Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

2

Effect of point and grain boundary defects on the mechanical behavior of monolayer MoS{sub 2} under tension via atomistic simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomistic simulation is used to study the structure and energy of defects in monolayer MoS{sub 2} and the role of defects on the mechanical properties of monolayer MoS{sub 2}. First, energy minimization is used to study the structure and energy of monosulfur vacancies positioned within the bottom S layer of the MoS{sub 2} lattice, and 60° symmetric tilt grain boundaries along the zigzag and armchair directions, with comparison to experimental observations and density functional theory calculations. Second, molecular dynamics simulations are used to subject suspended defect-containing MoS{sub 2} membranes to a state of multiaxial tension. A phase transformation is observed in the defect-containing membranes, similar to prior work in the literature. For monolayer MoS{sub 2} membranes with point defects, groups of monosulfur vacancies promote stress-concentration points, allowing failure to initiate away from the center of the membrane. For monolayer MoS{sub 2} membranes with grain boundaries, failure initiates at the grain boundary and it is found that the breaking force for the membrane is independent of grain boundary energy.

Dang, Khanh Q. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Spearot, Douglas E., E-mail: dspearot@uark.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

3

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures Print Wednesday, 26 May 2010 00:00 Indium is a key material in lead-free solder...

4

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures Print Indium is a key material in lead-free solder applications for microelectronics due to its excellent wetting properties, extended...

5

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanical Behavior of IndiumMechanical Behavior of

6

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanical Behavior of IndiumMechanical Behavior

7

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanical Behavior of IndiumMechanical

8

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures Print

9

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures

10

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanical Behavior of Indium

11

Defect-related internal dissipation in mechanical resonators and the study of coupled mechanical systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding internal dissipation in resonant mechanical systems at the micro- and nanoscale is of great technological and fundamental interest. Resonant mechanical systems are central to many sensor technologies, and microscale resonators form the basis of a variety of scanning probe microscopies. Furthermore, coupled resonant mechanical systems are of great utility for the study of complex dynamics in systems ranging from biology to electronics to photonics. In this work, we report the detailed experimental study of internal dissipation in micro- and nanomechanical oscillators fabricated from amorphous and crystalline diamond materials, atomistic modeling of dissipation in amorphous, defect-free, and defect-containing crystalline silicon, and experimental work on the properties of one-dimensional and two-dimensional coupled mechanical oscillator arrays. We have identified that internal dissipation in most micro- and nanoscale oscillators is limited by defect relaxation processes, with large differences in the nature of the defects as the local order of the material ranges from amorphous to crystalline. Atomistic simulations also showed a dominant role of defect relaxation processes in controlling internal dissipation. Our studies of one-dimensional and two-dimensional coupled oscillator arrays revealed that it is possible to create mechanical systems that should be ideal for the study of non-linear dynamics and localization.

Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Czaplewski, David A.; Sullivan, John Patrick; Modine, Normand Arthur; Wendt, Joel Robert; Aslam, Dean (Michigan State University, Lansing, MI); Sepulveda-Alancastro, Nelson (University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Influence of defects on thermal and mechanical properties of metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SDen ..................................... 33 13 Copper with 8 interstitials at 1600K ....................................................... 34 14 Temperature Vs time for copper without defects at 1360K .................... 39 15 Potential energy Vs time for copper without defects... at 1360K .............. 40 16 Total energy Vs time for copper without defects at 1360K .................... 40 17 Average volume Vs temperature for pure copper without defects .......... 41 18 Total energy Vs temperature for copper without defects...

Kamani, Sandeep Kumar

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Proceedings of NAMRI/SME, Vol. 41, 2013 Removal Mechanism and Defect Characterization for Glass-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of NAMRI/SME, Vol. 41, 2013 Removal Mechanism and Defect Characterization for Glass of NAMRI/SME, Vol. 41, 2013 f

Yao, Y. Lawrence

14

Influence of oriented topological defects on the mechanical properties of carbon nanotube heterojunctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical properties of finite-length (5,0)/(8,0) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) heterojunctions with manipulated topological defects are investigated using molecular dynamics simulation calculations. The results show that the mechanical properties and deformation behavior of SWCNT heterojunctions are mainly affected not only by the diameter of the thinner segment of the SWCNT heterojunction but also by the orientation of the heptagon-heptagon (7-7) pair in the junction region. Moreover, the orientation of the 7-7 pair strongly affects those properties in the compression loading than those in tensile loading. Finally, it is found that the location of buckling deformation in the heterojunctions is dependent on the orientation of the 7-7 pair in the compression.

Lee, We-Jay [National Center for High-Performance Computing; Chang, Jee-Gong [National Center for High-Performance Computing; Yang, An-Cheng [National Center for High-Performance Computing; Wang, Yeng-Tseng [National Center for High-Performance Computing; Su, Wan-Sheng [National Center for High-Performance Computing; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Ho, Kai-Ming [Ames Laboratory

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

Improving Cooling performance of the mechanical resonator with the two-level-system defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study cooling performance of a realistic mechanical resonator containing defects. The normal cooling method through an optomechanical system does not work efficiently due to those defects. We show by employing periodical $\\sigma_z$ pulses, we can eliminate the interaction between defects and their surrounded heat baths up to the first order of time. Compared with the cooling performance of no $\\sigma_z$ pulses case, much better cooling results are obtained. Moreover, this pulse sequence has an ability to improve the cooling performance of the resonator with different defects energy gaps and different defects damping rates.

Tian Chen; Xiang-Bin Wang

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey MathematicaMeasuring and UnderstandingMechanical

17

Mechanical Behaviors of Alloys From First Principles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some Backgrounds on The Quantum Mechanical Stresses . . .3.2.2 The Quantum Mechanical Stresses and The Generalized3.2.3 Quantum-Mechanical

Hanlumyuang, Yuranan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of Advanced High...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

"Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08smith7.pdf More Documents & Publications Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of...

19

Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of Advanced High...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) Presenter: Mark Smith Principal Investigator: Xin Sun Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Principal...

20

Grain boundary defects initiation at the outer surface of dissimilar welds: Corrosion mechanism studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dissimilar welds located on the primary coolant system of the French PWR plants exhibit grain boundary defects in the true austenitic zones of the first buttering layer. If grain boundaries reach the interface, they can extend to the martensitic band. Those defects are filled with compact oxides. In addition, the ferritic base metal presents some pits along the interface. Nowadays, three mechanisms are proposed to explain the initiation of those defects: stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion and high temperature intergranular oxidation. This paper is dealing with the study of the mechanisms involved in the corrosion phenomenon. Intergranular corrosion tests performed on different materials show that only the first buttering layer, even with some {delta} ferrite, is sensitized. The results of stress corrosion cracking tests in water solutions show that intergranular cracking is possible on a bulk material representative of the first buttering layer. It is unlikely on actual dissimilar welds where the ferritic base metal protects the first austenitic layer by galvanic coupling. Therefore, the stress corrosion cracking assumption cannot explain the initiation of the defects in aqueous environment. The results of the investigations and of the corrosion studies led to the conclusion that the atmosphere could be the only possible aggressive environment. This conclusion is based on natural atmospheric exposure and accelerated corrosion tests carried out with SO{sub 2} additions in controlled atmosphere. They both induce a severe intergranular corrosion on true sensitized austenitic materials.

Bouvier, O. De; Yrieix, B. [Electricite De France, Moret Sur Loing (France). Research and Development Division

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A study of the mechanism of laser welding defects in low thermal expansion superalloy GH909  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe experimental laser welding of low-thermal-expansion superalloy GH909. The main welding defects of GH909 by laser in the weld are liquation cracks and porosities, including hydrogen and carbon monoxide porosity. The forming mechanism of laser welding defects was investigated. This investigation was conducted using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, energy diffraction spectrum, X-ray diffractometer and other methodologies. The results demonstrated that porosities appearing in the central weld were related to incomplete removal of oxide film on the surface of the welding samples. The porosities produced by these bubbles were formed as a result of residual hydrogen or oxygenium in the weld. These elements failed to escape from the weld since laser welding has both a rapid welding speed and cooling rate. The emerging crack in the heat affected zone is a liquation crack and extends along the grain boundary as a result of composition segregation. Laves–Ni{sub 2}Ti phase with low melting point is a harmful phase, and the stress causes grain boundaries to liquefy, migrate and even crack. Removing the oxides on the surface of the samples before welding and carefully controlling technological parameters can reduce welding defects and improve formation of the GH909 alloy weld. - Highlights: ? It is a new process for the forming of GH909 alloy via laser welding. ? The forming mechanism of laser welding defects in GH909 has been studied. ? It may be a means to improve the efficiency of aircraft engine production.

Yan, Fei; Wang, Chunming, E-mail: yanxiangfei225@163.com; Wang, Yajun; Hu, Xiyuan; Wang, Tianjiao; Li, Jianmin; Li, Guozhu

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Nonradiative coherent carrier captures and defect reaction at deep-level defects via phonon-kick mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We simulated the time evolution of electron-lattice coupling mode, and a series of nonradiative carrier captures by a deep-level defect in a semiconductor. For lattice relaxation energy of the order of the band gap, a series of coherent (athermal) electron and hole captures by a defect is possible for high carrier densities, which results in an inflation in the induced lattice vibration, which in turn enhances a defect reaction.

Wakita, Masaki; Suzuki, Kei; Shinozuka, Yuzo [Faculty of Systems Engineering, Wakayama University, 930 Sakaedani, Wakayama 640-8510 (Japan)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

Graphene flakes with defective edge terminations: Universal and topological aspects, and one-dimensional quantum behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systematic tight-binding investigations of the electronic spectra (as a function of the magnetic field) are presented for trigonal graphene nanoflakes with reconstructed zigzag edges, where a succession of pentagons and heptagons, that is 5-7 defects, replaces the hexagons at the zigzag edge. For nanoflakes with such reczag defective edges, emphasis is placed on topological aspects and connections underlying the patterns dominating these spectra. The electronic spectra of trigonal graphene nanoflakes with reczag edge terminations exhibit certain unique features, in addition to those that are well known to appear for graphene dots with zigzag edge termination. These unique features include breaking of the particle-hole symmetry, and they are associated with nonlinear dispersion of the energy as a function of momentum, which may be interpreted as nonrelativistic behavior. The general topological features shared with the zigzag flakes include the appearance of energy gaps at zero and low magnetic fields due to finite size, the formation of relativistic Landau levels at high magnetic fields, and the presence between the Landau levels of edge states (the socalled Halperin states) associated with the integer quantum Hall effect. Topological regimes, unique to the reczag nanoflakes, appear within a stripe of negative energies E_b < E < 0, and along a separate feature forming a constant-energy line outside this stripe. The lower bound (E_b) specifying the energy stripe is independent of size. A main finding concerns the limited applicability of the continuous Dirac-Weyl equation, since the latter does not reproduce the special reczag features. (See also the extended abstract in the paper.)

Igor Romanovsky; Constantine Yannouleas; Uzi Landman

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

Mechanical behavior of elastic rods under constraint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of an experimental investigation of the mechanics of thin elastic rods under a variety of loading conditions. Four scenarios are explored, with increasing complexity: i) the shape of a naturally ...

Miller, James Thomas, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Nanostructure stabilization and mechanical behavior of binary nanocrystalline alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unique mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline metals has become of great interest in recent years, owing to both their remarkable strength and the emergence of new deformation physics at the nanoscale. Of particular ...

Trelewicz, Jason R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of Advanced High...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm25smith.pdf More Documents & Publications Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of...

27

Mechanical behavior of dip-brazed aluminum sandwich panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study was carried out to determine the mechanical behavior of sandwich panels containing cellular cores of varying shape. Compression and four point bend tests were performed on sandwich panels with square ...

Hohmann, Brian P. (Brian Patrick)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

E-Print Network 3.0 - agglomerates behavioral defects Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

exceed the tensile strength of concrete these micro- cracksmicro-defects evolve. The control of concrete Source: Southwest Region University Transportation Center Collection:...

29

Graphene flakes with defective edge terminations: Universal and topological aspects, and one-dimensional quantum behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene flakes with defective edge terminations: Universal and topological aspects, and one graphene nanoflakes with reconstructed zigzag edges, where a succes- sion of pentagons and heptagons these spectra. The electronic spectra of trigonal graphene nanoflakes with reczag edge terminations exhibit

Yannouleas, Constantine

30

Defect dynamics in active nematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological defects are distinctive signatures of liquid crystals. They profoundly affect the viscoelastic behavior of the fluid by constraining the orientational structure in a way that inevitably requires global changes not achievable with any set of local deformations. In active nematic liquid crystals topological defects not only dictate the global structure of the director, but also act as local sources of motion, behaving as self-propelled particles. In this article we present a detailed analytical and numerical study of the mechanics of topological defects in active nematic liquid crystals.

Luca Giomi; Mark J. Bowick; Prashant Mishra; Rastko Sknepnek; M. Cristina Marchetti

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

31

Impact of defects on the electrical transport, optical properties and failure mechanisms of GaN nanowires.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a three year LDRD project that focused on understanding the impact of defects on the electrical, optical and thermal properties of GaN-based nanowires (NWs). We describe the development and application of a host of experimental techniques to quantify and understand the physics of defects and thermal transport in GaN NWs. We also present the development of analytical models and computational studies of thermal conductivity in GaN NWs. Finally, we present an atomistic model for GaN NW electrical breakdown supported with experimental evidence. GaN-based nanowires are attractive for applications requiring compact, high-current density devices such as ultraviolet laser arrays. Understanding GaN nanowire failure at high-current density is crucial to developing nanowire (NW) devices. Nanowire device failure is likely more complex than thin film due to the prominence of surface effects and enhanced interaction among point defects. Understanding the impact of surfaces and point defects on nanowire thermal and electrical transport is the first step toward rational control and mitigation of device failure mechanisms. However, investigating defects in GaN NWs is extremely challenging because conventional defect spectroscopy techniques are unsuitable for wide-bandgap nanostructures. To understand NW breakdown, the influence of pre-existing and emergent defects during high current stress on NW properties will be investigated. Acute sensitivity of NW thermal conductivity to point-defect density is expected due to the lack of threading dislocation (TD) gettering sites, and enhanced phonon-surface scattering further inhibits thermal transport. Excess defect creation during Joule heating could further degrade thermal conductivity, producing a viscous cycle culminating in catastrophic breakdown. To investigate these issues, a unique combination of electron microscopy, scanning luminescence and photoconductivity implemented at the nanoscale will be used in concert with sophisticated molecular-dynamics calculations of surface and defect-mediated NW thermal transport. This proposal seeks to elucidate long standing material science questions for GaN while addressing issues critical to realizing reliable GaN NW devices.

Armstrong, Andrew M.; Aubry, Sylvie; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Siegal, Michael P.; Li, Qiming; Jones, Reese E.; Westover, Tyler; Wang, George T.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Talin, Albert Alec; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Harris, C. Thomas; Huang, Jian Yu

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Corrosion and mechanical behavior of materials for coal gasification applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A state-of-the-art review is presented on the corrosion and mechanical behavior of materials at elevated temperatures in coal-gasification environments. The gas atmosphere in coal-conversion processes are, in general, complex mixtures which contain sulfur-bearing components (H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/, and COS) as well as oxidants (CO/sub 2//CO and H/sub 2/O/H/sub 2/). The information developed over the last five years clearly shows sulfidation to be the major mode of material degradation in these environments. The corrosion behavior of structural materials in complex gas environments is examined to evaluate the interrelationships between gas chemistry, alloy chemistry, temperature, and pressure. Thermodynamic aspects of high-temperature corrosion processes that pertain to coal conversion are discussed, and kinetic data are used to compare the behavior of different commercial materials of interest. The influence of complex gas environments on the mechanical properties such as tensile, stress-rupture, and impact on selected alloys is presented. The data have been analyzed, wherever possible, to examine the role of environment on the property variation. The results from ongoing programs on char effects on corrosion and on alloy protection via coatings, cladding, and weld overlay are presented. Areas of additional research with particular emphasis on the development of a better understanding of corrosion processes in complex environments and on alloy design for improved corrosion resistance are discussed. 54 references, 65 figures, 24 tables.

Natesan, K.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

On the mechanism of acceleration behavior of plasma bullet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two special experiments are designed to study the mechanism of the acceleration behavior of a plasma bullet when it exits a nozzle. First, a T-shape device is used to simulate the air diffusion when a plasma plume exits the nozzle. It is found that adding just 1% of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, or air to the main working gas He results in the acceleration of the plasma bullet. Second, materials of different permittivity are added to the left part of the outside of the tube. The experimental results show that the plasma bullet accelerates at the moment when it enters into the right part of the tube where there is no extra material on the outside of the tube. These two experiments confirm that the acceleration behavior of the plasma bullet when it exits the nozzle is due to the air diffusion, hence Penning ionization, and the permittivity change when the bullet exits the nozzle, for example, from a tube with high permittivity to air with low permittivity. Besides, electric field measurements show that the electric field in the bullet head increases when the plasma bullet accelerates. This confirms the electric field driven nature of the plasma bullet propagation.

Wu, S.; Lu, X., E-mail: luxinpei@hotmail.com; Pan, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Deployment Mechanism Design with Behavioral Modeling Based on Pro/Engineer Motion Skeleton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kind of motion mechanisms, is often used to stretch out solar panels or antennas in spacecraftDeployment Mechanism Design with Behavioral Modeling Based on Pro/Engineer Motion Skeleton Chao.com.cn Keywords: Deployment mechanism, Motion skeleton, Behavioral modeling, Feasibility analysis Abstract

35

Determination of Electrochemical Performance and Thermo-Mechanical-Chemical Stability of SOFCs from Defect Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was focused on two distinct but related issues. The first issue concerned using defect modeling to understand the relationship between point defect concentration and the electrochemical, thermo-chemical and mechano-chemical properties of typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) materials. The second concerned developing relationships between the microstructural features of SOFC materials and their electrochemical performance. To understand the role point defects play in ceramics, a coherent analytical framework was used to develop expressions for the dependence of thermal expansion and elastic modulus on point defect concentration in ceramics. These models, collectively termed the continuum-level electrochemical model (CLEM), were validated through fits to experimental data from electrical conductivity, I-V characteristics, elastic modulus and thermo-chemical expansion experiments for (nominally pure) ceria, gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with consistently good fits. The same values for the material constants were used in all of the fits, further validating our approach. As predicted by the continuum-level electrochemical model, the results reveal that the concentration of defects has a significant effect on the physical properties of ceramic materials and related devices. Specifically, for pure ceria and GDC, the elastic modulus decreased while the chemical expansion increased considerably in low partial pressures of oxygen. Conversely, the physical properties of YSZ remained insensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure within the studied range. Again, the findings concurred exactly with the predictions of our analytical model. Indeed, further analysis of the results suggests that an increase in the point defect content weakens the attractive forces between atoms in fluorite-structured oxides. The reduction treatment effects on the flexural strength and the fracture toughness of pure ceria were also evaluated at room temperature. The results reveal that the flexural strength decreases significantly after heat treatment in very low oxygen partial pressure environments; however, in contrast, fracture toughness is increased by 30-40% when the oxygen partial pressure was decreased to 10{sup -20} to 10{sup -22} atm range. Fractographic studies show that microcracks developed at 800 oC upon hydrogen reduction are responsible for the decreased strength. To understand the role of microstructure on electrochemical performance, electrical impedance spectra from symmetric LSM/YSZ/LSM cells was de-convoluted to obtain the key electrochemical components of electrode performance, namely charge transfer resistance, surface diffusion of reactive species and bulk gas diffusion through the electrode pores. These properties were then related to microstructural features, such as triple-phase boundary length and tortuosity. From these experiments we found that the impedance due to oxygen adsorption obeys a power law with pore surface area, while the impedance due to charge transfer is found to obey a power-law with respect to triple phase boundary length. A model based on kinetic theory explaining the power-law relationships observed was then developed. Finally, during our EIS work on the symmetric LSM/YSZ/LSM cells a technique was developed to improve the quality of high-frequency impedance data and their subsequent de-convolution.

Eric Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Mechanics of Insulator Behavior in Concrete Crosstie Fastening Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Insulator Behavior Analysis of failure modes and causes · Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) used

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

37

SISGR – Domain Microstructures and Mechanisms for Large, Reversible and Anhysteretic Strain Behaviors in Phase Transforming Ferroelectric Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This four-year project (including one-year no-cost extension) aimed to advance fundamental understanding of field-induced strain behaviors of phase transforming ferroelectrics. We performed meso-scale phase field modeling and computer simulation to study domain evolutions, mechanisms and engineering techniques, and developed computational techniques for nanodomain diffraction analysis; to further support above originally planned tasks, we also carried out preliminary first-principles density functional theory calculations of point defects and domain walls to complement meso-scale computations as well as performed in-situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray single crystal diffraction experiments to guide theoretical development (both without extra cost to the project thanks to XSEDE supercomputers and DOE user facility Advanced Photon Source).

Wang, Yu

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Model for the Nonlinear Mechanical Behavior of Asphalt Binders and its Application in Prediction of Rutting Susceptibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanical behavior of asphalt binders is nonlinear. The binders exhibit shear thinning/thickening behavior in steady shear tests and non-proportational behavior in other standard viscoelastic tests such as creep-recovery or stress relaxation...

Srinivasa Parthasarathy, Atul

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

The mechanical behavior of heavily overconsolidated resedimented Boston Blue Clay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geotechnical engineers encounter some of the most challenging problems in heavily overconsolidated soils. Clays under this condition originated in nature or man-made construction. This thesis investigates the mechanical ...

Vargas Bustamante, Albalyra Geraldine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Texas Heart Institute Journal Mechanical Behavior of Coronary Stents 491 2011 by the Texas Heart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Heart Institute Journal Mechanical Behavior of Coronary Stents 491 © 2011 by the Texas Heart in the clinical setting. (Tex Heart Inst J 2011;38(5):491-501) E ndovascular stents are expandable meshes

Canic, Suncica

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

An Atomistic Study of the Mechanical Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanocomposite Interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research presented in this dissertation pertains to the evaluation of stiffness of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a multiscale framework and modeling of the interfacial mechanical behavior in CNT-polymer nanocomposites. The goal is to study...

Awasthi, Amnaya P.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

42

Characterization of thermo-mechanical and long-term behaviors of multi-layered composite materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study presents characterization of thermo-mechanical viscoelastic and long-term behaviors of thick-section multi-layered fiber reinforced polymer composite materials. The studied multi-layered systems belong to a class of thermo...

Nair, Aravind R.

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

43

Mechanical behavior of closed-cell and hollow-sphere metallic foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) The elastic anisotropy and yield surfaces are fully characterized, and numerical equations are developed to allow the simple evaluation of the effect of geometric and material properties on the mechanical behavior ...

Sanders, Wynn Steven, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The influence of salinity on the mechanical behavior of high plasticity soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the influence of salinity on the mechanical behavior of smectitic rich high plasticity soils resedimented with pore fluid salinities ranging from 0 to 256 g/L. An extensive laboratory testing program ...

Fahy, Brian Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Coupled Effects of Mechanics, Geometry, and Chemistry on Bio-membrane Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

build and analyze complete models to understand the behavior of multi-component membranes. We proposeCoupled Effects of Mechanics, Geometry, and Chemistry on Bio-membrane Behavior Thesis by Ha Giang, and encouragement. #12;iv Abstract Lipid bilayer membranes are models for cell membranes­the structure that helps

Winfree, Erik

46

Mechanisms of classical crystal growth theory explain quartz and silicate dissolution behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanisms of classical crystal growth theory explain quartz and silicate dissolution behavior processes was previously unknown for oxides or silicates, our mechanism-based findings are consistent, the geochemistry of earth systems is, in large part, controlled by the kinetics of silicate mineral dissolution

Dove, Patricia M.

47

Atomic-Level Computer Simulation of SiC: Defect Accumulation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atomic-Level Computer Simulation of SiC: Defect Accumulation, Mechanical Properties and Defect Recovery. Atomic-Level Computer Simulation of SiC: Defect Accumulation, Mechanical...

48

Mechanical Behavior Studies of Depleted Uranium in the Presence of Hydrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project addresses critical issues related to aging in the presence of hydrides (UH{sub 3}) in DU and the subsequent effect on mechanical behavior. Rolled DU specimens with three different hydrogen concentrations and the as-rolled condition were studied. The texture measurements indicate that the hydrogen charging is affecting the initial as-rolled DU microstructure/texture. The macroscopic mechanical behavior suggests the existence of a threshold between the 0 wpmm H and 0.3 wppm H conditions. A VPSC simulation of the macroscopic strain-stress behavior, when taking into account only a texture effect, shows no agreement with the experiment. This suggests that the macroscopic mechanical behavior observed is indeed due to the presence of hydrogen/hydrides in the DU bulk. From the lattice strain variation it can be concluded that the hydrogen is affecting the magnitude and/or the nature of CRSS. The metallography indicates the specimens that underwent the hydrogen charging process, developed large grains and twinning, which were enhanced by the presence of hydrogen. Further studies using electron microscopy and modeling will be conducted to learn about the deformation mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior.

Garlea, E.; Morrell, J. S.; Bridges, R. L.; Powell, G. L.; Brown, d. W.; Sisneros, T. A.; Tome, C. N.; Vogel, S. C.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

The mechanical behavior of normally consolidated soils as a function of pore fluid salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pore fluid salinities in the Gulf of Mexico area can reach levels of 250 grams of salt per liter of pore fluid (g/1). It is now necessary to determine the effect that this salinity level can play on the mechanical behaviors ...

Horan, Aiden James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

MODEL OF MECHANISM BEHAVIOR FOR VERIFICATION OF PLC Jos M. Machado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODEL OF MECHANISM BEHAVIOR FOR VERIFICATION OF PLC PROGRAMS José M. Machado University of Minho on formal methods is now available for checking PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) programs. To verify a PLC program, it is necessary to consider a set of properties to prove and one of the most interesting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

51

BE436 FUNDAMENTALS OF FLUID MECHANICS (Spring 2014) Fluid mechanics is the study of how and why fluids move. The behavior of fluids plays a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BE436 FUNDAMENTALS OF FLUID MECHANICS (Spring 2014) Fluid mechanics is the study of how and why fluids move. The behavior of fluids plays a fundamental role in the function of living biological, and microfluidic devices. Course info: We will examine all of the usual topics in fluid mechanics. This course

Vajda, Sandor

52

NIH Grant Support for Health Behavior Technologies Parent Mechanisms for Design, Development, and Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIH Grant Support for Health Behavior Technologies Parent Mechanisms for Design, Development, and Testing: R03 http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-262.html R21 http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-261.html R34 http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-10-005.html R41/42 http://grants.nih

Chisholm, Rex L.

53

Tuning of the electro-mechanical behavior of the cellular carbon nanotube structures with nanoparticle dispersions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical and electrical characteristics of cellular network of the carbon nanotubes (CNT) impregnated with metallic and nonmetallic nanoparticles were examined simultaneously by employing the nanoindentation technique. Experimental results show that the nanoparticle dispersion not only enhances the mechanical strength of the cellular CNT by two orders of magnitude but also imparts variable nonlinear electrical characteristics; the latter depends on the contact resistance between nanoparticles and CNT, which is shown to depend on the applied load while indentation. Impregnation with silver nanoparticles enhances the electrical conductance, the dispersion with copper oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles reduces the conductance of CNT network. In all cases, a power law behavior with suppression in the differential conductivity at zero bias was noted, indicating electron tunneling through the channels formed at the CNT-nanoparticle interfaces. These results open avenues for designing cellular CNT foams with desired electro-mechanical properties and coupling.

Gowda, Prarthana; Misra, Abha, E-mail: abha@isu.iisc.ernet.in [Departments of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India)] [Departments of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Ramamurty, Upadrasta [Departments of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India) [Departments of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

54

An experimental investigation into the stress-dependent mechanical behavior of cohesive soil with application to wellbore instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the mechanical behavior of cohesive soils with reference to the applications of wellbore instabilities through an extensive program of laboratory element and model borehole tests. The laboratory ...

Abdulhadi, Naeem Omar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Dilatation-strain analysis of the effects of flaws on the mechanical behavior of a highly filled elastomer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DILATATION-STRAIN ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF FLANS ON THE MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF A HIGHLY FILLED ELASTOMER A Thesis By BENJAMIN RAY SMITH Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1966 Major Subject. 'Aerospace Engineering DILATATION-STRAIN ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF FLAWS ON THE MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF A HIGHLY FILLED ELASTOMER A Thesis By BENJAMIN RAY SMITH Approved...

Smith, Benjamin Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Who named the quantum defect?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The notion of the quantum defect is important in atomic and molecular spectroscopy and also in unifying spectroscopy with collision theory. In the latter context, the quantum defect may be viewed as an ancestor of the phase shift. However, the origin of the term quantum defect does not seem to be explained in standard textbooks. It occurred in a 1921 paper by Schroedinger, preceding quantum mechanics, yet giving the correct meaning as an index of the short-range interactions with the core of an atom. The authors present the early history of the quantum-defect idea, and sketch its recent developments.

Rau, A.R.P. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Inokuti, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Physics Div.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Microstructural and mechanical behavior of a duplex stainless steel under hot working conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the hot deformation of the duplex stainless steels, the complexity of the microstructure evolution and mechanical response is increased as compared with those of single-phase ferritic or austenitic stainless steels. In the present work, plane strain compression and torsion deformation modes have been used to analyze the microstructural evolution and the mechanical behavior of a duplex stainless steel in as-cast and wrought conditions, as a function of spatial phase distribution, the nature of interface, and the relative mechanical properties of both phases. The law of mixtures has been used to explain the different flow curves obtained when changing the phase distribution and/or the deformation mode. On deforming as-cast microstructures, the deformation partitions vary heterogeneously between both phases and some austenite areas act as hard nondeforming particles. Cracks have been observed to occur at the interface of such regions, from relatively low strains, for which the initial Kurdjumov-Sachs orientation relationship between ferrite and austenite is still present.

Iza-Mendia, A. [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Tecnicas de Gipuzkoa, San Sebastian (Spain). Dept. of Materials]|[Univ. of Navarra, San Sebastian (Spain); Pinol-Juez, A. [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Tecnicas de Gipuzkoa, San Sebastian (Spain). Dept. of Materials; Urcola, J.J.; Gutierrez, I. [Univ. of Navarra, San Sebastian (Spain)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Effects of Stone-Wales and vacancy defects in atomic-scale friction on defective graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphite is an excellent solid lubricant for surface coating, but its performance is significantly weakened by the vacancy or Stone-Wales (SW) defect. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite which contains a single defect or stacked defects. Our results suggest that the friction on defective graphite shows a strong dependence on defect location and type. The 5-7-7-5 structure of SW defect results in an effectively negative slope of friction. For defective graphite containing a defect in the surface, adding a single vacancy in the interior layer will decrease the friction coefficients, while setting a SW defect in the interior layer may increase the friction coefficients. Our obtained results may provide useful information for understanding the atomic-scale friction properties of defective graphite.

Sun, Xiao-Yu [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Key Laboratory of Hubei Province for Water Jet Theory and New Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wu, RunNi; Xia, Re [Key Laboratory of Hubei Province for Water Jet Theory and New Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chu, Xi-Hua; Xu, Yuan-Jie, E-mail: yj-xu@whu.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

59

Modeling Frameworks for Representing the Mechanical Behavior of Tissues with a Specific Look at Vasculature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many mechanicstic models aimed at predicting tissue behavior attempt to connect constitutive factors (such as effects due to collagen or fibrin concentrations) with the overall tissue behavior. Such a link between constitutive and material behaviors...

Andersohn, Alexander

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

60

Predicting the Operating Behavior of Ceramic Filters from Thermo-Mechanical Ash Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stable operation, in other words the achievement of a succession of uniform filtration cycles of reasonable length is a key issue in high-temperature gas filtration with ceramic media. Its importance has rather grown in recent years, as these media gain in acceptance due to their excellent particle retention capabilities. Ash properties have been known for some time to affect the maximum operating temperature of filters. However, softening and consequently ''stickiness'' of the ash particles generally depend on composition in a complex way. Simple and accurate prediction of critical temperature ranges from ash analysis--and even more so from coal analysis--is still difficult without practical and costly trials. In general, our understanding of what exactly happens during break-down of filtration stability is still rather crude and general. Early work was based on the concept that ash particles begin to soften and sinter near the melting temperatures of low-melting, often alkaline components. This softening coincides with a fairly abrupt increase of stickiness, that can be detected with powder mechanical methods in a Jenicke shear cell as first shown by Pilz (1996) and recently confirmed by others (Kamiya et al. 2001 and 2002, Kanaoka et al. 2001). However, recording {sigma}-{tau}-diagrams is very time consuming and not the only off-line method of analyzing or predicting changes in thermo-mechanical ash behavior. Pilz found that the increase in ash stickiness near melting was accompanied by shrinkage attributed to sintering. Recent work at the University of Karlsruhe has expanded the use of such thermo-analytical methods for predicting filtration behavior (Hemmer 2001). Demonstrating their effectiveness is one objective of this paper. Finally, our intent is to show that ash softening at near melting temperatures is apparently not the only phenomenon causing problems with filtration, although its impact is certainly the ''final catastrophe''. There are other significant changes in regeneration at intermediate temperatures, which may lead to long-term deterioration.

Hemmer, G.; Kasper, G.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of nickel-base superalloys. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main achievements of a 36-month research program are presented. The main objective was to gain more insight into the problem of crack growth under thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions. This program was conducted at M.I.T. for the period of September 1982 to September 1985. The program was arranged into five technical tasks. Under Task I, the literature of TMF data was reviewed. The goal was to identify the crack propagation conditions in aircraft engines (hot section) and to assess the validity of conventional fracture mechanics parameters to address TMF crack growth. The second task defined the test facilities, test specimen and the testing conditions needed to establish the effectiveness of data correlation parameters identified in Task I. Three materials (Inconel X-750, Hastelloy-X, and B-1900) were chosen for the program. Task II was accomplished in collaboration with Pratt and Whitney Aircraft engineers. Under Task III, a computerized testing system to measure the TMF behavior (LCF and CG behaviors) of various alloys systems was built. The software used to run isothermal and TMF tests was also developed. Built around a conventional servohydraulic machine, the system is capable of push-pull tests under stress or strain and temperature controlled conditions in the temperature range of 25C to 1050C. A crack propagation test program was defined and conducted under Task IV. The test variables included strain range, strain rate (frequency) and temperature. Task V correlated and generalized the Task IV data for isothermal and variable temperature conditions so that several crack propagation parameters could be compared and evaluated. The structural damage (mode of cracking and dislocation substructure) under TMF cycling was identified and contrasted with the isothermal damage to achieve a sound fundamental mechanistic understanding of TMF.

Pelloux, R.M.; Marchand, N.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

ADSORPTION MECHANISMS AND TRANSPORT BEHAVIOR BETWEEN SELENATE AND SELENITE ON DIFFERENT SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption of different oxidation species of selenium (Se), selenate (SeO42-) and selenite (SeO32-), with varying pHs (2 - 10) and ionic strengths (I = 0.01 M, 0.1 M and 1.0 M NaNO3) was measured on quartz, aluminum oxide, and synthetic iron oxide (ferrihydrite) using batch reactors to obtain a more detailed understanding of the adsorption mechanisms (e.g., inner- and outer-sphere complex). In addition to the batch experiments with single minerals contained in native Hanford Site sediment, additional batch adsorption studies were conducted with native Hanford Site sediment and groundwater as a function of 1) total Se concentration (from 0.01 to 10 mg L-1) and 2) soil to solution ratios (1:20 and 1:2 grams per mL). Results from these batch studies were compared to a set of saturated column experiments that were conducted with natural Hanford sediment and groundwater spiked with either selenite or selenate to observe the transport behavior of these species. Both batch and column results indicated that selenite adsorption was consistently higher than that of selenate in all experimental conditions used. These different adsorption mechanisms between selenite and selenate result in the varying mobility of Se in the subsurface environment and explain the dependence on the oxidation species.

Snyder, Michelle MV; Um, Wooyong

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

63

Materials Science and Engineering A261 (1999) 4452 Mo5Si3 single crystals: physical properties and mechanical behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Among these phases, refractory metal silicides appear to be more attractive because of their ultra-high melting temperatures [1]. Among the refractory metal silicides, the silicides in the Mo­Si system show processing, physical properties and mechanical behavior of an ultrahigh temperature structural silicide, Mo5

64

{l_brace}311{r_brace} Defects in ion-implanted silicon: The cause of transient diffusion, and a mechanism for dislocation formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion implantation is used at several critical stages of Si integrated circuit manufacturing. The authors show how {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects arising after implantation are responsible for both enhanced dopant diffusion during annealing, and stable dislocations post-anneal. They observe {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects in the earliest stages of an anneal. They subsequently undergo rapid Ostwald ripening and evaporation. At low implant doses evaporation dominates, and they can quantitatively relate the interstitials emitted from these defects to the transient enhancement in diffusivity of dopants such as B and P. At higher doses Ostwald ripening is significant, and they observe the defects to undergo a series of unfaulting reactions to form both Frank loops and perfect dislocations. They demonstrate the ability to control both diffusion and dislocations by the addition of small amounts of carbon impurities.

Eaglesham, D.J.; Stolk, P.A.; Cheng, J.Y.; Gossmann, H.J.; Poate, J.M. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Haynes, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

Simon Phillpot; James Tulenko

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} single crystals: Physical properties and mechanical behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The materials processing, physical properties and mechanical behavior of an ultra-high temperature structural silicide, Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, have been studied. High purity single crystals of Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} have been synthesized by both optical floating zone and Czochralski methods. The thermal and elastic properties of the MO{sub 5}Si{sub 3} single crystals were experimentally measured. Results show that Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} has significant thermal expansion anisotropy along the a and c directions with {alpha}{sub c}/{alpha}{sub a} = 2.2. Single crystal elastic moduli of Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} indicate that it has less elastic anisotropy and lower shear moduli than transition metal disilicides. Tensile stresses of up to 1.8 GPa can develop at grain boundaries after cooling from the melting point due to the thermal expansion mismatch in Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, causing grain boundary cracking during processing of polycrystals. Room temperature Vickers indentation tests on (100) and (001) planes have been performed with different indenter diagonal orientations. The orientation dependence of hardness and fracture toughness of Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} single crystals have been obtained. The corresponding deformation and fracture modes have been revealed by microscopy studies. A comparison of Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} with other high temperature structural silicides, e.g., C11{sub b} and C40 transition metal disilicides, is discussed.

Chu, F.; Thoma, D.J.; McClellan, K.J.; Peralta, P.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

EFFECTS OF MORPHOLOGY ON THE MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF DUAL PHASE Fe/Si/C STEELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ductility in dual phase steels. However, it seems thatmechanical behavior of dual phase steels. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSL INTRODUCTION Dual phase steels whose structures consist of

Kim, N.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The energy coupling efficiency of multi-wavelength laser pulses to damage initiating defects in DKDP nonlinear crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bulk damage performance of potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals under simultaneous exposure to 1064-, 532-, and 355-nm nanosecond-laser pulses is investigated in order to probe the laser-induced defect reactions leading to damage initiation during frequency conversion. The results provide insight into the mechanisms governing the behavior of the damage initiating defects under exposure to high power laser light. In addition, it is suggested that the damage performance can be directly related to and predicted from the damage behavior of the crystal at each wavelength separately.

DeMange, P; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Radousky, H B; Feit, M D; Demos, S G

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

69

Mechanical and optical behavior of a novel optical fiber crack sensor and an interferometric strain sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The proper interpretation of measurements from an optical fiber sensor requires a full understanding of its mechanical response to external action and the corresponding change in optical output. To quantify the mechanical ...

Olson, Noah Gale, 1969-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Asperity-scale surface mechanics - Implications to adhesive contacts and microscale deformation behavior of rough surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microtribology for Microelectromechanical Systems,” Wear,forces in microelectromechanical systems: mechanisms,Analysis Microelectromechanical Systems,” ASME J. Tribol. ,

Xu, Huaming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Fusion Engineering and Design 3940 (1998) 759764 Mechanical behavior and design database of packed beds for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of packed beds for blanket designs Alice Y. Ying *, Zi Lu, Mohamed A. Abdou Mechanical and Aerospace

Abdou, Mohamed

72

Discrete particle transport in porous media : discrete observations of physical mechanisms influencing particle behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An understanding of how discrete particles in the micron to submicron range behave in porous media is important to a number of environmental problems. Discrete particle behavior in the interior of a porous medium is complex ...

Yoon, Joon Sik, 1973-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Microstructure-based Computational Modeling of the Mechanical Behavior of Polymer Micro/Nano-composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. .......................................... 150  Fig. 5.2. Variation of non-linear viscoelastic parameters versus stress levels at 296 K. ............................................................................................................ 152  Fig. 5.3. Predictions for PMMA behavior...) strain and (b) time for creep tests in the range of 63 to 71.5 MPa at 323 K. ................................................................ 163  Fig. 5.10. Forecasting the behavior of PMMA under high stress levels for finding the stress where rupture...

Heydarkhan Tehrani, Ardeshir

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

74

Mechanical behavior of tissue simulants and soft tissues under extreme loading conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent developments in computer-integrated surgery and in tissue-engineered constructs necessitate advances in experimental and analytical techniques in characterizing properties of mechanically compliant materials such ...

Kalcioglu, Zeynep Ilke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Microstructure, strengthening mechanisms and hot deformation behavior of an oxide-dispersion strengthened UFG Al6063 alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ultrafine-grained Al6063/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0.8 vol.%, 25 nm) nanocomposite was prepared via powder metallurgy route through reactive mechanical alloying and hot powder extrusion. Scanning electron microcopy, transmission electron microscopy, and back scattered electron diffraction analysis showed that the grain structure of the nanocomposite is trimodal and composed of nano-size grains (< 0.1 {mu}m), ultrafine grains (0.1-1 {mu}m), and micron-size grains (> 1 {mu}m) with random orientations. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of the nanocomposite based on the strengthening-mechanism models revealed that the yield strength of the ultrafine-grained nanocomposite is mainly controlled by the high-angle grain boundaries rather than nanometric alumina particles. Hot deformation behavior of the material at different temperatures and strain rates was studied by compression test and compared to coarse-grained Al6063 alloy. The activation energy of the hot deformation process for the nanocomposite was determined to be 291 kJ mol{sup -1}, which is about 64% higher than that of the coarse-grained alloy. Detailed microstructural analysis revealed that dynamic recrystallization is responsible for the observed deformation softening in the ultrafine-grained nanocomposite. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strengthening mechanisms of Al6063/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite were evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hot deformation behavior of the nanocomposite was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hot deformation activation energy was determined using consecutive models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The restoration mechanisms and microstructural changes are presented.

Asgharzadeh, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, P.O. Box 51666-16471, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, P.O. Box 51666-16471, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kim, H.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 790-784, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 790-784, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Simchi, A., E-mail: simchi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Production, Characterization, and Mechanical Behavior of Cementitious Materials Incorporating Carbon Nanofibers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofirbers (CNFs) have excellent properties (mechanical, electrical, magnetic, etc.), which can make them effective nanoreinforcements for improving the properties of materials. The incorporation of CNT/Fs in a...

Yazdanbakhsh, Ardavan

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

Role of the precentral cortex in adapting behavior to different mechanical environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We routinely produce movements under different mechanical contexts. All interactions with the physical environment, such as swinging a hammer or lifting a carton of milk, alter the forces experienced during movement. With ...

Richardson, Andrew Garmory, 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Coupling of Mechanical Behavior of Cell Components to Electrochemical-Thermal Models for Computer-Aided Engineering of Batteries under Abuse  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by NREL at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about coupling of mechanical behavior of cell...

79

Behavior of Turbulent Structures within a Mach 5 Mechanically Distorted Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field of incompressible boundary layer, taken from Adrian et al. (2000). ............................................................................... 138 Figure 6.15 Schematic of an individual hairpin vortex, describing the sweep and ejection... hairpin vortex, identifying the motions contributing to sweeps and ejections ....................................................................................... 235 Figure 7.46 Illustrations of the possible mechanisms contributing to the reduced...

Peltier, Scott Jacob

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

80

Research into the microstructure and mechanical behavior of eutectic Bi-Sn and In-Sn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manuscript reports on research into two low-melting, lead-free solder alloys, eutectic Bi-Sn and eutectic In-Sn. The microstructures were found to depend on both cooling rate and substrate, with the greatest variability in the In-Sn alloy. The nature of the intermetallic layer formed at the solder-substrate interface depends on both the solder and the substrate (Cu versus Ni). Also, the microstructure of the Bi-Sn can recrystallize during deformation, which is not the case with In-Sn. Data from creep and constant strain rate tests are given for slowly cooled samples. The creep behavior of In-Sn is constant with temperature, but the creep seems to be controlled by the In-rich phase in In-Sn on Cu and by the Sn-rich phase in In-Sn on Ni. Bi-Sn exhibits different creep behavior at temperatures above 40 {degrees}C than at 20 {degrees}C or lower. Stress-strain curves of Bi-Sn on Cu and In-Sn on Cu are similar, while In-Sn on Ni behaves differently. This is explained in terms of the deformation patterns in the alloys.

Goldstein, J.L.F.; Mei, Z.; Morris, J.W. Jr. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Effect of interstitials on the mechanical behavior of P/M tantalum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used in an investigation of the effects of interstitial alloy content on the mechanical properties of P/M tantalum. Compacts were prepared by cold isostatic pressing (CIP) at 50 ksi (345 MPa) followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 30 ksi (207 MPa) at 1,600 C. Increases in both yield and flow stresses were observed in ambient temperature, quasi-static compression tests due to increases in interstitial alloy content. Variations in yield stress were attributed to solid solution strengthening due to interstitial elements, since no oxides, nitrides or carbides were observed via TEM.

Strutt, A.J.; Vecchio, K.S. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Sciences; Bingert, S.R.; Gray, G.T. III [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Phase transformation and mechanical behavior in annealed 2205 duplex stainless steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phase transformations and mechanical behaviour during welding and subsequent annealing treatment of 2205 duplex stainless steel have been investigated. Detailed microstructural examination showed the presence of higher ferrite amounts in the heat affected zone (HAZ), while higher amounts of austenite were recorded in the centre region of the weld metal. Annealing treatments in the temperature range of 800-1000 deg. C resulted in a precipitation of {sigma} phase and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} chromium carbides at the {gamma}/{delta} interfaces that were found to be preferential precipitation sites. Above 1050 deg. C, the volume fraction of {delta} ferrite increases with annealing temperature. The increase of {delta} ferrite occurs at a faster rate in the HAZ than in the base metal and fusion zone. Optimal mechanical properties and an acceptable ferrite/austenite ratio throughout the weld regions corresponds to annealing at 1050 deg. C. Fractographic examinations showed that the mode of failure changed from quasi-cleavage fracture to dimple rupture with an increase in the annealing temperature from 850 to 1050 deg. C.

Badji, Riad [LPMTM-CNRS- Universite Paris 13, 99, av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)], E-mail: riadbadji1@yahoo.fr; Bouabdallah, Mabrouk [Ecole Nationale Polytechnique, 10, Avenue Hassan Badi, BP 182, El Harrach (Algeria); Bacroix, Brigitte; Kahloun, Charlie [LPMTM-CNRS- Universite Paris 13, 99, av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Belkessa, Brahim; Maza, Halim [Welding and NDT research Centre, B.P 64, Cheraga (Algeria)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Influences of semiconductor morphology on the mechanical fatigue behavior of flexible organic electronics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of crystalline morphology on the mechanical fatigue of organic semiconductors (OSCs) was investigated using 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene) as a crystalline OSC and poly(triarylamine) (PTAA) as an amorphous OSC. During cyclic bending, resistances of the OSCs were monitored using the transmission-line method on a metal-semiconductor-metal structure. The resistance of the TIPS-pentacene increased under fatigue damage in tensile-stress mode, but no such degradation was observed in the PTAA. Both OSCs were stable under compressive bending fatigue. The formation of intergranular cracks at the domain boundaries of the TIPS-pentacene was responsible for the degradation of its electrical properties under tensile bending fatigue.

Lee, Young-Joo; Yeon, Han-Wool; Shin, Hae-A-Seul; Joo, Young-Chang, E-mail: ycjoo@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 151-744 Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 151-744 Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Uk Lee, Yong; Evans, Louise A. [Center for Process Innovation Limited, Thomas Wright Way, NETPark, Sedgefield, TS21 3FG County Durham (United Kingdom)] [Center for Process Innovation Limited, Thomas Wright Way, NETPark, Sedgefield, TS21 3FG County Durham (United Kingdom)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

84

Mechanical behavior of Fermilab/General Dynamics built 15M SSC collider dipoles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of full-scale demonstration SSC collider dipole magnets were built for the ASST. These magnets, DCA311 through DCA319, have 50 mm aperture and 15 m magnetic length with 6.6 Tesla uniform field. For the support structure of the W6733B cross section, the Fermilab design uses a vertical split in the yoke. The end sections of the magnet have solid spacers and are supported by collet clamps. The splices between inner and outer coils are made in preforms which lie outside of the high field region. The magnets were produced in pipeline fashion with no intentional major changes between magnets. As a part of the technology transfer program, the last 7 magnets were built by General Dynamics personnel using the magnet construction facilities of Fermilab, while the first two magnets were built entirely by Fermilab personnel. At present, the magnets up to DCA316 have been tested at Fermilab. The general characteristics of the magnets have been quite satisfactory. Both of the Fermilab built magnets have reached the conductor limited field strength with no significant training. Two of the General Dynamics built magnets each required a single training quench. However, all of the magnets tested up to date meet the ASST specifications. This report describes the mechanical properties of the ASST magnets at Fermilab based on the currently available test results.

Wake, M.; Bleadon, M.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Delchamps, S.; Gourlay, S.; Hanft, R.; Koska, W.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.; Mazur, P.; Orris, D.; Strait, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Devred, A.; DiMarco, J.; Kuzminski, J.; Nah, W.; Ogitsu, T.; Puglisi, M.; Thompkins, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Zheng, H. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Effect of fiber architecture on mechanical behavior of SiC(f)/SiC composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We evaluated mechanical properties (first matrix cracking stress, strength, and work-of-fracture) of Nicalon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites with three different fiber lay-up sequences (0{degrees}/20{degrees}/60{degrees}, 0{degrees}/40{degrees}/60{degrees}, and 0{degrees}/45{degrees}) at various temperatures from room to 1300{degrees}C. Up to 1200{degrees}C, ultimate strength and work-of-fracture for the 0{degrees}/40{degrees}/60{degrees} and 0{degrees}/45{degrees} composites increased, but then declined at 1300{degrees}C. The decreases were correlated to in-situ Nicalon fiber strength and fiber/matrix interface degradation. However, for the 0{degrees}/20{degrees}/60{degrees} composites, ultimate strength and work-of-fracture reached their a minima at 1200{degrees}C. These measured ultimate strengths at room and 1300{degrees}C were correlated to the predictions made with an analytical model and to in-situ fiber strength characteristics. The large difference in room-temperature ultimate strengths between the three sets of composites is attributed to the relative contributions of the off-axis fibers to the load-bearing capacity of each composite.

Singh, D.; Singh, J.P.; Sutaria, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Impact of substrate temperature on the incorporation of carbon-related defects and mechanism for semi-insulating behavior in GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B 22, 1145 ?2004?. A. Armstrong, A. R. Arehart, D. Green, U.San Diego, 1992?. A. Armstrong, A. R. Arehart, and S. A.molecular beam epitaxy A. Armstrong Department of Electrical

Armstrong, A; Poblenz, C; Green, D S; Mishra, U K; Speck, J S; Ringel, S A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Final Technical Report of project: "Contactless Real-Time Monitoring of Paper Mechanical Behavior During Papermaking"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The early precursors of laser ultrasonics on paper were Prof. Y. Berthelot from the Georgia Institute of Technology/Mechanical Engineering department, and Prof. P. Brodeur from the Institute of Paper Science and Technology, both located in Atlanta, Georgia. The first Ph.D. thesis that shed quite some light on the topic, but also left some questions unanswered, was completed by Mont A. Johnson in 1996. Mont Johnson was Prof. Berthelot's student at Georgia Tech. In 1997 P. Brodeur proposed a project involving himself, Y. Berthelot, Dr. Ken Telschow and Mr. Vance Deason from INL, Honeywell-Measurex and Dr. Rick Russo from LBNL. The first time the proposal was not accepted and P. Brodeur decided to re-propose it without the involvement from LBNL. Rick Russo proposed a separate project on the same topic on his side. Both proposals were finally accepted and work started in the fall of 1997 on the two projects. Early on, the biggest challenge was to find an optical detection method which could detect laser-induced displacements of the web surface that are of the order of .1 micron in the ultrasonic range. This was to be done while the web was having an out-of-plane amplitude of motion in the mm range due to web flutter; while moving at 10 m/s to 30 m/s in the plane of the web, on the paper machine. Both teams grappled with the same problems and tried similar methods in some cases, but came up with two similar but different solutions one year later. The IPST, GT, INL team found that an interferometer made by Lasson Technologies Inc. using the photo-induced electro-motive force in Gallium Arsenide was able to detect ultrasonic waves up to 12-15 m/s. It also developed in house an interferometer using the Two-Wave Mixing effect in photorefractive crystals that showed good promises for on-line applications, and experimented with a scanning mirror to reduce motion-induced texture noise from the web and improve signal to noise ratio. On its side, LBNL had the idea to combine a commercial Mach-Zehnder interferometer to a spinning mirror synchronized to the web speed, in order to make almost stationary measurements. The method was demonstrated at up to 10 m/s. Both teams developed their own version of a web simulator that was driving a web of paper at 10 m/s or higher. The Department of Energy and members of the Agenda 2020 started to make a push for merging the two projects. This made sense because their topics were really identical but this was not well received by Prof. Brodeur. Finally IPST decided to reassign the direction of the IPST-INL-GT project in the spring of 1999 to Prof. Chuck Habeger so that the two teams could work together. Also at this time, Honeywell-Measurex dropped as a member of the team. It was replaced by ABB Industrial Systems whose engineers had extensive previous experience of working with ultrasonic sensors on paperboard. INL also finished its work on the project as its competencies were partly redundant with LBNL. From the summer of 1999, the IPST-GT and LBNL teams were working together and helped each other often by collaborating and visiting either laboratory when was necessary. Around the beginning of 2000, began an effort at IPST to create an off-line laser-ultrasonics instrument that could perform automated measurements of paper and paperboard's bending stiffness. It was widely known that the mechanical bending tests of paper used for years by the paper industry were very inaccurate and exhibited poor reproducibility; therefore the team needed a new instrument of reference to validate its future on-line results. In 1999-2000, the focus of the on-line instrument was on a pre-industrial demonstration on a pilot coater while reducing the damage to the web caused by the generation laser, below the threshold where it could be visible by the naked eye. During the spring of 2000 Paul Ridgway traveled to IPST and brought with him a redesigned system still using the same Mach-Zehnder interferometer as before, but this time employing an electric motor-driven spinning mirror instead of the previously belt-driven m

Emmanuel Lafond; Paul Ridgway; Ted Jackson; Rick Russo; Ken Telschow; Vance Deason; Yves Berthelot; David Griggs; Xinya Zhang; Gary Baum

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Further investigation of the characteristics of nodular defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To increase the understanding of the damage sensitivity of nodular defects and provide exact evidence for theoretical study, the structures and the damage behavior of nodular defects in electron-beam deposited mirrors of HfO2/SiO2 are systemically investigated with a double-beam microscope (focused ion beam, scanning electron microscope). Nodular defects are classified into two kinds. In one kind the boundaries between nodules and the surrounding layers have become continuous for the last deposited materials, and in the other there are discontinuous boundaries between nodules and the surrounding layers. Nodular defects of the first kind typically have low domes, and the second have high domes. Laser damage experiments show that nodular defects of the first kind usually have a high laser resistance, and the laser-induced damage thresholds are limited in the second class of nodules. The dominant parameter of nodular defects related to damage is the height of the nodular defect.

Liu Xiaofeng; Li Dawei; Zhao Yuan'an; Li Xiao

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Modeling rough energy landscapes in defected condensed matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation is a computational and theoretical investigation of the behavior of defected condensed matter and its evolution over long time scales. The thesis provides original contributions to the methodology used ...

Monasterio Velásquez, Paul Rene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Hydro-mechanical behavior of Municipal Solid Waste subject to leachate recirculation in a large-scale compression reactor cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of a laboratory experiment on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) subjected to one-dimensional compression in a 1 m{sup 3} instrumented cell. The focus was on the hydro-mechanical behavior of the material under conditions of confinement and leachate percolation that replicate those found in real-scale landfills. The operation of the apparatus is detailed together with the testing methodology and the monitoring program. Two samples of waste were tested: the first extended over a period of 10 months ('Control Test') and the second for 22 months ('Enhanced Test' with leachate recirculation). Consolidation data is reported with regard to both short-term (stress-dependent) and long-term (time-dependent) settlements. A discussion follows based on the derived values of primary and secondary compression ratios. Correlations between compression parameters and the biodegradation process are presented. In particular, results clearly highlight the effect of leachate recirculation on waste settlement: 24% secondary deformation reached after slightly less than 2 years (equivalent to a 5-fold increase in compressibility) and 17.9% loss of dry matter. Comparisons are proposed considering the results derived from the few monitoring programs conducted on experimental bioreactors worldwide. Finally, the hydraulic characterization of waste is discussed with regard to the evaluation of effective porosity and permeability.

Olivier, Franck [Environment, Energy and Waste Research Center (CREED), 291, avenue Dreyfous Ducas, 78520 Limay (France) and Laboratoire LIRIGM - Maison des Geosciences, 1381, rue de la piscine 38400 Saint-Martin d'Heres (France)]. E-mail: franck.olivier@ujf-grenoble.fr; Gourc, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire LIRIGM - Maison des Geosciences, 1381, rue de la piscine 38400 Saint-Martin d'Heres (France)]. E-mail: gourc@ujf-grenoble.fr

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Modelling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic and oxide fuels for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A robust and reliable code to model the irradiation behavior of metal and oxide fuels in sodium cooled fast reactors is developed. Modeling capability was enhanced by adopting a non-empirical mechanistic approach to the ...

Karahan, Aydin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Affine Defects and Gravitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We argue that the structure general relativity (GR) as a theory of affine defects is deeper than the standard interpretation as a metric theory of gravitation. Einstein-Cartan theory (EC), with its inhomogenous affine symmetry, should be the standard-bearer for GR-like theories. A discrete affine interpretation of EC (and gauge theory) yields topological definitions of momentum and spin (and Yang Mills current), and their conservation laws become discrete topological identities. Considerations from quantum theory provide evidence that discrete affine defects are the physical foundation for gravitation.

R. J. Petti

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

93

EFFECT OF AL2O3 ALD NANOCOATINGS ON THE THERMO-MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF AU/SI MEMS STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subjected to thermal holds and thermal cycling after release. Thin films attached to ceramic substrates various thermal and mechanical loading conditions. In the present study, we examine the thermo- mechanical experience in- plane stresses due to differences in the thermal expansion coefficients between adjacent

George, Steven M.

94

Microstructural Characterization of the Chemo-mechanical Behavior of Asphalt in Terms of Aging and Fatigue Performance Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

implements the framework of chemo-mechanics by investigating two types of chemical modification processes, natural (oxidative aging) and synthetic (chemical doping) as they relate not only to macro-scale properties of asphalt binder but also to the asphalt...

Allen, Robert Grover

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

95

EFFECT OF AGING ON THE PHASE TRANSFORMATION AND MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF Ti36Ni49Hf15 HIGH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, People's Republic of China (Received August 19 the microstructure, transformation temperature, mechanical properties and shape memory effects (SMEs) for Ti36Ni49Hf

Zheng, Yufeng

96

Mechanical relaxation behavior of polyurethanes reinforced with the in situ-generated sodium silica-polyphosphate nanophase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Further exploration of hybrid organic/inorganic composites (polyurethane based with inorganic material sodium silica polyphosphate) properties with mechanical relaxometer gives ability to analyze microstructure of such materials in terms of chain reptation tubes filler's fractal aggregates and stress amplification.

V. O. Dupanov; S. M. Ponomarenko

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Behavior-Based Transportation Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Under the Clean Development Mechanism Transport-Efficient Development in Nanchang, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a methodology, consistent with the Kyoto Protocol?s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction benefits of transport efficient development (TED). TED aims to reduce ...

Zegras, P. Christopher

98

Mayne, P.W., Coop, M.R., Springman, S., Huang, A-B., and Zornberg, J. (2009). State-of-the-Art Paper (SOA-1): GeoMaterial Behavior and Testing. Proc. 17th Intl. Conf. Soil Mechanics & Geotechnical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mayne, P.W., Coop, M.R., Springman, S., Huang, A-B., and Zornberg, J. (2009). State-of-the-Art Paper (SOA-1): GeoMaterial Behavior and Testing. Proc. 17th Intl. Conf. Soil Mechanics & Geotechnical

Mayne, Paul W.

99

Application of the multi-mechanism deformation model for three-dimensional simulations of salt : behavior for the strategic petroleum reserve.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve stores crude oil in 62 solution-mined caverns in salt domes located in Texas and Louisiana. Historically, three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the behavior of the caverns have been performed using a power law creep model. Using this method, and calibrating the creep coefficient to field data such as cavern closure and surface subsidence, has produced varying degrees of agreement with observed phenomena. However, as new salt dome locations are considered for oil storage facilities, pre-construction geomechanical analyses are required that need site-specific parameters developed from laboratory data obtained from core samples. The multi-mechanism deformation (M-D) model is a rigorous mathematical description of both transient and steady-state creep phenomena. Recent enhancements to the numerical integration algorithm within the model have created a more numerically stable implementation of the M-D model. This report presents computational analyses to compare the results of predictions of the geomechanical behavior at the West Hackberry SPR site using both models. The recently-published results using the power law creep model produced excellent agreement with an extensive set of field data. The M-D model results show similar agreement using parameters developed directly from laboratory data. It is also used to predict the behavior for the construction and operation of oil storage caverns at a new site, to identify potential problems before a final cavern layout is designed.

Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bean, James E.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Microstructural development and mechanical behavior of eutectic bismuth-tin and eutectic indium-tin in response to high temperature deformation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical behavior and microstructure of eutectic Bi-Sn and In-Sn solders were studied in parallel in order to better understand high temperature deformation of these alloys. Bi-Sn solder joints were made with Cu substrates, and In-Sn joints were made with either Cu or Ni substrates. The as-cast microstructure of Bi-Sn is complex regular, with the two eutectic phases interconnected in complicated patterns. The as-cast microstructure of In-Sn depends on the substrate. In-Sn on Cu has a non-uniform microstructure caused by diffusion of Cu into the solder during sample preparation, with regions of the Sn-rich {gamma} phase imbedded in a matrix of the In-rich {beta} phase. The microstructure of In-Sn on Ni is uniform and lamellar and the two phases are strongly coupled. The solders deform non-uniformly, with deformation concentrating in a band along the length of the sample for Bi-Sn and In-Sn on Cu, though the deformation is more diffuse in In-Sn than in Bi-Sn. Deformation of In-Sn on Ni spreads throughout the width of the joint. The different deformation patterns affect the shape of the stress-strain curves. Stress-strain curves for Bi-Sn and In-Sn on Cu exhibit sharp decays in the engineering stress after reaching a peak. Most of this stress decay is removed for In-Sn on Ni. The creep behavior of In-Sn also depends on the substrate, with the creep deformation controlled by the soft P phase of the eutectic for In-Sn on Cu and controlled by the harder {gamma} phase for In-Sn on Ni. When In-Sn on Ni samples are aged, the microstructure coarsens and changes to an array of {gamma} phase regions in a matrix of the {beta} phase, and the creep behavior changes to resemble that of In-Sn on Cu. The creep behavior of Bi-Sn changes with temperature. Two independent mechanisms operate at lower temperatures, but there is still some question as to whether one or both of these, or a third mechanism, operates at higher temperatures.

Goldstein, J.L.F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering; [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Defect mapping system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline materials in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a laser for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate rastor mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. 20 figures.

Sopori, B.L.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

102

Review on the effects of hydrogen at extreme pressures and temperatures on the mechanical behavior of polymers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of hydrogen on the mechanics (e.g. strength, ductility, and fatigue resistance) of polymer materials are outlined in this report. There are a small number of studies reported in the literature on this topic, and even fewer at the extreme temperatures to which hydrogen service materials will be exposed. Several studies found little evidence that hydrogen affects the static tensile properties, long term creep, or ductile fracture of high density polyethylene or polyamide. However, there has been a report that a recoverable drop in the modulus of high density polyethylene is observable under high hydrogen pressure. A research need exists on the mechanical effects of hydrogen on the wide range of polymers used or considered for use in the hydrogen economy, due to the lack of data in the literature.

Hecht, Ethan S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Role of defects in III-nitride based electronics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LDRD entitled ``Role of Defects in III-Nitride Based Devices'' is aimed to place Sandia National Laboratory at the forefront of the field of GaN materials and devices by establishing a scientific foundation in areas such as material growth, defect characterization/modeling, and processing (metalization and etching) chemistry. In this SAND report the authors summarize their studies such as (1) the MOCVD growth and doping of GaN and AlGaN, (2) the characterization and modeling of hydrogen in GaN, including its bonding, diffusion, and activation behaviors, (3) the calculation of energetic of various defects including planar stacking faults, threading dislocations, and point defects in GaN, and (4) dry etching (plasma etching) of GaN (n- and p-types) and AlGaN. The result of the first AlGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistor is also presented.

HAN,JUNG; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; SHUL,RANDY J.; BACA,ALBERT G.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The influence of fiber/matrix interface on the mechanical behavior of Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced glass-ceramic composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanical properties of unidirectional Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced Ca aluminosilicate (CAS/SiC) and Mg aluminosilicate (MAS/SiC) glass-ceramic composites were investigated by tensile testing and nondestructive laser-ultrasound technique. The Ba-stuffed MAS was either undoped or doped with 5% borosilicate glass. Degradation of elastic stiffness constant C{sub 11} in transverse direction due to interface damage was monitored in situ by measuring the laser- generated ultrasound wave velocity. The three composite materials show different characteristics of macroscopic deformation behavior, which is correlated strongly to interface degradation. A stronger reduction trend of the elastic constant C{sub 11} is associated with a larger degree of inelastic deformation. The fracture surfaces also reveal the close relation between fiber pullout length and interfacial characteristics. Interfaces of these composites were studied by TEM; their influence on inhibiting and deflecting matrix cracks is discussed.

Liu, Y.M.; Mitchell, T.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wadley, H.N.G. [Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Effect of reinforcing particle type on morphology and age-hardening behavior of Al–4.5 wt.% Cu based nanocomposites synthesized through mechanical milling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of reinforcing particle type (SiC and TiC) on morphology and precipitation hardening behavior of Al–4.5%Cu based nanocomposites synthesized via mechanical milling were investigated in the current work. In order to study the microstructure and morphology of mechanically milled powder, X-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were utilized. Results revealed that at the early stages of mechanical milling, when reinforcing particles are polycrystal, the alloying process is enhanced more in the case of using the TiC particles as reinforcement. But, at the final stages of mechanical milling, when reinforcing particles are single crystal, the alloying process is enhanced more in the case of using the SiC ones. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrated that Al–4.5 wt.%Cu based nanocomposite powders were synthesized and confirmed that the mutual diffusion of aluminum and copper occurs through the interfacial plane of (200). The hardness results showed that not only does introducing 4 vol.% of reinforcing particles (SiC or TiC) considerably decrease the porosity of the bulk composite samples, but also it approximately doubles the hardness of Al–4.5 wt.%Cu alloy (53.4 HB). Finally, apart from TEM and scanning electron microscopy observation which are localized, a decline in hardness in the TiC and SiC contained samples, respectively, after 1.5 and 2 h aging time at 473 K proves the fact that the size of SiC particles is smaller than the size of the TiC ones. - Highlights: ? HRTEM results show mutual diffusion of Al and Cu occurs through the (200) planes. ? TiC particles enhance alloying process more than the SiC ones at the early stages of MM. ? SiC particles enhance alloying process more than the TiC ones at the final stages of MM.

Mostaed, A., E-mail: alimostaed@yahoo.com [Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, 16765-3381 Pardis Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saghafian, H.; Mostaed, E. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, 16846-13114 Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokuhfar, A. [Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, 16765-3381 Pardis Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaie, H.R. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, 16846-13114 Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Constitutive Model for the Time-Dependent Mechanical Behavior of 430 Stainless Steel and FeCrAlY Foams in Sulfur-Bearing Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical behavior of 430 stainless steel and pre-oxidized FeCrAlY open-cell foam materials of various densities was evaluated in compression at temperatures between 450 C and 600 C in an environment containing hydrogen sulfide and water vapor. Both materials showed negligible corrosion due to the gaseous atmosphere for up to 168 hours. The monotonic stress-strain response of these materials was found to be dependent on both the strain rate and their density, and the 430 stainless steel foam materials exhibited less stress relaxation than FeCrAlY for similar experimental conditions. Using the results from multiple hardening-relaxation and monotonic tests, an empirical constitutive equation was derived to predict the stress-strain behavior of FeCrAlY foams as a function of temperature and strain rate. These results are discussed in the context of using these materials in a black liquor gasifier to accommodate the chemical expansion of the refractory liner resulting from its reaction with the soda in the black liquor.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Flow in porous media, phase behavior and ultralow interfacial tensions: mechanisms of enhanced petroleum recovery. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major program of university research, longer-ranged and more fundamental in approach than industrial research, into basic mechanisms of enhancing petroleum recovery and into underlying physics, chemistry, geology, applied mathematics, computation, and engineering science has been built at Minnesota. The 1982 outputs of the interdisciplinary team of investigators were again ideas, instruments, techniques, data, understanding and skilled people: forty-one scientific and engineering papers in leading journals; four pioneering Ph.D. theses; numerous presentations to scientific and technical meetings, and to industrial, governmental and university laboratories; vigorous program of research visits to and from Minnesota; and two outstanding Ph.D.'s to research positions in the petroleum industry, one to a university faculty position, one to research leadership in a governmental institute. This report summarizes the 1982 papers and theses and features sixteen major accomplishments of the program during that year. Abstracts of all forty-five publications in the permanent literature are appended. Further details of information transfer and personnel exchange with industrial, governmental and university laboratories appear in 1982 Quarterly Reports available from the Department of Energy and are not reproduced here. The Minnesota program continues in 1983, notwithstanding earlier uncertainty about the DOE funding which finally materialized and is the bulk of support. Supplemental grants-in-aid from nine companies in the petroleum industry are important, as are the limited University and departmental contributions. 839 references, 172 figures, 29 tables.

Davis, H.T.; Scriven, L.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

FRAPCON-2: A Computer Code for the Calculation of Steady State Thermal-Mechanical Behavior of Oxide Fuel Rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FRAPCON-2 is a FORTRAN IV computer code that calculates the steady state response of light Mater reactor fuel rods during long-term burnup. The code calculates the temperature, pressure, deformation, and tai lure histories of a fuel rod as functions of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. The phenomena modeled by the code include (a) heat conduction through the fuel and cladding, (b) cladding elastic and plastic deformation, (c) fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, (d) fission gas release, (e} fuel rod internal gas pressure, (f) heat transfer between fuel and cladding, (g) cladding oxidation, and (h) heat transfer from cladding to coolant. The code contains necessary material properties, water properties, and heat transfer correlations. FRAPCON-2 is programmed for use on the CDC Cyber 175 and 176 computers. The FRAPCON-2 code Is designed to generate initial conditions for transient fuel rod analysis by either the FRAP-T6 computer code or the thermal-hydraulic code, RELAP4/MOD7 Version 2.

Berna, G. A; Bohn, M. P.; Rausch, W. N.; Williford, R. E.; Lanning, D. D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The effect of magnetic field on bistability in 1D photonic crystal doped by magnetized plasma and coupled nonlinear defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we study the defect mode and bistability behavior of 1-D photonic band gap structure with magnetized plasma and coupled nonlinear defects. The transfer matrix method has been employed to investigate the magnetic field effect on defect mode frequency and bistability threshold. The obtained results show that the frequency of defect mode and bistability threshold can be altered, without changing the structure of the photonic multilayer. Therefore, the bistability behavior of the subjected structure in the presence of magnetized plasma can be utilized in manufacturing wide frequency range devices.

Mehdian, H.; Mohammadzahery, Z.; Hasanbeigi, A. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Kharazmi University, 49 Dr Mofatteh Avenue, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Kharazmi University, 49 Dr Mofatteh Avenue, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

3.22 Mechanical Properties of Materials, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phenomenology of mechanical behavior of materials at the macroscopic level. Relationship of mechanical behavior to material structure and mechanisms of deformation and failure. Topics include: elasticity, viscoelasticity, ...

Gibson, Lorna J.

111

Energy Dissipation and Defect Generation for Nanocrystalline...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dissipation and Defect Generation for Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide. Energy Dissipation and Defect Generation for Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Large-scale molecular...

112

6When you heat a rubber band, it contracts. If you only know about point particles and ideal gases, this behavior is perplexing. But, a simple classical statistical mechanics model of a chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gases, this behavior is perplexing. But, a simple classical statistical mechanics model of a chain for given N and M. Call the result (N,M). (b) Using Stirling's approximation in the form ln(N!) N ln(N) - N and extent R, in the regime Na >> R. Write down the expression for the free energy of the chain (in

Ha, Taekjip

113

Mechanical behavior of ultrastructural biocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For numerous centuries nature has successfully developed biocomposite materials with detailed multiscale architectures to provide a material stiffness, strength and toughness. One such example is nacre, which is found in ...

Kearney, Cathal (Cathal John)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey MathematicaMeasuring and Understanding

115

Gradient Improvement by Removal of Identified Local Defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experience of ILC cavity processing and testing at Jefferson Lab has shown that some 9-cell cavities are quench limited at a gradient in the range of 15-25 MV/m. Further studies reveal that these quench limits are often correlated with sub-mm sized and highly localized geometrical defects at or near the equator weld. There are increasing evidence to show that these genetic defects have their origin in the material or in the electron beam welding process (for example due to weld irregularities or splatters on the RF surface and welding porosity underneath the surface). A local defect removal method has been proposed at Jefferson Lab by locally re-melting the niobium material. Several 1-cell cavities with known local defects have been treated by using the JLab local e-beam re-melting method, resulting in gradient and Q0 improvement. We also sent 9-cell cavities with known gradient limiting local defects to KEK for local grinding and to FNAL for global mechanical polishing. We report on the results of gradient improvements by removal of local defects in these cavities.

R.L. Geng, W.A. Clemens, C.A. Cooper, H. Hayano, K. Watanabe

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Topological Defects from the Multiverse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many theories of the early universe predict the existence of a multiverse where bubbles continuously nucleate giving rise to observers in their interior. In this paper, we point out that topological defects of several dimensionalities will also be produced in de Sitter like regions of the multiverse. In particular, defects could be spontaneously nucleated in our parent vacuum. We study the evolution of these defects as they collide with and propagate inside of our bubble. We estimate the present distribution of defects in the observable part of the universe. The expected number of such nearby defects turns out to be quite small, even for the highest nucleation rate. We also study collisions of strings and domain walls with our bubble in our past light cone. We obtain simulated full-sky maps of the loci of such collisions, and find their angular size distribution. Similarly to what happens in the case of bubble collisions, the prospect of detecting any collisions of our bubble with ambient defects is greatly enhanced in the case where the cosmological constant of our parent vacuum is much higher than the vacuum energy density during inflation in our bubble.

Jun Zhang; Jose J. Blanco-Pillado; Jaume Garriga; Alexander Vilenkin

2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

117

Infrared photothermal radiometry of deep subsurface defects in semiconductor materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared photothermal radiometry of deep subsurface defects in semiconductor materials M. E. Rodri-resistivity Si wafer with a mechanical damage on the backsurface, probed from the front intact surface that the position of the underlying damage is well resolved in both images, with the phase image showing

Mandelis, Andreas

118

Density of defects and the scaling law of the entanglement entropy in quantum phase transition of one-dimensional spin systems induced by a quench  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied quantum phase transition induced by a quench in different one-dimensional spin systems. Our analysis is based on the dynamical mechanism which envisages nonadiabaticity in the vicinity of the critical point. This causes spin fluctuation which leads to the random fluctuation of the Berry phase factor acquired by a spin state when the ground state of the system evolves in a closed path. The two-point correlation of this phase factor is associated with the probability of the formation of defects. In this framework, we have estimated the density of defects produced in several one-dimensional spin chains. At the critical region, the entanglement entropy of a block of L spins with the rest of the system is also estimated which is found to increase logarithmically with L. The dependence on the quench time puts a constraint on the block size L. It is also pointed out that the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model in point-splitting regularized form appears as a combination of the XXX model and Ising model with magnetic field in the negative z axis. This unveils the underlying conformal symmetry at criticality which is lost in the sharp point limit. Our analysis shows that the density of defects as well as the scaling behavior of the entanglement entropy follows a universal behavior in all these systems.

Basu, Banasri; Bandyopadhyay, Pratul; Majumdar, Priyadarshi [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata 700 108 (India); Jyotinagar Bidyasree Niketan H.S. School, 41 Jyotinagar, Kolkata 700 108 (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Density of defects and the scaling law of the entanglement entropy in quantum phase transition of one dimensional spin systems induced by a quench  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied quantum phase transition induced by a quench in different one dimensional spin systems. Our analysis is based on the dynamical mechanism which envisages nonadiabaticity in the vicinity of the critical point. This causes spin fluctuation which leads to the random fluctuation of the Berry phase factor acquired by a spin state when the ground state of the system evolves in a closed path. The two-point correlation of this phase factor is associated with the probability of the formation of defects. In this framework, we have estimated the density of defects produced in several one dimensional spin chains. At the critical region, the entanglement entropy of a block of $L$ spins with the rest of the system is also estimated which is found to increase logarithmically with $L$. The dependence on the quench time puts a constraint on the block size $L$. It is also pointed out that the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model in point-splitting regularized form appears as a combination of the XXX model and Ising model with magnetic field in the negative z-axis. This unveils the underlying conformal symmetry at criticality which is lost in the sharp point limit. Our analysis shows that the density of defects as well as the scaling behavior of the entanglement entropy follows a universal behavior in all these systems.

Banasri Basu; Pratul Bandyopadhyay; Priyadarshi Majumdar

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

120

Composition dependent intrinsic defect structures in SrTiO3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intrinsic point defect complexes in SrTiO3 under different chemical conditions are studied using density functional theory. The Schottky defect complex consisting of nominally charged Sr, Ti and O vacancies is predicted to be the most stable defect structure in stoichiometric SrTiO3, with a relatively low formation energy of 1.64 eV/defect. In addition, the mechanisms of defect complex formation in nonstoichiometric SrTiO3 are investigated. Excess SrO leads to the formation of the oxygen vacancies and a strontium-titanium antisite defect, while a strontium vacancy together with an oxygen vacancy and the titanium-strontium antisite defect are produced in an excess TiO2 environment. Since point defects, such as oxygen vacancies and cation antisite defects, are intimately related to the functionality of SrTiO3, these results provide guidelines for controlling the formation of intrinsic point defects and optimizing the functionality of SrTiO3 by controlling nonstoichiometric chemical compositions of SrO and TiO2 in experiments.

Liu, Bin [ORNL] [ORNL; Cooper, Valentino R [ORNL] [ORNL; Xu, Haixuan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Xiao, Haiyan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL] [ORNL; Weber, William J [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurately estimating tritium retention in plasma facing components (PFCs) and minimizing its uncertainty are key safety issues for licensing future fusion power reactors. D-T fusion reactions produce 14.1 MeV neutrons that activate PFCs and create radiation defects throughout the bulk of the material of these components. Recent studies show that tritium migrates and is trapped in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten beyond the detection range of nuclear reaction analysis technique [1-2], and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique becomes the only established diagnostic that can reveal hydrogen isotope behavior in in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten. Radiation damage and its recovery mechanisms in neutron-irradiated tungsten are still poorly understood, and neutron-irradiation data of tungsten is very limited. In this paper, systematic investigations with repeated plasma exposures and thermal desorption are performed to study defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose neutron-irradiated tungsten. Three tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to high flux (ion flux of (0.5-1.0)x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1x1026 m-2) deuterium plasma at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C/min up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 hour. These procedures were repeated three (for 100 and 200 °C samples) and four (for 500 °C sample) times to uncover damage recovery mechanisms and its effects on deuterium behavior. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 90, 75, and 66 % for 100, 200, and 500 °C, respectively after each annealing. When subjected to the same TDS recipe, the desorption temperature shifts from 800 °C to 600 °C after 1st annealing for the sample exposed to TPE at 500 °C. Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) analysis reveals that the detrapping energy decreases from 1.8 eV to 1.4 eV, indicating the changes in trapping mechanisms. This paper also summarizes deuterium behavior studies in HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten under US-Japan TITAN program.

Masashi Shimada; M. Hara; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; Y. Hatano

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Apparatus and method for defect testing of integrated circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for defect and failure-mechanism testing of integrated circuits (ICs) is disclosed. The apparatus provides an operating voltage, V.sub.DD, to an IC under test and measures a transient voltage component, V.sub.DDT, signal that is produced in response to switching transients that occur as test vectors are provided as inputs to the IC. The amplitude or time delay of the V.sub.DDT signal can be used to distinguish between defective and defect-free (i.e. known good) ICs. The V.sub.DDT signal is measured with a transient digitizer, a digital oscilloscope, or with an IC tester that is also used to input the test vectors to the IC. The present invention has applications for IC process development, for the testing of ICs during manufacture, and for qualifying ICs for reliability.

Cole, Jr., Edward I. (Albuquerque, NM); Soden, Jerry M. (Placitas, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Apparatus and method for defect testing of integrated circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for defect and failure-mechanism testing of integrated circuits (ICs) is disclosed. The apparatus provides an operating voltage, V(DD), to an IC under test and measures a transient voltage component, V(DDT), signal that is produced in response to switching transients that occur as test vectors are provided as inputs to the IC. The amplitude or time delay of the V(DDT) signal can be used to distinguish between defective and defect-free (i.e. known good) ICs. The V(DDT) signal is measured with a transient digitizer, a digital oscilloscope, or with an IC tester that is also used to input the test vectors to the IC. The present invention has applications for IC process development, for the testing of ICs during manufacture, and for qualifying ICs for reliability.

Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.

2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

124

Ozonization at the Vacancy Defect Site of the Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Lei Vincent Liu, Wei Quan Tian, and Yan Alexander Wang*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ozonization at the Vacancy Defect Site of the Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Lei Vincent Liu, Wei at the vacancy defect site of the single-walled carbon nanotube has been studied by static quantum mechanics approach. Among five different reaction pathways at the vacancy defect, the reaction involving

Wang, Yan Alexander

125

Structure, defects, and strain in silicon-silicon oxide interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure of the interfaces between silicon and silicon-oxide is responsible for proper functioning of MOSFET devices while defects in the interface can deteriorate this function and lead to their failure. In this paper we modeled this interface and characterized its defects and strain. MD simulations were used for reconstructing interfaces into a thermodynamically stable configuration. In all modeled interfaces, defects were found in the form of three-coordinated silicon atom, five coordinated silicon atom, threefold-coordinated oxygen atom, or displaced oxygen atom. Three-coordinated oxygen atom can be created if dangling bonds on silicon are close enough. The structure and stability of three-coordinated silicon atoms (P{sub b} defect) depend on the charge as well as on the electric field across the interface. The negatively charged P{sub b} defect is the most stable one, but the electric field resulting from the interface reduces that stability. Interfaces with large differences in periodic constants of silicon and silicon oxide can be stabilized by buckling of silicon layer. The mechanical stress resulted from the interface between silicon and silicon oxide is greater in the silicon oxide layer. Ab initio modeling of clusters representing silicon and silicon oxide shows about three time larger susceptibility to strain in silicon oxide than in silicon if exposed to the same deformation.

Kova?evi?, Goran, E-mail: gkova@irb.hr; Pivac, Branko [Department of Materials Physics, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijeni?ka 56, P.O.B. 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

126

Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU . S . DMagellancarbide. |

127

Energetics of Defects on Graphene through Fluorination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present study, we used FGS[5] as the substrate and implemented low temperature (<=150 oC) direct fluorination on graphene sheets. The fluorine content has been modulated to investigate the formation mechanism of different functional groups such as C-F, CF2, O-CF2 and (C=O)F during the fluorination process. The detailed structure and chemical bonds were simulated theoretically and quantified experimentally by using density function theory (DFT) calculations and NMR techniques, respectively. The adjustable power/energy ratio from fluorinated graphene as cathode for primary lithium batteries is also discussed. From a combination of NMR spectroscopy and theoretical calculation, we conclude that the topological defects without oxygen containing groups provide most of the reactive sites to react with F. FGS also contain a small number of COOH groups which contribute for the fluorination reaction. Hydroxyl or epoxy groups contribute to another fraction of the reaction products.

Xiao, Jie; Meduri, Praveen; Chen, Honghao; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Hu, Jian Z.; Feng, Ju; Hu, Mary Y.; Dai, Sheng; Brown, Suree; Adcock, Jamie L.; Deng, Zhiqun; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Zhang, Jiguang

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Anticorrelation between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects and the Impact on the Redox Chemistry of TiO2(110). Anticorrelation between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects and the...

129

Method for mask repair using defect compensation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for repair of amplitude and/or phase defects in lithographic masks. The method involves modifying or altering a portion of the absorber pattern on the surface of the mask blank proximate to the mask defect to compensate for the local disturbance (amplitude or phase) of the optical field due to the defect.

Sweeney, Donald W. (San Ramon, CA); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Learning Defect Predictors:Lessons from the Trenches Learning Defect Predictors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning Defect Predictors:Lessons from the Trenches Learning Defect Predictors: Lessons from the Trenches Tim Menzies LCSEE, WVU tim@menzies.us October 28, 2008 1 / 40 #12;Learning Defect Predictors:Lessons change the rules of the game. 2 / 40 #12;Learning Defect Predictors:Lessons from the Trenches

Menzies, Tim

131

Effect of implanted species on thermal evolution of ion-induced defects in ZnO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implanted atoms can affect the evolution of ion-induced defects in radiation hard materials exhibiting a high dynamic annealing and these processes are poorly understood. Here, we study the thermal evolution of structural defects in wurtzite ZnO samples implanted at room temperature with a wide range of ion species (from {sup 11}B to {sup 209}Bi) to ion doses up to 2?×?10{sup 16}?cm{sup ?2}. The structural disorder was characterized by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis, and transmission electron microscopy, while secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to monitor the behavior of both the implanted elements and residual impurities, such as Li. The results show that the damage formation and its thermal evolution strongly depend on the ion species. In particular, for F implanted samples, a strong out-diffusion of the implanted ions results in an efficient crystal recovery already at 600?°C, while co-implantation with B (via BF{sub 2}) ions suppresses both the F out-diffusion and the lattice recovery at such low temperatures. The damage produced by heavy ions (such as Cd, Au, and Bi) exhibits a two-stage annealing behavior where efficient removal of point defects and small defect clusters occurs at temperatures ?500?°C, while the second stage is characterized by a gradual and partial annealing of extended defects. These defects can persist even after treatment at 900?°C. In contrast, the defects produced by light and medium mass ions (O, B, and Zn) exhibit a more gradual annealing with increasing temperature without distinct stages. In addition, effects of the implanted species may lead to a nontrivial defect evolution during the annealing, with N, Ag, and Er as prime examples. In general, the obtained results are interpreted in terms of formation of different dopant-defect complexes and their thermal stability.

Azarov, A. Yu.; Rauwel, P.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G. [Department of Physics, Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, PO Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Hallén, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH-ICT, Electrum 229, SE-164 40, Kista, Stockholm (Sweden); Du, X. L. [Institute of Physics, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Computer code for the atomistic simulation of lattice defects and dynamics. [COMENT code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document has been prepared to satisfy the need for a detailed, up-to-date description of a computer code that can be used to simulate phenomena on an atomistic level. COMENT was written in FORTRAN IV and COMPASS (CDC assembly language) to solve the classical equations of motion for a large number of atoms interacting according to a given force law, and to perform the desired ancillary analysis of the resulting data. COMENT is a dual-purpose intended to describe static defect configurations as well as the detailed motion of atoms in a crystal lattice. It can be used to simulate the effect of temperature, impurities, and pre-existing defects on radiation-induced defect production mechanisms, defect migration, and defect stability.

Schiffgens, J.O.; Graves, N.J.; Oster, C.A.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Process for rapid detection of fratricidal defects on optics using Linescan Phase Differential Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase-defects on optics used in high-power lasers can cause light intensification leading to laser-induced damage of downstream optics. We introduce Linescan Phase Differential Imaging (LPDI), a large-area dark-field imaging technique able to identify phase-defects in the bulk or surface of large-aperture optics with a 67 second scan-time. Potential phase-defects in the LPDI images are indentified by an image analysis code and measured with a Phase Shifting Diffraction Interferometer (PSDI). The PSDI data is used to calculate the defects potential for downstream damage using an empirical laser-damage model that incorporates a laser propagation code. A ray tracing model of LPDI was developed to enhance our understanding of its phase-defect detection mechanism and reveal limitations.

Ravizza, F L; Nostrand, M C; Kegelmeyer, L M; Hawley, R A; Johnson, M A

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

134

High-field critical current enhancement by irradiation induced correlated and random defects in (Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed pinning landscapes in superconductors are emerging as an effective strategy to achieve high critical currents in high, applied magnetic fields. Here, we use heavy-ion and proton irradiation to create correlated and point defects to explore the vortex pinning behavior of each and combined constituent defects in the iron-based superconductor Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and find that the pinning mechanisms are non-additive. The major effect of p-irradiation in mixed pinning landscapes is the generation of field-independent critical currents in very high fields. At 7 T ? c and 5 K, the critical current density exceeds 5 MA/cm{sup 2}.

Kihlstrom, K. J.; Crabtree, G. W. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Fang, L.; Jia, Y.; Shen, B.; Koshelev, A. E.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W.-K. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kayani, A. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008 (United States); Zhu, S. F. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Wen, H.-H. [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Department of Physics, Center for Superconducting Physics and Materials, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Department of Physics, Center for Superconducting Physics and Materials, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

135

Conformal nets III: fusion of defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conformal nets provides a mathematical model for conformal field theory. We define a notion of defect between conformal nets, formalizing the idea of an interaction between two conformal field theories. We introduce an operation of fusion of defects, and prove that the fusion of two defects is again a defect, provided the fusion occurs over a conformal net of finite index. There is a notion of sector (or bimodule) between two defects, and operations of horizontal and vertical fusion of such sectors. Our most difficult technical result is that the horizontal fusion of the vacuum sectors of two defects is isomorphic to the vacuum sector of the fused defect. Equipped with this isomorphism, we construct the basic interchange isomorphism between the horizontal fusion of two vertical fusions and the vertical fusion of two horizontal fusions of sectors.

Arthur Bartels; Christopher L. Douglas; André Henriques

2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Graphene defect formation by extreme ultraviolet generated photoelectrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the effect of photoelectrons on defect formation in graphene during extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation. Assuming the major role of these low energy electrons, we have mimicked the process by using low energy primary electrons. Graphene is irradiated by an electron beam with energy lower than 80?eV. After e-beam irradiation, it is found that the D peak, I(D), appears in the Raman spectrum, indicating defect formation in graphene. The evolution of I(D)/I(G) follows the amorphization trajectory with increasing irradiation dose, indicating that graphene goes through a transformation from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline and then further to amorphous carbon. Further, irradiation of graphene with increased water partial pressure does not significantly change the Raman spectra, which suggests that, in the extremely low energy range, e-beam induced chemical reactions between residual water and graphene are not the dominant mechanism driving defect formation in graphene. Single layer graphene, partially suspended over holes was irradiated with EUV radiation. By comparing with the Raman results from e-beam irradiation, it is concluded that the photoelectrons, especially those from the valence band, contribute to defect formation in graphene during irradiation.

Gao, A., E-mail: a.gao@utwente.nl; Lee, C. J.; Bijkerk, F. [FOM-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN Nieuwegein, The Netherlands and XUV Optics Group, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands)

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Perfect preferential orientation of nitrogen-vacancy defects in a synthetic diamond sample  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the orientation of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in diamond can be efficiently controlled through chemical vapor deposition growth on a (111)-oriented diamond substrate. More precisely, we demonstrate that spontaneously generated NV defects are oriented with a ?97% probability along the [111] axis, corresponding to the most appealing orientation among the four possible crystallographic axes. Such a nearly perfect preferential orientation is explained by analyzing the diamond growth mechanism on a (111)-oriented substrate and could be extended to other types of defects. This work is a significant step towards the design of optimized diamond samples for quantum information and sensing applications.

Lesik, M.; Roch, J.-F. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud and Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 91405 Orsay (France); Tetienne, J.-P.; Jacques, V., E-mail: vjacques@ens-cachan.fr [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud and Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 91405 Orsay (France); Laboratoire de Photonique Quantique et Moléculaire, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan and CNRS UMR 8537, 94235 Cachan (France); Tallaire, A., E-mail: alexandre.tallaire@lspm.cnrs.fr; Achard, J.; Mille, V.; Gicquel, A. [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, CNRS and Université Paris 13, 93340 Villetaneuse (France)

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

138

Determining thermal diffusivity and defect attributes in ceramic matrix composites by infrared imaging.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ceramic matrix composites are being developed for numerous high temperature applications, including rotors and combustors for advanced turbine engines, heat exchanger and hot-gas filters for coal gasification plants. Among the materials of interest are silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced-silicon-carbide (SiC{sub (f)}/SiC), silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced-silicon-nitride (SiC{sub (f)}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), aluminum-oxide-reinforced-alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3(f)}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), etc. In the manufacturing of these ceramic composites, the conditions of the fiber/matrix interface are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component. Defects such as delaminations and non-uniform porosity can directly effect the performance. A nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method, developed at Argonne National Laboratory has proved beneficial in analyzing as-processed conditions and defect detection created during manufacturing. This NDE method uses infrared thermal imaging for fill-field quantitative measurement of the distribution of thermal diffusivity in large components. Intensity transform algorithms have been used for contrast enhancement of the output image. Nonuniformity correction and automatic gain control are used to dynamically optimize video contrast and brightness, providing additional resolution in the acquired images. Digital filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques have been incorporated for noise reduction and data acquisition. The Argonne NDE system has been utilized to determine thermal shock damage, density variations, and variations in fiber coating in a full array of test specimens.

Ahuja, S.; Ellingson, W. A.; Koehl, E. R.; Stuckey, J.

1997-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

Evolution of Topological Defects During Inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological defects can be formed during inflation by phase transitions as well as by quantum nucleation. We study the effect of the expansion of the Universe on the internal structure of the defects. We look for stationary solutions to the field equations, i.e. solutions that depend only on the proper distance from the defect core. In the case of very thin defects, whose core dimensions are much smaller than the de Sitter horizon, we find that the solutions are well approximated by the flat space solutions. However, as the flat space thickness parameter $\\delta_0$ increases we notice a deviation from this, an effect that becomes dramatic as $\\delta_0$ approaches $(H)^{-1}/{\\sqrt 2}$. Beyond this critical value we find no stationary solutions to the field equations. We conclude that only defects that have flat space thicknesses less than the critical value survive, while thicker defects are smeared out by the expansion.

R. Basu; A. Vilenkin

1994-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

140

Evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic response and fuel rod thermal and mechanical deformation behavior during the power burst facility test LOC-3. [PWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the results from the LOC-3 nuclear blowdown test conducted in the Power Burst Facility is presented. The test objective was to examine fuel and cladding behavior during a postulated cold leg break accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Separate effects of rod internal pressure and the degree of irradiation were investigated in the four-rod test. Extensive cladding deformation (ballooning) and failure occurred during blowdown. The deformation of the low and high pressure rods was similar; however, the previously irradiated test rod deformed to a greater extent than a similar fresh rod exposed to identical system conditions.

Yackle, T.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Broughton, J.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

High-Temperature Mechanical Behavior and Hot Rolling S.F. HARNISH, H.A. PADILLA, B.E. GORE, J.A. DANTZIG, A.J. BEAUDOIN,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and processing performance of 705X aluminum alloys is exam- ined, employing a combination of mechanical testing aluminum has been one of the most widely successful and broadly applicable materials devel- oped of these alloys include packaging, automotive, and aerospace. The Al-Zn- Mg-Cu 7000 series alloys have seen

Dantzig, Jonathan A.

142

Threshold displacement energies and defect formation energies...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energies and defect formation energies in Y2Ti2O7. Abstract: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to determine both the threshold displacement...

143

Quantum Mechanical Description of Fluid Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we deal with fluid motion in terms of quantum mechanics. Mechanism accounting for the appearance of quantum behavior is discussed.

H. Y. Cui

2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

Predicting the equilibria of point defects in zirconium oxide : a route to understand the corrosion and hydrogen pickup of zirconium alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance of zirconium alloys in nuclear reactors is compromised by corrosion and hydrogen pickup. The thermodynamics and kinetics of these two processes are governed by the behavior of point defects in the ZrO? layer ...

Youssef, Mostafa Youssef Mahmoud

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder A China Paper on Type 4;Industrial Computed Tomography (CT) Examination of Composite Gas Cylinder #12;CT of 01-01 Layer at 4.8MPa during the gas compressing and releasing processes are the direct causes for liner defect - Since

146

DefectDomain Wall Interactions in Trigonal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Defect­Domain Wall Interactions in Trigonal Ferroelectrics Venkatraman Gopalan,1 Volkmar Dierolf,2 walls in the trigonal ferroelectrics lithium niobate and lithium tantalate. It is shown that extrinsic questions re- garding intrinsic widths, defect­domain wall interactions, and static versus dynamic wall

Gopalan, Venkatraman

147

Energy levels and decoherence properties of single electron and nuclear spins in a defect center in diamond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The coherent behavior of the single electron and single nuclear spins of a defect center in diamond and a 13C nucleus in its vicinity, respectively, are investigated. The energy levels associated with the hyperfine coupling of the electron spin of the defect center to the 13C nuclear spin are analyzed. Methods of magnetic resonance together with optical readout of single defect centers have been applied in order to observe the coherent dynamics of the electron and nuclear spins. Long coherence times, in the order of microseconds for electron spins and tens of microseconds for nuclear spins, recommend the studied system as a good experimental approach for implementing a 2-qubit gate.

I. Popa; T. Gaebel; M. Domhan; C. Wittmann; F. Jelezko; J. Wrachtrup

2004-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

148

Native point defects in GaSb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have applied positron annihilation spectroscopy to study native point defects in Te-doped n-type and nominally undoped p-type GaSb single crystals. The results show that the dominant vacancy defect trapping positrons in bulk GaSb is the gallium monovacancy. The temperature dependence of the average positron lifetime in both p- and n-type GaSb indicates that negative ion type defects with no associated open volume compete with the Ga vacancies. Based on comparison with theoretical predictions, these negative ions are identified as Ga antisites. The concentrations of these negatively charged defects exceed the Ga vacancy concentrations nearly by an order of magnitude. We conclude that the Ga antisite is the native defect responsible for p-type conductivity in GaSb single crystals.

Kujala, J.; Segercrantz, N.; Tuomisto, F.; Slotte, J. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 14100, FI-00076 AALTO (Finland)

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

149

Programmable Mechanical Metamaterials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We create mechanical metamaterials whose response to uniaxial compression can be programmed by lateral confinement, allowing monotonic, non-monotonic and hysteretic behavior. These functionalities arise from a broken rotational symmetry which causes highly nonlinear coupling of deformations along the two primary axes of these metamaterials. We introduce a soft mechanism model which captures the programmable mechanics, and outline a general design strategy for confined mechanical metamaterials. Finally, we show how inhomogeneous confinement can be explored to create multi stability and giant hysteresis.

Bastiaan Florijn; Corentin Coulais; Martin van Hecke

2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

150

Leak before break behaviour of austenitic and ferritic pipes containing circumferential defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several research projects carried out at MPA Stuttgart to investigate the Leak-before-Break (LBB) behavior of safety relevant pressure bearing components are summarized. Results presented relate to pipes containing circumferential defects subjected to internal pressure and external bending loading. An overview of the experimentally determined results for ferritic components is presented. For components containing postulated or actual defects, the dependence of the critical loading limit on the defect size is shown in the form of LBB curves. These are determined experimentally and/or by calculation for through-wall slits, and represent the boundary curve between leakage and massive fracture. For surface defects and a given bending moment and internal pressure, no fracture will occur if the length at leakage remains smaller than the critical defect length given by the LBB curve for through-wall defects. The predictive capability of engineering calculational methods are presented by way of example. The investigation programs currently underway, testing techniques, and initial results are outlined.

Stadtmueller, W.; Sturm, D.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Physical process Mechanical mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Physical process Generation · Mechanical mechanisms F = m·a · Electric/Magnetic mechanisms F ­ Quadrupoles......shear stress fluctuations ­ High order poles...... phys. interpretation difficult Governing

Berlin,Technische Universität

152

Coulomb screening in graphene with topological defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the screening of an external Coulomb charge in gapless graphene cone, which is taken as a prototype of a topological defect. In the subcritical regime, the induced charge is calculated using both the Green's function and the Friedel sum rule. The dependence of the polarization charge on the Coulomb strength obtained from the Green's function clearly shows the effect of the conical defect and indicates that the critical charge itself depends on the sample topology. Similar analysis using the Friedel sum rule indicates that the two results agree for low values of the Coulomb charge but differ for the higher strengths, especially in the presence of the conical defect. For a given subcritical charge, the transport cross-section has a higher value in the presence of the conical defect. In the supercritical regime we show that the coefficient of the power law tail of polarization charge density can be expressed as a summation of functions which vary log periodically with the distance from the Coulomb impurity. The period of variation depends on the conical defect. In the presence of the conical defect, the Fano resonances begin to appear in the transport cross-section for a lower value of the Coulomb charge. For both sub and supercritical regime we derive the dependence of LDOS on the conical defect. The effects of generalized boundary condition on the physical observables are also discussed.

Baishali Chakraborty; Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

153

Coulomb screening in graphene with topological defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the screening of an external Coulomb charge in gapless graphene cone, which is taken as a prototype of a topological defect. In the subcritical regime, the induced charge is calculated using both the Green's function and the Friedel sum rule. The dependence of the polarization charge on the Coulomb strength obtained from the Green's function clearly shows the effect of the conical defect and indicates that the critical charge itself depends on the sample topology. Similar analysis using the Friedel sum rule indicates that the two results agree for low values of the Coulomb charge but differ for the higher strengths, especially in the presence of the conical defect. For a given subcritical charge, the transport cross-section has a higher value in the presence of the conical defect. In the supercritical regime we show that the coefficient of the power law tail of polarization charge density can be expressed as a summation of functions which vary log periodically with the distance from the Coulomb impurity. The period of variation depends on the conical defect. In the presence of the conical defect, the Fano resonances begin to appear in the transport cross-section for a lower value of the Coulomb charge. For both sub and supercritical regime we derive the dependence of LDOS on the conical defect. The effects of generalized boundary condition on the physical observables are also discussed.

Baishali Chakraborty; Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

154

Exploration of Quench Initiation Due to Intentional Geometrical Defects in a High Magnetic Field Region of an SRF Cavity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer program which was used to simulate and analyze the thermal behaviors of SRF cavities has been developed at Jefferson Lab using C++ code. This code was also used to verify the quench initiation due to geometrical defects in high magnetic field region of SRF cavities. We built a CEBAF single cell cavity with 4 artificial defects near equator, and this cavity has been tested with T-mapping. The preheating behavior and quench initiation analysis of this cavity will be presented here using the computer program.

J. Dai, K. Zhao, G.V. Eremeev, R.L. Geng, A.D. Palczewski; Dai, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, A. D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Eremeev, G. V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Geng, R. L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhao, K. [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Analysis of a Defected Dissimilar Metal Weld in a PWR Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the refueling outage 2000, inspections of the RC-loops of one of the Ringhals PWR-units, Ringhals 4, indicated surface breaking defects in the axial direction of the piping in a dissimilar weld between the Low alloy steel nozzle and the stainless safe end in the hot leg. In addition some indications were found that there were embedded defects in the weld material. These defects were judged as being insignificant to the structural integrity. The welds were inspected in 1993 with the result that no significant indications were found. The weld it self is a double U weld, where the thickness of the material is ideally 79,5 mm. Its is constructed by Inconel 182 weld material. At the nozzle a buttering was applied, also by Inconel 182. The In-service inspection, ISI, of the object indicated four axial defects, 9-16 mm deep. During fabrication, the areas where the defects are found were repaired at least three times, onto a maximum depth of 32 mm. To evaluate the defects, 6 boat samples from the four axial defects were cut from the perimeter and shipped to the hot-cell laboratory for further examination. This examination revealed that the two deep defects had been under sized by the ISI outside the requirement set by the inspection tolerances, while the two shallow defects were over sized, but within the tolerances of the detection system. When studying the safety case it became evident that there were several missing elements in the way this problems is handled with respect to the Swedish safety evaluation code. Among these the most notable at the beginning was the absence of reliable fracture mechanical data such as crack growth laws and fracture toughness at elevated temperature. Both these questions were handled by the project. The fracture mechanical evaluation has focused on a fit for service principal. Thus defects both in the unaffected zones and the disturbed zones, boat sample cutouts, of the weld have been analyzed. With reference to the Swedish safety evaluation system in accordance to the regulatory demands, a safety evaluation was performed using the R6-method. The failure assessment diagram is modified by the addition of the ASME XI safety factors both for limit load analysis and fracture assessment. This results in a very high conservatism since the secondary stresses such as residual stresses are high in the area. In order to quantify this effect an analysis in accordance to ASME IWB-3640, App. C was performed. This analysis provides the decision-makers with a sensitivity study; important to have to value the real risk of any missed defects in the area. (authors)

Efsing, P. [Barseback Kraft AB, P.O. Box 524, Loddekopinge SE-246 25 (Sweden); Lagerstrom, J. [Vattenfall AB, Ringhals, 430 22 Vaeroebacka (Sweden)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Irradiation-induced defect clustering and amorphization in silicon...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Irradiation-induced defect clustering and amorphization in silicon carbide. Irradiation-induced defect clustering and amorphization in silicon carbide. Abstract: Previous computer...

157

Defect classes - an overdue paradigm for CMOS IC testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IC test industry has struggled for more than 30 years to establish a test approach that would guarantee a low defect level to the customer. We propose a comprehensive strategy for testing CMOS ICs that uses defect classes based on measured defect electrical properties. Defect classes differ from traditional fault models. Our defect class approach requires that the test strategy match the defect electrical properties, while fault models require that IC defects match the fault definition. We use data from Sandia Labs failure analysis and test facilities and from public literature. We describe test pattern requirements for each defect class and propose a test paradigm.

Hawkins, C.F. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Soden, J.M.; Righter, A.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ferguson, F.J. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Modification of Defect Structures in Graphene by Electron Irradiation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modification of Defect Structures in Graphene by Electron Irradiation: Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations. Modification of Defect Structures in Graphene by Electron...

159

Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene surface using dispersion corrected DFT studies. Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective...

160

Polycrystal model of the mechanical behavior of a Mo-TiC30vol.% metal-ceramic composite using a 3D microstructure map obtained by a dual beam FIB-SEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanical behavior of a Mo-TiC30 vol.% ceramic-metal composite was investigated over a large temperature range (25^{\\circ}C to 700^{\\circ}C). High-energy X-ray tomography was used to reveal the percolation of the hard titanium carbide phase through the composite. Using a polycrystal approach for a two-phase material, finite element simulations were performed on a real 3D aggregate of the material. The 3D microstructure, used as starting configuration for the predictions, was obtained by serial-sectioning in a dual beam Focused Ion Beam (FIB)-Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled to an Electron Back Scattering Diffraction system (3D EBSD, EBSD tomography). The 3D aggregate consists of a molybdenum matrix and a percolating TiC skeleton. As most BCC metals, the molybdenum matrix phase is characterized by a change in the plasticity mechanisms with temperature. We used a polycrystal model for the BCC material, which was extended to two phases (TiC and Mo). The model parameters of the matrix were determin...

Cédat, Denis; Rey, Colette; Raabe, Dierk; 10.1016/actamat.2011.11.55

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

From Quantum Mechanics to Thermodynamics?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Quantum Mechanics to Thermodynamics? Dresden, 22.11.2004 Jochen Gemmer Universit¨at Osnabr to thermodynamical behavior · Quantum approach to thermodynamical behavior · The route to equilibrium · Summary of thermodynamical behavior entirely on the basis of Hamilton models and Schr¨odinger-type quantum dynamics. · define

Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

162

Brake Defect Causation and Abatement Study (BDCAS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brake Defect Causation and Abatement Study (BDCAS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT corrective actions and validate true abatement of initial out-of- service causation the FMCSA began the BDCAS

163

Generalized quantum defect methods in quantum chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reaction matrix of multichannel quantum defect theory, K, gives a complete picture of the electronic structure and the electron - nuclear dynamics for a molecule. The reaction matrix can be used to examine both bound ...

Altunata, Serhan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Di-interstitial defect in silicon revisited  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the defect spectrum of Cz-Si samples following fast neutron irradiation. We mainly focus on the band at 533 cm{sup ?1}, which disappears from the spectra at ?170 °C, exhibiting similar thermal stability with the Si-P6 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum previously correlated with the di-interstitial defect. The suggested structural model of this defect comprises of two self-interstitial atoms located symmetrically around a lattice site Si atom. The band anneals out following a first-order kinetics with an activation energy of 0.88 ± 0.3 eV. This value does not deviate considerably from previously quoted experimental and theoretical values for the di-interstitial defect. The present results indicate that the 533 cm{sup ?1} IR band originates from the same structure as that of the Si-P6 EPR spectrum.

Londos, C. A.; Antonaras, G. [Solid State Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, 157 84 Athens (Greece)] [Solid State Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, 157 84 Athens (Greece); Chroneos, A. [Engineering and Innovation, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom) [Engineering and Innovation, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

PARTIAL DISCHARGE TESTING OF DEFECTIVE THREE-PHASE PILC CABLE UNDER RATED CONDITIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARTIAL DISCHARGE TESTING OF DEFECTIVE THREE-PHASE PILC CABLE UNDER RATED CONDITIONS J. A. Hunter 1 lifespan. An increase in the failure rates of paper insulated lead covered (PILC) cables that make up is to document the effects of mechanical stress on the generation of partial discharge (PD) for cables of PILC

Southampton, University of

166

Atomic-scale electron-beam sculpting of defect-free graphene nanostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomic-scale electron-beam sculpting of defect-free graphene nanostructures Bo Song, Grégory F.w.zandbergen@tudelft.nl ABSTRACT. In order to harvest the many promising properties of graphene in (electronic) applications a temperature-dependent self-repair mechanism allowing damage-free atomic-scale sculpting of graphene using

Dekker, Cees

167

Effects of boron-nitride substrates on Stone-Wales defect formation in graphene: An ab initio molecular dynamics study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effects of a boron nitride (BN) substrate on Stone-Wales (SW) defect formation and recovery in graphene. It is found that SW defects can be created by an off-plane recoil atom that interacts with the BN substrate. A mechanism with complete bond breakage for formation of SW defects in suspended graphene is also revealed for recoils at large displacement angles. In addition, further irradiation can result in recovery of the SW defects through a bond rotation mechanism in both graphene and graphene/BN, and the substrate has little effect on the recovery process. This study indicates that the BN substrate enhances the irradiation resistance of graphene.

Jin, K.; Xiao, H. Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Zhang, Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Weber, W. J., E-mail: wjweber@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

168

Automated laser scatter detection of surface and subsurface defects in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon Nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramics are currently a primary material of choice to replace conventional materials in many structural applications because of their oxidation resistance and desirable mechanical and thermal properties at elevated temperatures. However, surface or near-subsurface defects, such as cracks, voids, or inclusions, significantly affect component lifetimes. These defects are currently difficult to detect, so a technique is desired for the rapid automated detection and quantification of both surface and subsurface defects. To address this issue, the authors have developed an automated system based on the detection of scattered laser light which provides a 2-D map of surface or subsurface defects. This system has been used for the analysis of flexure bars and button-head tensile rods of several Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. Mechanical properties of these bars have also been determined and compared with the laser scatter results.

Steckenrider, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Last Passage Percolation with a Defect Line and the Solution of the Slow Bond Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We address the question of how a localized microscopic defect, especially if it is small with respect to certain dynamic parameters, affects the macroscopic behavior of a system. In particular we consider two classical exactly solvable models: Ulam's problem of the maximal increasing sequence and the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process. For the first model, using its representation as a Poissonian version of directed last passage percolation on $\\mathbb R^2$, we introduce the defect by placing a positive density of extra points along the diagonal line. For the latter, the defect is produced by decreasing the jump rate of each particle when it crosses the origin. The powerful algebraic tools for studying these processes break down in the perturbed versions of the models. Taking a more geometric approach we show that in both cases the presence of an arbitrarily small defect affects the macroscopic behavior of the system: in Ulam's problem the time constant increases, and for the exclusion process the flux of particles decreases. This, in particular, settles the longstanding Slow Bond Problem.

Riddhipratim Basu; Vladas Sidoravicius; Allan Sly

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

Simulation of localized barrier defects in resonant tunneling diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . 30 14 PVCR versus left energy and position for right defect atxt = 2152 A and Et =-0. 1 eV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 15 16 17 PVCR versus left defect position and energy for the right defect at xt... = 2152 A and Et = 0. 15 eV. . . . . . . . PVCR versus left defect position and energy for the right defect at xt = 2142 A and Et = 0. 15 eV. . . . . . . PVCR versus left defect position and energy for the right defect at x I = 2122 A and Et = 0 e...

Stoneberg, Jason Neal

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Role of point defects/defect complexes in silicon device processing. Book of abstracts, fourth workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 41 abstracts are arranged into 6 sessions: impurities and defects in commercial substrates: their sources, effects on material yield, and material quality; impurity gettering in silicon: limits and manufacturability of impurity gettering and in silicon solar cells; impurity/defect passivation; new concepts in silicon growth: improved initial quality and thin films; and silicon solar cell design opportunities.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uni-directional wind turbine fiber-reinforced composite material with an epoxy resin were utilized of wind turbine blades have essentially dictated the use of low cost fiberglass composite materials. Even1 Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects Jared W. Nelson

173

Comment on the article ``UCN anomalous losses and the UCN capture cross section on material defects'' by A. Serebrov et al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present correct solution of the problem about a scattering of the neutron on a point-like defect existing in a medium and show that this mechanism cannot explain anomalous losses of UCN in storage bottles.

A. L. Barabanov; K. V. Protasov

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

174

High-Power Detectors Newport Corporation warrants this product to be free from defects In material and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Power Detectors #12;Warranty Newport Corporation warrants this product to be free from defects.3 Unpacking and Inspection 2 Section 2 - Detector Operation 2.1 Introduction 3 2.2 Power Signal Behavior 3 2 Reflections 7 2.7 Spectral Response 8 2.8 Care for High-Power Detectors 9 2.9 Detector Recalibration 9 Section

Kleinfeld, David

175

PAH Sorption Mechanism and Partitioning Behavior in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Prior to the widespread distribution of natural gas, manu- factured gas from coke, coal, and oil. In the eastern United States, where coal was plentiful, gas was derived from coal or coke. Along the West Coast, because of the availability of oil and the expense in transporting coal or coke to this region, gas

Zare, Richard N.

176

Neuronal and behavioral mechanisms of Gestalt perception .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Principles of Gestalt perception have fundamentally influenced our understanding of visual cognition. In the past century, Gestalt psychologists postulated that the human brain determines single… (more)

Rennig, Johannes

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Structure and mechanical behavior of bird beaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is imported from CAD (Solid Works). Figure 4.1: Photographsbehavior of toucan beak, Solid Works (CAD software) is usedcomponents are created by Solid Works. The model was meshed

Seki, Yasuaki

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The effects of fastener hole defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) August 1991 ABSTRACT The Effects of Fastener Hole Defects. (August 1991) Scot D. Andrews, B. S. , Texas A8rM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Orden O. Ochoa The influence of drilling-induced defects, such as delamination, on the fatigue... ambient and elevated temperature wet conditions. Specimens were tested in a bearing tension frame to static failure in order to measure the failure load and to calculate pin bearing stress. From static test results, a fatigue load was selected as 66...

Andrews, Scot D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Modulated Amplitude Waves and the Transition from Phase to Defect Chaos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanism for transitions from phase to defect chaos in the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE) is presented. We introduce and describe periodic coherent structures of the CGLE, called Modulated Amplitude Waves (MAWs). MAWs of various period P occur naturally in phase chaotic states. A bifurcation study of the MAWs reveals that for sufficiently large period P, pairs of MAWs cease to exist via a saddle-node bifurcation. For periods beyond this bifurcation, incoherent near-MAW structures occur which evolve toward defects. This leads to our main result: the transition from phase to defect chaos takes place when the periods of MAWs in phase chaos are driven beyond their saddle-node bifurcation.

Lutz Brusch; Martin G. Zimmermann; Martin van Hecke; Markus Baer; Alessandro Torcini

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Development of SQUID microscope for localization and imaging of material defects (NDE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dramatic progress was made in FY1997, the first full year of implementing a new technique for detecting and imaging material defects in nuclear weapon components. Design, fabrication, and initial tests of a ``SQUID Microscope`` has been completed utilizing the extraordinary sensitivity of High-Critical-Temperature (HTC) Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) technology. SQUIDs, the most sensitive magnetic field detectors known, are used to sense magnetic anomalies caused by the perturbation of an induction field by defects in the material under examination. Time variation of the amplitude (A) and angle ({theta}) of an induction field with unique spatial distribution allows examination of material defects as a function of depth and orientation within the sample. Variation of the frequency of amplitude variation, {Omega}(A), enables depth selection in a given sample. Scanning the sample in physical, A, and {theta} space enables detection and localization of defects to high precision. A few examples of the material defects anticipated for study include cracks, stress fractures, corrosion, separation between layers, and material inclusions. Design and fabrication of a prototype SQUID Microscope has been completed during FY97. Extensive testing of the physical, thermal, precision mechanical, and vacuum performance of the SQUID microscope were performed. First preliminary tests of the integrated system have been performed and initial results were obtained in the first week of September 1997, more than 3 months ahead of schedule.

Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Espy, M.; Atencio, L.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Defect analysis using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ......................................................................... 62 Figure 4.5 FEA models of (a) Y Bend 1, (b) X Torsion 1, and (c) Z Bend 1 ......................................................................................... 64 Figure 4.6 Change in frequency vs. defect depth for mode Y Bend 1...................................................................................................... ix LIST OF TABLES .................................................................................................... xiii 1. INTRODUCTION............................................................................................... 1 1.1...

Flynn, Kevin Joseph

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Defect Characterization for Scaling of QCA Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operation and ultra low power dissipation [8]. Among these new devices, quantum dot cellular automata (QCA promising new computing scheme in the nano-scale regimes. As an emerging technology, QCA relies on radically voter, the inverter and the binary wire, are provided to show that defects have definitive trends

183

Coulomb screening in graphene with topological defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the screening of an external Coulomb charge in gapless graphene cone, which is taken as a prototype of a topological defect. In the subcritical regime, the induced charge is calculated using both the Green's function and the Friedel sum rule. The dependence of the polarization charge on the Coulomb strength obtained from the Green's function clearly shows the effect of the conical defect and indicates that the critical charge itself depends on the sample topology. Similar analysis using the Friedel sum rule indicates that the two results agree for low values of the Coulomb charge but differ for the higher strengths, especially in the presence of the conical defect. For a given subcritical charge, the transport cross-section has a higher value in the presence of the conical defect. In the supercritical regime we show that the coefficient of the power law tail of polarization charge density can be expressed as a summation of functions which vary log periodically with the distance from the Coulomb imp...

Chakraborty, Baishali; Sen, Siddhartha

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Linear elastic fracture mechanics in anisotropic solids : application to fluid-driven crack propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fracture mechanics is a field of continuum mechanics with the objective to predict how cracks initiate and propagate in solids. It has a wide domain of application. While aerospace engineers want to make sure a defect in ...

Laubie, Hadrien Hyacinthe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial wall mechanics Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mechanics Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Effects of elastin haploinsufficiency on the mechanical behavior of mouse arteries Summary: mechanical testing. The carbon markers stick to...

186

Estimating the expected latency to failure due to manufacturing defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manufacturers of digital circuits test their products to find defective parts so they are not sold to customers. Despite extensive testing, some of their products that are defective pass the testing process. To combat this problem, manufacturers...

Dorsey, David Michael

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Defect site prediction based upon statistical analysis of fault signatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Good failure analysis is the ability to determine the site of a circuit defect quickly and accurately. We propose a method for defect site prediction that is based on a site's probability of excitation, making no assumptions about the type...

Trinka, Michael Robert

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

THE DEFECT STRUCTURE OF CdTe (*) F. A. KRGER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DEFECT STRUCTURE OF CdTe (*) F. A. KR�GER David Packard Professor of Electrical Engineering haute résistivité. Abstract. 2014 Evidence concerning the defect structure of CdTe is reviewed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

189

Buckling and Topological Defects in Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

defect formation energy in carbon nanotubes and graphene”.Carbon Nanotubes strain e zz Defect Formation Energies fromCARBON NANOTUBES Figure 4.3: Contour plots of strain energy

Chen, Shuo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at nano-crystalline ZrO2SiO2Si Interfaces . Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at...

191

Healing of defects in a two-dimensional granular crystal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a macroscopic analog for a two dimensional hexagonal crystal, we perform an experimental investigation of the self-healing properties of circular grain defects with an emphasis on defect orientation. A circular grain ...

Rice, Marie C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Higgsless superconductivity from topological defects in compact BF terms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1)-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact low-energy effective BF theories. In the average field approximation, the corresponding uniform emergent charge creates a gap for the (D-2)-dimensional branes via the Magnus force, the dual of the Lorentz force. One particular combination of intrinsic and emergent charge fluctuations that leaves the total charge distribution invariant constitutes an isolated gapless mode leading to superfluidity. The remaining massive modes organise themselves into a D-dimensional charged, massive vector. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2) and the topological order (4) are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D this type of superconductivity is explicitly realized as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

M. Cristina Diamantini; Carlo A. Trugenberger

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

193

Collective phenomena in defect crystals Reimer Kuhn1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by quantum effects. Both thermal and dynamical properties are considered. The influence of interactions Talence cedex, France Received 25 April 2000 We investigate the effects of interactions between substitutional defects on the properties of defect crystals at low temperatures, where defect motion is governed

Kühn, Reimer

194

Investigation of oxygen point defects in cubic ZrO2 by density functional theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energetics of formation and migration of the oxygen vacancy and interstitial in cubic ZrO2 are investigated by density functional theory calculations. In an O-rich environment, the negatively charged oxygen interstitial is the most dominant defect whereas, the positively charged oxygen vacancy is the most dominant defect under O-poor conditions. Oxygen interstitial migration occurs by the interstitialcy and the direct interstitial mechanisms, with calculated migration energy barriers of 2.94 eV and 2.15 eV, respectively. For the oxygen vacancy, diffusion is preferred along the <100> direction, and the calculated energy barriers are 0.26 eV for , 0.27 eV for and 0.54 eV for . These results indicate that oxygen diffusivity is higher through the vacancy-migration mechanism.

Liu, Bin [ORNL] [ORNL; Xiao, Haiyan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL] [ORNL; Aidhy, Dilpuneet S [ORNL] [ORNL; Weber, William J [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Metastable light induced defects in pentacene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study we analyzed one of the environmental factors that could affect organic materials. Pentacene thin film samples were fabricated and the degradation of their electrical characteristics was measured when the devices were exposed to ultraviolet light irradiation. The results have been reported in terms of a trap density model, which provides a description of the dynamics of light induced electrically active defects in an organic semiconductor.

Liguori, R.; Aprano, S.; Rubino, A. [Department of Industrial Engineering (DIIn), University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II, 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

196

AMEAerospace & Mechanical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMEAerospace & Mechanical Engineering #12;Aerospace and Mechanical Engineers design complex mechanical, thermal, fluidic, acousti- cal, optical, and electronic systems, with char- acteristic sizes space. Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (AME) students conduct basic and applied research within

Wang, Hai

197

Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of n-irradiated Fe-Cr Model Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High chromium ( 9-12 wt %) ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors and other advanced systems such as accelerator driven systems (ADS). Their use for these applications requires a careful assessment of their mechanical stability under high energy neutron irradiation and in aggressive environments. In particular, the Cr concentration has been shown to be a key parameter to be optimized in order to guarantee the best corrosion and swelling resistance, together with the least embrittlement. In this work, the characterization of the neutron irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys with different Cr % with respect to microstructure and mechanical tests will be presented. The behavior of Fe-Cr alloys have been studied using tensile tests at different temperature range ( from -160 deg. C to 300 deg. C). Irradiation-induced microstructure changes have been studied by TEM for two different irradiation doses at 300 deg. C. The density and the size distribution of the defects induced have been determined. The tensile test results indicate that Cr content affects the hardening behavior of Fe-Cr binary alloys. Hardening mechanisms are discussed in terms of Orowan type of approach by correlating TEM data to the measured irradiation hardening. (authors)

Matijasevic, Milena; Al Mazouzi, Abderrahim [Reactor materials research, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Mechanical Network in Titin Immunoglobulin from Force Distribution Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Network in Titin Immunoglobulin from Force Distribution Analysis Wolfram Stacklies1. , M, Stuttgart, Germany Abstract The role of mechanical force in cellular processes is increasingly revealed force propagates within proteins determines their mechanical behavior yet remains largely unknown. We

Gräter, Frauke

199

Sandia National Laboratories: Defect-Carrier Interactions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0EnergySandia InvolvesDOE-BER NASA AwardDefect-Carrier Interactions

200

DFT+U Study of CeO2 and Its Native Defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in solid state fuel cells2, as a catalyst3-6, as a high-dielectric constant gate oxide7, and in resistance random access memories (ReRAM)8. Many properties of CeO2 are determined by its intrinsic defects9-23 and the unusual behavior of the semi-core Ce 4f... averaging scheme46 for spin- orbital coupling effect. The RRKJ method is chosen as optimization of pseudopotentials47. The PBE functional was chosen for PBE+U calculations with a kinetic cutoff energy of 750eV, which expands the valence electrons states...

Huang, Bolong; Gillen, Roland; Robertson, John

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450{degree}C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC- based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response (ZrC) by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800{degree}C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation-induced microstructures mapped spatially and temporally, microstructural evolution during post-irradiation annealing, and atomistic modeling of defect formation and transport energetics will provide new, critical understanding about property changes in ZrC. The behavior of materials under irradiation is determined by the balance between damage production, defect clustering, and lattice response. In order to predict those effects at high temperatures so targeted testing can be expanded and extrapolated beyond the known database, it is necessary to determine the defect energetics and mobilities as these control damage accumulation and annealing. In particular, low-temperature irradiations are invaluable for determining the regions of defect mobility. Computer simulation techniques are particularly useful for identifying basic defect properties, especially if closely coupled with a well-constructed and complete experimental database. The close coupling of calculation and experiment in this project will provide mutual benchmarking and allow us to glean a deeper understanding of the irradiation response of ZrC, which can then be applied to the prediction of its behavior in reactor conditions.

Motta, Arthur; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

202

Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotube with vacant defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is important for its engineering applications and hydrogen energy storage. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the physisorption of molecular hydrogen on a SWCNT with a vacant defect, focusing on the effect of the vacant defect size and external parameters such as temperature and pressure. We find that hydrogen can be physisorbed inside a SWCNT through a vacant defect when the defect size is above a threshold. By controlling the size of the defects, we are able to extract hydrogen molecules from a gas mixture and store them inside the SWCNT. We also find that external parameters, such as low temperature and high pressure, enhance the physisorption of hydrogen molecules inside the SWCNT. In addition, the storage efficiency can be improved by introducing more defects, i.e., reducing the number of carbon atoms on the SWCNT.

Sun, Gang; Shen, Huaze; Wang, Enge; Xu, Limei, E-mail: limei.xu@pku.edu.cn [International Center for Quantum Materials and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Tangpanitanon, Jirawat [University of Cambridge, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire CB2 1TP (United Kingdom); Wen, Bo [International Center for Quantum Materials and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Heqing Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Xue, Jianming [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

203

Formulas for the force dipole interaction of surface line defects in homoepitaxy This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decays as R-3 . This behavior is contrasted with the elastic interaction energy arising in heteroepitaxy of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About energy per unit length between line defects (steps) of the same sign that form perturbations of circles

Margetis, Dionisios

204

Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs : numerical supplement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide, GaAs, as computed by density functional theory. This Report serves as a numerical supplement to the results published in: P.A. Schultz and O.A. von Lilienfeld, 'Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs', Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci Eng., Vol. 17, 084007 (2009), and intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models. The numerical results for density functional theory calculations of properties of simple intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide are presented.

Schultz, Peter Andrew

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The case against scaling defect models of cosmic structure formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate predictions from defect models of structure formation for both the matter and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) over all observable scales. Our results point to a serious problem reconciling the observed large-scale galaxy distribution with the COBE normalization, a result which is robust for a wide range of defect parameters. We conclude that standard scaling defect models are in conflict with the data, and show how attempts to resolve the problem by considering non-scaling defects would require radical departures from the standard scaling picture.

Andreas Albrecht; Richard A. Battye; James Robinson

1997-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

206

Surface defect states in MBE-grown CdTe layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Semiconductor surface plays an important role in the technology of semiconductor devices. In the present work we report results of our deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) investigations of surface defect states in nitrogen doped p-type CdTe layers grown by the molecular-beam epitaxy technique. We observed a deep-level trap associated with surface states, with the activation energy for hole emission of 0.33 eV. DLTS peak position in the spectra for this trap, and its ionization energy, strongly depend on the electric field. Our measurements allow to determine a mechanism responsible for the enhancement of hole emission rate from the traps as the phonon-assisted tunnel effect. Density of surface defect states significantly decreased as a result of passivation in ammonium sulfide. Capacitance-voltage measurements confirmed the results obtained by the DLTS technique.

Olender, Karolina; Wosinski, Tadeusz; Fronc, Krzysztof; Tkaczyk, Zbigniew; Chusnutdinow, Sergij; Karczewski, Grzegorz [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 40, NO. 1, JANUARY 2004 43 Mechanical Damage Detection With Magnetic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, stress. I. INTRODUCTION NONDESTRUCTIVE evaluation of in-service oil and gas pipelines by the magnetic to study MFL signals from corrosion pits [3]­[7]. Because these defects produce MFL signals mainly due pipe wall. In addition to corrosion defects, dents or "mechanical damage" in pipelines are also

Clapham, Lynann

208

Binding energetics of substitutional and interstitial helium and di-helium defects with grain boundary structure in ?-Fe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation/binding energetics and length scales associated with the interaction between He atoms and grain boundaries in BCC ?-Fe were explored. Ten different low ? grain boundaries from the ?100? and ?110? symmetric tilt grain boundary systems were used. In this work, we then calculated formation/binding energies for 1–2 He atoms in the substitutional and interstitial sites (HeV, He{sub 2}V, HeInt, He{sub 2}Int) at all potential grain boundary sites within 15?Å of the boundary (52?826 simulations total). The present results provide detailed information about the interaction energies and length scales of 1–2 He atoms with grain boundaries for the structures examined. A number of interesting new findings emerge from the present study. For instance, the ?3(112) twin boundary in BCC Fe possesses a much smaller binding energy than other boundaries, which corresponds in long time dynamics simulations to the ability of an interstitial He defect to break away from the boundary in simulations on the order of nanoseconds. Additionally, positive correlations between the calculated formation/binding energies of the He defects (R?>?0.9) asserts that the local environment surrounding each site strongly influences the He defect energies and that highly accurate quantum mechanics calculations of lower order defects may be an adequate predictor of higher order defects. Various metrics to quantify or classify the local environment were compared with the He defect binding energies. The present work shows that the binding and formation energies for He defects are important for understanding the physics of He diffusion and trapping by grain boundaries, which can be important for modeling He interactions in polycrystalline steels.

Tschopp, M. A., E-mail: mark.tschopp@gatech.edu [Dynamic Research Corporation, (on site at) U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States); Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems, Mississippi State University, Starkville, Mississippi 39762 (United States); Gao, F.; Yang, L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Solanki, K. N. [Arizona State University, School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

209

Evolution of Frictional Behavior of Punchbowl Fault Gouges Sheared at Seismic Slip Rates and Mechanical and Hydraulic Properties of Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism Sediments Deformed at Different Loading Paths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frictional measurements were made on natural fault gouge at seismic slip rates using a high-speed rotary-shear apparatus to study effects of slip velocity, acceleration, displacement, normal stress, and water content. Thermal-, mechanical...

Kitajima, Hiroko

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

Using Gold Nanoparticles as Artificial Defects in Thin Films: What Have We Learned About Laser-Induced Damage Driven by Localized Absorbers?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is general agreement that localized absorbing defects are a major factor affecting thin-film performance, and laser-induced damage in films designed for UV, nanosecond-scale, pulsed-laser applications is driven by nanoscale absorbers. Low number densities and size (few nanometer), however, prevent any characterization of these defects and, consequently, deterministic film improvement. This situation also hampers further development of localized defect-driven damage theory, since initial conditions for modeling remain uncertain. Recently, a new approach for studying laser interaction with thin-film nanoscale defects was implemented in which well-characterized, isolated artificial absorbing defects (gold nanoparticles) were introduced inside the thin film. This work is a review in which we discuss main findings from experiments with gold nanoparticles, such as delocalization of absorption during the laser pulse, importance of the defect boundary conditions (contact with the matrix), and competition of pure thermal and stress-driven mechanisms of damage-crater formation. These experimental results will be compared with theoretical results of damage-crater formation in such model thin films using both phenomenological modeling and detailed calculations of the kinetics of the damage process. An outlook on future thin-film-damage studies using model systems with artificial defects is also presented.

Papernov, S.; Schmid, A.W.

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

211

The impact of trench defects in InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes and implications for the “green gap” problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of trench defects in blue InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) has been investigated. Two mechanisms responsible for the structural degradation of the multiple quantum well (MQW) active region were identified. It was found that during the growth of the p-type GaN capping layer, loss of part of the active region enclosed within a trench defect occurred, affecting the top-most QWs in the MQW stack. Indium platelets and voids were also found to form preferentially at the bottom of the MQW stack. The presence of high densities of trench defects in the LEDs was found to relate to a significant reduction in photoluminescence and electroluminescence emission efficiency, for a range of excitation power densities and drive currents. This reduction in emission efficiency was attributed to an increase in the density of non-radiative recombination centres within the MQW stack, believed to be associated with the stacking mismatch boundaries which form part of the sub-surface structure of the trench defects. Investigation of the surface of green-emitting QW structures found a two decade increase in the density of trench defects, compared to its blue-emitting counterpart, suggesting that the efficiency of green-emitting LEDs may be strongly affected by the presence of these defects. Our results are therefore consistent with a model that the “green gap” problem might relate to localized strain relaxation occurring through defects.

Massabuau, F. C.-P., E-mail: fm350@cam.ac.uk; Oehler, F.; Pamenter, S. K.; Thrush, E. J.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Oliver, R. A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 22 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Davies, M. J.; Dawson, P. [Photon Science Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kovács, A.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt- Straße, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Williams, T.; Etheridge, J. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Clayton Campus, VIC 3800 (Australia); Hopkins, M. A.; Allsopp, D. W. E. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Simple intrinsic defects in InAs : numerical predictions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in indium arsenide, InAs, as computed by density functional theory using semi-local density functionals, intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models.

Schultz, Peter Andrew

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Understanding of Defect Physics in Polycrystalline Photovoltaic Materials: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of thin-film solar cells is influenced by the quality of interfaces and formation of defects such as point defects, stacking faults, twins, dislocations, and grain boundaries. It is important to understand the defect physics so that appropriate methods may be developed to suppress the formation of harmful defects. Here, we review our understanding of defect physics in thin-film photovoltaic (PV) materials such as Si, CdTe, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), Cu2ZnSnSe2 (CZTSe), and Cu2ZnSnS2 (CZTS) using the combination of nanoscale electron microscopy characterization and density-functional theory (DFT). Although these thin-film PV materials share the same basic structural feature - diamond structure based - the defect physics in them could be very different. Some defects, such as stacking faults and special twins, have similar electronic properties in these thin-film materials. However, some other defects, such as grain boundaries and interfaces, have very different electronic properties in these materials. For example, grain boundaries produce harmful deep levels in Si and CdTe, but they do not produce significant deep levels in CIGS, CZTSe, and CZTS. These explain why passivation is critical for Si and CdTe solar cells, but is less important in CIS and CZTS solar cells. We further provide understanding of the effects of interfaces on the performance of solar cells made of these PV materials.

Yan, Y.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Apple Defect Segmentation by Artificial Neural Networks Devrim Unay a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apple Defect Segmentation by Artificial Neural Networks Devrim Unay a Bernard Gosselin a a TCTS Lab-colored apple fruits performed by several artificial neural networks. Pixel-wise classification approach apple defects. 1 Introduction Quality of apple fruits depends on size, color, shape and presence

Dupont, Stéphane

215

Actinic characterization of EUV bump-type phase defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite tremendous progress and learning with EUV lithography, quantitative experimental information about the severity of point-like phase defects remains in short supply. We present a study of measured, EUV aerial images from a series of well-characterized, open-field, bump-type programmed phase defects, created on a substrate before multilayer deposition.

Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Liang, Ted

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

216

CHARACTERIZATION OF VIBRATIONINDUCED IMAGE DEFECTS IN INPUT SCANNERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) by dynamic errors of gears, timing bets, and motors, and indirectly by structural vibrations induced by gearsCHARACTERIZATION OF VIBRATION­INDUCED IMAGE DEFECTS IN INPUT SCANNERS Robert P. Loce George Wolberg. Keywords: image defects, digital documents, scanned documents, vibrations, motion quality 1. INTRODUCTION

Wolberg, George

217

Point Defect Characterization in CdZnTe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of the defect levels and performance testing of CdZnTe detectors were performed by means of Current Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (I-DLTS), Transient Charge Technique (TCT), Current versus Voltage measurements (I-V), and gamma-ray spectroscopy. CdZnTe crystals were acquired from different commercial vendors and characterized for their point defects. I-DLTS studies included measurements of defect parameters such as energy levels in the band gap, carrier capture cross sections, and defect densities. The induced current due to laser-generated carriers was measured using TCT. The data were used to determine the transport properties of the detectors under study. A good correlation was found between the point defects in the detectors and their performance.

Gul,R.; Li, Z.; Bolotnikov, A.; Keeter, K.; Rodriguez, R.; James, R.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

Disentangling defects and sound modes in disordered solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a new method to isolate localized defects from extended vibrational modes in disordered solids. This method augments particle interactions with an artificial potential that acts as a high-pass filter: it preserves small-scale structures while pushing extended vibrational modes to higher frequencies. The low-frequency modes that remain are "bare" defects; they are exponentially localized without the quadrupolar tails associated with elastic interactions. We identify a robust definition for the energy barrier associated with each defect, which is an important parameter in continuum models for plasticity. Surprisingly, we find that the energy barriers associated with "bare" defects are generally higher than those for defects decorated with elastic tails, suggesting that elastic interactions may help to constitutively activate particle rearrangements.

Sven Wijtmans; M. Lisa Manning

2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

219

Defect formation in long Josephson junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study numerically a mechanism of vortex formation in a long Josephson junction within the framework of the one-dimensional sine-Gordon model. This mechanism is switched on below the critical temperature. It is shown that the number of fluxons versus velocity of cooling roughly scales according to the power law with the exponent of either 0.25 or 0.5 depending on the temperature variation in the critical current density.

Gordeeva, Anna V. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, RAS, GSP-105, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, B309, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Pankratov, Andrey L. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, RAS, GSP-105, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Mechanical Properties and Radiation Tolerance of Ultrafine Grained and Nanocrystalline Metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

loops. Here we provide experimental evidence that high angle grain boundaries can effectively remove radiation-induced defects. The equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) technique was used to produce ultrafine grained Fe-Cr-Ni alloy. Mechanical...

Sun, Cheng

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The spatial evaluation of neighborhood clusters of birth defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial statistics have recently been applied in epidemiology to evaluate clusters of cancer and birth defects. Their use requires a comparison population, drawn from the population at risk for disease, that may not always be readily available. In this dissertation the plausibility of using data on all birth defects, available from birth defects registries, as a surrogate for the spatial distribution of all live births in the analysis of clusters is assessed. Three spatial statistics that have been applied in epidemiologic investigations of clusters, nearest neighbor distance, average interpoint distance, and average distance to a fixed point, were evaluated by computer simulation for their properties in a unit square, and in a zip code region. Comparison of spatial distributions of live births and birth defects was performed by drawing samples of live births and birth defects from Santa Clara County, determining the street address at birth, geocoding this address and evaluating the resultant maps using various statistical techniques. The proposed method was then demonstrated on a previously confirmed cluster of oral cleft cases. All live births for the neighborhood were geocoded, as were all birth defects. Evaluation of this cluster using the nearest neighbor and average interpoint distance statistics was performed using randomization techniques with both the live births population and the birth defect population as comparison groups. 113 refs., 36 figs., 16 tabs.

Frisch, J.D.

1990-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

222

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from reservoir rock formation. - Task 2: Carbonation study of minerals. - Task 3: Mechanical behaviors of carbonated minerals. - Task 4: Modeling of CO2- reservoir rock...

223

Point defect balance in epitaxial GaSb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Positron annihilation spectroscopy in both conventional and coincidence Doppler broadening mode is used for studying the effect of growth conditions on the point defect balance in GaSb:Bi epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Positron annihilation characteristics in GaSb are also calculated using density functional theory and compared to experimental results. We conclude that while the main positron trapping defect in bulk samples is the Ga antisite, the Ga vacancy is the most prominent trap in the samples grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The results suggest that the p–type conductivity is caused by different defects in GaSb grown with different methods.

Segercrantz, N., E-mail: natalie.segercrantz@aalto.fi; Slotte, J.; Makkonen, I.; Kujala, J.; Tuomisto, F. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, P.O. Box 14100, FIN-00076 Aalto Espoo (Finland); Song, Y.; Wang, S. [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

224

Diffraction of light by topological defects in liquid crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study light scattering by a hedgehog-like and linear disclination topological defects in a nematic liquid crystal by a metric approach. Light propagating near such defects feels an effective metric equivalent to the spatial part of the global monopole and cosmic string geometries. We obtain the scattering amplitude and the differential and total scattering cross section for the case of the hedgehog defect, in terms of the characteristic parameters of the liquid crystal. Studying the disclination case, a cylindrical partial wave method is developed. As an application of the previous developments, we also examine the temperature influence on the localization of the diffraction patterns.

E. Pereira; F. Moraes

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

225

Probing graphene defects and estimating graphene quality with optical microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a simple and accurate method for detecting graphene defects that utilizes the mild, dry annealing of graphene/Cu films in air. In contrast to previously reported techniques, our simple approach with optical microscopy can determine the density and degree of dislocation of defects in a graphene film without inducing water-related damage or functionalization. Scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman and atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis were performed to demonstrate that our nondestructive approach to characterizing graphene defects with optimized thermal annealing provides rapid and comprehensive determinations of graphene quality.

Lai, Shen [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kyu Jang, Sung [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jae Song, Young, E-mail: yjsong@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sungjoo, E-mail: leesj@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

226

Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state suggests that there are preferred Si <100> interstitial splits. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C-SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C-SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8±0.4×10e-19 m2/sec.

Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic scale defect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

assembled DNA nanostructures. Atomic force microscope (AFM) images are used... of defect identification. 4.1 Defect ... Source: Chakrabarty, Krishnendu - Department of Electrical...

228

Modeling and experimental characterization of stepped and v-shaped (311) defects in silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose an atomistic model to describe extended (311) defects in silicon. It is based on the combination of interstitial and bond defect chains. The model is able to accurately reproduce not only planar (311) defects but also defect structures that show steps, bends, or both. We use molecular dynamics techniques to show that these interstitial and bond defect chains spontaneously transform into extended (311) defects. Simulations are validated by comparing with precise experimental measurements on actual (311) defects. The excellent agreement between the simulated and experimentally derived structures, regarding individual atomic positions and shape of the distinct structural (311) defect units, provides strong evidence for the robustness of the proposed model.

Marqués, Luis A., E-mail: lmarques@ele.uva.es; Aboy, María [Departamento de Electrónica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. de Telecomunicación, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Dudeck, Karleen J.; Botton, Gianluigi A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Knights, Andrew P. [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Gwilliam, Russell M. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic defect detection Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Food Packages Using the Ultrasonic Contrast Summary: a signicant impact on the DBAI value. The utility of DBAI for detecting defects makes it a useful... detection of defects....

230

Do the Defects Make It Work? Defect Engineering in Pi-Conjugated Polymers and Their Solar Cells: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The charged defect density in common pi-conjugated polymers such as poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT, is around 1018 cm-3. Despite, or perhaps because of, this huge defect density, bulk heterojunction solar cells made from these polymers and a C60 derivative such as PCBM exhibit some of the highest efficiencies (~5%) yet obtained in solid state organic photovoltaic cells. We discuss defects in molecular organic semiconductors and in pi-conjugated polymers. These defects can be grouped in two categories, covalent and noncovalent. Somewhat analogous to treating amorphous silicon with hydrogen, we introduce chemical methods to modify the density and charge of the covalent defects in P3HT by treating it with electrophiles such as dimethyl sulfate and nucleophiles such as sodium methoxide. The effects of these treatments on the electrical and photovoltaic properties and stability of organic PV cells is discussed in terms of the change in the number and chemical properties of the defects. Finally, we address the question of whether the efficiency of OPV cells requires the presence of these defects which function as adventitious p-type dopants. Their presence relieves the resistance limitations usually encountered in cleaner organic semiconductors and can create built-in electric fields at junctions.

Wang, D.; Reese, M.; Kopidakis N.; Gregg, B. A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Plug Load Behavioral Change Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the methods and results of a plug load study of the Environmental Protection Agency's Region 8 Headquarters in Denver, Colorado, conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The study quantified the effect of mechanical and behavioral change approaches on plug load energy reduction and identified effective ways to reduce plug load energy. Load reduction approaches included automated energy management systems and behavioral change strategies.

Metzger, I.; Kandt, A.; VanGeet, O.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Defects Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), along with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), has an interest in overweight commercial motor vehicles, how they affect infrastructure, and their impact on safety on the nation s highways. To assist both FHWA and FMCSA in obtaining more information related to this interest, data was collected and analyzed from two separate sources. A large scale nationwide data collection effort was facilitated by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance as part of a special study on overweight vehicles and an additional, smaller set, of data was collected from the state of Tennessee which included a much more detailed set of data. Over a six-month period, 1,873 Level I inspections were performed in 18 different states that volunteered to be a part of this study. Of the 1,873 inspections, a vehicle out-of-service (OOS) violation was found on 44.79% of the vehicles, a rate significantly higher than the national OOS rate of 27.23%. The main cause of a vehicle being placed OOS was brake-related defects, with approximately 30% of all vehicles having an OOS brake violation. Only about 4% of vehicles had an OOS tire violation, and even fewer had suspension and wheel violations. Vehicle weight violations were most common on an axle group as opposed to a gross vehicle weight violation. About two thirds of the vehicles cited with a weight violation were overweight on an axle group with an average amount of weight over the legal limit of about 2,000 lbs. Data collection is scheduled to continue through January 2014, with more potentially more states volunteering to collect data. More detailed data collections similar to the Tennessee data collection will also be performed in multiple states.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Quality improvement and control based on defect reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis addresses the quality improvement in a printing process at a food packaging company now experiencing hundreds of printing defects. Methodologies of Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC), and ...

Dai, Qi, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Spin properties of very shallow nitrogen vacancy defects in diamond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate spin and optical properties of individual nitrogen vacancy centers located within 1–10 nm from the diamond surface. We observe stable defects with a characteristic optically detected magnetic-resonance ...

Ofori-Okai, Benjamin Kwasi

235

Design and process solutions for decreasing vendor defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why do some new initiatives fail while others succeed? This thesis attempts to answer this complex question by investigating the failure of a defect tracking initiative at Amazon and examining how a reintroduction of the ...

Joyce, Michael (Michael Sagar)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

RIS-M-2478 ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY, DEFECT STRUCTURE AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BACKGROUND 7 THEORY 8 MODEL FOR CALCULATION OF THEORETICAL DENSITY IN THE SYSTEM 10 EXPERIMENTAL 12 sensors, fuel c e l l s and electrolyzers. The defect responsible for the high conductivity

237

The geodesic rule for higher codimensional global defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We generalize the geodesic rule to the case of formation of higher codimensional global defects. Relying on energetic arguments, we argue that, for such defects, the geometric structures of interest are the totally geodesic submanifolds. On the other hand, stochastic arguments lead to a diffusion equation approach, from which the geodesic rule is deduced. It turns out that the most appropriate geometric structure that one should consider is the convex hull of the values of the order parameter on the causal volumes whose collision gives rise to the defect. We explain why these two approaches lead to similar results when calculating the density of global defects by using a theorem of Cheeger and Gromoll. We present a computation of the probability of formation of strings/vortices in the case of a system, such as nematic liquid crystals, whose vacuum is $\\mathbb{R}P^2$.

Anthony J. Creaco; Nikos Kalogeropoulos

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Liability for Defective Documentation FloridaInstitute of Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liability for Defective Documentation Cem Kaner FloridaInstitute of Technology 150 West University behind its claims. False claims in documentation might subject the manufacturer to liability for breach Engineering]: Distribution, Maintenance and Enhancement ­ documentation. General Terms Documentation, Human

239

Method and apparatus for inspecting reflection masks for defects  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An at-wavelength system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask blank defect detection is provided. When a focused beam of wavelength 13 nm is incident on a defective region of a mask blank, three possible phenomena can occur. The defect will induce an intensity reduction in the specularly reflected beam, scatter incoming photons into an off-specular direction, and change the amplitude and phase of the electric field at the surface which can be monitored through the change in the photoemission current. The magnitude of these changes will depend on the incident beam size, and the nature, extent and size of the defect. Inspection of the mask blank is performed by scanning the mask blank with 13 nm light focused to a spot a few .mu.m in diameter, while measuring the reflected beam intensity (bright field detection), the scattered beam intensity (dark-field detection) and/or the change in the photoemission current.

Bokor, Jeffrey (Oakland, CA); Lin, Yun (Berkeley, CA)

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

240

COMMUNICATION Escherichia coli tatC Mutations that Suppress Defective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNICATION Escherichia coli tatC Mutations that Suppress Defective Twin-Arginine Transporter@che.utexas.edu. Abbreviations used: Tat, twin-arginine translocation; MBP, maltose-binding protein; GFP, green fluorescence

Georgiou, George

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Topological defect motifs in two-dimensional Coulomb clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The most energetically favourable arrangement of low-density electrons in an infinite two-dimensional plane is the ordered triangular Wigner lattice. However, in most instances of contemporary interest one deals instead with finite clusters of strongly interacting particles localized in potential traps, for example, in complex plasmas. In the current contribution we study distribution of topological defects in two-dimensional Coulomb clusters with parabolic lateral confinement. The minima hopping algorithm based on molecular dynamics is used to efficiently locate the ground- and low-energy metastable states, and their structure is analyzed by means of the Delaunay triangulation. The size, structure and distribution of geometry-induced lattice imperfections strongly depends on the system size and the energetic state. Besides isolated disclinations and dislocations, classification of defect motifs includes defect compounds --- grain boundaries, rosette defects, vacancies and interstitial particles. Proliferatio...

Radzvilavi?ius, A; 10.1088/0953-8984/23/38/385301

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Defects and impurities in graphene-like materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene-like materials could be used in the fabrication of electronic and optoelectronic devices, gas sensors, biosensors, and batteries for energy storage. Since it is almost impossible to work with defect-free or ...

Terrones, Mauricio

243

Wave propagation in periodic lattices with defects of smaller dimension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The procedure of evaluating of the spectrum for discrete periodic operators perturbed by operators of smaller dimensions is obtained. This result allows to obtain propagative, guided, localised spectra for different kind of physical operators on graphs with defects.

A. A. Kutsenko

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

244

Defect reaction network in Si-doped InP : numerical predictions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Report characterizes the defects in the defect reaction network in silicon-doped, n-type InP deduced from first principles density functional theory. The reaction network is deduced by following exothermic defect reactions starting with the initially mobile interstitial defects reacting with common displacement damage defects in Si-doped InP until culminating in immobile reaction products. The defect reactions and reaction energies are tabulated, along with the properties of all the silicon-related defects in the reaction network. This Report serves to extend the results for intrinsic defects in SAND 2012-3313: %E2%80%9CSimple intrinsic defects in InP: Numerical predictions%E2%80%9D to include Si-containing simple defects likely to be present in a radiation-induced defect reaction sequence.

Schultz, Peter Andrew

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Automated defect spatial signature analysis for semiconductor manufacturing process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for performing automated defect spatial signature alysis on a data set representing defect coordinates and wafer processing information includes categorizing data from the data set into a plurality of high level categories, classifying the categorized data contained in each high level category into user-labeled signature events, and correlating the categorized, classified signature events to a present or incipient anomalous process condition.

Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN); Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Karnowski, Thomas P. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Relative projective cover works for Broue's abelian defect group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, Chiba, Japan Tue. 22 June, 2010 Joint work with J¨urgen M¨uller and Felix Noeske Brou´e's abelian that A is a block algebra of OG with a defect group P and that AN is a block algebra of ONG(P) which is the Brauer´e's abelian defect group conjecture holds for all primes p and for all block algebras of OG if G = Co3, where

Thévenaz, Jacques

247

Graphene materials having randomly distributed two-dimensional structural defects  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Graphene-based storage materials for high-power battery applications are provided. The storage materials are composed of vertical stacks of graphene sheets and have reduced resistance for Li ion transport. This reduced resistance is achieved by incorporating a random distribution of structural defects into the stacked graphene sheets, whereby the structural defects facilitate the diffusion of Li ions into the interior of the storage materials.

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

248

Crystal defect studies using x-ray diffuse scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microscopic lattice defects such as point (single atom) defects, dislocation loops, and solute precipitates are characterized by local electronic density changes at the defect sites and by distortions of the lattice structure surrounding the defects. The effect of these interruptions of the crystal lattice on the scattering of x-rays is considered in this paper, and examples are presented of the use of the diffuse scattering to study the defects. X-ray studies of self-interstitials in electron irradiated aluminum and copper are discussed in terms of the identification of the interstitial configuration. Methods for detecting the onset of point defect aggregation into dislocation loops are considered and new techniques for the determination of separate size distributions for vacancy loops and interstitial loops are presented. Direct comparisons of dislocation loop measurements by x-rays with existing electron microscopy studies of dislocation loops indicate agreement for larger size loops, but x-ray measurements report higher concentrations in the smaller loop range. Methods for distinguishing between loops and three-dimensional precipitates are discussed and possibilities for detailed studies considered. A comparison of dislocation loop size distributions obtained from integral diffuse scattering measurements with those from TEM show a discrepancy in the smaller sizes similar to that described above.

Larson, B.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A detail study of defect models for cosmic structure formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate predictions from wide class of `active' models of cosmic structure formation which allows us to scan the space of possible defect models. We calculate the linear cold dark matter power spectrum and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies over all observable scales using a full linear Einstein-Boltzmann code. Our main result, which has already been reported, points to a serious problem reconciling the observed amplitude of the large-scale galaxy distribution with the COBE normalization. Here, we describe our methods and results in detail. The problem is present for a wide range of defect parameters, which can be used to represent potential differences among defect models, as well as possible systematic numerical errors. We explicitly examine the impact of varying the defect model parameters and we show how the results substantiate these conclusions. The standard scaling defect models are in serious conflict with the current data, and we show how attempts to resolve the problem by considering non-scaling defects or modified stress-energy components would require radical departures from what has become the standard picture.

A. Albrecht; R. A. Battye; J. Robinson

1997-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

The influence of TiSi2 and CoSi2 growth on Si native point defects: The role of the diffusing species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from codeposited metal and Si. The as-deposited films had the compositions Ti, TiSi0.8 , TiSi2 undersaturation.3 Nevertheless, the mechanism by which silicide films effect a perturbance in the point defect, causing a va- cancy supersaturation. The formation of CoSi2 from CoSi proceeds via diffusion of metal

Florida, University of

251

DEFECT ASSESSMENT USING CONFORMABLE ARRAY DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conformable array data acquisition system consists of the array, the data acquisition and analysis hardware, and the data acquisition and analysis software. The following decisions were made in the development of the system. Array design decisions include the following: (a) The flexible array board will be approximately 8 by 12 inches square with the active coil section confined to a smaller 6-inch-square section at the center of the board. The outer edges of the board will be used for switching and other circuitry. (b) The diameter of the array coils will be approximately 0.375 inch (9.5 mm). Data acquisition strategy includes: (a) The corrosion spots will be mapped by successive interrogations of the active section of the array board. Approximately 10,000 samples will be acquired for each coil. The 10,000 readings will be averaged to produce one lower-noise value for each coil. This will be repeated for each coil in the array in a sequential manner. The total corrosion image for the sector will be built from the individual coil data. (b) Corrosion larger than the operational portion of the array board will be measured using a grid technique. Uniquely identified areas in the grid will overlay a corroded area, and data collected for each area will be connected by the display and assessment software to form a composite image for the corroded area. (c) Defect assessment will be invoked on the corrosion image by ''boxing'' selected areas on the color contour map. Software decisions consisted of selecting the appropriate LABVIEW modules running in a Windows XP operating system to obtain the required functionality. This third quarterly report of the project presents the activity and conclusions reached to date. Specifically, the design of the conformable array was completed and work was started on obtaining the data acquisition hardware. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and Clock Spring{reg_sign} staff met at the SwRI facilities in June 2003 to discuss the project. The Clock Spring representative was given the latest version of the data acquisition and analysis software for evaluation. Comments were received.

Alfred E. Crouch

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Mechanical Operations and Maintenance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanical Behavior ofAPS ... Search Button

253

Continuous-Wave Radar to Detect Defects Within Heat Exchangers and Steam Generator Tubes ; Revised September 3, 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK B204 Continuous-Wave Radar to Detect Defects Within Heat Exchangers and Steam Generator Tubes ; Revised September 3, 2003. A major cause of failures in heat exchangers and steam generators in nuclear power plants is degradation of the tubes within them. The tube failure is often caused by the development of cracks that begin on the outer surface of the tube and propagate both inwards and laterally. A new technique was researched for detection of defects using a continuous-wave radar method within metal tubing. The technique is 100% volumetric, and may find smaller defects, more rapidly, and less expensively than present methods. The project described in this report was a joint development effort between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) funded by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the project was to research, design, and develop a new concept utilizing a continuous wave radar to detect defects inside metallic tubes and in particular nuclear plant steam generator tubing. The project was divided into four parallel tracks: computational modeling, experimental prototyping, thermo-mechanical design, and signal detection and analysis.

Gary E. Rochau and Thurlow W.H. Caffey, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0740; Bahram Nassersharif and Gabe V. Garcia, Department of Mechanical Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001; Russell P. Jedlicka, Klipsch School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Defect studies in low-temperature-grown GaAs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High content of excess As is incorporated in GaAs grown by low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy (LTMBE). The excess As exists primarily as As antisite defects AsGa and a lesser extent of gallium vacancies V{sub Ga}. The neutral AsGa-related defects were measured by infrared absorption at 1{mu}m. Gallium vacancies, V{sub Ga}, was investigated by slow positron annihilation. Dependence of defect contents on doping was studied by Si and Be dopants. No free carriers are generated by n-type or p-type doping up to 10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3} Si or Be. Raman data indicate Be occupies Ga substitutional sites but Si atom is not substitutional. Si induces more As{sub Ga} in the layer. As As{sub Ga} increases, photoquenchable As{sub Ga} decreases. Fraction of photoquenchable defects correlates to defects within 3 nearest neighbor separations disrupting the metastability. Annealing reduces neutral As{sub Ga} content around 500C, similar to irradiation damaged and plastically deformed Ga{sub As}, as opposed to bulk grown GaAs in which As{sub Ga}-related defects are stable up to 1100C. The lower temperature defect removal is due to V{sub Ga} enhanced diffusion of As{sub Ga} to As precipitates. The supersaturated V{sub GA} and also decreases during annealing. Annealing kinetics for As{sub Ga}-related defects gives 2.0 {plus_minus} 0.3 eV and 1.5 {plus_minus} 0.3 eV migration enthalpies for the As{sub Ga} and V{sub Ga}. This represents the difference between Ga and As atoms hopping into the vacancy. The non-photoquenchable As{sub Ga}-related defects anneal with an activation energy of 1.1 {plus_minus} 0.3eV. Be acceptors can be activated by 800C annealing. Temperature difference between defect annealing and Be activation formation of As{sub Ga}-Be{sub Ga} pairs. Si donors can only be partially activated.

Bliss, D.E.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Defect studies in low-temperature-grown GaAs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High content of excess As is incorporated in GaAs grown by low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy (LTMBE). The excess As exists primarily as As antisite defects AsGa and a lesser extent of gallium vacancies V[sub Ga]. The neutral AsGa-related defects were measured by infrared absorption at 1[mu]m. Gallium vacancies, V[sub Ga], was investigated by slow positron annihilation. Dependence of defect contents on doping was studied by Si and Be dopants. No free carriers are generated by n-type or p-type doping up to 10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3] Si or Be. Raman data indicate Be occupies Ga substitutional sites but Si atom is not substitutional. Si induces more As[sub Ga] in the layer. As As[sub Ga] increases, photoquenchable As[sub Ga] decreases. Fraction of photoquenchable defects correlates to defects within 3 nearest neighbor separations disrupting the metastability. Annealing reduces neutral As[sub Ga] content around 500C, similar to irradiation damaged and plastically deformed Ga[sub As], as opposed to bulk grown GaAs in which As[sub Ga]-related defects are stable up to 1100C. The lower temperature defect removal is due to V[sub Ga] enhanced diffusion of As[sub Ga] to As precipitates. The supersaturated V[sub GA] and also decreases during annealing. Annealing kinetics for As[sub Ga]-related defects gives 2.0 [plus minus] 0.3 eV and 1.5 [plus minus] 0.3 eV migration enthalpies for the As[sub Ga] and V[sub Ga]. This represents the difference between Ga and As atoms hopping into the vacancy. The non-photoquenchable As[sub Ga]-related defects anneal with an activation energy of 1.1 [plus minus] 0.3eV. Be acceptors can be activated by 800C annealing. Temperature difference between defect annealing and Be activation formation of As[sub Ga]-Be[sub Ga] pairs. Si donors can only be partially activated.

Bliss, D.E.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Mechanical memory  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

Gilkey, Jeffrey C. (Albuquerque, NM); Duesterhaus, Michelle A. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Renn, Rosemarie A. (Albuquerque, NM); Baker, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

257

Mechanical memory  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

Gilkey, Jeffrey C. (Albuquerque, NM); Duesterhaus, Michelle A. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Renn, Rosemarie A. (Alburquerque, NM); Baker, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Context-based automated defect classification system using multiple morphological masks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Automatic detection of defects during the fabrication of semiconductor wafers is largely automated, but the classification of those defects is still performed manually by technicians. This invention includes novel digital image analysis techniques that generate unique feature vector descriptions of semiconductor defects as well as classifiers that use these descriptions to automatically categorize the defects into one of a set of pre-defined classes. Feature extraction techniques based on multiple-focus images, multiple-defect mask images, and segmented semiconductor wafer images are used to create unique feature-based descriptions of the semiconductor defects. These feature-based defect descriptions are subsequently classified by a defect classifier into categories that depend on defect characteristics and defect contextual information, that is, the semiconductor process layer(s) with which the defect comes in contact. At the heart of the system is a knowledge database that stores and distributes historical semiconductor wafer and defect data to guide the feature extraction and classification processes. In summary, this invention takes as its input a set of images containing semiconductor defect information, and generates as its output a classification for the defect that describes not only the defect itself, but also the location of that defect with respect to the semiconductor process layers.

Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Hunt, Martin A. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Lubbock, TX)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Systems and methods for forming defects on graphitic materials and curing radiation-damaged graphitic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods are disclosed herein for forming defects on graphitic materials. The methods for forming defects include applying a radiation reactive material on a graphitic material, irradiating the applied radiation reactive material to produce a reactive species, and permitting the reactive species to react with the graphitic material to form defects. Additionally, disclosed are methods for removing defects on graphitic materials.

Ryu, Sunmin; Brus, Louis E.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Liu, Haitao

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

260

Mechanical instability at finite temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many physical systems including lattices near structural phase transitions, glasses, jammed solids, and bio-polymer gels have coordination numbers that place them at the edge of mechanical instability. Their properties are determined by an interplay between soft mechanical modes and thermal fluctuations. In this paper we investigate a simple square-lattice model with a $\\phi^4$ potential between next-nearest-neighbor sites whose quadratic coefficient $\\kappa$ can be tuned from positive negative. We show that its zero-temperature ground state for $\\kappa power-law behavior of the shear modulus as a function of temperature. We expect our study to provide a general framework for the study of finite-temperature mechanical and phase behavior of other systems with a large number of floppy modes.

Xiaoming Mao; Anton Souslov; Carlos I. Mendoza; T. C. Lubensky

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Defects and persistent conductivity in SrTiO{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}) is often used as a substrate for oxide thin films such as high-temperature superconductors. It has the perovskite structure and an indirect band gap of 3.25 eV. Our prior work showed that hydrogen impurities form a defect complex that contains two hydrogen atoms. The complex was tentatively attributed to a passivated strontium vacancy. Alternatively, it could be a partially passivated titanium vacancy. In order to create titanium vacancies, we annealed samples in an evacuated ampoule with SrO powder. These samples show unexpected behavior. After illuminating with sub-gap light, the free-electron concentration increases significantly. After the light is turned off, the high conductivity persists at room temperature. We attribute persistent photoconductivity (PPC) to the excitation of an electron from a vacancy into the conduction band, with a low recapture rate.

McCluskey, Matthew D.; Tarun, Marianne C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2814 (United States)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

262

Electroluminescence from isolated defects in zinc oxide, towards electrically triggered single photon sources at room temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single photon sources are required for a wide range of applications in quantum information science, quantum cryptography and quantum communications. However, so far majority of room temperature emitters are only excited optically, which limits their proper integration into scalable devices. In this work, we overcome this limitation and present room temperature electrically triggered light emission from localized defects in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and thin films. The devices emit at the red spectral range and show excellent rectifying behavior. The emission is stable over an extensive period of time, providing an important prerequisite for practical devices. Our results open up possibilities to build new ZnO based quantum integrated devices that incorporate solid-state single photon sources for quantum information technologies.

Choi, Sumin; Gentle, Angus; Ton-That, Cuong; Phillips, Matthew R; Aharonovich, Igor

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Physink: sketching physical behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Describing device behavior is a common task that is currently not well supported by general animation or CAD software. We present PhysInk, a system that enables users to demonstrate 2D behavior by sketching and directly ...

Davis, Randall

264

22.314J / 1.56J / 2.084J Structural Mechanics in Nuclear Power Technology, Spring 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural components in nuclear power plant systems, their functional purposes, operating conditions, and mechanical-structural design requirements. Combines mechanics techniques with models of material behavior to determine ...

Kazimi, Mujid S.

265

Deformation Behavior of Nanoporous Metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoporous open-cell foams are a rapidly growing class of high-porosity materials (porosity {ge} 70%). The research in this field is driven by the desire to create functional materials with unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties where the material properties emerge from both morphology and the material itself. An example is the development of nanoporous metallic materials for photonic and plasmonic applications which has recently attracted much interest. The general strategy is to take advantage of various size effects to introduce novel properties. These size effects arise from confinement of the material by pores and ligaments, and can range from electromagnetic resonances to length scale effects in plasticity. In this chapter we will focus on the mechanical properties of low density nanoporous metals and how these properties are affected by length scale effects and bonding characteristics. A thorough understanding of the mechanical behavior will open the door to further improve and fine-tune the mechanical properties of these sometimes very delicate materials, and thus will be crucial for integrating nanoporous metals into products. Cellular solids with pore sizes above 1 micron have been the subject of intense research for many years, and various scaling relations describing the mechanical properties have been developed.[4] In general, it has been found that the most important parameter in controlling their mechanical properties is the relative density, that is, the density of the foam divided by that of solid from which the foam is made. Other factors include the mechanical properties of the solid material and the foam morphology such as ligament shape and connectivity. The characteristic internal length scale of the structure as determined by pores and ligaments, on the other hand, usually has only little effect on the mechanical properties. This changes at the submicron length scale where the surface-to-volume ratio becomes large and the effect of free surfaces can no longer be neglected. As the material becomes more and more constraint by the presence of free surfaces, length scale effects on plasticity become more and more important and bulk properties can no longer be used to describe the material properties. Even the elastic properties may be affected as the reduced coordination of surface atoms and the concomitant redistribution of electrons may soften or stiffen the material. If, and to what extend, such length scale effects control the mechanical behavior of nanoporous materials depends strongly on the material and the characteristic length scale associated with its plastic deformation. For example, ductile materials such as metals which deform via dislocation-mediated processes can be expected to exhibit pronounced length scale effects in the sub-micron regime where free surfaces start to constrain efficient dislocation multiplication. In this chapter we will limit our discussion to our own area of expertise which is the mechanical behavior of nanoporous open-cell gold foams as a typical example of nanoporous metal foams. Throughout this chapter we will review our current understanding of the mechanical properties of nanoporous open-cell foams including both experimental and theoretical studies.

Biener, J; Hodge, A M; Hamza, A V

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Subcritical percolation with a line of defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the Bernoulli bond percolation process $\\mathbb{P}_{p,p'}$ on the nearest-neighbor edges of $\\mathbb{Z}^d$, which are open independently with probability $pp_c'$. Moreover, $p_c'(p,2)=p_c'(p,3)=p$, and $p_c'(p,d)>p$ for $d\\geq 4$. We also analyze the behavior of $\\xi_p-\\xi_{p,p'}$ as $p'\\downarrow p_c'$ in dimensions $d=2,3$. Finally, we prove that when $p'>p_c'$, the following purely exponential asymptotics holds: \\[\\mathbb {P}_{p,p'}(0\\leftrightarrow n\\mathbf {e}_1)=\\psi_de^{-\\xi_{p,p'}n}\\bigl(1+o(1)\\bigr)\\] for some constant $\\psi_d=\\psi_d(p,p')$, uniformly for large values of $n$. This work gives the first results on the rigorous analysis of pinning-type problems, that go beyond the effective models and don't rely on exact computations.

S. Friedli; D. Ioffe; Y. Velenik

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

267

Invisible surface defects in a tight-binding lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface Tamm states arise in one-dimensional lattices from some defects at the lattice edge and their energy generally falls in a gap of the crystal. The defects at the surface change rather generally the phase of propagative Bloch waves scattered off at the lattice edge, so that an observer, far from the surface, can detect the existence of edge defects from e.g. time-of-flight measurements as a delay or an advancement of a Bloch wave packet. Here we show that a special class of defects can sustain surface Tamm states which are invisible, in a sense that reflected waves acquire the same phase as in a fully homogeneous lattice with no surface state. Surface states have an energy embedded into the tight-binding lattice band and show a lower than exponential (algebraic) localization. Like most of bound states in the continuum of von Neumann - Wigner type, such states are fragile and decay into resonance surface states in presence of perturbations or lattice disorder. The impact of structural lattice imperfections and disorder on the invisibility of the defects is investigated by numerical simulations.

Stefano Longhi

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

268

Fracture mechanics of cellular glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellular glasses are prime candidate materials for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solar concentrator reflecting panels. These materials are brittle, however, and susceptible to mechanical failure from slow crack growth caused by a stress corrosion mechanism. The results are detailed of one part of a program established to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize the behavior of these and commercially available materials. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials are developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region I may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

Zwissler, J.G.; Adams, M.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Mechanical Analysis of the Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet HD1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7] J. Strait, et al. , “Mechanical behavior of Fermilab-9] J. Buckley, et al. , “Mechanical performance of a twin-S. Caspi, et al. , “Mechanical design of a second generation

Ferracin, Paolo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

On the effect of x-ray irradiation on the deformation and fracture behavior of human cortical bone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ mechanical testing coupled with imaging using high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction or tomography imaging is gaining in popularity as a technique to investigate micrometer and even sub-micrometer deformation and fracture mechanisms in mineralized tissues, such as bone and teeth. However, the role of the irradiation in affecting the nature and properties of the tissue is not always taken into account. Accordingly, we examine here the effect of x-ray synchrotron-source irradiation on the mechanistic aspects of deformation and fracture in human cortical bone. Specifically, the strength, ductility and fracture resistance (both work-of-fracture and resistance-curve fracture toughness) of human femoral bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation were evaluated following exposures to 0.05, 70, 210 and 630 kGy irradiation. Our results show that the radiation typically used in tomography imaging can have a major and deleterious impact on the strength, post-yield behavior and fracture toughness of cortical bone, with the severity of the effect progressively increasing with higher doses of radiation. Plasticity was essentially suppressed after as little as 70 kGy of radiation; the fracture toughness was decreased by a factor of five after 210 kGy of radiation. Mechanistically, the irradiation was found to alter the salient toughening mechanisms, manifest by the progressive elimination of the bone's capacity for plastic deformation which restricts the intrinsic toughening from the formation 'plastic zones' around crack-like defects. Deep-ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy indicated that this behavior could be related to degradation in the collagen integrity.

Barth, Holly D.; Launey, Maximilien E.; McDowell, Alastair A.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

271

Computational mechanics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Computational Mechanics thrust area sponsors research into the underlying solid, structural and fluid mechanics and heat transfer necessary for the development of state-of-the-art general purpose computational software. The scale of computational capability spans office workstations, departmental computer servers, and Cray-class supercomputers. The DYNA, NIKE, and TOPAZ codes have achieved world fame through our broad collaborators program, in addition to their strong support of on-going Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) programs. Several technology transfer initiatives have been based on these established codes, teaming LLNL analysts and researchers with counterparts in industry, extending code capability to specific industrial interests of casting, metalforming, and automobile crash dynamics. The next-generation solid/structural mechanics code, ParaDyn, is targeted toward massively parallel computers, which will extend performance from gigaflop to teraflop power. Our work for FY-92 is described in the following eight articles: (1) Solution Strategies: New Approaches for Strongly Nonlinear Quasistatic Problems Using DYNA3D; (2) Enhanced Enforcement of Mechanical Contact: The Method of Augmented Lagrangians; (3) ParaDyn: New Generation Solid/Structural Mechanics Codes for Massively Parallel Processors; (4) Composite Damage Modeling; (5) HYDRA: A Parallel/Vector Flow Solver for Three-Dimensional, Transient, Incompressible Viscous How; (6) Development and Testing of the TRIM3D Radiation Heat Transfer Code; (7) A Methodology for Calculating the Seismic Response of Critical Structures; and (8) Reinforced Concrete Damage Modeling.

Goudreau, G.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Zurek-Kibble Mechanism for the Spontaneous Vortex Formation in Nb-Al/Al{sub ox}/Nb Josephson Tunnel Junctions: New Theory and Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New scaling behavior has been both predicted and observed in the spontaneous production of fluxons in quenched Nb-Al/Al{sub ox}/Nb annular Josephson tunnel junctions (JTJs) as a function of the quench time, {tau}{sub Q}. The probability f{sub 1} to trap a single defect during the normal-metal-superconductor phase transition clearly follows an allometric dependence on {tau}{sub Q} with a scaling exponent {sigma}=0.5, as predicted from the Zurek-Kibble mechanism for realistic JTJs formed by strongly coupled superconductors. This definitive experiment replaces one reported by us earlier, in which an idealized model was used that predicted {sigma}=0.25, commensurate with the then much poorer data. Our experiment remains the only condensed matter experiment to date to have measured a scaling exponent with any reliability.

Monaco, R. [Istituto di Cibernetica del C.N.R., 80078, Pozzuoli (Italy) and Unita INFM-Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, 84081 Baronissi (Italy); Mygind, J.; Aaroe, M. [Department of Physics, B309, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Rivers, R.J. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Koshelets, V.P. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Science, Mokhovaya 11, Building 7, 125009, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ultrasonic imaging system for in-process fabric defect detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrasonic method and system are provided for monitoring a fabric to identify a defect. A plurality of ultrasonic transmitters generate ultrasonic waves relative to the fabric. An ultrasonic receiver means responsive to the generated ultrasonic waves from the transmitters receives ultrasonic waves coupled through the fabric and generates a signal. An integrated peak value of the generated signal is applied to a digital signal processor and is digitized. The digitized signal is processed to identify a defect in the fabric. The digitized signal processing includes a median value filtering step to filter out high frequency noise. Then a mean value and standard deviation of the median value filtered signal is calculated. The calculated mean value and standard deviation are compared with predetermined threshold values to identify a defect in the fabric.

Sheen, Shuh-Haw (Naperville, IL); Chien, Hual-Te (Naperville, IL); Lawrence, William P. (Downers Grove, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Insights in fundamental scratch behavior of polymeric materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of polymeric materials under scratch deformations are dependent on the type and physical nature of the material, whereas brittle and ductile materials show various behaviors under the specified conditions. Based on the failure mechanism which the material...

Moghbelli, Ehsan

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

275

Mechanisms of articular cartilage defect repair in vivo after implantation of stratified cartilaginous tissue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diacetate, succinimidyl ester (CFDA, SE) which passivelysuccinimidyl ester (CFDA, SE) [33] which passively diffusesdiacetate, succinimidyl ester (CFDA, SE)[43] which passively

Chawla, Kanika

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Atomic-Level Computer Simulation of SiC: Defect Accumulation, Mechanical  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,Arthur J. NozikAtomsurface:productivity.

277

Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sasaki, M.S. , Sonoda, E. , Fukushima, T. , Morrison, C. ,M.S. , Tachiiri, S. , Fukushima, T. , Sonoda, E. , Schild,

Schild, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Finite Deformation of Materials with an Ensemble of Defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theory of large deformations developed here is closely related to continuum mechanics but it differs in several major respects, especially in considering the deformation associated with various types of physical behavior, making it possible to synthesize a general approach to formulating constitutive laws. One goal is to derive general concepts of strain, strain rate, stress, and stress rate that are somewhat more physics-based than in most standard works on continuum mechanics, and to demonstrate some new relations between these quantities. With these concepts it is possible to develop a generalized principle of superposition of strain rates (GSSR) that accounts for damage as well as plastic flow. The traditional superposition of strain rates allows for addition of elastic and plastic strain rates and is commonly thought to be valid only for small strains. The GSSR allows us to compute deformations involving plastic flow and, in addition, brittle failure, fragmentation, high-pressure effects and other types of behavior as necessary, and the theory is valid for arbitrarily large deformations. In fact, GSSR is derived from more basic ideas and has broader application than the standard superposition of strain rates. The physical basis for calculations of complex material response is developed in a separate report. The implementation into the SCRAM computer program is documented separately. The polar decomposition theorem is taken as a starting point for the theory of large deformation, an approach somewhat different from that usually taken in continuum mechanics. Two sets of orthogonal axes are distinguished, space axes that are fixed in ambient space, and polar axes that are related to material deformation. This clarifies several concepts; for example, it is shown that the Signorini and Green-St. Venant strains are actually measures of the same physical entity, one in space axes and the other in polar axes. It follows that they are not competing measures, as is often implied in traditional continuum mechanics. It also follows that Piola stress is a measure in polar axes, while Cauchy stress is a measure in space axes. Another consequence of polar decomposition is a proof that vorticity is not a measure of the rate of material rotation (as is often stated in the hydrodynamics literature) but that they are related. This allows us to develop an exact approach to computing rates of tensor quantities, called polar rates, that account for material rotation in an exact way. This leads to a simple relation between Signorini strain rate and stretching (the symmetric part of the velocity gradient). It also follows that the polar stress rate is the appropriate measure for the rate of change of Cauchy stress, and that the more traditional stress rate of Zaremba, Jaumann, and Noll is only an approximation, valid at small strains. Examples are described for materials undergoing simple shear, vortex motion, and torsion.

J.K. Dienes

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

I{sub DDQ} Testing and Defect Classes: A Tutorial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I{sub DDQ} testing of CMOSICs is a technique for production quality and reliability improvement, design validation, and failure analysis. The origin and basic concepts of I{sub DDQ} testing are reviewed. The relationship of I{sub DDQ} testing to other test methods is considered in the context of the whole IC life cycle from design, fabrication, and test through end use. A comprehensive test strategy is described that uses defect classes based on defect electrical properties rather than traditional fault models.

Soden, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hawkins, C.F. [New Mexico State Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

On the defect induced gauge and Yukawa fields in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider lattice deformations (both continuous and topological) in the hexagonal lattice Hubbard model in the tight binding approximation to graphene, involving operators with the range up to next-to-neighbor. In the low energy limit, we find that these deformations give rise to couplings of the electronic Dirac field to an external scalar (Yukawa) and gauge fields. The fields are expressed in terms of original defects. As a by-product we establish that the next-to-nearest order is the minimal range of deformations which produces the complete gauge and scalar fields. We consider an example of Stone--Wales defect, and find the associated gauge field.

Corneliu Sochichiu

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

On the material geometry of continuously defective corrugated graphene sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geometrical objects describing the material geometry of continuously defective graphene sheets are introduced and their compatibility conditions are formulated. Effective edge dislocations embedded in the Riemann-Cartan material space and defined by their scalar density and by local Burgers vectors, are considered. The case of secondary curvature-type defects created by this distribution of dislocations is analysed in terms of the material space. The variational geometry of the material space closely related with the existence of a characteristic length parameter is proposed. The formula which describes, in a reference temperature, the influence of dislocations on the material Riemannian metric, is given.

Andrzej Trzesowski

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

282

Deformation Behavior of Laser Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant Fe-Cr-Al Alloys for Fuel Cladding Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al in weight percent with a minor addition of yttrium using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions for all alloys studied. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. No significant correlation was found between the deformation behavior/mechanical performance of welds and the level of Cr or Al in the alloy ranges studied.

Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Thermodynamic and Kinetic Properties of Intrinsic Defects and Mg Transmutants in 3C-SiC Determined by Density Functional Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of transmutant Mg in 3C-SiC due to high-energy neutron irradiation associated with the fusion nuclear environment. The formation and binding energies of intrinsic defects, Mg-related defects, and clusters in 3C-SiC are systematically calculated. The minimum energy paths and activation energies during point defect migration and small cluster evolution are studied using a generalized solid-state elastic band (G-SSNEB) method with DFT energy calculations. Stable defect structures and possible defect migration mechanisms are identified. The evolution of binding energies during Mg2Si formation demonstrates that the formation of Mg2Si needs to overcome a critical nucleus size and nucleation barrier. It is also found that a compressive stress field exists around the Mg2Si nucleus. These data are important inputs in meso- and macro-scale modeling and experiments to understand and predict the impact of Mg on phase stability, microstructure evolution, and performance of SiC and SiC-based materials during long-term neutron exposures.

Hu, Shenyang Y.; Setyawan, Wahyu; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Jiang, Weilin; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and significant plastic deformation during compressi on . On the other hand, the micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited brittle f racture in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 3um Al 2 O 3 particles fractured into pieces without observable plastic deformation in compression. Particle deformation behaviors will be used to inform Al 2 O 3 coating deposition parameters and particle - particle bonding in the consolidated Al 2 O 3 coatings.

Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul G.; McKenzie, Bonnie B.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Native defects in tetradymite Bi2(TexSe3-x) topological insulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formation energies of native defects in Bi2(TexSe3-x), with comparison to ideal Bi2Te2S, are calculated in density-functional theory to assess transport properties. Bi2Se3 is found to be n type for both Bi- and Se-rich growth conditions, while Bi2Te3 changes from n to p type going from Te- to Bi-rich conditions, as observed. Bi2Te2Se and Bi2Te2S are generally n type, explaining observed heavily doped n-type behavior in most samples. A (0/-) transition level at 16 meV above valence-band maximum for Bi on Te antisites in Bi2Te2Se is related to the observed thermally active transport gap causing a p-to-n transition at low temperature. Bi2(TexSe3-x) with x>2 are predicted to have high bulk resistivity due to effective carrier compensation when approaching the n-to-p crossover. Predicted behaviors are confirmed from characterization of our grown single crystals.

Wang, Lin-Lin [Ames Laboratory; Huang, Mianliang [South Dakota School of Mines; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa [Ames Laboratory; Alam, Aftab [Ames Laboratory; Budko, Sergey L. [Ames Laboratory; Kaminski, Adam [Ames Laboratory; Lograsso, Thomas A. [Ames Laboratory; Canfield, Paul [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Laboratory

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

Empirical Evaluation of Defect Projection Models for Widely-deployed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Reliability Engineering, Defect modeling, empirical research, COTS, open source software, maintenance resource. *Bonnie Ray and P. Santhanam are researchers at the Center for Software Engineering at IBM T. J. Watson Research Center. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grand CCR-0086003

287

Empirical Evaluation of Defect Projection Models for Widelydeployed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Reliability Engineering, Defect modeling, empirical research, COTS, open source software, maintenance resource. *Bonnie Ray and P. Santhanam are researchers at the Center for Software Engineering at IBM T. J. Watson Research Center. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grand CCR­0086003

288

An Empirical Comparison of Field Defect Modeling Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management, Measurement, Reliability, Experimentation, Defect modeling, empirical research, COTS, maintenance of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh PA, 15213 *Center for Software Engineering IBM T.J. Watson Research Center Hawthorne, NY 10532 This research was supported by the National Science Foundation

289

Defect of villous cytotrophoblast differentiation into syncytiotrophoblast in Down syndrome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Defect of villous cytotrophoblast differentiation into syncytiotrophoblast in Down syndrome FRENDO: evain@pharmacie.univ-paris5.fr Running title: Trophoblast and Down syndrome Key words: Trisomy 21 the formation and function of the ST in trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). We first used the in vitro model

Boyer, Edmond

290

Measuring Point Defect Density in Individual Carbon Nanotubes Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

based on defec- tive nanotubes also show improved sensitivity.7 Recently, high-energy electron and ionMeasuring Point Defect Density in Individual Carbon Nanotubes Using Polarization-Dependent X in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dramatically alter their physical, mechani- cal, and electronic properties.1

Hitchcock, Adam P.

291

Preparation and characterization of low-defect surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silver crystal surfaces with low defect densities were prepared electrochemically from aqueous solutions using capillary-growth techniques. These surfaces had low rates for the nucleation of new silver layers. The impedance of these inert silver/aqueous silver nitrate interfaces was used to determine silver adatom concentration and water dipole reorientation energetics.

Robinson, T.O.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Modeling of three dimensional defects in integrated circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties that result from the interaction between the IC and the defect size in two coordinate spaces: x-y and z. The approach is a natural extension to the concept of critical areas, namely, the extraction of critical volumes. Through the course...

Dani, Sameer Manohar

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Convergence properties of the local defect correction method for parabolic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and, for a one-dimensional heat equation, we study its properties analytically. Numerical experiment of adaptive grid techniques. In adaptive grid methods, a fine grid spacing and a relatively small time step requirements are minimized. An adaptive grid technique of particular interest is the Local Defect Correction

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

294

Defects and Faults in Quantum Cellular Automata at Nano Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Defects and Faults in Quantum Cellular Automata at Nano Scale Mehdi Baradaran Tahoori, Mariam considerable research on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA) as a new computing scheme in the nano, quantum dot cellular automata (QCA) not only gives a solution at nano scale, but also it offers a new

295

Rate-dependent deformation behavior of poss-filled and plasticized poly(vinyl chloride)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polymers are known to exhibit strong time-dependent mechanical behavior. In different temperatures or frequency regimes, the rate sensitivities of polymers change as various primary and secondary molecular mobility mechanisms ...

Soong, Sharon Yu-Wen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Agreement Mechanisms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministratorCFM LEAPAgenda AgendaAgreement Mechanisms

297

Essays in behavioral economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Essays in Behavioral Economics A dissertation submitted inDoctor of Philosophy in Economics by David Holding Eilfunction,” The Review of Economics and Statistics, 1995,

Eil, David Holding

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Growth strains and creep in thermally grown alumina : oxide growth mechanisms.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ measurements of growth strains and creep relaxation in {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, isothermally grown on {beta}-NiAl alloys at 1100 C, are reported and analyzed. Samples containing the reactive element Zr, and Zr-free samples, are examined. For Zr-free samples, steady state growth strains are compressive, whereas the growth strains are tensile when the reactive element (RE) is added to the alloy. This behavior is attributed to the counterflow of oxygen and aluminum interstitials, and to simultaneous counterflow of oxygen and aluminum vacancies, all moving through the grain boundaries. Cross diffusing oxygen and aluminum interstitials may merge and combine within the film, forming new oxide along grain boundary walls, a mechanism that leads to an in-plane compressive stress. Cross diffusing oxygen and aluminum vacancies will also merge and combine within the film; in this case material is removed from grain boundary walls, a mechanism that leads to an in-plane tensile stress. When no RE is present, the interstitial mechanism dominates and the resultant stress is compressive. Consistent with the 'dynamic segregation model', the RE slows the outdiffusion of Al interstitials permitting the tensile mechanism to dominate. This interpretation invokes the unconventional view that oxygen and aluminum interstitials and vacancies, created in and driven by the strong chemical gradient, all participate meaningfully in the scale growth process. Grain boundary diffusion measurements were obtained from low stress creep data, interpreted using the Coble model of grain boundary diffusion. Reported diffusion measurements of oxygen through grain boundaries of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which are known to be inconsistent with oxide scale growth, are critically examined. A simple picture, a 'balanced defect model', emerges that is consistent with the dynamic segregation model, observed growth stresses and their dependence on the presence of a reactive element, sequential oxidation experiments, and our best knowledge about grain boundary diffusion coefficients.

Veal, B. W.; Paulikas, A. P.; Materials Science Division

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Mechanical Engineering ME 3720 FLUID MECHANICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Engineering ME 3720 FLUID MECHANICS Pre-requisite: ME 2330 Co-requisite: ME 3210) to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms and the mathematical models of fluid mechanics of fluid mechanics problems in engineering practice. The basic principles of fluid mechanics

Panchagnula, Mahesh

300

Identification of structural defects in graphitic materials by gas-phase anisotropic etching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of structural defects in graphitic materials by gas-phase anisotropic etching Shuang interest but also industrial importance, as the existence of surface and bulk defects inevitably influences

Zhang, Guangyu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Characterization of Defects in N-type 4H-SiC After High-Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterization of Defects in N-type 4H-SiC After High-Energy N Ion Implantation by RBS-Channeling and Raman Spectroscopy. Characterization of Defects in N-type 4H-SiC After...

302

Atomic Computer Simulations of Defect Migration in 3C and 4H...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Simulations of Defect Migration in 3C and 4H-SiC. Atomic Computer Simulations of Defect Migration in 3C and 4H-SiC. Abstract: Knowledge of the migration of intrinsic point...

303

High-energy mechanical synthesis of nanophase fluorite-structured mixed oxide catalysts with a high redox activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of nanostructured, highly defective, ternary solid solutions containing CeO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and MnO{sub 2} or CuO were prepared by high-energy mechanical milling of individual components. Morphological and redox properties were studied by XRD, HRTEM and temperature-programmed reduction techniques. It was shown that the introduction of small amounts of copper and manganese strongly promotes the redox behavior of cerium at lower temperatures in comparison with CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}. High temperature treatment of up to 1,400 K was also shown to further promote overall redox capacity without affecting low-temperature redox behavior. Moreover, evidence is provided to show that Cu and Mn are dissolved within the CeO{sub 2} lattice structure. Addition of dopants enhances catalytic redox properties in the oxidation of CO at low temperatures, which is associated with the high concentration of oxygen vacancies that form on the introduction of aliovalent elements into the ceria-zirconia lattice.

Primavera, A.; Trovarelli, A.; Terribile, D.; Leitenburg, C. de; Dolcetti, G. [Univ. di Udine (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche; Llorca, J. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Inorganica

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Technical Note Viscoelastic Behavior of Silica Particle Compacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the noise emitted by trains, particularly high-speed trains. How soil is affected by dynamic mechanical Lu1 and D. D. L. Chung2 Abstract: The viscoelastic behavior of model sandy soils in the form is recommended for mechanical energy dissipation. DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)MT.1943-5533.0000831. © 2014 American

Chung, Deborah D.L.

305

EFFECTS OF MANUFACTURING DEFECTS ON THE STRENGTH OF TOUGHENED CARBON/EPOXY PREPREG COMPOSITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF MANUFACTURING DEFECTS ON THE STRENGTH OF TOUGHENED CARBON/EPOXY PREPREG COMPOSITES .......................................................................................11 Toughened Resin Systems

306

DISSERTATION Role of the Cu-O Defect in CdTe Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE CU-O DEFECT COMPLEX IN CDTE SOLAR CELLS Thin-film CdTe is one of the leading materials used the defects present in thin-film CdTe deposited for solar cells. One key defect seen in the thin-film CdDISSERTATION Role of the Cu-O Defect in CdTe Solar Cells Submitted by Caroline R. Corwine

Sites, James R.

307

Robotic Tracking and Marking of Surface Shape Defects on Moving Automotive Panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotic Tracking and Marking of Surface Shape Defects on Moving Automotive Panels Valentin Borsu defects for quality control in the automotive industry. In order to integrate a defects detection station. INTRODUCTION Quality control in the automotive industry is essential in order to ensure that the products meet

Payeur, Pierre

308

Stability of irradiation-induced point defects on walls of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability of irradiation-induced point defects on walls of carbon nanotubes A. V. Krasheninnikov #3 of atomic-scale irradiation- induced defects on walls of carbon nanotubes. Since atomic vacancies. Carbon nanotubes; C. Computational chemistry; Scanning tunneling microscopy; D. Defects; Electronic

Nordlund, Kai

309

Polarized Luminescence of Defects in CuGaSe2 Susanne Siebentritt1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). But for the whole group of I-III-VI2 chalcopyrite semiconductors no reliable identification of native defects by ESR been found in CuInSe2. [14] In the effort of relating the energy positions of the defects to defect. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 1012 © 2007 Materials Research Society 1012-Y13-01 #12;the experiment

Rockett, Angus

310

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects Vijay Babbar1 weaker flux signals. KEY WORDS: Magnetic flux leakage; residual magnetization; pipeline defects; pipeline pipelines, which may develop defects such as corrosion pits as they age in service.(1) Under the ef- fect

Clapham, Lynann

311

Oxygen sublattice defect in cobalt oxide : formation, migration, charge localization and thermodynamic processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

643 Oxygen sublattice defect in cobalt oxide : formation, migration, charge localization of oxygen defects in CoO using classical simulations. The charge localization in the oxygen vacancy has]. The defect concentration in the oxygen sublattice is several orders of magnitude smaller, but never- theless

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

312

Ab Initio Studies of Vacancy-Defected Fullerenes and Single-Walled Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ab Initio Studies of Vacancy-Defected Fullerenes and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes LEI VINCENT LIU- vacancy-defected fullerenes, C60 and C70, and the single- and double-vacancy-defected single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were studied within density functional theory. The isomerization barriers for the single-vacancy

Wang, Yan Alexander

313

A simulation model of focus and radial servos in Compact Disc players with Disc surface defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simulation model of focus and radial servos in Compact Disc players with Disc surface defects P of controllers handling surface defects easier. A simulation model of Compact Disc players playing discs of the controller has been based on trial and error on real test systems since no simulation models of the defects

Wickerhauser, M. Victor

314

Defect production in tungsten: A comparison between field-ion microscopy and molecular-dynamics simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Defect production in tungsten: A comparison between field-ion microscopy and molecular defect production efficiencies obtained by FIM are a consequence of a surface effect, which greatly enhances defect production compared to that in the crystal interior. Comparison of clustering of vacancies

Nordlund, Kai

315

PREDICTIONS FOR STRESS-STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF PANKI FLY-ASH USING MODIFIED CAM CLAY MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the fact that fly-ash is a granular material and its mechanical response may be similar to that of soils) is based on critical state soil mechanics, and today it is one of the most widely used constitutive model for predicting the mechanical behavior of geo-materials. In critical state soil mechanics, it is proposed

Prashant, Amit

316

Thermo-mechanical Behavior of Lithium-ion Battery Electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing electric vehicles is widely considered as a direct approach to resolve the energy and environmental challenges faced by the human race. As one of the most promising power solutions to electric cars, the lithium ion battery is expected...

An, Kai

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mechanical behavior and microstructure of self-assembling oligopeptide gels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogels have become widely used in the fields of tissue engineering and drug delivery. One class of hydrogel is formed from synthetic oligopeptides that self-assemble into a solution of beta-sheet filaments. These filaments ...

Hammond, Nathan Allen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Low temperature electrical and mechanical behavior of composite aluminum cryoconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composite can also be theoretically determined using the rule of mixtures. By substituting conductivity for yield strength in equation (7), then inverting, since resistivity is the inverse of conductivity, the total resistivity, p, is PfPm P= ffp + f pf...

De Frese, Raymond Jack

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

Neurotoxic mechanisms of methylmercury: cellular and behavior changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The organic or methylated form of mercury (Hg), consisting of one methyl group bound to each atom of Hg, (methylmercury; MeHg), accounts for most of the Hg to which humans are exposed. MeHg, by virtue of its lipophilicity is highly neurotoxic...

Bellum, Sairam

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

320

Cartel Mechanism Design: Nonratifiable Conditions of Collusive Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

boost exemption or have more budget to subsidize agents, it is less likely that a ring will be formed. v To my family and Hellen vi ACKNOWLEDGMENTS First, I am heartily grateful to my advisory committee. Professor Guoqiang Tian, chair of my advisory....3 concludes. All proofs are in Appendix A. 2.2. Model There are one seller and n (n ? 2) bidders in the economy. Bidder i?s value is vi ? V , i = (1, ..., n), which represents i?s willingness to pay for an object in an auction, and v = (v1, ..., vn...

Hsueh, Shao-Chieh

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Roles of nanofiller structure on mechanical behavior of thermoplastic nanocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. orientation of the clay in the nanocomposite and the simple shear process. It is found that the modulus, strength, and heat distortion temperature of the nanocomposites decrease as the clay aspect ratio and degree of orientation are reduced. The micromechanics...

Weon, Jong Il

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Potential Network Mechanisms Mediating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, 2Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, Massachusetts General Hospital with general anesthesia. Key words: propofol anesthesia; paradoxical excitation; GABAA ; M-current; EEG; beta rhythms Introduction General anesthesia is defined as a reversible, drug-induced con- junction of four

Kopell, Nancy

323

The normal basilar artery: structural properties and mechanical behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

male White New Zealand specific pathogen free rabbits underwent cyclic pressurization tests at in vivo conditions and controlled levels of myogenic tone. Sections of basilar arteries were imaged for collagen fiber orientation at 0, 40 and 80 mmHg...

Wicker, Bethany Kay

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of Advanced High Strength  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Day withCharacterization andTechniques

325

Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of Advanced High Strength  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Day withCharacterization andTechniquesSteels (AHSS) |

326

Behavioral mechanisms underlying the extinction of cocaine self-administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of the present series of experiments was to outline the influence of different doses of cocaine during training, training schedule, training length and abstinence duration to modulate subsequent extinction and reinstatement patterns. Abram...

Valles, Rodrigo, Jr.

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

327

Native defects in MBE-grown CdTe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep-level traps in both n- and p-type CdTe layers, grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates, have been investigated by means of deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Four of the traps revealed in the DLTS spectra, which displayed exponential kinetics for capture of charge carriers into the trap states, have been assigned to native point defects: Cd interstitial, Cd vacancy, Te antisite defect and a complex formed of the Te antisite and Cd vacancy. Three further traps, displaying logarithmic capture kinetics, have been ascribed to electron states of treading dislocations generated at the mismatched interface with the substrate and propagated through the CdTe layer.

Olender, Karolina; Wosinski, Tadeusz; Makosa, Andrzej; Tkaczyk, Zbigniew; Kolkovsky, Valery; Karczewski, Grzegorz [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

328

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering An experimental methodology is presented for mechanism verification of physics-based prognosis of mechanical damage, such as fatigue. The proposed experimental methodology includes multi-resolution in-situ mechanical testing, advanced imaging analysis, and mechanism

329

Plasma-based localized defect for switchable coupling applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report in this paper experimental measurements in order to validate the concept of switchable electromagnetic band gap filters based on plasma capillaries in the microwave regime. The plasma tube is embedded inside the structure to create a bistable (plasma on or off) punctual defect. We first investigate two kinds of discharge tubes: Ar-Hg and pure Ne, which we then use to experimentally achieve plasma-based reconfigurable applications, namely, a two-port coupler and a two-port demultiplexer.

Varault, Stefan [ONERA/DEMR, 2, Avenue Edouard Belin, BP4025, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); LAboratoire PLAsma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), UPS, CNRS, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Gabard, Benjamin [STAE, 4, rue Emile Monso, BP84234, 31030 Toulouse, Cedex 4 (France); Sokoloff, Jerome [LAboratoire PLAsma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), UPS, CNRS, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Bolioli, Sylvain [ONERA/DEMR, 2, Avenue Edouard Belin, BP4025, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France)

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

1 Semst 8 Semth7 Semth6 Semth5 Semth4 Semth3 Semrd2 Semnd Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering MIE 570 Solar & Dir. Energy Conver. MIE 573 Engin. Windpower Systems MIE 597B Mechanical Behavior

Mountziaris, T. J.

331

Light defection due to a charged, rotating body  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to GTR and subsequent developments in the field, it is known that there are three factors namely mass, rotation and charge that can influence the space-time geometry. Accordingly, we discuss the effect of space-time geometry of a charged, rotating body on the motion of the light ray. We obtained the expression for equatorial defection of light due to such a body up to fourth order term. In our expression for defection angle it is clear that charge can influence the path of light ray. We used the null geodesic approach of light ray for our calculation. If we set the charge to zero our expression of bending angle gets reduced to the Kerr equatorial bending angle.If we set rotation to zero our expression reduces to Resinner-Nordstr$\\ddot{o}$m defection angle and if we set both charge and rotation to zero our expression reduces to Schwarzschild bending angle. However, we get non-zero bending angle for a hypothetical massless, rotating, charged body.

Sarani Chakraborty; A. K. Sen

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Silicide Schottky Contacts to Silicon: Screened Pinning at Defect Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicide Schottky contacts can be as large as 0.955 eV (E{sub v} + 0.165 eV) on n-type silicon and as large as 1.05 eV (E{sub c} {minus} 0.07 eV) on p-type silicon. Current models of Schottky barrier formation do not provide a satisfactory explanation of occurrence of this wide variation. A model for understanding Schottky contacts via screened pinning at defect levels is presented. In the present paper it is shown that most transition metal silicides are pinned approximately 0.48 eV above the valence band by interstitial Si clusters. Rare earth disilicides pin close to the divacancy acceptor level 0.41 eV below the conduction band edge while high work function silicides of Ir and Pt pin close to the divacancy donor level 0.21 eV above the valence band edge. Selection of a particular defect pinning level depends strongly on the relative positions of the silicide work function and the defect energy level on an absolute energy scale.

Drummond, T.J.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nature of Radiation-Induced Defects in Quartz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although quartz ($\\rm \\alpha$-form) is a mineral used in numerous applications wherein radiation exposure is an issue, the nature of the atomistic defects formed during radiation-induced damage have not been fully clarified. Especially, the extent of oxygen vacancy formation is still debated, which is an issue of primary importance as optical techniques based on charged oxygen vacancies have been utilized to assess the level of radiation damage in quartz. In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are applied to study the effects of ballistic impacts on the atomic network of quartz. We show that the defects that are formed mainly consist of over-coordinated Si and O, as well as Si--O connectivity defects, e.g., small Si--O rings and edge-sharing Si tetrahedra. Oxygen vacancies, on the contrary, are found in relatively low abundance, suggesting that characterizations based on $E^{\\prime}$ centers do not adequately capture radiation-induced structural damage in quartz. Finally, we evaluate the dependenc...

Wang, Bu; Pignatelli, Isabella; Sant, Gaurav N; Bauchy, Mathieu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Defects in Four-Dimensional Continua: A Paradigm for the Expansion of the Universe?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The presence of defects in material continua is known to produce internal permanent strained states. Extending the theory of defects to four dimensions and allowing for the appropriate signature, it is possible to apply these concepts to space-time. In this case a defect would induce a non-trivial metric tensor, which can be interpreted as a gravitational field. The image of a defect in space-time can be applied to the description of the Big Bang. A review of the four-dimensional generalisation of defects and an application to the expansion of the universe will be presented.

A. Tartaglia

2008-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

335

Interpreting Grazing Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock producers can use their observations of grazing behavior to gauge the amount and quality of forage being consumed. This publication explains how grazing animals eat, when and where they graze, and how forage availability, patch grazing...

Lyons, Robert K.; Machen, Richard V.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Aquifer behavior with reinjection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AQUIFER BEHAVIOR WITH REINJECTION A Thesis By EUCLIDES JOSE BONET Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARUM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, f967 Major Subject... Petroleum Engineering AQUIFER BEHAVIOR WITH REINJECTION A Thesis By E UC LI DES JOSE BONE T Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) May, 1967 ACKNOWLEDGMENT Thanks are due to Petroleo Brasilerio S...

Bonet, Euclides Jose

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Method for characterizing mask defects using image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention applies techniques for image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns on the three-dimensional imaging of defects in EUVL multilayer films. The reconstructed image gives information about the out-of-plane position and the diffraction strength of the defect. The positional information can be used to select the correct defect repair technique. This invention enables the fabrication of defect-free (since repaired) X-ray Mo--Si multilayer mirrors. Repairing Mo--Si multilayer-film defects on mask blanks is a key for the commercial success of EUVL. It is known that particles are added to the Mo--Si multilayer film during the fabrication process. There is a large effort to reduce this contamination, but results are not sufficient, and defects continue to be a major mask yield limiter. All suggested repair strategies need to know the out-of-plane position of the defects in the multilayer.

Hau-Riege, Stefan Peter (Fremont, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Effect of friction stir weld defects on fatigue lifetime of an Al-Cu-Li alloy T. Le Jolu, T.F. Morgeneyer, A.F. Gourgues-Lorenzon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Effect of friction stir weld defects on fatigue lifetime of an Al-Cu-Li alloy (AA-2198) T. Le of friction stir welds of a 2198 Al-alloy in T851 condition has been assessed experimentally by investigating concerning crack initiation mechanisms. KEYWORDS Friction Stir Welding, Joint Line Remnant, Al-Cu-Li, S

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

339

Mechanical and microstructural response of Ni sub 3 Al at high strain rate and elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the effect of strain rate and temperature on the substructure evolution and mechanical response of Ni{sub 3}Al will be presented. The strain rate response of Ni{sub 3}Al was studied at strain rates from 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} (quasi-static) to 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1} using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The Hopkinson Bar tests were conducted at temperatures ranging from 77K to 1273K. At high strain rates the flow strength increased significantly with increasing temperature, similar to the behavior observed at quasi-static rates. The work hardening rates increased with strain rate and varied with temperatures. The work hardening rates, appeared to be significantly higher than those found for Ni270. The substructure evolution was characterized utilizing TEM. The defect generation and rate sensitivity of Ni{sub 3}Al are also discussed as a function of strain rate and temperature. 15 refs., 4 figs.

Sizek, H.W.; Gray, G.T. III.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

In Situ Small Scale Mechanical Characterization of Materials Under Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, aluminum and titanium alloys were examined using those two techniques. Analysis of their behavior in comparison with their published mechanical properties made it possible to establish connections between test parameters and conventional uniaxial tensile...

Sanders, Matthew Wayne

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Defect Structure of Epitaxial CrxV1 ? x Thin Films on MgO(001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epitaxial thin films of CrxV1-x over the entire composition range were deposited on MgO(001) by molecular beam epitaxy. The films exhibited the expected 45° in-plane rotation with no evidence of phase segregation or spinodal decomposition. Pure Cr, with the largest lattice mismatch to MgO, exhibited full relaxation and cubic lattice parameters. As the lattice mismatch decreased with alloy composition, residual epitaxial strain was observed. For 0.2 ? x ? 0.4 the films were coherently strained to the substrate with associated tetragonal distortion; near the lattice-matched composition of x = 0.33, the films exhibited strain-free pseudomorphic matching to MgO. Unusually, films on the Cr-rich side of the lattice-matched composition exhibited more in-plane compression than expected from the bulk lattice parameters; this result was confirmed with both x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling measurements. Although thermal expansion mismatch in the heterostructure may play a role, the dominant mechanism for this phenomenon is still unknown. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was utilized to characterize the misfit dislocation network present at the film/MgO interface. Dislocations were found to be present with a non-uniform distribution, which is attributed to the Volmer-Weber growth mode of the films. The CrxV1-x / MgO(001) system can serve as a model system to study both the fundamentals of defect formation in bcc films and the interplay between nanoscale defects such as dislocations and radiation damage.

Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Bowden, Mark E.; Wang, Chong M.; Shutthanandan, V.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Modeling the mechanical response of PBX 9501  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering overview of the mechanical response of Plastic-Bonded eXplosives (PBXs), specifically PBX 9501, will be provided with emphasis on observed mechanisms associated with different types of mechanical testing. Mechanical tests in the form of uniaxial tension, compression, cyclic loading, creep (compression and tension), and Hopkinson bar show strain rate and temperature dependence. A range of mechanical behavior is observed which includes small strain recoverable response in the form of viscoelasticity; change in stiffness and softening beyond peak strength due to damage in the form microcracks, debonding, void formation and the growth of existing voids; inelastic response in the form of irrecoverable strain as shown in cyclic tests, and viscoelastic creep combined with plastic response as demonstrated in creep and recovery tests. The main focus of this paper is to elucidate the challenges and issues involved in modeling the mechanical behavior of PBXs for simulating thermo-mechanical responses in engineering components. Examples of validation of a constitutive material model based on a few of the observed mechanisms will be demonstrated against three point bending, split Hopkinson pressure bar and Brazilian disk geometry.

Ragaswamy, Partha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lewis, Matthew W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Cheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Darla G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Modeling and implementation of solder-activated joints for single actuator, centimeter-scale robotic mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explains when, and why, solder-based phase change materials (PCMs) are best-suited as a means to modify a robotic mechanism's kinematic and elastomechanic behavior. The preceding refers to mechanisms that possess ...

Telleria, Maria J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Effect of atomic scale plasticity on hydrogen diffusion in iron: Quantum mechanically informed and on-the-fly kinetic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

viewpoints, is futile. Among several mechanisms proposed for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of metals, hydrogenEffect of atomic scale plasticity on hydrogen diffusion in iron: Quantum mechanically informed-assisted diffusion and trapping of hydrogen by crystalline defects in iron. Given an embedded atom (EAM) potential

Ortiz, Michael

345

Prediction of failure behavior of a welded pressure vessel containing flaws during a hydrogen-charged burst test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An industry-government collaborative program was carried out with an aim to promoting the acceptance of fracture mechanics based fitness-for-service assessment methodology for a service-damaged pressure vessel. A collaborative round robin exercise was carried out to predict the fracture behavior of a vessel containing hydrogen damage, fabrication related lack-of-fusion defects, an artificially induced fatigue crack and a localized thinned area. The fracture assessment procedures used include the US ASME Material Property Council`s PREFIS Program based on the British Standard (BS) Published Document (PD) 6493, ASME Section XI and The Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) R6 approach; The welding Institute (TWI) CRACKWISE program (based on BS PD6493 Level 2 approach), a variant of the R6 approach, J-tearing instability approaches, various J-estimation schemes, LEFM approach and simplified stress analysis. Assessments were compared with the results obtained from a hydrogen charged burst test of the vessel. Predictions, based on the J-tearing approach, compared well with the actual burst test results. Actual burst pressure was about five times the operating pressure.

Bhuyan, G.S. [Powertech Labs. Inc., Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Sperling, E.J. [Amoco Corp., Naperville, IL (United States); Shen, G. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Metals Technology Labs.; Yin, H. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Farmers Branch, TX (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Prediction of failure behavior of a welded pressure vessel containing flaws during a hydrogen-charged burst test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An industry-government collaborative program was carried out with an aim to promoting the acceptance of fracture mechanics-based fitness-for-service assessment methodology for a service-damaged pressure vessel. A collaborative round robin exercise was carried out to predict the fracture behavior of a vessel containing hydrogen damage, fabrication-related lack-of-fusion defects, an artificially induced fatigue crack, and a localized thinned area. The fracture assessment procedures used include the US ASME Material Property Council`s PREFIS Program based on the British Standard (BS) Published Document (PD) 6493, ASME Section XI and The Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) R6 approach, The Welding Institute (TWI) CRACKWISE program (based on BS PD6493 Level 2 approach), a variant of the R6 approach, J-tearing instability approaches, various J-estimation schemes, LEFM approach, and simplified stress analysis. Assessments were compared with the results obtained from a hydrogen-charged burst test of the vessel. Predictions, based on the J-tearing approach, compared well with the actual burst test results. Actual burst pressure was about five times the operating pressure.

Bhuyan, G.S. [Powertech Labs Inc., Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Sperling, E.J. [BP-Amoco, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Shen, G. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Metals Technology Labs.; Yin, H. [Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering seminar Three Dimensional Traction Force Microscopy with Applications in Cell Mechanics abstract The interactions between biochemical and mechanical signals during-dimensional measurement techniques are needed to investigate the effect of mechanical properties of the substrate

348

Mechanical Engineer Company Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Engineer Company Description Control Solutions Inc. is a small, dynamic, and rapidly. Position Description The Mechanical Engineer is responsible for all aspects associated with the mechanical enclosures, brackets, cabling assemblies among others. Systems include mechanisms, sensors, hydraulics, among

Kostic, Milivoje M.

349

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Ross Schlueter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Ross Schlueter Engineering Deputy For Mechanical Engineering Russ Wells Mechanical Engineering Department Deputy ELECTRONICS, SOFTWARE & INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERING Henrik von Der Sen Mechanical Admin. Assist. Joan Wolter Electronics Admin. Assist. Marilyn Wong Division Admin

350

Preshot Predictions for Defect Induced Mix (DIME) Capsules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this memo, we evaluate the most probable yield and other results for the Defect Induced Mix (DIME-12A) Polar Direct Drive (PDD) capsule-only shots. We evaluate the expected yield, bang time, burn averaged ion temperature, and the average electron temperature of the Ge line-emitting region. We also include synthetic images of the capsule backlit by Cu K-{alpha} emission (8.39 keV) and core self-emission synthetic images. This memo is a companion to the maximum credible yield memo (LA-UR-12-00287) published earlier.

Bradley, Paul A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krasheninnikova, Natalia S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tregillis, Ian L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmitt, Mark J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Blade reliability collaborative : collection of defect, damage and repair data.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) was started by the Wind Energy Technologies Department of Sandia National Laboratories and DOE in 2010 with the goal of gaining insight into planned and unplanned O&M issues associated with wind turbine blades. A significant part of BRC is the Blade Defect, Damage and Repair Survey task, which will gather data from blade manufacturers, service companies, operators and prior studies to determine details about the largest sources of blade unreliability. This report summarizes the initial findings from this work.

Ashwill, Thomas D.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Paquette, Joshua A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Energetics of Defects on Graphene through Fluorination. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia Nanoparticles asSecond stage ofDefects on Graphene through

353

Sandia National Laboratories: Research Challenge 4: Defect-Carrier  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik SpoerkeSolar RegionalClimateResearchInteractions 4: Defect-Carrier

354

Mechanics and tribology of MEMS materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Micromachines have the potential to significantly impact future weapon component designs as well as other defense, industrial, and consumer product applications. For both electroplated (LIGA) and surface micromachined (SMM) structural elements, the influence of processing on structure, and the resultant effects on material properties are not well understood. The behavior of dynamic interfaces in present as-fabricated microsystem materials is inadequate for most applications and the fundamental relationships between processing conditions and tribological behavior in these systems are not clearly defined. We intend to develop a basic understanding of deformation, fracture, and surface interactions responsible for friction and wear of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) materials. This will enable needed design flexibility for these devices, as well as strengthen our understanding of material behavior at the nanoscale. The goal of this project is to develop new capabilities for sub-microscale mechanical and tribological measurements, and to exercise these capabilities to investigate material behavior at this size scale.

Prasad, Somuri V.; Dugger, Michael Thomas; Boyce, Brad Lee; Buchheit, Thomas Edward

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Mechanical Design Engineer | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanical Behavior of IndiumMechanicalMechanical

356

New mechanism of membrane fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have carried out Monte Carlo simulation of the fusion of bilayers of single chain amphiphiles which show phase behavior similar to that of biological lipids. The fusion mechanism we observe is very different from the ``stalk'' hypothesis. Stalks do form on the first stage of fusion, but they do not grow radially to form a hemifused state. Instead, stalk formation destabilizes the membranes and results in hole formation in the vicinity of the stalks. When holes in each bilayer nucleate spontaneously next to the same stalk, an incomplete fusion pore is formed. The fusion process is completed by propagation of the initial connection, the stalk, along the edges of the aligned holes.

M. Mueller; K. Katsov; M. Schick

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

357

Defect Prevention and Detection in Software for Automated Test Equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Software for automated test equipment can be tedious and monotonous making it just as error-prone as other software. Active defect prevention and detection are also important for test applications. Incomplete or unclear requirements, a cryptic syntax used for some test applications—especially script-based test sets, variability in syntax or structure, and changing requirements are among the problems encountered in one tester. Such problems are common to all software but can be particularly problematic in test equipment software intended to test another product. Each of these issues increases the probability of error injection during test application development. This report describes a test application development tool designed to address these issues and others for a particular piece of test equipment. By addressing these problems in the development environment, the tool has powerful built-in defect prevention and detection capabilities. Regular expressions are widely used in the development tool as a means of formally defining test equipment requirements for the test application and verifying conformance to those requirements. A novel means of using regular expressions to perform range checking was developed. A reduction in rework and increased productivity are the results. These capabilities are described along with lessons learned and their applicability to other test equipment software. The test application development tool, or “application builder”, is known as the PT3800 AM Creation, Revision and Archiving Tool (PACRAT).

E. Bean

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory of Strontium Rydberg Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the reactance matrix approach, we systematically develop new multichannel quantum defect theory models for the singlet and triplet S, P, D and F states of strontium based on improved energy level measurements. The new models reveal additional insights into the character of doubly excited perturber states, and the improved energy level measurements for certain series allow fine structure to be resolved for those series' perturbers. Comparison between the predictions of the new models and those of previous empirical and \\emph{ab initio} studies reveals good agreement with most series, however some discrepancies are highlighted. Using the multichannel quantum defect theory wave functions derived from our models we calculate other observables such as Land\\'e $g_J$-factors and radiative lifetimes. The analysis reveals the impact of perturbers on the Rydberg state properties of divalent atoms, highlighting the importance of including two-electron effects in the calculations of these properties. The work enables future investigations of properties such as Stark maps and long-range interactions of Rydberg states of strontium.

C L Vaillant; M P A Jones; R M Potvliege

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

359

Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency.

Qingbang, Han; Ling, Chen; Changping, Zhu [Changzhou Key Laboratory of Sensor Networks and Environmental Sensing, College of IOT, Hohai University Changzhou, Jiangsu, 213022 (China)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

360

Defective graphene as promising anode material for Na-ion battery and Ca-ion battery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have investigated adsorption of Na and Ca on graphene with divacancy (DV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defect. Our results show that adsorption is not possible on pristine graphene. However, their adsorption on defective sheet is energetically favorable. The enhanced adsorption can be attributed to the increased charge transfer between adatoms and underlying defective sheet. With the increase in defect density until certain possible limit, maximum percentage of adsorption also increases giving higher battery capacity. For maximum possible DV defect, we can achieve maximum capacity of 1459 mAh/g for Na-ion batteries (NIBs) and 2900 mAh/g for Ca-ion batteries (CIBs). For graphene full of SW defect, we find the maximum capacity of NIBs and CIBs is around 1071 mAh/g and 2142 mAh/g respectively. Our results will help create better anode materials with much higher capacity and better cycling performance for NIBs and CIBs.

Datta, Dibakar; Shenoy, Vivek B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Identification of dominant scattering mechanism in epitaxial graphene on SiC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scheme of identification of scattering mechanisms in epitaxial graphene (EG) on SiC substrate is developed and applied to three EG samples grown on SiC (0001), (112{sup ¯}0), and (101{sup ¯}0) substrates. Hall measurements combined with defect detection technique enable us to evaluate the individual contributions to the carrier scatterings by defects and by substrates. It is found that the dominant scatterings can be due to either substrate or defects, dependent on the substrate orientations. The EG on SiC (112{sup ¯}0) exhibits a better control over the two major scattering mechanisms and achieves the highest mobility even with a high carrier concentration, promising for high performance graphene-based electronic devices. The method developed here will shed light on major aspects in governing carrier transport in EG to harness it effectively.

Lin, Jingjing; Guo, Liwei, E-mail: lwguo@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: chenx29@aphy.iphy.ac.cn; Jia, Yuping; Huang, Jiao; Guo, Yu; Li, Zhilin; Chen, Xiaolong, E-mail: lwguo@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: chenx29@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Research and Development Center for Functional Crystals, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Yang, Rong; Wu, Shuang; Zhang, Guangyu [Nanoscale Physics and Devices Laboratory, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China)

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

362

Multichannel framework for singular quantum mechanics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multichannel S-matrix framework for singular quantum mechanics (SQM) subsumes the renormalization and self-adjoint extension methods and resolves its boundary-condition ambiguities. In addition to the standard channel accessible to a distant (“asymptotic”) observer, one supplementary channel opens up at each coordinate singularity, where local outgoing and ingoing singularity waves coexist. The channels are linked by a fully unitary S-matrix, which governs all possible scenarios, including cases with an apparent nonunitary behavior as viewed from asymptotic distances. -- Highlights: •A multichannel framework is proposed for singular quantum mechanics and analogues. •The framework unifies several established approaches for singular potentials. •Singular points are treated as new scattering channels. •Nonunitary asymptotic behavior is subsumed in a unitary multichannel S-matrix. •Conformal quantum mechanics and the inverse quartic potential are highlighted.

Camblong, Horacio E., E-mail: camblong@usfca.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94117-1080 (United States); Epele, Luis N., E-mail: epele@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Física Teórica, Departamento de Física, IFLP, CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67–1900 La Plata (Argentina); Fanchiotti, Huner, E-mail: huner@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Física Teórica, Departamento de Física, IFLP, CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67–1900 La Plata (Argentina)] [Laboratorio de Física Teórica, Departamento de Física, IFLP, CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67–1900 La Plata (Argentina); García Canal, Carlos A., E-mail: garcia@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Física Teórica, Departamento de Física, IFLP, CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67–1900 La Plata (Argentina); Ordóñez, Carlos R., E-mail: ordonez@uh.edu [Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5506 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Multiple stalk formation as a pathway of defect-induced membrane fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose that the first stage of membrane fusion need not be the formation of a single stalk. Instead, we consider a scenario for defect-induced membrane fusion that proceeds cooperatively via multiple stalk formation. The defects (stalks or pores) attract each other via membrane-mediated capillary interactions that result in a condensation transition of the defects. The resulting dense phase of stalks corresponds to the so-called fusion intermediate.

D. B. Lukatsky; Daan Frenkel

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

364

First principles predictions of intrinsic defects in aluminum arsenide, AlAs : numerical supplement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in aluminum arsenide, AlAs, as computed by density functional theory. This Report serves as a numerical supplement to the results published in: P.A. Schultz, 'First principles predictions of intrinsic defects in Aluminum Arsenide, AlAs', Materials Research Society Symposia Proceedings 1370 (2011; SAND2011-2436C), and intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models.

Schultz, Peter Andrew

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The corrosion behavior of DWPF glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors analyzed the corroded surfaces of reference glasses developed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to characterize their corrosion behavior. The corrosion mechanism of nuclear waste glasses must be known in order to provide source terms describing radionuclide release for performance assessment calculations. Different DWPF reference glasses were corroded under conditions that highlighted various aspects of the corrosion process and led to different extents of corrosion. The glasses corroded by similar mechanisms, and a phenomenological description of their corrosion behavior is presented here. The initial leaching of soluble glass components results in the formation of an amorphous gel layer on the glass surface. The gel layer is a transient phase that transforms into a layer of clay crystallites, which equilibrates with the solution as corrosion continues. The clay layer does not act as a barrier to either water penetration or glass dissolution, which continues beneath it, and may eventually separate from the glass. Solubility limits for glass components may be established by the eventual precipitation of secondary phases; thus, corrosion of the glass becomes controlled by the chemical equilibrium between the solution and the assemblage of secondary phases. In effect, the solution is an intermediate phase through which the glass transforms to an energetically more favorable assemblage of phases. Implications regarding the prediction of long-term glass corrosion behavior are discussed.

Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Exploration of mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of single chondrocytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on the characterization by Atomic Force Microscopy, we report that the mechanical property of single chondrocytes has dependency on the strain-rates. By comparing the mechanical deformation responses and the Young's moduli of living and fixed chondrocytes at four different strain-rates, we explore the deformation mechanisms underlying this dependency property. We found that the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of living cells is governed by both of the cellular cytoskeleton and the intracellular fluid when the fixed chondrocytes are mainly governed by their intracellular fluid, which is called the consolidation-dependent deformation behavior. Finally, we report that the porohyperelastic constitutive material model which can capture the consolidation-dependent behavior of both living and fixed chondrocytes is a potential candidature to study living cell biomechanics.

Nguyen, Trung Dung; Gu, YuanTong, E-mail: yuantong.gu@qut.edu.au [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetabular bone defect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Journal of Arthroplasty Vol. 14 No. 7 1999 Case Report Summary: modular head and polyethylene liner. Bone defects were filled with morcellized allograft. Three months......

368

Interstitial defects in silicon from 1{endash}5 keV Si{sup +} ion implantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extended defects from 5-, 2-, and 1-keV Si{sup +} ion implantation are investigated by transmission electron microscopy using implantation doses of 1 and 3{times}10{sup 14}cm{sup {minus}2} and annealing temperatures from 750 to 900{degree}C. Despite the proximity of the surface, {l_brace}311{r_brace}-type defects are observed even for 1 keV. Samples with a peak concentration of excess interstitials exceeding {approximately}1{percent} of the atomic density also contain some {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects which are corrugated across their width. These so-called zig-zag {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects are more stable than the ordinary {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects, having a dissolution rate at 750{degree}C which is ten times smaller. Due to their enhanced stability, the zig-zag {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects grow to lengths that are many times longer than their distance from the surface. It is proposed that zig-zag {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects form during the early stages of annealing by coalescence the high volume density of {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects confined within a very narrow implanted layer. These findings indicate that defect formation and dissolution will continue to control the interstitial supersaturation from ion implantation down to very low energies. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Agarwal, A.; Haynes, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Eaglesham, D.J.; Gossmann, H.; Jacobson, D.C.; Poate, J.M. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Erokhin, Y.E. [Eaton Corporation, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)] [Eaton Corporation, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated defect classification Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: automated defect classification Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ADC customization software module, Applied Materials, Summary: Classification...

370

Anharmonic vibrations of the dicarbon antisite defect in 4H-SiC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dicarbon antisite defects were created by either electron irradiation or ion implantation into 4H-SiC. The no-phonon lines from the dicarbon antisite defect center were observed with their phonon replicas. The stretch frequencies of the defect were observed up to the fifth harmonic. The Morse potential model accounts for the anharmonicity quite well and gives a very good prediction of the vibration energies up to the fifth harmonic with an error of less than 1%. First principles calculations show that the model of a dicarbon antisite defect along with its four nearest neighboring carbon atoms can explain the observed anharmonicity.

Yan, F.; Devaty, R. P.; Choyke, W. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Gali, A. [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Kimoto, T. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Ohshima, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Pensl, G. [Lehrstuhl fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudstr. 7/A3 Erlangen (Germany)

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

371

E-Print Network 3.0 - annealing radiation defects Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

band decreases... that the combination of laser annealing and passivation of oxygen vacancies by hydrogen results in films free of defect... method of nanocluster surface...

372

2012 DEFECTS IN SEMICONDUCTORS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 12-17, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The meeting shall strive to develop and further the fundamental understanding of defects and their roles in the structural, electronic, optical, and magnetic properties of bulk, thin film, and nanoscale semiconductors and device structures. Point and extended defects will be addressed in a broad range of electronic materials of particular current interest, including wide bandgap semiconductors, metal-oxides, carbon-based semiconductors (e.g., diamond, graphene, etc.), organic semiconductors, photovoltaic/solar cell materials, and others of similar interest. This interest includes novel defect detection/imaging techniques and advanced defect computational methods.

GLASER, EVAN

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

373

Physical Modeling of Transient Enhanced Diusion and Dopant Deactivation via Extended Defect Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical Modeling of Transient Enhanced Diusion and Dopant Deactivation via Extended Defect requires the use of well-founded physical models for these aggregation processes. We have developed

Dunham, Scott

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - apoptosis-associated reproductive defects...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reproduction and Development March 5, 2009 Summary: -98-1 Birth defects, Spontaneous abortion Known reproductive hazard for males and females. Butyl Benzyl... showed...

375

ENGINEERING MECHANICS SEMINARSENGINEERING MECHANICS SEMINARS THINK COMPOSITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENGINEERING MECHANICS SEMINARSENGINEERING MECHANICS SEMINARS THINK COMPOSITE "THINK outside the box" for more competitive structural COMPOSITES Dr. Melih Papila Visiting Professor, Aero/Astro Department, Stanford University. Adv. Composites and Polymer Processing Lab., Sabanci University, Istanbul. mpapila

Ponce, V. Miguel

376

Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The position is a Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop) located in Kent, Washington, and will be responsible for the safe and efficient operation of a field garage performing...

377

Scratch behavior of polymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is focused on the analytical and numerical examination of the mechanical response of polypropylene (PP) under scratch deformation by a semi- spherical indenter. The finite element (FE) method is employed as the analysis technique and ABAQUS ? , a... ? ) ?.?????????...????... 152 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION This study is concerned with the analytical and numerical examination of the mechanical response of polypropylene (PP) under scratch deformation by a semi- spherical indenter. The goal of this study is to apply...

Lim, Goy Teck

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Annealing behavior of the hydrogen-vacancy complex in bulk indium phosphide crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to explain the effects of hydrogen on the electrical properties of bulk indium phosphide crystals, they have performed a series of high temperature annealing studies with both undoped and iron-doped indium phosphide crystals. The samples were annealed at 900 C for 6, 36, and 72 hours, respectively, under a phosphorus overpressure of five atmospheres. Samples were characterized at 10 K by Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy which allowed us to measure the concentrations of both the Fe{sup 2+} and V{sub In}-H{sub 4} defects simultaneously. Undoped samples were further characterized by the Hall effect measurements. The authors find in the iron-doped samples that the [Fe{sup 2+}]/[Fe{sup 3+}] ratio decreases gradually with increasing annealing time, indicating a reduction in the number of donors in the samples. In the undoped samples, annealing leads to a reduction of the free electron concentration accompanied by an increase in the 77 K mobility. The increase of the sample`s mobility eliminates the possibility that the reduction of the free electron concentration is due to an increase in the concentration of the compensating acceptors. The explanation for the observed behavior in all samples is that hydrogen acts as a donor and it diffuses out of the crystal during the annealing process. Based on the experimental data, they propose a calibration equation of [V{sub In}-H{sub 4}] = 4.2 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}1} {times} Absorbance (cm{sup {minus}1}) which is used to correlate the hydrogen-vacancy complex concentrations with the changes of the V{sub In}-H{sub 4} absorption peak in both the iron-doped and the undoped samples. Their results confirm the donor nature of the hydrogen-vacancy complex and provide strong evidence regarding the reduction mechanism of free carrier concentrations in bulk indium phosphide crystals during high temperature annealing under a phosphorus atmosphere.

Ye, Q.; Wolk, J.A.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.; Bliss, D.F. [Air Force Rome Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Mechanical & Biomedical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical & Biomedical Engineering Department BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING COURSE 105 Mechanical Engineering Graphics 3 CHEM 111L College Chemistry Lab (DLN) 1 ENGL 102 English PHYS 211 Mechanics, Waves & Heat (DLN) 4 UF 100 Intellectual Foundations 3 PHYS 211L Mechanics, Waves

Barrash, Warren

380

Philosophy of Mind and the Problem of FreeWill in the Light of Quantum Mechanics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arguments pertaining to the mind-brain connection and to the physical effectiveness of our conscious choices have been presented in two recent books, one by John Searle, the other by Jaegwon Kim. These arguments are examined, and it is argued that the difficulties encountered arise from a defective understanding and application of a pertinent part of contemporary science, namely quantum mechanics.

Stapp, Henry; Stapp, Henry P

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Atomistic simulations of structures and mechanical properties of polycrystalline diamond: Symmetrical S001< tilt grain boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomistic simulations of structures and mechanical properties of polycrystalline diamond for diamond to deposit as a polycrystalline film with a high density of grain boundaries and related defects structures and energies of symmetrical 001 tilt grain boundaries GB's in diamond have been calculated over

Brenner, Donald W.

382

Philosophy of mind and the problem of free will in the light of quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Defects occasioned by the advent of quantum mechanics are described in detail of recent arguments by John Searle and by Jaegwon Kim pertaining to the question of the complete reducibility to the physical of the apparent capacity of a person's conscious thoughts to affect the behaviour of that person's physically described brain.

Henry P. Stapp

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Periodic Schrödinger operators with local defects and spectral pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article deals with the numerical calculation of eigenvalues of perturbed periodic Schr\\"odinger operators located in spectral gaps. Such operators are encountered in the modeling of the electronic structure of crystals with local defects, and of photonic crystals. The usual finite element Galerkin approximation is known to give rise to spectral pollution. In this article, we give a precise description of the corresponding spurious states. We then prove that the supercell model does not produce spectral pollution. Lastly, we extend results by Lewin and S\\'er\\'e on some no-pollution criteria. In particular, we prove that using approximate spectral projectors enables one to eliminate spectral pollution in a given spectral gap of the reference periodic Sch\\"odinger operator.

Eric Cancès; Virginie Ehrlacher; Yvon Maday

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

384

Directed polymers in a random environment with a defect line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the depinning transition of the $1+1$ dimensional directed polymer in a random environment with a defect line. The random environment consists of i.i.d. potential values assigned to each site of $\\mathbb{Z}^2$; sites on the positive axis have the potential enhanced by a deterministic value $u$. We show that for small inverse temperature $\\beta$ the quenched and annealed free energies differ significantly at most in a small neighborhood (of size of order $\\beta$) of the annealed critical point $u_c^a=0$. For the case $u=0$, we show that the difference between quenched and annealed free energies is of order $\\beta^4$ as $\\beta\\to 0$, assuming only finiteness of exponential moments of the potential values, improving existing results which required stronger assumptions.

Kenneth S. Alexander; Gökhan Y?ld?r?m

2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

385

Defect localization, characterization and reliability assessment in emerging photovoltaic devices.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microsystems-enabled photovoltaics (MEPV) can potentially meet increasing demands for light-weight, portable, photovoltaic solutions with high power density and efficiency. The study in this report examines failure analysis techniques to perform defect localization and evaluate MEPV modules. CMOS failure analysis techniques, including electroluminescence, light-induced voltage alteration, thermally-induced voltage alteration, optical beam induced current, and Seabeck effect imaging were successfully adapted to characterize MEPV modules. The relative advantages of each approach are reported. In addition, the effects of exposure to reverse bias and light stress are explored. MEPV was found to have good resistance to both kinds of stressors. The results form a basis for further development of failure analysis techniques for MEPVs of different materials systems or multijunction MEPVs. The incorporation of additional stress factors could be used to develop a reliability model to generate lifetime predictions for MEPVs as well as uncover opportunities for future design improvements.

Yang, Benjamin Bing-Yeh; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Haase, Gad S.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Cole, Edward Isaac,; Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Defects and diffusion in MeV implanted silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we demonstrate that the defects that are created by 2-MeV Si ions can interact with dopant atoms both during implantation and during post-implant annealing. We show that the interstitials and vacancies created during MeV Si implantation result in a radiation enhanced diffusion of B and Sb markers, respectively, when the temperature of implantation is above the threshold temperature for formation of mobile dopant complexes. With the use of these dopant markers we also demonstrate that a vacancy-rich near surface region results during post-implant annealing of MeV implanted silicon. The depth distribution and the thermal evolution of clustered vacancies was measured by a Au labeling technique.

Venezia, V. C.; Haynes, T. E.; Agarwal, Aditya; Gossmann, H.-J.; Pelaz, L.; Jacobson, D. C.; Eaglesham, D. J.; Duggan, J. L. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Semiconductor Equipment Operations, Eaton Corporation, 55 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States); Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76201 (United States)

1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

387

Electrodes mitigating effects of defects in organic electronic devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound electrode for organic electronic devices comprises a thin first layer of a first electrically conducting material and a second electrically conducting material disposed on the first layer. In one embodiment, the second electrically conducting material is formed into a plurality of elongated members. In another embodiment, the second material is formed into a second layer. The elongated members or the second layer has a thickness greater than that of the first layer. The second layer is separated from the first layer by a conducting material having conductivity less than at least the material of the first layer. The compound electrode is capable of mitigating adverse effects of defects, such as short circuits, in the construction of the organic electronic devices, and can be included in light-emitting or photovoltaic devices.

Heller, Christian Maria Anton (Albany, NY)

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

388

Ion beam collimating grid to reduce added defects  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A collimating grid for an ion source located after the exit grid. The collimating grid collimates the ion beamlets and disallows beam spread and limits the beam divergence during transients and steady state operation. The additional exit or collimating grid prevents beam divergence during turn-on and turn-off and prevents ions from hitting the periphery of the target where there is re-deposited material or from missing the target and hitting the wall of the vessel where there is deposited material, thereby preventing defects from being deposited on a substrate to be coated. Thus, the addition of a collimating grid to an ion source ensures that the ion beam will hit and be confined to a specific target area.

Lindquist, Walter B. (Oakland, CA); Kearney, Patrick A. (Livermore, CA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Atomic-scale investigation of point defects and hydrogen-solute atmospheres on the edge dislocation mobility in alpha iron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we present atomistic mechanisms of 1/2 [111](11{sup ¯}0) edge dislocation interactions with point defects (hydrogen and vacancies) and hydrogen solute atmospheres in body centered cubic (bcc) iron. In metals such as iron, increases in hydrogen concentration can increase dislocation mobility and/or cleavage-type decohesion. Here, we first investigate the dislocation mobility in the presence of various point defects, i.e., change in the frictional stress as the edge dislocation interacts with (a) vacancy, (b) substitutional hydrogen, (c) one substitutional and one interstitial hydrogen, (d) interstitial hydrogen, (e) vacancy and interstitial hydrogen, and (f) two interstitial hydrogen. Second, we examine the role of a hydrogen-solute atmosphere on the rate of local dislocation velocity. The edge dislocation simulation with a vacancy in the compression side of the dislocation and an interstitial hydrogen atom at the tension side exhibit the strongest mechanical response, suggesting a higher potential barrier and hence, the higher frictional stress (i.e., ?83% higher than the pure iron Peierls stress). In the case of a dislocation interacting with a vacancy on the compressive side, the vacancy binds with the edge dislocation, resulting in an increase in the friction stress of about 28% when compared with the Peierls stress of an edge dislocation in pure iron. Furthermore, as the applied strain increases, the vacancy migrates through a dislocation transportation mechanism by attaining a velocity of the same order as the dislocation velocity. For the case of the edge dislocation interacting with interstitial hydrogen on the tension side, the hydrogen atom jumps through one layer perpendicular to the glide plane during the pinning-unpinning process. Finally, our simulation of dislocation interactions with hydrogen show first an increase in the local dislocation velocity followed by a pinning of the dislocation core in the atmosphere, resulting in resistance to dislocation motion as the dislocation moves though the hydrogen-solute atmospheres. With this systematic, atomistic study of the edge dislocation with various point defects, we show significant increase in obstacle strengths in addition to an increase in the local dislocation velocity during interaction with solute atmospheres. The results have implications for constitutive development and modeling of the hydrogen effect on dislocation mobility and deformation in metals.

Bhatia, M. A.; Solanki, K. N., E-mail: kiran.solanki@asu.edu [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport, and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Groh, S. [Institute of Mechanics and Fluid Dynamics, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg 09556 (Germany)

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Health Behavior Health Promotion -Prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chronic disease complications Improve quality of life Reduce health care costs #12;ImpactHealth Behavior Health Promotion - Prevention Modification of Health Attitudes and Health Behavior #12;Health Promotion: An Overview Basic philosophy Good health = individual and collective goal

Meagher, Mary

391

Yield improvement and defect reduction in steel casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project investigated yield improvement and defect reduction techniques in steel casting. Research and technology development was performed in the following three specific areas: (1) Feeding rules for high alloy steel castings; (2) Unconventional yield improvement and defect reduction techniques--(a) Riser pressurization; and (b) Filling with a tilting mold; and (3) Modeling of reoxidation inclusions during filling of steel castings. During the preparation of the proposal for this project, these areas were identified by the High Alloy Committee and Carbon and Low Alloy Committee of the Steel Founders' Society of America (SFSA) as having the highest research priority to the steel foundry industry. The research in each of the areas involved a combination of foundry experiments, modeling and simulation. Numerous SFSA member steel foundries participated in the project through casting trials and meetings. The technology resulting from this project will result in decreased scrap and rework, casting yield improvement, and higher quality steel castings produced with less iteration. This will result in considerable business benefits to steel foundries, primarily due to reduced energy and labor costs, increased capacity and productivity, reduced lead-time, and wider use and application of steel castings. As estimated using energy data provided by the DOE, the technology produced as a result of this project will result in an energy savings of 2.6 x 10{sup 12} BTU/year. This excludes the savings that were anticipated from the mold tilting research. In addition to the energy savings, and corresponding financial savings this implies, there are substantial environmental benefits as well. The results from each of the research areas listed above are summarized.

Kent Carlson

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

Intracardiac Echocardiography Evaluation in Secundum Atrial Septal Defect Transcatheter Closure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study was designed to assess the balloon sizing maneuvers and deployment of an Amplatzer Septal Occluder (ASO). In addition, intraprocedural balloon sizing was compared with off-line intracardiac echocardiographic measurements. Methods: The intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) measurements were: maximum transverse and longitudinal atrial septal defect (ASD) diameters in the aortic valve and four-chamber planes;area of the ASD and its equivalent circle diameter. Thirteen consecutive patients underwent transcatheter implantation of an ASO device using ICE guidance under local anesthesia. The device matching the balloon sizing diameter of the defect was implanted. Qualitative ICE assessment of the ASO devices implanted was performed off line. Results: The mean equivalent circle diameter predicted by ICE was 24.40 {+-} 5.61 mm and was significantly higher(p 0.027) than the ASD measured by balloonsizing (21.38 {+-} 5.28 mm). Unlike previous studies we did not find any correlation between the two measurements (correlation coefficient = 0.47). Only four of the 13 patients had optimal device positioning as shown by the qualitative ICE evaluation, whereas the remaining nine patients had inadequate device placement. This resulted in a waist diameter that was an average 26.1% undersized in seven patients and 12.7% oversized in two patients. Five of the seven patients with an undersized device had ASO-atrial septum misalignment with leftward device deviation. Conclusion: The ICE images allowed careful measurement of the dimensions of the ASD and accurately displayed the spatial relations of the ASO astride the ASD.Moreover, use of the ICE measurement led to selection of a different size of device in comparison with those of balloon sizing. The clinical benefit of this new approach needs to be rigorously tested.

Zanchetta, Mario; Pedon, Luigi; Rigatelli, Gianluca; Carrozza, Antonio; Zennaro, Marco; Di Martino, Roberta [Department of Cardiovascular Disease, Cittadella General Hospital, Cittadella, Padua (Italy); Onorato, Eustaquio [Operative Unit ofCardiology, Clinica S. Rocco, Ome, Brescia (Italy); Maiolino, Pietro [Department of Cardiovascular Disease, Cittadella General Hospital, Cittadella, Padua (Italy)

2003-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Thermodynamics of fission products in dispersion fuel designs - first principles modeling of defect behavior in bulk and at interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of fission product (Xe, Sr, and Cs) incorporation and segregation in alkaline earth metal oxides, HfO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} oxides, and the MgO/(U, Hf, Ce)O{sub 2} interfaces have been carried out. In the case of UO{sub 2}, the calculations were performed using spin polarization and with a Hubbard U term characterizing the on-sit Coulomb repulsion between the localized 5f electrons. The fission product solution energies in bulk UO{sub 2{+-}x} have been calculated as a function of non-stoichiometry x, and were compared to that in MgO. These calculations demonstrate that the fission product incorporation energies in MgO are higher than in HfO{sub 2}. However, this trend is reversed or reduced for alkaline earth oxides with larger cation sizes. The solution energies of fission products in MgO are substantially higher than in UO{sub 2{+-}x}, except for the case of Sr in the hypostoichiometric case. Due to size effects, the thermodynamic driving force of segregation for Xe and Cs from bulk MgO to the MgO/fluorite interface is strong. However, this driving force is relatively weak for Sr.

Liu, Xiang-yand [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nerikar, Pankaj [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sickafus, Kurt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stanek, Chris R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Preliminary Comparison of Reaction Rate theory and Object Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Defect Cluster Dynamics under Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multiscale modeling scheme encompasses models from the atomistic to the continuum scale. Phenomena at the mesoscale are typically simulated using reaction rate theory (RT), Monte Carlo (MC), or phase field models. These mesoscale models are appropriate for application to problems that involve intermediate length scales ( m to >mm), and timescales from diffusion (~ s) to long-term microstructural evolution (~years). Phenomena at this scale have the most direct impact on mechanical properties in structural materials of interest to nuclear energy systems, and are also the most accessible to direct comparison between the results of simulations and experiments. Recent advances in computational power have substantially expanded the range of application for MC models. Although the RT and MC models can be used simulate the same phenomena, many of the details are handled quite differently in the two approaches. A direct comparison of the RT and MC descriptions has been made in the domain of point defect cluster dynamics modeling, which is relevant to both the nucleation and evolution of radiation-induced defect structures. The relative merits and limitations of the two approaches are discussed, and the predictions of the two approaches are compared for specific irradiation conditions.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Golubov, Stanislav I [ORNL; Becquart, C. S. [Universite de Lille; Domain, C. [EDF R& D, Clamart, France

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Mechanical Engineering Graduate Student  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................................9 Engineering Career Services ................................................................9 McMechanical Engineering Graduate Student Handbook January 2014 Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Wisconsin-Madison #12;Mechanical Engineering Web Page: http://www.engr.wisc.edu/me Graduate

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

396

Mechanical & Industrial Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 1 Welcome MIE Industrial Advisory Board October 15, 2010 #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 2 MIE Dorothy Adams Undergraduate/Graduate Secretary David Schmidt Associate Professor & Graduate Program Director #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 3 MIE James Rinderle

Mountziaris, T. J.

397

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Department of Mechanical Engineering Tufts University Retooling Our Energy Ecosystem: challengesMechanical engineering Department Seminar Robert J. Hannemann The Gordon Institute and Chair of the Tufts Department of Mechanical Engineering. His technical and academic interests

398

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HANDBOOK FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR Old Dominion University Department of Mechanical Engineering Batten College of Engineering and Technology Norfolk, Virginia 23529-0247 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS MECHANICAL ENGINEERING HANDBOOK

399

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar Katia Bertoldi Harvard University Soft materials in response to diverse stimuli. While the mechanical attributes - such as energy absorption, stiffness and switchable functionalities. Katia Bertoldi is an Assistant Professor of Applied Mechanics at Harvard

400

Understanding Creep Mechanisms in Graphite with Experiments, Multiscale Simulations, and Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disordering mechanisms in graphite have a long history with conflicting viewpoints. Using Raman and x-ray photon spectroscoy, electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction experiments and atomistic modeling and simulations, the current project has developed a fundamental understanding of early-to-late state radiation damage mechanisms in nuclear reactor grade graphite (NBG-18 and PCEA). We show that the topological defects in graphite play an important role under neutron and ion irradiation.

Eapen, Jacob; Murty, Korukonda; Burchell, Timothy

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Effect of defect imbalance on void swelling distributions produced in pure iron irradiated with 3.5 MeV self-ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion irradiation has been widely used to simulate neutron-induced radiation damage. There are a number of features of ion-induced damage that differ from neutron-induced damage, however, and these differences require investigation before ion data can be confidently used to predict behavior arising from neutron bombardment. In this study 3.5 MeV self-ion irradiation of pure iron was used to study the influence on void swelling of the depth-dependent defect imbalance between vacancies and interstitials that arises from various surface effects, forward scattering of displaced atoms, and especially the injected interstitial effect. It was observed that the depth dependence of void swelling does not follow the behavior anticipated from the depth dependence of the damage rate. Void nucleation and growth develop first in the lower-dose, near-surface region, and then moves to progressively deeper and higher-damage depths during continued irradiation. This indicates a strong initial suppression of void nucleation in the peak damage region that is eventually overcome with continued irradiation. Using the Boltzmann transport equation method, this phenomenon is shown to be due to depth-dependent defect imbalances created under ion irradiation. These findings demonstrate that void swelling does not depend solely on the local dose level and that this sensitivity of swelling to depth must be considered in extraction and interpretation of ion-induced swelling data. 2014 El

Lin Shao; C.-C. Wei; J. Gigax; A. Aitkaliyeva; D. Chen; B.H. Sencer; F.A. Garner

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Heart Defects in Gulf Tuna Seen Tied to 2010 BP Oil Spill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heart Defects in Gulf Tuna Seen Tied to 2010 BP Oil Spill By Jim Efstathiou Jr. Mar 25, 2014 12 of Mexico spill may have led to heart defects and premature death for tuna, researchers backed hearts may reduce swimming performance, jeopardizing a fish's survival. "The timing and location

Grosell, Martin

403

Impurity-defect interaction in polycrystalline silicon for photovoltaic applications. The role of hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

655 Impurity-defect interaction in polycrystalline silicon for photovoltaic applications. The role of hydrogen A. Chari, P. de Mierry, A. Menikh and M. Aucouturier Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, C silicon, passivation of recombining defects by hydrogen, hydrogen-dopant interaction. A more focused

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

404

Electrochemical method for defect delineation in silicon-on-insulator wafers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical method for defect delineation in thin-film SOI or SOS wafers in which a surface of a silicon wafer is electrically connected so as to control the voltage of the surface within a specified range, the silicon wafer is then contacted with an electrolyte, and, after removing the electrolyte, defects and metal contamination in the silicon wafer are identified.

Guilinger, Terry R. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Howland D. T. (Albuquerque, NM); Kelly, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM); Medernach, John W. (Albuquerque, NM); Stevenson, Joel O. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Sylvia S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Shape defect detection in ferrite cores Judit Verest'oy and Dmitry Chetverikov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shape defect detection in ferrite cores Judit Verest'oy and Dmitry Chetverikov Computer. The method is applied to the visual inspection and dimensional measurement of ferrite cores. An optical shape defects may deteriorate any of the dimensions. Key words: image analysis, industrial inspection, ferrite

Chetverikov, Dmitry

406

Detecting shape defects in ferrite cores \\Lambda Dmitry Chetverikov and Judit Verest'oy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detecting shape defects in ferrite cores \\Lambda Dmitry Chetverikov and Judit Verest'oy Computer of the objects. The method is applied to the visual inspection and dimensional measurement of ferrite cores CIPA­CT94 0153 CRASH (for CRAck and SHape defect detection in ferrite cores) which has been in progress

Chetverikov, Dmitry

407

DuoTracker: Tool Support for Software Defect Data Collection and Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evaluate their process using either the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) [3] or the ISO 9001 standards [4 software processes. Keywords--software defects; software anomalies; defect classification; PSP; CMM; IS0-9001 is then compared against the quality models of CMM or IS0 9001. There are also improvement methods such as IDEAL [5

Dascalu, Sergiu

408

IDENTIFICATION OF IMPACTING FACTORS OF SURFACE DEFECTS IN HOT ROLLING PROCESSES USING MULTI-LEVEL REGRESSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFICATION OF IMPACTING FACTORS OF SURFACE DEFECTS IN HOT ROLLING PROCESSES USING MULTI. The result obtained can provide guidelines for root cause identification and quality improvement of hot products. Surface defects remain as a weakness or stress concentration site of the bulk material and hence

Zhou, Shiyu

409

Topological description of the Stone-Wales defect formation energy in carbon nanotubes and graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological description of the Stone-Wales defect formation energy in carbon nanotubes and graphene,10,12,16,18,26 The reported values for SW defect formation energies both in carbon nanotubes and graphene8 energies depend largely on the nanotube radius, the orientation of the dislocation dipole, and, to a lesser

Daw, Murray S.

410

Ian Sommerville 2000 Software Engineering, 6th edition. Chapter 20 Slide 1 Defect testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

©Ian Sommerville 2000 Software Engineering, 6th edition. Chapter 20 Slide 1 Defect testing l Testing programs to establish the presence of system defects #12;©Ian Sommerville 2000 Software Engineering, 6th edition. Chapter 20 Slide 2 Objectives l To understand testing techniques that are geared

Scharff, Christelle

411

Stone-Wales defects in graphene and other planar sp2 -bonded materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stone-Wales defects in graphene and other planar sp2 -bonded materials Jie Ma,1,2,3 Dario Alfè,2 that the structure of the Stone-Wales SW defect in graphene is more complex than hitherto appreciated. Rather than of graphene and in so doing modify its chemical re- activity toward adsorbates, and likely impact upon its

Alfè, Dario

412

Silicon Solar Cell Light-Trapping Using Defect Mode Photonic Kelsey A. Whitesell*a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Silicon Solar Cell Light-Trapping Using Defect Mode Photonic Crystals Kelsey A. Whitesell to enhance performance of thin film solar cells because of their unique ability to control light. We show for light trapping in thin film photovoltaics. Keywords: photonic crystals, defect, silicon, solar cell

Atwater, Harry

413

Dark defects in InGaAsP/InP double heterostructure lasers under accelerated aging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Degradation modes due to dark defects under accelerated aging for InGaAsP/InP double heterostructure lasers are investigated by monitoring pulse threshold current, leak current, absorption coefficient, gain factor, and electroluminescence topograph. Most of the dark defects are dark spot defects (DSD's) and there are only few <100> dark line defects. At the initial stage of the degradation, these dark defects scarcely absorb the emitted light, and the reduction of gain factor causes the increase of pulse threshold current. After this stage, dark defects begin to act as absorber of the emitted light. The generation time of such DSD's strongly depends on the injected current density but only weakly on the junction temperature in the range of 25/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C. The activation energies for the generation time of the first dark spot defect and the growing speed of <100> dark line defects are estimated to be 0.16 and 0.2 eV, respectively.

Fukuda, M.; Wakita, K.; Iwane, G.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

76 PostErs EMBnet.journal 19.B An ontology describing congenital heart defects data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

76 PostErs EMBnet.journal 19.B An ontology describing congenital heart defects data Charalampos interests: the authors have declared that no competing interests exist. Abstract Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are a group of diseases characterized by a structural anomaly of the heart that is pre- sent

415

Towards Fault-Tolerant Digital Microfluidic Lab-on-Chip: Defects, Fault Modeling, Testing, and Reconfiguration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Fault-Tolerant Digital Microfluidic Lab-on-Chip: Defects, Fault Modeling, Testing, NC 27708, USA Abstract Dependability is an important attribute for microfluidic lab-on-chip devices microfluidic lab-on-chip systems. Defects are related to logical fault models that can be viewed not only

Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

416

Characterization of the nitrogen split interstitial defect in wurtzite aluminum nitride using density functional theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We carried out Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid density functional theory plane wave supercell calculations in wurtzite aluminum nitride in order to characterize the geometry, formation energies, transition levels, and hyperfine tensors of the nitrogen split interstitial defect. The calculated hyperfine tensors may provide useful fingerprint of this defect for electron paramagnetic resonance measurement.

Szállás, A., E-mail: szallas.attila@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Szász, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Institute of Physics, Eötvös University, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/A, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Trinh, X. T.; Son, N. T.; Janzén, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Gali, A., E-mail: gali.adam@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

417

Electrical characterisation of defects in polycrystalline B-doped diamond films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applied to B-doped thin polycrystalline diamond films deposited on p+ -silicon by hot filament chemical]. Recently valuable information about defects in monocrystalline [3] and polycrystalline [7] diamond filmsElectrical characterisation of defects in polycrystalline B-doped diamond films O. S. Elsherif 1, a

Bristol, University of

418

Unifying power-law behaviour, functionality and defect distribution in general software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unifying power-law behaviour, functionality and defect distribution in general software systems Les between power-law distribution of component sizes and defect growth in maturing software systems. It was further noted that power-law distributions appear to be present in software systems from the beginning

Hatton, Les

419

Vacancy-type defects induced by grinding of Si wafers studied by monoenergetic positron beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vacancy-type defects introduced by the grinding of Czochralski-grown Si wafers were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation and the lifetime spectra of positrons showed that vacancy-type defects were introduced in the surface region (<98?nm), and the major defect species were identified as (i) relatively small vacancies incorporated in dislocations and (ii) large vacancy clusters. Annealing experiments showed that the defect concentration decreased with increasing annealing temperature in the range between 100 and 500?°C. After 600–700?°C annealing, the defect-rich region expanded up to about 170?nm, which was attributed to rearrangements of dislocation networks, and a resultant emission of point defects toward the inside of the sample. Above 800?°C, the stability limit of those vacancies was reached and they started to disappear. After the vacancies were annealed out (900?°C), oxygen-related defects were the major point defects and they were located at <25?nm.

Uedono, Akira; Yoshihara, Nakaaki [Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Mizushima, Yoriko [Devices and Materials Labs Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0197 (Japan); ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kim, Youngsuk [ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Disco Corporation, Ota, Tokyo 143-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Tomoji [Devices and Materials Labs Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0197 (Japan); Ohba, Takayuki [ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Oshima, Nagayasu; Suzuki, Ryoichi [Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

420

Hydrogen interaction with point defects in tungsten K. Heinola, T. Ahlgren, K. Nordlund, and J. Keinonen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen interaction with point defects in tungsten K. Heinola, T. Ahlgren, K. Nordlund, and J-principles calculations were used in determining the binding and trapping properties of hydrogen to point defects in tungsten. Hydrogen zero-point vibrations were taken into account. It was concluded that the monovacancy can

Nordlund, Kai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Transient behavior of ultracapacitors and supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several different mechanisms can be used to provide short term high power pulses from electrochemical systems. Their fundamental characteristics and applicability to the different types of transient output requirements will be discussed. When significant amounts of energy must be delivered, the most favorable materials operate by means of insertion reactions. The methods that can be employed to quantitatively evaluate the critical materials parameters will be described. Spreadsheet techniques are especially useful for modeling the transient transport behavior of components containing such materials under various boundary conditions. LaPlace transform methods can then be used to convert information about the parameters of individual components into the dynamic response of the total system.

Huggins, R.A. [Center for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research, Ulm (Germany)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Delocalised oxygen as the origin of two-level defects in Josephson junctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the key problems facing superconducting qubits and other Josephson junction devices is the decohering effects of bi-stable material defects. Although a variety of phenomenological models exist, the true microscopic origin of these defects remains elusive. For the first time we show that these defects may arise from delocalisation of the atomic position of the oxygen in the oxide forming the Josephson junction barrier. Using a microscopic model, we compute experimentally observable parameters for phase qubits. Such defects are charge neutral but have non-zero response to both applied electric field and strain. This may explain the observed long coherence time of two-level defects in the presence of charge noise, while still coupling to the junction electric field and substrate phonons.

Timothy C. DuBois; Manolo C. Per; Salvy P. Russo; Jared H. Cole

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene surface using dispersion corrected DFT studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To analyze the lithium ion interaction with realistic graphene surfaces, we carried out dispersion corrected DFT-D3 studies on graphene with common point defects and chemisorbed oxygen containing functional groups along with defect free graphene surface. Our study reveals that, the interaction between lithium ion (Li+) and graphene is mainly through the delocalized ? electron of pure graphene layer. However, the oxygen containing functional groups pose high adsorption energy for lithium ion due to the Li-O ionic bond formation. Similarly, the point defect groups interact with lithium ion through possible carbon dangling bonds and/or cation-? type interactions. Overall these defect sites render a preferential site for lithium ions compared with pure graphene layer. Based on these findings, the role of graphene surface defects in lithium battery performance were discussed.

Vijayakumar, M.; Hu, Jian Z.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Behavior of Bidirectional Spring Unit in Isolated Floor Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gravity based sys- tems suspension mechanisms or linear spring based systems coil springs or rubber unitsBehavior of Bidirectional Spring Unit in Isolated Floor Systems Shenlei Cui, M.ASCE1 ; Michel of bidirectional spring units used as isolators in a kind of isolated floor system, three types of characterization

Bruneau, Michel

425

Dynamics of Johari-Goldstein ? relaxation and its universal relation to ? relaxation in bulk metallic glasses by mechanical spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of the Johari–Goldstein (JG) ? relaxation and the ? relaxation in bulk metallic glasses (MGs) has been investigated by using mechanical spectroscopy combined with the Coupling Model. The ? relaxations of MGs exhibit different behaviors such as peaks, humps, and excess wings due to the different fluctuations of the chemical interactions among the constituting atoms. A universal correlation between the ? relaxation and the ? relaxation is generally found by their activation energies and relaxation times as well as the non-exponentiality parameter of the ? relaxation, which can be predicted quantitatively from the Coupling Model. Based on the quasi-point defects theory, a correlation factor ? shows a broad peak along with the ? relaxation, suggesting that the concentration and the correlation degree of the string-like configurations involved in the ? relaxation vary with increasing temperature, which challenges the previous view that the system is in an iso-configuration state below T{sub g} and may shed new light on the nature of the JG ? relaxation in metallic glasses.

Wu, Xuebang, E-mail: xbwu@issp.ac.cn; Guo, Lijun; Liu, C. S. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1129, Hefei, Anhui (China)

2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

426

Progress report on DOE research project [Thermodynamic and kinetic behavior of systems with intermetallic and intermediate phases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical investigation was made of the coherent displacive phase transformation between two equilibrium single-phase states producing several orientation variants of the product phase. The research was focused on a behavior of coherent systems (martensitic systems, metal and ceramic, and ferroelectric systems) with defects. The computer simulation demonstrated that randomly distributed static defects may drastically affect the thermodynamics, kinetics, and morphology of the transformation. In particular, the interaction of the transformation mode with the defects may be responsible for appearance of two new fields in the phase diagram: (i) the two-phase field describing the tweed microstructure, which consists of the retain parent phase and the variants of the product phase and (ii) the single-phase field describing the tweed microstructure, which consists of the variants of the product phase. These new fields can be attributed to the pre-transitional states observed in some of th e displacive transformations. The microstructure evolution resulting in formation of the thermoelastic equilibrium is path dependent. This unusual behavior is expected in systems with a sharp dependence of the transition temperature on the defect concentration.

Tsakalakos, T.; Semenovskaya-Khachaturyan, S.; Khachaturyan, A.G.

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

427

Behavioral Health Insurance Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2 Beamline21BeckyEnergyBehavioral

428

Characteristics of syntactic processing : an examination utilizing behavioral and fMRI techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores two important factors that constrain the syntactic parser of the sentence processing mechanism, syntactic storage costs and plausibility information. It uses behavioral methods to explore the characteristics ...

Chen, Evan, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Atomistics of defect nucleation and mobility : dislocations and twinning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiscale materials modeling has emerged in recent years as a significant concept and the only viable approach to understand the mechanical response of materials by linking modeling research at different length scales and ...

Chang, Jinpeng, 1974-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Mechanical & Industrial Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 1 Welcome MIE Industrial Advisory Board May 5th, 2011 #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 2 IAB 2010-2011 · David K. Anderson ­ Alden Research Laboratory, Inc went on for three weeks Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 6 #12;Reza Shahbazian Yassar Mechanical

Mountziaris, T. J.

431

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar Ju Li Professor MIT Electrochemical-mechanical actions computational and experimental research on mechanical properties of materials, and energy storage and conversion Refreshments served at 10:45 AM The creation of a nanoscale electrochemical and mechanical testing platform

Lin, Xi

432

Mechanical Engineering Undergraduate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Engineering Department Undergraduate Advising Manual for Bachelor of Science Degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Mechanics 2011-2012 - Updated April 15, 2012 #12;Johns Hopkins University ­ Department of Mechanical Engineering 2011-2012 Undergraduate Student Advising Manual Page 2

Ghosh, Somnath

433

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar James Bird Department of Mechanical Engineering Boston ­ are discussed. James Bird is an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Boston completed post-doctoral research at MIT. His research interests include experimental fluid mechanics

434

Mechanical Engineering Undergraduate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Engineering Department Undergraduate Advising Manual for Bachelor of Science Degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Mechanics 2012-2013 - Updated July 14, 2013 #12;Johns Hopkins University ­ Department of Mechanical Engineering 2012-2013 Undergraduate Student Advising Manual Page 2

Ghosh, Somnath

435

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has, and ground- based mechanical systems. Instrument Design Building on decades of design experience that has evolved with the complexity of instrument design demands, LASP mechanical engineers develop advanced

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

436

Combined Quantum Mechanical and Molecular Mechanics Studies of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mechanical and Molecular Mechanics Studies of the Electron-Transfer Reactions Involving Carbon Tetrachloride in Combined Quantum Mechanical and Molecular Mechanics Studies of the...

437

Ion Hydration and Associated Defects in Hydrogen Bond Network of Water: Observation of Reorientationally Slow Water Molecules Beyond First Hydration Shell in Aqueous Solutions of MgCl$_2$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of presence of ions, at moderate to high concentrations, on dynamical properties of water molecules are investigated through classical molecular dynamics simulations using two well known non-polarizable water models. Simulations reveal that the presence of magnesium chloride (MgCl$_2$) induces perturbations in the hydrogen bond network of water leading to the formation of bulk-like domains with \\textquoteleft defect sites\\textquoteright~on boundaries of such domains: water molecules at such defect sites have less number of hydrogen bonds than those in bulk water. Reorientational autocorrelation functions for dipole vectors of such defect water molecules are computed at different concentrations of ions and compared with system of pure water. Earlier experimental and simulation studies indicate significant differences in reorientational dynamics for water molecules in the first hydration shell of many dissolved ions. Results of this study suggest that defect water molecules, which are beyond the first hydration shells of ions, also experience significant slowing down of reorientation times as a function of concentration in the case of MgCl$_2$. However, addition of cesium chloride(CsCl) to water does not perturb the hydrogen bond network of water significantly even at higher concentrations. This difference in behavior between MgCl$_2$ and CsCl is consistent with the well-known Hofmeister series.

Upayan Baul; Satyavani Vemparala

2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

Observations of an Impurity-driven Hysteresis Behavior in Ice Crystal Growth at Low Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mechanisms for this instability, which can be used to produce clean, faceted ice surfaces. 1 IntroductionObservations of an Impurity-driven Hysteresis Behavior in Ice Crystal Growth at Low Pressure Abstract. We describe observations of a novel hysteresis behavior in the growth of ice crystals under near

Libbrecht, Kenneth G.

439

Acceleration of dormant storage effects to address the reliability of silicon surface micromachined Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Qualification of microsystems for weapon applications is critically dependent on our ability to build confidence in their performance, by predicting the evolution of their behavior over time in the stockpile. The objective of this work was to accelerate aging mechanisms operative in surface micromachined silicon microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with contacting surfaces that are stored for many years prior to use, to determine the effects of aging on reliability, and relate those effects to changes in the behavior of interfaces. Hence the main focus was on 'dormant' storage effects on the reliability of devices having mechanical contacts, the first time they must move. A large number ({approx}1000) of modules containing prototype devices and diagnostic structures were packaged using the best available processes for simple electromechanical devices. The packaging processes evolved during the project to better protect surfaces from exposure to contaminants and water vapor. Packages were subjected to accelerated aging and stress tests to explore dormancy and operational environment effects on reliability and performance. Functional tests and quantitative measurements of adhesion and friction demonstrated that the main failure mechanism during dormant storage is change in adhesion and friction, precipitated by loss of the fluorinated monolayer applied after fabrication. The data indicate that damage to the monolayer can occur at water vapor concentrations as low as 500 ppm inside the package. The most common type of failure was attributed to surfaces that were in direct contact during aging. The application of quantitative methods for monolayer lubricant analysis showed that even though the coverage of vapor-deposited monolayers is generally very uniform, even on hidden surfaces, locations of intimate contact can be significantly depleted in initial concentration of lubricating molecules. These areas represent defects in the film prone to adsorption of water or contaminants that can cause movable structures to adhere. These analysis methods also indicated significant variability in the coverage of lubricating molecules from one coating process to another, even for identical processing conditions. The variability was due to residual molecules left in the deposition chamber after incomplete cleaning. The coating process was modified to result in improved uniformity and total coverage. Still, a direct correlation was found between the resulting static friction behavior of MEMS interfaces, and the absolute monolayer coverage. While experimental results indicated that many devices would fail to start after aging, the modeling approach used here predicted that all the devices should start. Adhesion modeling based upon values of adhesion energy from cantilever beams is therefore inadequate. Material deposition that bridged gaps was observed in some devices, and potentially inhibits start-up more than the adhesion model indicates. Advances were made in our ability to model MEMS devices, but additional combined experimental-modeling studies will be needed to advance the work to a point of providing predictive capability. The methodology developed here should prove useful in future assessments of device aging, however. Namely, it consisted of measuring interface properties, determining how they change with time, developing a model of device behavior incorporating interface behavior, and then using the age-aware interface behavior model to predict device function.

Cox, James V.; Candelaria, Sam A.; Dugger, Michael Thomas; Duesterhaus, Michelle Ann; Tanner, Danelle Mary; Timpe, Shannon J.; Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Skousen, Troy J.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Parson, Ted Blair

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Investigation of deep-level defects in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films by a steady-state photocapacitance method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of defect levels located 0.8?eV above the valence band in Cu(In{sub 1?x},Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} thin films were investigated by a steady-state photocapacitance method. When illuminated by light with a photon energy of 0.8?eV at 60?K, a fast increase, followed by a slow increase, was observed in the photocapacitance transients of all samples. Upon being re-exposed, samples with a low bandgap energy showed a slow decrease in photocapacitance transients. These observations were interpreted using a configuration coordinate model assuming two states for the 0.8?eV defect: a stable state D and its metastable state D* with a large lattice relaxation. The difference in the evolution mechanisms of the photocapacitance transients was attributed to the difference in the optical transition of carriers between the two states of the 0.8?eV defect and the valence and conduction bands.

Hu, Xiaobo, E-mail: hxb1314@gmail.com; Sakurai, Takeaki; Akimoto, Katsuhiro [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Yamada, Akimasa; Ishizuka, Shogo; Niki, Sigeru [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report) Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy...

442

Current rectification, switching, polarons, and defects in molecular electronic devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Devices for nano- and molecular size electronics are currently a focus of research aimed at an efficient current rectification and switching. A few generic molecular scale devices are reviewed here on the basis of first-principles and model approaches. Current rectification by (ballistic) molecular quantum dots can produce the rectification ratio ~100. Current switching due to conformational changes in the molecules is slow, on the order of a few kHz. Fast switching (~1THz) may be achieved, at least in principle, in a degenerate molecular quantum dot with strong coupling of electrons with vibrational excitations. We show that the mean-field approach fails to properly describe intrinsic molecular switching and present an exact solution to the problem. Defects in molecular films result in spurious peaks in conductance, apparent negative differential resistance, and may also lead to unusual temperature and bias dependence of current. The observed switching in many cases is_extrinsic_, caused by changes in molecule-electrode geometry, molecule reconfiguration, metallic filament formation through, and/or changing amount of disorder in a molecular film. We give experimental examples of telegraph "switching" and "hot spot" formation in the molecular films.

A. M. Bratkovsky

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

443

Control of Suspect/Counterfeit and Defective Items  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure implements portions of the requirements of MSC-MP-599, Quality Assurance Program Description. It establishes the Mission Support Alliance (MSA) practices for minimizing the introduction of and identifying, documenting, dispositioning, reporting, controlling, and disposing of suspect/counterfeit and defective items (S/CIs). employees whose work scope relates to Safety Systems (i.e., Safety Class [SC] or Safety Significant [SS] items), non-safety systems and other applications (i.e., General Service [GS]) where engineering has determined that their use could result in a potential safety hazard. MSA implements an effective Quality Assurance (QA) Program providing a comprehensive network of controls and verification providing defense-in-depth by preventing the introduction of S/CIs through the design, procurement, construction, operation, maintenance, and modification of processes. This procedure focuses on those safety systems, and other systems, including critical load paths of lifting equipment, where the introduction of S/CIs would have the greatest potential for creating unsafe conditions.

Sheriff, Marnelle L.

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

444

The Defect Induced Mix Experiment (DIME) for NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LANL will perform two Defect Induced Mix Experiment (DIME) implosion campaigns on NIF in July and September, 2012. This presentation describes the goals for these shots and the experimental configuration and diagnostic set up to collect the appropriate data. The first two-shot campaign will focus on executing polar direct drive (PDD) implosions of plastic CH capsules filled with deuterium gas. Gas filling will be performed through a fill tube at target chamber center. A vanadium backligher foil will provide x-rays to radiograph the last half of the implosion to compare the implosion trajectory with modeling predictions. An equatorial groove in one of the capsules will be present to determine its effect on implosion dynamics. The second DIME campaign will commission and use a spectral imager (MMI) to examine the evolution of thin capsule layers doped with either Ge or Ga at 1.85%. Spectral line emission from these layers will quantify the mix width at the inner shell radius and near an equatorial groove feature.

Schmitt, Mark J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradley, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cobble, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hakel, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hsu, Scott C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krasheninnikova, Natalia S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kyrala, George A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murphy, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Obrey, Kimberly A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shah, Rahul C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tregillis, Ian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Hydrogen decoration of radiation damage induced defect structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The defect complexes that are formed when protons with energies in the MeV-range were implanted into high-purity silicon were investigated. After implantation, the samples were annealed at 400 °C or 450 °C for times ranging between 15 minutes and 30 hours. The resistivity of the samples was then analyzed by Spreading Resistance Profiling (SRP). The resistivity shows minima where there is a high carrier concentration and it is possible to extract the carrier concentration from the resistivity data. Initially, there is a large peak in the carrier concentration at the implantation depth where most of the hydrogen is concentrated. For longer anneals, this peak widens as the hydrogen diffuses away from the implantation depth. Following the changes in resistivity as a function of annealing time allows us to characterize the diffusion of hydrogen through these samples. Differences in the diffusion were observed depending on whether the silicon was grown by the magnetic Czochralski (m:Cz) method or the Float zone (Fz) method.

Kirnstötter, S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, 8010 Graz and Infineon Technologies Austria AG, 9500 Villach (Austria); Faccinelli, M.; Hadley, P. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, 8010 (Austria); Schustereder, W. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, 9500 Villach (Austria); Laven, J. G.; Schulze, H.-J. [Infineon Technologies AG, 81726 Munich (Germany)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

446

Comparison of fast 3D simulation and actinic inspection for EUV masks with buries defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerial images for isolated defects and the interactions of defects with features are compared between the Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the fast EUV simulation program RADICAL. Comparisons between AIT images from August 2007 and RADICAL simulations are used to extract aberrations. At this time astigmatism was the dominant aberration with a value of 0.55 waves RMS. Significant improvements in the imaging performance of the AIT were made between August 2007 and December 2008. A good match will be shown between the most recent AIT images and RADICAL simulations without aberrations. These comparisons will demonstrate that a large defect, in this case 7nm tall on the surface, is still printable even if it is centered under the absorber line. These comparisons also suggest that the minimum defect size is between 1.5nm and 0.8nm surface height because a 1.5nm defect was printable but a 0.8nm was not. Finally, the image of a buried defect near an absorber line through focus will demonstrate an inversion in the effect of the defect from a protrusion of the dark line into the space to a protrusion of the space into the line.

Clifford, C. H.; Wiraatmadja, S.; Chan, T. T.; Neureuther, A. R.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Liang, T.

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

447

Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser`s wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known ``feature masks`` of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects. 29 figs.

Ellingson, W.A.; Brada, M.P.

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

448

Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser's wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known "feature masks" of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects.

Ellingson, William A. (Naperville, IL); Brada, Mark P. (Goleta, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Sandia National Laboratories: Mechanical Testing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EnergyNuclear Energy Systems Laboratory (NESL) Brayton LabMechanical Testing Mechanical Testing Mechanical Testing Overview Mechanical 1-2 (2008). Standard Test Methods for...

450

Spin counting in electrically detected magnetic resonance via low-field defect state mixing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work herein describes a method that allows one to measure paramagnetic defect densities in semiconductor and insulator based devices with electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). The method is based upon the mixing of defect states which results from the dipolar coupling of paramagnetic sites at low magnetic fields. We demonstrate the measurement method with spin dependent tunneling in thin film dielectrics; however, the method should be equally applicable to paramagnetic defect density measurements in semiconductors via the more commonly utilized EDMR technique called spin dependent recombination.

Cochrane, Corey J.; Lenahan, Patrick M. [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

451

Scattering of linear and nonlinear waves in a waveguide array with a PT-symmetric defect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the scattering of linear and nonlinear waves in a long waveguide array with a parity-time (PT)-symmetric defect created by two waveguides with balanced gain and loss. We present exact solutions for the scattering of linear waves on such a defect, and then demonstrate numerically that the linear theory can describe, with a good accuracy, the soliton scattering in the case of weak nonlinearity. We reveal that the reflected and transmitted linear and nonlinear waves can be amplified substantially after interaction with the PT-symmetric defect thus allowing an active control of the wave scattering in the array.

Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Suchkov, Sergey V. [Institute for Metals Superplasticity Problems, Russian Academy of Science, Ufa RU-450001 (Russian Federation); Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Kivshar, Yuri S. [Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering,Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Society Evaluation of point defect concentrations in B2-FeAl intermetallic compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal defects are studied for three compositions (49, 50 and 52 at.%Fe) of the intermetallic compound FeAl with B2 structure. Magnetic measurements are used to determine the thermal defect concentrations. These concentrations are determined from fitting the experimental curves of magnetic susceptibility, obtained during an isochronal annealing after a quench. Next we have evaluated theoretically the concentrations of different point defects that exist in this compound. The used model is based in the Bragg-Williams approximation assuming the nearest-neighbour interaction. The calculated concentrations describe well the experimental values. I.

S. Zaroual; O. Sassi; J. Aride; J. Bernardini; G. Moya; Supérieure Takaddoum; B. P. Rabat-morocco

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Defect motion and lattice pinning barriers in Josephson-junction ladders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the motion of domain wall defects in a fully frustrated Josephson-junction ladder system, driven by small applied currents. For small system sizes, the energy barrier E{sub B} to the defect motion is computed analytically via symmetry and topological considerations. More generally, we perform numerical simulations directly on the equations of motion, based on the resistively-shunted junction model, to study the dynamics of defects, varying the system size. Coherent motion of domain walls is observed for large system sizes. In the thermodynamical limit, we find E{sub B}=0.1827 in units of the Josephson coupling energy.

Kang, H.; Lim, Jong Soo [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Fortin, J.-Y. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite Louis Pasteur, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Choi, J. [Department of Physics, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, M. Y. [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

455

Does complex absorption behavior leading to conditioning and damage in KDP/DKDP reflect the electronic structure of initiators?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, most of our thinking about the defects responsible for initiating laser damage considers them as featureless absorbers. However, an increasing body of evidence, particularly involving multi-wavelength irradiation, suggests electronic structure of damage initiators is important in determining both initiation and conditioning behaviors in KDP. The effective absorption coefficient of energy under multi-wavelength irradiation cannot be accounted for by a structureless absorber, but is consistent with an initiator with a multi-level structure. We outline the evidence and assess the ability of such a simple multi-level model to explain these and other experimentally observed behaviors.

Feit, M D; DeMange, P P; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Demos, S G

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

456

Internal pipe attachment mechanism  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An attachment mechanism for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection.

Bast, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (Pleasanton, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Lennon, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA); Pastrnak, John W. (Livermore, CA); Smith, Joseph A. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Internal pipe attachment mechanism  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An attachment mechanism is described for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection. 6 figures.

Bast, R.M.; Chesnut, D.A.; Henning, C.D.; Lennon, J.P.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Smith, J.A.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

458

Automobile Driving and Aggressive Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The accident prone automobile driver. American Journal ofAutomobile Driving And Aggressive Behavior Raymond W. Novacofor its content or use. Automobile Driving and Aggressive

Novaco, Raymond W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

460

Nonlinear geometric effects in mechanical bistable morphing structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bistable structures associated with non-linear deformation behavior, exemplified by the Venus flytrap and slap bracelet, can switch between different functional shapes upon actuation. Despite numerous efforts in modeling such large deformation behavior of shells, the roles of mechanical and nonlinear geometric effects on bistability remain elusive. We demonstrate, through both theoretical analysis and table-top experiments, that two dimensionless parameters control bistability. Our work classifies the conditions for bistability, and extends the large deformation theory of plates and shells.

Zi Chen; Qiaohang Guo; Carmel Majidi; Wenzhe Chen; David J. Srolovitz; Mikko P. Haataja

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Ordered and self-disordered dynamics of holes and defects in the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the dynamics of holes and defects in the 1D complex Ginzburg--Landau equation in ordered and chaotic cases. Ordered hole--defect dynamics occurs when an unstable hole invades a plane wave state and periodically nucleates defects from which new holes are born. The results of a detailed numerical study of these periodic states are incorporated into a simple analytic description of isolated "edge" holes. Extending this description, we obtain a minimal model for general hole--defect dynamics. We show that interactions between the holes and a self--disordered background are essential for the occurrence of spatiotemporal chaos in hole--defect states.

Martin van Hecke; Martin Howard

2001-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Effect of defects on long-pulse laser-induced damage of two kinds of optical thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to study the effect of defects on the laser-induced damage of different optical thin films, we carried out damage experiments on two kinds of thin films with a 1ms long-pulse laser. Surface-defect and subsurface-defect damage models were used to explain the damage morphology. The two-dimensional finite element method was applied to calculate the temperature and thermal-stress fields of these two films. The results show that damages of the two films are due to surface and subsurface defects, respectively. Furthermore, the different dominant defects for thin films of different structures are discussed.

Wang Bin; Qin Yuan; Ni Xiaowu; Shen Zhonghua; Lu Jian

2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

463

Correlation between nuclear response and defects in CZT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vertical high pressure Bridgman (VHPB) was considered until now to be the most successful crystal growth method to produce Cd{sub 1{minus}x}Zn{sub x}Te (CZT), (0.04 < x < 0.24), for X- and gamma-ray detector crystals. Recently Horizontal Bridgman (HB) Cd{sub 1{minus}x}Zn{sub x}Te crystals produced by IMARAD Co. have also been successfully fabricated into nuclear spectroscopic radiation detectors. In view of the database of many years' study of the electrical properties of VHPB CZT grown and obtained from various sources, the authors also studied the HB CZT crystals in order to compare the defects present in both different kinds of crystals grown by different methods. The VHB-grown samples were examined using thermoelectric emission spectroscopy (TEES), X- and gamma ray spectroscopy and laser induced transient charge technique (TCT). The surface and the bulk crystalline homogeneity were mapped using triaxial double crystal x-ray diffraction (TADXRD) and infrared transmission spectroscopy (IR). They have found a correlation between crystallinity, IR transmission microstructure and trapping times. Spectrometer grade VHPB CZT crystals exhibit trapping times of 20 {micro}s for electrons and 7 {micro}s for holes, however, regions, which were opaque to IR transmission, had trapping times shorter by one order of magnitude. The trapping times of HB CZT for electrons, were 10--15 {micro}s. A similar trend has been observed on VHPB CZT crystals with poor crystallinity. The HB CZT crystals that they measured in this study had a crystallinity that was inferior to that of the best spectroscopic grade VHPB crystals.

H. Hermon; M. Schieber; R. B. James; E. Lee; E. Cross; M. Goorsky; T. Lam; T. E. Schlesinger; M. Greaves

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

464

3.40J / 22.71J Physical Metallurgy, Spring 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This course examines how the presence of 1-, 2- and 3D defects and second phases control the mechanical, electromagnetic and chemical behavior of metals and alloys. It considers point, line and interfacial defects in the ...

Russell, Kenneth

465

Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation and imaging of defects in reinforced cementitious materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of defect is one of the important objectives of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for condition assessment of structures. Among many other NDE techniques, ultrasonic methods play a prominent role in the both ...

Wang, Ji-yong, 1967-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Integrated approaches to elucidate the genetic architecture of congenital heart defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Congenital heart defects (CHD) are structural anomalies affecting the heart, are found in 1% of the population and arise during early stages of embryo development. Without surgical and medical interventions, most of the severe CHD cases would...

Al Turki, Saeed

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

467

BORON-OXYGEN DEFECTS IN COMPENSATED P-TYPE CZOCHRALSKI SILICON D. Macdonald1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BORON-OXYGEN DEFECTS IN COMPENSATED P-TYPE CZOCHRALSKI SILICON D. Macdonald1 , A. Liu1 , F Energy, PO Box 1, NL-1755 ZG Petten, The Netherlands. email: daniel.macdonald@anu.edu.au ABSTRACT

468

Investigation on Wave Propagation Characteristics in Plates and Pipes for Identification of Structural Defect Locations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For successful identification of structural defects in plates and pipes, it is essential to understand structural wave propagation characteristics such as dispersion relations. Analytical approaches to identify the dispersion relations...

Han, Je Heon

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

Development of a Bulk GaN Growth Technique for Low Defect Density...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

current due to bulk defects GaN is Grown Heteroepitaxially on Sapphire (and Silicon Carbide) Substrates * As grown GaN nucleation layers contain disordered GaN with many...

470

An analytical study of rail grinding optimization for rail-head fatigue defect prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and increased train traffic on the remaining routes. These changes in railroad industry practice have caused an increase in the rate of occurrence of rail head fatigue defects, one potential cause of train derailment. The primary form of maintenance employed...

Jones, Scott Laurence

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Stochastic Damage Evolution under Static and Fatigue Loading in Composites with Manufacturing Defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this dissertation, experimental investigations and theoretical studies on the stochastic matrix cracking evolution under static and fatigue loading in composite laminates with defects are presented. The presented work demonstrates a methodology...

Huang, Yongxin

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

472

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 165440 (2012) Graphene flakes with defective edge terminations: Universal and topological aspects,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 165440 (2012) Graphene flakes with defective edge terminations: Universal (as a function of the magnetic field) are presented for trigonal graphene nanoflakes. The electronic spectra of trigonal graphene nanoflakes with reczag edge terminations exhibit certain unique

Yannouleas, Constantine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Defect-Enhanced Charge Transfer by Ion-Solid Interactions in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

transfer effects on recoil atoms. Citation: Gao F, HY Xiao, XT Zu, M Posselt, and WJ Weber.2009."Defect-Enhanced Charge Transfer by Ion-Solid Interactions in SiC using...

474

E-Print Network 3.0 - aging-related chromatin defects Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

temperature... Research Fund tion at ARS elements in cells carrying defective ORC2Lincoln's Inn Fields and ORC5 (Fox et al... United Kingdom yeast silent mating-type...

475

Impact of defect type on hydrogen passivation effectiveness in multicrystalline silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we examine the effectiveness of hydrogen passivation at grain boundaries as a function of defect type and microstructure in multicrystalline silicon. We analyze a specially prepared solar cell with alternating ...

Bertoni, Mariana I.

476

Ab initio calculations on magnetism induced by composite defects in magnesium oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The local magnetic state induced by the composite defects, composed of an oxygen vacancy and a nitrogen substituting oxygen, in magnesium oxide has been studied by using ab initio calculation based on density functional theory. The calculated results show that local magnetic moment can be induced by the composite defects around the oxygen vacancy, when the exchange split of the oxygen vacancy is enhanced either by the hybridization between the N-p and nearest neighbor O-p orbitals or by applying on-site Coulomb repulsion (U) and exchange interaction (J). We show that the magnetic state induced by the composite defect is energetically more stable than the non-magnetic state. In addition, we show that the U and J applied on the p-orbitals of N and O atoms may significantly impact the calculated magnetic state of the composite defect, resulting in magnetic state for a configuration that is non-magnetic by generalized gradient approximation.

Zhang, Yao-Fang [Department of Physics, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300384 (China); College of Electronic Information and Optical Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Feng, Min [School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Shao, Bin [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lu, Yuan; Zuo, Xu, E-mail: xzuonku@gmail.com [College of Electronic Information and Optical Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Liu, Hong [Office of International Academic Exchanges, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

477

Real-Time Tracking and Shape Analysis of Atrial Septal Defects in 3D Echocardiography1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heart procedures. Our application assists pediatric atrial septal defect (ASD) closure techniques using.G.L., R.D.H.); National Institutes of Health, Diag- nostic Radiology Department, Bethesda, MD (M

478

Defect-Band Emission Photoluminescence Imaging on Multi-Crystalline Si Solar Cells: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Defect-band photoluminescence (PL) imaging with an InGaAs camera was applied to multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers, which were taken from different heights of different Si bricks. Neighboring wafers were picked at six different processing steps, from as-cut to post-metallization. By using different cut-off filters, we were able to separate the band-to-band emission images from the defect-band emission images. On the defect-band emission images, the bright regions that originate from the grain boundaries and defect clusters were extracted from the PL images. The area fraction percentage of these regions at various processing stages shows a correlation with the final cell electrical parameters.

Yan, F.; Johnston, S.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Blosse, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Integrated Droplet Routing and Defect Tolerance in the Synthesis of Digital  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11 Integrated Droplet Routing and Defect Tolerance in the Synthesis of Digital Microfluidic Biochips TAO XU and KRISHNENDU CHAKRABARTY Duke University Microfluidic biochips are revolutionizing high to digital microfluidic platforms, the need for design automation techniques is being increasingly felt

Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

480

The use of mouse models to elucidate the genetic and environmental components of neural tube defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neural tub defects (NTDs) rank among the most common phics. congenital anomalies affecting human infants worldwide. Unfortunately, the: etiology is poorly understood accuse the genetic and environmental components contributing to their expression...

Gefrides, Lisa Anne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "defects mechanical behavior" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Origin of radiation tolerance in 3C-SiC with nanolayered planar defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have recently found that the radiation tolerance of SiC is highly enhanced by introducing nanolayers of stacking faults and twins [Y. Zhang et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 14, 13429 (2012)]. To reveal the origin of this radiation resistance, we used in situ transmission electron microscopy to examine structural changes induced by electron beam irradiation in 3C-SiC containing nanolayers of (111) planar defects. We found that preferential amorphization, when it does occur, takes place at grain boundaries and at 111 and 111 planar defects. Radiationinduced point defects, such as interstitials and vacancies, migrate two-dimensionally between the (111) planar defects, which probably enhances the damage recovery.

Ishimaru, Dr. Manabu [Osaka University; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Shannon, Prof. Steven [North Carolina State University; Weber, William J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

E-Print Network 3.0 - active point defects Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Technology Rev. IFP, Vol. 56 (2001), No. 1, pp. 23-31 Copyright 2001, ditions Technip Summary: small number of defects acting as individual pinning points. Then we...

483

E-Print Network 3.0 - a-center defect complex Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Technology Rev. IFP, Vol. 56 (2001), No. 1, pp. 23-31 Copyright 2001, ditions Technip Summary: of defects is smaller than the capillary length, the contact line shape is...

484

E-Print Network 3.0 - active defects induced Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Technology Rev. IFP, Vol. 56 (2001), No. 1, pp. 23-31 Copyright 2001, ditions Technip Summary: . The three-dimensional deformation induced by the surface defects is...

485

Higher-Order Mass Defect Analysis for Mass Spectra of Complex...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

high-resolution mass spectrum of crude oil containing nearly 13,000 peaks. Citation: Roach PJ, J Laskin, and A Laskin.2011."Higher-Order Mass Defect Analysis for Mass Spectra of...

486

Electrical properties and defect structures of praseodymium-cerium oxide solid solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A defect chemistry model consistent with observed trends in the pO2 and temperature dependence of electrical conductivity in praseodymium cerium oxide (PCO) was developed. Four point DC conductivity measurements were made ...

Stefanik, Todd Stanley, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Hydrogen effects on the point defect spectrum in Fe-C alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As part of a multi-scale approach for modeling hydrogen embrittlement in hardened steels we have investigated, employing density functional theory methods, the stability and concentrations of the point defect clusters ...

Monasterio Velásquez, Paul Rene

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Mechanical & Industrial Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Mario A. Rotea Professor and Department Head #12;2Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Outline · Undergraduate Degree Programs · Graduate Degree Programs · The Faculty · The Research · Summary #12;3Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Undergraduate Programs ­ BSME & BSIE 0 20 40 60

Mountziaris, T. J.

489

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficient energy systems. Evelyn N. Wang is an Associate Professor in the Mechanical Engineering DepartmentMechanical engineering Department Seminar Evelyn Wang Depaprtment of Mechanical Engineering MIT Nanoengineered Surfaces: Transport Phenomena and Energy Applications 11:00 AM Friday, 5 April 2013 Room 245, 110

490

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar Domitilla Del Vecchio Department of Mechanical. A near future is envisioned in which re- engineered bacteria will turn waste into energy and kill cancer, she joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Laboratory for Information and Decision

491

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Mechanical Engineering at the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, working in Dr. MarcusMechanical & Aerospace Engineering The atomization of a liquid jet by a high speed cross.S.E. degree in mechanical engineering from Amirkabir University of Technology in 2006 and M.S. degree

492

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar Shuodao Wang Postdoctoral Fellow University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Mechanical Design and Fabrication Techniques for Bio-Electronic Systems 11:00 AM Friday that bridge this gap in mechanics and form will create new opportunities in bio-inspired and bio

Lin, Xi

493

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Abstract Solid materials used in energy conversion and storage that couples the mechanical and chemical (or electrochemical) fields in solids via the use of stress-chemo- mechanical theory, two examples of practical interest will be discussed, namely, solid oxide fuel cells

494

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical engineering Department Seminar Maureen Lynch Postdoctoral Fellow Cornell University Mechanical Loading Decreases Osteolysis and Tumor Formation via Effects on Bone Remodeling 11:00 AM Friday to mechanical stimuli in the skeleton, yet the role of biomechanical loading remains poorly characterized

Lin, Xi

495

UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS IMPLEMENTATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS IMPLEMENTATION DURING PAVEMENT CONSTRUCTION QUALITY ASSURANCE Mn !! Performance Based Construction QA !! Unsaturated Soil Mechanics !! What We've Learned !! Next Steps #12.6-6.0 5 - 7 19 0.8 5 7 - 9 24 1.1 4 9 - 11 28 1.2 4 #12;Unsaturated Soil Mechanics #12;Fundamentals

Minnesota, University of

496

Victor Yakhot Mechanical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to flows of strongly non-linear fluids relevant for mechanical engineering, polymers and bio-fluid dynamicsVictor Yakhot Mechanical Engineering UniversalReynoldsNumberofTransition,Renormalizationand Mechanical Engineering 11 AM Friday, October 31st Room 245, 110 Cummington Mall Refreshments served at 10

Lin, Xi

497

Confinement of magnetostatic forward volume waves in two-dimensional magnonic crystals with line defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mode patterns of magnetostatic forward volume waves (MSFVWs) propagating in two-dimensional magnonic crystals with line defects via periodic variation in thickness of square lattice in a yttrium iron garnet thin film are reported. The theoretical approach based on Walker's equation was employed to analyze the confinement of MSFVWs in the line defects. A good agreement between the theoretical predictions and the experimental results was obtained.

Chi, K. H.; Zhu, Y. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Institute for Surface and Interface Science, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Tsai, C. S., E-mail: cstsai@uci.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Institute for Surface and Interface Science, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

498

Point Defects in CdZnTe Crystals Grown by Different Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied, by current deep-level transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS), point defects in CdZnTe detectors grown by different techniques. We identified 12 different traps with energy levels from 7 meV to 1.1 eV. Although the levels of most of the identified defects were independent of the crystal growth techniques, nevertheless there were some associated differences in the traps energies and densities.

R Gul; A Bolotnikov; H Kim; R Rodriguez; K Keeter; Z Li; G Gu; R James