Sample records for deep-sea oil plume

  1. Microbial gene functions enriched in the Deepwater Horizon deep-sea oil plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Z.; Deng, Y.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; He, Z.; Voordeckers, J.; Zhou, A.; Lee, Y.-J.; Mason, O.U.; Dubinsky, E.; Chavarria, K.; Tom, L.; Fortney, J.; Lamendella, R.; Jansson, J.K.; D?haeseleer, P.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the deepest and largest offshore spill in U.S. history and its impacts on marine ecosystems are largely unknown. Here, we showed that the microbial community functional composition and structure were dramatically altered in a deep-sea oil plume resulting from the spill. A variety of metabolic genes involved in both aerobic and anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation were highly enriched in the plume compared to outside the plume, indicating a great potential for intrinsic bioremediation or natural attenuation in the deep-sea. Various other microbial functional genes relevant to carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur and iron cycling, metal resistance, and bacteriophage replication were also enriched in the plume. Together, these results suggest that the indigenous marine microbial communities could play a significant role in biodegradation of oil spills in deep-sea environments.

  2. Deep-sea oil plume enriches psychrophilic oil-degrading bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.; Dubinsky, E.A.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Andersen, G.L.; Piceno, Y.M.; Singh, N.; Jansson, J.K.; Probst, A.; Borglin, S.E.; Fortney, J.L.; Stringfellow, W.T.; Bill, M.; Conrad, M.S.; Tom, L.M.; Chavarria, K.L.; Alusi, T.R.; Lamendella, R.; Joyner, D.C.; Spier, C.; Auer, M.; Zemla, M.L.; Chakraborty, R.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; D'haeseleer, P.; Holman, H.-Y. N.; Osman, S.; Lu, Z.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Deng, Y.; Zhou, J.; Mason, O.U.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The biological effects and expected fate of the vast amount of oil in the Gulf of Mexico from the Deepwater Horizon blowout are unknown owing to the depth and magnitude of this event. Here, we report that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated deep-sea indigenous {gamma}-Proteobacteria that are closely related to known petroleum degraders. Hydrocarbon-degrading genes coincided with the concentration of various oil contaminants. Changes in hydrocarbon composition with distance from the source and incubation experiments with environmental isolates demonstrated faster-than-expected hydrocarbon biodegradation rates at 5 C. Based on these results, the potential exists for intrinsic bioremediation of the oil plume in the deep-water column without substantial oxygen drawdown.

  3. Microbial gene functions enriched in the Deepwater Horizon deep-sea oil plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Z.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to 15 detected in the non-oil contaminated samples. The alkBappeared to be dominant in all oil plume samples (Fig. S2).signal intensities. All oil plume samples clustered together

  4. Microbial gene functions enriched in the Deepwater Horizon deep-sea oil plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Z.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the deepest andof Gulf of Mexico from other historic offshore oil spillsDeepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico was one of

  5. Microbial gene functions enriched in the Deepwater Horizon deep-sea oil plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Z.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subsurface and the origin of heavy oil. Nature 426: 344-352.2007). Effects of heavy fuel oil on the bacterial community

  6. Microbial Manganese(II) oxidation : biogeochemistry of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume, enzymatic mechanism, and genomic perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dick, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plume. Multicopper oxidase (MCO) enzymes are involved in Mn(elucidated multicopper oxidase (MCO) genes that are requiredO (Solomon et al. , 1996). MCO substrates include a variety

  7. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would depend on how native microorganisms respond to an increased concentration of hydrocarbons andor dispersant at such extreme depths and temperatures (4C). A collaboration...

  8. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'. WilliamEnergy Innovation

  9. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'. WilliamEnergy InnovationMolecular Measurements of

  10. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'. WilliamEnergy InnovationMolecular Measurements

  11. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'. WilliamEnergy InnovationMolecular

  12. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'. WilliamEnergy InnovationMolecularMolecular

  13. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A.ModelAlyssaReceptor Revealed

  14. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A.ModelAlyssaReceptor RevealedMolecular

  15. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A.ModelAlyssaReceptor

  16. The goal of this paper is to review current impacts of human activities on the deep-sea floor ecosystem, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Craig

    (structures, radioactive wastes, munitions and carbon dioxide), deep-sea fishing, oil and gas extraction be significant by 2025 include deep-sea carbon-dioxide sequestration, sewage-sludge emplacement and dredge fishing pressure. Oil and gas exploitation has begun, and will continue, in deep water, creating

  17. Weathering and the Fallout Plume of Heavy Oil from Strong Petroleum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Weathering and the Fallout Plume of Heavy Oil from Strong Petroleum Seeps Near Coal Oil Point, CA C pattern for heavy oil from the persistent surface slicks; average surface currents appear to modulate by the National Research Council (2). An important emerging issue is the fate of heavy oils introduced

  18. DEEP SEA DRILLING PROJECT DATA FILE DOCUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche&M University, as an account of work performed under the international Ocean Drilling Program which is managedDEEP SEA DRILLING PROJECT DATA FILE DOCUMENTS Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical

  19. Extreme Longevity in Proteinaceous Deep-Sea Corals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Dunbar, R B; Fallon, S J; Mucciarone, D A

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep-sea corals are found on hard substrates on seamounts and continental margins world-wide at depths of 300 to {approx}3000 meters. Deep-sea coral communities are hotspots of deep ocean biomass and biodiversity, providing critical habitat for fish and invertebrates. Newly applied radiocarbon age date from the deep water proteinaceous corals Gerardia sp. and Leiopathes glaberrima show that radial growth rates are as low as 4 to 35 {micro}m yr{sup -1} and that individual colony longevities are on the order of thousands of years. The management and conservation of deep sea coral communities is challenged by their commercial harvest for the jewelry trade and damage caused by deep water fishing practices. In light of their unusual longevity, a better understanding of deep sea coral ecology and their interrelationships with associated benthic communities is needed to inform coherent international conservation strategies for these important deep-sea ecosystems.

  20. Evolutionary and ecological genomics in deep-sea organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera Monroy, Santiago

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal vents and coral ecosystems are conspicuous biological hot spots in the deep-sea. These ecosystems face increasing threats from human activities. Having thorough taxonomic inventories as well as understanding ...

  1. atlantic deep sea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    locatedsr2 0967-0645 - see front matter r 2004 Yoder, James S. 17 Abrupt climate change and collapse of deep-sea ecosystems Geosciences Websites Summary: Abrupt climate...

  2. Species-specific bioluminescence facilitates speciation in the deep sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Matthew P.; Holcroft, Nancy I.; Wiley, Edward O.; Sparks, John S.; Smith, William Leo

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vast darkness of the deep sea is an environment with few obvious genetic isolating barriers, and little is known regarding the macroevolutionary processes that have shaped present-day biodiversity in this habitat. ...

  3. Selected biological investigations on deep sea disposal of industrial wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, Sandra Lea

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SELECTED SIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS ON DEEP SEA DISPOSAL OF INDUSTRIAL WASTES A Thesis by SANDRA LEA PAGE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1975 Major Subject: Civil Engineering SELECTED BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS ON DEEP SEA DISPOSAL OF INDUSTRIAL WASTES A Thesis by SANDRA LEA PAGE Approved as to style and content by: ((chairman of Committee) / / (Head of Department) bger...

  4. 2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project- and Ocean Drilling Program Services on behalf of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program September 2007 #12;#12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which in February 2007 contained

  5. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Gulfstream I measurements of the Kuwait oil-fire plume, July--August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busness, K M; Hales, J M; Hannigan, R V; Thorp, J M; Tomich, S D; Warren, M J [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Al-Sunaid, A A [Saudi ARAMCO, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Daum, P H; Mazurek, M [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a series of aircraft measurements to determine pollutant and radiative properties of the smoke plume from oil fires in Kuwait. This work was sponsored by the US Department emanating of Energy, in cooperation with several other agencies as part of an extensive effort coordinated by the World Meteorological Organization, to obtain a comprehensive data set to assess the characteristics of the plume and its environmental impact. This report describes field measurement activities and introduces the various data collected, but provides only limited analyses of these data. Results of further data analyses will be presented in subsequent open-literature publications.

  6. Morphology and seismic stratigraphy of the Toyama deep sea fan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, David Barton

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) was obtained from the Geodynamics Research Institute at Texas A&M University, and along with additional data obtained from NAVOCEANO, provided significant control for mapping in the study area (Figure 9). The GSJ.... C. Hilde The Toyama Deep Sea Fan, a contemporary depositional feature located in the Japan Sea, is a canyon-fed elongate fan system with pronounced lobes in both the Yamato and Japan Basins. The Toyama Fan is the eighth largest modern fan system...

  7. Quantitative evaluation of bioturbation on the deep sea floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guinasso, Norman Louis

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Bowen (1973) reported measurements of plutonium in six cores taken in 1969 through 1971 in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterran- ean Sea. Measurable amounts of plutonium were found at depths of the order of 10 cm below the surface in five of these cores... between 1 and 10 cd kyr r by invoking the assumption that mixing is proportional to biomass. Plutonium distributions in deep sea sedi- ments (Noshkin and Bowcn, 1973) indicate abyssal mixing rates ranging from 100-400 cmP kyr r . AC KN OWLE DGEMEN TS...

  8. Patterns of Nitrogen Utilization in Deep-Sea Syntrophic Consortia (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wiegel, Detlef

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Victoria Orphan from Caltech discusses "Patterns of nitrogen utilization in deep-sea syntrophic consortia" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  9. Design study of the deep-sea reactor X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iida, Hiromasa (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)); Ishizaka, Yuichi (Mitsubishi Atomic Power Industries, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)); Kim, Y.C.; Yamaguchi, Chouichi (Japan Research Inst., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deep-sea reactor X (DRX) is a small nuclear plant designed to provide undersea power sources. It has the full advantages of nuclear reactors and can provide large power capacity and does not require oxygen for power production. An application conceivable in the near future is that for a submersible. The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is conducting a design study of a 150-kW(electric) DRX plant for a deep-sea research vessel. It has a so-called integrated pressurized water reactor,'' having a steam generator inside the reactor vessel. A pressure shell includes a turbine and a generator as well as a reactor vessel, resulting in a very compact electricity producing plant. It should be easy to operate and have high passive safety characteristics; namely, a short startup time, good reactor response to power demand changes, and passive core flooding and decay heat removal in case of an accident. Transient analyses including those for load follow-up, reactor startup, and accidents have been conducted. The results show that the DRX has excellent inherent characteristics satisfying those requirements.

  10. Movement of Deep-Sea Coral Populations on Climatic Timescales 3.1 ABSTRACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    the distributions and rates of deep-water mass shifts during times of past climate change has largely been informed by several millennial scale rapid climate change events. Here we investigate the ecological response of deep-sea coral communities to both glaciation and rapid climate change. We find that the deep-sea coral

  11. Climate change, body size evolution, and Cope's Rule in deep-sea ostracodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Kaustuv

    Climate change, body size evolution, and Cope's Rule in deep-sea ostracodes Gene Hunt* and Kaustuv­Bergmann hypothesis using the fossil record of body size evolution in the deep-sea ostracode genus Poseidonamicus information on the PNAS web site). This temperature depen- dence, when combined with the rich fossil record

  12. Deep-sea vent -proteobacterial genomes provide insights into emergence of pathogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    % of the human population is infected by Helicobacter pylori, which causes gastric ulcer and cancer (12, Helicobacter and Campylobacter species. The deep-sea vent -proteobacterial genomes encode for multiple systems

  13. Radiocarbon in the Weddell Sea as observed in a deep-sea coral and in Krill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Robert L; Druffel, Ellen M

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    isotopic growth record in a reef coral from the Florida keysand a deep-sea coral from Blake Plateau, Science, thelower Suess. in banded corals: Conclusions Weddell of meters

  14. Food of deep-sea demersal fishes of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rayburn, Ralph

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOOD OF DEEP-SEA DEMERSAL FISHES OF THE NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by RALPH RAXBURN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1975... Major Subject: Oceanography FOOD OF DEEP-SEA DEMERSAL FISHES OF THE NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by RALPH RAYBURN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairma of C ittee (Head of Departmen (Member) (Member) May 1975 ABSTRACT Food...

  15. New insights into microbial responses to oil spills from the Deepwater Horizon incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, O.U.; Hazen, T.C.

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 20, 2010, a catastrophic eruption of methane caused the Deepwater Horizon exploratory drill rig drilling the Macondo Well in Mississippi Canyon Block 252 (MC252) to explode. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill was unprecendeted for several reasons: the volume of oil released; the spill duration; the well depth; the distance from the shore-line (77 km or about 50 miles); the type of oil (light crude); and the injection of dispersant directly at the wellhead. This study clearly demonstrated that there was a profound and significant response by certain members of the in situ microbial community in the deep-sea in the Gulf of Mexico. In particular putative hydrocarbon degrading Bacteria appeared to bloom in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, even though the temperature at these depths is never >5 C. As the plume aged the shifts in the microbial community on a temporal scale suggested that different, yet metabolically important members of the community were able to respond to a myriad of plume constituents, e.g. shifting from propane/ethane to alkanes and finally to methane. Thus, the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in the plume by Bacteria was a highly significant process in the natural attenuation of many compounds released during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

  16. Posted on Sat, Jun. 19, 2010 Oil plumes invade a dark, mysterious world at Gulf's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    1980s, which led the federal government -- and in particular the Minerals Management Service globules of toxic oil could also enter the food chain, contaminating it as the material falls on the reefs

  17. Formation of seep bubble plumes in the Coal Oil Point seep field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifer, Ira; Culling, Daniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil Point, California. Mar Petrol Geol 22:569–578 Winkel ES,methane exhalations. Mar Petrol Geol 22:579–590 Kvenvoldenunconsolidated sediment. Mar Petrol Geol 22:551–568 Leifer

  18. Potential export of unattached benthic macroalgae to the deep sea through wind-driven Langmuir circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burdige, David

    Potential export of unattached benthic macroalgae to the deep sea through wind-driven Langmuir; revised 24 November 2008; accepted 14 January 2009; published 18 February 2009. [1] Carbon export export of >7 Â 1010 g of carbon. This is equivalent to the daily carbon flux of phytoplankton biomass

  19. Response of deep-sea CaCO3 sedimentation to Atlantic meridional overturning circulation shutdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chikamoto, Megumi O.

    Response of deep-sea CaCO3 sedimentation to Atlantic meridional overturning circulation shutdown of the preservation and burial of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in deep ocean sediments and associated atmospheric pCO2 significantly decreases the CaCO3 content in North Atlantic sediments. This is a consequence of a decrease

  20. Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 211243 On the Atlantic inflow to the Caribbean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fratantoni, David

    Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 211­243 On the Atlantic inflow to the Caribbean Sea William E. Johnsa description of the mean inflow distribution in the passages connecting the Atlantic Ocean with the Caribbean Sea. The total Caribbean inflow of 28 Sv is shown to be partitioned approximately equally between

  1. Sustainability of deep-sea fisheries Elliott A. Norse a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekeland, Ivar

    around the world have collapsed, industrial fishing has spread seaward and deeper in pursuit of the last is by far the largest but least productive part of the oceans, although in very limited places fish biomass can be very high. Most deep-sea fishes have life histories giving them far less population resilience

  2. Deep-Sea Coral Evidence for Rapid Change in Ventilation of the Deep North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adkins, Jess F.

    Deep-Sea Coral Evidence for Rapid Change in Ventilation of the Deep North Atlantic 15,400 Years Ago radiocarbon and thorium-230 dates from benthic coral species reveal that the ventilation rate of the North to interstadials of longer dura- tion (5). One problem has been that the time resolution of sediments is limited

  3. Metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and single cell genomics reveal functional response of active Oceanospirillales to Gulf oil spill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Olivia U.; Hazen, Terry C.; Borglin, Sharon; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Dubinsky, Eric A.; Fortney, Julian L.; Han, James; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Hultman, Jenni; Lamendella, Regina; Mackelprang, Rachel; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tom, Lauren M.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Woyke, Tanja; Zhou, Jizhong; Rubin, Edward M.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume that caused a shift in the indigenous microbial community composition with unknown ecological consequences. Early in the spill history, a bloom of uncultured, thus uncharacterized, members of the Oceanospirillales was previously detected, but their role in oil disposition was unknown. Here our aim was to determine the functional role of the Oceanospirillales and other active members of the indigenous microbial community using deep sequencing of community DNA and RNA, as well as single-cell genomics. Shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing revealed that genes for motility, chemotaxis and aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation were significantly enriched and expressed in the hydrocarbon plume samples compared with uncontaminated seawater collected from plume depth. In contrast, although genes coding for degradation of more recalcitrant compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified in the metagenomes, they were expressed at low levels, or not at all based on analysis of the metatranscriptomes. Isolation and sequencing of two Oceanospirillales single cells revealed that both cells possessed genes coding for n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. Specifically, the near-complete pathway for cyclohexane oxidation in the Oceanospirillales single cells was elucidated and supported by both metagenome and metatranscriptome data. The draft genome also included genes for chemotaxis, motility and nutrient acquisition strategies that were also identified in the metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. These data point towards a rapid response of members of the Oceanospirillales to aliphatic hydrocarbons in the deep sea.

  4. Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 1307 Erratum to ``On the Atlantic inflow to the Caribbean Sea''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 1307 Erratum Erratum to ``On the Atlantic inflow to the Caribbean Sea is printed below. Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience caused. Fig. 14. Comparison of Caribbean

  5. Spatial and temporal population genetics at deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise and Galápagos Rift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusaro, Abigail Jean

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecological processes at deep-sea hydrothermal vents on fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are punctuated by frequent physical disturbance. Larval dispersal among disjunct vent sites facilitates the persistence of sessile ...

  6. Microbial Manganese(II) oxidation : biogeochemistry of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume, enzymatic mechanism, and genomic perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dick, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2738. Cowen J. P. and Bruland K. W. (1985) Metal depositsLanding W. M. and Bruland K. W. (1987) The contrastingopen ocean (Landing and Bruland, 1987) or some hydrothermal

  7. Microbial Manganese(II) oxidation : biogeochemistry of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume, enzymatic mechanism, and genomic perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dick, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mn(II) oxidation. Near the Mox-1 region there is a predictedCu-binding regions. In the Mox-2 region there is a permeasethat are duplicated in both Mox regions include several

  8. Organic-rich sediments in ventilated deep-sea environments: Relationship to climate, sea level, and trophic changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Organic-rich sediments in ventilated deep-sea environments: Relationship to climate, sea level, and trophic changes P. Bertrand,1 T. F. Pedersen,2 R. Schneider,3 G. Shimmield,4 E. Lallier-Verges,5 J. R. [1] Sediments on the Namibian Margin in the SE Atlantic between water depths of $1000 and $3600 m

  9. Deep-Sea Research II 54 (2007) 789796 The Leeuwin Current and its eddies: An introductory overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep-Sea Research II 54 (2007) 789­796 The Leeuwin Current and its eddies: An introductory overview 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Mesoscale eddy; Leeuwin Current; Leeuwin Undercurrent December 2006; accepted 24 December 2006 Available online 21 June 2007 Abstract The Leeuwin Current (LC

  10. Deep-Sea Research I 51 (2004) 12451274 Carbon fluxes through food webs of the eastern equatorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, George

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep-Sea Research I 51 (2004) 1245­1274 Carbon fluxes through food webs of the eastern equatorial inverse and network analyses to examine food web interactions at 0 , 140 W during EqPac time approach allowed us to trace the pathway of fixed carbon through a representative food web

  11. The transcriptional landscape of the deep-sea bacterium Photobacterium profundum in both a toxR mutant and its parental strain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campanaro, Stefano; Pascale, Fabio; Telatin, Andrea; Schiavon, Riccardo; Bartlett, Douglas H; Valle, Giorgio

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    involved in the biosynthesis of riboflavin. The biologicallythiamin (vitamin B1) and riboflavin (vitamin B2) are TPP anda possible role of riboflavin in deep-sea adaptation. P.

  12. Study: Exposure to crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon disaster causes swimming deficiencies in juvenile mahi mahi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosell, Martin

    , the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill also had profound impacts on the open ocean and deep sea environmentStudy: Exposure to crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon disaster causes swimming deficiencies in juvenile mahi mahi Posted on June 12, 2014 by Bob Berwyn Evidence is mounting that BP's oil harmed millions

  13. A View of Antarctic Ice-Sheet Evolution from Sea-Level and Deep-Sea Isotope Changes During the Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, K. G.; Wright, J. D.; Katz, M. E.; Browning, J. V.; Cramer, B. S.; Wade, Bridget S.; Mizintseva, S. F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Proceedings of the 10th International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.3133/of2007-1047.kp06 A View of Antarctic Ice-Sheet Evolution from Sea-Level and Deep-Sea Isotope Changes During the Late...

  14. Deep-Sea Research, Vol . 25, pp . 589 to 604 0011-7471,78 N701-0589 80200/0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jumars, Pete

    (82%) of polychaetes, however, appear regularly to inhabit the uppermost centimeter of sediments, suggesting a refinement of current bioturbation models . INTRODUCTION SPATIAL patterns of variation for the observed patterns . In the-former context, the dispersion patterns of deep-sea benthic populations have

  15. Remote sensing in marine environment - acquiring, processing, and interpreting GLORIA sidescan sonor images of deep sea floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, D.W.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey's remote sensing instrument for regional imaging of the deep sea floor (> 400 m water depth) is the GLORIA (Geologic Long-Range Inclined Asdic) sidescan sonar system, designed and operated by the British Institute of Oceanographic Sciences. A 30-sec sweep rate provides for a swath width of approximately 45 km, depending on water depth. The return signal is digitally recorded as 8 bit data to provide a cross-range pixel dimension of 50 m. Postcruise image processing is carried out by using USGS software. Processing includes precision water-column removal, geometric and radiometric corrections, and contrast enhancement. Mosaicking includes map grid fitting, concatenation, and tone matching. Seismic reflection profiles, acquired along track during the survey, are image correlative and provide a subsurface dimension unique to marine remote sensing. Generally GLORIA image interpretation is based on brightness variations which are largely a function of (1) surface roughness at a scale of approximately 1 m and (2) slope changes of more than about 4/degrees/ over distances of at least 50 m. Broader, low-frequency changes in slope that cannot be detected from the Gloria data can be determined from seismic profiles. Digital files of bathymetry derived from echo-sounder data can be merged with GLORIA image data to create relief models of the sea floor for geomorphic interpretation of regional slope effects.

  16. Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Waste oils offer a tremendous recycling potential. An important, dwindling natural resource of great economic and industrial value, oil products are a cornerstone of our modern industrial society. Petroleum is processed into a wide variety of products: gasoline, fuel oil, diesel oil, synthetic rubber, solvents, pesticides, synthetic fibres, lubricating oil, drugs and many more ' (see Figure 1 1. The boilers of Amercian industries presently consume about 40 % of the used lubricating oils collected. In Ontario, the percentage varies from 20 to 30%. Road oiling is the other major use of collected waste oils. Five to seven million gallons (50-70 % of the waste oil col1ected)is spread on dusty Ontario roads each summer. The practice is both a wasteful use of a dwindling resource and an environmental hazard. The waste oil, with its load of heavy metals, particularly lead, additives including dangerous polynuclear aromatics and PCBs, is carried into the natural environment by runoff and dust to contaminate soils and water courses.2 The largest portion of used oils is never collected, but disappears into sewers, landfill sites and backyards. In Ontario alone, approximately 22 million gallons of potentially recyclable lube oil simply vanish each year. While oil recycling has ad-114 Oil

  17. The Influence of deep-sea bed CO2 sequestration on small metazoan (meiofaunal) community structure and function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carman, Kevin R; Fleeger, John W; Thistle, David

    2013-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We conducted a series of experiments in Monterey Submarine Canyon to examine potential ecological impacts of deep-ocean CO2 sequestration. Our focus was on responses of meiofaunal invertebrates (< 1 mm body length) living within the sediment at depths ranging between 3000-3600 m. Our particular emphasis was on harpacticoid copepods and nematodes. In the first phase of our DOE funding, we reported findings that suggest substantial (~80%) mortality to harpacticoid copepods. In the second phase of our funding we published additional findings from phase one and conducted follow-up experiments in the Monterey Canyon and in the laboratory. In one experiment we looked for evidence that meiofauna seek to escape areas where CO2 concentrations are elevated. �Emergence traps� near the source of the CO2-rich seawater caught significantly more harpacticoids than those far from it. The harpacticoids apparently attempted to escape from the advancing front of carbon dioxide-rich seawater and therefore presumably found exposure to it to be stressful. Although most were adversely affected, species differed significantly in the degree of their susceptibility. Unexpectedly, six species showed no effect and may be resistant. The hypothesis that harpacticoids could escape the effects of carbon dioxide-rich seawater by moving deeper into the seabed was not supported. Exposure to carbon dioxide-rich seawater created partially defaunated areas, but we found no evidence that disturbance-exploiting harpacticoid species invaded during the recovery of the affected area. Based on a detailed analysis of nematode biovolumes, we postulated that the nematode community in Monterey Canyon throughout the upper 3 cm suffered a high rate of mortality after exposure to CO2, and that nematodes were larger because postmortem expansions in body length and width occurred. Decomposition rates were probably low and corpses did not disintegrate in 30 days. The observable effects of a reduction in pH to about 7.0 after 30 days were as great as an extreme pH reduction (5.4), suggesting that �moderate� CO2 exposure, compared to the range of exposures possible following CO2 release, causes high mortality rates in the two most abundant sediment-dwelling metazoans (nematodes and copepods). While we found evidence for negative impacts on deep-sea benthos, we also observed that small-scale experiments with CO2 releases were difficult to replicate in the deep sea. Specifically, in one CO2-release experiment in the Monterey Canyon we did not detect an adverse impacts on benthic meiofauan. In laboratory experiments, we manipulated seawater acidity by addition of HCl and by increasing CO2 concentration and observed that two coastal harpacticoid copepod species were both more sensitive to increased acidity when generated by CO2. Copepods living in environments more prone to hypercapnia, such as mudflats, may be less sensitive to future acidification. Ocean acidification is also expected to alter the toxicity of waterborne metals by influencing their speciation in seawater. CO2 enrichment did not affect the free-ion concentration of Cd but did increase the free-ion concentration of Cu. Antagonistic toxicities were observed between CO2 with Cd, Cu and Cu free-ion. This interaction could be due to a competition for H+ and metals for binding sites.

  18. Polychaete Annelid Dynamics in the Northern Gulf of Mexico, From Shallow Water to the Deep-Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Fangyuan

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Polychaete annelids dominated the macrobenthos in sediments located 5 to 9 km from the Deep Water Horizon (DWH) Oil Spill site five months after the event. Numbers of species, abundance, and biodiversity indices in the polychaete taxa were...

  19. OIL IN THE OPEN WATER Oil in the open water may a ect the health of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OIL IN THE OPEN WATER Oil in the open water may a ect the health of microscopic plants and animals. Far beneath the surface, corals and other deepwater communities might also be a ected. OIL AND HUMAN AND SEDIMENTS · Water quality surveys · Transect surveys to detect submerged oil · Oil plume modeling · Sediment

  20. Configuration studies for a cubic-kilometre deep-sea neutrino telescope - KM3NeT - with NESSY, a fast and flexible approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Carr; D. Dornic; F. Jouvenot; G. Maurin; for the KM3NeT consortium

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical predictions for neutrino fluxes indicate that km$^{3}$ scale detectors are needed to detect certain astrophysical sources. The three Mediterranean experiments, ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR are working together on a design study, KM3NeT, for a large deep-sea neutrino telescope. A detector placed in the Mediterranean Sea will survey a large part of the Galactic disc, including the Galactic Centre. It will complement the IceCube telescope currently under construction at the South Pole. Furthermore, the improved optical properties of sea water, compared to Antarctic ice, will allow a better angular resolution and hence better background rejection. The main work presented in this paper is to evaluate different km$^{3}$ scale detector geometries in order to optimize the muon neutrino sensitivity between 1 and 100 TeV. For this purpose, we have developed a detailed simulation based on the {\\it Mathematica} software - for the muon track production, the light transmission in water, the environmental background and the detector response. To compare different geometries, we have mainly used the effective neutrino area obtained after the full standard reconstruction chain.}

  1. Plume measurement system (plumes) calibration experiment. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohrmann, A.; Huhta, C.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Measurement of Entrainment and Transport work unit under the Dredging Research Program's Technical Area 1, entitled' Analysis of Dredged Material Placed in Open Water,' developed the PLUmes MEasurement System (PLUMES) to monitor the transport of suspended sediment from dredging and dredged material disposal operations. This acoustic system can monitor nearly synoptically, both horizontally and vertically. To determine the relationship between PLUMES acoustic measurements and suspended sediment concentrations, a laboratory sediment calibration experiment was conducted. The experiment studied acoustic backscattering from particles equivalent in size to those commonly found at dredging and dredged material disposal sites. These particles were suspended in a calibration chamber built for the study. The experiment showed that backscatterance could be predicted and concentrations calculated using Rayleigh scattering theory and an acoustic calibration of PLUMES. This report describes the experiment and the results of the experiment. Data from each calibration run are presented in the Appendices.

  2. In situ ore formation experiment: Amino acids and amino sugars trapped in artificial chimneys on deep-sea hydrothermal systems at Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takano,; Marumo,; K.,; Ebashi,; T.,; Gupta,; P., L; Kawahata,; H.,; Kobayashi,; K.,; Yamagishi,; A.,; Kuwabara,; T,

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study reports on the bio-organic composition of a deep-sea venting hydrothermal system originating from arc volcanism; the origin of the particulates in hydrothermal fluids from the Suiyo Seamount in the southern Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) Arc is discussed with regard to amino compounds. Chimney samples on deep-sea hydrothermal systems and core samples at Suiyo Seamount were determined for amino acids, and occasionally amino sugars. Two types of chimney samples were obtained from active hydrothermal systems by submersible vehicles: one was natural chimney (NC) on a hydrothermal natural vent; the other was artificial chimneys (AC), mainly formed by the growth and deposition of sulfide-rich particulate components in a Kuwabara-type in situ incubator (KI incubator). Total hydrolyzed amino acids (THAA) and hydrolyzed hexosamines (HA) in AC ranged from 10.7 nmol/g to 64.0 nmol/g and from 0 nmol/g to 8.1 nmol/g, respectively, while THAA in hydrothermally altered core samples ranged from 26.0 nmol/g to 107.4 ...

  3. EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

  4. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammer, J.H.

    1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described of generating power at a situs exposed to the solar wind which comprises creating at separate sources at the situs discrete plasma plumes extending in opposed directions, providing electrical communication between the plumes at their source and interposing a desired electrical load in the said electrical communication between the plumes.

  5. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammer, James H. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

  6. OIL IN THE OPEN WATER microscopic plants and animals that form the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OIL IN THE OPEN WATER microscopic plants and animals that form the basis of the oceanic food web the surface, corals and other deepwater OIL AND HUMAN USE Wellhead CORALS · Coral surveys · Tissue collections · Transect surveys to detect submerged oil · Oil plume modeling · Sediment sampling AQUATIC VEGETATION

  7. Gulf oil spill's ripples still a worry Warranted or not, disaster fears loom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Gulf oil spill's ripples still a worry Warranted or not, disaster fears loom BY JIM WAYMER from the nation's worst-ever oil mess. Oceanographers want to know the paths of underwater oil plumes. Biologists wonder if nesting sea turtles that accidentally gulped oil will lay viable eggs or whether eggs

  8. Field determination of dispersivity of comingling plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Van Alan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This gives a wor king basis to extend the same style analysis to a real mass distribution. The real analysis is carried out upon a landfill leachate plume emanating from the Babylon Landfill occurring in Long Island, New York. The plume is described... of Iteration Diagrams Ideal Plume Parameter Determination. Sensitivity Analysis for Iteration Diagrams. PHYSICAL FRAMEWORK FOR REAL ANALYSIS. Description of Landfill. Chemistry of Leachate. Hydrogeology of Babylon Site Well Control Three Dimensional...

  9. Plume detachment from a magnetic nozzle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deline, Christopher A. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, Boris N.; Tushentsov, Mikhail R. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Jones, Jonathan E.; Chavers, D. Greg; Dobson, Chris C. [Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35805 (United States); Schuettpelz, Branwen M. [University of Alabama at Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-powered electric propulsion thrusters utilizing a magnetized plasma require that plasma exhaust detach from the applied magnetic field in order to produce thrust. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating that a sufficiently energetic and flowing plasma can indeed detach from a magnetic nozzle. Microwave interferometer and probe measurements provide plume density, electron temperature, and ion flux measurements in the nozzle region. Measurements of ion flux show a low-beta plasma plume which follows applied magnetic field lines until the plasma kinetic pressure reaches the magnetic pressure and a high-beta plume expanding ballistically afterward. Several magnetic configurations were tested including a reversed field nozzle configuration. Despite the dramatic change in magnetic field profile, the reversed field configuration yielded little measurable change in plume trajectory, demonstrating the plume is detached. Numerical simulations yield density profiles in agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill By Ed Killer Saturday, June 12 like if touched by an underwater plume of oil. No doubt, much of it would be gone forever. Reed inhabiting the reefs, Reed hoped the oil would not be swept around the tip of Florida and onto the fragile

  11. A modeling of buoyant gas plume migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic time, eventually dissolves in the formation brine and remains trapped by mineralization. However, one of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is that naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even in a supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the formation brine. Buoyancy tends to drive the leaked CO{sub 2} plume upward. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution and migration, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for safe carbon dioxide geologic sequestration. In this study, we obtain simple estimates of vertical plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. We describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases by a Buckley-Leverett type model. The model predicts that a plume of supercritical carbon dioxide in a homogeneous water-saturated porous medium does not migrate upward like a bubble in bulk water. Rather, it spreads upward until it reaches a seal or until it becomes immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration (Silin et al., 2007). In a layered reservoir, the simplified solution predicts a slower plume front propagation relative to a homogeneous formation with the same harmonic mean permeability. In contrast, the model yields much higher plume propagation estimates in a high-permeability conduit like a vertical fracture.

  12. Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in deep-sea deposits, heavy oils, and tar sands. Ominously,Includes crude oil, light products, and heavy products.

  13. Smoke-plume distributions above large-scale fires: Implications for simulations of ''nuclear winter''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, J.E.; Haselman L. Jr.; Edwards, L.L.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smoke from raging fires produced in the aftermath of a major nuclear exchange has been predicted to cause large decreases in surface temperatures. However, the extent of the decrease and even the sign of the temperature change depend on how the smoke is distributed with altitude. We present a model capable of evaluating the initial distribution of lofted smoke above a massive fire. Calculations are shown for a two-dimensional slab version of the model and a full three-dimensional version. The model has been evaluated by simulating smoke heights for the Hamburg firestorm of 1943, and a smaller-scale oil fire which occurred in Long Beach in 1958. Our plume heights for these fires are compared to those predicted by the classical Morton-Taylor-Turner theory for weakly buoyant plumes. We consider the effect of the added buoyancy caused by condensation of waterladen ground level air being carried to high altitude with the convection column, as well as the effects of background wind on the calculated smoke plume heights for several fire intensities. We find that the rise height of the plume depends on the assumed background atmospheric conditions, as well as the fire intensity.

  14. Ablation Plume Dynamics in a Background Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoruso, Salvatore [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Schou, Joergen [Deparment of Photonics Engineering, Risoe Campus, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Lunney, James G. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The expansion of a plume in a background gas of pressure comparable to that used in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been analyzed in terms of the model of Predtechensky and Mayorov (PM). This approach gives a relatively clear and simple description of the essential hydrodynamics during the expansion. The model also leads to an insightful treatment of the stopping behavior in dimensionless units for plumes and background gases of different atomic/molecular masses. The energetics of the plume dynamics can also be treated with this model. Experimental time-of-flight data of silver ions in a neon background gas show a fair agreement with predictions from the PM-model. Finally we discuss the validity of the model, if the work done by the pressure of the background gas is neglected.

  15. ANTARES deep sea neutrino telescope results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangano, Salvatore [IFIC - Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Edificio Institutos de Investigatión, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Collaboration: ANTARES Collaboration

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ANTARES experiment is currently the largest underwater neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. It is taking high quality data since 2007. Its main scientific goal is to search for high energy neutrinos that are expected from the acceleration of cosmic rays from astrophysical sources. This contribution reviews the status of the detector and presents several analyses carried out on atmospheric muons and neutrinos. For example it shows the results from the measurement of atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum and of atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters as well as searches for neutrinos from steady cosmic point-like sources, for neutrinos from gamma ray bursts and for relativistic magnetic monopoles.

  16. Buoyant plumes with inertial and chemical reaction-driven forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Stephen W.

    . The forced plumes were compositionally buoy- ant and were injected with inertial forcing into a fluid filled power law relationship that explains their ascent velocity. However, the morphology of the plume heads

  17. Colloid Formation at Waste Plume Fronts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Saiz, Eduardo; Larsen, Joern T.; Zheng, Zuoping; Couture, Rex A.

    2004-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly saline and caustic tank waste solutions containing radionuclides and toxic metals have leaked into sediments at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities such as the Hanford Site (Washington State). Colloid transport is frequently invoked to explain migration of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface. To understand colloid formation during interactions between highly reactive fluids and sediments and its impact on contaminant transport, we simulated tank waste solution (TWS) leakage processes in laboratory columns at ambient and elevated (70 C) temperatures. We found that maximum formation of mobile colloids occurred at the plume fronts (hundreds to thousands times higher than within the plume bodies or during later leaching). Concentrations of suspended solids were as high as 3 mass%, and their particle-sizes ranged from tens of nm to a few {micro}m. Colloid chemical composition and mineralogy depended on temperature. During infiltration of the leaked high Na{sup +} waste solution, rapid and completed Na{sup +} replacement of exchangeable Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} from the sediment caused accumulation of these divalent cations at the moving plume front. Precipitation of supersaturated Ca{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+}-bearing minerals caused dramatic pH reduction at the plume front. In turn, the reduced pH caused precipitation of other minerals. This understanding can help predict the behavior of contaminant trace elements carried by the tank waste solutions, and could not have been obtained through conventional batch studies.

  18. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guennou, Chloé; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) 10 eV). We have used EIS spectroscopic observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over an ~24 hour period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we have used a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We have used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we have estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These res...

  19. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression for the non-decaying tracer. If the power-law equation for the median dilution factor, Df, based on a non-decaying tracer has the general form Df=a?×t?^(-b) for time t after the release event, then the equation has the form Df=e^(-?t)×a×t^(-b) for a radioactive isotope, where ? is the decay constant for the isotope.

  20. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  1. Deepwater Horizon Study Finds Crude Oil Harmful to Bluefin, Yellowfin Tuna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosell, Martin

    , as a large plume of smoke rises from fires on BP's Deepwater Horizon offshore oil rig. Image: Gerald Herbert Deepwater Horizon oil spill caused malformations in developing hearts of yellowfin and bluefin tuna the Deepwater Horizon spill. An Atlantic bluefin tuna. Image: Wikimedia Commons #12;They found a variety

  2. Plume dynamics in femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, T.; Lunney, J. G. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Amoruso, S.; Bruzzese, R.; Wang, X. [Coherentia CNR-INFM and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Fedrico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126, Napoli (Italy)

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In femtosecond laser ablation the plume has two components: a faster-moving plasma part and a slower nanoparticle plume which contains most of the ablated material. This paper describes the results of experiments to comprehensively characterize the plume in laser ablation of Ni with {approx_equal}300 fs pulses at 527 nm. Both single-pulse and double-pulse irradiation was used. The laser ablation depth was measured using white light interferometry. The dynamics of the plasma part of the ablation plume was measured using Langmuir ion probes. The shape of the overall ablation plume was recorded by depositing a thin film on a transparent substrate and measuring the thickness distribution. The expansion of the plasma plume is well described by the Anismov isentropic model of plume expansion. Just above the ablation threshold, the nanoparticle plume is also well described by the Anisimov expansion model. However, at higher fluence a wider plume is formed, perhaps due to the pressure exerted by plasma. For double-pulse ablation it is observed that as the second pulse is delayed beyond {approx_equal}20 ps the ablation depth is reduced and the ion yield is increased. This behaviour is due to reheating of the nascent plasma plume produced by the first pulse. This generates a pressure pulse that acts as a tamper which impedes the fragmentation and ablation of deeper layers of material.

  3. Entrainment in two coalescing axisymmetric turbulent plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cenedese, Claudia; Linden, P. F.

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    process in environmental and indus- trial applications. The air circulation in a ventilated enclosure with multiple heat sources, e.g. offices with electronic equipment and humans, is regulated by the dynamics of tur- bulent buoyant plumes that rise... ridges from hydrothermal vents (Baker et al. 1995; Speer & Rona 1989) and they are occasionally observed to coalesce. Coastal cities often discharge their partially treated waste waters at the bottom of the ocean via an outfall. Ocean outfall design...

  4. Hydrate-phobic surfaces: fundamental studies in clathrate hydrate adhesion reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, J. David

    Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for deep-sea oil and gas operations. Current methods for hydrate mitigation are expensive and energy ...

  5. EVALUATION OF NATURAL AND IN-SITU REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR A COAL-RELATED METALS PLUME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Jeffrey A.; Bayer, Cassandra L.; Socha, Ronald P.; Sochor,Cynthia S.; Fliermans, Carl B.; McKinsey, Pamela C.; Millings, Margaret R.; Phifer, Mark A.; Powell, Kimberly R.; Serkiz, Steven M.; Sappington, Frank C.; Turick, Charles E.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Metals contamination exceeding drinking water standards (MCLs) is associated with acidic leachate generated from a coal pile runoff basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The metals plume extends over 100 acres with its' distal boundary about onehalf mile from the Savannah River. Based on the large plume extent and high dissolved iron and aluminum concentrations, conventional treatment technologies are likely to be ineffective and cost prohibitive. In-situ bioremediation using existing groundwater microbes is being evaluated as a promising alternative technology for effective treatment, along with consideration of natural attenuation of the lower concentration portions of the plume to meet remedial goals. Treatment of the high concentration portion of the groundwater plume by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is being evaluated through laboratory microcosm testing and a field-scale demonstration. Organic substrates are added to promote SRB growth. These bacteria use dissolved sulfate as an electron acceptor and ultimately precipitate dissolved metals as metal sulfides. Laboratory microcosm testing indicate SRB are present in groundwater despite low pH conditions, and that their growth can be stimulated by soybean oil and sodium lactate. The field demonstration consists of substrate injection into a 30-foot deep by 240-foot long permeable trench. Microbial activity is demonstrated by an increase in pH from 3 to 6 within the trench. Downgradient monitoring will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of SRB in reducing metal concentrations. Natural attenuation (NA) is being evaluated for the low concentration portion of the plume. A decrease in metal mobility can occur through a variety of abiotically and/or biotically mediated mechanisms. Quantification of these mechanisms is necessary to more accurately predict contaminant attenuation using groundwater transport models that have historically relied on simplified conservative assumptions. Result s from matched soil/porewater samples indicate higher soil/water partition coefficients (Kds) with increasing distance from the source. In addition, site-specific metals availability is being assessed using sequential extraction techniques, which more accurately represent environmental conditions as compared to default EPA extraction methods. Due to elevated sulfate levels in the plume, SRB are most likely to be the dominant biotic contributor to NA processes.

  6. Plume measurement system (PLUMES) technical manual and data analysis procedures. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tubman, M.W.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PLUmes MEasurement System (PLUMES) was developed under the Measurement of Entrainment and Transport work unit, Dredging Research Program Technical Area 1, Analysis of Dredged Material Placed in Open Water, to monitor the transport of suspended sediment from dredging and dredged material disposal operations. This system can monitor the transport nearly synoptically, both horizontally and vertically. This report provides technical information on the overall system, guidance on locating specific information in the standard technical manuals provided by the manufacturers of the individual system components, technical information on special features of the system components not included in the manufacturer`s manuals, information on system operation and deployment procedures, descriptions of the PLUMES software, and information on the data analysis procedures.

  7. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    growth. For data on world oil consumption and long- term oilOil Production Domestic Oil Consumption a variety of

  8. Algorithms and analysis for underwater vehicle plume tracing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Savage, Elizabeth L. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Hurtado, John Edward (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Eskridge, Steven E.

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to develop and demonstrate cooperative 3-D plume tracing algorithms for miniature autonomous underwater vehicles. Applications for this technology include Lost Asset and Survivor Location Systems (L-SALS) and Ship-in-Port Patrol and Protection (SP3). This research was a joint effort that included Nekton Research, LLC, Sandia National Laboratories, and Texas A&M University. Nekton Research developed the miniature autonomous underwater vehicles while Sandia and Texas A&M developed the 3-D plume tracing algorithms. This report describes the plume tracing algorithm and presents test results from successful underwater testing with pseudo-plume sources.

  9. Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Farid, N. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Kozhevin, V. M. [Ioffe Physics Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)] [Ioffe Physics Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

  10. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Northwest Plume interceptor system evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laase, A.D.; Clausen, J.L.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) recently installed an interceptor system consisting of four wells, evenly divided between two well fields, to contain the Northwest Plume. As stated in the Northwest Plume Record of Decision (ROD), groundwater will be pumped at a rate to reduce further contamination and initiate control of the northwest contaminant plume. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the optimum (minimal) well field pumping rates required for plume hotspot containment. Plume hotspot, as defined in the Northwest Plume ROD and throughout this report, is that portion of the plume with trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations greater than 1,000 {micro}g/L. An existing 3-dimensional groundwater model was modified and used to perform capture zone analyses of the north and south interceptor system well fields. Model results suggest that the plume hotspot is not contained at the system design pumping rate of 100 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well field. Rather, the modeling determined that north and south well field pumping rates of 400 and 150 gal/min, respectively, are necessary for plume hotspot containment. The difference between the design and optimal pumping rates required for containment can be attributed to the discovery of a highly transmissive zone in the vicinity of the two well fields.

  11. The Hydrothermal Outflow Plume of Valles Caldera, New Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to mixed fluids flowing in the hydrothermal plume. However, isotopic data, borehole data, basic geology, and inverse relations between temperature and chloride content at...

  12. Investigation of oil injection into brine for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve : hydrodynamics and mixing experiments with SPR liquids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Cote, Raymond O.; Torczynski, John Robert; O'Hern, Timothy John

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental program was conducted to study a proposed approach for oil reintroduction in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The goal was to assess whether useful oil is rendered unusable through formation of a stable oil-brine emulsion during reintroduction of degassed oil into the brine layer in storage caverns. An earlier report (O'Hern et al., 2003) documented the first stage of the program, in which simulant liquids were used to characterize the buoyant plume that is produced when a jet of crude oil is injected downward into brine. This report documents the final two test series. In the first, the plume hydrodynamics experiments were completed using SPR oil, brine, and sludge. In the second, oil reinjection into brine was run for approximately 6 hours, and sampling of oil, sludge, and brine was performed over the next 3 months so that the long-term effects of oil-sludge mixing could be assessed. For both series, the experiment consisted of a large transparent vessel that is a scale model of the proposed oil-injection process at the SPR. For the plume hydrodynamics experiments, an oil layer was floated on top of a brine layer in the first test series and on top of a sludge layer residing above the brine in the second test series. The oil was injected downward through a tube into the brine at a prescribed depth below the oil-brine or sludge-brine interface. Flow rates were determined by scaling to match the ratio of buoyancy to momentum between the experiment and the SPR. Initially, the momentum of the flow produces a downward jet of oil below the tube end. Subsequently, the oil breaks up into droplets due to shear forces, buoyancy dominates the flow, and a plume of oil droplets rises to the interface. The interface was deflected upward by the impinging oil-brine plume. Videos of this flow were recorded for scaled flow rates that bracket the equivalent pumping rates in an SPR cavern during injection of degassed oil. Image-processing analyses were performed to quantify the penetration depth and width of the oil jet. The measured penetration depths were shallow, as predicted by penetration-depth models, in agreement with the assumption that the flow is buoyancy-dominated, rather than momentum-dominated. The turbulent penetration depth model overpredicted the measured values. Both the oil-brine and oil-sludge-brine systems produced plumes with hydrodynamic characteristics similar to the simulant liquids previously examined, except that the penetration depth was 5-10% longer for the crude oil. An unexpected observation was that centimeter-size oil 'bubbles' (thin oil shells completely filled with brine) were produced in large quantities during oil injection. The mixing experiments also used layers of oil, sludge, and brine from the SPR. Oil was injected at a scaled flow rate corresponding to the nominal SPR oil injection rates. Injection was performed for about 6 hours and was stopped when it was evident that brine was being ingested by the oil withdrawal pump. Sampling probes located throughout the oil, sludge, and brine layers were used to withdraw samples before, during, and after the run. The data show that strong mixing caused the water content in the oil layer to increase sharply during oil injection but that the water content in the oil dropped back to less than 0.5% within 16 hours after injection was terminated. On the other hand, the sediment content in the oil indicated that the sludge and oil appeared to be well mixed. The sediment settled slowly but the oil had not returned to the baseline, as-received, sediment values after approximately 2200 hours (3 months). Ash content analysis indicated that the sediment measured during oil analysis was primarily organic.

  13. Stochastic mapping for chemical plume source localization with application to autonomous hydrothermal vent discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakuba, Michael Vavrousek, 1976-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a stochastic mapping framework for autonomous robotic chemical plume source localization in environments with multiple sources. Potential applications for robotic chemical plume source localization ...

  14. A Numerical Study of the Mid-field River Plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Kelly Lynne

    2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Idealized and realistic simulations of the Merrimack River plume on the east coast of the U.S. are performed using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). The effect of discharge, tides and rotation on the evolution of the tidal plume...

  15. Ocean and Plume Science and Management Forum January 24, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was needed on both the table and draft management questions to prepare a package of materials for scientific1 Ocean and Plume Science and Management Forum January 24, 2014 Northwest Power and Conservation of the Ocean and Plume Science and Management Forum and led a round of introductions. The October 24, 2013

  16. SRS reactor stack plume marking tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petry, S.F.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests performed in 105-K in 1987 and 1988 demonstrated that the stack plume can successfully be made visible (i.e., marked) by introducing smoke into the stack breech. The ultimate objective of these tests is to provide a means during an emergency evacuation so that an evacuee can readily identify the stack plume and evacuate in the opposite direction, thus minimizing the potential of severe radiation exposure. The EPA has also requested DOE to arrange for more tests to settle a technical question involving the correct calculation of stack downwash. New test canisters were received in 1988 designed to produce more smoke per unit time; however, these canisters have not been evaluated, because normal ventilation conditions have not been reestablished in K Area. Meanwhile, both the authorization and procedure to conduct the tests have expired. The tests can be performed during normal reactor operation. It is recommended that appropriate authorization and procedure approval be obtained to resume testing after K Area restart.

  17. Calculating the probability of injected carbon dioxide plumes encountering faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, P.D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Division of Oil Gas and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR), 1998.Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR Measure

  18. Crude oil and shale oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrotra, A.K. [Univ. of Calgary (Canada)

    1995-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This year`s review on crude oil and shale oil has been prepared by classifying the references into the following main headings: Hydrocarbon Identification and Characterization, Trace Element Determination, Physical and Thermodynamic Properties, Viscosity, and Miscellaneous Topics. In the two-year review period, the references on shale oils were considerably less in number than those dealing with crude oils. Several new analytical methodologies and applications were reported for hydrocarbon characterization and trace element determination of crude oils and shale oils. Also included in this review are nine U.S., Canadian British and European patents. 12 refs.

  19. A forced baroclinic vortex around a hydorthermal plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, K.G. (Institut Francais de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer, Brest (France))

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A steady, frictional flow around a hydrothermal plume is described which is forced by the entrainment of water into the buoyant part of the plume as it rises above its source. The circulation is anticyclonic (clockwise in the northern hemisphere) near the equilibrium density level or spreading level of plume, and cyclonic below this level. The strength of this flow line is adequate to trap anomalous properties from the hydrothermal fluid near the source in the presence of weak background flow. Some observational support for such a flow is presented.

  20. Time resolved Nomarski interferometery of laser produced plasma plumes P. Hough a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    diagnostic studies of the plasma plume have focussed on late times (>100 ns) in the lifecycle of the plume (lifecycle of the plume as it determines the future lifecycle [12]. We report here a study of electron density profiles in laser generated Zn plasma plumes

  1. Hydrate-phobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jonathan David, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for ultra deep-sea production. Current methods for hydrate mitigation focus on injecting thermodynamic ...

  2. Linking Europa's plume activity to tides, tectonics, and liquid water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoden, Alyssa R; Roth, Lorenz; Retherford, Kurt

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the geologic activity preserved on Europa's icy surface has been attributed to tidal deformation, mainly due to Europa's eccentric orbit. Although the surface is geologically young (30 - 80 Myr), there is little information as to whether tidally-driven surface processes are ongoing. However, a recent detection of water vapor near Europa's south pole suggests that it may be geologically active. Initial observations indicated that Europa's plume eruptions are time-variable and may be linked to its tidal cycle. Saturn's moon, Enceladus, which shares many similar traits with Europa, displays tidally-modulated plume eruptions, which bolstered this interpretation. However, additional observations of Europa at the same time in its orbit failed to yield a plume detection, casting doubt on the tidal control hypothesis. The purpose of this study is to analyze the timing of plume eruptions within the context of Europa's tidal cycle to determine whether such a link exists and examine the inferred similarities and...

  3. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Landfill-Leachate Plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, E. L.; Cifuentes, L. A.; Cozzarelli, I. M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and (2) negligible oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate concentrations. Methane concentrations and stable carbon isotope (?13C) values suggest anaerobic methane oxidation was occurring within the plume and at its margins. Methane ?13C values increased from about...

  4. Integral Model of a Multiphase Plume in Quiescent Stratification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crounse, B. C.

    The writers present a one-dimensional integral model to describe multiphase plumes discharged to quiescent stratified receiving waters. The model includes an empirical submodel for detrainment, and the capability to include ...

  5. Behavior of buoyant moist plumes in turbulent atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Redouane

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A widely applicable computational model of buoyant moist plumes in turbulent atmospheres has been constructed. To achieve this a one dimensional Planetary Boundary Layer (P.B.L.) model has been developed to account for ...

  6. ablation plumes produced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observed jet and plume relationship are discussed. N. -E. Raouafi; G. J. D. Petrie; A. A. Norton; C. J. Henney; S. K. Solanki 2008-06-18 83 Modeling and Control of Steerable...

  7. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

  8. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  9. Stereoscopic Polar Plume Reconstructions from Stereo/Secchi Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, L; Solanki, S K; Wilhelm, K; Wiegelmann, T; Podlipnik, B; Howard, R A; Plunkett, S P; Wuelser, J P; Gan, W Q; 10.1088/0004-637X/700/1/292

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present stereoscopic reconstructions of the location and inclination of polar plumes of two data sets based on the two simultaneously recorded images taken by the EUVI telescopes in the SECCHI instrument package onboard the \\emph{STEREO (Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory)} spacecraft. The ten plumes investigated show a superradial expansion in the coronal hole in 3D which is consistent with the 2D results. Their deviations from the local meridian planes are rather small with an average of $6.47^{\\circ}$. By comparing the reconstructed plumes with a dipole field with its axis along the solar rotation axis, it is found that plumes are inclined more horizontally than the dipole field. The lower the latitude is, the larger is the deviation from the dipole field. The relationship between plumes and bright points has been investigated and they are not always associated. For the first data set, based on the 3D height of plumes and the electron density derived from SUMER/\\emph{SOHO} Si {\\sc viii} line pair, ...

  10. Metagenomic analysis of microbial consortium from natural crude oil that seeps into the marine ecosystem offshore Southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, Erik R.; Piao, Hailan; Scott, Nicole M.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Pagani, Ioanna; Huntemann, Marcel; Chen, Amy; del Rio, Tijana G.; Foster, Brian; Copeland, A.; Jansson, Janet K.; Pati, Amrita; Gilbert, Jack A.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Lorenson, Thomas D.; Hess, Matthias

    2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oils can be major contaminants of the marine ecosystem and microorganisms play a significant role in the degradation of the main constituents of crude oil. To increase our understanding of the microbial hydrocarbon degradation process in the marine ecosystem, we collected crude oil from an active seep area located in the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) and generated a total of about 52 Gb of raw metagenomic sequence data. The assembled data comprised ~500 Mb, representing ~1.1 million genes derived primarily from chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. Members of Oceanospirillales, a bacterial order belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, recruited less than 2% of the assembled genes within the SBC metagenome. In contrast, the microbial community associated with the oil plume that developed in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout in 2010, was dominated by Oceanospirillales, which comprised more than 60% of the metagenomic data generated from the DWH oil plume. This suggests that Oceanospirillales might play a less significant role in the microbially mediated hydrocarbon conversion within the SBC seep oil compared to the DWH plume oil. We hypothesize that this difference results from the SBC oil seep being mostly anaerobic, while the DWH oil plume is aerobic. Within the Archaea, the phylum Euryarchaeota, recruited more than 95% of the assembled archaeal sequences from the SBC oil seep metagenome, with more than 50% of the sequences assigned to members of the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales. These orders contain organisms capable of anaerobic methanogenesis and methane oxidation (AOM) and we hypothesize that these orders and their metabolic capabilities may be fundamental to the ecology of the SBC oil seep.

  11. Calculating the probability of injected carbon dioxide plumes encountering faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, P.D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOGGR), 1998. California Oil and Gas Fields, Volume 1. 507geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basinstructure maps for the oil and gas fields shown on Figure 4.

  12. Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C; Haut, R; Jahn, G; Goldman, J; Colvin, J; Karpinski, A; Dobley, A; Halfinger, J; Nagley, S; Wolf, K; Shapiro, A; Doucette, P; Hansen, P; Oke, A; Compton, D; Cobb, M; Kopps, R; Chitwood, J; Spence, W; Remacle, P; Noel, C; Vicic, J; Dee, R

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operations: (1) PWR = Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor + Lead-Acid Battery; (2) FC1 = Line for Surface O{sub 2} + Well Head Gas + Reformer + PEMFC + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (3) FC2 = Stored O2 + Well Head Gas + Reformer + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (4) SV1 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (5) SV2 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Engine or Turbine + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (6) SV3 = Submersible Vehicle + Charge at Docking Station + ZEBRA & Li-Ion Batteries; (7) PWR TEG = PWR + Thermoelectric Generator + Lead-Acid Battery; (8) WELL TEG = Thermoelectric Generator + Well Head Waste Heat + Lead-Acid Battery; (9) GRID = Ocean Floor Electrical Grid + Lead-Acid Battery; and (10) DOC = Deep Ocean Current + Lead-Acid Battery.

  13. Review Paper/ Crude Oil at the Bemidji Site: 25 Years of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and water flow, vapor diffusion, and the progression of biodegradation. Pore-scale capillary pressure large residual oil saturations. Hydrocarbon attenuation and plume extent was a function of groundwater of ground- water contamination by benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) (Council

  14. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the Venezuelan Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . .and Productivity: Evidence from the Oil Industry . .

  15. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and

  16. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oppenheim, A.K.; Maxson, J.A.; Hensinger, D.M.

    1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure. 24 figures.

  17. Solar coronal plumes and the fast solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwivedi, B N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral profiles of the coronal Ne viii line at 77 nm have different shapes in quiet-Sun regions and coronal holes (CHs). A single Gaussian fit of the line profile provides an adequate approximation in quiet-Sun areas, whereas a strong shoulder on the long-wavelength side is a systematic feature in CHs. Although this has been noticed since 1999, no physical reason for the peculiar shape could be given. In an attempt to identify the cause of this peculiarity, we address three problems that could not be conclusively resolved in a review article by a study team of the International Space Science Institute (ISSI; Wilhelm et al. 2011) : (1) The physical processes operating at the base and inside of plumes as well as their interaction with the solar wind (SW). (2) The possible contribution of plume plasma to the fast SW streams. (3) The signature of the first-ionization potential (FIP) effect between plumes and inter-plume regions (IPRs). Before the spectroscopic peculiarities in IPRs and plumes in polar coron...

  18. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oppenheim, Antoni K. (Kensington, CA); Maxson, James A. (Berkeley, CA); Hensinger, David M. (Albany, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

  19. Ebb Tide Dynamics and Spreading of a Large River Plume4 Ryan M. McCabe*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    and Bruland 2006) since light may be readily8 available. Additionally, plumes provide a method for horizontal

  20. Plume-induced topography and geoid anomalies and their implications for the Tharsis rise on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Shijie

    in influencing long-wave- length gravity anomalies produced by a plume [Zhong, 2002]. Phillips et al. [2001

  1. Nonlinear signal contamination effects for gaseous plume detection in hyperspectral imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theiler, James

    Nonlinear signal contamination effects for gaseous plume detection in hyperspectral imagery James-plume pixels are inadvertently included, then that background characterization will be contaminated. In broad in the scene are off- plume, so some contamination is inevitable. In general, the contaminated background

  2. Using Heat Plumes in Controlled Breathing as Non-Contact Assistive Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Howard E.

    Using Heat Plumes in Controlled Breathing as Non- Contact Assistive Technology Howard E Michel to record the heat plumes associated with different breathing patterns in controlled experiments and then develop computer algorithms to process and characterize these heat plumes. To accomplish this processing

  3. Displaced helium and carbon in the Hawaiian plume Albrecht W. Hofmann a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farnetani, Cinzia G.

    Displaced helium and carbon in the Hawaiian plume Albrecht W. Hofmann a,b, , Cinzia G. Farnetani c 2011 Available online 1 November 2011 Editor: Y. Ricard Keywords: mantle plumes Hawaii helium vertically due to its low density and viscosity and is thus displaced from the plume center. Helium

  4. Ambient gas effects on the dynamics of laser-produced tin plume expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    Ambient gas effects on the dynamics of laser-produced tin plume expansion S. S. Harilal,a Beau O online 28 April 2006 Controlling the debris from a laser-generated tin plume is one of the prime issues radiation can be used for controlling highly energetic particles from the tin plume. We employed a partial

  5. CLOSE ASSOCIATION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SUNSPOT PLUME WITH DEPRESSIONS IN THE SUNSPOT RADIO EMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    a plume in the sunspot umbra on both observing dates. The plume appears brightest in emission lines formed at temperatures between 1:6 Ă? 105 and 5:0 Ă? 105 K. Radio emission from the sunspot umbra is dominated by thermal gyroemission from the plume, which accounts for radio brightness temperatures umbra on both

  6. Particle resuspension in the Columbia River plume near field Emily Y. Spahn,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Particle resuspension in the Columbia River plume near field Emily Y. Spahn,1 Alexander R. Horner are used to investigate the mechanisms of sediment resuspension and entrainment into the plume. An east, the plume is much less stratified during low-discharge conditions, and large resuspension events

  7. Dynamics and internal structure of the Hawaiian plume Cinzia G. Farnetani a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farnetani, Cinzia G.

    Dynamics and internal structure of the Hawaiian plume Cinzia G. Farnetani a, , Albrecht W. Hofmann Available online 1 May 2010 Editor: Y. Ricard Keywords: plume dynamics Hawaii HSDP mantle heterogeneities A thorough understanding of the internal structure of the Hawaiian plume conduit requires to link geochemical

  8. The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing), The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing on the fate of topography, winddriven and eddydriven circulation on the offshore removal of plume waters. A realistically

  9. Entrainment and mixing properties of multiphase plumes: Experimental studies on turbulence and scalar structure of a bubble plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seol, Dong Guan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 xv FIGURE Page 5.2 Sample of PLIF image (a) and thresholded image (b) of a stratifled bubble plume. The dashed lines represent the location of plume center, and upper and lower dotted lines represent the peel and trap heights in sub-plot (b...), respectively. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 5.3 Time series of measured peel and trap heights (a) and spectrum analysis results for the time-series peel/trap heights (b). In sub- plot (b), the shaded area indicates the identical frequency of peel and trap...

  10. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  11. Bioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    (IV) (UO2[s], uraninite) Anthropogenic · Release of mill tailings during uranium mining - MobilizationBioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale Zero-valent Iron Angela Athey Advisers: Dr. Reyes Undergraduate Student Fellowship Program April 15, 2011 #12;Main Sources of Uranium Natural · Leaching from

  12. RESEARCH ARTICLE Optical plume velocimetry: a new flow measurement technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    hydrothermal systems Timothy J. Crone Ă? Russell E. McDuff Ă? William S. D. Wilcock Received: 5 November 2007 that fluid flow rates in mid- ocean ridge hydrothermal systems may be strongly influ- enced by mechanical that are transitioning between jet-like and plume-like behavior. List of symbols A area of jet nozzle, m2 B initial

  13. Recycled dehydrated lithosphere observed in plume-influenced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langmuir, Charles H.

    Recycled dehydrated lithosphere observed in plume-influenced mid-ocean-ridge basalt Jacqueline Eaby the deep mantle through the subduction and recycling of hydrated oceanic lithosphere. Here we address the question of recycling of water into the deep mantle by characterizing the volatile contents of different

  14. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY REACTIONS IN COAL POWER PLANT PLUMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Levin

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Program Area of Interest: No.5--Environmental and Water Resources. The project team includes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) as the contractor and the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and Frontier Geosciences as subcontractors. Wisconsin Energies and its Pleasant Prairie Power Plant acted as host for the field-testing portion of the research. The project is aimed at clarifying the role, rates, and end results of chemical transformations that may occur to mercury that has been emitted from elevated stacks of coal-fired electric power plants. Mercury emitted from power plants emerges in either its elemental, divalent, or particulate-bound form. Deposition of the divalent form is more likely to occur closer to the source than that of the other two forms, due to its solubility in water. Thus, if chemical transformations occur in the stack emissions plume, measurements in the stack may mischaracterize the fate of the material. Initial field and pilot plant measurements have shown significant and rapid chemical reduction of divalent to elemental mercury may occur in these plumes. Mercury models currently assume that the chemical form of mercury occurring in stacks is the same as that which enters the free atmosphere, with no alteration occurring in the emissions plume. Recent data indicate otherwise, but need to be evaluated at full operating scale under field conditions. Prestbo and others have demonstrated the likelihood of significant mercury chemical reactions occurring in power plant plumes (Prestbo et al., 1999; MDNR-PPRP, 2000; EERC, 2001). This experiment will thus increase our understanding of mercury atmospheric chemistry, allowing informed decisions regarding source attribution. The experiment was carried out during the period August 22-September 5, 2003. The experimental site was the Pleasant Prairie Power Plant in Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just west of Kenosha. The experiment involved using an aircraft to capture emissions and document chemistry changes in the plume. While using the airplane for sampling, supplemental fast-response sensors for NOx, connected to data loggers, were used to gauge entry and exit times and transect intervals through plume emissions material. The Frontier Geosciences Static Plume Dilution Chamber (SPDC) was employed simultaneously adjacent to the stack to correlate its findings with the aircraft sampling, as well as providing evaluation of the SPDC as a rapid, less costly sampler for mercury chemistry. A complementary stack plume method, the Dynamic Plume Dilution (DPD) was used in the latter portion of the experiment to measure mercury speciation to observe any mercury reduction reaction with respect to both the reaction time (5 to 30 seconds) and dilution ratio. In addition, stack sampling using the ''Ontario Hydro'' wet chemistry method and continuous mercury monitors (CMM) were used to establish the baseline chemistry in the stack. Comparisons among stack, SPDC, DPD and aircraft measurements allow establishment of whether significant chemical changes to mercury occur in the plume, and of the verisimilitude of the SPDC and DPD methods. This progress report summarizes activities during a period of results review from the stack/aircraft subcontractor, data analysis and synthesis, and preparation and presentation of preliminary results to technical and oversight meetings.

  15. Two counter-propagating He plasma plumes and ignition of a third plasma plume without external applied voltage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, S.; Lu, X., E-mail: luxinpei@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the interaction of the two counter-propagating helium plasma plume inside a dielectric tube is investigated. When voltages applied to the two electrodes are the same, a dark zone always occurs no matter if the electrodes are symmetric or not. The length of the dark zone decreases from 6?mm to 2?mm when the voltages applied to the two electrodes are increased from 5.5?kV to 7.5?kV. Then with the increase of the applied voltage up to 9?kV, the length of the dark zone becomes stable and approaches to a const value of 1.8?mm. On the other hand, when the voltages applied to the two electrodes are different, instead of a dark zone, a third plasma plume is generated between the upstream and downstream plasma plumes. Detailed studies found that the third plasma plume is ignited more than 300?ns after the voltage is off, it is the difference of the local space charges of the heads of the downstream plasma and the upstream plasma induces the local electric field, which ignites the plasma rather than the external applied voltages.

  16. amazon deep sea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    basins Christian Beck1 Physics Websites Summary: -Late Glacial Homogenite with a coarse-sand and mudclasts layer. II-4-c- Depositional model for the pre). Especially during the...

  17. Genomic analysis of high pressure adaptation in deep sea bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stratton, Taylor Kristen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thiamine metabolism Riboflavin metabolism Vitamin B6phosphate biosynthesis 35 Riboflavin biosynthesis 36 Thiam

  18. High-Tech Fishing Is Emptying Deep Seas, Scientists Warn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    by Daniel Pauly of the University of British Columbia Fisheries Center and sponsored by the Pew Charitable, after local people experienced the benefits. Several decades ago, a scientist helped villagers on Apo

  19. Morphology and seismic stratigraphy of the Toyama deep sea fan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, David Barton

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are found in all fan regions, although facies F is more plentiful in slope regions. Since facies C, D, and G are found in both non-fan and lower fan turbi- dite sequences, fan deposits must be distinguished by their thickening and coarsening...

  20. Permanent carbon dioxide storage in deep-sea sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    is enormous, capable of storing thousands of years of current U.S. CO2 emissions. climate change CO2 hydrates. Because of the geothermal gradient in the continental crust, the tempera- ture at injection is always greater than the critical temperature of CO2. Under the high pressures (10­30 MPa) and high temperatures

  1. NOAAlNMFS Developments Deep-Sea Camera Records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of fishes, might be affected by Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants planned for the islands

  2. Optimal capital structure of deep sea foreign freight transportation companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgiadis, Vasilis

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis aims to understand the optimal leverage range for shipping companies (maritime foreign freight transportation companies - SIC 4412), through data analysis. This study confirms that in a traditional industry ...

  3. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

  4. Method and device for controlling plume during laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fuerschbach, Phillip W. (Tijeras, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Oberkampf, William L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for enhancing the weldment of a laser welding system is provided. The laser weld plume control device includes a cylindrical body defining an upside-down cone cavity; the upper surface of the body circumscribes the base of the cone cavity, and the vertex of the cone cavity forms an orifice concentrically located with respect to the laser beam and the plume which forms as a result of the welding operation. According to the method of the invention, gas is directed radially inward through inlets in the upper surface of the body into and through channels in the wall of the body and finally through the orifice of the body, and downward onto the surface of the weldment. The gas flow is then converted by the orifice of the device from radial flow to an axisymmetric gas jet flowing away from the weldment surface in a direction perpendicular to the surface and opposite to that of the laser.

  5. Aerosol size distribution evolution in large area fire plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porch, W.M.; Penner, J.E.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large fires are significant seasonal contributors to western visibility reduction. We have found that the relative concentration of supermicron size particles (assumed to be a mixture of mechanically generated particles by high winds associated with large fires and low density chain aggregates from coagulation in the fire) and high turbulence in fire plumes can radically change the aerosol sizes in the fire plume. This is especially important for aerosols with high visibility reduction and long range transport potential. This calculation was done with a 10 level one dimensional model with parameterized vertical and horizontal diffusion, sedimentation and coagulation. The optical effects of the evolving concentration and size distributions were modeled using Mie scattering and absorption assumptions.

  6. Plume dynamics and shielding characteristics of nanosecond scale multiple pulse in carbon ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pathak, Kedar; Povitsky, Alex [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44325-3903 (United States)

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of ablated plumes produced by nanosecond scale multiple laser pulses typical for carbon ablation is studied in order to understand the plume expansion dynamics and shielding effect of plume with special interest to ionization of plumes. The patterns of a planar plume (typical for channel cutting) and an axisymmetric plume (typical for hole drilling) appear to be quite different. Ionization in carbon plume is estimated using the Saha equation. An iterative procedure is developed to determine the local equilibrium temperature affected by ionization. It is shown that though shielding due to the presence of ionized particles in carbon plume is small, the effect of ionization on plume temperature can be considerable. Shielding effect is calculated for laser pulses with different time intervals between pulses. The effects of high temperature and low density of plume are conflicting and cause shielding behavior to be nonmonotonic. It is shown that the nonmonotonic dependence of the delivered laser energy, the pulse number, and the difference in shielding characteristics between planar and axisymmetric formulations increase with the time duration between two consecutive pulses.

  7. GIS and plume dispersion modeling for population exposure assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Jeffrey Keith

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . CHAPTER vll I INTRODUCTION. II REVIEW OF PREVIOUS RESEARCH III JUSTIFICATION AND OBJECTIVES. 3. 1 Justification. 3. 2 Project Objectives. IV METHODOLOGY . . . 15 . 15 . . . 17 . . 19 4. 1 The Study Site. 4. 2 Pollution Plume Dispersion Data.... 4. 3 Spatial and Demographic Data. 4. 4 Data Integration. V RESULTS. . . . . 19 . . . 21 . . . 36 . . 45 VI CONCLUSIONS. . . . . 60 6. 1 Conclusions, 6. 2 Room for Improvement. REFERENCES. APPENDIX A: Charts and Data Sheets. 60 . . . 61...

  8. Formation of seep bubble plumes in the Coal Oil Point seep field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifer, Ira; Culling, Daniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the gas flux from shallow gas hydrate deposits: interactionupper water column by gas hydrate-coated methane bubbles.

  9. Analysis of dissolved benzene plumes and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) plumes in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Happel, A.M.; Rice, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Beckenbach, E. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Savalin, L.; Temko, H.; Rempel, R. [California State Water Resources Control Board, Sacramento, CA (United States); Dooher, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandate the addition of oxygenates to gasoline products to abate air pollution. Currently, many areas of the country utilize oxygenated or reformulated fuel containing 15- percent and I I-percent MTBE by volume, respectively. This increased use of MTBE in gasoline products has resulted in accidental point source releases of MTBE containing gasoline products to ground water. Recent studies have shown MTBE to be frequently detected in samples of shallow ground water from urban areas throughout the United States (Squillace et al., 1995). Knowledge of the subsurface fate and transport of MTBE in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites and the spatial extent of MTBE plumes is needed to address these releases. The goal of this research is to utilize data from a large number of LUFT sites to gain insights into the fate, transport, and spatial extent of MTBE plumes. Specific goals include defining the spatial configuration of dissolved MTBE plumes, evaluating plume stability or degradation over time, evaluating the impact of point source releases of MTBE to ground water, and attempting to identify the controlling factors influencing the magnitude and extent of the MTBE plumes. We are examining the relationships between dissolved TPH, BTEX, and MTBE plumes at LUFT sites using parallel approaches of best professional judgment and a computer-aided plume model fitting procedure to determine plume parameters. Here we present our initial results comparing dissolved benzene and MTBE plumes lengths, the statistical significance of these results, and configuration of benzene and MTBE plumes at individual LUFT sites.

  10. PERGAMON Deep-Sea Research II DEEP-SEA RESEARCH PART II Internal Wave Excitation from a Collapsing Mixed Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Experiments, Numerical Simulations 1 Introduction Internal gravity waves (hereafter "IGW") trans- port energy-integrated zonal pressure gradient ap- proximately balances the surface zonal wind stress over seasonal or annual important global mecha- nism for IGW excitation. In particular, obser- vations in the Brazil Basin indicate

  11. Ash plume properties retrieved from infrared images: a forward and inverse modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerminara, Matteo; Valade, Sébastien; Harris, Andrew J L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a coupled fluid-dynamic and electromagnetic model for volcanic ash plumes. In a forward approach, the model is able to simulate the plume dynamics from prescribed input flow conditions and generate the corresponding synthetic thermal infrared (TIR) image, allowing a comparison with field-based observations. An inversion procedure is then developed to retrieve ash plume properties from TIR images. The adopted fluid-dynamic model is based on a one-dimensional, stationary description of a self-similar (top-hat) turbulent plume, for which an asymptotic analytical solution is obtained. The electromagnetic emission/absorption model is based on the Schwarzschild's equation and on Mie's theory for disperse particles, assuming that particles are coarser than the radiation wavelength and neglecting scattering. [...] Application of the inversion procedure to an ash plume at Santiaguito volcano (Guatemala) has allowed us to retrieve the main plume input parameters, namely the initial radius $b_0$, velocity $U_...

  12. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Baseline review of three groundwater plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lab Technical Assistance #114 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory – Baseline Review of Three Groundwater Plumes Page 21 LBNL-51386 the Savannah River

  13. Sediment transport and topographic evolution of a coupled river and river plume system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sediment transport and topographic evolution of a coupled river and river plume system inundation from storms, hurricanes, and tsunamis [Tornqvist et al., 2007; Blum and Roberts, 2009; Jerolmack

  14. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    West Plume) Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corp Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver...

  15. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    East Plume) Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? No...

  16. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over time even if the oil market were perfectly competitive.a big role in world oil markets, that era is long past.and re?ning oil and delivering it to the market. We could

  17. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appeared in the world oil market in the last fifteen years.have on the world oil markets and international relationsthe stability of the oil markets. 11 This literature,

  18. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China made an Iranian oil investment valued at $70 billion.across Iran, China’s oil investment may exceed $100 billionthese involving investment in oil and gas, really undermine

  19. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),the faster its growth in oil demand over the last half ofthe income elasticity of oil demand to fall signi?cantly.

  20. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    current pace of growth in oil demand as staying consistentthis point, China’s demand Oil Demand vs. Domestic Supply inand predictions of oil supply and demand affected foreign

  1. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

  2. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crudein predicting quarterly real oil price change. variable real

  3. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    per day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq KuwaitEIA Table 1.2, “OPEC Crude Oil Production (Excluding Lease2008, from EIA, “Crude Oil Production. ” Figure 16. U.S.

  4. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    unfettered access to oil resources including the possibleChina’s search for oil resources around the world. However,a survey of China’s oil resources, while others focus

  5. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

  6. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural Gas, Heating Oil and Gasoline,” NBER Working Paper.2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),

  7. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Michael T. Klare, Blood and Oil: The Dangers of America’sDowns and Jeffrey A. Bader, “Oil-Hungry China Belongs at BigChina, Africa, and Oil,” (Council on Foreign Relations,

  8. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in U.S. real GDP and oil consumption, 1949-2006. slope =Historical Chinese oil consumption and projection of trend.1991-2006: Chinese oil consumption in millions of barrels

  9. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 5. Monthly oil production for Iran, Iraq, and Kuwait,day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq Kuwait Figure 6.and the peak in U.S. oil production account for the broad

  10. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

  11. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    historical data for claiming to be able to predict oil pricehistorical data. The second is to look at the predictions of economic theory as to how oil prices

  12. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007”. comparison, Mexico used 6.6— Chinese oil consumption17. Oil production from the North Sea, Mexico’s Cantarell,

  13. Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

  14. Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

  15. Dynamics of freshwater plumes: observations and numerical modeling of the wind-forced response and alongshore freshwater transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fong, Derek Allen

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A freshwater plume often forms when a river or an estuary discharges water onto the continental shelf. Freshwater plumes are ubiquitous features of the coastal ocean and usually leave a striking signature in the coastal ...

  16. Anatomy of the recurrent coastal sediment plume in Lake Michigan and its impacts on light climate, nutrients, and plankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the occurrence of storm-driven recurrent coastal sediment plumes to define the anatomy of the resuspension events EEGLE studies lead us to conclude that storms and storm-driven plumes had a negative effect

  17. Biological Ocean Margins Program. Active Microbes Responding to Inputs from the Orinoco River Plume. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge E. Corredor

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the proposed work is to identify the active members of the heterotrophic community involved in C and N cycling in the perimeter of the Orinoco River Plume (ORP), assess their spatial distribution, quantify their metabolic activity, and correlate these parameters to plume properties such as salinity, organic matter content and phytoplankton biomass.

  18. Linkages between coastal runoff and the Florida Keys ecosystem: A study of a dark plume event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a dark water plume from near Charlotte Harbor, Florida, to the Dry Tortugas in the Florida Keys in mid, respectively. The dark color became increasingly dominated by colored dissolved organic matter, toward the DryLinkages between coastal runoff and the Florida Keys ecosystem: A study of a dark plume event

  19. Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia), Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia, J. Geophys. Res., 116, D08207, doi:10.1029/2010JD015148. 1. Introduction [2] Peat and deforestation fires

  20. Modeling benzene plume elongation mechanisms exerted by ethanol using RT3D with a general

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Modeling benzene plume elongation mechanisms exerted by ethanol using RT3D with a general substrate ethanol on benzene fate and transport in fuel-contaminated groundwater and to discern the most influential benzene plume elongation mechanisms. The model, developed as a module for the Reactive Transport in 3

  1. Internal structure and expansion dynamics of laser ablation plumes into ambient gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Internal structure and expansion dynamics of laser ablation plumes into ambient gases S. S. Harilal 13 December 2002 The effect of ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of the plasma generated by laser together with time resolved emission diagnostics, a triple structure of the plume was observed

  2. Ancient recycled mantle lithosphere in the Hawaiian plume: OsmiumHafnium isotopic evidence from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Ancient recycled mantle lithosphere in the Hawaiian plume: Osmium­Hafnium isotopic evidence from that recycled (i.e. previously subducted) basaltic oceanic crust (with or without sediments) is part of an ancient (N2 Ga) depleted and recycled mantle lithosphere that is part of the upwelling Hawaiian plume

  3. Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes S. S. Harilal,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes S. S. Harilal,1 N. Farid,1,2 A tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features.1063/1.4833564] I. INTRODUCTION Nanoparticle production and application research is an area of significant

  4. A tandem mirror hybrid plume plasma propulsion facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang-Diaz, F.R.; Yang, T.F.; Krueger, W.A.; Peng, S.; Urbahn, J.; Yao, X.; Griffin, D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A concept in electrodeless plasma propulsion, which is also capable of delivering a variable Isp, is presented. The concept involves a three-stage system of plasma injection, heating, and subsequent ejection through a magnetic nozzle. The nozzle produces the hybrid plume by the coaxial injection of hypersonic neutral gas. The gas layer, thus formed, protects the material walls from the hot plasma and, through increased collisions, helps detach it from the diverging magnetic field. The physics of this concept is evaluated numerically through full spatial and temporal simulations; these explore the operating characteristics of such a device over a wide region of parameter space. An experimental facility to study the plasma dynamics in the hybrid plume was built. The device consists of a tandem mirror operating in an asymmetric mode. A later upgrade of this system will incorporate a cold plasma injector at one end of the machine. Initial experiments involve the full characterization of the operating envelope, as well as extensive measurements of plasma properties at the exhaust. The results of the numerical simulations are described.

  5. Nuclear thermal rocket plume interactions with spacecraft. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mauk, B.H. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States); Gatsonis, N.A.; Buzby, J.; Yin, X. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States). Mechanical Engineering Department

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first study that has treated the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) effluent problem in its entirety, beginning with the reactor core, through the nozzle flow, to the plume backflow. The summary of major accomplishments is given below: (1) Determined the NTR effluents that include neutral, ionized and radioactive species, under typical NTR chamber conditions. Applied an NTR chamber chemistry model that includes conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (2) Performed NTR nozzle flow simulations using a Navier-Stokes solver. We assumed frozen chemistry at the chamber conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (3) Performed plume simulations using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code with chemistry. In order to account for radioactive trace species that may be important for contamination purposes we developed a multi-weighted DSMC methodology. The domain in our simulations included large regions downstream and upstream of the exit. Inputs were taken from the Navier-Stokes solutions.

  6. Eco Oil 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett Earl; Brenda Clark

    2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the processes, challenges, and achievements of researching and developing a biobased motor oil.

  7. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption would be reduced and incentives for production increased whenever the price of crude oil

  8. OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

  9. Coupling of Realistic Real Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roland L. Crawford

    2006-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupling of Realistic Real Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment

  10. Importance of vertical mixing for additional sources of nitrate and iron to surface waters of the Columbia River plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    of the Columbia River plume: Implications for biology Maeve C. Lohan a,*, Kenneth W. Bruland b a Institute

  11. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n{sub plu}, which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v{sub gas} is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n{sub plu} ? log(v{sub gas}). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity.

  12. On the offshore dispersal of the Amazon's Plume in the North Atlantic: Comments on the paper by A. Longhurst, "Seasonal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGillicuddy Jr., Dennis J.

    ) Abstract-Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) satellite images show extensive plumes of discolored water plumes of discolored water in the western tropical Atlantic (Fig. 1). Both plumes form during August- bean Sea and drifts northwestward across the Caribbean, reaching Puerto Rico around October

  13. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Venezuelan Oil Industry Total Wells Drilled and InvestmentWells Drilled and Investment in the Venezuelan Oil Industryopenness of the oil sector to foreign investment contributes

  14. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is described below. Data Crude oil production data is fromproductivity measure is crude oil production per worker, andwhich is measured as crude oil production per worker, is

  15. Oil and Gas Supply Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and sources. Crude oil recovery includes improved oil recovery processes such as water flooding, infill drilling, and horizontal drilling, as well as enhanced oil recovery...

  16. Oil and Gas Supply Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and sources. Crude oil recovery includes improved oil recovery processes such as water flooding, infill drilling, and horizontal continuity, as well as enhanced oil recovery...

  17. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . .2.6: Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico 350 Productivity

  18. Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

    1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

  19. Libyan oil industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddams, F.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three aspects of the growth and progress of Libya's oil industry since the first crude oil discovery in 1961 are: (1) relations between the Libyan government and the concessionary oil companies; (2) the impact of Libyan oil and events in Libya on the petroleum markets of Europe and the world; and (3) the response of the Libyan economy to the development of its oil industry. The historical review begins with Libya's becoming a sovereign nation in 1951 and traces its subsequent development into a position as a leading world oil producer. 54 references, 10 figures, 55 tables.

  20. REVIEW PAPER Biodeterioration of crude oil and oil derived

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appanna, Vasu

    , the majority of applied microbiologi- cal methods of enhanced oil recovery also dete- riorates oil and appearsREVIEW PAPER Biodeterioration of crude oil and oil derived products: a review Natalia A. Yemashova January 2007 Ó Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007 Abstract Biodeterioration of crude oil and oil

  1. Environmental disaster or just a drop in the bucket: Texas scientists on the real effects of the Deewater Horizon oil spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that caused the leak. #22;ousands of barrels of oil leaked from the well each day until it was capped on July #23;#21;, #25;#24;#23;#24;. #22;e National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration?s (NOAA) #28;nal total estimate, contested by BP for being too... of methane, creating huge plumes, McKinney said. Skimming the oil, using dispersants, and using bioremediation are all arti#28;cial processes for breaking down oil. Natural processes, such as photo-oxidation, physical breakdown from waves...

  2. Environmental disaster or just a drop in the bucket?: Texas scientists on the real effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that caused the leak. #22;ousands of barrels of oil leaked from the well each day until it was capped on July #23;#21;, #25;#24;#23;#24;. #22;e National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration?s (NOAA) #28;nal total estimate, contested by BP for being too... of methane, creating huge plumes, McKinney said. Skimming the oil, using dispersants, and using bioremediation are all arti#28;cial processes for breaking down oil. Natural processes, such as photo-oxidation, physical breakdown from waves...

  3. Using Oils As Pesticides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogran, Carlos E.; Ludwig, Scott; Metz, Bradley

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum and plant-derived spray oils show increasing potential for use as part of Integrated Pest Management systems for control of soft-bodied pests on fruit trees, shade trees, woody ornamentals and household plants. Sources of oils, preparing...

  4. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an alternative investment strategy to buying oil today andinvestments necessary to catch up. This was the view o?ered by oilinvestment strategy. date t) in order to purchase a quantity Q barrels of oil

  5. Gas and Oil (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment has the authority to enact regulations pertaining to oil and gas production, but it cannot prorate or limit the output of any gas or oil well. A permit from the...

  6. Shale oil demetallization process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, M. A.

    1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Trace metals, particularly As, Fe and Ni, are removed from hydrocarbonaceous oils, particularly shale oil by contacting the shale oil with quadrolobe alumina with or without a processing gas such as hydrogen or nitrogen at 500/sup 0/ F. to 800/sup 0/ F. at 250 to 750 psig and LHSV of 0.4 to 3.0 to deposit a portion of said trace metal onto said alumina and recover an oil product having substantially reduced amounts of trace metal.

  7. Oil Peak or Panic?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this balanced consideration of the peak-oil controversy, Gorelick comes down on the side of the optimists.

  8. Oil and Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    , oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics Products 23. Sloan dolomite quarry 24. Weiser gypsum quarry Oil Fields 1. Blackburn field 2. North WillowMetals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada

  9. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

  10. Exploiting heavy oil reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    North Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen the potential of heavy oil 8/9 Taking the legal lessons learned in the north Sea to a global audience 10 potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Aberdeen: A community of science AT WORK FOR THE ENERGY SECTOR ISSUE

  11. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

  12. Simulation of the Visual Effects of Power Plant Plumes1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    -fired power plant with six 500 MW coal-fired power plants located at hypothetical sites in southeastern Utah coal-fired power plants are greater than those from oil or natural gas. If we must use more coal, how in a comparison of large and small coal-fired power plants in the West. Using hypothetical power plants

  13. Penetration of buoyancy driven current due to a wind forced river plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baek, Seong-Ho

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The long term response of a plume associated with freshwater penetration into ambient, ocean water under upwelling favorable winds is studied using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) in an idealized domain. Three different cases were examined...

  14. Geochemical heterogeneity in the Hawaiian plume : constraints from Hawaiian volcanoes and Emperor seamounts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shichun

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 6000-km long, age-progressive linear Hawaii-Emperor Chain is one of the best defined hotspot tracks. This hotspot track plays an important role in the plume hypothesis. In this research, geochemical data on the ...

  15. Effects of buoyancy source composition on multiphase plume behavior in stratification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Aaron C. (Aaron Chunghin), 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments are performed where a dense multiphase plume is released vertically in a salinity stratified ambient. The constituent phase composition of the initial buoyancy flux can be dense brine, particles, or a mixture ...

  16. Numerical and analytical studies of single and multiphase starting jets and plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ruo-Qian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase starting jets and plumes are widely observed in nature and engineering systems. An environmental engineering example is open-water disposal of sediments. The present study numerically simulates such starting ...

  17. Interactions between mantle plumes and mid-ocean ridges : constraints from geophysics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgen, Jennifer E

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies interactions between mid-ocean ridges and mantle plumes using geophysics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modeling. Chapter 1 investigates the effects of the Marion and Bouvet hotspots on the ultra-slow ...

  18. Natural versus forced convection in laminar starting plumes Michael C. Rogers and Stephen W. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Stephen W.

    that the ascent velocity of the plume, nondimensionalized by Ri, exhibits a power law relationship with Re by the Richardson number Ri, defined in Eq. 1, which is the ratio of buoy- ancy forces to inertial effects. Thus, Ri

  19. Characterizing fault-plume intersection probability for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage of CO{sub 2} out of the designated storage region via faults is a widely recognized concern for geologic carbon sequestration. The probability of such leakage can be separated into the probability of a plume encountering a fault and the probability of flow along such a fault. In the absence of deterministic fault location information, the first probability can be calculated from regional fault population statistics and modeling of the plume shape and size. In this study, fault statistical parameters were measured or estimated for WESTCARB's Phase III pilot test injection in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Combining CO{sub 2} plume model predictions with estimated fault characteristics resulted in a 3% probability that the CO{sub 2} plume will encounter a fault fully offsetting the 180 m (590 ft) thick seal. The probability of leakage is lower, likely much lower, as faults with this offset are probably low-permeability features in this area.

  20. Ambient gas effects on the dynamics of laser-produced tin plume expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S S; O'Shay, B; Tillac, M S; Tao, Y

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mitigation in a laser-produced tin plasma is one of the mostambient pressure, the tin species with kinetic Downloaded 19Sn + species ejected by the tin plume exhibits a Downloaded

  1. Framework for multi-vehicle adaptive sampling of jets and plumes in coastal zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gildner, Matthew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a framework for the sampling of thermal and effluent jets and plumes using multiple autonomous surface vehicles. The framework was developed with the goal of achieving rapid and accurate in-situ ...

  2. Penetration of buoyancy driven current due to a wind forced river plume 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baek, Seong-Ho

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The long term response of a plume associated with freshwater penetration into ambient, ocean water under upwelling favorable winds is studied using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) in an idealized domain. Three different cases were examined...

  3. Carbon flow and ecosystem dynamics in the Mississippi River plume described by inverse analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breed, Greg Allen

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2002 Major Subject: Oceanography CARBON FLOW AND ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS IN THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER PLUME DESCRIBED BY INVERSE ANALYSIS A Thesis by GREG ALLEN BREED Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial... of Department) December 2002 Major Sublect: Oceanography ABSTRACT Carbon Flow and Ecosystem Dynamics in the Mississippi River Plume Described by Inverse Analysis. (December 2002) Greg Allen Breed, B. S. , University of Minnesota Chair of Advisory...

  4. Transport parameter determination and modeling of sodium and strontium plumes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Londergan, John Thomas

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRANSPORT PARAMETER DETERMINATION AND MODELING OF SODIUM AND STRONTIUM PLUMES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY A Thesis by JOHN THOMAS LONDERGAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Geophysics TRANSPORT PARAMETER DETERMINATION AND MODELING OF SODIUM AND STRONTIUM PLUMES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY A Thesis by JOHN THOMAS LONDERGAN Approved...

  5. Geochemical evolution of highly alkaline and saline tank waste plumes during seepage through vadose zone sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Larsen, Joern T.; Serne, R JEFFREY.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage of highly saline and alkaline radioactive waste from storage tanks into underlying sediments is a serious environmental problem at the Hanford Site in Washington State. This study focuses on geochemical evolution of tank waste plumes resulting from interactions between the waste solution and sediment. A synthetic tank waste solution was infused into unsaturated Hanford sediment columns (0.2, 0.6, and 2 m) maintained at 70C to simulate the field contamination process. Spatially and temporally resolved geochemical profiles of the waste plume were obtained. Thorough OH neutralization (from an initial pH 14 down to 6.3) was observed. Three broad zones of pore solutions were identified to categorize the dominant geochemical reactions: the silicate dissolution zone (pH > 10), pH-neutralized zone (pH 10 to 6.5), and displaced native sediment pore water (pH 6.5 to 8). Elevated concentrations of Si, Fe, and K in plume fluids and their depleted concentrations in plume sediments reflected dissolution of primary minerals within the silicate dissolution zone. The very high Na concentrations in the waste solution resulted in rapid and complete cation exchange, reflected in high concentrations of Ca and Mg at the plume front. The plume-sediment profiles also showed deposition of hydrated solids and carbonates. Fair correspondence was obtained between these results and analyses of field borehole samples from a waste plume at the Hanford Site. Results of this study provide a well-defined framework for understanding waste plumes in the more complex field setting and for understanding geochemical factors controlling transport of contaminant species carried in waste solutions that leaked from single-shell storage tanks in the past.

  6. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  7. Emission factors for particles, elemental carbon, and trace gases from the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laursen, K.K.; Ferek, R.J.; Hobbs, P.V. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rasmussen, R.A. [Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Beaverton, OR (United States)

    1992-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission factors are presented for particles, elemental carbon (i.e., soot), total organic carbon in particles and vapor, and for various trace gases from the 1991 Kuwait oil fires. Particle emissions accounted for {approximately} 2% of the fuel burned. In general, soot emission factors were substantially lower than those used in recent {open_quotes}nuclear winter{close_quotes} calculations. Differences in the emissions and appearances of some of the individual fires are discussed. Carbon budget data for the composite plumes from the Kuwait fires are summarized; most of the burned carbon in the plumes was in the form of CO{sub 2}. Fluxes are presented for several combustion products. 26 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  8. Measuring and Modeling Fault Density for Plume-Fault Encounter Probability Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, P.D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sheirer 2007). Figure 2. Oil and gas fields in the vicinity10° strike intervals in oil and gas fields centered within10° strike intervals in oil and gas fields centered within

  9. Area 2: Inexpensive Monitoring and Uncertainty Assessment of CO2 Plume Migration using Injection Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In-depth understanding of the long-term fate of CO2 in the subsurface requires study and analysis of the reservoir formation, the overlaying caprock formation, and adjacent faults. Because there is significant uncertainty in predicting the location and extent of geologic heterogeneity that can impact the future migration of CO2 in the subsurface, there is a need to develop algorithms that can reliably quantify this uncertainty in plume migration. This project is focused on the development of a model selection algorithm that refines an initial suite of subsurface models representing the prior uncertainty to create a posterior set of subsurface models that reflect injection performance consistent with that observed. Such posterior models can be used to represent uncertainty in the future migration of the CO2 plume. Because only injection data is required, the method provides a very inexpensive method to map the migration of the plume and the associated uncertainty in migration paths. The model selection method developed as part of this project mainly consists of assessing the connectivity/dynamic characteristics of a large prior ensemble of models, grouping the models on the basis of their expected dynamic response, selecting the subgroup of models that most closely yield dynamic response closest to the observed dynamic data, and finally quantifying the uncertainty in plume migration using the selected subset of models. The main accomplishment of the project is the development of a software module within the SGEMS earth modeling software package that implements the model selection methodology. This software module was subsequently applied to analyze CO2 plume migration in two field projects – the In Salah CO2 Injection project in Algeria and CO2 injection into the Utsira formation in Norway. These applications of the software revealed that the proxies developed in this project for quickly assessing the dynamic characteristics of the reservoir were highly efficient and yielded accurate grouping of reservoir models. The plume migration paths probabilistically assessed by the method were confirmed by field observations and auxiliary data. The report also documents the application of the software to answer practical questions such as the optimum location of monitoring wells to reliably assess the migration of CO2 plume, the effect of CO2-rock interactions on plume migration and the ability to detect the plume under those conditions and the effect of a slow, unresolved leak on the predictions of plume migration.

  10. Crude Oil Analysis Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shay, Johanna Y.

    The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

  11. Measuring and Modeling Fault Density for Plume-Fault Encounter Probability Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, P.D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from higher in depleted oil and gas reservoirs to lower inreservoirs is one possible means for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, the volume of depleted oil

  12. Remediation of overlapping benzene/MTBE and MTBE-only plumes: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, P.L. [TolTest, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Vinch, C.A. [Ryder Transportation Services, Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two overlapping dissolved hydrocarbon plumes were identified in the shallow water-bearing zone at a commercial vehicle service and fueling facility. Plume 1 originated from a pre-1993 gasoline product line/dispenser leak. This plume contained a relatively common mix of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes (BTEX), and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE); benzene and MTBE were identified as the Plume 1 contaminants of concern based on their detection at approximately 200 {mu}g/l each, which exceeded regulatory guidance. Plume 2, which was detected in the tank cavity during UST removal, resulted from gasoline line leaks/underground storage tank overfills. Although the majority of impacted soils in both the dispenser and tank cavity areas were removed during UST excavation, rainfall during impacted soil removal mobilized the MTBE contained in the soils to groundwater. As a result, Plume 2 contained approximately 900 {mu}g/l MTBE while BTEX compounds were non-detect. Although the impacted zone sustained an approximate yield of only 0.3 gallon per minute, Pennsylvania regulations dictate that this zone must be treated as an aquifer. The failure of remediating gasoline plumes using pump-and-treat has been predominantly due to BTEX`s tendency to adsorb onto soil, creating a residual-phase product layer which acts as a continuing source of dissolved-phase BTEX. Based on this experience, most groundwater and remediation professionals reject pump-and-treat as a viable remedial option, except in situations where controlling groundwater movement is the predominant goal.

  13. World Oil: Market or Mayhem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

  14. Near Shore Submerged Oil Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Near Shore Submerged Oil Assessment September 2010 In the context of the BP Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, submerged oil refers to near shore oil which has picked up sediments from very different physical and chemical processes. In this spill, the oil was released more than 5

  15. Oil spill response resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muthukrishnan, Shankar

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and development program. Title VIII concerns the amendments to the Trans Alaska Pipeline System Act. Title I deals with probably the most important part of OPA-90 ? liability and compensation. Claim procedures, federal authority, financial responsibility... minimum. LITERATURE REVIEW From the time that oil was discovered, drilled and transported, oil spills have been occurring. As long as crude oils and petroleum products are transported across the seas by ships or pipelines, there is the risk of spillage...

  16. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    disruptions, and the peak in U.S. oil production account foroil increased 81.1% (logarithmically) between January 1979 and the peak

  17. Oil and Gas (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

  18. NETL: Oil & Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that address the unique nature and challenging locations of many of our remaining oil and natural gas accumulations. The National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL)...

  19. Diagnostic probes for particle and molecule distributions in laser-generated plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbrell, S.M.

    1990-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser microprobe analysis (LMA) offers good spatial and depth resolution for solid sampling of virtually any material. Coupled with numerous optical spectroscopic and mass spectrometric detection methods, LMA is a powerful analytical tool. Yet, fundamental understanding of the interaction between the laser and the sample surface leading to the formation of the high temperature plasma (plume) is far from complete. To better understand the process of plume formation, an imaging method based on acousto-optic laser beam deflection has been coupled with light scattering methods and absorption methods to record temporal and spatial maps of the particle and molecule distributions in the plume with good resolution. Because particles can make up a major fraction of the vaporized material under certain operating conditions, they can reflect a large loss of atomic signal for elemental analysis, even when using auxiliary excitation to further vaporized the particles. Characterization of the particle size distributions in plumes should provide insight into the vaporization process and information necessary for studies of efficient particle transfer. Light scattering methods for particle size analysis based on the Mie Theory are used to determine the size of particles in single laser-generated plumes. The methods used, polarization ratio method and dissymmetry ratio method, provide good estimates of particle size with good spatial and temporal resolution for this highly transient system. Large particles, on the order of 0.02-0.2{mu}m in radius, were observed arising directly from the sample surface and from condensation.

  20. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northeast Plume | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and OilGeothermal andofEnergyEnergy Northeast

  1. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northwest Plume | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and OilGeothermal andofEnergyEnergy

  2. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reserves. In the data, crude oil reserve addi- tions consistForce and Proven Reserves in the Venezuelan Oil Industry .such as crude oil production, proved reserves, new reserves,

  3. Oil and Gas Production (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A State Oil and Gas Council regulates and oversees oil and gas production in Missouri, and conducts a biennial review of relevant rules and regulations. The waste of oil and gas is prohibited. This...

  4. The Legacy of Oil Spills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevors, J. T.; Saier, M. H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    010-0527-5 The Legacy of Oil Spills J. T. Trevors & M. H.workers were killed, and oil has been gushing out everday. It is now June, and oil continues to spew forth into

  5. Oil shale technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

  6. NUCLEAR NON-PROLIFERATION-TASK 1: Deployable Plume and Aerosol Release Prediction and Tracking System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Kleppe, Ph.D., William Norris, Ph.D., Mehdi Etezada, Ph.D., P.E.

    2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This contract was awarded in response to a proposal in which a deployable plume and aerosol release prediction and tracking system would be designed, fabricated, and tested. The system would gather real time atmospheric data and input it into a real time atmospheric model that could be used for plume predition and tracking. The system would be able to be quickly deployed by aircraft to points of interest or positioned for deployment by vehicles. The system would provide three dimensional (u, v, and w) wind vector data, inversion height measurements, surface wind information, classical weather station data, and solar radiation. The on-board real time computer model would provide the prediction of the behavior of plumes and released aerosols.

  7. OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT IN CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Qian; J. Wang; S. Li

    In this paper history, current status and forecast of Chinese oil shale indus-try, as well as the characteristics of some typical Chinese oil shales are given.

  8. Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

  9. Petroleum Oil | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Petroleum Oil Petroleum Oil The production of energy feedstock and fuels requires substantial water input. Not only do biofuel feedstocks like corn, switchgrass and agricultural...

  10. Synthetic aircraft turbine oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaffe, R.

    1982-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic lubricating oil composition having improved oxidation stability comprising a major portion of an aliphatic ester base oil having lubricating properties, formed by the reaction of pentaerythritol and an organic monocarboxylic acid and containing a phenylnaphthylamine, a dialkyldiphenylamine, a polyhydroxy anthraquinone, a hydrocarbyl phosphate ester and a dialkyldisulfide.

  11. Shale oil by 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaac, E.D.; Svoboda, D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial processing of oil shale is currently being carried out in two countries, these being Manchuria and Estonia. Germany, Israel, Australia, Brazil and the United States are planning commercial development of oil shale during the 1980's. In the United States, developers currently pursuing production facilities in the Piceance Basin in Colorado are the Union Oil Company; Colony Development Company, now owned by Tosco and Exxon; Occidental Oil Shale Inc.; The Rio Blanco Shale Company (Amoco and Gulf) CA Tract; The Cathedral Bluff's Oil Shale Company (Oxy and Tenneco) at CB tract; The Anvil Points Bureau of Mines Site under the direction of DOE which has been leased to the Paraho Development Company to optimize their process; and Superior Oil. Superior Oil plans to recover Negcolite and Dowsonite that are associated with their oil shale. The processes used by these companies are described briefly. These are the Union B process, Tosco II process, Paraho process, and Occidental process. It is estimated that between 400,000 to 500,000 barrels per day (63,600 to 79,500 m/sup 3//day) production would be achieved by 1990 if all of the effects on the infrastructure are planned for and constructed in an orderly manner.

  12. Marathon Oil Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Marine oil shale from the Shenglihe oil shale section in the Qiangtang basin, northern Tibet, China, was dated by the Re-Os technique using Carius Tube digestion, Os distillation, Re extraction by acetone and ICP-MS measure-ment. An isochron was obtained giving an age of 101±24 Ma with an initial

  13. Oil Quantity : The histori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    model for Prudhoe Bay. Figure 11: Historical Prudhoe Bay oil production data, modeled economically Production (million bbl per Month) Historical Production Best Fit (Hist. Tax w/ELF, Ref. P) High Price 120 140 160 19 Oil Quantity Con Wel N E A N N ng Results e Bay : The histori Bay over tim : Prudhoe Ba

  14. Hit from both sides: tracking industrial and volcanic plumes in Mexico City with surface measurements and OMI SO2 retrievals during the MILAGRO field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Foy, B.

    Large sulfur dioxide plumes were measured in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO field campaign. This paper seeks to identify the sources of these plumes and the meteorological processes that affect ...

  15. Dissolved and particulate aluminum in the Columbia River and coastal waters of Oregon and Washington: behavior in near-field and far-field plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    and Washington: behavior in near-field and far-field plumes Matthew T. Brown* and Kenneth W. Bruland Department conditions (Bruland et al., 2008). The Columbia River plume also plays a key role in the delivery of both mac

  16. International Journal of Ventilation ISSN 1473-3315 Volume 4 No 4 Interacting Turbulent Plumes in a Naturally Ventilated Enclosure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linden, Paul F.

    International Journal of Ventilation ISSN 1473-3315 Volume 4 No 4 ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 301 Interacting Turbulent Plumes in a Naturally Ventilated Enclosure P. F. Linden1 and N. B. Kaye2 1 of turbulent plumes is examined in the context of building ventilation flows. Recent models for natural

  17. Impacts of suspended sediment on the ecosystem in Lake Michigan: A comparison between the 1998 and 1999 plume events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Changsheng

    of a reflective, recurrent coastal resuspension plume on the lower trophic food web system in Lake Michigan Michigan [Eadie et al., 1996]. This plume is caused mainly by wind- driven sediment resuspension. Sediment resuspension reoccurred episodically during sustained strong southward wind events for about two

  18. Novel inversion approach to constrain plume sedimentation from tephra deposit data: Application to the 17 June 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Cecily J.

    and the distribution of tephra sedimentation from a weak plume. Our model is parameterized as a set of point sourcesNovel inversion approach to constrain plume sedimentation from tephra deposit data: Application source releases tephra that is dispersed according to an advection-diffusion equation. This dispersion

  19. TREATABILITY STUDY FOR EDIBLE OIL DEPLOYMENT FOR ENHANCED CVOC ATTENUATION FOR T-AREA, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riha, B.; Looney, B.; Noonkester, J.; Hyde, W.; Walker, R.

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater beneath T-Area, a former laboratory and semiworks operation at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS), is contaminated by chlorinated solvents (cVOCs). Since the contamination was detected in the 1980s, the cVOCs at T-Area have been treated by a combination of soil vapor extraction and groundwater pump and treat. The site received approval to temporarily discontinue the active groundwater treatment and implement a treatability study of enhanced attenuation - an engineering and regulatory strategy that has recently been developed by DOE and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC 2007). Enhanced attenuation uses active engineering solutions to alter the target site in such a way that the contaminant plume will passively stabilize and shrink and to document that the action will be effective, timely, and sustainable. The paradigm recognizes that attenuation remedies are fundamentally based on a mass balance. Thus, long-term plume dynamics can be altered either by reducing the contaminant loading from the source or by increasing the rate of natural attenuation processes within all, or part of, the plume volume. The combination of technologies that emerged for T-Area included: (1) neat (pure) vegetable oil deployment in the deep vadose zone in the former source area, (2) emulsified vegetable oil deployment within the footprint of the groundwater plume, and (3) identification of attenuation mechanisms and rates for the distal portion of the plume. In the first part, neat oil spreads laterally forming a thin layer on the water table to intercept and reduce future cVOC loading (via partitioning) and reduce oxygen inputs (via biostimulation). In the second and third parts, emulsified oil forms active bioremediation reactor zones within the plume footprint to degrade existing groundwater contamination (via reductive dechlorination and/or cometabolism) and stimulates long-term attenuation capacity in the distal plume (via cometabolism). For TArea, the enhanced attenuation development process proved to be a powerful tool in developing a strategy that provides a high degree of performance while minimizing adverse collateral impacts of the remediation (e.g., energy use and wetland damage) and minimizing life-cycle costs. As depicted in Figure 1, Edible oil deployment results in the development of structured geochemical zones and serves to decrease chlorinated compound concentrations in two ways: (1) physical sequestration, which reduces effective aqueous concentration and mobility; and (2) stimulation of anaerobic, abiotic and cometabolic degradation processes. In the central deployment area, contaminant initially partitions into the added oil phase. Biodegradation of the added organic substrate depletes the aquifer of oxygen and other terminal electron acceptors and creates conditions conducive to anaerobic degradation processes. The organic substrate is fermented to produce hydrogen, which is used as an electron donor for anaerobic dechlorination by organisms such as Dehalococcoides. Daughter products leaving the central treatment zone are amenable to aerobic oxidation. Further, the organic compounds leaving the central deployment zone (e.g., methane and propane) stimulate and enhance down gradient aerobic cometabolism which degrades both daughter compounds and several parent cVOCs. Figure 1 depicts TCE concentration reduction processes (labeled in green) along with their corresponding breakdown products in a structured geochemical zone scenario. A consortium of bacteria with the same net effect of Dehalococcoides may be present in the structured geochemical zones leading to the degradation of TCE and daughter products. Figure 2 shows a schematic of the documented cVOC degradation processes in both the anaerobic and aerobic structured geochemical zones. Specific aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and their degradation pathways are also listed in the diagram and have either been confirmed in the field or the laboratory. See references in the bibliography in Section 11.

  20. Oil removal from water via adsorption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, William Edward

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION I I. LITERATURE REVIEW Significance of Oil Spill Proble. ". . s Growth of Marine Commerce Superport Oil Spills Oil Spills and the Law Oil Spill Control Methods Physical Removal of Oil III. MATERIALS... IV Table V Table VI Significant Facts about Major Oil Spills Viscosity of Test Oils Determined by Capillary Viscometer Percent of Oil Remaining in Water After Removal of Oil-Carrier Combination Maximum Oil Adsorption Capacity for Light Crude...

  1. 5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for gasoline, diesel and other petroleum products. This chapter provides an overview of world oil trends agreements on export routes have limited development. Petroleum production in the United States, including half of petroleum supplies to the United States. OPEC petroleum production also increased in 1994

  2. QUIESCENT PROMINENCE DYNAMICS OBSERVED WITH THE HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE. I. TURBULENT UPFLOW PLUMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Thomas E.; Slater, Gregory; Hurlburt, Neal; Shine, Richard; Tarbell, Theodore; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Lites, Bruce W. [High Altitude Observatory, University Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Okamoto, Takenori J.; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Katsukawa, Yukio; Magara, Tetsuya; Suematsu, Yoshinori [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shimizu, Toshifumi, E-mail: berger@lmsal.co [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan)

    2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) observations reveal two new dynamic modes in quiescent solar prominences: large-scale (20-50 Mm) 'arches' or 'bubbles' that 'inflate' from below into prominences, and smaller-scale (2-6 Mm) dark turbulent upflows. These novel dynamics are related in that they are always dark in visible-light spectral bands, they rise through the bright prominence emission with approximately constant speeds, and the small-scale upflows are sometimes observed to emanate from the top of the larger bubbles. Here we present detailed kinematic measurements of the small-scale turbulent upflows seen in several prominences in the SOT database. The dark upflows typically initiate vertically from 5 to 10 Mm wide dark cavities between the bottom of the prominence and the top of the chromospheric spicule layer. Small perturbations on the order of 1 Mm or less in size grow on the upper boundaries of cavities to generate plumes up to 4-6 Mm across at their largest widths. All plumes develop highly turbulent profiles, including occasional Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex 'roll-up' of the leading edge. The flows typically rise 10-15 Mm before decelerating to equilibrium. We measure the flowfield characteristics with a manual tracing method and with the Nonlinear Affine Velocity Estimator (NAVE) 'optical flow' code to derive velocity, acceleration, lifetime, and height data for several representative plumes. Maximum initial speeds are in the range of 20-30 km s{sup -1}, which is supersonic for a {approx}10,000 K plasma. The plumes decelerate in the final few Mm of their trajectories resulting in mean ascent speeds of 13-17 km s{sup -1}. Typical lifetimes range from 300 to 1000 s ({approx}5-15 minutes). The area growth rate of the plumes (observed as two-dimensional objects in the plane of the sky) is initially linear and ranges from 20,000 to 30,000 km{sup 2} s{sup -1} reaching maximum projected areas from 2 to 15 Mm{sup 2}. Maximum contrast of the dark flows relative to the bright prominence plasma in SOT images is negative and ranges from -10% for smaller flows to -50% for larger flows. Passive scalar 'cork movies' derived from NAVE measurements show that prominence plasma is entrained by the upflows, helping to counter the ubiquitous downflow streams in the prominence. Plume formation shows no clear temporal periodicity. However, it is common to find 'active cavities' beneath prominences that can spawn many upflows in succession before going dormant. The mean flow recurrence time in these active locations is roughly 300-500 s (5-8 minutes). Locations remain active on timescales of tens of minutes up to several hours. Using a column density ratio measurement and reasonable assumptions on plume and prominence geometries, we estimate that the mass density in the dark cavities is at most 20% of the visible prominence density, implying that a single large plume could supply up to 1% of the mass of a typical quiescent prominence. We hypothesize that the plumes are generated from a Rayleigh-Taylor instability taking place on the boundary between the buoyant cavities and the overlying prominence. Characteristics, such as plume size and frequency, may be modulated by the strength and direction of the cavity magnetic field relative to the prominence magnetic field. We conclude that buoyant plumes are a source of quiescent prominence mass as well as a mechanism by which prominence plasma is advected upward, countering constant gravitational drainage.

  3. Spot-Oiling Johnsongrass.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Fred C.; Norris, M. J.; Rea, H. E.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kerosene or diesel fuel oil reduced the stand of the grass 95 percent following 4 applications in each of 4 tests. Ten thousand gallons of this mixture were used at College Station for crown-oiling scattered second gowth Johnsongrass in 49 1 acres... and kerosene kill tender second-growth ~hnsongrass when temperatures are high. lowever, they are slow in killing the grass uring low temperatures and when the grass .ears the boot stage. Oil-soluble dinitro and :her proved fortifiers can be added to diesel...

  4. Observations of the plume generated by the December 2005 oil depot explosions and prolonged fire at Buncefield (Hertfordshire, UK) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of ~300 tonnes of unleaded petrol, which had overspilled from a storage tank. At the time of ignition, petrol and pet

  5. Showmaker-Levy 9 and plume-forming collisions on Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boslough, M.B.E.; Crawford, D.A.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational models for the July, 1994 collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter have provided a framework for interpreting the observational data. Imaging, photometry, and spectroscopy data from ground-based, Hubble Space Telescope, and Galileo spacecraft instruments are consistent with phenomena that were dominated by the generation of incandescent fireballs that were ballistically ejected to high altitudes, where they formed plumes that subsequently collapsed over large areas of Jupiter`s atmosphere. Applications of similar computational models to collisions into Earth`s atmosphere show that a very similar sequence of events should take place for NEO impacts with energies as low as 3 megatons, recurring on 100 year timescales or less. This result suggests that the 1908 Tunguska event was a plume-forming atmospheric explosion, and that some of the phenomena associated with it might be related to the ejection and collapse of a high plume. Hazards associated with plume growth and collapse should be included in the evaluation of the impact threat to Earth, and opportunities should be sought for observational validation of atmospheric impact models by exploiting data already being collected from the natural flux of multi-kiloton to megaton sized objects that constantly enter Earth`s atmosphere on annual to decadal timescales.

  6. Multi-decadal projections of surface and interior pathways of the Fukushima Cesium-137 radioactive plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    England, Matthew

    contaminated with radionuclides, including Cesium-137, were released into the Pacific Ocean. With a halfMulti-decadal projections of surface and interior pathways of the Fukushima Cesium-137 radioactive of the leaked Cs-137 in the North Pacific Ocean. The simulations suggest that the contaminated plume would have

  7. Impact of Ethanol on Benzene Plume Lengths: Microbial and Modeling Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Impact of Ethanol on Benzene Plume Lengths: Microbial and Modeling Studies Rula A. Deeb1 ; Jonathan with Federal Clean Air Act requirements for carbon monoxide and ozone attainment, ethanol is being considered as a replacement for MTBE. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential impact of ethanol on benzene

  8. Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenes, Athanasios

    for a proposed solar chimney facility in southwestern Australia. A range of temperatures and updraft velocities technology for converting solar energy into electricity that has shown promise in recent years is the so1 Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study

  9. Dexou low pH plume baseline permeable reactive barrier options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, M.A.

    2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The current Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) baseline configuration consists of a limestone trench and a granular cast iron trench in series. This report provides information relative to the use of PRB technology for the remediation of the D-Area low pH groundwater plumes.

  10. Can the transition zone test the Plate and Plume hypotheses? Gillian R. Foulger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Can the transition zone test the Plate and Plume hypotheses? Gillian R. Foulger Dept. Earth wave-speed anomalies above, within and below the transition zone. The Plate model, in contrast and on into the transition zone, but rarely, if ever, deeper and through the 660-km discontinuity. The 410-km discontinuity

  11. Optimal design of pump-and-treat systems under uncertain hydraulic conductivity and plume distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bau, Domenico A.

    Optimal design of pump-and-treat systems under uncertain hydraulic conductivity and plume of the cleanup by pump-and-treat of polluted shallow aquifers. In the problem being investigated, hydraulic accordingly the design of the pump-and-treat system for the remainder of the remedial process. The study

  12. Temperatures in ambient mantle and plumes: Constraints from basalts, picrites, and komatiites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    below oceanic ridges, islands, and plateaus, on the basis of the petrology and geochemistry of erupted plumes; ambient mantle temperatures; petrology; mid ocean ridge basalt. Index Terms: 3610 Mineralogy and Petrology: Geochemical modeling (1009, 8410); 3619 Mineralogy and Petrology: Magma genesis and partial

  13. Measurements of Outflow Velocities in On-Disk Plumes from EIS Hinode Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Hui; Li, Bo; Huang, Zhenghua; Jiao, Fangran; Mou, Chaozhou

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of plumes to the solar wind has been subject to hot debate in the past decades. The EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode provides a unique means to deduce outflow velocities at coronal heights via direct Doppler shift measurements of coronal emission lines. Such direct Doppler shift measurements were not possible with previous spectrometers. We measure the outflow velocity at coronal heights in several on-disk long-duration plumes, which are located in coronal holes and show significant blue shifts throughout the entire observational period. In one case, a plume is measured 4 hours apart. The deduced outflow velocities are consistent, suggesting that the flows are quasi-steady. Furthermore, we provide an outflow velocity profile along the plumes, finding that the velocity corrected for the line-of-sight effect can reach 10 km s$^{-1}$ at 1.02 $R_{\\odot}$, 15 km s$^{-1}$ at 1.03 $R_{\\odot}$, and 25 km s$^{-1}$ at 1.05 $R_{\\odot}$. This clear signature of steady acceleration, combined...

  14. Continuous Plume Monitoring Using Wireless Sensors: Proof of Concept in Intermediate Scale Tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Qi "Chee"

    managers and planners. Groundwater monitoring is an important component in the design of strategies is used to build and calibrate groundwater flow and transport models to pre- dict plume behavior resulting from the spatial vari- ability of soil properties cannot be fully characterized using only

  15. Oil shale research in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jianqiu, W.; Jialin, Q. (Beijing Graduate School, Petroleum Univ., Beijing (CN))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been continued efforts and new emergence in oil shale research in Chine since 1980. In this paper, the studies carried out in universities, academic, research and industrial laboratories in recent years are summarized. The research areas cover the chemical structure of kerogen; thermal behavior of oil shale; drying, pyrolysis and combustion of oil shale; shale oil upgrading; chemical utilization of oil shale; retorting waste water treatment and economic assessment.

  16. Production of Shale Oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loper, R. D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan...

  17. Oil Market Assessment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on Energy Information Administration (EIA) contacts and trade press reports, overall U.S. and global oil supplies appear to have been minimally impacted by yesterday's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

  18. Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

  19. Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oil/gas collector/separator for recovery of oil leaking, for example, from an offshore or underwater oil well. The separator is floated over the point of the leak and tethered in place so as to receive oil/gas floating, or forced under pressure, toward the water surface from either a broken or leaking oil well casing, line, or sunken ship. The separator is provided with a downwardly extending skirt to contain the oil/gas which floats or is forced upward into a dome wherein the gas is separated from the oil/water, with the gas being flared (burned) at the top of the dome, and the oil is separated from water and pumped to a point of use. Since the density of oil is less than that of water it can be easily separated from any water entering the dome.

  20. Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pride, S.R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic wavesbe expected to enhance oil production. INTRODUCTION The hopethe reservoir can cause oil production to increase. Quite

  1. Water Heaters (Storage Oil) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oil) Water Heaters (Storage Oil) Water Heater, Storage Oil - v1.0.xlsx More Documents & Publications Water Heaters (Tankless Electric) Water Heaters (Storage Electric)...

  2. The Vapor Plume at Material Disposal Are C in Relation to Pajarito Corridor Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masse, William B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor plume made up of volatile organic compounds is present beneath Material Disposal Area C (MDA C) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The location and concentrations within the vapor plume are discussed in relation to existing and planned facilities and construction activities along Pajarito Road (the 'Pajarito Corridor') and in terms of worker health and safety. This document provides information that indicates that the vapor plume does not pose a threat to the health of LANL workers nor will it pose a threat to workers during construction of proposed facilities along Pajarito Road. The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) monitors emissions, effluents, and environmental media to meet environmental compliance requirements, determine actions to protect the environment, and monitor the long-term health of the local environment. LANL also studies and characterizes 'legacy' waste from past Laboratory operations to make informed decisions regarding eventual corrective actions and the disposition of that waste. Starting in 1969, these activities have been annually reported in the LANL Environmental Report (formerly Environmental Surveillance Report), and are detailed in publicly accessible technical reports meeting environmental compliance requirements. Included among the legacy sites being investigated are several formerly used material disposal areas (MDAs) set aside by the Laboratory for the general on-site disposal of waste from mission-related activities. One such area is MDA C located in Technical Area 50 (TA-50), which was used for waste disposal between 1948 and 1974. The location of TA-50 is depicted in Figure 1. The present paper uses a series of maps and cross sections to address the public concerns raised about the vapor plume at MDA C. As illustrated here, extensive sampling and data interpretation indicate that the vapor plume at MDA C does not pose a threat to the health of LANL workers nor will it pose a threat to workers during construction of the proposed facilities and utility trenches. The public cannot be directly exposed to the vapor plume beneath MDA C because Pajarito Road is closed to the public.

  3. Innovative Strategy For Long Term Monitoring Of Metal And Radionuclide Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Millings, Margaret R.; Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Many government and private industry sites that were once contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. The sites will require long term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality at these "legacy" sites. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site, the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. There is a need to optimize the performance and manage the cost of long term surveillance and monitoring at their sites. Currently, SRNL is initiating a pilot field test using alternative protocols for long term monitoring of metals and radionuclides. A key component of the approach is that monitoring efforts are focused on measurement of low cost metrics related to hydrologic and chemical conditions that control contaminant migration. The strategy combines careful monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions with measurement of master variables such as chemical surrogates along with a smaller number of standard well analyses. In plumes contaminated with metals, master variables control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. Significant changes in these variables will result in conditions whereby the plume may not be stable and therefore can be used to predict possible plume migration. Conversely, concentration measurements for all types of contaminants in groundwater are a lagging indicator plume movement - major changes contaminant concentrations indicate that contamination has migrated. An approach based on measurement of master variables and explicit monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions combined with traditional metrics should lead to improved monitoring while simultaneously reducing costs. This paradigm is being tested at the SRS F-Area where an innovative passive remedial system is being monitored and evaluated over the long term prior to traditional regulatory closure. Contaminants being addressed at this site are uranium, strontium-90, iodine-129, and tritium. We believe that the proposed strategies will be more effective in early identification of potential risks; these strategies will also be cost effective because controlling variables are relatively simple to measure. These variables also directly reflect the evolution of the plume through time, so that the monitoring strategy can be modified as the plume 'ages'. This transformational long-term monitoring paradigm will generate large cost savings to DOE, other federal agencies and industry and will provide improved performance and leading indicators of environmental management performance.

  4. CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellman Jr., R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature, type of shale and oil content of shale isof Sulfur in Colorado Oil Shale Oil yield of shale, gal/toncontent of the shale, and shale oil content of the rock can

  5. Formation of ozone and growth of aerosols in young smoke plumes from biomass burning: 1. Lagrangian parcel studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarado, Matthew James

    We have developed a new model of the gas- and aerosol-phase chemistry of biomass burning smoke plumes called Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP). Here we use ASP combined with a Lagrangian parcel model to simulate the chemistry ...

  6. Origin of geochemical heterogeneity in the mantle : constraints from volcanism associated with Hawaiian and Kerguelen mantle plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Guangping

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lavas derived from long-lived mantle plumes provide important information of mantle compositions and the processes that created the geochemical heterogeneity within the mantle. Kerguelen and Hawaii are two long-lived mantle ...

  7. Study of the spatial coherence of high order harmonic radiation generated from pre-formed plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, M.; Singhal, H.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Khan, R. A.; Gupta, P. D. [Laser Plasma Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, M.P. (India)

    2013-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the spatial coherence of the high order harmonic radiation generated by the interaction of 45 fs Ti:sapphire laser beam with carbon (graphite) plasma plume has been carried out using Young's double slit interferometry. It is observed that the spatial coherence varies with harmonic order, laser focal spot size in plasma plume, and peaks at an optimal spot size. It is also observed that the spatial coherence is higher when the laser pulse is focused before the plasma plume than when focused after the plume, and it decreases with increase in the harmonic order. The optimum laser parameters and the focusing conditions to achieve good spatial coherence with high harmonic conversion have been identified, which is desirable for practical applications of the harmonic radiation.

  8. Numerical modeling of multiphase plumes: a comparative study between two-fluid and mixed-fluid integral models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhaumik, Tirtharaj

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the physics of multiphase plumes and their simulation through numerical modeling has been an important area of research in recent times in the area of environmental fluid mechanics. The two renowned numerical modeling types...

  9. Used Oil and Filter Disposal Used Oil: Create a segregated storage area or container. Label the container "Waste Oil Only".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Used Oil and Filter Disposal Used Oil: Create a segregated storage area or container. Label the container "Waste Oil Only". Maintain a written log to document all amounts and types of oil added to the container. No solvents, oil contaminated with solvents, PCBs, non-petroleum based oils, or any other

  10. Oil removal from water via adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, William Edward

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Inorganic adsorbents, such as perlite and glass wool, do not have high oil adsorption capacities compared to organ- ics and the capacities are dependent on the viscosity of the oils. The inorganic adsorbents have higher oil adsorption capacities in more... IV Table V Table VI Significant Facts about Major Oil Spills Viscosity of Test Oils Determined by Capillary Viscometer Percent of Oil Remaining in Water After Removal of Oil-Carrier Combination Maximum Oil Adsorption Capacity for Light Crude...

  11. Enhanced Oil Recovery of Viscous Oil by Injection of Water-in-Oil Emulsion Made with Used Engine Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Xuebing

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    was proposed for emulsion generation because of several key advantages: more favorable viscosity that results in better emulsion injectivity, soot particles within the oil that readily promote stable emulsions, almost no cost of the oil itself and relatively...

  12. Virent is Replacing Crude Oil

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2A—Conversion Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors, Distributed Models, and Refinery Co-Processing Virent is Replacing Crude Oil Randy Cortright, Founder & Chief Technology Officer, Virent

  13. Oil and Gas Conservation (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Parts 1 and 2 of this chapter contain a broad range of regulations pertaining to oil and gas conservation, including requirements for the regulation of oil and gas exploration and extraction by the...

  14. Oil and Gas Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oil and Gas section of the Tennessee Code, found in Title 60, covers all regulations, licenses, permits, and laws related to the production of natural gas. The laws create the Oil and Gas...

  15. Business cycles in oil economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Mutairi, N.H.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the impact of oil price shocks on output fluctuations of several oil-exporting economies. In most studies of business cycles, the role of oil price is ignored; the few studies that use oil price as one of the variables in the system focus on modeling oil-importing economies. The vector autoregression (VAR) technique is used to consider the cases of Norway, Nigeria, and Mexico. Both atheoretical and structural' VARs are estimated to determine the importance of oil price impulses on output variations. The study reports two types of results: variance decomposition and impulse response functions, with particular emphasis on the issues of stationarity and co-integration among the series. The empirical results suggest that shocks to oil price are important in explaining output variations. In most cases, shocks to oil price are shown to explain more than 20% of the forecast variance of output over a 40-quarter horizon.

  16. fuel_oil.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand Motor444B (11-19-10)Fuel Oil

  17. Oil | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake YourDepartment ofCDepartmentthe ChiefOil Oil For the

  18. Oil and Gas Air Heaters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kou, G.; Wang, H.; Zhou, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the relation of hot-air temperature, oil or gas consumption and fresh airflow is determined based on energy equilibrium....

  19. Analysis Patterns for Oil Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Zhen; Guangzhen Shao

    We present analysis patterns to describe the structure of oil refineries. The Refinery Produc tion Unit Pattern describes the structure of units and unit groups. The Oil Storage Pattern describes the structure of tanks and tank groups. The Oil Delivery Pattern describes the structure of stations for import and export of oil. The Production Process Pattern describes the productionprocess. The audience for this paper includes analysts, designers, and programmers who are involved in developing Refinery Information Systems.

  20. Oil and Gas Air Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kou, G.; Wang, H.; Zhou, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the relation of hot-air temperature, oil or gas consumption and fresh airflow is determined based on energy equilibrium....

  1. Nineteenth oil shale symposium proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, J.H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains 23 selections. Some of the titles are: Effects of maturation on hydrocarbon recoveries from Canadian oil shale deposits; Dust and pressure generated during commercial oil shale mine blasting: Part II; The petrosix project in Brazil - An update; Pathway of some trace elements during fluidized-bed combustion of Israeli Oil Shale; and Decommissioning of the U.S. Department of Energy Anvil Points Oil Shale Research Facility.

  2. Determination of transport parameters from coincident chloride and tritium plumes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fryar, Alan Ernest

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -radioactive waste, but rad1onuclides are often toxic at far lower concentrations than are hazardous non-radi oacti ve speci es (Freeze and Cherry, 1979). Most radioactive waste, in terms of activity, is generated at vari ous stages of what Freeze and Cherry...DETERMINATION OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS FROM COINCIDENT CHLORIDE AND TRITIUM PLUMES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY A Thesis by ALAN ERNEST FRYAR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  3. Determination of transport parameters from coincident chloride and tritium plumes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fryar, Alan Ernest

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (after Barraclough et al. , 1981). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Well layout in the vicinity of the ICPP (after Lewis and Jensen, 1984). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Contour map of the ICPP chloride plume. Concentrations... discharged to the ICPP disposal well during the period January 1962-December 1981 (after Lewis and Jensen, 1984). 40 50 LIST OF TABLES Table page Chloride concentrations at monitoring wells in the vicinity of the ICPP during the period October 1980...

  4. A study of exhaust plume interactions with external flow by the hydraulic analogy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawton, Stephen Hayes

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Office, United States Army, Grant No. DA-ERO-78-G-028, The Aeronautical Research Institute of Sweden, Bromma, Sweden, November, 1984 Nyberg, S. E. , and Agrell, J. , "Effects of Control Fins and Angle of Attack on Plume Afterbody Flow... Simulations, " Final Technical Report, European Research Office, United States Army, Contract No. DAJA-81-C-1213, The Aeronautical Research Institute of Sweden, Bromma, Sweden, November, 1984. Page, R. H. , "A Theory for Incipient Separation, " Qftg[t80]g...

  5. Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flows: Experimental Studies on the Turbulence of Multiphase Plumes and Tidal Vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, Duncan Burnette

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Akker 1999), and ocean CO2 sequestration (Adams and Wannamaker 2005; Adams and Wannamaker 2006). In particular, ocean CO2 sequestration has been noted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in its 2005 special report on Carbon Dioxide... for direct carbon sequestration in the oceans have been considered as a means to mitigate the effects on global warming of burning fossil fuels. While the concept of CO2 sequestration is promising, the turbulent structures in multiphase plumes...

  6. LIF-imaging and gas-phase diagnostics of laser desorbed MALDI-matrix plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puretzky, A.A.; Geohegan, D.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first gated LIF-imaging and absorption spectroscopy has been performed on laser desorbed plumes from organic crystals which are commonly used as MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) matrices. These plasma diagnostic techniques, including ion probe measurements were employed to investigate the desorbed products, densities, fractional ionization, and velocity distributions of the plume of ejecta which is typically employed as the main desorption product in the mass spectrometry analysis of large biomolecules. Ultraviolet pulsed 193-nm and 248-nm irradiation of 3-hydroxypicolinic acid (3-HPA) crystals were studied to understand the effect of very different gas-phase absorption cross sections measured here for this material. In both cases, LIF imaging revealed two plume components: a fast (maximum {approximately} 0.1 cm/{micro}s) low-intensity component which appear to be 3-HPA fragments, and a slower component of 3-HPA expanding at 0.05 cm/{micro}s. In the case of ArF-laser irradiation, optical absorption spectroscopy indicated a breaking of the intramolecular hydrogen bond in the gas-phase matrix material.

  7. Propagation dynamics of laterally colliding plasma plumes in laser-blow-off of thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R. K.; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.; Kumar, Ajai, E-mail: ajai@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a systematic investigation of two plume interactions at different spatial separation (3-7?mm) in laser-blow-off. The plasmas plumes are created using Laser-blow-off (LBO) scheme of a thin film. The fast imaging technique is used to record the evolution of seed plasmas and the interaction zone which is formed as a result of interaction of the two seed plasmas. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy is used to study evolution of optical emissions of the species present in the different regions of the plasmas. Neutral Li emissions (Li I 670.8?nm (2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} ? 2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2}) and Li I 610.3?nm (2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2} ? 3d {sup 2}D{sub 3/2,5/2})) are dominant in the plasmas but significant differences are observed in the emission and estimated plasma parameters of the seed and the interaction zone. The transport of plasma species from the seed plasmas to the interaction zone is discussed in the terms of plume divergence, kinetic energy of particles, and ion acoustic speed. An attempt is made to understand the formation and dynamics of the interaction zone in the colliding LBO seed plasmas.

  8. Dynamics of laser-blow-off induced Li plume in confined geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R K; Kumar, Ajai [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamics of Li plasma plume created by laser-blow-off technique in air ambient is reported. Plasma plume dynamics and its optical emission are investigated in planar and confined geometries using time resolved shadowgraph imaging and optical emission spectroscopy. Significant differences in the plasma characteristics in confined geometry are quantitatively investigated by comparing the plasma parameters (temperature and density) in free expansion and confined geometry configurations. Dynamics and physical parameters of the primary as well as the reflected shock waves (in confined geometry) and their interactions with expanding plasma are briefly addressed. A large enhancement in the emission intensities of Li I 610.3 nm (2p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}? 3d {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,5/2}) and 670.8 nm (2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}? 2p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}) is correlated with the shock wave dynamics in the two geometries. Strong self reversal in the neutral emission infers an increase in the population density of neutrals within the confined plasma plume.

  9. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

  10. Plume dispersion sensitivity to upper-level wind variations in a Chilean coastal environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. Brown; Brown, M.J.; Williams, M.D.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Government and industry leaders in Chile are concerned with the impact of coastal smelter emissions on the air quality of surrounding communities and the inland capitol city of Santiago. The smelter emissions contain large amounts of sulfur and heavy metals. Because several large smelters are located along the coast, an air quality modeling system must be able to handle flow in both a coastal and mountainous environment. Linked seabreeze and mountain-induced slope flows which change in time and space have been best handled using prognostic numerical models. We are using a prognostic mesoscale meteorological model (HOTMAC - Higher-Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric Circulation) linked to a random walk/puff model (RAPTAD - Random Particle Transport and Dispersion) in order to simulate plume transport over hundreds of kilometers. In this paper, we test the sensitivity of plume dispersion to variations in the prescribed wind direction. These tests were motivated by our desire to evaluate the effect of the uncertainties inherent in rawinsonde wind measurements and large-scale weather wind-field forecasts, which are often used as input to meteorological models, as well as to develop a climatology of plume transport direction based on prevailing wind direction.

  11. OIL ANALYSIS LAB TRIVECTOR ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OIL ANALYSIS LAB TRIVECTOR ANALYSIS This test method is a good routine test for the overall condition of the oil, the cleanliness, and can indicate the presence of wear metals that could be coming of magnetic metal particles within the oil. This may represent metals being worn from components (i

  12. Oil shale: Technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oil Shale Program as of the end of FY 86. The report consists of (1) a status of oil shale development, (2) a description of the DOE Oil Shale Program, (3) an FY 86 oil shale research summary, and (4) a summary of FY 86 accomplishments. Discoveries were made in FY 86 about the physical and chemical properties and behavior of oil shales, process chemistry and kinetics, in situ retorting, advanced processes, and the environmental behavior and fate of wastes. The DOE Oil Shale Program shows an increasing emphasis on eastern US oil shales and in the development of advanced oil shale processing concepts. With the award to Foster Wheeler for the design of oil shale conceptual plants, the first step in the development of a systems analysis capability for the complete oil shale process has been taken. Unocal's Parachute Creek project, the only commercial oil shale plant operating in the United States, is operating at about 4000 bbl/day. The shale oil is upgraded at Parachute Creek for input to a conventional refinery. 67 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Oil and Global Adjustment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brad Setser

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current account surplus of the world’s major oil exporting economies – defined as the IMF’s fuel-exporting emerging economies plus Norway – increased from $110b to about $500b between 2002 and 2006. 2 In 2006, the current account surplus of the Gulf

  14. Dying for oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sachs, A.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the fight and execution of Ken Saro-Wiwa, the Ogoni leader who defended his people`s land on the Niger delta against oil development encouraged by the government and persued by the Royal/Dutch Shell Co. Political reprocussions and heightened vigilance of environmental activists are discussed at length.

  15. Production of Shale Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loper, R. D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the principal features of a proposed $5 billion project to develop facilities for production of 100,000 barrels per day of synthetic crude from oil shale. Subjects included are resource evaluation, environmental baseline studies, plans for acquisition of permits...

  16. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, A.J. (BHP Petroleum, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  17. World Oil Transit Chokepoints

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chokepoints are narrow channels along widely used global sea routes, some so narrow that restrictions are placed on the size of vessel that can navigate through them. They are a critical part of global energy security due to the high volume of oil traded through their narrow straits.

  18. Structural Oil Pan With Integrated Oil Filtration And Cooling System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freese, V, Charles Edwin (Westland, MI)

    2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An oil pan for an internal combustion engine includes a body defining a reservoir for collecting engine coolant. The reservoir has a bottom and side walls extending upwardly from the bottom to present a flanged lip through which the oil pan may be mounted to the engine. An oil cooler assembly is housed within the body of the oil pan for cooling lubricant received from the engine. The body includes an oil inlet passage formed integrally therewith for receiving lubricant from the engine and delivering lubricant to the oil cooler. In addition, the body also includes an oil pick up passage formed integrally therewith for providing fluid communication between the reservoir and the engine through the flanged lip.

  19. Integration of Predicted Atmospheric Contaminant Plumes into ArcView GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koffman, Larry D.

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) plays a key role in emergency response scenarios in which there may be a release of atmospheric chemical or radiological contamination at the DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). Meteorologists at SRNL use a variety of tools to predict the path of the plume and levels of contamination along the path. These predictions are used to guide field teams that take sample measurements for verification. Integration of these predicted plumes as well as field measurements into existing Geographic Information System (GIS) interactive maps provides key additional information for decision makers during an emergency. In addition, having this information in GIS format facilitates sharing the information with other agencies that use GIS. In order to be useful during an emergency, an application for converting predictions or measurements into GIS format must be automated and simple to use. Thus, a key design goal in developing such applications is ease of use. Simple menu selections and intuitive forms with graphical user interfaces are used to accomplish this goal. Applications have been written to convert two different predictive code results into ArcView GIS. Meteorologists at SRNL use the Puff/Plume code, which is tied to real-time wind data, to predict the direction and spread of the atmospheric plume for early assessment. The calculated circular puffs are converted into an ArcView polygon shapefile with attributes for predicted time, dose, and radius of the puff. The meteorologists use the more sophisticated Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) to predict particle dispersion and deposition. The calculational grid is brought into ArcView as a point shapefile and then interpolated to ARC GRID format using Spatial Analyst. This GRID can then be contoured into a line shapefile, which is easily shared with other agencies. The deposition grid is also automatically contoured for values that correspond to FDA Derived Intervention Levels for beef, produce, and dairy products. Decision makers at SRS routinely use these predicted plumes to direct field teams. In the case of a strong release, this information can be used to decide whether to evacuate a particular area. Having this information in GIS format may aid the decision maker because other infrastructure information can be overlaid with geographic reference.

  20. Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND SOCIAL IMPACTS OF OIL product, product that does notthe quantity of oil products that escapes from pipelines. ”transport of crude oil and petroleum products accounted for

  1. Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VII. IMPACTS OF OIL CONSUMPTION . . . . . . .and the location of oil consumption necessitates that crudere?neries. VII. IMPACTS OF OIL CONSUMPTION The combustion of

  2. Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bution of the impacts of oil production and consumption. Theof harmful effects from oil production and use. A criticaland procedural impacts of oil production and consumption

  3. Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

  4. Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EOR continues to unlock oil resources. Oil & Gas Journal, [of conventional oil resource availability. Estimates ofthe tar sands and heavy oil resource in Figure 10. Note that

  5. Shale oil recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zerga, Daniel P. (Concord, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of producing within a subterranean oil shale deposit a retort chamber containing permeable fragmented material wherein a series of explosive charges are emplaced in the deposit in a particular configuration comprising an initiating round which functions to produce an upward flexure of the overburden and to initiate fragmentation of the oil shale within the area of the retort chamber to be formed, the initiating round being followed in a predetermined time sequence by retreating lines of emplaced charges developing further fragmentation within the retort zone and continued lateral upward flexure of the overburden. The initiating round is characterized by a plurality of 5-spot patterns and the retreating lines of charges are positioned and fired along zigzag lines generally forming retreating rows of W's. Particular time delays in the firing of successive charges are disclosed.

  6. Oil shale retort apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reeves, Adam A. (Grand Junction, CO); Mast, Earl L. (Norman, OK); Greaves, Melvin J. (Littleton, CO)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A retorting apparatus including a vertical kiln and a plurality of tubes for delivering rock to the top of the kiln and removal of processed rock from the bottom of the kiln so that the rock descends through the kiln as a moving bed. Distributors are provided for delivering gas to the kiln to effect heating of the rock and to disturb the rock particles during their descent. The distributors are constructed and disposed to deliver gas uniformly to the kiln and to withstand and overcome adverse conditions resulting from heat and from the descending rock. The rock delivery tubes are geometrically sized, spaced and positioned so as to deliver the shale uniformly into the kiln and form symmetrically disposed generally vertical paths, or "rock chimneys", through the descending shale which offer least resistance to upward flow of gas. When retorting oil shale, a delineated collection chamber near the top of the kiln collects gas and entrained oil mist rising through the kiln.

  7. Imbibition assisted oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pashayev, Orkhan H.

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    as two superimposed continuous porous media. In the dual porosity model, the fluid flow between the matrix blocks and the surrounding fractures is characterized by the transfer functions. For the transfer functions, it is a prerequisite.... 1.2 Capillary Imbibition Capillary imbibition is described as a spontaneous penetration of a wetting phase into a porous media while displacing a non-wetting phase by means of capillary pressure, e.g., water imbibing into an oil-saturated rock...

  8. Emulsified industrial oils recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabris, T.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial lubricant market has been analyzed with emphasis on current and/or developing recycling and re-refining technologies. This task has been performed for the United States and other industrialized countries, specifically France, West Germany, Italy and Japan. Attention has been focused at emulsion-type fluids regardless of the industrial application involved. It was found that emulsion-type fluids in the United States represent a much higher percentage of the total fluids used than in other industrialized countries. While recycling is an active matter explored by the industry, re-refining is rather a result of other issues than the mere fact that oil can be regenerated from a used industrial emulsion. To extend the longevity of an emulsion is a logical step to keep expenses down by using the emulsion as long as possible. There is, however, another important factor influencing this issue: regulations governing the disposal of such fluids. The ecological question, the respect for nature and the natural balances, is often seen now as everybody's task. Regulations forbid dumping used emulsions in the environment without prior treatment of the water phase and separation of the oil phase. This is a costly procedure, so recycling is attractive since it postpones the problem. It is questionable whether re-refining of these emulsions - as a business - could stand on its own if these emulsions did not have to be taken apart for disposal purposes. Once the emulsion is separated into a water and an oil phase, however, re-refining of the oil does become economical.

  9. Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daley, T.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Doughty, C.A.

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Crosswell CASSM (continuous active-source seismic monitoring) data was acquired as part of the Frio-II brine pilot CO{sub 2} injection experiment. To gain insight into the CO{sub 2} plume evolution, we have integrated the 3D multiphase flow modeling code TOUGH2 with seismic simulation codes via a petrophysical model that predicts seismic velocity for a given CO{sub 2} saturation. Results of forward seismic modeling based on the CO{sub 2} saturation distribution produced by an initial TOUGH2 model compare poorly with the CASSM data, indicating that the initial flow model did not capture the actual CO{sub 2} plume dynamics. Updates to the TOUGH2 model required to better match the CASSM field data indicate vertical flow near the injection well, with increased horizontal plume growth occurring at the top of the reservoir sand. The CASSM continuous delay time data are ideal for constraining the modeled spatiotemporal evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume and allow improvement in reservoir model and estimation of CO{sub 2} plume properties.

  10. Improving Modeling of Iodine-129 Groundwater Contamination Plumes Using the System Assessment Capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirkes, J.; Nichols, W.E.; Wurstner, S.K.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Years of production of radioactive materials at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has resulted in contamination of surface, subsurface, and surface water environments. Cleanup of the site has been aided by various tools, including computer software used to predict contaminant migration in the future and estimate subsequent impacts. The System Assessment Capability (SAC) is a total systems tool designed to simulate the movement of contaminants from all waste sites at Hanford through the vadose zone, the unconfined aquifer, and the Columbia River. Except for iodine-129, most of the contaminants modeled by SAC have acceptably matched field measurements. The two most likely reasons for the inconsistency between the measured field data and SAC modeled predictions are an underestimated inventory and an overestimated sorption value (Kd). Field data tend to be point measurements taken from near the surface of the unconfined aquifer. Thus, the depth of the iodine-129 contamination plume on the site is not well characterized. Geostatistical analyses of the measured data were conducted to determine the mass of iodine-129 for four assumed plume depths within the unconfined aquifer. Several simulations for two different Kd’s using the initial SAC inventory were run to determine the effect of an overestimated sorption value on SAC modeled predictions. The initial SAC inventory was then increased for the two different Kd’s to determine the influence of an underestimated inventory on SAC modeled predictions. It was found that evidence for both an underestimated inventory and for an overestimated sorption value for iodine-129 exist. These results suggest that the Kd for iodine-129 should be reevaluated and that a more complete inventory must be generated in order to more accurately model iodine-129 groundwater contamination plumes that match available field data.

  11. Hydrogeologic analysis of remedial alternatives for the solar ponds plume, RFETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLane, C.F. III; Whidden, J.A. [McLane Environmental, L.L.C., Princeton, NJ (United States); Hopkins, J.K. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this paper is to develop a conceptual model and a hydrogeologic analysis plan for remedial alternatives being considered for the remediation of a ground water contaminant plume consisting of chiefly nitrate and uranium. The initial step in this process was to determine the adequacy of the existing data from the vast database of site information. Upon concluding that the existing database was sufficient to allow for the development of a conceptual model and then constructing the conceptual model, a hydrogeologic analysis plan was developed to evaluate several alternatives for plume remediation. The plan will be implemented using a combination of analytical and simple numerical ground water flow and contaminant transport models. This allows each portion of the study to be addressed using the appropriate tool, without having to develop a large three-dimensional numerical ground water flow and transport model, thereby reducing project costs. The analysis plan will consist of a preliminary phase of screening analyses for each of the remedial alternative scenarios, and a second phase of more comprehensive and in-depth analyses on a selected subset of remedial alternative scenarios. One of the alternatives which will be analyzed is phytoremediation (remediation of soil and ground water via uptake of chemicals by plants) because of the potential for relatively low capital and operation and maintenance costs, passive nature, and potential to provide long-term protection of the surface water. The results of these hydrogeological analyses will be factored into the selection of the preferred remedial alternative, or combination of alternatives, for the contaminant plume.

  12. Dynamics of the plumes produced by ultrafast laser ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, T.; Lunney, J. G. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Amoruso, S.; Bruzzese, R.; Wang, X. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche and CNR-SPIN, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Ni, X. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology and Education, Tianjin 300222 (China)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed ultrafast laser ablation of a metallic target (Nickel) in high vacuum addressing both expansion dynamics of the various plume components (ionic and nanoparticle) and basic properties of the ultrafast laser ablation process. While the ion temporal profile and ion angular distribution were analyzed by means of Langmuir ion probe technique, the angular distribution of the nanoparticulate component was characterized by measuring the thickness map of deposition on a transparent substrate. The amount of ablated material per pulse was found by applying scanning white light interferometry to craters produced on a stationary target. We have also compared the angular distribution of both the ionic and nanoparticle components with the Anisimov model. While the agreement for the ion angular distribution is very good at any laser fluence (from ablation threshold up to {approx_equal}1 J/cm{sup 2}), some discrepancies of nanoparticle plume angular distribution at fluencies above {approx_equal}0.4 J/cm{sup 2} are interpreted in terms of the influence of the pressure exerted by the nascent atomic plasma plume on the initial hydrodynamic evolution of the nanoparticle component. Finally, analyses of the fluence threshold and maximum ablation depth were also carried out, and compared to predictions of theoretical models. Our results indicate that the absorbed energy is spread over a length comparable with the electron diffusion depth L{sub c} ({approx_equal}30 nm) of Ni on the timescale of electron-phonon equilibration and that a logarithmic dependence is well-suited for the description of the variation in the ablation depth on laser fluence in the investigated range.

  13. Application Of ERT For Tracking CO2 Plume Growth And Movement At The SECARB Cranfield Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigan, C R; Ramirez, A L; Newmark, R L; Aines, R; Friedmann, S J

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) installed to track the development of an injected subsurface CO{sub 2} plume at the SECARB Cranfield, MS. sequestration site will be the deepest subsurface application of this method to date. ERT utilizes vertical arrays of electrodes, usually in a cross-well arrangement, to perform four-electrode measurements of changes in the spatial distribution of electrical resistance within a subsurface formation. Because a formation containing super-critical CO{sub 2} is approximately five times as resistive as its surroundings, significant resistance changes are anticipated during plume growth and movement within a brine-filled formation. ERT has also been shown to be quite sensitive to CO{sub 2} saturation changes. The Cranfield ERT electrode arrays will be emplaced at a depth exceeding 10,000 ft. (3280 m); the system design and installation must address significant challenges associated with both the depth and borehole conditions including temperatures of 258 F (126 C), pressures exceeding 5000 psi and a groundwater pH of 3. In addition, the system must allow co-located emplacement and concurrent operation with other monitoring techniques that utilize the same boreholes. ERT electrode and cabling will be attached to the outside of the well casing, allowing free access to the interior of the well, which is required by some of the other monitoring techniques being fielded. We will highlight these design challenges along with preliminary simulations indicating the anticipated level of imaging and the advantages of applying the technique in conjunction with other methods (such as cross-well seismics) to more accurately track the properties, location and movement of CO{sub 2} plumes.

  14. Canadian Oil Sands: Canada An Emerging Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    (collectively "statements") with respect to: expectations regarding crude oil production, global energy demand1 Canadian Oil Sands: Canada ­ An Emerging Energy Superpower 0 University of Alberta February 8 Oil Sands Limited ("Canadian Oil Sands"), Syncrude Canada Ltd. ("Syncrude") and the oil sands industry

  15. BP Oil Spill November 10, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    BP Oil Spill Qiyam Tung November 10, 2011 1 Introduction Figure 1: BP Oil spill (source: http://thefoxisblack.com/2010/05/02/the-bp-oil-spill-in-the-gulf-of-mexico/) Last year, there was a major oil spill caused major techniques to minimize the threat once it happened. What kind of damage would an oil spill like this cause

  16. The twentieth oil shale symposium proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, J.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: The technical contributions of John Ward Smith in oil shale research; Oil shale rubble fires: ignition and extinguishment; Fragmentation of eastern oil shale for in situ recovery; A study of thermal properties of Chinese oil shale; and Natural invasion of native plants on retorted oil shale.

  17. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  18. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  19. Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    state oil companies, Saudi Aramco, Petroleos de Venezuela,state oil companies, Saudi Aramco, Petroleos de Venezuela,

  20. Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    English, William A. (Murrysville, PA); Young, Robert R. (Murrysville, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler 18 and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor 24 where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap 50 which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator 26 and then out to a multiplicity of holes 52 to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber 58 to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole 62 also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator 68 from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe 66 to the suction plenum 64 and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum 64.

  1. Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    English, W.A.; Young, R.R.

    1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator and then out to a multiplicity of holes to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe to the suction plenum and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum. 3 figs.

  2. Table 1. Crude Oil Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    December 1980; Form EIA-14, "Refiners' Monthly Cost Report," January 1981 to present. 1. Crude Oil Prices 2 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996...

  3. Table 1. Crude Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    December 1980; Form EIA-14, "Refiners' Monthly Cost Report," January 1981 to present. 1. Crude Oil Prices 2 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997...

  4. Oil and Gas Exploration (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to activities conducted for the purpose of obtaining geological, geophysical, or geochemical information about oil or gas including seismic activities but excluding...

  5. Carbo-metallic oil conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, G.D.

    1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method for catalytically cracking reduced crude oil feeds comprising Conradson carbon in the presence of a premised catalyst temperature of about 760/sup 0/C (1400/sup 0/F). The cracking is carried out to form hydrocarbon products comprising gasoline, which method comprises maintaining the functions of oil feed, Conradson carbon, hydrogen in deposited carbonaceous material, and water addition to the oil feed to be converted in accordance with the relationship of operating parameters for a catalyst to oil ratio in the range of about 4.5 to 7.5.

  6. Maps of crude oil futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masters, C.D.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Crude Oil Futures presentation shows their concept of the quantity of oil possibly present (the combination of conventional demonstrated reserves plus undiscovered recoverable resources) within the areas outlined. The Crude Oil Futures is not as an exploration map but as a perspective on the distribution of world oil. The occurrence of oil is, after all, a function of particular geologic factors that are not everywhere present. Furthermore, large amounts of oil can occur only where the several necessary independent variables (geologic factors) combine optimally. In the Western Hemisphere, similar minimal crude oil futures are shown for North America and South America. This similarity is a reflection not of similar geology but rather of the fact that most of the oil has already been produced from North America, whereas South America as a whole (except for Venezuela) possesses a geology less likely to produce oil. In Europe, Africa, and Asia, four regions are dominant: the Middle East, Libya, North Sea, and west Siberia. Paleogeography and source rock distribution were keys to this distribution - the Middle East and Libya reflecting the Tethyan association, and the North Sea and west Siberia benefitting from the Late Jurassic marine transgression into geographic environments where ocean circulation was restricted by tectonic events.

  7. Solar retorting of oil shale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, David W. (Morago, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for retorting oil shale using solar radiation. Oil shale is introduced into a first retorting chamber having a solar focus zone. There the oil shale is exposed to solar radiation and rapidly brought to a predetermined retorting temperature. Once the shale has reached this temperature, it is removed from the solar focus zone and transferred to a second retorting chamber where it is heated. In a second chamber, the oil shale is maintained at the retorting temperature, without direct exposure to solar radiation, until the retorting is complete.

  8. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume V. Supporting data for estuarine hydrology, discharge plume analysis, chemical oceanography, biological oceanography, and data management. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume V contains appendices for the following: supporting data for estuarine hydrology and hydrography; supporting data analysis of discharge plume; supporting data for water and sediment chemistry; CTD/DO and pH profiles during biological monitoring; supporting data for nekton; and supporting data for data management.

  9. A review and assessment of variable density ground water flow effects on plume formation at UMTRA project sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard assumption when evaluating the migration of plumes in ground water is that the impacted ground water has the same density as the native ground water. Thus density is assumed to be constant, and does not influence plume migration. This assumption is valid only for water with relatively low total dissolved solids (TDS) or a low difference in TDS between water introduced from milling processes and native ground water. Analyses in the literature suggest that relatively minor density differences can significantly affect plume migration. Density differences as small as 0.3 percent are known to cause noticeable effects on the plume migration path. The primary effect of density on plume migration is deeper migration than would be expected in the arid environments typically present at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, where little or no natural recharge is available to drive the plume into the aquifer. It is also possible that at some UMTRA Project sites, a synergistic affect occurred during milling operations, where the mounding created by tailings drainage (which created a downward vertical gradient) and the density contrast between the process water and native ground water acted together, driving constituents deeper into the aquifer than either process would alone. Numerical experiments were performed with the U.S. Geological Survey saturated unsaturated transport (SUTRA) model. This is a finite-element model capable of simulating the effects of variable fluid density on ground water flow and solute transport. The simulated aquifer parameters generally are representative of the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project site where some of the highest TDS water from processing has been observed.

  10. European Market Study for BioOil (Pyrolysis Oil)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilns 6.2. Sawmill Dry Kilns 6.3. District Heating 6.4. Power Plants- Co-firing and Alternative Fuels 6-distance transportation advantages over raw biomass and wood pellets is BioOil from fast pyrolysis, or Pyrolysis Oil and district heating applications, and in the long-term as a clean burning fuel to replace diesel in industrial

  11. Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Lan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who...

  12. CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellman Jr., R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS A. Levy and R.of Metals in In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts," NACE Corrosion 80,Corrosion of Oil Shale Retort Component Materials," LBL-

  13. WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III, "Method of Breaking Shale Oil-Water Emulsion," U. S.Waters from Green River Oil Shale," Chem. and Ind. , 1. ,Effluents from In-Situ oil Shale Processing," in Proceedings

  14. Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pride, S.R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elastic-wave stimulation of oil produc- tion: A review ofCapillary-induced resonance of oil blobs in capillary tubesCapillary-induced resonance of oil blobs in porous media:

  15. CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellman Jr., R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS A. Levy and R.of Metals in In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts," NACE Corrosion 80,Elevated Temperature Corrosion of Oil Shale Retort Component

  16. WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waters from Green River Oil Shale," Chem. and Ind. , 1. ,Effluents from In-Situ oil Shale Processing," in Proceedingsin the Treatment of Oil Shale Retort Waters," in Proceedings

  17. CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellman Jr., R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elevated Temperature Corrosion of Oil Shale Retort Componentin In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts," NACE Corrosion 80, Paper No.6-10, 1981 CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS A.

  18. WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III, "Method of Breaking Shale Oil-Water Emulsion," U. S.and Biological Treatment of Shale Oil Retort Water, DraftPA (1979). H. H. Peters, Shale Oil Waste Water Recovery by

  19. Deep-Sea Research I 46 (1999) 353--369 Transmissometer measurement of POC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    * School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada Received 25 August 1997

  20. Climate Change in the Cenozoic as Seen in Deep Sea Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Wolf

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Asymmetry of interoceanic fresh-water and heat fluxes. Proc.2002. Sea-level and deep water temperature changes derivedwind forcing and surface water advection. In: G. Wefer et

  1. Geochemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal vent fluids from the Mid-Cayman Rise, Caribbean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermott, Jill Marie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the controls on organic, inorganic, and volatile species distributions in hydrothermal fluids venting at Von Damm and Piccard, two recently discovered vent fields at the ultra slow spreading Mid-Cayman ...

  2. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pylori. Arch MicrobiolP, Kelly D (1998) Helicobacter pylori porCDAB and oorDABCAcid Cycle Enzyme in Helicobacter pylori: the Malate:Quinone

  3. DEEP-SEA EXPLORATION: A GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE STEAMER ALBATROSS, HER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    seaworthy steamer, capable of making extended cruises and working with dredge and trawl in all depths to 3, for the sum of $145,800, exclusive of outfit and special equipment, which cost an addi- tional $45,000. She

  4. Deep-Sea Research II 51 (2004) 28892904 Internal wave excitation from a collapsing mixed region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Morris R.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reserved. 1. Introduction Internal gravity waves (hereafter ``IGW'') trans- port energy and momentum- proximately balances the surface zonal wind stress over seasonal or annual time scales. However, Dillon et al global mechanism for IGW excitation. In particular, observations in the Brazil Basin indicate that IGW

  5. Man and the Last Great Wilderness: Human Impact on the Deep Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    , technological developments now allow exploitation of fisheries resources, hydrocarbons and minerals below 2000 m, New Zealand, 5 Universidad Nacional Auto´noma de Me´xico, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologi´a, Me´xico, D.F., Mexico, 6 Integrative Oceanography Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La

  6. Deep-sea bioturbation and the role of the sea urchin Echinocrepis rostrata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardaro, Michael F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediment Resuspension and Gas Hydrate Stability at a Gulf ofSeries from a Seafloor Gas Hydrate Deposit on the Gulf ofprocesses observed at a gas hydrate outcropping on the

  7. Deep-Sea Research II 49 (2002) 59695990 Phytoplankton growth, microzooplankton herbivory and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bering Sea coccolithophorid bloom. We found that reduced microzooplankton grazing mortality is a key), eddies, and wind-driven vertical mixing of nutrients into surface waters, provide the compo- nents

  8. Ghosts of Oceans Past: Analysis of Microfossils from Deep Sea Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Regina

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . Elsevier. 1998. Kennett, James P. Marine Geology. Prentice Hall. 1982. CONTACT INFORMATION Name: Regina Lea Perry Address: Department of Oceanography Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3146 paleoreg@yahoo.com...

  9. Community structure of deep-sea bivalve mollusks from the northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Density, species diversity, species richness, and evenness of bivalve mollusks were measured in the deep (0.2km to 3.7km) northern Gulf of Mexico to describe the community structure of benthic bivalve mollusks. Density decreased gradually from...

  10. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospiracrunogena XCL-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Kathleen M.; Sievert, Stefan M.; Abril, Fereniki N.; Ball,Lois A.; Barrett, Chantell J.; Blake, Rodrigo A.; Boller, Amanda J.; Chain, Patrick S.G.; Clark, Justine A.; Davis, Carisa R.; Detter, Chris; Do, Kimberly F.; Dobrinski, Kimberly P.; Faza, BrandonI.; Fitzpatrick,Kelly A.; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Harmer, Tara L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Hugler, Michael; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Klotz, Martin G.; Kong, William W.; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Larimer, Frank W.; Longo, Dana L.; Lucas,Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Massey, Steven E.; Martin, Darlene D.; McCuddin, Zoe; Meyer, Folker; Moore, Jessica L.; Ocampo, Luis H.; Paul,John H.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Reep, Douglas K.; Ren, Qinghu; Ross, Rachel L.; Sato, Priscila Y.; Thomas, Phaedra; Tinkham, Lance E.; Zeruth, Gary T.

    2006-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented here is the complete genome sequence ofThiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, representative of ubiquitouschemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from deep-seahydrothermal vents. This gammaproteobacterium has a single chromosome(2,427,734 bp), and its genome illustrates many of the adaptations thathave enabled it to thrive at vents globally. It has 14 methyl-acceptingchemotaxis protein genes, including four that may assist in positioningit in the redoxcline. A relative abundance of CDSs encoding regulatoryproteins likely control the expression of genes encoding carboxysomes,multiple dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate transporters, as wellas a phosphonate operon, which provide this species with a variety ofoptions for acquiring these substrates from the environment. T. crunogenaXCL-2 is unusual among obligate sulfur oxidizing bacteria in relying onthe Sox system for the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. A 38 kbprophage is present, and a high level of prophage induction was observed,which may play a role in keeping competing populations of close relativesin check. The genome has characteristics consistent with an obligatelychemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, including few transporters predicted tohave organic allocrits, and Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle CDSs scatteredthroughout the genome.

  11. Evolutionary and functional genomics of bacteria from the cold deep sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauro, Federico M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. Karl. 2006. Community genomics among stratified microbialprofundum strains. BMC Genomics 6:122 Vezzi, A. , Campanaro,profundum strains. BMC Genomics 6:122. Chi, E. , and D. H.

  12. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UniProt, TIGRFam, Pfam, PRIAM, KEGG, COG, and InterProhierarchy of TIGRFam, PRIAM, Pfam, Smart (part of InterPro),

  13. METABOLIC POTENTIAL OF DEEP-SEA ANIMALS: REGIONAL AND GLOBAL J. J. CHILDRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thuesen, Erik V.

    ) and others have cited the need for an assessment of the role of animals in oceanic carbon flux (Bruland et al

  14. Ultrafine-grained magnetite in deep-sea sediments: Possible bacterial magnetofossils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    extraction efficiencies in this small size range and incomplete separation of magnetic minerals from other of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 ABSTRACT A new extraction technique now permits ultrafine magnetite marine sediments. These objects possibly constitute the smallest mineral fossils yet recovered from

  15. The feeding behaviour of a deep-sea holothurian, Stichopus tremulus (Gunnerus) based on in situ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

    observations and experiments using a Remotely Operated Vehicle Ian R. Hudson*, Benjamin D. Wigham, Paul A September 2003 Abstract Using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) to deploy an in situ cage experiment-2380-596-247. E-mail address: irh@soc.soton.ac.uk (I.R. Hudson). www.elsevier.com/locate/jembe Journal

  16. Standing Stocks and Faunal Zonation of Deep-Sea Benthos: Patterns and Predictions across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Chih-Lin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    constructed from 24 oceanographic institutions worldwide within the Census of Marine Life (CoML) field projects. The machine-learning algorithm, Random Forests, was employed to model and predict seafloor standing stocks from surface primary production... variables: Decadal mean and standard deviation (S.D.) of monthly net primary production (NPP) models (cbpm, vgpm), and the data inputs for the NPP models (Behrenfeld & Falkowski 1997, Westberry et al. 2008) including chlorophyll concentration (chl), sea...

  17. Comparative analysis of piezophilic bacteria : the search for adaptations to life in the deep sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerman, Ian McKenzie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C. R. (1993). Pathways of protein folding. Annual review of1994). Volume changes on protein folding. Structure (London,side chain volume upon protein folding. Amino Acid Changes

  18. Deep Sea High Pressure Desalination Mason BenYair, Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to it has become a problematic subject in every nation around the globe; one which policy, investment as a way to mitigate the energy cost that has traditionally prevented a more widespread use of this technology. Coming up with a sustainable source of water is worth the investment in research and development

  19. Deep-Sea Research II 52 (2005) 799822 Top predator distribution and abundance across the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in abundance in the oceanic zone in 1998, 2001, and 2002, owing primarily to influxes of dark shearwaters 0967-0645/$ - see front matter r 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dsr2 and location of water masses strong

  20. Deep-Sea Research II 51 (2004) 21392168 Overwintering growth and development of larval Euphausia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daly, Kendra L.

    source of food during winter, but progressively more important in spring as irradiance levels increase and extent, as sea-ice biota may provide food when other sources are scarce in the water column. During) longer than reported summer values. During winter, larvae appeared to be food-limited based

  1. Deep sea tests of a prototype of the KM3NeT digital optical module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Aharonian, F; Aiello, S; Albert, A; Ameli, F; Anassontzis, E G; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; de Asmundis, R; Band, H; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F; Baret, B; Baron, S; Belias, A; Berbee, E; Berg, A M van den; Berkien, A; Bertin, V; Beurthey, S; van Beveren, V; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Bianucci, S; Billault, M; Birbas, A; Rookhuizen, H Boer; Bormuth, R; Bouche, V; Bouhadef, B; Bourlis, G; Bouwhuis, M; Bozza, C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Cacopardo, G; Caillat, L; Calamai, M; Calvo, D; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Caruso, F; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Cereseto, R; Champion, C; Chateau, F; Chiarusi, T; Christopoulou, B; Circella, M; Classen, L; Cocimano, R; Colonges, S; Coniglione, R; Cosquer, A; Costa, M; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Curtil, C; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Rosa, G; Deniskina, N; Destelle, J -J; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q; Drakopoulou7, E; Drouhin, D; Drury, L; Durand, D; Eberl, T; Eleftheriadis, C; Elsaesser, D; Enzenhofer, A; Fermani, P; Fusco, L A; Gajana, D; Gal, T; Galata, S; Gallo, F; Garufi, F; Gebyehu, M; Giordano, V; Gizani, N; Ruiz, R Gracia; Graf, K; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Grmek, A; Habel, R; van Haren, H; Heid, T; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Henry, S; Hernandez-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hevinga, M A; van der Hoek, M; Hofestadt, J; Hogenbirk, J; Hugon, C; Hosl, J; Imbesi, M; James, C; Jansweijer, P; Jochum, J; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Kappos, E; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Keller, P; Kieft, G; Koffeman, E; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Koopstra, J; Korporaal, A; Kouchner, A; Koutsoukos, S; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Provost, H Le; Leisos, A; Lenis, D; Leonora, E; Clark, M Lindsey; Liolios, A; Alvarez, C D Llorens; Lohner, H; Presti, D Lo; Louis, F; Maccioni, E; Mannheim, K; Manolopoulos, K; Margiotta, A; Maris, O; Markou, C; Martinez-Mora, J A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Mos, S; Moudden, Y; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolaou, C; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Orzelli, A; Papageorgiou, K; Papaikonomou, A; Papaleo, R; Pavalas, G E; Peek, H; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Petridou, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, Th; Priede, M; Puhlhofer, G; Pulvirenti, S; Racca, C; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Rapidis, P A; Razis, P; Real, D; Resvanis, L; Reubelt, J; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Royon, J; Saldana, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Santangelo, A; Sapienza, P; Savvidis, I; Schmelling, J; Schnabel, J; Sedita, M; Seitz, T; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Siotis, I; Sipala, V; Solazzo, M; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J; Stolarczyk, T; Stransky, D; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Tezier, D; Theraube, S; Thompson, L F; Timmer, P; Trapierakis, H I; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tsirigotis, A; Tzamarias, S; Tzamariudaki, E; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vermeulen, J; Vernin, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D; Werneke, P; Wiggers, L; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; van Wooning, R H L; Yatkin, K; Zachariadou, K; Zonca, E; Zornoza, J D; Zúńiga, J; Zwart, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first prototype of a photo-detection unit of the future KM3NeT neutrino telescope has been deployed in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This digital optical module has a novel design with a very large photocathode area segmented by the use of 31 three inch photomultiplier tubes. It has been integrated in the ANTARES detector for in-situ testing and validation. This paper reports on the first months of data taking and rate measurements. The analysis results highlight the capabilities of the new module design in terms of background suppression and signal recognition. The directionality of the optical module enables the recognition of multiple Cherenkov photons from the same $^{40}$K decay and the localization bioluminescent activity in the neighbourhood. The single unit can cleanly identify atmospheric muons and provide sensitivity to the muon arrival directions.

  2. First results of the Instrumentation Line for the deep-sea ANTARES neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, J A; Ameli, F; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Aslanides, E; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Barbarito, E; Basa, S; Battaglieri, M; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Beltramelli, J; Bertin, V; Bigi, A; Billault, M; Blaes, R; de Botton, N; Bouwhuis, M C; Bradbury, S M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Burgio, G F; Busto, J; Cafagna, F; Caillat, L; Calzas, A; Capone, A; Caponetto, L; Carmona, E; Carr, J; Cartwright, S L; Castel, D; Castorina, E; Cavasinni, V; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Charvis, P; Chauchot, P; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Colnard, C; Compere, C; Coniglione, R; Cottini, N; Coyle, P; Cuneo, S; Cussatlegras, A S; Damy, G; Van Dantzig, R; De Marzo, C; Dekeyser, I; Delagnes, E; Denans, D; Deschamps, A; Dessages-Ardellier, F; Destelle, J J; Dinkespieler, B; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Drogou, J F; Druillole, F; Durand, D; Ernenwein, J P; Escoffier, S; Falchini, E; Favard, S; Feinstein, F; Ferry, S; Festy, D; Fiorello, C; Flaminio, V; Galeotti, S; Gallone, J M; Giacomelli, G; Girard, N; Gojak, C; Goret, P; Graf, K; Hallewell, G D; Harakeh, M N; Hartmann, B; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Hossl, J; Hoffman, C; Hogenbirk, J; Hubbard, John R; Jaquet, M; Jaspers, M; De Jong, M; Jouvenot, F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karkar, S; Katz, U; Keller, P; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Kopper, C; Korolkova, E V; Kouchner, A; Kretschmer, W; Kruijer, A; Kuch, S; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lachartre, D; Lafoux, H; Lagier, P; Lahmann, R; Lamanna, G; Lamare, P; Languillat, J C; Laschinsky, H; Le Guen, Y; Le Provost, H; Le Van-Suu, A; Legou, T; Lim, G; Lo Nigro, L; Lo Presti, D; Löhner, H; Loucatos, Sotirios S; Louis, F; Lucarelli, F; Lyashuk, V; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Masullo, R; Mazéas, F; Mazure, A; McMillan, J E; Megna, R; Melissas, M; Migneco, E; Milovanovic, A; Mongelli, M; Montaruli, T; Morganti, M; Moscoso, L; Musumeci, M; Naumann, C; Naumann-Godo, M; Niess, V; Olivetto, C; Ostasch, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Payre, P; Peek, H; Petta, C; Piattelli, P; Pineau, J P; Poinsignon, J; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Randazzo, N; Van Randwijk, J; Real, D; Van Rens, B; Rethore, F; Rewiersma, P A M; Riccobene, G; Rigaud, V; Ripani, M; Roca, V; Roda, C; Rolin, J F; Romita, M; Rose, H J; Rostovtsev, A; Roux, J; Ruppi, M; Russo, G V; Salesa, F; Salomon, K; Sapienza, P; Schmitt, F; Schuller, J P; Shadnize, R; Sokalski, I A; Spona, T; Spurio, M; van der Steenhoven, G; Stolarczyk, T; Streeb, K; Stubert, D; Sulak, L; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Tao, C; Terreni, G; Thompson, L F; Valdy, P; Valente, V; Vallage, B; Venekamp, G; Verlaat, B; Vernin, P; De Vita, R; De Vries, G; Van Wijk, R F; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; Wobbe, G; De Wolf, E; Yao, A F; Zaborov, D; Zaccone, Henri; De Dios-Zornoza-Gomez, Juan; Zúńiga, J; Deceased

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the ANTARES Collaboration deployed and operated at a depth of 2500 m a so-called Mini Instrumentation Line equipped with Optical Modules (MILOM) at the ANTARES site. The various data acquired during the continuous operation from April to December 2005 of the MILOM confirm the satisfactory performance of the Optical Modules, their front-end electronics and readout system, as well as the calibration devices of the detector. The in-situ measurement of the Optical Module time response yields a resolution better than 0.5 ns. The performance of the acoustic positioning system, which enables the spatial reconstruction of the ANTARES detector with a precision of about 10 cm, is verified. These results demonstrate that with the full ANTARES neutrino telescope the design angular resolution of better than $0.3^\\circ$ can be realistically achieved.

  3. Defensive Behaviors of Deep-sea Squids: Ink Release, Body Patterning, and Arm Autotomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, Stephanie Lynn

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occurrence and properties of tyrosinase in the ejected inkof the active as tyrosinase. Biochemical and Biophysical1981) suggested that the tyrosinase found in ink could be

  4. Deep-Sea Research I 52 (2005) 519542 Davis Strait volume, freshwater and heat fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cycle is a complex combination of land runoff, precipitation, ice freezing­melting and input of salty that the freshwater flux coming out of Baffin Bay asso- ciated with the sea ice melting in that area repre- sents 70 to the melting of ice drifting with the shelf Labrador Current (Khatiwala et al., 2002). Hud- son Bay runoff

  5. Deep-sea bioturbation and the role of the sea urchin Echinocrepis rostrata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardaro, Michael F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    processes observed at a gas hydrate outcropping on thetime series at a seafloor gas hydrate deposit on the Gulf ofSediment Resuspension and Gas Hydrate Stability at a Gulf of

  6. 1984 Deep Sea Roundup: an analysis of participants' characteristics, attitudes, and expenditures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arneson, Lynn A

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , by a second mailing and a phone call. Forty-seven percent of the fishermen in the heavy-tackle, and 51 percent of the light-tackle and bay-surf division participants responded, resulting in a total response rate of 51 percent. Telephone interviews...-tackle respondents. The most important reasons for tournament fishing reported by respondents in all divisions were the challenge or sport, to escape from the regular routine and to relax. Total direct purchases associated with the tournament were estimated...

  7. Oil and Gas

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and Oil ResearchEnergy OfficeProjectsResearch in

  8. World Crude Oil Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand Motor444 U.S.Working and

  9. NETL: Oil & Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide CaptureSee theOil & Gas Efficient recovery

  10. Residential heating oil price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001) - HouseholdshortEIA-782AAdministrationheating oil price

  11. Residential heating oil price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001) - HouseholdshortEIA-782AAdministrationheating oil

  12. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): USDOE Paducah Gas Diffusion Plant, Northeast Plume Operable Unit, Paducah, KY, June 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decision document presents the selected interim remedial action for the Northeast Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) near Paducah, Kentucky. The primary objective of the interim remedial action is to implement a first-phase remedial action as an interim action to initiate hydraulic control of the high concentration area within the Northeast Plume that extends outside the plant security fence.

  13. Waste and cost reduction using dual wall reverse circulation drilling with multi-level groundwater sampling for contaminant plume delineation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smuin, D.R.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the drilling and sampling methods used to delineate a groundwater contaminant plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) during the Groundwater Monitoring IV characterization. The project was unique in that it relied upon dual wall reverse circulation drilling instead of the traditional hollow stem auger method. The Groundwater Monitoring program sought to characterize the boundaries, both vertically and horizontally, of the northeast plume which contains both {sup 99}Tc and trichloroethene. This paper discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the drilling method used by investigators.

  14. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Northwest Plume, Paducah, KY, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Northwest Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The primary objective of this interim remedial action is to initiate a first phase remedial action, as an interim action to initiate control of the source and mitigate the spread of contamination in the Northwest plume. This operable unit addresses a portion of the contaminated ground water. Additional interim actions associated with this integrator operable unit are being considered, as well as for other areas of contaminated ground water.

  15. Intrinsic bioremediation of a BTEX and MTBE plume under mixed aerobic/denitrifying conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borden, R.C.; Daniel, R.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A shallow Coastal Plain aquifer in rural Sampson Country, North Carolina, has been contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbon from a leaking underground storage tank containing gasoline.An extensive field characterization has been performed to define the horizontal and vertical distribution of soluble gasoline components and indicator parameters. A plume of dissolved methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and the aromatic hydrocarbons benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene isomers (BTEX) is present in the aquifer and has migrated over 600 ft from the source area. Background dissolved oxygen concentrations range from 7 to 8 mg/L, and nitrate concentrations range from 5 to 22 mg/L as N due to extensive fertilization of fields surrounding the spill. In the center of the BTEX plume, oxygen concentrations decline to less than 1 mg/L while nitrate concentrations remain high. The total mass flux of MTBE and all BTEX components decline with distance downgradient relative to a conservative tracer (chloride). At the source, the total BTEX concentration exceeds 75 mg/L while 130 ft downgradient, total BTEX concentrations are less than 4.9 mg/L, a 15-fold reduction. Toluene and ethylbenzene decline most rapidly followed by m-p-xylene, o-xylene and finally benzene. Biodegradation of TEX appears to be enhanced by the excess nitrate present in the aquifer while benzene biodegradation appears to be due to strictly aerobic processes.

  16. The blue plume population in dwarf spheroidal galaxies: genuine blue stragglers or young stellar population?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Momany; E. V. Held; I. Saviane; S. Zaggia; L. Rizzi; M. Gullieuszik

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Abridged... Blue stragglers (BSS) are thought to be the product of either primordial or collisional binary systems. In the context of dwarf spheroidal galaxies it is hard to firmly disentangle a genuine BSS population from young main sequence (MS) stars tracing a ~1-2 Gyr old star forming episode. Assuming that their blue plume populations are made of BSS, we estimate the BSS frequency for 8 Local Group non star-forming dwarf galaxies, using a compilation of ground and space based photometry. Our results can be summarized as follows: (i) The BSS frequency in dwarf galaxies, at any given Mv, is always higher than that in globular clusters of similar luminosities; (ii) the BSS frequency for the lowest luminosity dwarf galaxies is in excellent agreement with that observed in the Milky Way halo; and most interestingly (iii) derive a statistically significant anti-correlation between the BSS frequency and the galaxy Mv. The low density, almost collision-less, environments of our dwarf galaxy sample allow us to infer (i) their very low dynamical evolution; (ii) a negligible production of collisional BSS; and consequently (iii) that their blue plumes are mainly made of primordial binaries. The dwarf galaxies anti-correlation can be used as a discriminator: galaxies obeying the anti-correlation are more likely to possess genuine primordial BSS rather than young main sequence stars.

  17. Analysis of uncertainties in CRAC2 calculations: wet deposition and plume rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, R.C.; Kocher, D.C.; Hicks, B.B.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.; Ku, J.Y.; Rao, K.S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the sensitivity of results from the CRAC2 computer code, which predicts health impacts from a reactor-accident scenario, to uncertainties in selected meteorological models and parameters. The sources of uncertainty examined include the models for plume rise and wet deposition and the meteorological bin-sampling procedure. An alternative plume-rise model usually had little effect on predicted health impacts. In an alternative wet-deposition model, the scavenging rate depends only on storm type, rather than on rainfall rate and atmospheric stability class as in the CRAC2 model. Use of the alternative wet-deposition model in meteorological bin-sampling runs decreased predicted mean early injuries by as much as a factor of 2 to 3 and, for large release heights and sensible heat rates, decreased mean early fatalities by nearly an order of magnitude. The bin-sampling procedure in CRAC2 was expanded by dividing each rain bin into four bins that depend on rainfall rate. Use of the modified bin structure in conjunction with the CRAC2 wet-deposition model changed all predicted health impacts by less than a factor of 2. 9 references.

  18. Processing alternatives for glandless cottonseed oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chamkasem, Narong

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to contamination of the two oils at processing facilities. This practice results in increased refining costs and increased oil loss. In many oil processing plants it would be economically advantageous to process all cotton- seed oils in the same manner as soy... with various levels of glanded cottonseed were quantified. Generally conventional refining of oil from glandless cottonseed containing up to 10% glanded seed contamination produced refined and bleached oils as good in color as extraction-site miscella-refined...

  19. www.fightbac.o anola oil is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ca co Th Ca "Canola" c which is Addition Ca he Ca in Th ca Ca m C know? anola oil is ooking oils. he average anola oil is comes fro s another nal Inform anola oil is eart healthy anola oil is n the world. he part of th anola meal anola oil ca many crop va ano the lowest . canola see a good sou m

  20. Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery The simulation provides an important approach to estimate...

  1. RMOTC to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RMOTC to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) announces that the "Teapot Dome" oil field in Wyoming is hosting a series of...

  2. Peak Oil Awareness Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Awareness Network Jump to: navigation, search Name: Peak Oil Awareness Network Place: Crested Butte, Colorado Zip: 81224 Website: http:www.PeakOilAwarenessNet Coordinates:...

  3. Engine breather oil recovery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, S.R.; Norton, J.G.; Wilson, J.D.

    1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an engine breather oil recovery system, for use with reciprocating engines having an oil breather and an oil reservoir recovery system. It comprises:an engine breather outlet from the engine; a vapor and oil separator device in fluid flow connection with the engine breather outlet; a motive flow suction means in fluid flow connection between the separator device and the engine, so as to provide a substantially continuous pressure drop between the separator device and the engine oil reservoir; an engine fluid system in parallel with the separator device; and an engine driven pump in fluid flow connection with such other engine fluid system, wherein the motive force for the motive flow suction means is provided by the fluid from the engine pump.

  4. Process for oil shale retorting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, John B. (300 Enterprise Bldg., Grand Junction, CO 80501); Kunchal, S. Kumar (300 Enterprise Bldg., Grand Junction, CO 80501)

    1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Particulate oil shale is subjected to a pyrolysis with a hot, non-oxygenous gas in a pyrolysis vessel, with the products of the pyrolysis of the shale contained kerogen being withdrawn as an entrained mist of shale oil droplets in a gas for a separation of the liquid from the gas. Hot retorted shale withdrawn from the pyrolysis vessel is treated in a separate container with an oxygenous gas so as to provide combustion of residual carbon retained on the shale, producing a high temperature gas for the production of some steam and for heating the non-oxygenous gas used in the oil shale retorting process in the first vessel. The net energy recovery includes essentially complete recovery of the organic hydrocarbon material in the oil shale as a liquid shale oil, a high BTU gas, and high temperature steam.

  5. The Politics of Mexico’s Oil Monopoly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huizar, Richard

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005), p. 59. Table 5: Oil production in barrels per daynot have much impact in oil production. In fact, oil exportscurrent oil reserves and oil production? 2) For how long can

  6. RESEARCH OIL RECOVERY MECHANISMS IN HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony R. Kovscek; William E. Brigham

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States continues to rely heavily on petroleum fossil fuels as a primary energy source, while domestic reserves dwindle. However, so-called heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o}API) remains an underutilized resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods such as pressure depletion and water injection. Thermal recovery is especially important for this class of reservoirs because adding heat, usually via steam injection, generally reduces oil viscosity dramatically. This improves displacement efficiency. The research described here was directed toward improved understanding of thermal and heavy-oil production mechanisms and is categorized into: (1) flow and rock properties; (2) in-situ combustion; (3) additives to improve mobility control; (4) reservoir definition; and (5) support services. The scope of activities extended over a three-year period. Significant work was accomplished in the area of flow properties of steam, water, and oil in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media, transport in fractured porous media, foam generation and flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, the effects of displacement pattern geometry and mobility ratio on oil recovery, and analytical representation of water influx. Significant results are described.

  7. No Oil: The coming Utopia/Dystopia and Communal Possibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Timothy

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supplies of conventional oil, and exploitable supplies of alternative forms of oil and related hydrocarbons, including tar sands and oil shale. Because new supplies of conventional oil are declining steadily, there is quite a lot of activity in the oil... to exploit the huge deposits of oil sands in Canada. Oil sands and oil shale look good because they contain vast amounts of oil. The problem is that of turning the reserves, locked into other geological formations, into useful oil. According to current...

  8. Water issues associated with heavy oil production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

  9. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, West Hackberry oil storage cavern fire and spill of September 21, 1978: an environmental assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, A

    1980-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes an environmental assessment of the fire and oil spill at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve site, West Hackberry, Louisiana. Subjective identification of oil contaminated habitats was supported by a more rigorous classification of samples utilizing discriminant analysis. Fourteen contaminated stations were identified along the shore of Black Lake just north and west of Wellpad 6, encompassing approximately 9 hectares. Seasonal variation in the structures of marsh and lake bottom communities in this contaminated area were not generally distinguishable from that of similar communities in uncontaminated habitats along the southern and southeastern shores of Black Lake. The major impact of spilled oil on the marsh vegetation was to accelerate the natural marsh deterioration which will eventually impact animals dependent on marsh vegetation for habitat structure. Vanadium, the predominate trace metal in the oil, and pyrogenic products due to the fire were found at the most distant sampling site (5 km) from Cavern 6 during Phase I, but were not detected downwind of the fire in excess of background levels in the later phases. Remote sensing evaluation of vegetation under the plume also indicated that stress existed immediately after the fire, but had disappeared by the end of the 1-year survey.

  10. Comparing the effects of various fuel alcohols on the natural attenuation of Benzene Plumes using a general substrate interaction model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    and Environmental Engineering, Rice University, MS-317, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005, USA a r t i c l e i n f o a b s t r a c t Article history: Received 30 October 2009 Received in revised form 26 January 2010 generalizations about the level of impact of specific fuel alcohols on benzene plume dynamics. © 2010 Elsevier B

  11. Oil field management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  12. Enhanced oil recovery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All energy resources available from a geopressured geothermal reservoir are used for the production of pipeline quality gas using a high pressure separator/heat exchanger and a membrane separator, and recovering waste gas from both the membrane separator and a low pressure separator in tandem with the high pressure separator for use in enhanced oil recovery, or in powering a gas engine and turbine set. Liquid hydrocarbons are skimmed off the top of geothermal brine in the low pressure separator. High pressure brine from the geothermal well is used to drive a turbine/generator set before recovering waste gas in the first separator. Another turbine/generator set is provided in a supercritical binary power plant that uses propane as a working fluid in a closed cycle, and uses exhaust heat from the combustion engine and geothermal energy of the brine in the separator/heat exchanger to heat the propane.

  13. Comparative dermotoxicity of shale oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, L.M.; Wilson, J.S.; Foreman, M.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When shale oils are applied at higher dose levels the standard observation of tumor production and latency are often obscured by a severe inflammatory response leading to epidermal degeneration. The two experiments reported here are still in progress, however the interim results are useful in assessing both the phlogistic and tumorigenic properties of three shale oils. Three shale oils were tested in these experiments. The first crude oil (OCSO No. 6) was produced in a modified in situ report at Occidental Oil Company's Logan Wash site near Debeque, Colorado. The second crude oil (PCSO II) was produced in the above ground Paraho vertical-kiln retort located at Anvil Points near Rifle, Colorado and the third oil was the hydrotreated daughter product of the Paraho crude (PCSO-UP). Experiment I was designed to determine the highest dose level at which tumor latency could be measured without interference from epidermal degeneration. Experiment II was designed to determine the effect of application frequency on both tumor response and inflammatory phenomena. Complete epidermal degeneration was used as the only measure of severe inflammation. Relative tumorigenicity was based on the number of tumor bearing mice without regard to multiple tumors on individual animals. In both experiments, tumor occurrence was confirmed one week after initial appearance. The sex-related difference in inflammatory response is striking and certanly has significance for experimental design. An increased phlogistic sensitivity expressed in male mice could affect the meaning of an experiment where only one sex was used.

  14. International Oil and Gas Board International Oil and Gas Board...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ministry of Oil Kuwait City Kuwait http www moo gov kw Syrian Petroleum Company Syrian Petroleum Company Damascus Syria http www spc sy com en production activities1 en php...

  15. Mercury speciation in coal-fired power plant plumes observed at three surface sites in the southeastern U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric S. Edgerton; Benjamin E. Hartsell; John J. Jansen [Atmospheric Research & Analysis, Inc., Cary, NC (United States)

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elemental Hg (Hg{sup 0}), reactive gaseous Hg (RGM) and fine particulate Hg (Hg{sub P}) were measured intermittently at three sites in the southeastern U.S. from June 2001 through November 2004. Simultaneous measurements of SO{sub 2} and NOy were used to identify plumes from coal fired power plants (CFPPs). Emission signatures and back trajectories were used to identity specific CFPPs, and to compare observed (i.e., at the site) versus expected (i.e., at the stack) Hg speciation. Results for 41 precipitation-free plume events show that observed RGM:SO{sub 2} is substantially lower (by a factor of 2-4) than expected RGM:SO{sub 2}. Hg{sub P} represented 2%, or less, of total-Hg in CFPP plumes, in general agreement with emission estimates. Results for 21 events, where both RGM and Hg{sup 0} could be estimated, show that total-Hg (i.e., RGM + Hg{sup 0}) was essentially conserved from the point of emission to the site, and that Hg{sup 0} was the dominant form (average 84%). Emission estimates, based on coal analyses and the EPRI-ICR Hg speciation model, indicate that Hg{sup 0} should represent about 42% of Hg in the observed plumes. Possible explanations for these differences include, but are not limited to, in-plume reduction of RGM to Hg{sub 0}, measurement error, errors in emission estimates, and depositional losses. Further work is needed to confirm these results and to determine if they apply to CFPPs in general, or the limited set of observed CFPPs. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Combustion heater for oil shale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA); Walton, Otis R. (Livermore, CA); Lewis, Arthur E. (Los Altos, CA); Braun, Robert L. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combustion heater for oil shale heats particles of spent oil shale containing unburned char by burning the char. A delayed fall is produced by flowing the shale particles down through a stack of downwardly sloped overlapping baffles alternately extending from opposite sides of a vertical column. The delayed fall and flow reversal occurring in passing from each baffle to the next increase the residence time and increase the contact of the oil shale particles with combustion supporting gas flowed across the column to heat the shale to about 650.degree.-700.degree. C. for use as a process heat source.

  17. Combustion heater for oil shale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mallon, R.; Walton, O.; Lewis, A.E.; Braun, R.

    1983-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A combustion heater for oil shale heats particles of spent oil shale containing unburned char by burning the char. A delayed fall is produced by flowing the shale particles down through a stack of downwardly sloped overlapping baffles alternately extending from opposite sides of a vertical column. The delayed fall and flow reversal occurring in passing from each baffle to the next increase the residence time and increase the contact of the oil shale particles with combustion supporting gas flowed across the column to heat the shale to about 650 to 700/sup 0/C for use as a process heat source.

  18. Residential heating oil prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001) -heating oil price decreasesheating oil3,heating oil

  19. THE RIMINI PROTOCOL Oil Depletion Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeling, Stephen L.

    Soaring oil prices have drawn attention to the issue of the relative supply and demand for crude oil1 THE RIMINI PROTOCOL an Oil Depletion Protocol ~ Heading Off Economic Chaos and Political Conflict During the Second Half of the Age of Oil As proposed at the 2003 Pio Manzu Conference

  20. What's Driving Oil Prices? James L. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Tom

    to demand and supply reactions. "The Coal Age didn't end because producers ran out of coal !!" OIL PRICE VS1 What's Driving Oil Prices? James L. Smith Cary M. Maguire Chair in Oil & Gas Management Critical Issues in Energy Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas November 2, 2006 The Price of OPEC Oil ($/bbl) $0 $20 $40

  1. Oil Trading Simon Basey / November 28, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    of oil and gas. #12;9 Trading tactics · ARBITRAGE: trade the dislocation of prices between geographicalOil Trading Simon Basey / November 28, 2013 #12;2 What does IST do? Imports crude oil and other Markets BP's equity crude oil, NGLs and natural gas Generates entrepreneurial trading income Manages BP

  2. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT SERVICE Signature Service Oil Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    UNM Staff EMPLOYEE BENEFIT SERVICE Jiffy Lube Signature Service Oil Change Fast - No Appointment We change your oil with up to 5 quarts of major brand motor oil We install a new oil fi We visually inspect. ASE training programs · Jiffy Lube uses top quality products that meet or exceed vehicle warranty

  3. Estimates of Oil Reserves Jean Laherrere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Tom

    Estimates of Oil Reserves Jean Laherrere e-mail: jean.laherrere@wanadoo.fr sites: http will solve the present problems on welfare, retirement and they would dearly love to see the reserves of oil or oil reserves is a political act. The SEC, to satisfy bankers and shareholders, obliges the oil

  4. Canadian Oil Sands: Canada's Energy Advantage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    crude oil production, global energy demand, the estimated reserves and resources at Syncrude, views that the world will need oil for decades to come, the expectations regarding oil sands productive capacityCanadian Oil Sands: Canada's Energy Advantage 0 #12;Forward looking information 1 In the interest

  5. Oil Classification with Fluorescence Spectroscopy Engineering Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    detected by these channels. The investigation used three methods to examine crude oil, heavy oil, sludge1 Oil Classification with Fluorescence Spectroscopy Engineering Physics Master of Engineering and classification of oil spills on water surfaces. It is an overview of the laser remote sensor technique

  6. OIL & GAS HISTORY 1 History in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OIL & GAS HISTORY 1 History in California 4 Superior figures refer to references at the end of the essay. OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION California oil was always a valued commodity. When the Spanish explorers landed in California in the 1500s, they found Indians gathering asphaltum (very thick oil) from natural

  7. Liens for Oil and Gas Operations (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section contains regulations concerning lien allowances made to operators of oil and gas operations.

  8. Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development Unconventional Fuels Conference University of Utah May 17, 2011 #12;#12;Domestic Oil Shale Resources Primary oil shale resources in the U.S. are in the Green River Formation in Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. 72 % of this oil shale resource is on Federal

  9. Favorable conditions noted for Australia shale oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After brief descriptions of the Rundle, Condor, and Stuart/Kerosene Creek oil shale projects in Queensland, the competitive advantages of oil shale development and the state and federal governments' attitudes towards an oil shale industry in Australia are discussed. It is concluded that Australia is the ideal country in which to start an oil shale industry.

  10. Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

  11. 1 What is Oil ? General information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    such as shale oil or synthetic crude oil from tar sands (see Table 4.1). A whole range of petroleum products69 1 What is Oil ? General information Petroleum is a complex mixture of liquid hydrocarbons in sedimentary rock. Coming from the Latin petra, meaning rock, and oleum, meaning oil, the word "petroleum

  12. LLM Oil, Gas and Mining Law Module Information: Oil, Gas & Mining Environmental Law I and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    LLM Oil, Gas and Mining Law Module Information: Oil, Gas & Mining Environmental Law I and Oil, Gas of the area of Oil, Gas &, Mining Environmental Law; 2. communicate complex legal concepts that apply within the area of Oil, Gas & Mining & Environmental Law to a high level of competence; and 3. deploy a highly

  13. Energy Policy 34 (2006) 515531 Have we run out of oil yet? Oil peaking analysis from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    price shocks and economic downturns. Over the next 30 years oil demand is expected to grow by 60Energy Policy 34 (2006) 515­531 Have we run out of oil yet? Oil peaking analysis from an optimist of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range

  14. 2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnello, Arthur M.

    ,buttheseweretoophytotoxic.Eventually, researchersconcentratedondistillatesintherangebetween kerosene and lubricating oils.Three basic classes of carbon structures present in petroleum oils2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Abstract Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop (aromatics and other un- saturated components) in oils that were removable with sulfuric acid; the remainder

  15. Oil and Gas CDT Development of a SUNTANS Baroclinic Model for 3D Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Development of a SUNTANS Baroclinic Model for 3D Oil Pollution Tracking Heriot) Key Words Oil Spill, HF Radar, Trajectory Forecasting, Hydrodynamic Modelling, Oil Chemistry Overview In an oil spill emergency, an operational system must forecast ocean and weather conditions in addition

  16. Research on Oil Recovery Mechanisms in Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis M. Castanier; William E. Brigham

    1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to increase recovery of heavy oils. Towards that goal studies are being conducted in how to assess the influence of temperature and pressure on the absolute and relative permeability to oil and water and on capillary pressure; to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the in site combustion process; to develop and understand mechanisms of surfactants on for the reduction of gravity override and channeling of steam; and to improve techniques of formation evaluation.

  17. Observations of the Temperature Dependent Response of Ozone to NOx Reductions in an Urban Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFranchi, B W; Goldstein, A H; Cohen, R C

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of NO{sub x} in the Sacramento, CA region show that mixing ratios decreased by 30% between 2001 and 2008. Here we use an observation-based method to quantify net ozone production rates in the outflow from the Sacramento metropolitan region and examine the O{sub 3} decrease resulting from reductions in NO{sub x} emissions. This observational method does not rely on assumptions about detailed chemistry of ozone production, rather it is an independent means to verify and test these assumptions. We use an instantaneous steady-state model as well as a detailed 1-D plume model to aid in interpretation of the ozone production inferred from observations. In agreement with the models, the observations show that early in the plume, the NO{sub x} dependence for O{sub x} (O{sub x} = O{sub 3}+NO{sub 2}) production is strongly coupled with temperature, suggesting that temperature dependent biogenic VOC emissions can drive O{sub x} production between NO{sub x}-limited and NO{sub x}-suppressed regimes. As a result, NO{sub x} reductions were found to be most effective at higher temperatures over the 7 year period. We show that violations of the California 1-hour O{sub 3} standard (90 ppb) in the region have been decreasing linearly with decreases in NO{sub x} (at a given temperature) and predict that reductions of NO{sub x} concentrations (and presumably emissions) by an additional 30% (relative to 2007 levels) will eliminate violations of the state 1 hour standard in the region. If current trends continue, a 30% decrease in NO{sub x} is expected by 2012, and an end to violations of the 1 hour standard in the Sacramento region appears to be imminent.

  18. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Baseline review of three groundwater plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry; et al.

    2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    During the closeout session, members of the technical assistance team conveyed to the site how impressed they were at the thoroughness of the site's investigation and attempts at remediation. Team members were uniformly pleased at the skilled detection work to identify sources, make quick remediation decisions, and change course when a strategy did not work well. The technical assistance team also noted that, to their knowledge, this is the only DOE site at which a world-class scientist has had primary responsibility for the environmental restoration activities. This has undoubtedly contributed to the successes observed and DOE should take careful note. The following overall recommendations were agreed upon: (1) The site has done a phenomenal job of characterization and identifying and removing source terms. (2) Technologies selected to date are appropriate and high impact, e.g. collection trenches are an effective remedial strategy for this complicated geology. The site should continue using technology that is adapted to the site's unique geology, such as the collection trenches. (3) The site should develop a better way to determine the basis of cleanup for all sites. (4) The sentinel well system should be evaluated and modified, if needed, to assure that the sentinel wells provide coverage to the current site boundary. Potential modifications could include installation, abandonment or relocation of wells based on the large amount of data collected since the original sentinel well system was designed. (5) Modeling to assist in remedial design and communication should continue. (6) The site should develop a plan to ensure institutional memory. (7) The most likely possibility for improving closure to 2006 is by removing the residual source of the Old Town plume and establishing the efficacy of remediation for the 51/64 plume.

  19. Pressure maintenance in a volatile oil reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Bruce Alan

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . 40 Cumulative Gas Produced vs. Time - Variable Well Spacing and Injection Pattern 75 76 INTRODUCTION In a typical basin, most shallow oil field can be classified as black oil reservoirs. Phase changes which occur in black oil reservoirs can... of the reservoir fluid. Black oil reservoirs produce oil at low to moderate gas oil ratios generally less than 2, 000 SCF/STB, with stock-tank oil gravities less than 45' API. These reservoirs are also identifled by having formation volume factors less than 2...

  20. Oil shale: The environmental challenges III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, K.K.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents the papers of a symposium whose purpose was to discuss the environmental and socio-economic aspects of oil shale development. Topics considered include oil shale solid waste disposal, modeling spent shale disposal, water management, assessing the effects of oil shale facilities on water quality, wastewater treatment and use at oil shale facilities, potential air emissions from oil shale retorting, the control of air pollutant emissions from oil shale facilities, oil shale air emission control, socioeconomic research, a framework for mitigation agreements, the Garfield County approach to impact mitigation, the relationship of applied industrial hygiene programs and experimental toxicology programs, and industrial hygiene programs.

  1. A stakeholder involvement approach to evaluate and enhance technology acceptance: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s Plume Focus Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, G.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States); Stein, S.L. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Division, Richland, WA (United States); Serie, P.J. [Environmental Issues Management, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) faces a major challenge in cleaning up its contaminated sites throughout the United States. One major area of concern is the plumes in soil and ground water which are contaminated with a myriad of different pollutants. DOE recently organized its plume-related problems into the Plume Focus Area. The mission of the Plume Focus Area is to enhance the deployment of innovative technologies for containing and cleaning up contaminant plumes in ground water and soil at all DOE sites. Environmental cleanup priorities for soil and ground water plumes are being defined and technology users have the challenge of matching current and innovative technologies to those priorities. By involving a range of stakeholders in the selection, demonstration, and evaluation of new technologies, the deployment of these technologies can be enhanced. If new plume cleanup technologies are to be deployable, they must improve on today`s baseline technologies. The Sites` Coordination Team (SCT) of the Plume Focus Area develops and supports the implementation of methods for stakeholder involvement throughout the multiple steps that define focus area activities. Site-specific teams are being formed to carry out the strategy at each site, and the teams will work through Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs) at each location. The SCT is responsible for identifying the site-specific stakeholder involvement teams, training the team members, preparing needed national-level guidance and strategies, helping the teams tailor a strategy for their particular site that meets the overall needs of the focus area, and facilitating inter-site coordination. The results will be used to develop national technology acceptance reports on the innovative technologies being funded and evaluated under the Plume Focus Area.

  2. Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, H.C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.

  3. RMOTC - Testing - Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhanced Oil Recovery Notice: As of July 1st, 2014, Testing at RMOTC has officially completed. We would like to thank all of our testing partners and everyone who helped make the...

  4. Table 1. Crude Oil Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    can be the month of loading, the month of landing, or sometime between those events. Prices for crude oil can be determined at a time other than the acquisition date. See the...

  5. Figure 4. World Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. World Oil Prices" " (2007 dollars per barrel)" ,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021,2022,2023,2024,2025,2026,2027,2028,2029,2030...

  6. Oil and Gas Conservation (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section establishes the state's interest in encouraging the development, production, and utilization of natural gas and oil resources in a manner which will prevent waste and lead to the...

  7. Method for retorting oil shale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shang, Jer-Yu; Lui, A.P.

    1985-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery of oil from oil shale is provided in a fluidized bed by using a fluidizing medium of a binary mixture of carbon dioxide and 5 steam. The mixture with a steam concentration in the range of about 20 to 75 volume percent steam provides an increase in oil yield over that achievable by using a fluidizing gas of carbon dioxide or steam alone when the mixture contains higher steam concentrations. The operating parameters for the fluidized bed retorted are essentially the same as those utilized with other gaseous fluidizing mediums with the significant gain being in the oil yield recovered which is attributable solely to the use of the binary mixture of carbon dioxide and steam. 2 figs.

  8. Method for enhanced oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comberiati, Joseph R. (Morgantown, WV); Locke, Charles D. (Morgantown, WV); Kamath, Krishna I. (Chicago, IL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to an improved method for enhanced recovery of oil from relatively "cold" reservoirs by carbon dioxide flooding. In oil reservoirs at a temperature less than the critical temperature of 87.7.degree. F. and at a pore pressure greater than the saturation pressure of carbon dioxide at the temperature of the reservoir, the carbon dioxide remains in the liquid state which does not satisfactorily mix with the oil. However, applicants have found that carbon dioxide can be vaporized in situ in the reservoir by selectively reducing the pore pressure in the reservoir to a value less than the particular saturated vapor pressure so as to greatly enhance the mixing of the carbon dioxide with the oil.

  9. Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Daegil

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    -heavy oil, and oil shale. Tremendous amounts of heavy oil resources are available in the world. Fig. 1.1 shows the total world oil reserves, and indicates that heavy oil, extra heavy oil, and bitumen make up about 70% of the world?s total oil resources...

  10. Oil transportation in the global landscape : the Murmansk Oil Terminal and Pipeline proposal evaluated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Ankur, 1976-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil and transportation have been commingled since the first oil reserves were discovered. The importance of energy, namely oil, and the transportation of that energy from the producers to the consumers is persistently ...

  11. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: Contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Konopka, Allan; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and that are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 µg/L or 0.126 µmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (< one pore volume). At the Rifle site, slow oxidation of naturally reduced, contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influences plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences between the sites include the geochemical nature of residual, contaminant U; the rates of current kinetic processes (both biotic and abiotic) influencing U(VI) solid-liquid distribution; the presence of detrital organic matter and the resulting spatial heterogeneity in microbially-driven redox properties; and the magnitude of groundwater hydrologic dynamics controlled by river-stage fluctuations, geologic structures, and aquifer hydraulic properties. The comparative analysis of these sites provides important guidance to the characterization, understanding, modeling, and remediation of groundwater contaminant plumes influenced by surface water interaction that are common world-wide.

  12. HYDROCARBONS FROM AUSTRALIAN OIL, 200 MILLION YEARS OLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Hoeven, William; Haug, Pat; Burlingame, A.L.; Calvin, Kelvin.

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Moonie Oil "Branched- Cyclic" Hydrocarbon FractionNo. W -7405 -eng -48 HYDROCARBONS FROM AUSTRALIAN OIL, 200and Melvin Calvin July HYDROCARBONS FROM AUSTRALIAN OIL, 200

  13. The effect of biofuel on the international oil market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofuel on the International Oil Market Gal Hochman, Deepakon the international oil market ? Gal Hochman, Deepakand biodiesel GEG to oil markets reduce gasoline consumption

  14. Crude Existence: The Politics of Oil in Northern Angola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Kristin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    waged for control of oil reserves. A brutal war wracked theguarantee rights to the oil reserves, offer an opportunitygles over control of oil reserves, but it also encompasses

  15. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Heating Oil Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release The Energy Policy and Conservation...

  16. Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leighty, Wayne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    included because its heavy oil is not currently technicallya marginal field with mostly heavy oil that maybe should notdelaying investments in heavy oil development. If true, this

  17. CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persoff, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Utilization of Oil Shale Resources, Tillinn, Estonia (and Utilization of Oil Shale Resources, Tallinn, Estonia (Colorado's Primary Oil-Shale Resource for Vertical Modified

  18. Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    response to high oil prices and geopolitical threats tofor the e?ect of the oil price through the price elasticityprojections, corresponding oil price series are extracted

  19. Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy supply. Oil & Gas Journal. , 101(29):20, 2003. [40]unlock oil resources. Oil & Gas Journal, [31] NEB. Canada’s

  20. Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1] Andrews, S. and Udall, R. Oil Prophets: Lookingat World Oil Studies Over Time. In Campbell, C.International Workshop on Oil Depletion 2003, Paris, France,

  1. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities Kathleen E. Duncan,in Alaskan North Slope oil production facilities. Title:in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities Authors: Kathleen E.

  2. Drunk On Oil: Russian Foreign Policy 2000-2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brugato, Thomas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Julia. “ World Stocks Sag as Oil Price Surges. ” The NewCollapse: Grain and Oil,” On the Issues, Am. Enterpriseet. al. , “Unrelenting Oil Addiction,” Russ. in Global

  3. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Upgrading...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Oil Upgrading Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Upgrading PNNL report-out at the CTAB webinar on Bio-Oil Upgrading. ctabwebinarbiooilsupgrading.pdf More...

  4. Oil Shale and Other Unconventional Fuels Activities | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Petroleum Reserves Naval Reserves Oil Shale and Other Unconventional Fuels Activities Oil Shale and Other Unconventional Fuels Activities The Fossil Energy program in oil...

  5. The effect of biofuel on the international oil market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    producer surplus from oil consumption and production. Ourconsumption of crude oil, consumption grew from 2005 to 2006from oil extraction, production, and consumption. More

  6. Dynamic analysis in productivity, oil shock, and recession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katayama, Munechika

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    displays the share of oil consumption in the transportationis a major source of oil consumption. Any investigation ofrepresents ?rm i’s oil consumption for capital utilization

  7. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Alaskan North Slope oil production facilities. Title:Profiling Despite oil production from several major16) was isolated from oil-production water and has optimal

  8. Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Regular conventional oil production to 2100 and resource10% of total US oil production in 2004, almost entirelysteam-induced heavy oil production in Cali- fornia [30].

  9. Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) The Oil...

  10. Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leighty, Wayne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY of carbon value and enhanced oil recovery The potential forCO 2 injection for enhanced oil recovery may differ from the

  11. Crude Existence: The Politics of Oil in Northern Angola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Kristin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Holing 1990:29,24). Oil pollution also presents a threat toof the dangers of oil pollution” (Sonangol 2005). Thebearing the toxic burden of oil pollution. Ironically, these

  12. Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leighty, Wayne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    like oil production requires some knowledge or assumptionlike oil production requires some knowledge or assumptionAlaska Oil Production We use the standard assumption that

  13. An MBendi Profile: World: Oil And Gas Industry -Peak Oil: an Outlook on Crude Oil Depletion -C.J.Campbell -Revised February 2002 Search for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An MBendi Profile: World: Oil And Gas Industry - Peak Oil: an Outlook on Crude Oil Depletion - C - Contact Us - Newsletter Register subscribe to our FREE newsletter World: Oil And Gas Industry - Peak Oil the subsequent decline. q Gas, which is less depleted than oil, will likely peak around 2020. q Capacity limits

  14. Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ranking the World’s Top Oil Companies, 2001: Fewer, Bigger,top echelon of “super majors” has been created that far surpasses other publicly traded oil companies

  15. Oil Price Shocks: Causes and Consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz Kilian; Key Words

    Research on oil markets conducted during the last decade has challenged long-held beliefs about the causes and consequences of oil price shocks. As the empirical and theoretical models used by economists have evolved, so has our understanding of the determinants of oil price shocks and of the interaction between oil markets and the global economy. Some of the key insights are that the real price of oil is endogenous with respect to economic fundamentals, and that oil price shocks do not occur ceteris paribus. This makes it necessary to explicitly account for the demand and supply shocks underlying oil price shocks when studying their transmission to the domestic economy. Disentangling cause and effect in the relationship between oil prices and the economy requires structural models of the global economy including oil and other commodity markets.

  16. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  17. Oil shale retorting method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, E.D.

    1983-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an improved method and apparatus for the retorting of oil shale and the formation of spent oil shale having improved cementation properties. The improved method comprises passing feed comprising oil shale to a contacting zone wherein the feed oil shale is contacted with heat transfer medium to heat said shale to retorting temperature. The feed oil shale is substantially retorted to form fluid material having heating value and forming partially spent oil shale containing carbonaceous material. At least a portion of the partially spent oil shale is passed to a combustion zone wherein the partially spent oil shale is contacted with oxidizing gas comprising oxygen and steam to substantially combust carbonaceous material forming spent oil shale having improved cementation properties.

  18. Pilot oil atlas for Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourgoyne, A.T. Jr.; Kimbrell, C.; Gao, Weigang.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An interdisciplinary research team of engineers, geologists, and computer scientists was assembled at LSU to develop unproved methods for prospecting for bypassed oil and to support oil and gas producers in Louisiana. The overall objective of the project was to develop methods for extending the producing life of several types of reservoirs by reducing the amount of oil being bypassed and abandoned. As part of this work, the team collected information available from public sources for several example reservoirs. One task of the project was to develop a format for the compilation of the extensive but cumbersome Louisiana reservoir data so that it could be used by government and industry to evaluate the resource and plan future activities. The existing information system maintained by Louisiana is a Production Audit Reporting System (PARS). It was designed to allow auditing of oil and gas production and severance taxes associated with this production. It was not intended to be used as a database for determining reservoir recovery efficiency or prospecting for oil and gas. Its use for these purposes, however, has been increasing. The database format suggested in this report would allow production information to be easily displayed by reservoir as well as by lease, unit, or well. The data collected as part of the bypassed-oil study was used to illustrate the proposed new format. This pilot database, or atlas, contains information available for 15 reservoirs. It is recommended that LSU continue to compile and publish database information on the potential for bypassed oil in Louisiana's active reservoirs. This technology-transfer activity should focus each year on those active reservoirs involved in hearings of the Louisiana Office of Conservation. It should also focus on reservoirs being screened by LSU for EOR.

  19. The Footprint of the CO[subscript 2] Plume during Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Aquifers: Storage Efficiency for Capillary Trapping at the Basin Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juanes, Ruben

    We study a sharp-interface mathematical model of CO[subscript 2] migration in deep saline aquifers, which accounts for gravity override, capillary trapping, natural groundwater flow, and the shape of the plume during the ...

  20. Determination of transport parameters of coincident inorganic and organic plumes in the Savannah River Plant M-Area, Aiken, South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cauffman, Toya Lyn

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS OF COINCIDENT INORGANIC AND ORGANIC PLUMES IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT M-AREA, AIKEN, SOUTH CAROLINA A Thesis by TOYA. LYN CAUFFMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Geology DETERMINATION OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS OF COINCIDENT INORGANIC AND ORGANIC PLUMES IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT M-AREA, AIKEN& SOUTH CAROLINA A Thesis...

  1. Permeability Change of Crystalline Silicate Mineral-Packed Bed Column by Highly Alkaline Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hideo Usui; Yuichi Niibori; Hitoshi Mimura [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza Aoba 6-6-01-2, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Osamu Tochiyama [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the construction of the geological disposal system, the use of the cementitious material may change the permeability of the natural barrier around the repository. Cementitious materials may alter the pH of ground water to highly alkaline. Also, the potential permeability change of the natural barrier is one of the notable factors for performance assessments of geological disposal systems. In the high pH region, the solubility of silica is very high compared to that in the natural pH (around 8). Therefore, highly alkaline groundwater would dissolve and alter a part of rock surface. Usui et al. (2005) reported that the change of mineral pore structure due to chemical reaction is the key factor to consider the change of the permeability [5-6]. Moreover, such a change of the pore structure was considered to be the result of the spatial heterogeneity of chemical composition. Since such spatial heterogeneity exists also in the sedimentary rocks consisting of crystalline minerals such as quartz and feldspar, we need to examine natural rock, in order to obtain more reliable understanding about the change of permeability induced by highly alkaline groundwater (plume). In this study, silica sand as crystalline mineral was packed in the column, and the effect of dissolution induced by the highly alkaline plume on the permeability-change was examined. The silica sand particles mainly consist of SiO{sub 2} and include Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeO, and K{sub 2}O. The volumetric flow rate and the pressure difference between the inlet and outlet of the column were measured, and the permeability was calculated. At the same time, the concentrations of elements in the fluid were measured by ICP-AES. The experimental result showed that permeability decreased gradually, although the silica sand was continuously dissolved in the column. The behavior of the permeability is considered to be the result from the rearrangement of the particles, or precipitation of secondary mineral. In the column test using the silica sand as packed mineral, the flow-path seems to be clogged by the rearrangement of the particles rather than the increase of the pore space between the particles. (authors)

  2. Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Treating Crude Oil Sludges and the Like. Patent No. US1983. Dewatering of oil sludge. Oil Gas Europe Mag. (1983 ): 9 Key words: sludge, disposal, oil, recovery Percy,

  3. Crude Existence: The Politics of Oil in Northern Angola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Kristin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    threatening to onshore oil investments in Cabinda. It usedto a $2.2 billion oil and gas investment in Block 14. Oil,the full burden of capital investment, oil corporations also

  4. Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine Seep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifer, Ira; Boles, J R; Luyendyk, B P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007, Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine2007, Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a MarineTides and the emission of oil and gas from an abandoned oil

  5. The Politics of Mexico’s Oil Monopoly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huizar, Richard

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based on the current oil reserves and oil production? 2) Forto either increase its oil reserves or decrease its oilthe world in terms of oil reserves by having 16,041 million

  6. Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leighty, Wayne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Weimer, D.L. (1984) Oil prices shock, market response,OPEC behavior and world oil prices (pp. 175-185) London:many decades. Recent high oil prices have caused oil-holding

  7. Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leighty, Wayne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil Production The production of crude oil can generally beNorth Slope crude, Q it is the oil production per perioddiscoveries, production, costs, and prices of crude oil. ”

  8. Crude Existence: The Politics of Oil in Northern Angola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Kristin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aimed at securing oil resources in the Gulf of Guinea (of (as yet unproven) oil resources in Angola (EIA 2008; Lylemost valuable natural resource: oil. But oil extraction—both

  9. The Politics of Mexico’s Oil Monopoly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huizar, Richard

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Iran, Mexico has very few oil reserves. For instance,Mexico is ranked eighth in the world in terms of oil reservescan oil last in Mexico based on the current oil reserves and

  10. Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine Seep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifer, Ira; Boles, J R; Luyendyk, B P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California, Marineet al. , 2007, Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from aand P.G. Mikolaj, Natural oil seepage at Coal Oil Point,

  11. Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine Seep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifer, Ira; Boles, J R; Luyendyk, B P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil-gas separator, and gas flux turbine. B. Image of oil-gaslines connected the turbine to the oil-gas separator andoil. Absent the oil-gas separator, the turbine would have

  12. CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persoff, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recovery Vent gas '\\Raw shale oil Recycled gas compressorThis process produces shale oil, a low BTU gas, and char,Oil Shale Process" in Oil Shale and Tar Sands, J. W. Smith

  13. Shale Oil Value Enhancement Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James W. Bunger

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Raw kerogen oil is rich in heteroatom-containing compounds. Heteroatoms, N, S & O, are undesirable as components of a refinery feedstock, but are the basis for product value in agrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, surfactants, solvents, polymers, and a host of industrial materials. An economically viable, technologically feasible process scheme was developed in this research that promises to enhance the economics of oil shale development, both in the US and elsewhere in the world, in particular Estonia. Products will compete in existing markets for products now manufactured by costly synthesis routes. A premium petroleum refinery feedstock is also produced. The technology is now ready for pilot plant engineering studies and is likely to play an important role in developing a US oil shale industry.

  14. Oil shale technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This collaborative project with industrial participants studied oil shale retorting through an integrated program of fundamental research, mathematical model development and operation of a 4-tonne-per-day solid recirculation oil shale test unit. Quarterly, project personnel presented progress and findings to a Project Guidance Committee consisting of company representatives and DOE program management. We successfully operated the test unit, developed the oil shale process (OSP) mathematical model, evaluated technical plans for process scale up and determined economics for a successful small scale commercial deployment, producing premium motor fuel, specility chemicals along with electricity co-production. In budget negotiations, DOE funding for this three year CRADA was terminated, 17 months prematurely, as of October 1993. Funds to restore the project and continue the partnership have not been secured.

  15. Understanding plume splitting of laser ablated plasma: A view from ion distribution dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Wei, Wenfu; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Plume splitting in low-pressure ambient air was understood in view of ion distribution dynamics from the laser ablated Al plasma (1064 nm 0.57 J/mm{sup 2}) by combining fast photography and spatially resolved spectroscopy. In the beginning, the spectral lines were mainly from the Al III ion. Then, the Bragg peak in stopping power of the ambient gas to Al III could be the dominant reason for the enhanced emission from the fast moving part, and the recombination of Al III to Al I-II ions near the target surface was response to the radiations from the slow moving/stationary part. As the ambient gas pressure increased, stopping distances of the Al III decreased, and radiation from the air ions became pronounced. The laser shadowgraph image at 1100 Pa indicated that the shock wave front located between the fast moving and slow moving parts. Electron densities of the fast moving plasma, which peaked at the plasma front, were on the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup ?3}, and the electron temperatures were 2–3 eV.

  16. A comparison of plume dispersion characteristics at RFP using different stability class determination methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, H.; Peterson, V.L.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the course of recent calculations of population dose using Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) meteorological statistics for the last several years, we have discovered interesting associations. It is the intent of this paper to communicate these to other workers in the field. In order to determine the potential dose to a person at the RFP site boundary from a source of radioactive effluent, it is necessary to account for atmospheric dispersion of the effluent. Often, a bounding calculation, using a ``worst case`` meteorological condition, is performed. We were interested, however, in using a more typical, or likely, condition. To do so, we used data derived from measurements at the RFP meteorological tower. These measurements include 15 minute samples of wind speed, wind direction, and temperatures at 10 meters, 25 meters and 60 meters above ground. We took these data for the complete period for which they are quality assured, March, 1989 through January, 1993, and used them in a simple computer program to develop dose statistics by repeated application of Gaussian plume dispersion.

  17. Measuring and Modeling Fault Density for Plume-Fault Encounter Probability Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, P.D.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Nicot, J.-P.

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission of carbon dioxide from fossil-fueled power generation stations contributes to global climate change. Storage of this carbon dioxide within the pores of geologic strata (geologic carbon storage) is one approach to mitigating the climate change that would otherwise occur. The large storage volume needed for this mitigation requires injection into brine-filled pore space in reservoir strata overlain by cap rocks. One of the main concerns of storage in such rocks is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available. This necessitates a method for using available fault data to develop an estimate of the likelihood of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault, primarily due to buoyancy. Fault population statistics provide one of the main inputs to calculate the encounter probability. Previous fault population statistics work is shown to be applicable to areal fault density statistics. This result is applied to a case study in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin with the result that the probability of a carbon dioxide plume from a previously planned injection had a 3% chance of encountering a fully seal offsetting fault.

  18. Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    du jour phenomenon is fed by oil market failures, overblownpalm oil to supply biodiesel for the European market, then

  19. The effect of biofuel on the international oil market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to reduction in crude oil production. The competitive modelbarrel of crude oil is allocated to gasoline production. The

  20. The effect of biofuel on the international oil market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    world consumption of crude oil, consumption grew from 2005mark). Although consumption of crude oil in the Middle East,