners allowing viewing of the screening, (4) a layered open/funnel/open/funnel design where open spaces are used to encourage a sense of ''communitas'' and take advantage of citizen ''sensing'' and funnels are technological tunnels of sensors (the tunnels of truth), (5) curved benches with blast proof walls or backs, (6) making it easy for the public to report, even if not sure/''non-event'' (e.g. ''I'm uncomfortable'') and processing those reports in aggregate not individually, (7) transforming the resident working population into a part-time undercover security/sensor force through more innovative training and (8) adding ambassadors/security that engage in unexpected conversation with the public. The group recommended that we take actions to pursue the following ideas next: (a) A concept for a mobile sensor transport (JMP); (b) Conduct a follow-on workshop; (c) Conduct social experiments/activities to see how people would react to the concepts related to community and security; (d) Explore further aesthetically pleasing, blast-resistance seating areas; and (e) The Art of Freedom (an educational, multi-media campaign).

  10. Cyber Security | National Security | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4Customer-Comments Sign In About |Cyber SecurityCyber

  11. Attack, Defense and Contagion in Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Sanjeev; Vigier, Adrien

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    compromise user privacy and jeopardize the functioning of the entire system.1 As energy, communication, travel, consumer interaction increasingly adopt digital networks, cybersecurity has emerged as a major priority.2 At the heart of these developments... the United States, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is responsible for cybersecurity. Its mission statement reads,“Our daily life, economic vitality, and national security depend on a stable, safe, and resilient cyberspace. We rely on this vast array...

  12. Security & Privacy | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security & Privacy Security & Privacy Privacy Notice We collect no personal information about you without your knowledge when you visit this site, although you may choose to...

  13. Advancing Global Nuclear Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today world leaders gathered at The Hague for the Nuclear Security Summit, a meeting to measure progress and take action to secure sensitive nuclear materials.

  14. Science and Technology Challenges for Homeland Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, C A

    2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Preventing and protecting against catastrophic terrorism is a complex and dynamic challenge. Small groups or individuals can use advanced technology to cause massive destruction, and the rapid pace of technology and ease of information dissemination continually gives terrorists new tools. A 100% defense is not possible. It's a numbers problem--there are simply too many possible targets to protect and too many potential attack scenarios and adversaries to defend against. However, science and technology (S&T) is a powerful force multiplier for defense. We must use S&T to get ahead of the game by making terrorist attacks more difficult to execute, more likely to be interdicted, and less devastating in terms of casualties, economic damage, or lasting disruption. Several S&T areas have potential to significantly enhance homeland security efforts with regard to detecting radiation, pathogens, explosives, and chemical signatures of weapons activities. All of these areas require interdisciplinary research and development (R&D), and many critically depend on advances in materials science. For example, the science of nuclear signatures lies at the core of efforts to develop enhanced radiation detection and nuclear attribution capabilities. Current radiation detectors require cryogenic cooling and are too bulky and expensive. Novel signatures of nuclear decay, new detector materials that provide high resolution at ambient temperatures, and new imaging detectors are needed. Such technologies will improve our ability to detect and locate small, distant, or moving sources and to discriminate threat materials from legitimate sources. A more complete understanding of isotopic ratios via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), NanoSIMS, or yet-to-be-developed technologies is required to elucidate critical characteristics of nuclear materials (e.g., isotopics, age, reprocessing) in order to identify their source and route history. S&T challenges abound in the biodefense arena as well. Improved biodetectors are needed--autonomous instruments that continuously monitor the environment for threat pathogens, promptly alert authorities in the event of a positive detection, and have an extremely low false alarm rate. Because many threat pathogens are endemic to various regions of the world, the natural microbial environment must be characterized so that background detections can be distinguished from a deliberate release. In addition, most current detection approaches require an a priori knowledge of the pathogens of concern and thus won't work in the face of a new, naturally occurring disease, such as a mutated avian influenza that effects humans, or a deliberately manipulated organism. Thus, we must move from species-specific detection to function-based detection based on a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms and genetic markers of infectivity, pathogenicity, antibiotic resistance, and other traits that distinguish a harmful organism from an innocuous one. Last but not least, new vaccines and treatments are needed, which in turn require in-depth understanding of cellular surfaces, protein folding, and myriad nano-bio aspects of host-pathogen interactions. Much attention is being devoted to countering weapons-of-mass-destruction terrorism, since Al-Qaeda and other terrorist groups have repeatedly stated their intention to acquire and use nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons. However, terrorists in Iraq and elsewhere continue to wreak havoc using improvised explosive devices. Thus, there is a pressing security need for better methods for detecting explosive materials and devices. Transformational S&T such as pulsed fast-neutron analysis or terahertz spectroscopy for material- and element-specific imaging offer the promise of greatly improved explosive detection. For bioscience-based approaches, the development of highly multiplexed transducer arrays and molecular recognition methods that mimic biological systems would similarly provide the foundation for vastly improved capabilities. Likewise, new materials an

  15. Natlonal Nuclear Security Admlnlstratlon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Defense Programs and 1 all believe that the management system proposed by Honeywell, together with the relief fiom DOE Directive requirements discussed below, will...

  16. Student Experiential Opportunities in National Security Careers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents student experiential opportunities in national security careers as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), being performed under a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This report includes a brief description of how experiential opportunities assist students in the selection of a career and a list of opportunities in the private sector and government. The purpose of the NSPP is to promote national security technologies through business incubation, technology demonstration and validation, and workforce development. Workforce development activities will facilitate the hiring of students to work with professionals in both the private and public sectors, as well as assist in preparing a workforce for careers in national security. The goal of workforce development under the NSPP grant is to assess workforce needs in national security and implement strategies to develop the appropriate workforce.

  17. 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Plan: Protecting National, Energy, and Economic Security with Advanced Science and Technology and Ensuring Environmental Cleanup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy contributes to the future of the Nation by ensuring energy security, maintaining the safety, security and reliability of the nuclear weapons stockpile, cleaning up the environment from the legacy of the Cold War, and developing innovations in science and technology. After 25 years in existence, the Department now operates 24 preeminent research laboratories and facilities and four power marketing administrations, and manages the environmental cleanup from 50 years of nuclear defense activities that impacted two million acres in communities across the country. The Department has an annual budget of about $23 billion and employs about 14,500 Federal and 100,000 contractor employees. The Department of Energy is principally a national security agency and all of its missions flow from this core mission to support national security. That is true not just today, but throughout the history of the agency. The origins of the Department can be traced to the Manhattan Project and the race to develop the atomic bomb during World War II. Following the war, Congress engaged in a vigorous and contentious debate over civilian versus military control of the atom. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 settled the debate by creating the Atomic Energy Commission, which took over the Manhattan Project’s sprawling scientific and industrial complex.

  18. Cyberspace security system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Ferragut, Erik M

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system evaluates reliability, performance and/or safety by automatically assessing the targeted system's requirements. A cost metric quantifies the impact of failures as a function of failure cost per unit of time. The metrics or measurements may render real-time (or near real-time) outcomes by initiating active response against one or more high ranked threats. The system may support or may be executed in many domains including physical domains, cyber security domains, cyber-physical domains, infrastructure domains, etc. or any other domains that are subject to a threat or a loss.

  19. An Integrated View of Security Analysis and Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldini, Alessandro

    An Integrated View of Security Analysis and Performance Evaluation: Trading QoS with Covert Channel@sti.uniurb.it Abstract. Security analysis and performance evaluation are two funda- mental activities in the system. This is accomplished by proposing a tool-supported methodology that combines noninterference-based security analysis

  20. Security tasks are highly interdependent.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motivation Security tasks are highly interdependent. To improve security tools, we need to understand how security practitioners collaborate in their organizations. Security practitioners in context Exchange of Information Develop security tools that: · Integrate information from different communication

  1. Security Policies Dr. Ahmad Almulhem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almulhem, Ahmad

    Security Policies Dr. Ahmad Almulhem Computer Engineering Department, KFUPM Spring 2008 Ahmad Almulhem - Network Security Engineering - 2008 1 / 51 #12;Security Policies Types of Security Policies Trust Types of Access Control Summary Part I Overview Ahmad Almulhem - Network Security Engineering

  2. Disused Radioactive Sources Secured in Georgia | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of disused high activity sources from the Institute of Radiobiology to a more secure storage facility. As part of NNSA's broader cooperative effort to help prevent nuclear and...

  3. Office of Security Assistance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Security Assistance manages the Technology Deployment Program to improve the security posture of the Department of Energy and the protection of its assets and facilities through the deployment of new safeguards and security technologies and development of advanced technologies that reduce operating costs, save protective force lives, and improve security effectiveness.

  4. Control Systems Security Test Center - FY 2004 Program Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert E. Polk; Alen M. Snyder

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 2004, the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) was established at Idaho National Laboratory to execute assessment activities to reduce the vulnerability of the nation’s critical infrastructure control systems to terrorist attack. The CSSC implements a program to accomplish the five goals presented in the US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security. This report summarizes the first year funding of startup activities and program achievements that took place in FY 2004 and early FY 2005. This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center of the National Cyber Security Division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs federal departments to identify and prioritize the critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the National Cyber Security Division to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems.

  5. MasteringWeb Services Security MasteringWeb Services Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preview of MasteringWeb Services Security Preview of MasteringWeb Services Security Konstantin introduction Highlights of the book Web Services security problem XML Security WS-Security Security mechanisms for ASP.NET Web Services Planning and building secure Web Service systems ­ Architectural and policy

  6. Mass and Elite Views on Nuclear Security: US National Security Surveys 1993-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERRON,KERRY G.; JENKINS-SMITH,HANK C.; HUGHES,SCOTT D.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fourth report in an ongoing series of studies examining how US perspectives about nuclear security are evolving in the post-Cold War era. In Volume 1 the authors present findings from a nationwide telephone survey of randomly selected members of the US general public conducted from 13 September to 14 October 1999. Results are compared to findings from previous surveys in this series conducted in 1993, 1995, and 1997, and trends are analyzed. Key areas of investigation reported in Volume 1 include evolving perceptions of nuclear weapons risks and benefits, preferences for related policy and spending issues, and views about three emerging issue areas: deterrent utility of precision guided munitions; response options to attacks in which mass casualty weapons are used; and expectations about national missile defenses. In this volume they relate respondent beliefs about nuclear security to perceptions of nuclear risks and benefits and to policy preferences. They develop causal models to partially explain key preferences, and they employ cluster analysis to group respondents into four policy relevant clusters characterized by similar views and preferences about nuclear security within each cluster. Systematic links are found among respondent demographic characteristics, perceptions of nuclear risks and benefits, policy beliefs, and security policy and spending preferences. In Volume 2 they provide analysis of in-depth interviews with fifty members of the US security policy community.

  7. ARM - Defensive Shotgun - Remington 870 Operator's Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m Documentation DataDatastreamsxsaprhsrhi Documentation DataAlaskaDefensive Shotgun -

  8. Biofuels in Defense, Aviation, and Marine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10 wt%in Defense, Aviation, and

  9. Sandia Energy - Defense Waste Management Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInApplied &ClimateContact Us HomeDefense

  10. The Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand WaterThe FutureRiskSalt Defense Disposal

  11. Tighter security for electronic information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, T.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Responding to interest expressed by many member utilities, EPRI is launching strategic core research in information security to help companies better protect power system operations, business-sensitive and private customer data, and networks from unauthorized access or use. Although the threat of computer security breaches has been relatively low and isolated in the past and break-ins have been few, the increasing use of networks for various business activities suggests that such risks will rise. EPRI expects to work through an existing strategic alliance with the Department of Energy to tap the expertise of the national laboratories in beefing up utilities` information security systems and practices. This paper describes these potential threats and strategies to combat them.

  12. DOE, NREL Help DoD Enhance Energy Security (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet gives an overview of the technical assistance provided by DOE/NREL to the Department of Defense to advance energy security. Specifically, the fact sheet describes the net zero energy project at the U.S. Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Miramar.

  13. On the Security of the CCM Encryption Mode and of a Slight Variant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouque, Pierre-Alain

    On the Security of the CCM Encryption Mode and of a Slight Variant Pierre-Alain Fouque1 and Gwena.Valette@dga.defense.gouv.fr Abstract. In this paper, we present an analysis of the CCM mode of operations and of a slight variant. CCM important fact is that, while the privacy of CCM is provably garan- teed up to the birthday paradox

  14. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source For Defense New Ventures #12;What is OTEC? OTEC B fiOTEC Benefits: Large Renewable Energy Source 3-5 Terawatts Water Temperature Delta 2 A New Clean Renewable 24/7 Energy Source #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion

  15. NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for...

  16. Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LM visited 84 defense-related legacy uranium mine sites located within 11 uranium mining districts in 6 western states. At these sites, photographs and global positioning...

  17. air defense warfare: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for FORCEnet Cruise Missile Defense by Juan G. Camacho; Lawrence F. Guest; Belen M. Hernandez; Thomas M in Systems Engineering (MSSE) Cohort 5 from the Naval Surface Warfare...

  18. Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds Defense Programs Goals During...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds Defense Programs ... Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds...

  19. DOE weapons laboratories' contributions to the nation's defense technology base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecker, S.S.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The question of how the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons laboratories can contribute to a stronger defense technology base is addressed in testimony before the Subcommittee on Defense Industry and Technology of the Senate Armed Services Committee. The importance of the defense technology base is described, the DOE technology base is also described, and some technology base management and institutional issues are discussed. Suggestions are given for promoting a more stable, long-term relationship between the DOE weapons laboratories and the Department of Defense. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  20. antibacterial host defense: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and to sustain a healthy pregnancy 2. Recent of these defenses by pathogens can lead to pregnancy complications such as preterm labor or vertical transmission Bakardjiev,...

  1. antimicrobial host defense: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and to sustain a healthy pregnancy 2. Recent of these defenses by pathogens can lead to pregnancy complications such as preterm labor or vertical transmission Bakardjiev,...

  2. Headquarters Program Elements/Offices....................................................... Section I Contracting Activities/Offices ........................................................................ Section II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : N/A andrew.freund@hq.doe.gov National Nuclear Security Adm. (NNSA)* 1000 Independence Avenue-7535 nnsa.smallbusiness@nnsa.doe.gov gary.lyttek@nnsa.doe.gov NNSA (NA-10) Defense Program** 1000-1507 marsha.davis@nnsa.doe.gov NNSA (NA-20) Defense Nuclear Non-Pro** 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington

  3. Sandia Energy - Security Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Risk Assessment Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Security Risk Assessment Security Risk Assessmentcwdd2015-05-04T21:...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MonitoringClimate Security Climate Security Climate Security Global reductions in greenhouse gases will eventually be motivated by an international climate treaty and will entail...

  5. Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,Enriched UraniumPhysical| Nationaltechnicalbefore the Housebefore

  6. Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovement of theResponses to PublicHydrogenDepartment

  7. SECURITY ASSESSMENTS: TOOLS FOR MEASURING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SECURITY CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SECURITY ASSESSMENTS: TOOLS FOR MEASURING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SECURITY CONTROLS Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology The selection and implementation of security controls are critical decisions for protecting

  8. Campus Security Report 1 Campus seCurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilmers, Chris

    Campus Security Report 1 Campus seCurity and Fire saFety report UC Santa Cruz 2010 #12;Campus Security Report 2 UC Santa Cruz Geography ........................................................ 8 Security and Access to Campus Buildings and Grounds ........................................ 8

  9. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). CAU 116 consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 consisted of Building 3210 and the attached concrete shield wall. CAS 25-23-20 consisted of the nuclear furnace piping and tanks. Closure activities began in January 2007 and were completed in August 2011. Activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 116 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2008). This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provides data confirming that closure objectives for CAU 116 were met. Site characterization data and process knowledge indicated that surface areas were radiologically contaminated above release limits and that regulated and/or hazardous wastes were present in the facility.

  10. ANNUAL SECURITY FIRE SAFETY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY REPORT OCTOBER 1, 2013 DARTMOUTH COLLEGE http://www.dartmouth.edu/~security/ #12;1 Table of Contents MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR OF SAFETY AND SECURITY................................................................................................................................................................... 7 ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT

  11. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of climate change, energy security and economic stability.DoD is improving U.S. energy security and national security.www.greenpacks.org • Energy Security & Climate Change:

  12. Defense of Trust Management Vulnerabilities in Distributed Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yan Lindsay

    Defense of Trust Management Vulnerabilities in Distributed Networks Yan (Lindsay) Sun , Zhu Han into distributed networks, the vulnerabilities in trust establishment methods, and the defense mechanisms. Five networks inherently rely on cooper- ation among distributed entities. However, coopera- tion is fragile

  13. EIS-0082: Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Defense Waste and Byproducts Management developed this EIS to provide environmental input into both the selection of an appropriate strategy for the permanent disposal of the high-level radioactive waste currently stored at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) and the subsequent decision to construct and operate a Defense Waste Processing Facility at the SRP site.

  14. History of Hanford Site Defense Production (Brief)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M S

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper acquaints the audience with the history of the Hanford Site, America's first full-scale defense plutonium production site. The paper includes the founding and basic operating history of the Hanford Site, including World War II construction and operations, three major postwar expansions (1947-55), the peak years of production (1956-63), production phase downs (1964-the present), a brief production spurt from 1984-86, the end of the Cold War, and the beginning of the waste cleanup mission. The paper also delineates historical waste practices and policies as they changed over the years at the Hanford Site, past efforts to chemically treat, ''fractionate,'' and/or immobilize Hanford's wastes, and resulting major waste legacies that remain today. This paper presents original, primary-source research into the waste history of the Hanford Site. Finally, the paper places the current Hanford Site waste remediation endeavors in the broad context of American and world history.

  15. Office of Information Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Information Security is responsible for implementation of the Classified Matter Protection and Control Program (CMPC), the Operations Security Program (OPSEC) and the Facility Clearance Program and the Survey Program for Headquarters

  16. Office of Security Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Security Policy is the central source within the Department of Energy for the development and analysis of safeguards and security policies and standards affecting facilities, nuclear materials, personnel, and classified information.

  17. Information Security Group IY5512 Computer Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Chris

    for process that controls interactions between users and resources. · Access control system implements Information Security Group Agenda · Access control basics · ACLs and capabilities · Information flow policies· Information flow policies · Bell-LaPadula Model · Role-Based Access Control · Resources 3 Information Security

  18. Interim Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, for Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A J

    2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 in fiscal years 2012 and 2013.

  19. Security system signal supervision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chritton, M.R. (BE, Inc., Barnwell, SC (United States)); Matter, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees for understanding and applying line supervision techniques to security communication links. A review of security communication links is followed by detailed discussions of link physical protection and DC/AC static supervision and dynamic supervision techniques. Material is also presented on security for atmospheric transmission and video line supervision. A glossary of security communication line supervision terms is appended. 16 figs.

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

  1. On the Security of Public Key Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danny Dolev; et al.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the use of public key encryption to provide secure network communication has received considerable attention. Such public key systems are usually effective against passive eavesdroppers, who merely tap the lines and try to decipher the message. It has been pointed out, however, that an improperly designed protocol could be vulnerable to an active saboteur, one who may impersonate another user or alter the message being transmitted. Several models are formulated in which the security of protocols can be discussed precisely. Algorithms and characteri-zations that can be used to determine protocol security in these models are given.

  2. SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2014 #12;2 Boise State University 2014 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report From the Vice President for Campus Operations and General Counsel At Boise State University, we are committed to providing a safe and secure environment for students, staff

  3. UNIVERSITY POLICE ANNUAL SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    UNIVERSITY POLICE 2013 ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY GUIDE In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act The University of New Orleans. Please take a moment to read the following information. #12;ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY GUIDE 2013

  4. Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND 2012-1846P CustomTraining Sandia providesPRAsandhowtheycanbemanaged to increase levels of safety and security. Like othertrainings,Sandiaexpertsdesigncoursesto beasbroadorin

  5. Secure Core Contact Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secure Core Contact Information C. E. Irvine irvine@nps.edu 831-656-2461 Department of Computer for the secure management of local and/or remote information in multiple contexts. The SecureCore project Science Graduate School of Operations and Information Sciences www.cisr.nps.edu Project Description

  6. Secure Data Transfer Guidance for Industrial Control and SCADA Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahan, Robert E.; Fluckiger, Jerry D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Tews, Cody W.; Burnette, John R.; Goranson, Craig A.; Kirkham, Harold

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was developed to provide guidance for the implementation of secure data transfer in a complex computational infrastructure representative of the electric power and oil and natural gas enterprises and the control systems they implement. For the past 20 years the cyber security community has focused on preventative measures intended to keep systems secure by providing a hard outer shell that is difficult to penetrate. Over time, the hard exterior, soft interior focus changed to focus on defense-in-depth adding multiple layers of protection, introducing intrusion detection systems, more effective incident response and cleanup, and many other security measures. Despite much larger expenditures and more layers of defense, successful attacks have only increased in number and severity. Consequently, it is time to re-focus the conventional approach to cyber security. While it is still important to implement measures to keep intruders out, a new protection paradigm is warranted that is aimed at discovering attempted or real compromises as early as possible. Put simply, organizations should take as fact that they have been, are now, or will be compromised. These compromises may be intended to steal information for financial gain as in the theft of intellectual property or credentials that lead to the theft of financial resources, or to lie silent until instructed to cause physical or electronic damage and/or denial of services. This change in outlook has been recently confirmed by the National Security Agency [19]. The discovery of attempted and actual compromises requires an increased focus on monitoring events by manual and/or automated log monitoring, detecting unauthorized changes to a system's hardware and/or software, detecting intrusions, and/or discovering the exfiltration of sensitive information and/or attempts to send inappropriate commands to ICS/SCADA (Industrial Control System/Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems.

  7. Dissertation Defense Checklist Student: Schedule Prospectus Meeting. This should be done 4-6 months prior to defense.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    Dissertation Defense Checklist Student: Schedule Prospectus Meeting. This should be done 4-6 months prior to defense. Take Approval of Dissertation Prospectus form to meeting. Date of meeting_____________ Student: Submit Approval of Dissertation Prospectus form to SAA Office. SAA Office submits Dissertation

  8. Defense programs business practices re-engineering QFD exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, C.; Halbleib, L.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The end of the cold war has resulted in many changes for the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). We now work in a smaller complex, with reduced resources, a smaller stockpile, and no new phase 3 weapons development programs. This new environment demands that we re-evaluate the way we design and produce nuclear weapons. The Defense Program (DP) Business Practices Re-engineering activity was initiated to improve the design and production efficiency of the DP Sector. The activity had six goals: (1) to identify DP business practices that are exercised by the Product Realization Process (PRP); (2) to determine the impact (positive, negative, or none) of these practices on defined, prioritized customer criteria; (3) to identify business practices that are candidates for elimination or re-engineering; (4) to select two or three business practices for re-engineering; (5) to re-engineer the selected business practices; and (6) to exercise the re-engineered practices on three pilot development projects. Business practices include technical and well as administrative procedures that are exercised by the PRP. A QFD exercise was performed to address (1)-(4). The customer that identified, defined, and prioritized the criteria to rate the business practices was the Block Change Advisory Group. Five criteria were identified: cycle time, flexibility, cost, product performance/quality, and best practices. Forty-nine business practices were identified and rated per the criteria. From this analysis, the group made preliminary recommendations as to which practices would be addressed in the re-engineering activity. Sixteen practices will be addressed in the re-engineering activity. These practices will then be piloted on three projects: (1) the Electronic Component Assembly (ECA)/Radar Project, (2) the B61 Mod 11, and (3) Warhead Protection Program (WPP).

  9. What is Security? A perspective on achieving security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides a perspective on achieving security in an organization. It touches upon security as a mindset, ability to adhere to rules, cultivating awareness of the reason for a security mindset, the quality of a security program, willingness to admit fault or acknowledge failure, peer review in security, science as a model that can be applied to the security profession, the security vision, security partnering, staleness in the security program, security responsibilities, and achievement of success over time despite the impossibility of perfection.

  10. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  11. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: ? DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste ? DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) ? DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) ? U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  12. Measurable Control System Security through Ideal Driven Technical Metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles McQueen; Wayne Boyer; Sean McBride; Marie Farrar; Zachary Tudor

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Homeland Security National Cyber Security Division supported development of a small set of security ideals as a framework to establish measurable control systems security. Based on these ideals, a draft set of proposed technical metrics was developed to allow control systems owner-operators to track improvements or degradations in their individual control systems security posture. The technical metrics development effort included review and evaluation of over thirty metrics-related documents. On the bases of complexity, ambiguity, or misleading and distorting effects the metrics identified during the reviews were determined to be weaker than necessary to aid defense against the myriad threats posed by cyber-terrorism to human safety, as well as to economic prosperity. Using the results of our metrics review and the set of security ideals as a starting point for metrics development, we identified thirteen potential technical metrics - with at least one metric supporting each ideal. Two case study applications of the ideals and thirteen metrics to control systems were then performed to establish potential difficulties in applying both the ideals and the metrics. The case studies resulted in no changes to the ideals, and only a few deletions and refinements to the thirteen potential metrics. This led to a final proposed set of ten core technical metrics. To further validate the security ideals, the modifications made to the original thirteen potential metrics, and the final proposed set of ten core metrics, seven separate control systems security assessments performed over the past three years were reviewed for findings and recommended mitigations. These findings and mitigations were then mapped to the security ideals and metrics to assess gaps in their coverage. The mappings indicated that there are no gaps in the security ideals and that the ten core technical metrics provide significant coverage of standard security issues with 87% coverage. Based on the two case studies and evaluation of the seven assessments, the security ideals demonstrated their value in guiding security thinking. Further, the final set of core technical metrics has been demonstrated to be both usable in the control system environment and provide significant coverage of standard security issues.

  13. Cyber Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Noyes

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These trainings vary from web-based cyber security trainings for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/ Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

  14. Department of Defense Energy Security Initiatives ... 3 Prepared by the DoD Energy Security Task Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    Applications Theodore Motyka Savannah River National Laboratory #12;http://wstiac.alionscience.com The WSTIACMarcus Hampton, Paul N. Barnes, T. J. Haugan, George A. Levin, Edward B. Durkin Air Force Research Laboratory

  15. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, P. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  16. A new secure process for steganography: CI2 Stego-security and topological-security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A new secure process for steganography: CI2 Stego-security and topological-security Nicolas Friot1- formation hiding security fields. We show that the proposed scheme is stego-secure, which is the highest level of security in a well defined and studied category of attack called "watermark-only attack

  17. Computer Security Division 2009 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Emerging Technologies Security Research Group 27 Identity Management Systems 27 Personal Identity Assessment Activities 31 Research in Emerging Technologies 33 Access Control - Information Sharing and cybersecurity outreach activities and carried out an expanded research agenda designed to develop and imple ment

  18. Nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament and extended deterrence in the new security environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the end of the Cold War, in a dramatically changed security environment, the advances in nonnuclear strategic capabilities along with reduced numbers and roles for nuclear forces has altered the calculus of deterrence and defense, at least for the United States. For many, this opened up a realistic possibility of a nuclear-free world. It soon became clear that the initial post-Cold War hopes were exaggerated. The world did change fundamentally, but it did not become more secure and stable. In place of the old Soviet threat, there has been growing concern about proliferation and terrorism involving nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction (WMD), regional conflicts, global instability and increasingly serious new and emerging threats, including cyber attacks and attacks on satellites. For the United States at least, in this emerging environment, the political rationales for nuclear weapons, from deterrence to reassurance to alliance management, are changing and less central than during the Cold War to the security of the United States, its friends and allies. Nuclear weapons remain important for the US, but for a far more limited set of roles and missions. As the Perry-Schlesinger Commission report reveals, there is a domestic US consensus on nuclear policy and posture at the highest level and for the near term, including the continued role of nuclear arms in deterring WMD use and in reassuring allies. Although the value of nuclear weapons has declined for the United States, the value of these weapons for Russia, China and so-called 'rogue' states is seen to be rising. The nuclear logic of NATO during Cold War - the need for nuclear weapons to counter vastly superior conventional capabilities of the Soviet Union and the Warsaw Pact - is today heard from Russians and even some proliferants. Moreover, these weapons present a way for rogues to achieve regional hegemony and possibly to deter interventions by the United States or others. While the vision of a nuclear-free world is powerful, both existing nuclear powers and proliferators are unlikely to forego nuclear weapons entirely in a world that is dangerous and uncertain. And the emerging world would not necessarily be more secure and stable without nuclear weapons. Even if nuclear weapons were given up by the United States and other nuclear-weapon states, there would continue to be concerns about the proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, which would not disappear and could worsen. WMD terrorism would remain a concern that was largely unaffected by US and other nuclear-weapon decisions. Conventional capabilities would not disappear and the prospects for warfare could rise. In addition, new problems could arise if rogue states or other non-status-quo powers attempted to take advantage of moves toward disarmament, while friends and allies who are not reassured as in the past could reconsider their options if deterrence declined. To address these challenges, non- and counter-proliferation and counterterrorismincluding defenses and consequence management-are priorities, especially in light of an anticipated 'renaissance' in civil nuclear power. The current agenda of the United States and others includes efforts to: (1) Strengthen International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its safeguards system; (2) Strengthen export controls, especially for sensitive technologies, by limiting the development of reprocessing and enrichment technologies and by requiring the Additional Protocol as a condition of supply; (3) Establish a reliable supply regime, including the possibility of multilateral or multinational ownership of fuel cycle facilities, as a means to promote nuclear energy without increasing the risks of proliferation or terrorism; (4) Implement effectively UN Security Council Resolution 1540; and (5) Strengthen and institutionalize the Proliferation Security Initiative and the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism. These and other activities are important in themselves, and are essential to maintaining and strengthening the Nonproliferati

  19. Information SecurityInformation Security--Applications andApplications and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Farid

    Information SecurityInformation Security-- Applications andApplications and Techniques about? InformationInformation SecuritySecurity Information SecurityInformation Security What?What? Why of Information SecuritySecurity Network SecurityNetwork Security PGP, SSL,PGP, SSL, IPsecIPsec Data Security

  20. Power Grid Defense Against Malicious Cascading Failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakarian, Paulo; Lindelauf, Roy

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An adversary looking to disrupt a power grid may look to target certain substations and sources of power generation to initiate a cascading failure that maximizes the number of customers without electricity. This is particularly an important concern when the enemy has the capability to launch cyber-attacks as practical concerns (i.e. avoiding disruption of service, presence of legacy systems, etc.) may hinder security. Hence, a defender can harden the security posture at certain power stations but may lack the time and resources to do this for the entire power grid. We model a power grid as a graph and introduce the cascading failure game in which both the defender and attacker choose a subset of power stations such as to minimize (maximize) the number of consumers having access to producers of power. We formalize problems for identifying both mixed and deterministic strategies for both players, prove complexity results under a variety of different scenarios, identify tractable cases, and develop algorithms f...

  1. Defense Special Case Transuranic Waste Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, G.D. (Rockwell International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Joint Integration Office) [Rockwell International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Joint Integration Office; Carson, P.H. (Stoller (S.M.) Corp., Boulder, CO (United States)) [Stoller (S.M.) Corp., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Special Case Implementation Plan (SCIP) is to establish a comprehensive plan for the efficient long-term management and disposal of defense special case (SC) transuranic (TRU) waste. To fulfill this purpose, a review of SC waste management strategies (at both the site-specific and TRU program levels), waste characteristics and inventories, processing and transportation options, and disposal requirements was made. This review provides a plan for implementing policy decisions and useful information for making those decisions. The SCIP is intended to provide a baseline plant to which alternate plans can be compared. General potential alternatives are provided for future consideration when data concerning facility availability and costs are better defined. Milestones for the SC Implementation Plan are included which summarize each SC waste site. The cost of implementing the SC program has an upper limit of $89 million for the worst case scenario. The actual cost of implementation could be dramatically lower than the worst case figure. 15 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Nuclear winter: the implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally believed possible for some range of heavy nuclear attacks directed against cities that significant but not lethal climate alteration will ensue for at least a few weeks. Three-dimensional global circulation models being developed and used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the National Center for Atmospheric Research for a reasonable attack size seem to be converging on a temperature depression of the order of 10 to 15/degree/C, averaged over all land areas of the temperate region of the northern hemisphere. Temperature depressions as large as 25/degree/C are predicted in the interiors of continents for attacks in the summertime. Winter wars produce temperature depressions of only a few degrees. The authors have drawn the following implications for civil defense of the possibility of nuclear winter: (1) Neither cold nor drought is likely to be a direct threat to human survival. (2) The principal threat of nuclear winter is to agriculture. (3) Nuclear winter does not present an entirely new threat from nuclear war to the United States or the Soviet Union. (4) The consequences of nuclear winter would fall more heavily on the Soviet Union.

  3. Second Line of Defense Spares Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Dale L.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.; Thorsen, Darlene E.

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    During Fiscal Year 2012, a team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an assessment and analysis of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Sustainability spare parts program. Spare parts management touches many aspects of the SLD Sustainability Program including contracting and integration of Local Maintenance Providers (LMP), equipment vendors, analyses and metrics on program performance, system state of health, and maintenance practices. Standardized spares management will provide better data for decisions during site transition phase and will facilitate transition to host country sustainability ownership. The effort was coordinated with related SLD Sustainability Program initiatives, including a configuration items baselining initiative, a metrics initiative, and a maintenance initiative. The spares study has also led to pilot programs for sourcing alternatives that include regional intermediate inventories and partnering agreements that leverage existing supply chains. Many partners from the SLD Sustainability program contributed to and were consulted in the course of the study. This document provides a description of the findings, recommendations, and implemented solutions that have resulted from the study.

  4. Securing Internet Routing Securing Internet Routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Sharon

    Plane (Routing protocols): S h b d Secure BGP [Kent Lynn Seo 00] soBGP, IRV, SPV, pgBGP, psBGP, Listen Whisper etc · Set up paths between nodes [Kent Lynn Seo 00] Listen-Whisper, etc., Data Plane: · Given d Secure BGP [Kent Lynn Seo 00] soBGP, IRV, SPV, pgBGP, psBGP, Listen Whisper etc · Set up paths

  5. Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aas, Christopher A.; Lenhart, James E.; Bray, Olin H.; Witcher, Christina Jenkin

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories was tasked with developing the Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS) with the sponsorship of NA-125.3 and the concurrence of DOE/NNSA field and area offices. The purpose of IIIMS was to modernize nuclear materials management information systems at the enterprise level. Projects over the course of several years attempted to spearhead this modernization. The scope of IIIMS was broken into broad enterprise-oriented materials management and materials forecasting. The IIIMS prototype was developed to allow multiple participating user groups to explore nuclear material requirements and needs in detail. The purpose of material forecasting was to determine nuclear material availability over a 10 to 15 year period in light of the dynamic nature of nuclear materials management. Formal DOE Directives (requirements) were needed to direct IIIMS efforts but were never issued and the project has been halted. When restarted, duplicating or re-engineering the activities from 1999 to 2003 is unnecessary, and in fact future initiatives can build on previous work. IIIMS requirements should be structured to provide high confidence that discrepancies are detected, and classified information is not divulged. Enterprise-wide materials management systems maintained by the military can be used as overall models to base IIIMS implementation concepts upon.

  6. Environmental management requirements/defensible costs project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) used a systems engineering approach to develop the first formal requirements baseline for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Management (EM) Programs. The recently signed Settlement Agreement with the State of Idaho (Batt Agreement), along with dramatically reduced EM funding targets from Department of Energy (DOE) headquarters, drove the immediacy of this effort. Programs have linked top-level requirements to work scope to cost estimates. All EM work, grouped by decision units, was scrubbed by INEL EM programs and by an independent {open_quotes}Murder Board.{close_quotes} Direct participation of upper level management from LITCO and the DOE-Idaho Operations Office ensured best information and decisions. The result is a scrubbed down, defensible budget tied to top-level requirements for use in the upcoming DOE-Headquarters` budget workout, the Internal Review Board, the FY98 Activity Data Sheets submittal, and preparation of the FY97 control accounts and out-year plans. In addition to the remarkable accomplishments during the past eight weeks, major issues were identified and documented and follow-on tasks are underway which will lead to further improvements in INEL EM program management.

  7. Process Control Security 44 PublishedbytheieeeComPutersoCiety1540-7993/08/$25.002008ieeeieeeseCurity&PrivaCy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correia, Miguel

    - structures such as power, water, gas, oil, and trans- portation. Therefore, the threat is no longer against a rather weak, form of security, essentially by obscurity. However, criti- cal infrastructure companies, and control and supervision proto- cols are normally encapsulated on top of UdP-TCP/ IP. The common defense

  8. Stellar: A Fusion System for Scenario Construction and Security Risk Stephen Boyer, Oliver Dain, and Robert Cunningham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stellar: A Fusion System for Scenario Construction and Security Risk Assessment Stephen Boyer St., Lexington, MA 02453 {boyer,odain,rkc}@ll.mit.edu Abstract Stellar aggregates and correlates), firewalls, 1This work is sponsored by the Department of Defense under the Air Force Contract F19628-00-C

  9. SECURITY AND COMMUNICATION NETWORKS Security Comm. Networks (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SECURITY AND COMMUNICATION NETWORKS Security Comm. Networks (2013) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI: 10.1002/sec.819 SPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Integrating security mechanisms, must be protected against security threats. Due to the security and also resource constraint concerns

  10. Using Security and Domain ontologies for Security Requirements Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Using Security and Domain ontologies for Security Requirements Analysis Amina Souag, Camille.Mouratidis@uel.ac.uk Abstract-- Recent research has argued about the importance of considering security during Requirements that security being a multi-faceted problem, a single security ontology is not enough to guide SR Engineering

  11. Information Security Governance: When Compliance Becomes more Important than Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Information Security Governance: When Compliance Becomes more Important than Security Terence Tan1 information security must adapt to changing conditions by extending security governance to middle management for implementing information security are more interested in complying with organizational standards and policies

  12. Information Security Advisory Information Security, Computing and Information Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    Information Security Advisory Information Security, Computing and Information Services security.cuny.edu Published: November 2014 Holiday Season Phishing Scams and Malware Campaigns CUNY/CIS Information Security.cuny.edu under "CUNY Issued Security Advisories" Visit the Federal Trade Commission's Consumer Information page

  13. INFORMATION SECURITY POLICY.doc INFORMATION SECURITY POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    - 1 ­ INFORMATION SECURITY POLICY.doc INFORMATION SECURITY POLICY Ratified by RCA Senate, February 2007 Contents Introduction 2 Policy Statement 3 Information Security at RCA 5 Annexes A. Applicable ­ INFORMATION SECURITY POLICY.doc Introduction Why Information Security? The access, availability

  14. U.S. second line of defense: preventing nuclear smuggling across Russia's borders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, D. Y.

    1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Preventing the theft of weapons-usable highly enriched uranium and plutonium in Russia is one of the central security concerns facing the US today. The dissolution of the highly centralized USSR and the resulting societal crisis has endangered Russia's ability to protect its more than 200 metric tons of plutonium and 1000 tons of highly enriched uranium (roughly 8 kg Pu or 25 kg HEU is sufficient to make a bomb). Producing this fissile material is the most difficult and expensive part of nuclear weapons production and the US must make every effort to ensure that fissile material (and nuclear-related technologies) does not reach the hands of terrorist groups, rogue states or other potential proliferators. In response to this concern, the US has undertaken a number of initiatives in partnership with Russia and other FSU states to prevent the theft of fissile material. The Material Protection, Control and Accounting Program (MPC&A) was begun in 1993 to prevent the theft of nuclear materials from Russian civilian complexes, that is facilities not under control of the Ministry of Defense, which is largely responsible for possession and oversight of nuclear weapons. The MPC&A program is considered the first line of defense against theft of nuclear material because its goal is to prevent theft of material at production and storage facilities. This year the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new program called the Second Line of Defense (SLD), the goal of which is to assist Russia in preventing the smuggling of nuclear material and weapons at its borders, either by land, sea or air. The SLD program represents an important phase in the overall effort to ensure the security of nuclear material and weapons in Russia. However, as the US engages Russian customs officials in this important project, Americans should keep in mind that providing equipment--even indigenous equipment--is insufficient by itself; material aid must be accompanied by rigorous inspection and accounting procedures. In addition, the equipment must be assessed according to international standards to ensure a high degree of confidence in its nuclear detection capability.

  15. EPC RFID Tag Security Weaknesses and Defenses: Passport Cards, Enhanced Drivers Licenses, and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuoka, Yoky

    , Washington, USA balkan@cs.washington.edu Tadayoshi Kohno University of Washington Seattle, Washington, USA of 2008, incorporates an EPC tag. This identity document was is- sued in response to the Western

  16. On the front lines of national security, the Department of Defense (DOD) recognizes how adoption of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a system that integrates solar photovoltaics, plug-in electric vehicles and a renewable energy management of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency

  17. A Game Theoretical Approach to Communication Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gueye, Assane

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information and communication systems’ securityTrust: An Element of Information Security,” in Security andInternational Journal of Information Security, vol. 4, pp.

  18. Octopus: A Secure and Anonymous DHT Lookup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Qiyan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed Hash Table (DHT) lookup is a core technique in structured peer-to-peer (P2P) networks. Its decentralized nature introduces security and privacy vulnerabilities for applications built on top of them; we thus set out to design a lookup mechanism achieving both security and anonymity, heretofore an open problem. We present Octopus, a novel DHT lookup which provides strong guarantees for both security and anonymity. Octopus uses attacker identification mechanisms to discover and remove malicious nodes, severely limiting an adversary's ability to carry out active attacks, and splits lookup queries over separate anonymous paths and introduces dummy queries to achieve high levels of anonymity. We analyze the security of Octopus by developing an event-based simulator to show that the attacker discovery mechanisms can rapidly identify malicious nodes with low error rate. We calculate the anonymity of Octopus using probabilistic modeling and show that Octopus can achieve near-optimal anonymity. We evaluate ...

  19. Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash., December 16, 2005, Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP CX) working to reduce injuries at selected (DoD)...

  20. National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005, Information...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005" (Public Law 108-375 Oct. 28 2004) Transition20082009EMAdditionalMaterialMACopy.pdf PUBLIC LAW 108-375-OCT. 28, 2004...

  1. U.S. Department of Defense's Rebates and Incentives Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the U.S. Department of Defense's (DoD's) statuatory authority and financial management regulation for rebates and incentives.

  2. Identifying Enterprise Leverage Points in Defense Acquisition Program Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Major Robb

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    *The views expressed in this talk are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, the Department of Defense (DoD), or the U.S. Government.

  3. Identifying enterprise leverage points in Defense Acquisition Program performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Joseph Robert, 1970-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large, complex systems development programs in the Department of Defense are finding it more difficult to deliver desired capabilities to the end user on time and on budget than ever before. Evidence exists that almost all ...

  4. Defense Energy Support Center: Installation Energy Commodity Business Unit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Defense Energy Support Center's (DESC's) Installation Energy Commodity Business Unit (CBU) including its intent, commitment, pilot project, lessons learned, and impending barriers.

  5. Psillos and Laudan Psillos's Defense of Scientific Realism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    defense of realism' (EDR), which argues that the best explanation of the empirical success of scientific theories is that they are approximately true. The EDR takes the NMA to represent an abductive inference

  6. Interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual defines the process DOE will use to interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and its staff. Canceled by DOE M 140.1-1A. Does not cancel other directives.

  7. Interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual presents the process the Department of Energy will use to interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) and its staff. Cancels DOE M 140.1-1.

  8. Interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual presents the process the Department of Energy will use to interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) and its staff. Cancels DOE M 140.1-1A.

  9. The Office of Environmental Management Non-Defense Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Microsoft Word - PSRP Updates 6-25-10v2 The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Defense Environmental Cleanup The Office of Environmental Management Uranium Enrichment D&D...

  10. NNSA Defense Programs Announces Quarterly Awards | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Announces Quarterly Awards | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

  11. Department of Defense Benchmarks VPP in Visit to Hanford

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP-CX) are working to meet a safety and health goal established by Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld to reduce injuries at DoD sites nationwide. In order to accomplish this goal, DoD visited the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State on December 12, 2005, to learn about its exemplary safety programs and benchmark the site's VPP effort.

  12. Annual Security Report October 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    1 Annual Security Report October 2013 Mission Statement The Campus Security and Parking Services Department ("Security") exists to provide a secure and welcoming research, educational, and work environment in which security concerns are balanced with freedom of movement in an open campus atmosphere while

  13. Dumb Ideas in Computer Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumb Ideas in Computer Security Dr Charles P Pfleeger Pfleeger Consulting Group 19 July 2011 chuck Security" (2005) http://www.ranum.com/security/computer_security/editorials/dumb/ Default permit Ideas in Computer Security 219 Jul 2011 #12;Struck a Nerve Results 1-10 of about 2,030,000 for dumb

  14. Security Division 2007 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer Security Division 2007 Annual Report #12;TAble of ConTenTS Welcome Division Organization The Computer Security Division Responds to the Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 Security Information Technology 15 Security Testing and Metrics 17 Validation Programs and Laboratory Accreditation 17

  15. August 2003 IT SECURITY METRICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 2003 IT SECURITY METRICS Elizabeth B. Lennon, Editor Information Technology Laboratory approach to measuring information security. Evaluating security at the sys tem level, IT security metrics and techniques contained in NIST SP 800-26, Security Self-Assessment Guide for Information Technology Systems

  16. Energy Security Initiatives Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—lists Federal government energy security initiatives.

  17. TEC Information Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    External Coordination Working Group Information Security E. Ralph Smith, Manager Institutional Programs April 22, 2004 Albuquerque, NM WIPP * Open communications * Notifications *...

  18. Personnel Security Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of the Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, Safety, and Security (AU) which provides corporate leadership and strategic approaches for protecting DOEs workers, the public,...

  19. NNSA orders security enhancements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    badge or valid driver's license) before proceeding, and will be asked to vouch for other vehicle occupants. LOS ALAMOS, N. M., Dec. 21, 2012-The National Nuclear Security...

  20. Cyber Security Architecture Guidelines

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides supplemental information on the implementation of cyber security architectures throughout the Department of Energy. Canceled by DOE N 205.18

  1. Hazardous Material Security (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All facilities processing, storing, managing, or transporting hazardous materials must be evaluated every five years for security issues. A report must be submitted to the Department of the...

  2. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Related Structures within TA-3 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Area...

  3. INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS RELEVANT TO NUCLEAR FACILITIES, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical questions surrounding industrial control system (ICS) cyber security always lead back to: What could a cyber attack do to my system(s) and; how much should I worry about it? These two leading questions represent only a fraction of questions asked when discussing cyber security as it applies to any program, company, business, or organization. The intent of this paper is to open a dialog of important pertinent questions and answers that managers of nuclear facilities engaged in nuclear facility security and safeguards should examine, i.e., what questions should be asked; and how do the answers affect an organization's ability to effectively safeguard and secure nuclear material. When a cyber intrusion is reported, what does that mean? Can an intrusion be detected or go un-noticed? Are nuclear security or safeguards systems potentially vulnerable? What about the digital systems employed in process monitoring, and international safeguards? Organizations expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against physical threats. However, cyber threats particularly on ICSs may not be well known or understood, and often do not receive adequate attention. With the disclosure of the Stuxnet virus that has recently attacked nuclear infrastructure, many organizations have recognized the need for an urgent interest in cyber attacks and defenses against them. Several questions arise including discussions about the insider threat, adequate cyber protections, program readiness, encryption, and many more. These questions, among others, are discussed so as to raise the awareness and shed light on ways to protect nuclear facilities and materials against such attacks.

  4. Trust Management Considerations For the Cooperative Infrastructure Defense Framework: Trust Relationships, Evidence, and Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiden, Wendy M.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooperative Infrastructure Defense (CID) is a hierarchical, agent-based, adaptive, cyber-security framework designed to collaboratively protect multiple enclaves or organizations participating in a complex infrastructure. CID employs a swarm of lightweight, mobile agents called Sensors designed to roam hosts throughout a security enclave to find indications of anomalies and report them to host-based Sentinels. The Sensors’ findings become pieces of a larger puzzle, which the Sentinel puts together to determine the problem and respond per policy as given by the enclave-level Sergeant agent. Horizontally across multiple enclaves and vertically within each enclave, authentication and access control technologies are necessary but insufficient authorization mechanisms to ensure that CID agents continue to fulfill their roles in a trustworthy manner. Trust management fills the gap, providing mechanisms to detect malicious agents and offering more robust mechanisms for authorization. This paper identifies the trust relationships throughout the CID hierarchy, the types of trust evidence that could be gathered, and the actions that the CID system could take if an entity is determined to be untrustworthy.

  5. 2004-05 Research Activities from the Office of the Vice President for Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    are actively seeking answers to grid security and transmission control, researching clean coal technologies

  6. From Panopticon to Fresnel, Dispelling a False Sense of Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Steven

    From Panopticon to Fresnel, Dispelling a False Sense of Security Jon Crowcroft1 and Ian Brown2 1 challenges. In this paper, we describe the Fresnel project's technology[ELMC10] that addresses Panopticon to Fresnel, Dispelling a False Sense of Security 239 afford a view onto human activities2

  7. Intrusion Detection, Diagnosis, and Recovery with SelfSecuring Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intrusion Detection, Diagnosis, and Recovery with Self­Securing Storage John Strunk, Garth Goodson Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, 15213 Abstract Self­securing storage turns storage devices active parts of intrusion survival strategy. From behind storage interface (e.g., SCSI CIFS), a self

  8. Office of Departmental Personnel Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Departmental Personnel Security serves as the central leader and advocate vested with the authority to ensure consistent and effective implementation of personnel security programs Department-wide (including for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  9. UC SECURITY FRAMEWORK 2011 -2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    1 UC SECURITY FRAMEWORK 2011 - 2012 #12;2 Contents Background..................................................................................................................................4 About UC Security & Campus Community Support .................................................................5 Security Service Authority and Relationship with NZ Police and Emergency Services ...........5

  10. The security of machine learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barreno, Marco; Nelson, Blaine; Joseph, Anthony D.; Tygar, J. D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the IEEE symposium on security and privacy (pp. 188–201).and communications security (CCS) (pp. 59–68). Globerson,detection. In USENIX security symposium. Klimt, B. , & Yang,

  11. January 2005 INTEGRATING IT SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 2005 INTEGRATING IT SECURITY INTO THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND INVESTMENT CONTROL PROCESS By Joan S. Hash, Computer Security Division, Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology Introduction To assist federal agencies with effec tively integrating security

  12. Departmental Cyber Security Management Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Departmental Cyber Security Management (DCSM) Policy was developed to further clarify and support the elements of the Integrated Safeguards and Security Management (ISSM) Policy regarding cyber security. Certified 9-23-10. No cancellation.

  13. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herr, M.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is likely to generate dusts, mists, fumes, or small particulates. A beryllium exposure control program should minimize airborne concentrations, the potential for and spread of contamination, the number of times individuals are exposed to beryllium, and the number of employees who may be potentially exposed.

  14. Information Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes an Information Security Program for the protection and control of classified and sensitive information. Extended until 5-11-06 by DOE N 251.63, dated 5-11-05. DOE O 471.2A, Information Security Program, dated 3/27/1997, extended by DOE N 251.57, dated 4/28/2004. Cancels: DOE O 471.2

  15. Incidents of Security Concern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation addresses incidents of security concern and an incident program for addressing them. It addresses the phases of an inquiry, and it divides incidents into categories based on severity and interest types based on whether security, management, or procedural interests are involved. A few scenarios are then analyzed according to these breakdowns.

  16. Social Networking? Secure Networking?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Social Networking? Secure Networking? Teaching & Learning Technology Roundtable February 2010 #12 ­ The intent behind the current security measures in place at OHSU ­ The OHSU Social Networking Guidelines 2. To begin a campus wide dialogue exploring the changing world of online social networking and it

  17. Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safeguards and Security Program ensures that the Department of Energy efficiently and effectively meets all its obligations to protect Special Nuclear Material, other nuclear materials, classified matter, sensitive information, government property, and the safety and security of employees, contractors, and the general public. Cancels DOE P 470.1.

  18. December 2007 SECURING EXTERNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    devices such as desktop and laptop computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and cell phones. These teleworkers use devices such as desktop and laptop computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and cellDecember 2007 SECURING EXTERNAL COMPUTERS AND OTHER DEVICES USED BY TELEWORKERS SECURING EXTERNAL

  19. Global Material Security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,SiteNational Nuclear SecuritySecurity

  20. The science, technology, and politics of ballistic missile defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, Philip E. [Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    America's missile defense systems are deployed at home and abroad. This includes the Groundbased Missile Defense (GMD) system in Alaska and California, the Phased Adaptive Approach in Europe (EPAA), and regional systems in the Middle East and Asia. Unfortunately these systems lack workable architectures, and many of the required elements either don't work or are missing. Major review and reconsideration is needed of all elements of these systems. GMD performance in tests has gotten worse with time, when it ought to be getting better. A lack of political support is not to blame as the DoD spends about $10 billion per year, and proposes to add about $5 billion over the next five years. Russia objects to the EPAA as a threat to its ICBM forces, and to the extensive deployment of U.S. military forces in countries such as Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania, once part of the Soviet Union. Going forward the U.S. should keep working with Russia whose cooperation will be key to diplomatic gains in the Middle East and elsewhere. Meanwhile, America's missile defenses face an enduring set of issues, especially target discrimination in the face of attacks designed to overwhelm the defenses, stage separation debris, chaff, decoys, and stealth. Dealing with target discrimination while also replacing, upgrading, or adding to the many elements of U.S. missiles defenses presents daunting budget priorities. A new look at the threat is warranted, and whether the U.S. needs to consider every nation that possesses even short-range missiles a threat to America. The proliferation of missiles of all sizes around the world is a growing problem, but expecting U.S. missile defenses to deal with all those missiles everywhere is unrealistic, and U.S. missile defenses, effective or not, are justifying more and more offensive missiles.

  1. Army Energy Security and Independence

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ARMY ENERGY SECURITY AND INDEPENDENCE Leadership Ownership Partnership 19 NOV 2008 Don Juhasz, PE, CEM CHIEF ARMY ENERGY POLICY Army Energy Security - "The Way Ahead" 2 ARMY ENERGY...

  2. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    It implements the requirements of: Title 32, CFR, Part 2001, Classified National Security Information Executive Order 13526, Classified National Security Information...

  3. Sandia Energy - Water Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Security Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Decision Models for Integrating EnergyWater Water Infrastructure Security Water Infrastructure...

  4. Smart-Grid Security Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khurana, Himanshu; Hadley, Mark D.; Lu, Ning; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    TITLE: Smart-Grid Security Issues (Editorial Material, English) IEEE SECURITY & PRIVACY 8 (1). JAN-FEB 2010. p.81-85 IEEE COMPUTER SOC, LOS ALAMITOS

  5. International Nuclear Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

  6. Trident | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Programs Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Inertial Confinement Fusion ICF Facilities Trident Trident Fred Archuleta working in the main laser bay of...

  7. The Technical Specification for the Security Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson of Booz Allen Hamilton; Alan Peltzman of the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA); and Jon

  8. Public key infrastructure for DOE security research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aiken, R.; Foster, I.; Johnston, W.E. [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the Department of Energy`s Second Joint Energy Research/Defence Programs Security Research Workshop. The workshop, built on the results of the first Joint Workshop which reviewed security requirements represented in a range of mission-critical ER and DP applications, discussed commonalties and differences in ER/DP requirements and approaches, and identified an integrated common set of security research priorities. One significant conclusion of the first workshop was that progress in a broad spectrum of DOE-relevant security problems and applications could best be addressed through public-key cryptography based systems, and therefore depended upon the existence of a robust, broadly deployed public-key infrastructure. Hence, public-key infrastructure ({open_quotes}PKI{close_quotes}) was adopted as a primary focus for the second workshop. The Second Joint Workshop covered a range of DOE security research and deployment efforts, as well as summaries of the state of the art in various areas relating to public-key technologies. Key findings were that a broad range of DOE applications can benefit from security architectures and technologies built on a robust, flexible, widely deployed public-key infrastructure; that there exists a collection of specific requirements for missing or undeveloped PKI functionality, together with a preliminary assessment of how these requirements can be met; that, while commercial developments can be expected to provide many relevant security technologies, there are important capabilities that commercial developments will not address, due to the unique scale, performance, diversity, distributed nature, and sensitivity of DOE applications; that DOE should encourage and support research activities intended to increase understanding of security technology requirements, and to develop critical components not forthcoming from other sources in a timely manner.

  9. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Jinrong; Stacey, Gary; Stacey, Minviluz; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  10. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Jinrong (Columbia, MO); Stacey, Gary (Columbia, MO); Stacey, Minviluz (Columbia, MO); Zhang, Xuecheng (Columbia, MO)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  11. Defense Waste Processing Facility wasteform and canister description: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, R.G.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the reference wasteform and canister for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The principal changes include revised feed and glass product compositions, an estimate of glass product characteristics as a function of time after the start of vitrification, and additional data on glass leaching performance. The feed and glass product composition data are identical to that described in the DWPF Basic Data Report, Revision 90/91. The DWPF facility is located at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and it is scheduled for construction completion during December 1989. The wasteform is borosilicate glass containing approximately 28 wt % sludge oxides, with the balance consisting of glass-forming chemicals, primarily glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its stability toward reaction with potential repository groundwaters, its relatively high ability to incorporate nuclides found in the sludge into the solid matrix, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains approximately 71% SiO/sub 2/, 12% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 10% Na/sub 2/O. Tests to quantify the stability of DWPF waste glass have been performed under a wide variety of conditions, including simulations of potential repository environments. Based on these tests, DWPF waste glass should easily meet repository criteria. The canister is filled with about 3700 lb of glass which occupies 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approximately 690 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and precipitate from 15-year-old supernate. The radionuclide activity of the canister is about 233,000 curies, with an estimated radiation level of 5600 rad/hour at the canister surface. 14 figs., 28 tabs.

  12. Extracting Security Control Requirements University of Tulsa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamble, R. F.

    , Requirements, Security Policy Modeling. 1. INTRODUCTION Networks and information systems have grown. Security has become a larger issue with the democratization of technology and information. Security accepted security controls for "Federal Information Systems and Organizations" [8]. NIST defines security

  13. An integrated mobile system for port security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cester, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, Padova I-35131 (Italy); Fabris, D. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, Padova I-35131 (Italy); Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, Padova I-35131 (Italy); Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, Padova I-35131 (Italy); Pesente, S.; Stevanato, L.; Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, Padova I-35131 (Italy); Neri, F.; Petrucci, S.; Selmi, S.; Tintori, C. [CAEN S.p.A., Via Vetraia 11, I-55049, Viareggio LU (Italy)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated mobile system for port security is presented. The system is designed to perform active investigations, by using the tagged neutron inspection technique, of suspect dangerous materials as well as passive measurements of neutrons and gamma rays to search and identify radioactive and special nuclear materials. (authors)

  14. IBM Software Solution Brief Simplify security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    simple or complex--and rest assured that your investments will be protected into the future. Addressing SmartCloud offerings provide complete cloud protection Highlights Ensure security of new cloud lead to a variety of new challenges, including data governance, access control, activity moni- toring

  15. INSTITUTE FOR CYBER SECURITY Application-Centric Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    INSTITUTE FOR CYBER SECURITY Application-Centric Security: How to Get There Prof. Ravi Sandhu Executive Director and Endowed Chair Institute for Cyber Security (ICS) University of Texas at San Antonio Executive Director and Endowed Chair Institute for Cyber Security (ICS) University of Texas at San Antonio

  16. March 24, 2008 Databases: Security 1 Database Security and Authorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, Salah

    to control login process by the DBMS Inference control The countermeasures to statistical database security database #12;March 24, 2008 Databases: Security 3 Chapter Outline Introduction Access Control Methods Policy System-related Security levels and categories Security Threats Loss of integrity Loss

  17. Safety and Security What do Safety/Security work with?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safety and Security on campus #12;Agenda · What do Safety/Security work with? · If something happens · Opening hours · Remember · Website · How to find us #12;The Section for Safety and Security work with; · Security revolving work environment · Handle locks, keys, alarms, surveillance · Responsible

  18. Urban Commerce and Security Study Urban Commerce and Security Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urban Commerce and Security Study Urban Commerce and Security Study Contact Information Fred S. Roberts Research Sponsor: Department of Homeland Security Rutgers University/CCICADA Center Professor.S. Department of Homeland Security, under Agreement 2009-ST-061-CCI002-02. Any opinions, findings

  19. SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Application for a Social Security Card

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Application for a Social Security Card Applying for a Social Security Card is easy AND it is FREE! If you DO NOT follow these instructions, we CANNOT process your and evidence to any Social Security office. Follow instructions below. HOW TO COMPLETE THE APPLICATION Most

  20. Wireless Security: Secure and Public Networks Villanova University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    36 Wireless Security: Secure and Public Networks Kory Kirk Villanova University Computer wireless access points. Security protocols exist for wireless networks; however, all widely implemented at implementing a protocol which allows public access to a secure wireless network have been made. In this report

  1. ITS Identity & Information Security Information Security Program Date 10-02-2013 Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    ITS Identity & Information Security Information Security Program Date 10-02-2013 Page 1 Information................................................................................................................................................................................3 Information Security Policy...............................................................................................................................................4 Information Security Policy Management

  2. 7 Key Challenges for Visualization in Cyber Network Defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, Daniel M.; Endert, Alexander; Kidwell, Dan

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present seven challenges, informed by two user studies, to be considered when developing a visualization for cyber security purposes. Cyber security visualizations must go beyond isolated solutions and “pretty picture” visualizations in order to make impact to users. We provide an example prototype that addresses the challenges with a description of how they are met. Our aim is to assist in increasing utility and adoption rates for visualization capabilities in cyber security.

  3. SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    business process for an organization; as a result, the security risks for RFID systems and the controls for an organization; as a result, the security risks for RFID systems and the controls available to address themMay 2007 SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID) SYSTEMS SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY

  4. UNCG Security Awareness Training & Instructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saidak, Filip

    UNCG Security Awareness Training & Instructions 02.09.2010 Page 1 of 4 Educating UNCG faculty and staff with respect to security best practices is essential in securing the University's information University employee that works with restricted or financial data. UNCG engaged Fishnet Security, a nationally

  5. ANNUAL SECURITY & FIRE SAFETY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    ANNUAL SECURITY & FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2014 A guide to policies, procedures, practices, and programs implemented to keep students, faculty, and staff safe and facilities secure. www.montana.edu/reports/security.pdf #12;Inside this Report 2014 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for Reporting Year 2013

  6. Operations Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish policies, responsibilities and authorities for implementing and sustaining the Department of Energy (DOE) Operations Security (OPSEC) Program. Cancels DOE O 5632.3B. Canceled by DOE O 471.2 of 9-28-1995.

  7. Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes roles and responsibilities for the Department of Energy Safeguards and Security Program. Cancels DOE O 470.4. Canceled by DOE O 470.4B

  8. AMALGAMATED SECURITY COMMUNITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Andrew Stephen

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the process of the formation and dissolution of Amalgamated Security Communities, a topic that has been ignored by the academic community except as a side note when the origins of Pluralistic ...

  9. Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1988-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish the policy and responsibilities for the Department of Energy safeguards and security program. Does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 5630.11A dated 12-7-92.

  10. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Security Administration FY 2011 - FY 2015 Budget Outlook Managing the NNSA 4.0% Science, Technology & Engineering 14.5% Stockpile Support 17.9% Preventing the Spread of...

  11. Data port security lock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quinby, Joseph D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hall, Clarence S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In a security apparatus for securing an electrical connector, a plug may be fitted for insertion into a connector receptacle compliant with a connector standard. The plug has at least one aperture adapted to engage at least one latch in the connector receptacle. An engagement member is adapted to partially extend through at least one aperture and lock to at least one structure within the connector receptacle.

  12. Engineering secure software 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jetly, Prateek

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    breaches in the operating environment. Security breaches resulting from misuse or tnisconfiguration of the program should not be blamed on the software. T'his is a debatable position. A security breach that results from an unintentional enor... units with public key algorithms, private keys, and certificates. Any attempt to access or modify the data in these devices will render them unusable. The device contains software tools. These devices use the computer they reside on as a general...

  13. Incidents of Security Concern

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Sets forth requirements for the DOE Incidents of Security Concern Program, including timely identification and notification of, response to, inquiry into, reporting of, and closure actions for incidents of security concern. Cancels Chapter VII of DOE O 470.1; DOE N 471.3; and Chapter IV of DOE M 471.2-1B (Note: Paragraphs 1 and 2 of Chapter III remain in effect.) Canceled by DOE O 470.4.

  14. Global climate change and international security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karas, Thomas H.

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report originates in a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories, bringing together a variety of external experts with Sandia personnel to discuss 'The Implications of Global Climate Change for International Security.' Whatever the future of the current global warming trend, paleoclimatic history shows that climate change happens, sometimes abruptly. These changes can severely impact human water supplies, agriculture, migration patterns, infrastructure, financial flows, disease prevalence, and economic activity. Those impacts, in turn, can lead to national or international security problems stemming from aggravation of internal conflicts, increased poverty and inequality, exacerbation of existing international conflicts, diversion of national and international resources from international security programs (military or non-military), contribution to global economic decline or collapse, or international realignments based on climate change mitigation policies. After reviewing these potential problems, the report concludes with a brief listing of some research, technology, and policy measures that might mitigate them.

  15. Lemnos Interoperable Security Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Stewart; Ron Halbgewachs; Adrian Chavez; Rhett Smith; David Teumim

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The manner in which the control systems are being designed and operated in the energy sector is undergoing some of the most significant changes in history due to the evolution of technology and the increasing number of interconnections to other system. With these changes however come two significant challenges that the energy sector must face; 1) Cyber security is more important than ever before, and 2) Cyber security is more complicated than ever before. A key requirement in helping utilities and vendors alike in meeting these challenges is interoperability. While interoperability has been present in much of the discussions relating to technology utilized within the energy sector and especially the Smart Grid, it has been absent in the context of cyber security. The Lemnos project addresses these challenges by focusing on the interoperability of devices utilized within utility control systems which support critical cyber security functions. In theory, interoperability is possible with many of the cyber security solutions available to utilities today. The reality is that the effort required to achieve cyber security interoperability is often a barrier for utilities. For example, consider IPSec, a widely-used Internet Protocol to define Virtual Private Networks, or â?? tunnelsâ?ť, to communicate securely through untrusted public and private networks. The IPSec protocol suite has a significant number of configuration options and encryption parameters to choose from, which must be agreed upon and adopted by both parties establishing the tunnel. The exercise in getting software or devices from different vendors to interoperate is labor intensive and requires a significant amount of security expertise by the end user. Scale this effort to a significant number of devices operating over a large geographical area and the challenge becomes so overwhelming that it often leads utilities to pursue solutions from a single vendor. These single vendor solutions may inadvertently lock utilities into proprietary and closed systems Lemnos is built on the successes of Open PCS Security Architecture for Interoperable Design (OPSAID), a previous DOE National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) project. It enhances security interoperability by identifying basic cyber security functions based on utility requirements and then selecting open source solutions, namely Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) RFCs, to support these functions. Once identified, specific configuration parameters for each RFC suitable for the electric utility control system environment are identified and documented. These configuration parameters are referred to as Interoperable Configuration Profiles (ICP) and their effectiveness within the utility control systems environment is verified with comprehensive testing as the final step in the process. The project focused on development of ICPs for four security protocols (IPsec, SSH, LDAP, and Syslog) which represent fundamental building blocks which can be utilized for securing utility control systems. These ICPs are product agnostic and can be applied modularly to any device (router, substation gateway, intelligent electronic device, etc.) within the utility control system as the end user deems necessary for their unique system architecture. The Lemnos Interoperable Security Program is a public-private partnership under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) program and supports The Roadmap to Secure Energy Delivery Systems. In addition to EnerNex, the core team supporting the effort includes Tennessee Valley Authority, Sandia National Laboratories, and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories. Adding to the core team effort is collaboration from additional industry participants in the project including the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Alien Vault, Cisco, Encore Networks, GarrettCom, Industrial Defender, N-Dimension Solutions, Phoenix Contact, RuggedCom, and Siemens.

  16. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 574: Neptune, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 574, Neptune. CAU 574 is included in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996 [as amended March 2010]) and consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 12 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 12-23-10, U12c.03 Crater (Neptune); (2) CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca). This plan provides the methodology for the field activities that will be performed to gather the necessary information for closure of the two CASs. There is sufficient information and process knowledge regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 574 using the SAFER process. Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, field screening, analytical results, the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process (Section 3.0), and an evaluation of corrective action alternatives (Appendix B), closure in place with administrative controls is the expected closure strategy for CAU 574. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation to verify and support the expected closure strategy and provide a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval.

  17. IY5512: Part 1 Information Security Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Chris

    IY5512: Part 1 1 Information Security Group IY5512 Computer Security Part 1: Introduction to computer security Chris Mitchell me@chrismitchell.net http://www.chrismitchell.net 1 Information Security) ... 2 Information Security Group Agenda · Overview · Security goals · Security approaches ­ prevention

  18. Are three-dimensional spider webs defensive adaptations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackledge, Todd

    LETTER Are three-dimensional spider webs defensive adaptations? Todd A. Blackledge1 *, Jonathan A-mail: tab42@cornell.edu Abstract Spider webs result from complex behaviours that have evolved under many selective pressures. Webs have been primarily considered to be foraging adaptations, neglecting

  19. Doctoral Defense "Low-Temperature Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Doctoral Defense "Low-Temperature Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor for Energy Recovery from Domestic such as anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) are emerging as one option to recover energy during domestic highlighting microbial community shifts in the bioreactor and biofilm during changes in membrane fouling

  20. School of Industrial Engineering and Management Doctoral Dissertation Defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    School of Industrial Engineering and Management Doctoral Dissertation Defense Objectives methodology and the results. · Provide the advisory committee with a means for assuring that the dissertation dissertation proposal. · Provide the advisory committee with a final data point for verification of the student

  1. BETAVOLTAIC BATTERIES Long-Life Power for Defense & Medical Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BETAVOLTAIC BATTERIES Long-Life Power for Defense & Medical Markets NREL Industry Growth Forum Jonathan W. Greene, CEO November 2, 2009 #12;·! Patented Betavoltaics ­ tiny, long life batteries targeting electronic and isotope powered batteries MS - 14 yrs management and engineering ·!Expert in patent

  2. RISK MANAGEMENT AND TORT DEFENSE Sub-Chapter 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    1 #12;2 RISK MANAGEMENT AND TORT DEFENSE 2.6.203 Sub-Chapter 2 State Vehicle Use 2.6.201 INTRODUCTION (1) The following rules define acceptable uses for state-owned or leased motor pool vehicles guidelines, policies, insurance coverage exclusions, or regulations for vehicle/equipment fleet operations

  3. analyses defense nuclear: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analyses defense nuclear First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Global Analyses of Nuclear...

  4. Towards Attack-Agnostic Defenses David Brumley and Dawn Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brumley, David

    Towards Attack-Agnostic Defenses David Brumley and Dawn Song Carnegie Mellon University {dbrumley,dawnsong}@cs.cmu.edu Abstract Internet attackers control hundreds of thousands to per- haps millions of computers, which they can use for a va- riety of different attacks. Common attacks include spam delivery, phishing, and DDo

  5. Embedded Electrical and Computer Engineering MASTER ORAL DEFENSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmoodi, Hamid

    of this research is to design a low power integrated system that can be used in vivo for scanning the electrode. A model created in Python provides input vectors and output comparison for the verification processEmbedded Electrical and Computer Engineering MASTER ORAL DEFENSE TITLE: Low Power Scanner for High

  6. On Clinical Trials in Psychiatry In Defense of the Traditional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On Clinical Trials in Psychiatry In Defense of the Traditional EĆcacy Trial The randomized controlled clinical trial is still a relatively new technology for as- sessing the value of therapeutic interven- tions, yet innovations in the design and analysis of clinical trials in psychiatry have lagged

  7. ata security feature: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sensitive data. The security of the data depends on physical security, OS security and DBMS security. Database security can be compromised by obtaining sensitive data, changing...

  8. Inhabiting cycles of maritime obsolescence : redirecting the National Defense Reserve Fleet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polansky, Nicholas W. (Nicholas Wilkes)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Defense is in a state of obsolescence. The metrics of risk have changed from threat of military invasion to that of weather. Infrastructure is in a state of transition. The Maritime Administration's National Defense Reserve ...

  9. Practical matters for defense contractors converting DoD technology to commercial markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting, Carina Maria

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis asks if and how the defense contractor can profitably transfer the technology and institutional learning obtained from DoD funded R&D to commercial markets. There are numerous examples of very successful defense ...

  10. Study of Medical Students’ Malpractice Fear and Defensive Medicine: A “Hidden Curriculum?”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, William; Rodriguez, Robert; Suarez, David; Fortman, Jonathan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Emergency Medicine Volume XV, NO . 3 : May 2014WM, et al. Defensive medicine among high-risk specialist293:2609-2617. 3. Defensive Medicine and Medical Practice.

  11. Security enhanced with increased vehicle inspections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security enhanced with increased vehicle inspections Security measures increase as of March: vehicle inspections won't delay traffic New increased security procedures meet LANL's...

  12. On Cyber Security for Networked Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, Saurabh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    her students on security of process control systems. I amcyber-security tools for process control systems. In theon the security mechanisms of process control systems, few

  13. Global Environmental Change and Human Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunnas, Jan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with human rights, human security or environmental change ifEnvironmental Change and Human Security By Matthew, RichardChange and Human Security. Cambridge, Massachusetts &

  14. Security and United States Immigration Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Totten, Robbie James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Change and European Security. London: Brassey's. Furer,1981]. American National Security, 6th ed. Baltimore, MD:J. Wheeler. 2008. The Security Dilemma: Fear, Cooperation

  15. Energy and Security in Northeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Michael; Johnson, Celeste; Fei, Edward; Suzuki, Tatsujiro

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regional cooperation on energy and security issues in Asia.Energy and Security in Northeast Asia An IGCC studycan be drawn. The energy security situation and outlook are

  16. Sandia Energy - Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure Home Stationary Power Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructureashoter2015...

  17. Preliminary Notice of Violation, National Security Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Security Technologies, LLC - September 26, 2014 Preliminary Notice of Violation, National Security Technologies, LLC - September 26, 2014 September 26, 2014 Security...

  18. Personnel Security - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72.2 Chg 1, Personnel Security by Mark Pekrul Functional areas: Personnel Security, Security, Human Capital The order establishes requirements that will enable DOE to operate a...

  19. Some Thoughts on Teaching Secure Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Teaching Context in Information Security,” ACM Journal onWorld Conference on Information Security Education pp. 23–Colloquium on Information Systems Security Education (CISSE)

  20. On Cyber Security for Networked Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, Saurabh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of Information Security Games, Proceedings of theon the Economics of Information Security WEIS’, Hanover, NH,on the Economics of Information Security’. Anderson, R. and

  1. DEFENSE THREAT REDUCTION AGENCY 8725 JOHN J . KINGMAN ROAD, STOP 620 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    DEFENSE THREAT REDUCTION AGENCY 8725 JOHN J . KINGMAN ROAD, STOP 620 1 FORT BELVOIR, VA 22060-6201 February 28, 2013 Industry and Academia Partners of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and U.S. Strategic of unceltainty for the entire Department of Defense. The Def1 ns Threat Reduction Agency and U. S. Strategic

  2. A Taxonomy of DDoS Attack and DDoS Defense Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ruby B.

    A Taxonomy of DDoS Attack and DDoS Defense Mechanisms Jelena Mirkovic 449 Smith Hall Computer the attacks and the defense approaches is overwhelming. This paper presents two taxonomies for classifying attacks and defenses, and thus provides researchers with a better understanding of the problem

  3. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE LUNG CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2013 STRATEGIC PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE LUNG CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2013 STRATEGIC PLAN The Fiscal Year 2013 (FY13) Defense Appropriations Act provides for $10.5 million to the Department of Defense Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP) to support innovative, high- impact lung cancer research. This program

  4. MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL ANNOUNCEMENT OF PUBLIC DEFENSE OF THE DISSERTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Matthew

    MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL ANNOUNCEMENT OF PUBLIC DEFENSE OF THE DISSERTATION This form obligates you, your Dissertation Director, and your committee to a public defense of your dissertation community. The dissertation defense schedule is published on the Graduate School's Web site. You are solely

  5. Testing a Collaborative DDoS Defense in a Red Team/Blue Team Exercise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Testing a Collaborative DDoS Defense in a Red Team/Blue Team Exercise Jelena Mirkovic, Member, IEEE, and performed October 2002 to May 2003. The goal of the exercise was to evaluate a collaborative DDoS defense in DDoS defense systems (e.g., avoiding reliance on timing mechanisms), and taught us many lessons about

  6. Administrator Highlights U.S.-Georgian Nuclear Security Cooperation in Tbilisi

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino highlighted the strong U.S.-Georgian cooperation on nuclear security issues during a day-long visit to the Republic of Georgia in mid-June. He briefed the media at availability at the Tbilisi airport. In April 2009, President Obama outlined an ambitious agenda to secure vulnerable nuclear material around the world within four years, calling the danger of a terrorist acquiring nuclear weapons "the most immediate and extreme threat to global security." In this year's State of the Union, he called the threat of nuclear weapons, "the greatest danger to the American people." In order to meet that challenge, the President's FY2011 Budget Request includes close to $2.7 billion for the National Nuclear Security Administration's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation program -- an increase of 25.7 percent over FY2010. Included in that request is NNSA's Second Line of Defense (SLD) program, which works around the world to strengthen the capability of foreign governments to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime shipping system.

  7. Administrator Highlights U.S.-Georgian Nuclear Security Cooperation in Tbilisi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino highlighted the strong U.S.-Georgian cooperation on nuclear security issues during a day-long visit to the Republic of Georgia in mid-June. He briefed the media at availability at the Tbilisi airport. In April 2009, President Obama outlined an ambitious agenda to secure vulnerable nuclear material around the world within four years, calling the danger of a terrorist acquiring nuclear weapons "the most immediate and extreme threat to global security." In this year's State of the Union, he called the threat of nuclear weapons, "the greatest danger to the American people." In order to meet that challenge, the President's FY2011 Budget Request includes close to $2.7 billion for the National Nuclear Security Administration's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation program -- an increase of 25.7 percent over FY2010. Included in that request is NNSA's Second Line of Defense (SLD) program, which works around the world to strengthen the capability of foreign governments to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime shipping system.

  8. Global Security | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNot Logged In You must createSecurity Global

  9. physical security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development of NovelHigh( ( ( ( (physical security |

  10. Radiological Security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,Enriched UraniumPhysical Security Systems(PA)About| National

  11. Security Commodity Team | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook TwitterSearch-Comments Sign InNuclear Security

  12. Security Notice | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomeland ScienceInnovationScience andbarrierSecurity

  13. Tag: security | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag: Safety Displaying 1security Tag:

  14. Secure Manufacturing | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is Taking OverEvaluating ' M M t345 UnlimitedSecure

  15. Secure Storage | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is Taking OverEvaluating ' M M t345Secure Storage

  16. Threats to financial system security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGovern, D.E.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The financial system in the United States is slowly migrating from the bricks and mortar of banks on the city square to branch banks, ATM`s, and now direct linkage through computers to the home. Much work has been devoted to the security problems inherent in protecting property and people. The impact of attacks on the information aspects of the financial system has, however, received less attention. Awareness is raised through publicized events such as the junk bond fraud perpetrated by Milken or gross mismanagement in the failure of the Barings Bank through unsupervised trading activities by Leeson in Singapore. These events, although seemingly large (financial losses may be on the order of several billion dollars), are but small contributors to the estimated $114 billion loss to all types of financial fraud in 1993. Most of the losses can be traced to the contribution of many small attacks perpetrated against a variety of vulnerable components and systems. This paper explores the magnitude of these financial system losses and identifies new areas for security to be applied to high consequence events.

  17. DESIGN ANALYSIS FOR THE DEFENSE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Radulesscu; J.S. Tang

    2000-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of ''Design Analysis for the Defense High-Level Waste Disposal Container'' analysis is to technically define the defense high-level waste (DHLW) disposal container/waste package using the Waste Package Department's (WPD) design methods, as documented in ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' (CRWMS M&O [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor] 2000a). The DHLW disposal container is intended for disposal of commercial high-level waste (HLW) and DHLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms), placed within disposable canisters. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-managed spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a DHLW disposal container along with HLW forms. The objective of this analysis is to demonstrate that the DHLW disposal container/waste package satisfies the project requirements, as embodied in Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description Document (SDD) (CRWMS M&O 1999a), and additional criteria, as identified in Waste Package Design Sensitivity Report (CRWMS M&Q 2000b, Table 4). The analysis briefly describes the analytical methods appropriate for the design of the DHLW disposal contained waste package, and summarizes the results of the calculations that illustrate the analytical methods. However, the analysis is limited to the calculations selected for the DHLW disposal container in support of the Site Recommendation (SR) (CRWMS M&O 2000b, Section 7). The scope of this analysis is restricted to the design of the codisposal waste package of the Savannah River Site (SRS) DHLW glass canisters and the Training, Research, Isotopes General Atomics (TRIGA) SNF loaded in a short 18-in.-outer diameter (OD) DOE standardized SNF canister. This waste package is representative of the waste packages that consist of the DHLW disposal container, the DHLW/HLW glass canisters, and the DOE-managed SNF in disposable canisters. The intended use of this analysis is to support Site Recommendation reports and to assist in the development of WPD drawings. Activities described in this analysis were conducted in accordance with the Development Plan ''Design Analysis for the Defense High-Level Waste Disposal Container'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c) with no deviations from the plan.

  18. Roundhouse: A Security Architecture for Active Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irvine, Cynthia E.

    on these because they offer the greatest opportunity for cost reduction: · Maintenance and retooling costs. Our long-range goal is to permit an order of magnitude reduction in protection and retooling costs. DEPOT: Specification, design, and prototype implementation on a PC base of the framework and initial

  19. Program Activities | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  20. Transportation Security Rulemaking Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon theTed DonatEnergyDepartment of EnergyPlan

  1. Independent Oversight Activity Report, National Nuclear Security

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEthe RankingReform atSolar Energy

  2. Engineering secure software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jetly, Prateek

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the vulnerabilities based on their coverage and cost. The above modeling approach is also known as thc onion peel model due to its nature of dividing the problem space into zones of similar security. These zones represent the peels of the onion. Each zone is also... into peels based on the security considerations of the entities of the system. The model describes minimum interaction among components across peels and maximum within peels. The onion diagram includes the physical entities of the systems and not just...

  3. GAANN -Computer Systems Security GAANN Computer Systems Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    GAANN - Computer Systems Security GAANN ­ Computer Systems Security · What is computer systems security? ­ The protection of all aspects of a computer system from unauthorized use · Why is it important? ­ Computing devices have a large impact on our daily life ­ Guaranteeing that the devices perform as desired

  4. Smart Grid Embedded Cyber Security: Ensuring Security While Promoting Interoperability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragsdale, G.

    -25, 2010 Implementing TCG Standards Within Systems ? Trusted Platform Module (TPM) ? Provides root of trust ? Secure storage ? Signing & hashing functions ? Tamper detection ? Accelerates cryptography ? TPM software stack ? Implements TCG stack... Update Session Security (symmetric key) Code and Data Integrity (memory hash) ?Secure secret storage ?TPM chip root trust secret ?Owner root trust secret ?Memory hash signature ?Standard encryption algorithm ?Standard hashing algorithm ?Tamper detection...

  5. SECURITY BASICS FOR MOBILE DEVICES UNH IT SECURITY, DECEMBER 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SECURITY BASICS FOR MOBILE DEVICES UNH IT SECURITY, DECEMBER 2011 Choose brands and models of mobile devices that have the options referenced below. Use all available security options that your or sensitive university information in un-approved off-campus services, such as public cloud based services

  6. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 547 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 547 consists of the following three Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 3, and 9 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; AND (3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly Closure activities began in August 2011 and were completed in June 2012. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for CAU 547 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2011). The recommended corrective action for the three CASs in CAU 547 was closure in place with administrative controls. The following closure activities were performed: (1) Open holes were filled with concrete; (2) Steel casings were placed over vertical expansion joints and filled with cement; (3) Engineered soil covers were constructed over piping and exposed sections of the gas sampling system components; (4) Fencing, monuments, Jersey barriers, radiological postings, and use restriction (UR) warning signs were installed around the perimeters of the sites; (5) Housekeeping debris was picked up from around the sites and disposed; and (6) Radiological surveys were performed to confirm final radiological postings. UR documentation is included in Appendix D. The post-closure plan was presented in detail in the CADD/CAP for CAU 547 and is included as Appendix F of this report. The requirements are summarized in Section 5.2 of this report. The proposed post-closure requirements consist of visual inspections to determine the condition of postings and radiological surveys to verify contamination has not migrated. NNSA/NSO requests the following: (1) A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 547; and (2) The transfer of CAU 547 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO.

  7. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 562 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 562 consists of the following 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 02-26-11, Lead Shot · CAS 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain · CAS 02-59-01, Septic System · CAS 02-60-01, Concrete Drain · CAS 02-60-02, French Drain · CAS 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain · CAS 02-60-04, French Drain · CAS 02-60-05, French Drain · CAS 02-60-06, French Drain · CAS 02-60-07, French Drain · CAS 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall · CAS 23-99-06, Grease Trap · CAS 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls Closure activities began in October 2011 and were completed in April 2012. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Plan for CAU 562 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2011). The corrective actions included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities generated sanitary waste and hazardous waste. Some wastes exceeded land disposal limits and required offsite treatment prior to disposal. Other wastes met land disposal restrictions and were disposed in appropriate onsite or offsite landfills. NNSA/NSO requests the following: · A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 562 · The transfer of CAU 562 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO

  8. INFORMATION SECURITY University Policy No: IM7800

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herwig, Falk

    Page 1 INFORMATION SECURITY POLICY University Policy No: IM7800 Classification: Information to an Information Security Incident Procedures for Addressing Security Vulnerabilities of University Information Resources and Information Systems University Information Security Classification Procedures Procedures

  9. Departmental Personnel Security- Clearance Automation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The primary objective of the DOE Integrated Security System (eDISS+) Initiative is to support the integration of multiple DOE security systems and databases. This integrated environment provides...

  10. Database Security: A Historical Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesov, Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of security in database research has greatly increased over the years as most of critical functionality of the business and military enterprises became digitized. Database is an integral part of any information system and they often hold sensitive data. The security of the data depends on physical security, OS security and DBMS security. Database security can be compromised by obtaining sensitive data, changing data or degrading availability of the database. Over the last 30 years the information technology environment have gone through many changes of evolution and the database research community have tried to stay a step ahead of the upcoming threats to the database security. The database research community has thoughts about these issues long before they were address by the implementations. This paper will examine the different topics pertaining to database security and see the adaption of the research to the changing environment. Some short term database research trends will be ascertained ...

  11. Computer Security Incident Handling Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    States Computer Emergency Readiness Team National Cyber Security Division Department of Homeland Security of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD Karen Scarfone Scarfone Cybersecurity C O M P U T E R S E C U R I

  12. System security Dr Len Hamey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamey, Len

    , firewalls, detecting intrusions) Security process cycle policy implementation administration audit risk access with firewall Use generic service banners Use intrusion detection system that can detect;2 Security Services Confidentiality service. Authentication service. Integrity service. Access Control

  13. A Historical Evaluation of the U15 Complex, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drollinger, Harold [DRI; Holz, Barbara A [DRI; Bullard, Thomas F [DRI; Goldenberg, nancy G [Carey & Co; Ashbaough, Laurence J [DRI; Griffin, Wayne R [DRI

    2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U15 Complex on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Three underground nuclear tests and two underground nuclear fuel storage experiments were conducted at the complex. The nuclear tests were Hard Hat in 1962, Tiny Tot in 1965, and Pile Driver in 1966. The Hard Hat and Pile Driver nuclear tests involved different types of experiment sections in test drifts at various distances from the explosion in order to determine which sections could best survive in order to design underground command centers. The Tiny Tot nuclear test involved an underground cavity in which the nuclear test was executed. It also provided data in designing underground structures and facilities to withstand a nuclear attack. The underground nuclear fuel storage experiments were Heater Test 1 from 1977 to 1978 and Spent Fuel Test - Climax from 1978 to 1985. Heater Test 1 was used to design the later Spent Fuel Test - Climax experiment. The latter experiment was a model of a larger underground storage facility and primarily involved recording the conditions of the spent fuel and the surrounding granite medium. Fieldwork was performed intermittently in the summers of 2011 and 2013, totaling 17 days. Access to the underground tunnel complex is sealed and unavailable. Restricted to the surface, four buildings, four structures, and 92 features associated with nuclear testing and fuel storage experiment activities at the U15 Complex have been recorded. Most of these are along the west side of the complex and next to the primary access road and are characteristic of an industrial mining site, albeit one with scientific interests. The geomorphological fieldwork was conducted over three days in the summer of 2011. It was discovered that major modifications to the terrain have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to the tests and experiments, and construction of drill pads and retention ponds. Six large trenches for exploring across the Boundary geologic fault are also present. The U15 Complex, designated historic district 143 and site 26NY15177, is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under Criteria A, C, and D of 36 CFR Part 60.4. As a historic district and archaeological site eligible to the National Register of Historic Places, the Desert Research Institute recommends that the area defined for the U15 Complex, historic district 143 and site 26NY15117, be left in place in its current condition. The U15 Complex should also be included in the NNSS cultural resources monitoring program and monitored for disturbances or alterations.

  14. Nike | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    or 2,000,000 miles per hour) than any other laser. For more information on NRL's Nike facility, visit Nike's webpage. Related Topics stockpile stewardship defense programs R&D...

  15. Safeguards and Security progress report, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.B.; Jaramillo, G.R. (comps.)

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From January to December 1989, the Los Alamos Safeguards and Security Research and Development (R D) program carried out the activities described in the first four parts of this report: Science and Technology Base Development, Basic Systems Design, Onsite Test and Evaluation and Facility Support, and International Safeguards. For the most part, these activities were sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Safeguards and Security. Part 1 covers development of the basic technology essential to continuing improvements in the practice of safeguards and security. It includes our computer security R D and the activities of the DOE Center for Computer Security, which provides the basis for encouraging and disseminating this important technology. Part 2 treats activities aimed at developing methods for designing and evaluating safeguards systems, with special emphasis on the integration of the several subsystems into a real safeguards system. Part 3 describes efforts of direct assistance to the DOE and its contractors and includes consultation on materials control and accounting problems, development and demonstration of specialized techniques and instruments, and comprehensive participation in the design and demonstration of advanced safeguards systems. Part 3 also reports a series of training courses in various aspects of safeguards that makes the technology more accessible to those who must apply it. Finally, Part 4 covers international safeguards activities, including both support to the International Atomic Energy Agency and bilateral exchanges. Part 5 reports several safeguards-related activities that have sponsors other than the DOE/OSS. 87 refs., 52 figs.

  16. Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies 2005...

  17. Line Management Perspective: National Nuclear Security Administration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Line Management Perspective: National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Addthis Description Slide Presentation by Jim...

  18. Office of Security Assessments | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    information, personnel security, and foreign visits and assignments. Assesses the information security practices at facilities managing special access programs and...

  19. Secretary Richardson Accepts Recommendations for Improving Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Secretary Richardson Accepts Recommendations for Improving Security at Nuclear Weapons Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS...

  20. Security Science & Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Security Science & Technology Border Security Comprehensive Vulnerability and Threat Analysis Consequence Management, Safeguards, and Non-Proliferation Tools Export...

  1. Corporate Security and Conflict Outcomes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tkach, Benjamin K

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    militaries (Avant 2000). Existing research has shown a steady increase in the number and employment of private security firms (PSFs) over the last five decades due to expansion of global market demand for private security (Avant 2005; Dunigan 2011; Singer... prominent role in international aviation security (Abrahamsen and Williams 2011). Because PSFs are based largely on corporate profit motivations, contract fulfillment and reputation are critical for firms to secure market share. The international market...

  2. East Asian Security in 2025

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heavin, Reagan; Hudson, Adam; Krueger, Brandon; O'Neil, Sean; Rozell, Griffin; Suma, Matt

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    East Asian Security in 2025 Who We Are • Reagan Heavin – Energy • Adam Hudson – State Capacity • Brandon Krueger – Military • Sean O’Neil – Demographics • Griffin Rozell – Balance of Power • Matt Suma – Economy East Asian Security in 2025 China...: Competition, Cooperation, Plateau? Reagan Heavin Adam Hudson Brandon Krueger Sean O’Neil Griffin Rozell Matt Suma 24 April 2008 East Asian Security in 2025 Agenda • Conclusions • Projections • Drivers • Four Outcomes • Questions East Asian Security in 2025...

  3. Safeguards and Security Program References

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual establishes definitions for terms related to the Department of Energy Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program and includes lists of references and acronyms/abbreviations applicable to S&S Program directives. Cancels the Safeguards and Security Glossary of Terms, dated 12-18-95. Current Safeguards and Security Program References can also be found at Safeguards and Security Policy Information Resource (http://pir.pnl.gov/)

  4. Cyber Security Process Requirements Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Manual establishes the minimum implementation standards for cyber security management processes throughout the Department. No cancellation.

  5. Safeguard Security and Awareness Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides detailed requirements and procedures to supplement DOE O 470.1, Safeguards and Security Program, Chapter IV.

  6. On Security Notions for Verifiably Encrypted Signature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1010 Leadership Laboratory IB .5 AEROS 1111 A AERO 1100 The Air Force Today 1 E AERO 1110 Aero Defense

  7. Sequential Defense Against Random and Intentional Attacks in Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Pin-Yu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Network robustness against attacks is one of the most fundamental researches in network science as it is closely associated with the reliability and functionality of various networking paradigms. However, despite the study on intrinsic topological vulnerabilities to node removals, little is known on the network robustness when network defense mechanisms are implemented, especially for networked engineering systems equipped with detection capabilities. In this paper, a sequential defense mechanism is firstly proposed in complex networks for attack inference and vulnerability assessment, where the data fusion center sequentially infers the presence of an attack based on the binary attack status reported from the nodes in the network. The network robustness is evaluated in terms of the ability to identify the attack prior to network disruption under two major attack schemes, i.e., random and intentional attacks. We provide a parametric plug-in model for performance evaluation on the proposed mechanism and valida...

  8. Defenses against Covert-Communications in Multimedia and Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jainsky, Julien Sebastien 1981-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    subversive communications to a much greater extent. 3 Furthermore, the acquisition of highly correlated multimedia provides fertile ground for advanced steganographic approaches. Covert communications in multimedia networks is of special concern...DEFENSES AGAINST COVERT-COMMUNICATIONS IN MULTIMEDIA AND SENSOR NETWORKS A Dissertation by JULIEN SEBASTIEN JAINSKY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  9. Simulated Interdiction: Proliferation Security Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ………………………………... Technical Capabilities to Support PSI ………………………………… Foreign Policy and External Relations ………………………............... Republic of Bevostan ………………………………………………………….. Geography ……………………………………………………………... iii 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 10... Security, Science and Policy Institute (NSSPI) Texas A&M University May 6, 2009 Simulated Interdiction: The Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI) Acknowledgements The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department...

  10. Security and Verification Provable cryptography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregoire, Benjamin - Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique, Centre de recherche Sophia Antipolis

    Security and Verification Provable cryptography Benjamin Grégoire1 Tamara Rezk1 1INRIA Sophia Antipolis - Méditerranée, France Cours de Master 2 Univerisité de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Security and Verification 1/ 33 #12;Cryptanalysis-driven Security Propose a cryptographic scheme Wait for someone to come

  11. MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2006 MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL INFORMATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS: FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 200 APPROVED BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE Shirley Radack, EditorShirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division

  12. RECOMMENDED SECURITY CONTROLS FOR FEDERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 2005 RECOMMENDED SECURITY CONTROLS FOR FEDERAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS: GUIDANCE FOR SELECTING COST-EFFECTIVE CONTROLS USING A RISK-BASED PROCESS Shirley Radack, Editor, Computer Security Division, Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology Security controls are the management

  13. Positioning Security from electronic warfare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, Markus

    Positioning Security from electronic warfare to cheating RFID and road-tax systems Markus Kuhn;Military positioning-security concerns Electronic warfare is primarily about denying or falsifying location of the importance of global positioning security has led to the military discipline of "navigation warfare". 5 #12

  14. Information Technology Security Assessment Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federal Information Technology Security Assessment Framework November 28, 2000 Prepared (NIST) Computer Security Division #12;Overview Information and the systems that process it are among and maintain a program to adequately secure its information and system assets. Agency programs must: 1) assure

  15. Foundations for Designing Secure Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurjens, Jan

    Architectures This talk: foundations for designing software architectures for secure systems, based their architectures. Will apply specialized tool-support to automatically evaluate the designs for potential security weaknesses. (Based on tutorial at WICSA 2004.) #12;Jan Jürjens, TU Munich: Foundations for Designing Secure

  16. GEORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSITT Computer Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grabowski, Jens

    GEORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSITÄT GÖTTINGEN Computer Security Overview and Introduction Computer Security Security @ Göttingen » Research group for comuter security » Prof. Dr. Konrad Rieck » 4 PhD students (+ 2 security » Research on analysis, detection and prevention of threats » Development of intelligent security

  17. SECURITY TECHNIQUES Chris J Mitchell1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Chris

    SECURITY TECHNIQUES Chris J Mitchell1 Introduction In this paper we consider the range of security security has been exerted. However, the techniques described are of general applicability by a security technique; in doing so we will distinguish between security features and security techniques (or

  18. Information Security Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Manual establishes security requirements for the protection and control of matter required to be classified or controlled by statutes, regulations, or U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directives. Original dated dated 1-16-09. Canceled by DOE O 471.6--except for Section D.

  19. Information Security Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes security requirements for the protection and control of matter required to be classified or controlled by statutes, regulations, or U.S. Department of Energy directives. Cancels DOE M 470.4-4 Chg 1. DOE M 470.4-4A Chg 1 issued 10-12-10.

  20. Information Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes an Information Security Program for the protection and control of classified and sensitive information. Cancels DOE 5630.8A, DOE 5639.1, DOE 5639.5, DOE 5639.6A, DOE 5639.7, DOE M 5632.1C-1, Chapter III, Para. 1, 2, and 4-9

  1. The decommodified security ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    are currently experiencing: changing patterns of work, the phenom- enon she calls the "breakdown in the wage furthered by the work of the International Labour Office. In particular, the programme of researchThe decommodified security ratio: A tool for assessing European social protection systems Georges

  2. Conceptualizing Energy Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winzer, Christian

    Energy security is one of the main targets of energy policy. However, the term has not been clearly defined, which makes it hard to measure and difficult to balance against other policy objectives. We review the multitude of definitions of energy...

  3. Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish responsibilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program, and to establish program planning and management requirements for the S&S Program. Cancels DOE O 470.4A, DOE M 470.4-1, Chg. 2, and DOE O 142.1.

  4. Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes roles and responsibilities for the Department of Energy Safeguards and Security Program. Cancels: DOE O 470.1, DOE O 471.2A, DOE O 471.4, DOE O 472.1C, DOE O 473.1, DOE O 473.2, DOE O 474.1A. Canceled by DOE O 470.4A.

  5. December 2003 SECURITY CONSIDERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    security early in the information system development life cycle (SDLC), you may be able to avoid higher, with tailoring, to any SDLC model or acquisition method the organization is using. The appendices to the guide.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/ index.html. The System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) The system development life cycle starts

  6. National Security System Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual provides baseline requirements and controls for the graded protection of the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of classified information and information systems used or operated by the Department of Energy (DOE), contractors, and any other organization on behalf of DOE, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE M 471.2-2. Canceled by DOE O 205.1B.

  7. A network security monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heberlein, L.T.; Dias, G.V.; Levitt, K.N.; Mukherjee, B.; Wood, J.; Wolber, D. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of security in computer networks is a rapidly growing area of interest because of the proliferation of networks and the paucity of security measures in most current networks. Since most networks consist of a collection of inter-connected local area networks (LANs), this paper concentrates on the security-related issues in a single broadcast LAN such as Ethernet. Specifically, we formalize various possible network attacks and outline methods of detecting them. Our basic strategy is to develop profiles of usage of network resources and then compare current usage patterns with the historical profile to determine possible security violations. Thus, our work is similar to the host-based intrusion-detection systems such as SRI's IDES. Different from such systems, however, is our use of a hierarchical model to refine the focus of the intrusion-detection mechanism. We also report on the development of our experimental LAN monitor currently under implementation. Several network attacks have been simulated and results on how the monitor has been able to detect these attacks are also analyzed. Initial results demonstrate that many network attacks are detectable with our monitor, although it can surely be defeated. Current work is focusing on the integration of network monitoring with host-based techniques. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Approved Module Information for CS4520, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Information Security Module Code: CS4520

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    Approved Module Information for CS4520, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Information Security Module Code and understanding of the need for and the underlying principles of information security. The module will enable MSc students to take an active role in the design, planning, evaluation and management of secure information

  9. Defense against common mode failures in protection system design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyman, R.H.; Johnson, G.L.

    1997-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of digital instrumentation and control into reactor safety systems creates a heightened concern about common-mode failure. This paper discusses the concern and methods to cope with the concern. Common-mode failures have been a ``fact-of-life`` in existing systems. The informal introduction of defense-in-depth and diversity (D-in-D&D)-coupled with the fact that hardware common-mode failures are often distributed in time-has allowed systems to deal with past common-mode failures. However, identical software operating in identical redundant systems presents the potential for simultaneous failure. Consequently, the use of digital systems raises the concern about common-mode failure to a new level. A more methodical approach to mitigating common-mode failure is needed to address these concerns. Purposeful introduction of D-in-D&D has been used as a defense against common-mode failure in reactor protection systems. At least two diverse systems are provided to mitigate any potential initiating event. Additionally, diverse displays and controls are provided to allow the operator to monitor plant status and manually initiate engineered safety features. A special form of conimon-mode failure analysis called ``defense-in-depth and diversity analysis`` has been developed to identify possible conimon-mode failure vulnerabilities in digital systems. An overview of this analysis technique is provided.

  10. T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is a high risk security vulnerability with the ActiveBar ActiveX controls used by IBM Rational System Architect.

  11. Information Analysis Methodology for Border Security Deployment Prioritization and Post Deployment Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, Paul M.; Maple, Scott A.

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to international commerce, cross-border conflicts, and corruption, a holistic, information driven, approach to border security is required to best understand how resources should be applied to affect sustainable improvements in border security. The ability to transport goods and people by land, sea, and air across international borders with relative ease for legitimate commercial purposes creates a challenging environment to detect illicit smuggling activities that destabilize national level border security. Smuggling activities operated for profit or smuggling operations driven by cross border conflicts where militant or terrorist organizations facilitate the transport of materials and or extremists to advance a cause add complexity to smuggling interdiction efforts. Border security efforts are further hampered when corruption thwarts interdiction efforts or reduces the effectiveness of technology deployed to enhance border security. These issues necessitate the implementation of a holistic approach to border security that leverages all available data. Large amounts of information found in hundreds of thousands of documents can be compiled to assess national or regional borders to identify variables that influence border security. Location data associated with border topics of interest may be extracted and plotted to better characterize the current border security environment for a given country or region. This baseline assessment enables further analysis, but also documents the initial state of border security that can be used to evaluate progress after border security improvements are made. Then, border security threats are prioritized via a systems analysis approach. Mitigation factors to address risks can be developed and evaluated against inhibiting factor such as corruption. This holistic approach to border security helps address the dynamic smuggling interdiction environment where illicit activities divert to a new location that provides less resistance to smuggling activities after training or technology is deployed at a given location. This paper will present an approach to holistic border security information analysis.

  12. Connecting to the Internet Securely; Protecting Home Networks CIAC-2324

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orvis, W J; Krystosek, P; Smith, J

    2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    With more and more people working at home and connecting to company networks via the Internet, the risk to company networks to intrusion and theft of sensitive information is growing. Working from home has many positive advantages for both the home worker and the company they work for. However, as companies encourage people to work from home, they need to start considering the interaction of the employee's home network and the company network he connects to. This paper discusses problems and solutions related to protection of home computers from attacks on those computers via the network connection. It does not consider protection of those systems from people who have physical access to the computers nor does it consider company laptops taken on-the-road. Home networks are often targeted by intruders because they are plentiful and they are usually not well secured. While companies have departments of professionals to maintain and secure their networks, home networks are maintained by the employee who may be less knowledgeable about network security matters. The biggest problems with home networks are that: Home networks are not designed to be secure and may use technologies (wireless) that are not secure; The operating systems are not secured when they are installed; The operating systems and applications are not maintained (for security considerations) after they are installed; and The networks are often used for other activities that put them at risk for being compromised. Home networks that are going to be connected to company networks need to be cooperatively secured by the employee and the company so they do not open up the company network to intruders. Securing home networks involves many of the same operations as securing a company network: Patch and maintain systems; Securely configure systems; Eliminate unneeded services; Protect remote logins; Use good passwords; Use current antivirus software; and Moderate your Internet usage habits. Most of these items do not take a lot of work, but require an awareness of the risks involved in not doing them or doing them incorrectly. The security of home networks and communications with company networks can be significantly improved by adding an appropriate software or hardware firewall to the home network and using a protected protocol such as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), a Virtual Private Network (VPN), or Secure Shell (SSH) for connecting to the company network.

  13. Development of a security-by-design handbook.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, David L.; Snell, Mark Kamerer; Iida, Toru (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan); Ochiai, Kazuya (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan); Tanuma, Koji (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing awareness that efficient and effective nuclear facility design is best achieved when requirements from the 3S disciplines Safety, Safeguards, and Security - are balanced and intrinsic to the facility design. This can be achieved when policy, processes, methods, and technologies are understood and applied in these areas during all phases of the design process. For the purposes of this paper, Security-by-design will be defined as the system level incorporation of the physical protection system (PPS) into a new or retrofitted nuclear power plant (NPP) or nuclear facility (NF) resulting in intrinsic security. Security-by-design can also be viewed as a framework to achieve robust and durable security systems. This paper reports on work performed to date to create a Security-by-Design Handbook, under a bilateral agreement between the United States and Japan, specifically, a review of physical protection principles and best practices, and a decommissioning to better understand where these principles and practices can be applied. This paper describes physical protection principles and best practices to achieve security-by- design that were gathered from International, Japanese, and U.S. sources. Principles are included for achieving security early in the design process where security requirements are typically less costly and easier to incorporate. The paper then describes a generic design process that covers the entire facility lifecycle from scoping and planning of the project to decommissioning and decontamination. Early design process phases, such as conceptual design, offer opportunities to add security features intrinsic to the facility design itself. Later phases, including design engineering and construction, are important for properly integrating security features into a coherent design and for planning for and assuring the proper performance of the security system during the operation and decommissioning of the facility. The paper also describes some future activities on this bilateral project to create a Security-by-Design Handbook. When completed, the Handbook is intended to assist countries with less experience in nuclear power programs to apply principles and best practices in an effective and efficient manner as early in the design as possible to achieve robust and durable security.

  14. At the end of the secure period, Technology Transfer (for patent works) or the Office of Research and Creative Activities (Export Controls) will be contacted to verify that the work can be released.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    At the end of the secure period, Technology Transfer (for patent works) or the Office of Research a patent, OR 2. Works with Export Control restrictions. Graduate Studies 105 FPH, Provo, UT, 84602 Tel@byu.edu patent OR export control restrictions #12;

  15. OVERVIEW OF TESTING TO SUPPORT PROCESSING OF SLUDGE BATCH 4 IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, C

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site began processing of its third sludge batch in March 2004. To avoid a feed outage in the facility, the next sludge batch will have to be prepared and ready for transfer to the DWPF by the end of 2006. The next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 4 (SB4), will consist of a significant volume of HM-type sludge. HM-type sludge is very high in aluminum compared to the mostly Purex-type sludges that have been processed to date. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with Liquid Waste Operations to define the sludge preparation plans and to perform testing to support qualification and processing of SB4. Significant challenges have arisen during SB4 preparation and testing to include poor sludge settling behavior and lower than desired projected melt rates. An overview of the testing activities is provided.

  16. Security seal. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gobeli, G.W.

    1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Security for a package or verifying seal in plastic material is provided by a print seal with unique thermally produced imprints in the plastic. If tampering is attempted, the material is irreparably damaged and thus detectable. The pattern of the imprints, similar to fingerprints are recorded as a positive identification for the seal, and corresponding recordings made to allow comparison. The integrity of the seal is proved by the comparison of imprint identification records made by laser beam projection.

  17. Cyber Security & Smart Grid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to complexity, proprietary nature and different management teams ? Ripe for exploitation ? Intel, Microsoft, Security vendors are not focused on this technology ? Many are NOT PC?s ? Many can be infected and the devices cannot be cleaned ESL-KT-11...-11-23 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 Inherent Vulnerabilities ? Two-way communications ? Distributed connectivity ? Customer usage data ? Metering devices ? Weak authentication and access control ? Lack of adequate training ? Lack...

  18. Perceptions of Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ura, Karma

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    followed by guerrillas, waged by the Bhutanese militia in rugged terrain. Though not written in accounts of any battles, the form of war oral sources describe suggest unconventional warfare. The natural defence position of the terrain combined with its... nor poverty in the areas adjacent to Bhutan, which are the ultimate causes of the current security problems Bhutan faces, are unfortunately on decline. Journal of Bhutan Studies 136 On the other hand, Bhutan, like several small states, has been...

  19. Security, Safety and Health

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of Energy Advisory BoardSecuring

  20. Information Security Management System for Microsoft's Cloud Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Information Security Management System for Microsoft's Cloud Infrastructure Online Services ......................................................................................................................................................................................1 Information Security Management System.......................................................................................................................7 Information Security Management Forum