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1

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep...

2

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cassia County Idaho; data; geophysical surveys; Idaho; Raft River geothermal area; surveys; United States; USGS; Well No. 3; well-logging Author(s): Covington, H.R. Published: Open-File Report - U. S. Geological Survey, 1/1/1978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Deep_drilling_data,_Raft_River_geothermal_area,_Idaho-Raft_River_geothermal_exploration_well_sidetrack-C&oldid=473365"

3

Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Stratigraphy and geophysical logs of three petroleum test boreholes in the Raft River Valley are presented. The geophysical logs include: temperature, resistivity, spontaneous potential, gamma, caliper, and acoustic logs. Author(s): Oriel, S. S.; Williams, P. L.; Covington, H. R.; Keys, W. S.; Shaver, K. C. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/1/1978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/6272996 Source: View Original Report Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) Raft River Geothermal Area

4

Progress Toward an Advanced Geothermal Deep-Drilling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A previously developed concept for an advanced geothermal drilling system (AGDS) has been extended toward a feasibility design stage. Hardware projects for two percussion, air and hydraulic, hammer drills are underway. Two drill string options and an unique nitrogen supply system are described.

Rowley, J.; Saito, S.; Long, R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Geothermal drilling technology update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories conducts a comprehensive geothermal drilling research program for the US Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies. The program currently includes seven areas: lost circulation technology, hard-rock drill bit technology, high-temperature instrumentation, wireless data telemetry, slimhole drilling technology, Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) projects, and drilling systems studies. This paper describes the current status of the projects under way in each of these program areas.

Glowka, D.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Geothermal Drilling Organization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), founded in 1982 as a joint Department of Energy (DOE)-Industry organization, develops and funds near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling costs. Sandia National Laboratories administers DOE funds to assist industry critical cost-shared projects and provides development support for each project. GDO assistance to industry is vital in developing products and procedures to lower drilling costs, in part, because the geothermal industry is small and represents a limited market.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

Challenges of deep drilling  

SciTech Connect

Deep drilling poses major problems when high temperatures, high pressures, and acid gases are encountered. A combination of these items usually requires extensive planning, exotic materials, long drilling times, and heavy expenditures. Only 2 wells have been drilled below 30,000 ft in the US, the deeper a 31,441-ft hole in 1974. The deepest well in the world is reported to be in the Soviet Union, recently drilled below 34,895 ft, with a target depth of 15,000 m (49,212 ft). A review of current deep drilling technology and its capabilities is given.

Chadwick, C.E.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Method of deep drilling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Deep drilling is facilitated by the following steps practiced separately or in any combination: (1) Periodically and sequentially fracturing zones adjacent the bottom of the bore hole with a thixotropic fastsetting fluid that is accepted into the fracture to overstress the zone, such fracturing and injection being periodic as a function of the progression of the drill. (2) Casing the bore hole with ductile, pre-annealed casing sections, each of which is run down through the previously set casing and swaged in situ to a diameter large enough to allow the next section to run down through it. (3) Drilling the bore hole using a drill string of a low density alloy and a high density drilling mud so that the drill string is partially floated.

Colgate, Stirling A. (4616 Ridgeway, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Well descriptions for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generic well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. They were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. Their nature, their construction, and their validation are discussed.

Carson, C.C.; Livesay, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Drilling for Geothermal Resources Rules - Idaho | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Resources Rules - Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Drilling for Geothermal Resources Rules - Idaho Details...

11

Near-Term Developments in Geothermal Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling geothermal wells. Current projects include: R & D in lost circulation control, high temperature instrumentation, underground imaging with a borehole radar insulated drill pipe development for high temperature formations, and new technology for data transmission through drill pipe that can potentially greatly improve data rates for measurement while drilling systems. In addition to this work, projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization are managed. During 1988, GDO projects include developments in five areas: high temperature acoustic televiewer, pneumatic turbine, urethane foam for lost circulation control, geothermal drill pipe protectors, an improved rotary head seals.

Dunn, James C.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

12

Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

Rowley, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Alpine Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Drilling Geothermal Drilling Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Alpine Geothermal Drilling Name Alpine Geothermal Drilling Address PO Box 141 Place Kittredge, Colorado Zip 80457 Sector Geothermal energy Product Geothermal drilling solutions, subsidiary of Rocky Mountain GeoExploration Inc Website http://www.alpinegeothermal.co Coordinates 39.64888°, -105.2984842° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.64888,"lon":-105.2984842,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development  

SciTech Connect

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. Sandia Laboratories has been selected to manage this technology development program, and this paper presents an overview of the program. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies in current rotary drilling techniques for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.; Stoller, H.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Google.org-Backed Potter Drilling Blazing Geothermal Trail |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Google.org-Backed Potter Drilling Blazing Geothermal Trail Google.org-Backed Potter Drilling Blazing Geothermal Trail September 22, 2010...

17

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/14/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) [Internet]. 09/14/2009. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management,

18

Drilling and operating geothermal wells in California  

SciTech Connect

The following procedural points for geothermal well drilling and operation are presented: geothermal operators, definitions, geothermal unit, agent, notice of intention, fees, report on proposed operations, bonds, well name and number, well and property sale on transfer, well records, and other agencies. (MHR)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Investigation of percussion drills for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of tests was conducted to provide data for an economic evaluation of percussion drilling in geothermal reservoirs. Penetration rate, operation on aqueous foam, and high temperature vulnerabilities of downhole percussion tools are described.

Finger, J.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Forecast of geothermal-drilling activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The number of geothermal wells that will be drilled to support electric power production in the United States through 2000 A.D. are forecasted. Results of the forecast are presented by 5-year periods for the five most significant geothermal resources.

Mansure, A.J.; Brown, G.L.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Geothermal drilling picking up steam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article discusses developments in geothermal energy exploitation at several California, U.S. locations. The author addresses the issues of capital and time investment, environmental impact, cost of energy produced and gives a view of global geothermal energy production.

Killalea, M

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Balanced pressure techniques applied to geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study is to evaluate balanced pressure drilling techniques for use in combating lost circulation in geothermal drilling. Drilling techniques evaluated are: aerated drilling mud, parasite tubing, concentric drill pipe, jet sub, and low density fluids. Based on the present state of the art of balanced pressure drilling techniques, drilling with aerated water has the best overall balance of performance, risk, availability, and cost. Aerated water with a 19:1 free air/water ratio reduce maximum pressure unbalance between wellbore and formation pressures from 1000 psi to 50 psi. This pressure unbalance is within acceptable operating limits; however, air pockets could form and cause pressure surges in the mud system due to high percent of air. Low density fluids used with parasite tubing has the greatest potential for combating lost circulation in geothermal drilling, when performance only is considered. The top portion of the hole would be aerated through the parasite tube at a 10:1 free air/mud ratio and the low density mud could be designed so that its pressure gradient exactly matches the formation pore pressure gradient. The main problem with this system at present is the high cost of ceramic beads needed to produce low density muds.

Dareing, D.W.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Development of drilling foams for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of foam drilling fluids in geothermal applications is addressed. A description of foams - what they are, how they are used, their properties, equipment required to use them, the advantages and disadvantages of foams, etc. - is presented. Geothermal applications are discussed. Results of industry interviews presented indicate significant potential for foams, but also indicate significant technical problems to be solved to achieve this potential. Testing procedures and results of tests on representative foams provide a basis for work to develop high-temperature foams.

McDonald, W.J.; Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; Chenevert, M.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Use of Downhole Motors in Geothermal Drilling in the Philippines  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the use of downhole motors in the Tiwi geothermal field in the Philippines, The discussion includes the application Of a Dyna-Drill with insert-type bits for drilling through surface alluvium. The economics of this type of drilling are compared to those of conventional rotary drilling. The paper also describes the use of a turbodrill that drills out scale as the well produces geothermal fluids.

Pyle, D. E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Challenges of deep drilling. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

This installment delineates current deep drilling technology limitations and discusses needed advances for the future. Problem areas are identified as material and seal problems in wellhead equipment, new fluid carriers for well stimulation, quality control/inspection/testing for equipment and performance flaws, arctic environment conditions, and experienced personnel. The main factors of operating environment that challenge advanced deep drilling are identified as temperature extremes, pressure extremes, acid gases, and deep-water presence.

Chadwick, C.E.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Support research for development of improved geothermal drill bits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in background research needed to develop drill bits for the geothermal environment is reported. Construction of a full-scale geothermal wellbore simulator and geothermal seal testing machine was completed. Simulated tests were conducted on full-scale bits. Screening tests on elastometric seals under geothermal conditions are reported. (JGB)

Hendrickson, R.R.; Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.; Winzenried, R.W.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Feasibility of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide as a Drilling Fluid for Deep Underbalanced Drilling Operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Feasibility of drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide to serve the needs of deep underbalanced drilling operations has been analyzed. A case study involving underbalanced drilling (more)

Gupta, Anamika

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

High Temperature 300C Directional Drilling System Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and DevelopmentAnalysis Project Type Topic 2 Directional Drilling Systems Project Description The development plan...

31

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Chapter 6. Drilling and Well...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Chapter 6. Drilling and Well Construction Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced...

32

Safety Measures a hinder for Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Safety Measures a hinder for Geothermal Drilling Citation Renewable Power...

33

Sandia/DOE geothermal drilling and completion technology development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs 25% by 1982 and 50% by 1986. Sandia Laboratories has managed this technology development program since October 1977, and this paper presents an overview of the program. A statement of program goals and structure is given. The content of the FY-79 program is presented and recent results of R and D projects are given. Plans for development of an advanced drilling and completion system are discussed.

Barnette, J.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Handbook of Best Practices for Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Handbook of Best Practices for Geothermal Drilling Handbook of Best Practices for Geothermal Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Handbook of Best Practices for Geothermal Drilling Abstract This Handbook is a description of the complex process that comprises drilling a geothermal well. The focus of the detailed Chapters covering various aspects of the process (casing design, cementing, logging and instrumentation, etc) is on techniques and hardware that have proven successful in geothermal reservoirs around the world. The Handbook will eventually be linked to the Geothermal Implementing Agreement (GIA) web site, with the hope and expectation that it can be continually updated as new methods are demonstrated or proven. Authors John Finger and Doug Blankenship

35

Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Details Activities (20) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: In 2005, Idaho National Laboratory was conducting a study of historical exploration practices and success rates for geothermal resources identification. Geo Hills Associates (GHA) was contracted to review and accumulate copies of published literature, Internet information, and unpublished geothermal exploration data to determine the level of exploration and drilling activities that occurred for all of the currently

36

Evaluation of commercially available geothermal drilling fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of geothermal drilling in the United States has revealed that serious problems are being encountered with corrosion and degradation of drilling fluids in high temperature wells. The best high temperature drilling fluids that could be formulated from commercially available materials were obtained from the five largest mud companies. These included samples of 9 and 18 lb/gal water muds and 18 lb/gal oil muds. Over 4,000 tests were conducted on these muds to evaluate their performance at high temperature. This included testing at temperatures to 550/sup 0/F and pressures to 15,000 psi. These tests revealed that most of the water muds had high viscosity, high filtration rates and poor corrosivity characteristics at temperatures above 350/sup 0/F. Although the oil muds performed better than water muds at high temperatures, some problems were encountered with viscosity at temperatures above 450/sup 0/F and with filtration at temperatures above 500/sup 0/F. Generally the corrosivity characteristics of the oil muds were much better than those of the water muds. Overall, oil muds have better temperature stability than water muds but their use is often limited because of problems with surface pollution, contamination of water zones and reservoir damage. Biodegradable oil mud systems would overcome some of these limitations.

Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; McDonald, W.J.; Maurer, W.C.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA(DOI-BLM...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

09142009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-...

38

A study of geothermal drilling and the production of electricity from geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report gives the results of a study of the production of electricity from geothermal energy with particular emphasis on the drilling of geothermal wells. A brief history of the industry, including the influence of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act, is given. Demand and supply of electricity in the United States are touched briefly. The results of a number of recent analytical studies of the cost of producing electricity are discussed, as are comparisons of recent power purchase agreements in the state of Nevada. Both the costs of producing electricity from geothermal energy and the costs of drilling geothermal wells are analyzed. The major factors resulting in increased cost of geothermal drilling, when compared to oil and gas drilling, are discussed. A summary of a series of interviews with individuals representing many aspects of the production of electricity from geothermal energy is given in the appendices. Finally, the implications of these studies are given, conclusions are presented, and program recommendations are made.

Pierce, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This project will implement and test a series of innovative geothermal exploration strategies in two phases. Phase 1 studies will comprise surface mapping, shallow seismic surveys, potential field surveys (gravity and magnetics), compilation of existing well data, and the construction of three dimension structure sections. Phase 2 will comprise two intermediate depth (1.5-1.6 km) slim-hole exploration wells with a full suite of geophysical borehole logs and a vertical seismic profile to extrapolate stratigraphy encountered in the well into the surrounding terrain. Both of the exploration wells will be fully cored to preserve a complete record of the volcanic stratigraphy that can be used in complementary science projects. This project will function in tandem with Project Hotspot, a continental scientific drilling project that focuses on the origin and evolution of the Yellowstone hotspot.

40

Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Drilling Systems Project Description Potter Drilling has recently demonstrated hydrothermal spallation drilling in the laboratory. Hydrothermal spallation drilling creates boreholes using a focused jet of superheated water, separating individual grains ("spalls") from the rock surface without contact between the rock and the drill head. This process virtually eliminates the need for tripping. Previous tests of flame-jet spallation achieved ROP of 50 ft/hr and higher in hard rock with minimal wear on the drilling assembly, but operating this technology in an air-filled borehole created challenges related to cuttings transport and borehole stability. The Potter Drilling system uses a water based jet technology in a fluid-filled borehole and as a result has the potential to achieve similarly high ROP that is uncompromised by stability or cuttings transport issues.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Solicitation - Geothermal Drilling Development and Well Maintenance Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy (DOE)-industry research and development (R and D) organization, sponsors near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling and well maintenance costs. Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) administers DOE funds for GDO cost-shared projects and provides technical support. The GDO serves a very important function in fostering geothermal development. It encourages commercialization of emerging, cost-reducing drilling technologies, while fostering a spirit of cooperation among various segments of the geothermal industry. For Sandia, the GDO also serves as a means of identifying the geothermal industry's drilling fuel/or well maintenance problems, and provides an important forum for technology transfer. Successfully completed GDO projects include: the development of a high-temperature borehole televiewer, high-temperature rotating head rubbers, a retrievable whipstock, and a high-temperature/high-pressure valve-changing tool. Ongoing GDO projects include technology for stemming lost circulation; foam cement integrity log interpretation, insulated drill pipe, percussive mud hammers for geothermal drilling, a high-temperature/ high-pressure valve changing tool assembly (adding a milling capability), deformed casing remediation, high- temperature steering tools, diagnostic instrumentation for casing in geothermal wells, and elastomeric casing protectors.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Recommendations of the workshop on advanced geothermal drilling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, Sandia National Laboratories convened a group of drilling experts in Berkeley, CA, on April 15-16, 1997, to discuss advanced geothermal drilling systems. The objective of the workshop was to develop one or more conceptual designs for an advanced geothermal drilling system that meets all of the criteria necessary to drill a model geothermal well. The drilling process was divided into ten essential functions. Each function was examined, and discussions were held on the conventional methods used to accomplish each function and the problems commonly encountered. Alternative methods of performing each function were then listed and evaluated by the group. Alternative methods considered feasible or at least worth further investigation were identified, while methods considered impractical or not potentially cost-saving were eliminated from further discussion. This report summarizes the recommendations of the workshop participants. For each of the ten functions, the conventional methods, common problems, and recommended alternative technologies and methods are listed. Each recommended alternative is discussed, and a description is given of the process by which this information will be used by the U.S. DOE to develop an advanced geothermal drilling research program.

Glowka, D.A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Geothermal gradient drilling, north-central Cascades of Oregon, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geothermal gradient drilling program was conducted on the western flank of the north-central Cascade Mountains in Oregon. Six wells were drilled during this program, although in effect seven were drilled, as two wells were drilled at site 3, the second well, however, actually going to a lesser depth than the first. Three of the wells (3, 4, and 5) were drilled in areas which topographically are subject to strong throughflows of ground water. None of these wells reached the regional water table, and all showed essentially isothermal geothermal gradients. The single well which was started essentially at the water table (well 6) shows a linear temperature rise with depth essentially from the top of the well bore. Well No. 2 shows an isothermal gradient down to the level of the regional water table and then shows a linear gradient of about 70/sup 0/C/km from the regional water table to total depth.

Youngquist, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Cascade geothermal drilling/corehole N-1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two core holes have been completed on the flanks of Newberry Volcano, Oregon. Core hole GEO N-1 has a heat flow of 180 mWm-2 reflecting subsurface temperature sufficient for commerical exploitation of geothermally generated electricity. GEO N-3, which has a heat flow of 86 mWm-2, is less encouraging. Considerable emphasis has been placed on the ''rain curtain'' effect with the hope that a detailed discussion of this phenomenon at two distinct localities will lead to a better understanding of the physical processes in operation. Core hole GEO N-1 was cored to a depth of 1387 m at a site located 9.3 km south of the center of the volcano. Core hole GEO N-3 was cored to a depth of 1220 m at a site located 12.6 km north of the center of the volcano. Both core holes penetrated interbedded pyroclastic lava flows and lithic tuffs ranging in composition from basalt to rhyolite with basaltic andesite being the most common rock type. Potassium-argon age dates range up to 2 Ma. Difficult drilling conditions were encountered in both core holes at depths near the regional water table. Additionally, both core holes penetrate three distinct thermal regimes (isothermal (the rain curtain), transition, and conductive) each having its own unique features based on geophysical logs, fluid geochemistry, age dates, and rock alteration. Smectite alteration, which seems to control the results of surface geoelectrical studies, begins in the isothermal regime close to and perhaps associated with the regional water table. 28 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Swanberg, C.A.; Combs, J. (Geothermal Resources International, Inc., San Mateo, CA (USA)); Walkey, W.C. (GEO Operator Corp., Bend, OR (USA))

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cascade geothermal drilling/corehole N-3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two core holes have been completed on the flanks of Newberry Volcano, Oregon. Core holes GEO N-1 has a heat flow of 180 mWm-2 reflecting subsurface temperature sufficient for commercial exploitation of geothermally generated electricity. GEO N-3, which has a heat flow of 86 mWm-2, is less encouraging. Considerable emphasis has been placed on the rain curtain'' effect with the hope that a detailed discussion of this phenomenon at two distinct localities will lead to a better understanding of the physical processes in operation. Core hole GEO N-1 was cored to a depth of 1387 m at a site located 9.3 km south of the center of the volcano. Core hole GEO N-3 was cored to a depth of 1220 m at a site located 12.6 km north of the center of the volcano. Both core holes penetrated interbedded pyroclastic lava flows and lithic tuffs ranging in composition from basalt to rhyolite with basaltic andesite being the most common rock type. Potassium-argon age dates range up to 2 Ma. Difficult drilling conditions were encountered in both core holes at depths near the regional water table. Additionally, both core holes penetrate three distinct thermal regimes (isothermal (the rain curtain), transition, and conductive) each having its own unique features based on geophysical logs, fluid geochemistry, age dates, and rock alteration. Smectite alteration, which seems to control the results of surface geoelectrical studies, begins in the isothermal regime close to and perhaps associated with the regional water table.

Swanberg, C.A.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

46

European Geothermal Drilling Experience-Problem Areas and Case Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal drilling has long been restricted in Western Europe to the sole dry steam field of Larderello in Italy. In the last few years, a wider experience is building up as a consequence of intensified exploration and development programs carried out for evaluation and production of both low- and high-enthalpy geothermal resources. A sample of some 40 boreholes indicates the problem areas which are given.

Baron, G.; Ungemach, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Geothermal Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada Abstract Exploration in a blind prospect has led to the confirmation of a geothermal resource at Blue Mt.Nevada. The latest results include drilling of three production wells into Piedmont faults. These wells produce from a 185 to 190°C dilute benign brine reservoir. Short flow tests have shown prolific flow rates and indications of reservoir continuity.Well entries have shown that system permeability is fault-dominated. This is confirmed by the results of seismic reflection imaging. Young faulting in the area includes intersecting range front faults that strike NW, NS, and NE. Exposure of

48

Seal/lubricant systems for geothermal drilling equipment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development and testing of seals and lubricants for journal-type roller-cone rock bits for drilling into geothermal reservoirs at temperatures over 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) are described. The conditions experienced by seals and lubricants subjected to geothermal drilling are reviewed along with the basic design requirements for roller-cone bit seals and journal bearing lubricants. Two unique test facilities are described: a seal test machine which simulates pressures, temperatures, and mechanical eccentricities, and a lubricant tester capable of evaluating load-bearing ability at temperature and pressure. Three candidate elastomeric compounds demonstrated 288/sup 0/C (550/sup 0/F) capability and several others demonstrated 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) or greater capability. Successful elastomeric seal candidates were proprietary compounds based on EPDM, Kalrez, and/or Viton polymers. Three mechanical seals for reservoir temperatures over 288/sup 0/C (550/sup 0/F) are presented. Lubricant screening tests on more than 50 products are summarized, and several newly developed lubricants which meet both the compatibility and lubrication requirements are described. Several seal/lubricant systems are recommended for laboratory or field geothermal drilling tests in roller-cone drill bits. The future availability of drill bits for geothermal use is discussed, as well as the potential spinoffs of the program findings for nongeothermal roller-cone bits.

Hendrickson, R.R.; Winzenried, R.W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Exploration and drilling for geothermal heat in the Capital District, New York. Volume 4. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Capital District area of New York was explored to determine the nature of a hydrothermal geothermal system. The chemistry of subsurface water and gas, the variation in gravity, magnetism, seismicity, and temperature gradients were determined. Water and gas analyses and temperature gradient measurements indicate the existence of a geothermal system located under an area from Ballston Spa, southward to Altamont, and eastward toward Albany. Gravimetric and magnetic surveys provided little useful data but microseismic activity in the Altamont area may be significant. Eight wells about 400 feet deep, one 600 feet and one 2232 feet were drilled and tested for geothermal potential. The highest temperature gradients, most unusual water chemistries, and greatest carbon dioxide exhalations were observed in the vicinity of the Saratoga and McGregor faults between Saratoga Springs and Schenectady, New York, suggesting some fault control over the geothermal system. Depths to the warm fluids within the system range from 500 meters (Ballston Spa) to 2 kilometers (Albany).

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Exploration and drilling for geothermal heat in the Capital District, New York. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Capital District area of New York was explored to determine the nature of a hydrothermal geothermal system. The chemistry of subsurface water and gas, the variation in gravity, magnetism, seismicity, and temperature gradients were determined. Water and gas analyses and temperature gradient measurements indicate the existence of a geothermal system located under an area from Ballston Spa, southward to Altamont, and eastware toward Albany. Gravimetric and magnetic surveys provided little useful data but microseismic activity in the Altamont area may be significant. Eight wells about 400 feet deep, one 600 feet and one 2232 feet were drilled and tested for geothermal potential. The highest temperature gradients, most unusual water chemistries, and greatest carbon dioxide exhalations were observed in the vicinity of the Saratoga and McGregor faults between Saratoga Springs and Schenectady, New York, suggesting some fault control over the geothermal system. Depths to the warm fluids within the system range from 500 meters (Ballston Spa) to 2 kilometers (Albany).

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Deep Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Exploration Concept For Low-Enthalpy Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Deep Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Exploration Concept For Low-Enthalpy Resources Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The first deep geothermal exploration borehole (995 m) to be drilled in the UK for over 20 years was completed at Eastgate (Weardale, Co. Durham) in December 2004. It penetrated 4 m of sandy till (Quaternary), 267.5 m of Lower Carboniferous strata (including the Whin Sill), and 723.5 m of the Weardale Granite (Devonian), with vein mineralization occurring to 913 m. Unlike previous geothermal investigations of UK radiothermal

52

Interpretation of drill cuttings from geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Problems in interpreting drill cuttings, as opposed to drill cores, and methods to solve these problems are outlined. The following are covered: identification of lithology; recognition of faults and fractures; interpretation of hydrothermal alteration; geochemistry; sample collection; sample preparple examination; and sample storage. (MHR)

Hulen, J.B.; Sibbett, B.S.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Corrosion Resistant Metallic Materials for Ultra-deep Well Drilling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... corrosion fatigue, etc., can be a primary cause of catastrophic degradation of tubular components during ultra-deep drilling of oil and natural gas shale.

54

Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, January 1981-March 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods as they apply to advanced drilling systems.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Drilling, Completing, and Maintaining Geothermal Wells in Baca, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 55-MWe power plant is planned for development in the Baca location in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. Union Geothermal has contracted to provide the steam for the power plant. This paper uses Baca Well No. 13 as a case history to describe the drilling methods, casing program, cementing program, and completion methods used by Union. The discussion includes aerated-water drilling and the methods of solving corrosion problems in aerated water. lost circulation control in mud drilling and its effect on the subsequent casing cementing program are discussed. The paper also includes a case history of scale removal methods used in Baca Well No. 11, including drilling the scale out with a turbo-drill and attempts at chemical inhibition.

Pye, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Deep Blue No 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Deep Blue No 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the geology, drilling operations, and down-hole measurements obtained during the drilling of Deep Blue No.1. This well was sited on the basis of proximity to numerous gold exploration holes that indicated thermal water, high temperature gradients recorded in the 12 shallow gradient holes, and low resistivity values associated with certain interpreted major faults. The well was targeted to intersect fracture zones associated with the West and

58

Geothermal Drilling of New England | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

England England Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Drilling of New England Address 358 Boylston Street Place Lowell, Massachusetts Zip 01852 Sector Geothermal energy Product Geothermal heat-exchange drilling and installers Website http://www.geodrillingofne.com Coordinates 42.6225853°, -71.2840943° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6225853,"lon":-71.2840943,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

59

Diagnostics-while drilling: Reducing the cost of geothermal-produced electricity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this document is to estimate the potential impact of proposed new Diagnostics-While-Drilling technology on the cost of electricity (COE) produced with geothermal energy. A cost model that predicts the COE was developed and exercised over the range of conditions found for geothermal plants in flashed-steam, binary, and enhanced-reservoir (e.g., Hot Dry Rock) applications. The calculations were repeated assuming that DWD technology is available to reduce well costs and improve well productivity. The results indicate that DWD technology would reduce the geothermal COE by 2--31%, depending on well depth, well productivity, and the type of geothermal reservoir. For instance, for a typical 50-MW, flashed-steam geothermal power plant employing 3-MW wells, 6,000-ft deep, the model predicts an electricity cost of 4.9 cents/kwh. With the DWD technology envisioned, the electricity cost could be reduced by nearly 20%, to less than 4 cents/kwh. Such a reduction in the cost of electricity would give geothermal power a competitive edge over other types of power at many locations across the US and around the world. It is thus believed that DWD technology could significantly expand the role of geothermal energy in providing efficient, environment-friendly electric generating capacity.

PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.; GLOWKA,DAVID A.

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

60

Exploration geothermal gradient drilling, Platanares, Honduras, Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is a review and summary of the core drilling operations component of the Honduras Geothermal Resource Development Project at the Platanares geothermal prospect in Honduras, Central America. Three intermediate depth (428 to 679 m) coreholes are the first continuously cored geothermal exploration boreholes in Honduras. These coring operations are part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) effort funded by the Agency for International Development (AID) and implemented by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) in cooperation with the Empresa Nacional de Energia Electrica (ENEE) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). This report emphasizes coring operations with reference to the stratigraphy, thermal gradient, and flow test data of the boreholes. The primary objectives of this coring effort were (1) to obtain quantitative information on the temperature distribution as a function of depth, (2) to recover fluids associated with the geothermal reservoir, (3) to recover 75% or better core from the subsurface rock units, and (4) to drill into the subsurface rock as deeply as possible in order to get information on potential reservoir rocks, fracture density, permeabilities, and alteration histories of the rock units beneath the site. The three exploration coreholes drilled to depths of 650, 428 and 679 m, respectively, encountered several hot water entries. Coring operations and associated testing began in mid-October 1986 and were completed at the end of June 1987.

Goff, S.J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Ruefenacht, H.D.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.; Ramos, N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Application Of Electrical Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep Geothermal Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Application Of Electrical Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The electrical resistivity method has been proven applicable to geothermal exploration because of the direct relationship between fluid and rock temperatures on the one hand electrical conductivity on the other. The problem of exploitation of a surface technique, such as resistivity, to the determination of geothermal gradients or 'hot spots' is complicated by the other geological parameters which affect resistivity: porosity, fluid salinity, cementation factor and clay content. However, by rational

62

Georgia Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia) Georgia Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia) Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General...

63

Deep Blue No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at Blue Mountain, Humboldt  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at Blue Mountain, Humboldt No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Deep Blue No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the geology, drilling operations, and down-hole measurements obtained during the drilling of Deep Blue No.1. This well was sited on the basis of proximity to numerous gold exploration holes that indicated thermal water, high temperature gradients recorded in the 12 shallow gradient holes, and low resistivity values associated with certain interpreted major faults. The well was targeted to intersect fracture zones associated with the West and Central Faults, two

64

U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project Abstract N/A Author U.S. Geothermal Inc. Published Publisher Not Provided, 2010 Report Number N/A DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project Citation U.S. Geothermal Inc.. 2010. U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project. Boise Idaho: (!) . Report No.: N/A.

65

Unique aspects of drilling and completing hot-dry-rock geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling operations at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site have led to numerous developments needed to solve the problems caused by a very harsh downhole environment. A pair of deep wells were drilled to approximately 15,000 ft (4.6 km); formation temperatures were in excess of 600/sup 0/F (300/sup 0/C). The wells were directionally drilled, inclined at 35/sup 0/, one above the other, in a direction orthogonal to the least principal stress field. The well site is near the flank of a young silicic composite volcano in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. The completion of this pair of wells is unique in reservoir development. The lower well was planned as a cold water injector which will be cooled by the introduced water from the static geothermal gradient to about 80/sup 0/F (25/sup 0/C). The upper well will be heated during production to over 500/sup 0/F (250/sup 0/C). The well pair is designed to perform as a closed loop heat-extraction system connected by hydraulic fractures with a vertical spacing of 1200 ft between the wells. These conditions strongly constrain the drilling technique, casing design, cement formulation, and cementing operations.

Carden, R.S.; Nicholson, R.W.; Pettitt, R.A.; Rowley, J.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental Assessment September 2008 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy 1617 Cole...

67

Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, October 1978-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drill bits, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Sampling and Interpretation of Drill Cuttings from Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drill cuttings from geothermal and mineral exploration boreholes, by contrast with those from most petroleum wells, commonly are derived highly fractured and faulted, hydrothermally altered igneous and metamorphic rock sequences, and are likely to be severely contaminated. Characterization of a subsurface resource from cuttings thus requires not only especially careful sample collection, preparation, storage and examination, but also a thorough knowledge of drilling technology, local geology and the full range of potential borehole contaminants. Accurate identification of lithology from cuttings is critical for recognition and correlation of rock types likely to selectively host the desired commodity. However, many of the rocks encountered in geothermal and mineral exploration boreholes (such as gneisses and granitic rocks) can resemble one another closely as cuttings even though dissimilar in outcrop or core. In such cases, the actual rock type(s) in a cuttings sample generally can be determined by comparison with simulated cuttings of representative surface rocks, and with various geophysical and other well logs. Many other clues in cuttings, such as diagnostic metamorphic mineralogy, or sedimentary rounding and sorting, may help identify subsurface lithologies. Faults and fractures commonly are the dominant physical controls on geothermal and mineral resources. Faults occasionally can be recognized directly in cuttings by the presence of slickensiding, gouge, or other crushed material. More commonly, however, the ''gouge'' observed in cuttings actually is pseudo-gouge created beneath a bit during drilling. Since most faults and all fractures produce no direct evidence apparent in cuttings, they are best recognized indirectly, either by commonly associated hydrothermal alteration, or by responses on appropriate geophysical well logs. Hydrothermal alteration, useful for locating and defining a geothermal or mineral resource, is far more difficult to recognize and interpret in cuttings than in core or outcrop. Alteration textures and paragenetic relationships can be obscured or obliterated as cuttings are produced. Less resistant alteration (and rock-forming) minerals can be disaggregated during drilling and lost from cuttings during sampling or washing. Relict and contemporary alteration can be indistinguishable, and a wide variety of borehole contaminants can closely resemble natural alteration products encountered during drilling. These contaminants also can produce confusing geochemical signatures.

Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Sibbett, Bruce S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Geopressured geothermal drilling and completions technology development needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured geothermal formations found in the Texas and Louisiana gulf coast region and elsewhere have the potential to supply large quantities of energy in the form of natural gas and warm brine (200 to 300/sup 0/F). Advances are needed, however, in hardware technology, well design technology, and drilling and completion practices to enable production and testing of exploratory wells and to enable economic production of the resource should further development be warranted. This report identifies needed technology for drilling and completing geopressured geothermal source and reinjection wells to reduce the cost and to accelerate commercial recovery of this resource. A comprehensive prioritized list of tasks to develop necessary technology has been prepared. Tasks listed in this report address a wide range of technology needs including new diagnostic techniques, control technologies, hardware, instrumentation, operational procedure guidelines and further research to define failure modes and control techniques. Tasks are organized into the functional areas of well design, drilling, casing installation, cementing, completions, logging, brine reinjection and workovers.

Maish, A.B.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Geothermal Energy for New Mexico: Assessment of Potential and Exploratory Drilling  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the drilling operations and subsequent interpretation of thermal and geochemical data from the New Mexico Tech NMT-2GT (OSE RG- 05276 POD) test well. This slim hole was drilled along an elongate heat-flow anomaly at the base of the Socorro Mountains to better assess the geothermal resource potential (Socorro Peak geothermal system) on the western side of the New Mexico Tech campus in Socorro, New Mexico. The reservoir depth, hydraulic properties, temperature and chemistry were unknown prior to drilling. The purpose of the NMT-2GT (OSE RG-05276 POD) well was to explore the feasibility of providing geothermal fluids for a proposed district space heating system on the New Mexico Tech campus. With DOE cost over runs funds we completed NMT-2GT to a depth of 1102 feet at the Woods Tunnel drill site. Temperatures were nearly constant (41 oC ) between a depth of 400???????????????????????????????¢????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????1102 feet. Above this isothermal zone, a strong temperature gradient was observed (210 oC /km) beneath the water table consistent with vertical convective heat transfer. The existence of a groundwater upflow zone was further supported by measured vertical hydraulic head measurements which varied between about 258 feet at the water table to 155 feet at a depth of 1102 feet yielding a vertical hydraulic a gradient of about 0.1. If the upflow zone is 1 km deep, then a vertical flow rate is about 0.6 m/yr could have produced the observed curvature in the thermal profile. This would suggest that the deep bedrock permeability is about 20 mD. This is much lower than the permeability measured in a specific capacity aquifer test completed in 2009 within fracture Paleozoic sandstones near the water table (3000 D). Flow rates measured during drilling were measured using a v-notch weir. Flow rates were consistently around 1000 gpm. While the temperatures are lower than we had anticipated, this geothermal resource can still be developed to heat the NM Tech campus using heat pump technology.

Mark Person, Lara Owens, James Witcher

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

76

Drilling of a 2000-metre (6562-FT) Borehole for Geothermal Steam in Iceland  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling for geothermal heat has been carried out in Iceland since 1928, when hot water was obtained for district heating in Reykjavik. From that time, in particular in the sixties, extensive drilling has resulted in the annual utilization of 54 million tons of water and 2 million tons of steam. Five drilling rigs are used for geothermal drilling, with depth capacity ranging from 400 to 3,600 meters (1,312 to 11,812 feet). Drilling procedures vary extensively and depend on whether a high- or low-temperature field is being drilled, the main difference being the well-casing program and the blowout equipment used.

Ragnars, K.; Benediktsson, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

EUROPEAN GEOTHERMAL DRILLING EXPERIENCE- PROBLEM AREAS AND CASE STUDIES  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

EUROPEAN GEOTHERMAL DRILLING EXPERIENCE- EUROPEAN GEOTHERMAL DRILLING EXPERIENCE- PROBLEM AREAS AND CASE STUDIES 0. Baron and P. Ungemach Commisslon of The European Communities Belglum ABSTRACT Geothermal d r i l l i n g h a s long been restricted i n Western Europe t o t h e sole d r y s t e a m f i e l d of L a r d e r e l l o i n I t a l y . I n t h e l a s t f e w y e a r s , a wider e x p e r i e n c e i s b u i l d i n g up a s a consequence of i n t e n s i f i e d explo- r a t i o n and development programs c a r r i e d o u t for e v a l u a t i o n and produc- t i o n of both l o w - and high-enthalpy geothermal resources. A sample Of some 40 boreholes i n d i c a t e s the following problem areas. 1. Low-Enthalpy D r i l l i n 9 Due t o s i m i l a r s e t t i n g s - - h o t water system flowing i n sedimentary u n i t s a t t e m p e r a t u r e s and d e p t h s r a n g i n g f r o m 40" t o 140°C (104" t o 284°F) and from 1,000 t

78

Aqueous foam surfactants for geothermal drilling fluids: 1. Screening  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aqueous foam is a promising drilling fluid for geothermal wells because it will minimize damage to the producing formation and would eliminate the erosion problems of air drilling. Successful use of aqueous foam will require a high foaming surfactant which will: (1) be chemically stable in the harsh thermal and chemical environment, and (2) form stable foams at high temperatures and pressures. The procedures developed to generate and test aqueous foams and the effects of a 260/sup 0/C temperature cycle on aqueous surfactant solutions are presented. More than fifty selected surfactants were evaluated with representatives from the amphoteric, anionic, cationic, and nonionic classes included. Most surfactants were severely degraded by this temperature cycle; however, some showed excellent retention of their properties. The most promising surfactant types were the alkyl and alkyl aryl sulfonates and the ethoxylated nonionics.

Rand, P.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Phase 2 and 3 Slim Hole Drilling and Testing at the Lake City, California Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Phases 2 and 3 of the Lake City GRED II project two slim holes were cored to depths of 1728 and 4727 ft. Injection and production tests with temperature and pressure logging were performed on the OH-1 and LCSH-5 core holes. OH-1 was permanently modified by cementing an NQ tubing string in place below a depth of 947 ft. The LCSH-1a hole was drilled in Quaternary blue clay to a depth of 1727 ft and reached a temperature of 193 oF at a depth of 1649 ft. This hole failed to find evidence of a shallow geothermal system east of the Mud Volcano but the conductive temperature profile indicates temperatures near 325 oF could be present below depth of 4000 ft. The LCSH-5 hole was drilled to a depth of 4727 ft and encountered a significant shallow permeability between depths of 1443 and 1923 ft and below 3955 ft. LCSH-5 drilled impermeable Quaternary fanglomerate to a depth of 1270 ft. Below 1270 ft the rocks consist primarily of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The most significant formation deep in LCSH-5 appears to be a series of poikoilitic mafic lava flows below a depth of 4244 ft that host the major deep permeable fracture encountered. The maximum static temperature deep in LCSH-5 is 323 oF and the maximum flowing temperature is 329 oF. This hole extended the known length of the geothermal system by of a mile toward the north and is located over mile north of the northernmost hot spring. The OH-1 hole was briefly flow tested prior to cementing the NQ rods in place. This flow test confirmed the zone at 947 ft is the dominant permeability in the hole. The waters produced during testing of OH-1 and LCSH-5 are generally intermediate in character between the deep geothermal water produced by the Phipps #2 well and the thermal springs. Geothermometers applied to deeper fluids tend to predict higher subsurface temperatures with the maximum being 382 oF from the Phipps #2 well. The Lake City geothermal system can be viewed as having shallow (elevation > 4000 ft and temperatures of 270 to 310 oF), intermediate (elevation 2800 to 3700 ft and temperatures 270 to 320 oF ) and deep (elevations < 1000 ft and temperatures 323 to 337 oF) components. In the south part of the field, near Phipps #2 the shallow and deep components are present. In the central part of the field, near OH-1 the shallow and intermediate components are present and presumably the deep component is also present. In the north part of the field, the intermediate and deep components are present. Most or all of the fractures in the core have dips between 45 degrees and vertical and no strong stratigraphic control on the resource has yet been demonstrated. Conceptually, the Lake City geothermal resource seems to be located along the north-south trending range front in a relatively wide zone of fractured rock. The individual fractures do not seem to be associated with any readily identifiable fault. In fact, no major hydraulically conductive faults were identified by the core drilling.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell; Joe Moore; Colin Goranson

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

80

The objectives for deep scientific drilling in Yellowstone National Park  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The western area of the United Stated contains three young silicic calderas, all of which contain attractive targets for scientific drilling. Of the three, the Yellowstone caldera complex is the largest, has the most intense geothermal anomalies, and is the most seismically active. On the basis of scientific objectives alone. it is easily the first choice for investigating active hydrothermal processes. This report briefly reviews what is known about the geology of Yellowstone National Park and highlights unique information that could be acquired by research drilling only in Yellowstone. However, it is not the purpose of this report to recommend specific drill sites or to put forth a specific drilling proposal. 175 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell Published: GRC, 2005 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Core Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Core Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Static Temperature Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Lake City Hot Springs Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Hole_Drilling_And_Testing_At_The_Lake_City,_California_Geothermal_Field&oldid=389996

82

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE. Author(s): William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 2008 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Compound and Elemental Analysis At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008)

83

The 1985 Geothermal Gradient Drilling Project for the State of Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes seven geothermal gradient test holes in the southern Washington Cascade Mountains. The objectives of the drilling program were to: (1) more accurately define the general extent of potential geothermal resources in the southern Washington Cascades, and (2) evaluate specific targets that are geologically and structurally favorable for the occurrence of geothermal resources. (ACR)

Barnett, B.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Subterrene rock-melting concept applied to the production of deep geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of wells comprises a large fraction of the costs of geothermal energy-extraction plants, and billions of dollars for wells will be needed before geothermal energy is nationally significant. Technical and cost studies were made of the application of the Subterrene concept, i.e., excavating and penetrating rocks or soils by melting, to deep wells such as may be used for dry-hot-rock or geopressure geothermal energy extraction systems. Technically, it was found that Subterrene requirements are compatible with those of current rotary drilling practices. Certain features of the rock-melting concept such as the glass lining on the borehole wall, and nonrotation, provide opportunities for the development of better well production techniques in hot wells. A typical optimum-cost well would be rotary-drilled in the upper regions and then rock-melted to total depth. Indicated cost-savings are significant: a 33 percent or 4.5 million dollars reduction from rotary drilled well costs are estimated for a 10 km depth well with bottom hole temperatures of 673 K. Even for normal geothermal gradient conditions, the savings for the 10 km depth is estimated as 23 percent or 2 million dollars.

Altseimer, J.H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The role of R and D in geothermal drilling cost reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role that drilling technology development can play in reducing the cost of geothermal power is examined. Factors contributing to the relatively high cost of geothermal drilling are discussed, and potential technology improvements that could reduce those costs are identified. Projects under way at Sandia National Laboratories to address these technology needs are summarized, and estimates are made of the potential drilling cost savings resulting from these projects.

Glowka, D.A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geothermal Research Dept.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Potential impacts of artificial intelligence expert systems on geothermal well drilling costs:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal research Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has as one of its goals to reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells by 25 percent. To attain this goal, DOE continuously evaluates new technologies to determine their potential in contributing to the Program. One such technology is artifical intelligence (AI), a branch of computer science that, in recent years, has begun to impact the marketplace in a number of fields. Expert systems techniques can (and in some cases, already have) been applied to develop computer-based ''advisors'' to assist drilling personnel in areas such as designing mud systems, casing plans, and cement programs, optimizing drill bit selection and bottom hole asssembly (BHA) design, and alleviating lost circulation, stuck pipe, fishing, and cement problems. Intelligent machines with sensor and/or robotic directly linked to AI systems, have potential applications in areas of bit control, rig hydraulics, pipe handling, and pipe inspection. Using a well costing spreadsheet, the potential savings that could be attributed to each of these systems was calculated for three base cases: a dry steam well at The Geysers, a medium-depth Imerial Valley well, and a deep Imperial Valley well. Based on the average potential savings to be realized, expert systems for handling lost circulations problems and for BHA design are the most likely to produce significant results. Automated bit control and rig hydraulics also exhibit high potential savings, but these savings are extremely sensitive to the assumptions of improved drilling efficiency and the cost of these sytems at the rig. 50 refs., 19 figs., 17 tabs.

Satrape, J.V.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

87

Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: No abstract prepared. Author(s): John Travis Finger, Eddie Ross Hoover Published: Publisher Unknown, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Annex_7_-_The_Iea%27S_Role_In_Advanced_Geothermal_Drilling&oldid=389771" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

88

Automatic detection and diagnosis of problems in drilling geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories and Tracor Applied Sciences have developed a proof-of-concept Expert System for the automatic detection and diagnosis of several important problems in geothermal drilling. The system is designed to detect loss of circulation, influx, loss of pump efficiency, and sensor problems. Data from flow sensors (including the rolling float meter), the pump stroke counter and other sensors are processed and examined for deviations from expected patterns. The deviations from expected patterns. The deviations are transformed into evidence for a Bayesian Network (a probabilistic reasoning tool), which estimates the probability of each fault. The results are displayed by a Graphical User Interface, which also allows the user to see data related to a specific fault. The prototype was tested on real data, and successfully detected and diagnosed faults.

Harmse, J.E.; Wallace, R.D.; Mansure, A.J.; Glowka, D.A.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Investigation of the feasibility of deep microborehole drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in sensor technology, microelectronics, and telemetry technology make it feasible to produce miniature wellbore logging tools and instrumentation. Microboreholes are proposed for subterranean telemetry installations, exploration, reservoir definition, and reservoir monitoring this assumes that very small diameter bores can be produced for significantly lower cost using very small rigs. A microborehole production concept based on small diameter hydraulic or pneumatic powered mechanical drilling, assemblies deployed on coiled tubing is introduced. The concept is evaluated using, basic mechanics and hydraulics, published theories on rock drilling, and commercial simulations. Small commercial drill bits and hydraulic motors were selected for laboratory scale demonstrations. The feasibility of drilling deep, directional, one to two-inch diameter microboreholes has not been challenged by the results to date. Shallow field testing of prototype systems is needed to continue the feasibility investigation.

Dreesen, D.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cohen, J.H. [Maurer Engineering, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Systems Study Of Drilling For Installation Of Geothermal Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal, or ground-source, heat pumps (GHP) are much more efficient than air-source units such as conventional air conditioners. A major obstacle to their use is the relatively high initial cost of installing the heat-exchange loops into the ground. In an effort to identify drivers which influence installation cost, a number of site visits were made during 1996 to assess the state-of-the-art in drilling for GHP loop installation. As an aid to quantifying the effect of various drilling-process improvements, we constructed a spread-sheet based on estimated time and material costs for all the activities required in a typical loop-field installation. By substituting different (improved) values into specific activity costs, the effect on total project costs can be easily seen. This report contains brief descriptions of the site visits, key points learned during the visits, copies of the spread-sheet, recommendations for further work, and sample results from sensitivity analysis using the...

John Finger William; William N. Sullivan; Ronald D. Jacobson; Kenneth G. Pierce

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Systems study of drilling for installation of geothermal heat pumps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal, or ground-source, heat pumps (GHP) are much more efficient than air-source units such as conventional air conditioners. A major obstacle to their use is the relatively high initial cost of installing the heat-exchange loops into the ground. In an effort to identify drivers which influence installation cost, a number of site visits were made during 1996 to assess the state-of-the-art in drilling for GHP loop installation. As an aid to quantifying the effect of various drilling-process improvements, we constructed a spread-sheet based on estimated time and material costs for all the activities required in a typical loop-field installation. By substituting different (improved) values into specific activity costs, the effect on total project costs can be easily seen. This report contains brief descriptions of the site visits, key points learned during the visits, copies of the spread-sheet, recommendations for further work, and sample results from sensitivity analysis using the spread-sheet.

Finger, J.T.; Sullivan, W.N.; Jacobson, R.D.; Pierce, K.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Hydrothermal spallation drilling and advanced energy conversion technologies for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was to study the various factors affecting the economic and technical feasibility of Engineered Geothermal Systems, with a special emphasis on advanced drilling technologies. The first part of ...

Augustine, Chad R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

94

Drilling for geothermal resources: rules and regulations and minimum well construction standards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following geothermal rules and regulations are presented: authority; policy; definitions; drilling; records; blow out prevention; injection wells; abandonment; maintenance; hearings; notice procedures; hearings on refused, limited, or conditioned permit; appeals; penalties; and forms;

Not Available

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Results of the 1988 geothermal gradient test drilling project for the State of Washington  

SciTech Connect

During late summer and early fall of 1988, the Washington Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) completed drilling eight shallow geothermal gradient test wells in the southern Washington Cascade Range. This report describes the preliminary results of the 1988 drilling and gradient measuring, and summarizes our current perspectives on distribution and magnitude of the geothermal resource potential in the southern Washington Cascades. 18 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

Barnett, D.B.; Korosec, M.A.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Geothermal Well Costs and their Sensitivities to Changes in Drilling and Completion Operations  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a detailed analysis of the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. The basis for much of the analysis is a computer-simulation-based model which calculates and accrues operational costs involved in drilling and completing a well. Geothermal well costs are discussed in general, with special emphasis on variations among different geothermal areas in the United States, effects of escalation and inflation over the past few years, and comparisons of geothermal drilling costs with those for oil and gas wells. Cost differences between wells for direct use of geothermal energy and those for electric generation, are also indicated. In addition, a breakdown of total well cost into its components is presented. This provides an understanding of the relative contributions of different operations in drilling and completions. A major portion of the cost in many geothermal wells is from encountered troubles, such as lost circulation, cementing difficulties, and fishing. These trouble costs are considered through both specific examples and statistical treatment of drilling and completions problems. The sensitivities of well costs to variations in several drilling and completion parameters are presented. The mode1 makes it possible to easily vary parameters such as rates of penetration; bit lifetimes; bit rental, or rig costs; delay times; number of cement plugs; etc. are compared.

Carson, C. C.; Lin, Y.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Directional drilling equipment and techniques for deep hot granite wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional directional drilling technology has been extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot dry Rock (HDR) experimental site. Completing the first of a two-wellbore HDR system has resulted in the definition of operational limitations of many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-2), to a measured depth of 15,300 ft (4.7 km) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 530/sup 0/F (275/sup 0/C) required the development of a new high temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 8500 ft (2.6 km) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35/sup 0/ from the vertical at a controlled azimuthal orientation.

Brittenham, T.L.; Sursen, G.; Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.; Williams, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Based on Slim Hole Drilling, Volume 1: Analytical Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI tested and documented slim hole drilling as a geothermal resource evaluation method. The results of this work confirm that lower cost reservoir evaluations can be performed using slim hole methods. On the basis of this report's probabilistic reservoir size estimate, the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the island of Hawaii could support 100-300 MWe of geothermal power capacity.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Based on Slim Hole Drilling, Volume 2: Application in Hawaii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI tested and documented slim hole drilling as a geothermal resource evaluation method. The results of this work confirm that lower cost reservoir evaluations can be performed using slim hole methods. On the basis of this report's probabilistic reservoir size estimate, the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the island of Hawaii could support 100-300 MWe of geothermal power capacity.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells in an H/sub 2/S environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following subjects are covered: facts about hydrogen sulfides; drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells; detection devices and protective equipment; hazard levels and safety procedures; first aid; and H/sub 2/S in California oil, gas, and geothermal fields. (MHR)

Dosch, M.W.; Hodgson, S.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Report of the workshop on advanced geothermal drilling and completion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discussions, conclusions, and recommendations of the Workshop on Advanced Geothermal Drilling and Completion Systems are summarized. The purpose of the workshop was to identify new drilling and completion systems that have the potential for significantly reducing the cost of geothermal wells, and to provide recommendations as to the research and development tasks that are required to develop these advanced systems. Participants in the workshop included representatives from private industry, universities, and government who were organized into four working groups as follows: Rock Drilling Technology, Surface Technology, Borehole Technology, and Directional Drilling Technology. The Panel on Rock Drilling Technology was charged with identifying advanced concepts for breaking rock that could result in instantaneous penetration rates three to five times higher than those of conventional rotary drilling. The Panel on Surface Technology discussed improvements in surface equipment and operating procedures that could contribute to reduced well costs. The Panel on Borehole Technology discussed problems associated with establishing and maintaining a stable borehole for the long-term production of geothermal wells. The Panel on Directional Drilling Technology addressed problems encountered in drilling deviated wells in geothermal reservoirs.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Modeling discharge requirements for deep geothermal wells at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, MX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the mid-l980's, Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) drilled a number of deep wells (M-200 series) at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California, Mexico to investigate the continuation of the geothermal reservoir to the east of the Cerro Prieto-II and III production areas. The wells encountered permeability at depths ranging from 2,800 to 4,400 m but due to the reservoir depth and the relatively cold temperatures encountered in the upper 1,000 to 2,000 m of the wells, it was not possible to discharge some of the wells. The wells at Cerro Prieto are generally discharged by injecting compressed air below the water level using 2-3/8-inch tubing installed with either a crane or workover rig. The objective of this technique is to lift sufficient water out of the well to stimulate flow from the reservoir into the wellbore. However, in the case of the M-200 series wells, the temperatures in the upper 1,000 to 2,000 m are generally below 50 C and the heat loss to the formation is therefore significant. The impact of heat loss on the stimulation process was evaluated using both a numerical model of the reservoir/wellbore system and steady-state wellbore modeling. The results from the study indicate that if a flow rate of at least 300 liters/minute can be sustained, the well can probably be successfully stimulated. This is consistent with the flow rates obtained during the successful stimulations of wells M-202 and M-203. If the flow rate is closer to 60 liters/minute, the heat loss is significant and it is unlikely that the well can be successfully discharged. These results are consistent with the unsuccessful discharge attempts in wells M-201 and M-205.

Menzies, Anthony J.; Granados, Eduardo E.; Puente, Hector Gutierrez; Pierres, Luis Ortega

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

103

Application of scientific core drilling to geothermal exploration: Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala, Central America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our efforts in Honduras and Guatemala were part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (AID). Exploration core drilling operations at the Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala sites were part of a geothermal assessment for the national utility companies of these countries to locate and evaluate their geothermal resources for electrical power generation. In Honduras, country-wide assessment of all thermal areas determined that Platanares was the site with the greatest geothermal potential. In late 1986 to middle 1987, three slim core holes were drilled at Platanares to a maximum depth of 680 m and a maximum temperature of 165{degree}C. The objectives were to obtain information on the geothermal gradient, hydrothermal alterations, fracturing, and possible inflows of hydrothermal fluids. Two holes produced copious amounts of water under artesian conditions and a total of 8 MW(t) of energy. Geothermal investigations in Guatemala focused on the Tecuamburro Volcano geothermal site. The results of surface geological, volcanological, hydrogeochemical, and geophysical studies at Tecuamburro Volcano indicated a substantial shallow heat source. In early 1990 we drilled one core hole, TCB-1, to 808 m depth. The measured bottom hole temperature was 238{degree}C. Although the borehole did not flow, in-situ samples indicate the hole is completed in a vapor-zone above a probable 300{degree}C geothermal reservoir.

Goff, S.J.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Duffield, W.A. [Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Technical and economic evaluation of selected compact drill rigs for drilling 10,000 foot geothermal production wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the investigation and evaluation of several {open_quotes}compact{close_quotes} drill rigs which could be used for drilling geothermal production wells. Use of these smaller rigs would save money by reducing mobilization costs, fuel consumption, crew sizes, and environmental impact. Advantages and disadvantages of currently-manufactured rigs are identified, and desirable characteristics for the {open_quotes}ideal{close_quotes} compact rig are defined. The report includes a detailed cost estimate of a specific rig, and an evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio of using this rig. Industry contacts for further information are given.

Huttrer, G.W. [Geothermal Management Company, Inc., Frisco, CO (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the most definitive in providing the necessary data for successful citing of geothermal exploration, production, and injection wells, which appears to be electrical geophysical...

106

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- GRED STUDIES AND DRILLING OF...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STATE 2, AMERICULTURE TILAPIA FARM LIGHTNING DOCK KGRA, ANIMAS VALLEY, NM Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

107

The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This project will implement and test a series of innovative geothermal exploration strategies in two phases. Phase 1 studies...

108

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is mined. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

109

EM Telemetry Tool for Deep Well Drilling Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report discusses the successful development and testing of a deep operational electromagnetic (EM) telemetry system, produced under a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. This new electromagnetic telemetry system provides a wireless communication link between sensors deployed deep within oil and gas wells and data acquisition equipment located on the earth's surface. EM based wireless telemetry is a highly appropriate technology for oil and gas exploration in that it avoids the need for thousands of feet of wired connections. In order to achieve the project performance objectives, significant improvements over existing EM telemetry systems were made. These improvements included the development of new technologies that have improved the reliability of the communications link while extending operational depth. A key element of the new design is the incorporation of a data-fusion methodology which enhances the communication receiver's ability to extract very weak signals from large amounts of ambient environmental noise. This innovative data-fusion receiver based system adapts advanced technologies, not normally associated with low-frequency communications, and makes them work within the harsh drilling environments associated with the energy exploration market. Every element of a traditional EM telemetry system design, from power efficiency to reliability, has been addressed. The data fusion based EM telemetry system developed during this project is anticipated to provide an EM tool capability that will impact both onshore and offshore oil and gas exploration operations, for conventional and underbalanced drilling applications.

Jeffrey M. Gabelmann

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Planning and drilling geothermal energy extraction hole EE-2: a precisely oriented and deviated hole in hot granitic rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the preceding work (Phase I) of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Project at Fenton Hill, two holes were drilled to a depth of nearly 3048 m (10,000 ft) and connected by a vertical hydraulic fracture. In this phase, water was pumped through the underground reservoir for approximately 417 days, producing an energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t). Energy Extraction Hole No. 2 (EE-2) is the first of two deep holes that will be used in the Engineering-Resource Development System (Phase II) of the ongoing HDR Project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This phase of the work consists of drilling two parallel boreholes, inclined in their lower, open-hole sections at 35/sup 0/ to the vertical and separated by a vertical distance of 366 m (1200 ft) between the inclined parts of the drill holes. The holes will be connected by a series of vertical, hydraulically produced fractures in the Precambrian granitic rock complex. EE-2 was drilled to a depth of 4660 m (15,289 ft), where the bottom-hole temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F). Directional drilling techniques were used to control the azimuth and deviation of the hole. Upgrading of the temperature capability of existing hardware, and development of new equipment was necessary to complete the drilling of the hole in the extremely hot, hard, and abrasive granitic formation. The drilling history and the problems with bits, directional tools, tubular goods, cementing, and logging are described. A discussion of the problems and recommendations for overcoming them are also presented.

Helmick, C.; Koczan, S.; Pettitt, R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 5 - System Evaluations. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is aimed at decreasing the costs and increasing the efficiency of drilling gas wells in excess of 15,000 feet. This volume presents a summary of an evaluation of various drilling techniques. Drilling solutions were compared quantitatively against typical penetration rates derived from conventional systems. A qualitative analysis measured the impact of a proposed system on the drilling industry. The evaluations determined that the best candidates f o r improving the speed and efficiency of drilling deep gas wells include: PDC/TSD bits, slim-hole drilling, roller-cone bits, downhole motors, top-driven systems, and coiled-tubing drilling.

None

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Mt. Hood geothermal exploratory drilling and testing plan. Old Maid Flat holes No. 1 and No. 7A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This plan has been prepared to establish the objectives and set forth the procedures and guidelines for conducting geothermal exploratory drilling and testing operations in the Old Maid Flat area of Mt. Hood, Oregon, approximately 50 miles east of Portland. The project will be conducted on lands within the Mt. Hood National Forest, which are currently under Federal Lease OR 13994 to the Northwest Geothermal Corporation. The exploratory geothermal operations will consist of (1) testing an existing 4,000-foot temperature gradient hole to determine the quality of geothermal fluids, and (2) drilling and testing a new 5,000-foot hole to determine overall geothermal reservoir characteristics.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Temperature histories in geothermal wells: survey of rock thermomechanical properties and drilling, production, and injection case studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal and mechanical properties for geothermal formations are tabulated for a range of temperatures and stress conditions. Data was obtained from the technical literature and direct contacts with industry. Thermal properties include heat capacity, conductivity, and diffusivity. Undisturbed geothermal profiles are also presented. Mechanical properties include Youngs modulus and Poisson ratio. GEOTEMP thermal simulations of drilling, production and injection are reported for two geothermal regions, the hot dry rock area near Los Alamos and the East Mesa field in the Imperial Valley. Actual drilling, production, and injection histories are simulated. Results are documented in the form of printed GEOTEMP output and plots of temperatures versus depth, radius, and time. Discussion and interpretation of the results are presented for drilling and well completion design to determine: wellbore temperatures during drilling as a function of depth; bit temperatures over the drilling history; cement temperatures from setting to the end of drilling; and casing and formation temperatures during drilling, production, and injection.

Goodman, M.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Exploration for hot dry rock geothermal resources in the Midcontinent USA. Hot dry rock conceptual models for exploration, HDR test site investigations, and the Illinois Deep Drill Hole Project. Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three potential sources of HDR, each covering approximately a 2/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ area, were identified and subjected to preliminary evaluation with ad hoc exploration strategies. In the Mississippi Embayment test site, lateral thermal conductivity variations and subcrustal heat sources may be involved in producing abnormally high subsurface temperatures. Studies indicate that enhanced temperatures are associated primarily with basement rift features where vertical displacement of aquifers and faults cause the upward migration of hot waters leading to anomalously high, local, upper crustal temperatures. The Western Nebraska test site is a potential low temperature HDR source also related, at least in part, to groundwater movement. There appear to be much more widespread possibilities for similar HDR sites in the Great Plains area. The Southeast Michigan test site was selected for study because of the possible presence of radiogenic plutons overlain by a thickened sedimentary blanket. There is no direct information on the presence of abnormally high temperatures in this area, but the study does show that a combination of gravity and magnetic anomaly mapping with regional geological information derived from sparse drill holes in the Phanerozoic rocks is useful on a widespread basis for focusing on local areas for detailed evaluation.

Hinze, W.J.; Braile, L.W.; von Frese, R.R.B.; Lidiak, E.G.; Denison, R.E.; Keller, G.R.; Roy, R.F.; Swanberg, C.A.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Morgan, P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Simulation of air and mist drilling for geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect

An improved method for calculating downhole temperatures, pressures, fluid densities and velocities during air drilling has been developed. The basic equations of fluid flow for a gas with cuttings and mist are presented along with a numerical method for their solution. Several applications of this calculational method are given, showing the effect of flow rate and standpipe pressures in typical air and mist drilling situations. 8 refs.

Mitchell, R.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Design, Development and Testing of a Drillable Straddle Packer for Lost Circulation Control in Geothermal Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost Circulation is a widespread problem encountered when drilling geothermal wells, and often represents a substantial portion of the cost of drilling a well. The U.S. Department of Energy sponsors research and development work at Sandia National Laboratories in an effort to reduce these lost circulation expenditures. Sandia has developed a down hole tool that improves the effectiveness and reduces th cost of lost circulation cement treatment while drilling geothermal wells. This tool, the Drillable Straddle Packer, is a low-cost disposable device that is used to isolate the loss zone and emplace the cement treatment directly into the region of concern. This report documents the design and development of the Drillabe Straddle Packer, the laboratory and field test results, and the design package that is available to transfer this technology to industry users.

Gabaldon, J.; Glowka, D.A.; Gronewald, P.; Knudsen, S.D.; Raymond, D.W.; Staller, G.E.; Westmoreland, J.J.; Whitlow, G.L.; Wise, J.L.; Wright, E.K.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in a research and development program to design, build, and test an improved geothermal drill bit. The major tasks of the Phase I effort are entitled: failure mechanisms of existing bits; new steels and new bearing design; and new seals and lubricants. It appears that a significant gain in drill-bit life can be attained by the use of higher-temperature steels which retain more hardness at temperatures above 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F). Such steels are available, and two research bits of high-temperature steels were made and will shortly be tested in a laboratory-simulated full-scale geothermal drilling environment. Two control bits of the same design, but made with conventional drill bit steels, were also obtained for identical laboratory test runs, so that the performance of the research bits can be meaningfully assessed. Base-line properties of the steels, such as hardness and fracture toughness as functions of temperature, are being measured to further assess the value of the high-temperature steels selected for the research bits. A geothermal test vessel was designed and fabricated in which the full-scale drill bits will be tested. The vessel is capable of temperature to 427/sup 0/C (800/sup 0/F) and pressures to 35 MPa (5,000 psi). Seal and lubrication designs were studied, and the state of the art in high-temperature seals and lubricants was assessed. Some candidate seals and lubricants have been obtained for testing, and others are being procured. In addition, a seal test vessel has been designed and will soon be completed which can simulate the geothermal drilling environment in full-scale testing of seal and lubricant designs and materials. (JGB)

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.; Maurer, W.C.; DeVries, L.K.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The influence of geothermal sources on deep ocean temperature, salinity, and flow fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a study of the effect of geothermal sources on the deep circulation, temperature and salinity fields. In Chapter 1 background material is given on the strength and distribution of geothermal heating. In ...

Speer, Kevin G. (Kevin George)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Simulation of air and mist drilling for geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect

An air drilling model has been developed that accounts for cuttings and mist. Comparison of the model results with previous work shows this model to be more conservative. The equations developed are simple enough to be used in hand calculations, but the full capability of the model is more easily obtained with a computer program. Studies with the model show that volume requirements and standpipe pressures are significantly different for mist drilling compared with air drilling. An improved method for calculating downhole temperatures, pressures, fluid densities, and velocities during air drilling has been developed. Improvements on previous methods include the following. A fully transient thermal analysis of the wellbore and formation is used to determine the flowing temperatures. The effects of flow acceleration are included explicitly in the calculation. The slip velocity between the gas and the cuttings is determined by the use of a separate momentum equation for the cuttings. The possibility of critical flow in the wellbore is tested and appropriate changes in the volume flow rate and standpipe pressure are made automatically. The standpipe and flowing pressures are predicted. The analysis is conservative. The effect of the cuttings on the wellbore flow will tend to overpredict the required volume flow rates. In this paper, the basic equations of fluid flow for a gas with cuttings and mist are presented along with a numerical method for their solution. Several applications of this calculational method are given, showing the effect of flow rate and standpipe pressure in typical air and mist drilling situations.

Mitchell, R.F.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Geothermal development in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

San Kampaeng and Fang geothermal areas are considered areas of interest for exploitation of geothermal energy. The technologies of exploration and development have been studied by Thai scientists and engineers during the past four years. The first geothermal deep exploration well was drilled, in cooperation with Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), in the San Kampaeng geothermal area. In 1985, supplementary work is planned to define the deep structural setting in greater detail before starting to drill the next deep exploration well. In Fang geothermal area some shallow exploitation wells have been drilled to obtain fluid to feed a demonstration binary system of 120 kWe, with the technical cooperation of BRGM and GEOWATT, France.

Praserdvigai, S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Semi-annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit, Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test facilities (the geothermal drilling vessel and the geothermal drill-bit seal tester) were completed and de-bugged, and the first tests were run on full-scale research drill bits and drill-bit seals. In addition, more materials information was gathered, and a number of additional seals of high-temperature elastomer materials were obtained for testing. Maurer Engineering has also been active in the design and procurement of candidate high-temperature drill-bit seals for testing, and has done a literature and patent search on the problem of drill-bit insert retention. Reed Tool Co. has cooperated in the fabrication of drill bits for testing, and has offered consultation on certain seal designs.

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Semi-annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit, phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test facilities (the geothermal drilling vessel and the geothermal drill-bit seal tester) were completed and de-bugged, and the first tests were run on full-scale research drill bits and drill-bit seals. In addition, more materials information was gathered, and a number of additional seals of high-temperature elastomer materials were obtained for testing. Maurer Engineering, on a subcontract basis, has also been active in the design and procurement of candidate high-temperature drill-bit seals for testing, and has done a literature and patent search on the problem of drill-bit insert retention. Reed Tool Co. has cooperated in the fabrication of drill bits for testing, and has offered consultation on certain seal designs.

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Evaluating candidate lost circulation materials for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories' Geothermal Technology Development Division is working to advance the state of the art of lost circulation prevention and control. For this purpose, a large-scale lost Circulation Test Facility was designed and built. This paper addresses the evaluation of candidate lost circulation materisl using this facility and also using the recommended practice of API RP 131. Test results from these facilities are compared and discussed for the materials tested.

Loeppke, G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Wear mechanisms for polycrystalline-diamond compacts as utilized for drilling in geothermal environments. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work, which was performed in the period from 12/6/79 to 9/30/81 included: (1) rock cutting experiments with single point polycrystalline sintered diamond compact (PDC) cutters to quantitatively determine cutter wear rates and identify wear modes, (2) PDC rock cutting experiments to measure temperatures developed and examine the effects of tool wear, cutting parameters and coolant flow rates on temperature generation, (3) assisting in performing full scale laboratory drilling experiments with PDC bits, using preheated air to simulate geothermal drilling conditions, and in analyzing and reporting the experimental results, and (4) acting in a consulting role with the purpose of establishing design specifications for geothermal hard matrix PDC bits to be procured by Sandia Laboratories for test purposes.

Hibbs, L.E. Jr.; Sogoian, G.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

A drillable straddle packer for lost circulation control in geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation is a persistent problem in geothermal drilling and often accounts for a significant fraction of the cost of drilling a typical geothermal well. The US Department of Energy sponsors work at Sandia National Laboratories to develop technology for reducing lost circulation costs. This paper describes a downhole tool that has been developed at Sandia for improving the effectiveness and reducing the cost of cementing operations used to treat lost circulation zones. This tool, known as the drillable straddle packer, is a low-cost, disposable assembly used for isolating a loss zone and directing the flow of cement into the zone. This paper describes the tool concept, hardware design, deployment procedure, laboratory testing, and technical issues addressed during the development process.

Glowka, D.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Siting and drilling recommendations for a geothermal exploration well, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available exploration data relevant to the GeoProducts leasehold in the Wendel-Amedee KGRA are reviewed and interpreted. On the basis of this interpretation, locations and procedures are recommended for drilling geothermal production wells capable of supplying fluid at a temperature of 250/sup 0/F or greater. The following are covered: stratigraphy and geological history, geologic structure, geochemistry, geophysics, temperature-gradient data, and fluid quality. (MHR)

McNitt, J.R.; Wilde, W.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling  

SciTech Connect

The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4) Analysis of Phase 1 data indicated that there is decreased specific energy as the rotational speed increases; (5) Technology transfer, as part of Phase 1, was accomplished with technical presentations to the industry (see Judzis, Boucher, McCammon, and Black); (6) TerraTek prepared a design concept for the high speed drilling test stand, which was planned around the proposed high speed mud motor concept. Alternative drives for the test stand were explored; a high speed hydraulic motor concept was finally used; (7) The high speed system was modified to accommodate larger drill bits than originally planned; (8) Prototype mud turbine motors and the high speed test stand were used to drive the drill bits at high speed; (9) Three different rock types were used during the testing: Sierra White granite, Crab Orchard sandstone, and Colton sandstone. The drill bits used included diamond impregnated bits, a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit, a thermally stable PDC (TSP) bit, and a hybrid TSP and natural diamond bit; and (10) The drill bits were run at rotary speeds up to 5500 rpm and weight on bit (WOB) to 8000 lbf. During Phase 2, the ROP as measured in depth of cut per bit revolution generally increased with increased WOB. The performance was mixed with increased rotary speed, with the depth cut with the impregnated drill bit generally increasing and the TSP and hybrid TSP drill bits generally decreasing. The ROP in ft/hr generally increased with all bits with increased WOB and rotary speed. The mechanical specific energy generally improved (decreased) with increased WOB and was mixed with increased rotary speed.

TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Preliminary petrographic and geophysical interpretations of the exploratory geothermal drill hole and core, Redstone, New Hampshire  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 3000 foot diamond drill hole was drilled in the Conway Granite in Redstone, New Hampshire. A comprehensive detailed petrographic and physical study of this core was made. The purpose of this study is to supply a sound data base for future geothermal and uranium-thorium studies of the drill core. An estimate of the heat flow potential of the Redstone drill hole gives a heat flow of 1.9 HFU. If only the red phase of the Conway Granite had been intersected the heat flow may have been as much as 2.7 HFU, reaching a temperature of 260/sup 0/C at 6 km. The drill hole intersected four lithologies; the green and red phase of the Conway Granite, the Albany quartz syenite and a medium-grained, hastingsite-biotite granite. The red phase has the highest and most irregular radioactivity. The irregularity is mainly due to minor variations in lithology. The drill core intersected several alteration zones up to a thickness of 150 feet. These alteration zones represent passage of low to medium temperature fluids which might have been mineralized. The Conway Granite has the physical and chemical characteristics necessary for the formation of vein type uranium deposits. The presence of unexplained radiometric anomalies lends support to the existence of such deposits.

Hoag, R.B. Jr.; Stewart, G.W.

1977-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Recent drilling activities at the earth power resources Tuscarora geothermal power project's hot sulphur springs lease area.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by at least 6,000 feet long with up to 1,700 feet of vertical offset. The well (HSS-2) was successfully drilled through a shallow thick sequence of altered Tertiary Volcanic where previous exploration wells had severe hole-caving problems. The ''tight-hole'' drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to reduce Smectite-type clay swelling problems. Core from the 330 F fractured geothermal reservoir system at depths of 2,950 feet indicated 30% Smectite type clays existed in a fault-gouge zone where total loss of circulation occurred during coring. Smectite-type clays are not typically expected at temperatures above 300 F. The fracture zone at 2,950 feet exhibited a skin-damage during injection testing suggesting that the drilling fluids may have caused clay swelling and subsequent geothermal reservoir formation damage. The recent well drilling experiences indicate that drilling problems in the shallow clays at Hot Sulphur Springs can be reduced. In addition, average penetration rates through the caprock system can be on the order of 25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production formation drilling will depend on finding drilling fluids that will not cause formation damage in the Smectite-rich fractured geothermal reservoir system. Information obtained at Hot Sulphur Springs may apply to other geothermal systems developed in volcanic settings.

Goranson, Colin

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Application of high powered lasers to drilling and completing deep walls.  

SciTech Connect

High powered laser rock drilling was studied as a revolutionary method for drilling and completing deep gas and oil wells. The objectives of this 2002 to 2003 fiscal year research were to study the concept that large diameter holes can be created by multiple overlapping small beam spots, to determine the ability of lasers to drill rock submerged to some depth in water, to demonstrate the possibilities of lasers for perforating application, and to determine the wavelength effects on rock removal. Laser technology applied to well drilling and completion operations is attractive because it has the potential to reduce drilling time, create a ceramic lining that may eliminate the need for steel casing, provide additional monitor-on-drilling laser sensors and improve well performance through improved perforation. The results from this research will help engineering design on a laser-based well drilling system.

Reed, C. B.; Xu, Z.; Parker, R. A.; Gahan, B. C.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.; Figueroa, H.; Deeg, W.

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

133

Semi-annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Considerable progress has been made in understanding the causes of premature drill-bit failure in the geothermal well drilling environment. Drill-bits of high-temperature steels are being fabricated, as well as a test chamber to simulate the geothermal environment. In addition, several basic properties of the candidate steels and of the conventional drill-bit steels have been gathered from the literature, and provisions have been made for completing the material property picture through a materials testing program at Terra Tek. Considerable background material has been gathered on the drill-bit seal problem and on candidate seal materials. Some seal materials have been selected for further testing, and a seal tester is being designed to provide a very good simulation of the environment experienced by seals in geothermal well drill-bits. Major guidance meetings on the project to develop an improved geothermal drill-bit were held on June 10--11, August 13, and December 10--11. Appendix B includes the reports of these meetings.

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.; Maurer, W.C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Geopressured-geothermal well report. Volume I. Drilling and completion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gladys McCall site activities are covered through the completion of the test well and salt water disposal well. The test well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet, then plugged back to 15,831 feet. Three 4'' diameter diamond cores were taken for analysis. An existing well on site, the Getty-Butts Gladys McCall No. 1, was reentered and completed to a depth of 3514 feet as a salt water disposal well. The geologic interpretation of the Gladys McCall site indicated target sands for testing at 15,080 feet through 15, 831 feet. Reservoir fluid temperature at this depth is estimated to be approximately 313/sup 0/F and pressure is estimated to be +-12,800 psi. The preliminary reservoir volume estimate is 3.6 billion barrels of brine. The design wells program includes environmental monitoring of the Gladys McCall site by Louisiana State University. Field stations are set up to monitor surface and ground water quality, subsidence, land loss and shoreline erosion, and seismicity. As of December 31, 1981 the study shows no significant impact on the environment by site operations.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Clackamas 4800-foot thermal gradient hole: Cascade geothermal drilling: Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal Power Company (Thermal) completed a thermal gradient hole to about 5000 feet (1524 m) total depth in Section 28, Township 8 South, Range 8 East, Willamette Meridian, Marion County, Oregon. The objective was to obtain data for the characterization of the deep hydrothermal regime in the Cascades volcanic region in order to better define its geothermal resource potential. The depth and location of the thermal gradient hole were designed by Thermal to test the basis of the Clackamas geothermal system exploration model developed by Chevron Resources Company.

Iovenitti, J.L.; D'Olier, W.L.

1987-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

Research on Vortex Unstablity Caused by Bending Deformation of Drilling Bar in BTA Deep Hole Machining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vortex and unstability of bending boring bar caused by cutting fluid force are researched, with Timoshenko beam model and mated vibration model, based on which machining quality of BTA deep hole drilling and tools life can be promoted in practice. Linear ... Keywords: deep hole boring, boring bar, Timoshenko beam, mating vibration, vortex motion stability

Zhanqi Hu; Wu Zhao

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Marysville, Montana, Geothermal Project: Environmental Analysis of the Deep Geothermal Research Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to investigate a geothermal anomaly of high heat flow discovered in 1969 in central Montana, and to determine how this natural resource might be developed as a source of useful energy. Under Phase I, the natural resource will be explored, drilled, and modeled at an estimated cost of $2,588,935 over a 3-year period. Phase II, depending upon the nature of the heat source, will be developing the resource under a cooperative effort of government and private industry. This environmental analysis is intended to cover the drilling and logging operations noted under Phase I, the only work being undertaken at this time. As can be seen from Figure 1, further tests may be run at this site in later phases of the study. But since the nature of these tests are highly dependent on the results of Phase I, it is not considered productive to speculate on their environmental impact. As is show, however, any later experiments would cover a range of underground experiments, some of which consume water and others which would produce water. Before a meaningful analysis of such work can be written, it will be necessary to analyze the results of Phase I findings.

None

1973-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Deep Production Well for Geothermal Direct-Use Heating of A Large Commercial Greenhouse, Radium Springs, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Expansion of a large commercial geothermally-heated greenhouse is underway and requires additional geothermal fluid production. This report discusses the results of a cost-shared U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and A.R. Masson, Inc. drilling project designed to construct a highly productive geothermal production well for expansion of the large commercial greenhouse at Radium Springs. The well should eliminate the potential for future thermal breakthrough from existing injection wells and the inducement of inflow from shallow cold water aquifers by geothermal production drawdown in the shallow reservoir. An 800 feet deep production well, Masson 36, was drilled on a US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Geothermal Lease NM-3479 at Radium Springs adjacent to the A. R. Masson Radium Springs Farm commercial greenhouse 15 miles north of Las Cruces in Dona Ana County, New Mexico just west of Interstate 25 near the east bank of the Rio Grande. The area is in the Rio Grande rift, a tectonically-active region with high heat flow, and is one of the major geothermal provinces in the western United State.

James C. Witcher

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

139

Optimization of Deep Drilling Performance - Development and Benchmark Testing of Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits & HP/HT Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

SciTech Connect

This document details the progress to date on the OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS AND HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION contract for the year starting October 2004 through September 2005. The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit--fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all Phase 1 testing and is planning Phase 2 development.

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Utility of drill-stem tests in determination of the geothermal regime of Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate representation of geothermal conditions is necessary to determine generation potential of source rocks buried in Railroad Valley. Boreholes, provide the best source of geothermal information, but formation temperature data must be screened for variations caused by drilling. Bottomhole temperatures from wireline logs are affected by initial formation conditions, drilling fluid that moves into the formation while drilling, and lag time between cessation of drilling fluid circulation and acquisition of logs. More accurate indicators of formation conditions are temperatures recorded during drill-stem tests, especially for tests that recovered large amounts of fluid. Over 130 drill-stem tests were examined to establish the viability of this source of data and to determine the geothermal conditions of the Railroad Valley basin. Results indicate that 500 feet or more of fluid recovery on a test is necessary to get a temperature recorded that is not influenced by drilling perturbations. The formation temperature data collected for Railroad Valley indicate the possibility of 2 thermal regimes. A low-temperature gradient regime is probably influenced by meteoric water. The high-temperature gradient regime probably reflects the regional heat flow associated with the thin crust of the Great Basin.

French, D.E. [Independent Geologist, Billings, MT (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

File:Hawaii rules on leasing and drilling of geothermal resources.pdf |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

File File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Hawaii rules on leasing and drilling of geothermal resources.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Hawaii rules on leasing and drilling of geothermal resources.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 339 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 52 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:43, 23 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 09:43, 23 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 52 pages (339 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs)

142

Feasibility study of tuned-resonator, pulsating cavitating water jet for deep-hole drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study presents the advantages of pulsing a submerged jet to increase its erosion capability (particularly as caused by cavitation) in augmenting deep-hole drill bits. Various methods of accomplishing the pulsation are presented and discussed. The most attractive systems uncovered are acoustic oscillators which passively accomplish pulsations in the flow at frequencies corresponding to a Strouhal number in the range of 0.2 to 1.0. Such passive oscillators are assessed to be feasible candidates for development into practical deep hole drill bit systems and a long range plan for this research and development is presented and discussed.

Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Lindenmuth, W.T.; Conn, A.F.; Frederick, G.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Initial investigation of soil mercury geochemistry as an aid to drill site selection in geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A mercury-in-soil survey was conducted at the Roosevelt Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), Utah, to evaluate mercury soil geochemistry as a method of selecting exploration well sites in a hot-water geothermal system. Samples of -80 mesh soil were collected at 30.5 m intervals along traverses crossing known structures, surficial geothermal alteration, and exploration well sites, and were analyzed using a Gold Film Mercury Detector. Strong mercury anomalies occur at locations along known structures in close proximity to subsurface thermal activity; examples include areas over hot spring deposits and near a shallow producing well. In contrast, background mercury concentrations are present in nearby locations with little or no indication of subsurface thermal activity, such as areas around deep marginal producing wells and dry wells, and areas lacking hot spring deposits. These results indicate that mercury geochemical surveys can be useful for identifying and mapping structures controlling fluid flow in geothermal systems and for delineating areas overlying near-surface thermal activity. Soil mercury geochemistry thus provides information which may aid in the cost-effective selection of exploratory well sites.

Capuano, R.M.; Bamford, R.W.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

None

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Results from shallow research drilling at Inyo Domes, Long Valley Caldera, California and Salton Sea geothermal field, Salton Trough, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the results from two shallow drilling programs recently completed as part of the United States Department of Energy Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The purpose is to provide a broad overview of the objectives and results of the projects, and to analyze these results in the context of the promise and potential of research drilling in crustal thermal regimes. The Inyo Domes drilling project has involved drilling 4 shallow research holes into the 600-year-old Inyo Domes chain, the youngest rhyolitic event in the coterminous United States and the youngest volcanic event in Long Valley Caldera, California. The purpose of the drilling at Inyo was to understand the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of silicic magma as it intrudes the upper crust. This behavior, which involves the response of magma to decompression and cooling, is closely related to both eruptive phenomena and the establishment of hydrothermal circulation. The Salton Sea shallow research drilling project involved drilling 19 shallow research holes into the Salton Sea geothermal field, California. The purpose of this drilling was to bound the thermal anomaly, constrain hydrothermal flow pathways, and assess the thermal budget of the field. Constraints on the thermal budget links the local hydrothermal system to the general processes of crustal rifting in the Salton Trough.

Younker, L.W.; Eichelberger, J.C.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Newmark, R.L.; Vogel, T.A.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS & HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit-fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all major preparations for the high pressure drilling campaign. Baker Hughes encountered difficulties in providing additional pumping capacity before TerraTek's scheduled relocation to another facility, thus the program was delayed further to accommodate the full testing program.

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala geothermal gradient core hole drilling, operations, and preliminary results  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal gradient core hole (TCB-1) was drilled to a depth of 700+ m at the Tecuamburro geothermal site, Guatemala during February and March, 1990. The core hole is located low on the northern flank of the Tecuamburro Volcano complex. Preliminary analysis of cores (>98% core recovery) indicates that the hydrothermal system may be centered in the 4-km-diameter Chupadero Crater, which has been proposed as the source of pyroxene pumice deposits in the Tecuamburro area. TCB-1 is located 300 m south of a 300-m-diameter phreatic crater, Laguna Ixpaco; the core hole penetrates the thin edge of a tuff ring surrounding Ixpaco and zones of hydrothermal brecciation within the upper 150 m may be related to the phreatic blast, dated at 2,910 {sup 14}C years. At the time of this writing, the unequilibrated temperature at a depth of 570m was 180{degree}C. Data on fracturing, permeability, hydrothermal alteration, and temperature will be presented. 3 refs., 3 figs.

Goff, S.; Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Gardner, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Duffield, W. (Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (USA)); Martinelli, L.; Aycinena, S. (Swissboring Overseas Corp. Ltd., Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Castaneda, O. (Unidad de Desarrollo Geotermico, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2 (RRGE-2) is the second exploratory hole drilled in the Raft River Valley location of the Idaho Geothermal R and D Project for the purpose of determining the existence of hot water in quantities suitable for commercial power generation and nonelectric applications. This well was drilled to a depth of 6,543 feet below ground level to obtain additional geological information for evaluation of the deep geothermal reservoir system. The drilling and completion of RRGE-2 are described. The daily drilling reports, drill bit records, casing records, and descriptions of the cementing, logging, coring and containment techniques employed during the drilling operation are included.

Speake, J.L. (comp.)

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Cascades geothermal program  

SciTech Connect

The Cascades region is an area with high geothermal potential but few surface manifestations and limited subsurface data. To stimulate further development of hydrothermal resources, DOE-Idaho Operations Office issued Solicitation Number DE-SC07-85IDI2580. The reason for this solicitation was to secure cost sharing agreements with industry to drill gradient holes that would penetrate the rain curtain and obtain deep thermal, lithologic, and structural data. The data obtained and studies conducted under this program are to be released to the public for the benefit of the geothermal industry and the scientific community. The first thermal gradient hole to be drilled under this program was finished November 1985 by GEO-Newberry Crater, Inc. on the south flank of Newberry volcano. Data for additional wells drilled under the Cascades Geothermal Drilling Program will be released as they become available.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Advanced Drilling through Diagnostics-White-Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-speed data link that would provide dramatically faster communication from downhole instruments to the surface and back again has the potential to revolutionize deep drilling for geothermal resources through Diagnostics-While-Drilling (DWD). Many aspects of the drilling process would significantly improve if downhole and surface data were acquired and processed in real-time at the surface, and used to guide the drilling operation. Such a closed-loop, driller-in-the-loop DWD system, would complete the loop between information and control, and greatly improve the performance of drilling systems. The main focus of this program is to demonstrate the value of real-time data for improving drilling. While high-rate transfer of down-hole data to the surface has been accomplished before, insufficient emphasis has been placed on utilization of the data to tune the drilling process to demonstrate the true merit of the concept. Consequently, there has been a lack of incentive on the part of industry to develop a simple, low-cost, effective high-speed data link. Demonstration of the benefits of DWD based on a high-speed data link will convince the drilling industry and stimulate the flow of private resources into the development of an economical high-speed data link for geothermal drilling applications. Such a downhole communication system would then make possible the development of surface data acquisition and expert systems that would greatly enhance drilling operations. Further, it would foster the development of downhole equipment that could be controlled from the surface to improve hole trajectory and drilling performance. Real-time data that would benefit drilling performance include: bit accelerations for use in controlling bit bounce and improving rock penetration rates and bit life; downhole fluid pressures for use in the management of drilling hydraulics and improved diagnosis of lost circulation and gas kicks; hole trajectory for use in reducing directional drilling costs; and downhole weight-on-bit and drilling torque for diagnosing drill bit performance. In general, any measurement that could shed light on the downhole environment would give us a better understanding of the drilling process and reduce drilling costs.

FINGER,JOHN T.; GLOWKA,DAVID ANTHONY; LIVESAY,BILLY JOE; MANSURE,ARTHUR J.; PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of modifications for Coflexip flexible drilling pipe for high-temperature and -pressure geothermal service. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coflexip (France) flexible drilling pipe can provide economies in drilling geothermal wells. However, the current liner materials cannot take the high temperatures (approx.250C) and pressures (approx.69 MPa). Development was undertaken to replace the liner with higher temperature materials and, thus increase the temperature capability of the flexible pipe. DuPont Teflon PFA 350, L'Garde EPDM Y267 and L'Garde AFLAS 291 were considered but they all require backing by a closely woven stainless steel fabric to prevent extrusion. A graphite-reinforced EPDM elastomer was developed which has the potential of meeting the pressure-temperature requirements without the metal fabric reinforcement.

Friese, G.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Laser-Mechanical Drilling for Geothermal Energy: Low-Contact Drilling Technology to Enable Economical EGS Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Foro Energy is developing a unique capability and hardware system to transmit high power lasers over long distances via fiber optic cables. This laser power is integrated with a mechanical drilling bit to enable rapid and sustained penetration of hard rock formations too costly to drill with mechanical drilling bits alone. The laser energy that is directed at the rock basically softens the rock, allowing the mechanical bit to more easily remove it. Foro Energys laser-assisted drill bits have the potential to be up to 10 times more economical than conventional hard-rock drilling technologies, making them an effective way to access the U.S. energy resources currently locked under hard rock formations.

None

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7) 7) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 4, RRGE-4 drilled. During this time Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C also completed. References Kunze, J. F.; Stoker, R. C.; Allen, C. A. (14 December 1977) Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Covington, H.R. (1 January 1978) Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Exploratory_Well_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=473847"

154

Idaho Geothermal Commercialization Program. Idaho geothermal handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: geothermal resources in Idaho, market assessment, community needs assessment, geothermal leasing procedures for private lands, Idaho state geothermal leasing procedures - state lands, federal geothermal leasing procedures - federal lands, environmental and regulatory processes, local government regulations, geothermal exploration, geothermal drilling, government funding, private funding, state and federal government assistance programs, and geothermal legislation. (MHR)

Hammer, G.D.; Esposito, L.; Montgomery, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Minor actinide waste disposal in deep geological boreholes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a waste canister design suitable for the disposal of vitrified minor actinide waste in deep geological boreholes using conventional oil/gas/geothermal drilling technology. ...

Sizer, Calvin Gregory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling ...

Hoag, Christopher Ian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

COSO Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1, CGEH No. 1. Completion report. [Coso Hot Springs KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH No. 1) is the first deep exploratory hole drilled in the Coso Hot Springs area of Southeastern California. CGEH No. 1 was drilled to a depth of 4,845 ft in the central area of a large thermal anomaly and was a continuation of investigative work in that locale to determine the existence of a geothermal resource. The drilling and completion of CGEH No. 1 is described. Also included are the daily drilling reports, drill bit records, descriptions of the casing, cementing, logging and coring program, and the containment equipment used during the drilling operation.

Not Available

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Advanced geothermal foam drilling systems (AFS) -- Phase 1 final report, Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced coiled-tubing foam drilling system is being developed where two concentric strings of coiled tubing are used to convey water and air to the hole bottom where they are mixed together to produce foam for underbalanced drilling. This system has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs by increasing drilling rates (due to the motor being powered by water), and reducing compressor and nitrogen costs (due to lower gas pressures and volumes).

W. C. Maurer

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nv Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nv Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies performed by personnel from the Geothermal Program Office (GPO) strongly suggested that there is a geothermal resource beneath lands controlled by the Hawthorne Ammunition Depot. The geothermal fluid is thought to be convecting meteoric water that is derived from precipitation within the

160

INEL/Snake River plain geothermal drilling and testing plan - INEL - 1 well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plan for drilling a 7500 ft exploratory hole is described. This hole would be drilled at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, so that it could be immediately used by one of the government facilties. The plan details the hole design, describes the drilling program, proposes a testing program, and estimates costs. (MHR)

Miller, L.G.; Prestwich, S.M.; Griffith, J.L.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Improved Tubulars for Better Economics in Deep Gas Well Drilling Using Microwave Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the entire research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Based on the results of the Phase I and insurmountable difficulties faced in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program was slightly changed in the Phase II in which an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) has been adopted. This process can be developed into a semicontinuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. The main objective of the Phase II research program is to demonstrate the potential to economically manufacture microwave processed coiled tubing with improved performance for extended useful life under hostile coiled tubing drilling conditions. After the completion of the Phase II, it is concluded that scale up and sintering of a thin wall common O.D. size tubing that is widely used in the market is still to be proved and further experimentation and refinement of the sintering process is needed in Phase III. Actual manufacturing capability of microwave sintered, industrial quality, full length tubing will most likely require several million dollars of investment.

Dinesh Agrawal

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Improved Tubulars for Better Economics in Deep Gas Well Drilling using Microwave Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the entire research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Based on the results of the Phase I and insurmountable difficulties faced in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program was slightly changed in the Phase II in which an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) has been adopted. This process can be developed into a semicontinuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. The main objective of the Phase II research program is to demonstrate the potential to economically manufacture microwave processed coiled tubing with improved performance for extended useful life under hostile coiled tubing drilling conditions. After the completion of the Phase II, it is concluded that scale up and sintering of a thin wall common O.D. size tubing that is widely used in the market is still to be proved and further experimentation and refinement of the sintering process is needed in Phase III. Actual manufacturing capability of microwave sintered, industrial quality, full length tubing will most likely require several million dollars of investment.

Dinesh Agrawal; Paul Gigl; Mark Hunt; Mahlon Dennis

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

COSO Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1, CGEH No. 1. Completion report.  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COSO Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1, CGEH No. 1. Completion report. COSO Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1, CGEH No. 1. Completion report. (Coso Hot Springs KGRA) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: COSO Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1, CGEH No. 1. Completion report. (Coso Hot Springs KGRA) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH No. 1) is the first deep exploratory hole drilled in the Coso Hot Springs area of Southeastern California. CGEH No. 1 was drilled to a depth of 4,845 ft in the central area of a large thermal anomaly and was a continuation of investigative work in that locale to determine the existence of a geothermal resource. The drilling and completion of CGEH No. 1 is described. Also included are the daily drilling reports, drill bit records, descriptions of the casing,

164

Support research for development of improved geothermal drill bits. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A full-scale geothermal wellbore simulator and geothermal seal testing machine were constructed. The major emphasis in the Phase II program, in addition to constructing the above research simulators, includes: simulated tests on full-scale components, i.e., full-scale bits; screening tests on elastomeric seals under geothermal conditions; and initial considerations of research needs for development of sealed high-temperature bits. A detailed discussion of the work is presented. (MHR)

hendrickson, R.R.; Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.; Winzenried, R.W.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Honey Lake Geothermal Project, Lassen County, California. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the drilling, completion, and testing of deep well WEN-2 for a hybrid electric power project which will use the area's moderate temperature geothermal fluids and locally procured wood fuel. The project is located within the Wendel-Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Mexican-American cooperative program at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field: recent results of the well-drilling program at Cerro Prieto  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the 1980 and 1981 well drilling activities at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field are summarized. Details are given on the new series of deeper wells completed in the western (older) part of the field (Cerro Prieto I), and on the development and step-out wells drilled in the eastern part of the field (Cerro Prieto II and III). Production characteristics of on-line and standby wells are discussed. Recent changes in well completion procedures are also described.

Dominguez A, B.; Lippmann, M.J.; Bermejo M.; F.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A field strategy to monitor radioactivity associated with investigation derived wastes returned from deep drilling sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA) is drilling deep (>1500m) monitoring wells that penetrate both unsaturated (vadose) and saturated zones potentially contaminated by sub-surface nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Drill site radiological monitoring returns data on drilling effluents to make informed management decisions concerning fluid management. Because of rapid turn-around required for on-site monitoring, a representative sample will be analyzed simultaneously for {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} emitters by instrumentation deployed on-site. For the purposes of field survey, accurate and precise data is returned, in many cases, with minimal sample treatment. A 30% efficient high purity germanium detector and a discriminating liquid scintillation detector are being evaluated for {gamma} and {alpha}/{beta} monitoring respectively. Implementation of these detector systems complements a successful on-site tritium monitoring program. Residual radioactivity associated with underground nuclear tests include tritium, activation products, fission products and actinides. Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) is used in {alpha}/{beta} liquid scintillation counting and is a function of the time distribution of photon emission. In particular, we hope to measure {sup 241}Am produced from {sup 241}Pu by {beta} decay. Because {sup 241}Pu is depleted in fissile bomb fuels, maximum PSD resolution will be required. The high purity germanium detector employs a multichannel analyzer to count gamma emitting radionuclides; we will designate specific window configurations to selectively monitor diagnostic fission product radionuclides (i.e., {sup 137}Cs).

Rego, J.H.; Smith, D.K.; Friensehner, A.V.

1995-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Use of geothermal heat for sugar refining in Imperial County: drilling and resource development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project plans and procedures to be used in drilling and completing both the production and injection wells for Holly Sugar Company are described. The following are included: general site activities, occupational health and safety, drilling operations, permits, environmental report, and schedule.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Northern Basin and Range Province, Stillwater prospect, Churchill County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-July 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Union Oil Company of California drilled two exploratory geothermal wells in the Stillwater geothermal prospect area in northwestern Nevada to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations, which included the drilling of four earlier deep temperature gradient wells in the Stillwater area, was also provided. The two wells were drilled to total depths of 6946 ft and 10,014 ft with no significant drilling problems. A maximum reservoir temperature of 353 F was measured at 9950 ft. The most productive well flow tested at a rate of 152,000 lbs/hr with a wellhead temperature of 252 F and pressure of 20 psig. Based upon current economics, the Stillwater geothermal prospect is considered to be subcommercial for the generation of electrical power. This synopsis of the exploratory drilling activities and results contains summary drilling, geologic, and reservoir information from two exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Reconnaissance for mercury over geothermal areas of the Imperial Valley, California. [Analysis of samples of soil gas and gas from drill holes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine samples of soil gas and gas from drill holes were collected over and near two geothermal anomalies in the Imperial Valley, California, to measure the possible presence of mercury. With the instrumentation used, the smallest quantity of mercury that could be detected was 2 nanograms. No mercury was detected in any sample.

Hinkle, M.E.; Vaughn, W.W.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River area of Idaho contains a geothermal system of intermediate temperatures (approx. = 150 0C) at depths of about 1.5 km. Outside of the geothermal area, temperature measurements in three intermediate-depth drill holes (200 to 400 m) and one deep well (1500 m) indicate that the regional conductive heat flow is about 2.5 mucal/cm 2 sec or slightly higher and that temperature gradients range from 50 0 to 60

172

Executive Order 2010-001: New Mexico Clean Energy Economy Action Report from the Deep Source Geothermal Commercialization Working Group to the Green Jobs Council and Clean Energy Development Council: New Mexico Geothermal Resource Assessment and Data Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Executive Order 2010-001 establishes directives for the Energy Minerals and Natural Resources Department (EMNRD) and New Mexico Tech (NMT) to convene a Geothermal Group to oversee the development of a statewide geothermal resource assessment and data base and develop technical and policy recommendations to accelerate full-scale development of New Mexicos deep-source geothermal resource: EMNRD, with the cooperation of the New Mexico Institute ofMining and Technology (NMT), shall convene a Deep Source Geothermal Commercialization Working Group (Geothermal Group) no later than March 1, 2010. The Geothermal Group shall be chaired by EMNRD. The Geothermal Group shall oversee the development of a statewide geothermal resource assessment and database. The purpose of the resource assessment and database shall be to sufficiently characterize the States geothermal resource and provide a database to prospective geothermal developers that shall promote commercial-scale development of the States geothermal resource. The Geothermal Group shall also develop technical and policy recommendations to accelerate full-scale development of New Mexicos deep-source geothermal resource.

Bill Richardson; Jim Noel; Karen W. Garcia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5) 5) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1975 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis First exploratory well Notes Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1) is drilled. References Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, Nev. (USA) (1 October 1975) Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report Kunze, J.F. (1 May 1977) Geothermal R and D project report, October 1, 1976--March 31, 1977 Oriel, S. S.; Williams, P. L.; Covington, H. R.; Keys, W. S.; Shaver, K. C. (1 January 1978) Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal

174

Drilling techniques presently in use by the Geothermal Studies Project, US Geological Survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The heat-flow studies program has evolved from one in which holes drilled for other purposes (mining and oil exploration, nuclear tests, hydrologic studies, etc.) provided the bulk of the data to a program in which the free holes, while still providing cost-effective and useful data, are being supplemented increasingly by holes drilled specifically for heat-flow determinations at locations where thermal data of high quality are needed, and where nobody else is interested in drilling. Ideally, heat-flow holes should be located in areas with moderate local relief and should be completed so that vertical water movement is inhibited. The most satisfactory test media for heat-flow determinations are crystalline rocks (particularly granites) and unconsolidated sediments; carbonate rocks and volcanic terranes can provide useful heat-flow data, but they present greater challenges both in drilling and interpretation. Drilling techniques have evolved from that of the continuously cored diamond-drilled hole (adapted from mining exploration) to adaptations of the shot-hole and blast-hole techniques used in petroleum exploration, water-well construction, and quarry operations. Spot cores are obtained where necessary to provide specific petrologic, geochemical, and physical data, but primary reliance is placed on ditch samples from rotary or percussion drilling for routine measurements of thermal conductivity and heat production. In shallow (50 to 100 m) holes in low temperature environments, plastic casing is used to maintain access for later temperature measurements. For deeper holes, steel casing is preferred. The annulus between casing and borehole wall in the lowermost 50 to 80 meters of heat-flow holes is routinely grouted off with a specially designed mixture of cement, bentonite, salt, and water to prevent vertical water movement.

Moses, T.H. Jr.; Sass, J.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results of exploration techniques applied to geothermal resource investigations in northern Nevada were evaluated and rated by seven investigators involved in the work. A quantitative rating scheme was used to obtain estimates of technique effectiveness. From survey cost information we also obtained and compared cost-effectiveness estimates for the various techniques. Effectiveness estimates were used to develop an exploration strategy for the area. However, because no deep confirmatory drilling has been done yet, the technique evaluations and exploration

176

Field drilling tests on improved geothermal unsealed roller-cone bits. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development and field testing of a 222 mm (8-3/4 inch) unsealed, insert type, medium hard formation, high-temperature bit are described. Increased performance was gained by substituting improved materials in critical bit components. These materials were selected on bases of their high temperature properties, machinability and heat treatment response. Program objectives required that both machining and heat treating could be accomplished with existing rock bit production equipment. Six of the experimental bits were subjected to air drilling at 240/sup 0/C (460/sup 0/F) in Franciscan graywacke at the Geysers (California). Performances compared directly to conventional bits indicate that in-gage drilling time was increased by 70%. All bits at the Geysers are subjected to reaming out-of-gage hole prior to drilling. Under these conditions the experimental bits showed a 30% increase in usable hole drilled, compared with the conventional bits. The materials selected improved roller wear by 200%, friction per wear by 150%, and lug wear by 150%. These tests indicate a potential well cost savings of 4 to 8%. Savings of 12% are considered possible with drilling procedures optimized for the experimental bits.

Hendrickson, R.R.; Jones, A.H.; Winzenried, R.W.; Maish, A.B.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The design of a water jet drill for development of geothermal resources. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water jet drilling of rock is shown to be a feasible method for potential improvement in gaining access to the earth's resources. Drilling rates of up to 280 in./min in sandstone and 40 in./min in granite have been achieved. While the addition of polymers to the jet stream is found advantageous the low (15%) level of improvement and the difficulty in maintaining concentrate negated further development. The application of confining pressure was found to reduce jet performance, but this was found to be a function more of the rock response than of the jet parameters. Field tests of water jets underground indicated the jet system could be modified to cope with this change. Water jets were found to be more effective, for drilling larger holes, where a combined water jet:roller bit system was developed and laboratory and field trials of this are described. As well as determining the controlling parameters affecting jet drilling performance, and proving that rock compressive strength is not one of them, the research examined other methods of improving jet cutting performance. At jet pressures below 10,000 psi abrasive laden jets were found most advantageous while, for drilling granite, a cavitating flow proved more effective at pressures above 10,000 psi. A reason for this is postulated. Experiments to develop a standardized cavitation resistance test for rock specimens have also been undertaken.

Summers, David A.; Lehnhoff, Terry F.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

IMPROVED TUBULARS FOR BETTER ECONOMICS IN DEEP GAS WELL DRILLING USING MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Originally, it was proposed to accomplish this by developing an efficient and economically viable continuous microwave process to sinter continuously formed/extruded steel powder for the manufacture of seamless coiled tubing and other tubular products. However, based on the results and faced with insurmountable difficulties in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program has been slightly changed. In the continuation proposal an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) is adopted. This process can be developed into a semi-continuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. Originally, the entire program was spread over three phases with the following goals: Phase I: Demonstration of the feasibility concept of continuous microwave sintering process for tubular steel products. Phase II: Design, building and testing of a prototype microwave system which shall be combined with a continuous extruder for steel tubular objects. Phase III: Execution of the plan for commercialization of the technology by one of the industrial partners. However, since some of the goals of the phase I were not completed, an extension of nine months was granted and we continued extrusion experiments, designed and built semicontinuous microwave sintering unit.

Dinesh Agrawal; Paul Gigl; Mahlon Dennis; Roderic Stanley

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Alphine 1/Federal: Drilling report. Final report, Part 1  

SciTech Connect

Regional geologic and geophysical surveys, shallow temperature-gradient drilling, and published reconnaissance geothermal studies infer possible hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resources in the Alpine-Springerville area. This report discusses the results of a State of Arizona and US Department of Energy funded drilling project designed to gather the deep temperature and stratigraphic data necessary to determine if near-term HDR geothermal potential actually exists in this portion of the White Mountains region of Arizona. A 4505 feet deep slim-hole exploratory well, Alpiner/Federal, was drilled within the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest at Alpine Divide near the Alpine Divide Camp Ground about 5 miles north of Alpine, Arizona in Apache County (Figure 1).

Witcher, J.C. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.; Pisto, L. [Tonto Drilling Services, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hahman, W.R. [Hahman (W. Richard), Las Cruces, NM (United States); Swanberg, C.A. [Swanberg (Chandler A.), Phoenix, AZ (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Geology, drill holes, and geothermal energy potential of the basal Cambrian rock units of the Appalachian Basin of New York State  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The published geologic and geophysical records plus data gathered from deep wells during hydrocarbon exploration were inventoried, discussed and summarized to evaluate hydro-geothermal energy potential in the western counties of New York, south of the 42/sup 0/ latitude. An assessment is provided of local geothermal energy potential based on these data. The assessed potential is a function of the geothermal gradient, the depth of porous Cambrian age sedimentary units and a variety of features thought to be related to deep fracturing and hence enhanced porosity and permeability. The completion history of a selected set of plugged and abandoned deep wells was examined to determine the feasibility and advisability of re-entering these holes for geothermal development. All wells showed extensive cement plugging and uncertain materials introduced for bridging. It was recommended that no attempt be made to re-enter these wells. The hydro-geothermal energy potential in Western New York State is largely comparable to that of other regions possessing porous/permeable units of sedimentary rock at sufficient depth to contain formation waters of useful temperatures (>140/sup 0/F). A comparison of geothermal reservoirs in New York to similar sites now under development in Canada and France has revealed that potential resources in New York State are slightly hotter, though somewhat thicker and less permeable with significantly higher proportions of dissolved constituents.

Pferd, J.W.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 4 - System Description. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first section of this Volume will discuss the ''Conventional Drilling System''. Today's complex arrangement of numerous interacting systems has slowly evolved from the very simple cable tool rigs used in the late 1800s. Improvements to the conventional drilling rig have varied in size and impact over the years, but the majority of them have been evolutionary modifications. Each individual change or improvement of this type does not have significant impact on drilling efficiency and economics. However, the change is almost certain to succeed, and over time--as the number of evolutionary changes to the system begin to add up--improvements in efficiency and economics can be seen. Some modifications, defined and described in this Volume as Advanced Modifications, have more than just an evolutionary effect on the conventional drilling system. Although the distinction is subtle, there are several examples of incorporated advancements that have had significantly more impact on drilling procedures than would a truly evolutionary improvement. An example of an advanced modification occurred in the late 1970s with the introduction of Polycrystalline Diamond Compact (PDC) drill bits. PDC bits resulted in a fundamental advancement in drilling procedures that could not have been accomplished by an evolutionary improvement in materials metallurgy, for example. The last drilling techniques discussed in this Volume are the ''Novel Drilling Systems''. The extent to which some of these systems have been developed varies from actually being tested in the field, to being no more than a theoretical concept. However, they all have one thing in common--their methods of rock destruction are fundamentally different from conventional drilling techniques. When a novel drilling system is introduced, it is a revolutionary modification of accepted drilling procedures and will completely replace current techniques. The most prominent example of a revolutionary modification in recent history was the complete displacement of cable tool rigs by rotary drilling rigs in the late 1920s.

Anderson, E.E.; Maurer, W.C.; Hood, M.; Cooper, G.; Cook, N.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Exploration of Ulumbu geothermal field, Flores-east nusa tenggara, Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the progress made in developing geothermal resources at Ulumbu Flores, Indonesia for utilization mini geothermal power generation. Two deep exploratory wells drilling drilled by PLN confirmed the existence of the resources. The well measurement carried out during drilling and after completion of the well indicated that the major permeable zone at around 680 m depth and that this zone is a steam cap zone, which is likely to produce high enthalpy steam. The above information indicates that well ULB-01 will produce a mass flow at least 40 tonnes per hour, which will ensure a 3 MW (E) Ulumbu mini geothermal power plant.

Sulasdi, Didi

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

183

Energy Basics: Geothermal Electricity Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Electricity Production A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California. Geothermal energy originates from deep...

184

Development and Application of Insulated Drill Pipe for High Temperature, High Pressure Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project aimed to extend the insulated drill pipe (IDP) technology already demonstrated for geothermal drilling to HTHP drilling in deep gas reservoirs where temperatures are high enough to pose a threat to downhole equipment such as motors and electronics. The major components of the project were: a preliminary design; a market survey to assess industry needs and performance criteria; mechanical testing to verify strength and durability of IDP; and development of an inspection plan that would quantify the ability of various inspection techniques to detect flaws in assembled IDP. This report is a detailed description of those activities.

Tom Champness; Tony Worthen; John Finger

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion report |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion report Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2 (RRGE-2) is the second exploratory hole drilled in the Raft River Valley location of the Idaho Geothermal R and D Project for the purpose of determining the existence of hot water in quantities suitable for commercial power generation and nonelectric applications. This well was drilled to a depth of 6,543 feet below ground level to obtain additional geological information for evaluation of the deep geothermal reservoir system. The drilling and completion of RRGE-2 are described. The daily drilling

186

Temporary Bridging Agents for use in Drilling and Completion of Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CSI Technologies, in conjunction with Alta Rock Energy and the University of Utah have undergone a study investigating materials and mechanisms with potential for use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems wells as temporary diverters or lost circulation materials. Studies were also conducted with regards to particle size distribution and sealing effectiveness using a lab-scale slot testing apparatus to simulate fractures. From the slot testing a numerical correlation was developed to determine the optimal PSD for a given fracture size. Field trials conducted using materials from this study were also successful.

Watters, Larry; Watters, Jeff; Sutton, Joy; Combs, Kyle; Bour, Daniel; Petty, Susan; Rose, Peter; Mella, Michael

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

187

Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

A brief general description is given of a geothermal resource. Geothermal exploration in the Takinoue area is reviewed. Geothermal drilling procedures are described. The history of the development at the Takinoue area (the Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant), and the geothermal fluid characteristics are discussed. The technical specifications of the Kakkonda facility are shown. Photographs and drawings of the facility are included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Reverse trade mission on the drilling and completion of geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This draft report was prepared as required by Task No. 2 of the US Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG07-89ID12850 Reverse Trade Mission to Acquaint International Representatives with US Power Plant and Drilling Technology'' (mission). As described in the grant proposal, this report covers the reactions of attendees toward US technology, its possible use in their countries, and an evaluation of the mission by the staff leaders. Note this is the draft report of one of two missions carried out under the same contract number. Because of the diversity of the mission subjects and the different attendees at each, a separate report for each mission has been prepared. This draft report has been sent to all mission attendees, specific persons in the US Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Lab., the California Energy Commission (CEC), and various other governmental agencies.

Not Available

1989-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

189

Evaluation of saponite and saponite/sepiolite fluids for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rheology and other properties of drilling fluids containing saponite and a saponite-sepiolite mixture as the main vicosifier have been systematically evaluated in the temperature range of 300-600{degree}F under appropriate confining pressures up to 16,000 psi. Saponite represents the magnesium analog of the clay mineral montmorillonite, which is the main constituent in conventional bentonite-based fluids. The fluid with 6% saponite exhibits a prominent viscosity enhancement at temperatures above 250{degree}F. This viscosity enhancement is easily controlled by salts and hydroxides of Na and K. The addition of Na-polyacrylates (low- and high-molecular weight polymers) eliminates the viscosity anomaly of pure saponite fluids. These polymers also increase the filtration control of saponite. The anomalous viscosity enhancement of saponite is significantly reduced by the addition of sepiolite (a clay mineral with a fibrous morphology). 12 refs., 31 figs., 26 tabs.

Guven, N.; Panfil, D.J.; Carney, L.L. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (USA). Dept. of Geosciences)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Exploration Criteria for Low Permeability Geothermal Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decision to drill deep holes in a prospective geothermal system implies that geothermal energy resources exist at depth. The drill hole location and budget result from hypothesis regarding the location and depth of the resource within the overall system. Although operational decisions normally dictate the practicality of drilling, the characteristics, we must first understand how unique various surface or shallow subsurface data are in assessing the nature of the resource. The following progress report summarizes the results of numerical simulations of heat and mass transport around igneous plutons and the synthesis of geologic data. To date, the results of the study describe the transient nature of thermal resources and the ambiguities which must be accounted for in using current technology to assess the nation's geothermal resources. [DJE-2005

Norton, D.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Alaska: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Washington: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

Bloomquist, R.G.; Basescu, N.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Understanding The Chena Hot Springs, Alaska, Geothermal System Using  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Understanding The Chena Hot Springs, Alaska, Geothermal System Using Temperature And Pressure Data From Exploration Boreholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Understanding The Chena Hot Springs, Alaska, Geothermal System Using Temperature And Pressure Data From Exploration Boreholes Details Activities (7) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Chena Hot Springs is a small, moderate temperature, deep circulating geothermal system, apparently typical of those associated to hot springs of interior Alaska. Multi-stage drilling was used in some

195

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1978 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geology and alteration mapping analyzed exposed rocks in geothermal region. Neither geologic mapping nor deep drilling have revealed potential deep primary aquifers. Surface alteration at Coso is of three main types: (1) clay-opal-alunite alteration, (2) weak argillic alteration, and (3) stockwork calcite veins and veinlets, which are locally associated with calcareous sinter. References Hulen, J. B. (1 May 1978) Geology and alteration of the Coso

196

Geothermal COMPAX drill bit development. Final technical report, July 1, 1976-September 30, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective was to develop and demonstrate the performance of new drill bit designs utilizing sintered polycrystalline diamond compacts for the cutting edges. The scope included instrumented rock cutting experiments under ambient conditions and at elevated temperature and pressure, diamond compact wear and failure mode analysis, rock removal modeling, bit design and fabrication, full-scale laboratory bit testing, field tests, and performance evaluation. A model was developed relating rock cutting forces to independent variables, using a statistical test design and regression analysis. Experiments on six rock types, covering a range of compressive strengths from 8 x 10/sup 3/ psi to 51 x 10/sup 3/ psi, provided a satisfactory test of the model. Results of the single cutter experiments showed that the cutting and thrust (penetration) forces, and the angle of the resultant force, are markedly affected by rake angle, depth of cut, and speed. No unusual force excursions were detected in interrupted cutting. Wear tests on two types of diamond compacts cutting Jack Fork Sandstone yielded wear rates equivalent at high cutting speeds, where thermal effects are probably operative. At speeds below approx. 400 surface feet per minute (sfm), the coarser sintered diamond product was superior. 28 refs., 235 figs., 55 tabs.

Hibbs, L.E. Jr.; Sogoian, G.C.; Flom, D.G.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Brookins & Laughlin, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Brookins & Laughlin, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR Site References D. G. Brookins, A. W. Laughlin (1983) Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From Deep Geothermal Drill Holes, Fenton Hill, New Mexico Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Brookins_%26_Laughlin,_1983)&oldid=511281"

198

Logging, Testing and Monitoring Geothermal Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logging, Testing and Monitoring Geothermal Wells Logging, Testing and Monitoring Geothermal Wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Logging, Testing and Monitoring Geothermal Wells Abstract Wells or boreholes are essential components in both geothermal research and utilization as they enable a drastic increase in geothermal energy production beyond natural out-flow as well as providing access deep into the systems, not otherwise possible. Wells also play a vital role in all geothermal reservoir physics (also called reservoir engineering) research, which would be particularly ineffec-tive without the access into geothermal systems provided by wells. During drilling the main reservoir physics research is performed through logging of different parameters as functions

199

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Research Program for Fiscal Year 1998. The Exploration Technology research area focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to expose the deep portions of known systems. The Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal and hot dry rock reservoirs. The Drilling Technology projects focus on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. The Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Direct use research covers the direct use of geothermal energy sources for applications in other than electrical production.

Keller, J.G.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Research Program for Fiscal Year 1998. The Exploration Technology research area focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to expose the deep portions of known systems. The Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal and hot dry rock reservoirs. The Drilling Technology projects focus on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. The Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Direct use research covers the direct use of geothermal energy sources for applications in other than electrical production.

Keller, J.G.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DOE/EA-1621: Oregon Institute of Technology Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project (September 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental Assessment September 2008 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 Prepared by: MHA Environmental Consulting, An RMT Business 4 West Fourth Avenue, Suite 303 San Mateo, CA 94402 www.mha-inc.com - www.rmtinc.com Geo-Heat Center Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Klamath Falls, OR 97601 Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental Assessment September 2008 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 Prepared by: MHA Environmental Consulting, An RMT Business 4 West Fourth Avenue, Suite 303 San Mateo, CA 94402 www.mha-inc.com - www.rmtinc.com Geo-Heat Center

202

Application of coiled-tubing-drilling technology on a deep underpressured gas reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper-Mississippian Elkton formation is a dolomitized shallow-water carbonate consisting of dense limestones and porous dolomites. The Elkton was deposited in an open-shelf environment as crinoid grainstones, coral packstones, and lime muds. Deposition of impermeable shales and siltstones of the Lower Cretaceous created the lateral and updip seals. Reservoir thickness can be up to 20 m, with porosities reaching 20% and averaging 10%. The reservoir gas contains approximately 0.5% hydrogen sulfide. Well 11-18 was to be completed in the Harmatten Elkton pool. The pool went on production in 1967 at an initial pressure of 23,500 kPa. At the current pressure of 16,800 kPa, the remaining reserves are underpressured at 6.5 kPa/m, and underbalanced horizontal drilling was selected as the most suitable technique for exploiting remaining reserves. Coiled-tubing (CT) technology was selected to ensure continuous underbalanced conditions and maintain proper well control while drilling. The paper describes the equipment, CT drilling summary, and drilling issues.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent Geophysical And Drilling Data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent Geophysical And Drilling Data Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: an updated picture of the Travale field is given, based on geophysical and drilling data acquired since 1978. In deriving the model, extensive use is made of the geophysical data produced in the course of the EEC test site programme (1980-1983), particularly from seismic and time domain EM methods which allowed for penetrating thick and conductive cover formations and to match deep tectonic and hydrothermal alteration trends thought to indirectly characterize the geothermal reservoir. It is

204

Be in the Salton Sea Geothermal System, California (USA): Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project, California State 2-14 well: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salton Sea Geothermal System lies in the old Colorado River Delta, where sediments have been metamorphosed by hydrothermal processes. Fluids, from well Fee No. 5 and deep hole SSSDP California State 2-14, as well as rocks from the deep hole were studied for /sup 10/Be and /sup 9/Be. In the solid samples /sup 10/Be concentration ranges from 29 to 259 /times/ 10/sup 6/ atom/g and /sup 9/Be from 0.49 to 2.52 ppM. The /sup 10/Be concentration in the geothermal waters ranges from 2 /times/ 10/sup 3/ to 2.9 /times/ 10/sup 6/ atom/g and /sup 9/Be from 0.7 to 16.6 ppB. Compared to the steady-state inventory which represents the quantity of /sup 10/Be expected from rain deposition alone (/approximately/1 /times/ 10/sup 12/ atom/cm/sup 2/), the /sup 10/Be inventory in the deep core is 3 orders of magnitude higher (>1 /times/ 10/sup 15/ atom/cm/sup 2/). This indicates that most /sup 10/Be is inherited and that the sediments hosting the geothermal field down to 3250m are young, less than few million year old. /sup 10/Be and /sup 9/Be Kds decrease from surface to bottom (3333 to 48 and 727 to 393, respectively) expressing the strong leaching effect of the solid material by the geothermal waters. This process is more active at depth where pH is <5.3 and salinity high (approx. =25%). Compared to other natural systems, Salton Sea Geothermal fluids are strongly enriched in /sup 10/Be and /sup 9/Be. Finally, contamination has been observed in the fluids samples and we developed a tool that is helping in detecting which samples are contaminated.

Valette-Silver, N.J.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan. General Crude Oil--Dept. of Energy Pleasant Bayou No. 1 well, Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a result of geopressured resource assessment studies in the Gulf Coast region, the Brazoria fairway, located in Brazoria County, Texas was determined to be an optimum area for additional studies. A plan is presented for drilling, completion, and testing of one geopressured-geothermal well and two disposal wells in Brazoria County, Texas. The objectives of the well drilling and testing program are to determine the following parameters: reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, rock material properties, depth, temperature, and pressure; reservoir fluid content, specific gravity, resistivity, viscosity, and hydrocarbons in solution; reservoir fluid production rates, pressure, temperature, production decline, and pressure decline; geopressured well and surface equipment design requirements for high-volume production and possible sand production; specific equipment design for surface operations, hydrocarbons distribution, and effluent disposal; and possibilities of reservoir compaction and/or surface subsidence. (JGB)

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Geothermal test-well drilling program for the Village of Jemez Springs, New Mexico. Final technical report, January 1, 1979-June 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal resources located during test drilling at Jemez Springs, New Mexico are described and the feasibility of utilizing this low-temperature resource for a space heating demonstration project at the Town Hall and Fire Department Building is discussed. A test well was drilled to a depth of 824 feet that penetrated water-producing zones at 80 feet with a water temperature of approximately 150 to 155/sup 0/F and at 500 feet with waters of approximately 120 to 125/sup 0/F. After a number of repairs to the Jemez Springs Well Number 1, the project was ended having completed a well capable of producing a flow of approximately 20 gpm at 150 to 155/sup 0/F. A follow-up demonstration heating project is planned.

Armenta, E.; Icerman, L.; Starkey, A.H.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Drill pipe protector development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.

Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R. [Regal International Corp., Corsicanna, TX (United States); Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Geothermal development of the Madison group aquifer: a case study  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal well has been drilled at the St. Mary's Hospital in Pierre, South Dakota. The well is 2176 feet deep and artesian flows 375 gpm at 106/sup 0/F. The well is producing fluids from the Mississippian Madison Group, a sequence of carbonate rocks deposited over several western states. The project was funded to demonstrate the goethermal potential of this widespread aquifer. This case study describes the development of the project through geology, drilling, stimulation, and testing.

Martinez, J.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Geothermal Progress Monitor report No. 5. Progress report, June 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Updated information is presented on activities and progress in the areas of electric power plants, direct heat applications, deep well drilling, leasing of federal lands, legislative and regulatory actions, research and development, and others. Special attention is given in this report to 1980 highlights, particularly in the areas of electric and direct heat uses, drilling, and the Federal lands leasing program. This report also includes a summary of the DOE FY 1982 geothermal budget request to Congress.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K. (eds.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update, FY 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Geothermal Program serves two broad purposes: 1) to assist industry in overcoming near-term barriers by conducting cost-shared research and field verification that allows geothermal energy to compete in today's aggressive energy markets; and 2) to undertake fundamental research with potentially large economic payoffs. The four categories of work used to distinguish the research activities of the Geothermal Program during FY 2000 reflect the main components of real-world geothermal projects. These categories form the main sections of the project descriptions in this Research Update. Exploration Technology research focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to explore the deep portions of known systems. Research in geophysical and geochemical methods is expected to yield increased knowledge of hidden geothermal systems. Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal reservoirs and enhanced geothermal systems. Research in various reservoir analysis techniques is generating a wide range of information that facilitates development of improved reservoir management tools. Drilling Technology focuses on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. Ongoing research to avert lost circulation episodes in geothermal drilling is yielding positive results. Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Increased output and improved performance of binary cycles will result from investigations in heat cycle research.

Renner, Joel Lawrence

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Well Log Techniques At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques At Raft River Geothermal Area Well Log Techniques At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Well Log Techniques Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Characterize the rock using well log data. Notes Information is given on the following logs: dual-induction focused log, including resistivity, sp, and conductivity; acoustic log; compensated neutron; compensated densilog; and caliper. Lithologic breaks for a drill core to a depth of 2840 ft are illustrated. References Covington, H.R. (1 January 1978) Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Raft River geothermal exploration well No. 4 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Well_Log_Techniques_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=6004

213

Missouri/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri/Geothermal Missouri/Geothermal < Missouri Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Missouri Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Missouri No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Missouri No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Missouri No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Missouri Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

214

Oklahoma/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Oklahoma Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Oklahoma Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Oklahoma No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Oklahoma No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Oklahoma No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Oklahoma Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

215

Arkansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arkansas/Geothermal Arkansas/Geothermal < Arkansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Arkansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Arkansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Arkansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Arkansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Arkansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

216

Maryland/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland/Geothermal Maryland/Geothermal < Maryland Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maryland Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maryland No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maryland No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maryland No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maryland Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

217

Alabama/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama/Geothermal Alabama/Geothermal < Alabama Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Alabama Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Alabama No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Alabama No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Alabama No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Alabama Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

218

Illinois/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois/Geothermal Illinois/Geothermal < Illinois Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Illinois Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Illinois No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Illinois No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Illinois No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Illinois Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

219

Minnesota/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota/Geothermal Minnesota/Geothermal < Minnesota Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Minnesota Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Minnesota No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Minnesota No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Minnesota No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Minnesota Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

220

Massachusetts/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts/Geothermal Massachusetts/Geothermal < Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Massachusetts Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Massachusetts No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Massachusetts No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Massachusetts No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Massachusetts Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Delaware/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Delaware Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Delaware Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Delaware No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Delaware No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Delaware No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Delaware Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

222

Kansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas/Geothermal Kansas/Geothermal < Kansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

223

Kentucky/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky/Geothermal Kentucky/Geothermal < Kentucky Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kentucky Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kentucky No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kentucky No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kentucky No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kentucky Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

224

Nebraska/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska/Geothermal Nebraska/Geothermal < Nebraska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Nebraska Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Nebraska No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Nebraska No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Nebraska No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Nebraska Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

225

Florida/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida/Geothermal Florida/Geothermal < Florida Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Florida Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Florida No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Florida No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Florida No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Florida Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

226

Pennsylvania/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania/Geothermal Pennsylvania/Geothermal < Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Pennsylvania Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Pennsylvania No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Pennsylvania No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Pennsylvania No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Pennsylvania Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

227

Ohio/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Ohio Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Ohio Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Ohio No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Ohio No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Ohio No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Ohio Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water resource acquisition, and relevant environmental considerations.

228

Vermont/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vermont/Geothermal Vermont/Geothermal < Vermont Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Vermont Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Vermont No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Vermont No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Vermont No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Vermont Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

229

Louisiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana/Geothermal Louisiana/Geothermal < Louisiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Louisiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Louisiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Louisiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Louisiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Louisiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

230

Mississippi/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mississippi/Geothermal Mississippi/Geothermal < Mississippi Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Mississippi Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Mississippi No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Mississippi No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Mississippi No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Mississippi Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

231

Maine/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maine/Geothermal Maine/Geothermal < Maine Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maine Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maine No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maine No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maine No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maine Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

232

Connecticut/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Connecticut Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Connecticut Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Connecticut No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Connecticut No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Connecticut No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Connecticut Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

233

Georgia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Georgia/Geothermal Georgia/Geothermal < Georgia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Georgia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Georgia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Georgia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Georgia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Georgia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

234

Indiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Indiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Indiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Indiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Indiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Indiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Indiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

235

Michigan/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan/Geothermal Michigan/Geothermal < Michigan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Michigan Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Michigan No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Michigan No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Michigan No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Michigan Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

236

Deep Blue No 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI: Unavailable Core Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Blue Mountain Geothermal...

237

Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Temperatures,...

238

Chemical damage due to drilling operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of geothermal wells can result in near wellbore damage of both the injection wells and production wells if proper precautions are not taken. Very little specific information on the chemical causes for drilling damage that can directly be applied to the drilling of a geothermal well in a given situation is available in the literature. As part of the present work, the sparse literature references related to the chemical aspects of drilling damage are reviewed. The various sources of chemically induced drilling damages that are related to drilling operations are summarized. Various means of minimizing these chemical damages during and after the drilling of a geothermal well are suggested also.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

239

Geothermal Well Technology Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. An overview of the program is presented. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies encountered when current rotary drilling techniques are used for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

NNSA Small Business Week Day 2: United Drilling, Inc. | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

business based in Roswell, N.M. United Drilling drills oil, gas, water, geothermal, and environmental wells throughout the southwestern U.S. The small business has...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Update on slimhole drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories manages the US Department of Energy program for slimhole drilling. The principal objective of this program is to expand proven geothermal reserves through increased exploration made possible by lower-cost slimhole drilling. For this to be a valid exploration method, however, it is necessary to demonstrate that slimholes yield enough data to evaluate a geothermal reservoir, and that is the focus of Sandia`s current research.

Finger, J.T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Advanced drilling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling is ubiquitous in oil, gas, geothermal, minerals, water well, and mining industries. Drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing power from geothermal energy. Reduced drilling costs will reduce the cost of electricity produced from geothermal resources. Undoubtedly, there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied. However, the breadth and depth of previous efforts in this area almost guarantee that any new efforts will at least initially build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts, coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems, provide the basis for this study.

Pierce, K.G.; Finger, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Drilling for energy resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling is integral to the exploration, development, and production of most energy resources. Oil and natural gas, which are dependent on drilling technology, together account for about 77% of the energy sources consumed in the US. Thus, the limitations of current drilling technology also restrict the rate at which new energy supplies can be found, extracted, and brought to the marketplace. The purpose of the study reported was to examine current drilling technology, suggest areas where additional research and development (R and D) might significantly increase drilling rates and capabilities, and suggest a strategy for improving drilling technology. An overview is provided of the US drilling industry. The drilling equipment and techniques now used for finding and recovering oil, natural gas, coal, shale oil, nuclear fuels, and geothermal energy are described. Although by no means exhaustive, these descriptions provide the background necessary to adequately understand the problems inherent in attempts to increase instantaneous and overall drilling rates.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Drilling Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Systems Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Drilling Systems 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Drilling Systems Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Drilling Systems Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

245

Critique of Drilling Research  

SciTech Connect

For a number of years the Department of Energy has been funding research to reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells. Generally that research has been effective and helped to make geothermal energy economically attractive to developers. With the increased competition for the electrical market, geothermal energy needs every advantage it can acquire to allow it to continue as a viable force in the marketplace. In drilling related research, there is essentially continuous dialogue between industry and the national laboratories. Therefore, the projects presented in the Program Review are focused on subjects that were previously recommended or approved by industry.

Hamblin, Jerry

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

South Dakota/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dakota Dakota Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF South Dakota Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in South Dakota No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in South Dakota No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in South Dakota No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for South Dakota Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

247

Rhode Island/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Rhode Island Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Rhode Island No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Rhode Island No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Rhode Island No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Rhode Island Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

248

Virginia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia Virginia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Virginia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Virginia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Virginia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Virginia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Virginia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

249

Tennessee/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tennessee Tennessee Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Tennessee Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Tennessee No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Tennessee No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Tennessee No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Tennessee Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

250

South Carolina/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carolina Carolina Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF South Carolina Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in South Carolina No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in South Carolina No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in South Carolina No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for South Carolina Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

251

Geothermal Energy Resource Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the objectives and the status of a long-range program to develop techniques for assessing the resource potential of liquid-dominated geothermal systems. Field studies underway in northern Nevada comprise a systematic integrated program of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical measurements, necessary to specify a drilling program encompassing heat flow holes, deep calibration holes, and ultimately, deep test wells. The status of Nevada field activities is described. The areas under study are in a region characterized by high heat flow where temperatures at depth in some geothermal systems exceed 180 C. Areas presently being examined include Beowawe Hot Springs in Whirlwind Valley. Buffalo Valley Hot Springs, Leach Hot Springs in Grass Valley, and Kyle Hot Springs in Buena Vista Valley. Geologic studies encompass detailed examinations of structure and lithology to establish the geologic framework of the areas. The geothermal occurrences are characterized by zones of intense fault intersection, which furnish permeable channelways for the introduction of meteoric water into regions of high temperature at depth.

Wollenberg, H.A.; Asaro, F.; Bowman, H.; McEvilly, T.; Morrison, F.; Witherspoon, P.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Drilling technology/GDO  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy is sponsoring two programs related to drilling technology. The first is aimed at development of technology that will lead to reduced costs of drilling, completion, and logging of geothermal wells. This program has the official title ''Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics.'' The second program is intended to share with private industry the cost of development of technology that will result in solutions to the near term geothermal well problems. This program is referred to as the ''Geothermal Drilling Organization''. The Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics Program was funded at $2.65M in FY85 and the GDO was funded at $1.0M in FY85. This paper details the past year's activities and accomplishments and projects the plans for FY86 for these two programs.

Kelsey, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Geothermal Program serves two broad purposes: (1) to assist industry in overcoming near-term barriers by conducting cost-shared research and field verification that allows geothermal energy to compete in today's aggressive energy markets; and (2) to undertake fundamental research with potentially large economic payoffs. The four categories of work used to distinguish the research activities of the Geothermal Program during FY 2000 reflect the main components of real-world geothermal projects. These categories form the main sections of the project descriptions in this Research Update. Exploration Technology research focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to explore the deep portions of known systems. Research in geophysical and geochemical methods is expected to yield increased knowledge of hidden geothermal systems. Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal reservoirs and enhanced geothermal systems. Research in various reservoir analysis techniques is generating a wide range of information that facilitates development of improved reservoir management tools. Drilling Technology focuses on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. Ongoing research to avert lost circulation episodes in geothermal drilling is yielding positive results. Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Increased output and improved performance of binary cycles will result from investigations in heat cycle research.

Renner, J.L.

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Geothermal resources and conflicting concerns in the Alvord Valley, Oregon: an update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal resource potential of the Alvord Valley is among the highest in Oregon. However, environmental concerns, litigation, and administrative requirements have delayed exploration for and development of this resource. Present estimates indicate that deep exploratory drilling may not take place on Federal lands in the Alvord Valley until 1982.

Wassinger, C.E.; Koza, D.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Advanced drilling systems study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work was initiated as part of the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program. It is being performed through joint finding from the Department of Energy Geothermal Division and the Natural Gas Technology Branch, Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Interest in advanced drilling systems is high. The Geothermal Division of the Department of Energy has initiated a multi-year effort in the development of advanced drilling systems; the National Research Council completed a study of drilling and excavation technologies last year; and the MIT Energy Laboratory recently submitted a proposal for a national initiative in advanced drilling and excavation research. The primary reasons for this interest are financial. Worldwide expenditures on oil and gas drilling approach $75 billion per year. Also, drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing electricity from geothermal energy. There is incentive to search for methods to reduce the cost of drilling. Work on ideas to improve or replace rotary drilling technology dates back at least to the 1930`s. There was a significant amount of work in this area in the 1960`s and 1970`s; and there has been some continued effort through the 1980`s. Undoubtedly there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied; however, it is almost certain that new efforts to initiate work on advanced drilling systems will build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems provide the basis for the current study of advanced drilling.

Pierce, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Travale Geothermal Field Based...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent Geophysical And Drilling Data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Updated Conceptual Model Of...

257

Drilling Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drilling Methods Drilling Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Methods Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Drilling Methods: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Document # Analysis Type Applicant Geothermal Area Lead Agency District Office Field Office Mineral Manager Surface Manager Development Phase(s) Techniques CA-170-02-15 EA Mammoth Pacific Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area BLM BLM Central California District Office BLM Bishop Field Office BLM Geothermal/Exploration Drilling Methods

258

Driltac (Drilling Time and Cost Evaluation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The users manual for the drill tech model for estimating the costs of geothermal wells. The report indicates lots of technical and cost detail. [DJE-2005

None

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Category:Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the...

260

Armored instrumentation cable for geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multiconductor armored well-logging cable is used extensively by the oil and natural gas industry to lower various instruments used to measure the geological and geophysical parameters into deep wellbores. Advanced technology in oil-well drilling makes it possible to achieve borehole depths of 9 km (30,000 ft). The higher temperatures in these deeper boreholes demand advancements in the design and manufacturing of wireline cable and in the electrical insulating and armoring materials used as integral components. If geothermal energy is proved an abundant economic resource, drilling temperatures approaching and exceeding 300/sup 0/C will become commonplace. The adaptation of teflons as electrical insulating material permitted use of armored cable in geothermal wellbores where temperatures are slightly in excess of 200/sup 0/C, and where the concentrations of corrosive minerals and gases are high. Teflon materials presently used in wireline cables, however, are not capable of continuous operation at the anticipated higher temperatures.

Dennis, B.R.; Johnson, J.; Todd, B.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geothermal resources of the Alberta Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formation waters of the Alberta Plains are inventoried in a new report prepared for the Renewable Energy Branch, Energy, Mines, and Resources, Canada. Water temperatures, salinities, depths, and the reservoir capacities of the enclosing rocks are included. From geological information and preexisting temperature and gradient data, 21 maps were drawn often rock units and the enclosed fluids. Although some previous site-specific inventories of the geothermal resources of the Alberta Plains have been made, the study is the first comprehensive survey. Capital costs to install geothermal energy recovery operations from scratch are prohibitively high on Canada's Alberta Plains. The geothermal resources there are about 1.5 kilometers deep, and drilling wells to reach them is expensive. For a geothermal recovery operation to be economically feasible, drilling cots must be avoided. One way is through a joint-venture operation with the petroleum industry. A joint venture may be possible because oil extraction often involves the production of large volumes of hot water, a geothermal resource. Typically, after the hot water is brought to the surface with oil, it is injected underground and the heat is never used. Ways to obtain and use this heat follow.

Loveseth, G.E.; Pfeffer, B.J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Beowawe geothermal-resource assessment. Final report. Shallow-hole temperature survey geophysics and deep test hole Collins 76-17  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resource investigation field efforts in the Beowawe Geysers Area, Eureka County, Nevada are described. The objectives included acquisition of geotechnical data for understanding the nature and extent of the geothermal resource boundaries south of the known resource area. Fourteen shallow (<500 feet) temperature-gradient holes plus geophysics were used to select the site for a deep exploratory well, the Collins 76-17, which was completed to a total depth of 9005 feet. Maximum downhole recorded temperature was 311/sup 0/F, but no flow could be induced.

Jones, N.O.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Technical and cost analysis of rock-melting systems for producing geothermal wells. [GEOWELL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of wells makes up a large fraction of the costs of geothermal energy-extraction plants, and billions of dollars for wells will be needed before geothermal energy is nationally significant. Technical and economic systems studies are summarized regarding the application of the Subterrene concept, i.e., excavating and penetrating rocks or soils by melting, to the production of deep wells such as may be used for dry hot rock or geopressurized geothermal energy-extraction systems. Technically, it was found that Subterrene features are compatible with those of current rotary drilling practices. In fact, some special features could lead to improved well production techniques. These include the buildup of a glass lining along the borehole wall which provides structural resistance to collapse; close control of hole geometry; the existence of a barrier between the drilling fluids and the formations being penetrated; nonrotation; potentially better bit life; and faster rates of penetration in deep, hard rock. A typical optimum-cost well would be rotary-drilled in the upper regions and then rock-melted to total depth. Indicated cost savings are significant: a 30 percent or 3.9 million dollar (1975 $) reduction from rotary-drilled well costs are estimated for a 10-km depth well with a bottom hole temperature of 673 K. Even for relatively cool normal geothermal gradient conditions, the savings for the 1..pi..-km well are estimated as 23 percent of 2.1 million dollars.

Altseimer, J.H.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Geothermal R and D project report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1975. [Freon 113  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Geothermal Research and Development Project is conducting two major geothermal development efforts: (1) a project aimed at medium temperature (approximately 300/sup 0/F) utilization to produce electricity with supplemental direct thermal use of the energy and (2) a low temperature (approximately 170/sup 0/F) space heating project. The first effort has progressed in the field to the successful drilling of two deep geothermal wells providing flows of the desired temperature in the Raft River Valley of Southcentral Idaho. The second program involves the heating of government buildings and a university campus at Boise, Idaho. This report covers the period July 1 to September 30, 1975.

Not Available

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Geothermal studies in northern Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and University of California (UCB), under the auspices of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration, are conducting field studies at potential geothermal resource areas in north-central Nevada. The goal of the LBL-UCB program is to develop and evaluate techniques for the assessment of the resource potential of liquid-dominated systems. Field studies presently being conducted in northern Nevada incorporate an integrated program of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical surveys leading to heat flow measurements, and eventually to deep (1.5 to 2 km) confirmatory drill holes. Techniques evaluated include geophysical methods to measure contrasts in electrical resistivity and seismic parameters. Geochemical studies have emphasized techniques to disclose the pathways of water from its meteoric origin into and through the hydrothermal systems. Geochemical and radiometric analyses also help to provide a baseline upon which the effects of future geothermal development may be superimposed.

Wollenberg, H.A.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geology and alteration of the Coso geothermal area were mapped in conjunction with geophysical surveys and a deep drill test (CGEH-1) to facilitate selection of a follow-up drill site. The oldest rocks exposed at Coso are intermediate to mafic metamorphic rocks of uncertain age intruded by dikes and pods of quartz latite porphyry and felsite, and by a small

267

Exploration, Drilling and Development Operations in the Bottle Rock Area of the Geysers Steam Field, With New Geologic Insights and Models Defining Reservoir Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MCR Geothermal Corporation pioneered successful exploratiory drilling the Bottle Rock area of the Geysers Steam Field in 1976. The wellfield is characterized by a deep reservoir with varied flowrates, temperatures, pressures, and stem chemistries being quite acceptable. More detailed reservoir engineering tests will follow as production commences.

Hebein, Jeffrey J.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

GeoSys.Chem: Estimate of reservoir fluid characteristics as first step in geochemical modeling of geothermal systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer code GeoSys.Chem for the calculation of deep geothermal reservoir fluid characteristics from the measured physical-chemical parameters of separated water and condensed vapor samples obtained from drilled wells is presented. It was written ... Keywords: GeoChem, GeoSys.Chem, Geochemical modeling, Los Azufres, VB.NET

Mahendra P. Verma

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Planning, drilling, logging, and testing of energy extraction hole EE-1, Phases I and II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy Extraction Hole No. 1 (EE-1) is the second deep hole drilled into the Precambrian-age granitic rocks of the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico. EE-1 was drilled to intersect a hydraulic fracture extending outward from near the bottom of previously drilled hole GT-2, thus completing the underground circulation loop required for the hot dry rock geothermal energy extraction experiment. Directional drilling techniques were used to intersect the fracture zone. In addition, high-temperature instrumentation and equipment development, hydraulic fracturing experiments, pressure-flow testing of the fracture systems, and fracture mapping and borehole-ranging technique activities were conducted. The drilling, logging, and testing operations in EE-1 are described.

Pettitt, R.A.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Geothermal energy abstract sets. Special report No. 14  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bibliography contains annotated citations in the following areas: (1) case histories; (2) drilling; (3) reservoir engineering; (4) injection; (5) geothermal well logging; (6) environmental considerations in geothermal development; (7) geothermal well production; (8) geothermal materials; (9) electric power production; (10) direct utilization of geothermal energy; (11) economics of geothermal energy; and (12) legal, regulatory and institutional aspects. (ACR)

Stone, C. (comp.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of the cost of a new geothermal power plant is in the wells that must be drilled. Compared to the majority of oil and gas wells, geothermal wells are more difficult and costly to drill for several reasons. First, most U.S. geothermal resources consist of hot, hard crystalline rock formations which drill much slower than the relatively soft sedimentary formations associated with most oil and gas production. Second, high downhole temperatures can greatly shorten equipment life or preclude the use of some technologies altogether. Third, producing viable levels of electricity from geothermal fields requires the use of large diameter bores and a high degree of fluid communication, both of which increase drilling and completion costs. Optimizing fluid communication often requires creation of a directional well to intersect the best and largest number of fracture capable of producing hot geothermal fluids. Moineau motor stators made with elastomers cannot operate at geothermal temperatures, so they are limited to the upper portion of the hole. To overcome these limitations, Maurer Engineering Inc. (MEI) has developed a turbodrill that does not use elastomers and therefore can operate at geothermal temperatures. This new turbodrill uses a special gear assembly to reduce the output speed, thus allowing a larger range of bit types, especially tri-cone roller bits, which are the bits of choice for drilling hard crystalline formations. The Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) represents a significant improvement for drilling geothermal wells and has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs while increasing production, thereby making geothermal energy less expensive and better able to compete with fossil fuels. The final field test of the AGT will prepare the tool for successful commercialization.

W. C. Maurer

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Geothermal reservoir assessment case study: Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two 1500 foot temperature gradient holes and two deep exploratory wells were drilled and tested. Hydrologic-hydrochemical, shallow temperature survey, structural-tectonic, petrologic alteration, and solid-sample geochemistry studies were completed. Eighteen miles of high resolution reflection seismic data were gathered over the area. The study indicates that a geothermal regime with temperatures greater than 400/sup 0/F may exist at a depth of approximately 7500' to 10,000' over an area more than ten miles in length.

Denton, J.M.; Bell, E.J.; Jodry, R.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Sierra La Primavera, a late Pleistocene rhyolitic caldera complex in Jalisco, Mexico, contains fumaroles and large-discharge 65°C hot springs that are associated with faults related to caldera collapse and to later magma insurgence. The nearly-neutral, sodium bicarbonate, hot springs occur at low elevations at the margins of the complex, whereas the water-rich fumaroles are high and central. The Comision Federal de Electricidad de Mexico (CFE) has recently drilled two deep holes at the

274

Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From Deep  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From Deep Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From Deep Geothermal Drill Holes, Fenton Hill, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From Deep Geothermal Drill Holes, Fenton Hill, New Mexico Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Analyses of twenty-six gneissic whole rocks from the depth range 732-2588 m in drill hole GT-2 yield a 1.62 ± 0.04 b.y. isochron age with initial 86Sr/86Sr (Ro) = 0.7067 ± 0.0014; this age is in agreement with radiometric ages reported for rocks elsewhere in north-central New Mexico. A preliminary isochron age of 1.92 ± 0.18 b.y. with Ro = 7014 ± 0.0025 from the nearby drill hole GT-1 is defined by eight samples. Because these

275

Definition: Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Drilling Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Exploration Drilling Exploratory drilling is the Initial phase of drilling for the purpose of determining the physical properties and boundaries of a reservoir. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Geothermal Exploration is the exploration of the subsurface in search of viable active geothermal regions with the goal of building a geothermal power plant, where hot fluids drive turbines to create electricity. Exploration methods include a broad range of disciplines including geology, geophysics, geochemistry and engineering. Geothermal regions with adequate heat flow to fuel power plants are found in rift zones, subduction zones and mantle plumes. Hot spots are characterized by four geothermal elements. An active region will have: Heat Source - Shallow

276

ESMERALDA ENERGY COMPANY FINAL SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT, January 2008, EMIGRANT SLIMHOLE DRILLING PROJECT, DOE GRED III (DE-FC36-04GO14339)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project (ESDP) was a highly successful, phased resource evaluation program designed to evaluate the commercial geothermal potential of the eastern margin of the northern Fish Lake Valley pull-apart basin in west-central Nevada. The program involved three phases: (1) Resource evaluation; (2) Drilling and resource characterization; and (3) Resource testing and assessment. Efforts included detailed geologic mapping; 3-D modeling; compilation of a GIS database; and production of a conceptual geologic model followed by the successful drilling of the 2,938 foot deep 17-31 slimhole (core hole), which encountered commercial geothermal temperatures (327? F) and exhibits an increasing, conductive, temperature gradient to total depth; completion of a short injection test; and compilation of a detailed geologic core log and revised geologic cross-sections. Results of the project greatly increased the understanding of the geologic model controlling the Emigrant geothermal resource. Information gained from the 17-31 core hole revealed the existence of commercial temperatures beneath the area in the Silver Peak Core Complex which is composed of formations that exhibit excellent reservoir characteristics. Knowledge gained from the ESDP may lead to the development of a new commercial geothermal field in Nevada. Completion of the 17-31 core hole also demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of deep core drilling as an exploration tool and the unequaled value of core in understanding the geology, mineralogy, evolutional history and structural aspects of a geothermal resource.

John Deymonaz, Jeffrey G. Hulen, Gregory D. Nash, Alex Schriener

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

277

Reservoir assessment of The Geysers Geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Big Sulphur Creek fault zone, in The Geysers Geothermal field, may be part of a deep-seated, wrench-style fault system. Hydrothermal fluid in the field reservoir may rise through conduits beneath the five main anomalies associated with the Big Sulphur Creek wrench trend. Some geophysical anomalies (electrical resistivity and audio-magnetotelluric) evidently are caused by the hot water geothermal field or zones of altered rocks; others (gravity, P-wave delays, and possibly electrical resistivity) probably respresent the underlying heat source, a possible magma chamber; and others (microearthquake activity) may be related to the steam reservoir. A large negative gravity anomaly and a few low-resistivity anomalies suggest areas generally favorable for the presence of steam zones, but these anomalies apparently do not directly indicate the known steam reservoir. At the current generating capacity of 930 MWe, the estimated life of The Geysers Geothermal field reservoir is 129 years. The estimated reservoir life is 60 years for the anticipated maximum generating capacity of 2000 MWe as of 1990. Wells at The Geysers are drilled with conventional drilling fluid (mud) until the top of the steam reservoir is reached; then, they are drilled with air. Usually, mud, temperature, caliper, dual induction, and cement bond logs are run on the wells.

Thomas, R.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Dykstra, H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Chemical logging of geothermal wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The presence of geothermal aquifers can be detected while drilling in geothermal formations by maintaining a chemical log of the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions in the return drilling fluid. A continuous increase in the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions is indicative of the existence of a warm or hot geothermal aquifer at some increased depth.

Allen, Charles A. (Idaho Falls, ID); McAtee, Richard E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Development Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Development Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(9) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

280

Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Drilling Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling‎ Parent Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Hydrogen chloride in superheated steam and chloride in deep brine at The Geysers geothermal field, California  

SciTech Connect

Chloride (Cl) concentrations of 10-120 ppm{sub w} have been measured in superheated steam produced by wells at The Geysers, a vapor-dominated geothermal field in northern California. Corrosion of the well casing and steam-gathering system has been recognized in some parts of The Geysers, and is apparently related to the presence of Cl. Cl in the steam is in a volatile form, generated with the steam at reservoir temperatures, and probably travels to the wellhead as HCl gas. Published experimental data for partial pressures of HCl in steam over aqueous HCl solutions and for dissociation constants of HCl were used to calculate distribution coefficients for HCl. Reservoir liquid Cl concentrations capable of generating steam with the observed Cl concentrations were then calculated as a function of pH and temperatures from 250 to 350 C. Equilibrium mineral/liquid reactions with the K-mica and K-feldspar assemblage found in the wells limit the reservoir liquid pH values at various Cl concentrations to about 5 to 6 (near neutral at 250 to 350 C). Within this pH range, liquid at 250 C could not produce steam containing the high Cl concentrations observed. However, liquid at higher temperatures (300 to 350 C) with chloride concentrations greater than 10,000 ppm{sub w} could generate steam with 10 to over 200 ppm{sub w} Cl. There is a positive correlation between pH and the chloride concentrations required to generate a given Cl concentration in steam. The concentration of Cl in superheated steam constrains not only the reservoir liquid composition, but the temperature at which the steam last equilibrated with liquid.

Haizlip, J.R.; Truesdell, A.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heat transmission fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.the 5-km Deep Enhanced Geothermal Reservoir at Soultz-sous-

Pruess, Karsten

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

HydroPulse Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tempress HydroPulse{trademark} tool increases overbalanced drilling rates by generating intense suction pulses at the drill bit. This report describes the operation of the tool; results of pressure drilling tests, wear tests and downhole drilling tests; and the business case for field applications. The HydroPulse{trademark} tool is designed to operate on weighted drilling mud at conventional flow rates and pressures. Pressure drilling tests confirm that the HydroPulse{trademark} tool provides 33% to 200% increased rate of penetration. Field tests demonstrated conventional rotary and mud motor drilling operations. The tool has been operated continuous for 50 hours on weighted mud in a wear test stand. This level of reliability is the threshold for commercial application. A seismic-while-drilling version of the tool was also developed and tested. This tool was used to demonstrate reverse vertical seismic profiling while drilling an inclined test well with a PDC bit. The primary applications for the HydroPulse{trademark} tool are deep onshore and offshore drilling where rate of penetration drives costs. The application of the seismic tool is vertical seismic profiling-while-drilling and look-ahead seismic imaging while drilling.

J.J. Kolle

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Advanced drilling systems study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis (Livesay Consultants, Encintas, CA)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Newberry Exploratory Slimhole: Drilling And Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During July-November, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with CE Exploration, drilled a 5360' exploratory slimhole (3.895" diameter) in the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Bend, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia's program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling we performed numerous temperature logs, and at the completion of drilling attempted to perform injection tests. In addition to these measurements, the well's data set includes: over 4000' of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Newberry KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for ...

John Finger Ronald; Ronald D. Jacobson; Charles E. Hickox

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

High-temperature directional drilling turbodrill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a high-temperature turbodrill for directional drilling of geothermal wells in hard formations is summarized. The turbodrill may be used for straight-hole drilling but was especially designed for directional drilling. The turbodrill was tested on a dynamometer stand, evaluated in laboratory drilling into ambient temperature granite blocks, and used in the field to directionally drill a 12-1/4-in.-diam geothermal well in hot 200/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) granite at depths to 10,5000 ft.

Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

North Carolina/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carolina/Geothermal Carolina/Geothermal < North Carolina Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF North Carolina Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in North Carolina No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in North Carolina No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in North Carolina No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for North Carolina Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

289

Iowa/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa/Geothermal Iowa/Geothermal < Iowa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Iowa Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Iowa No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Iowa No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Iowa No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Iowa Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water resource acquisition, and relevant environmental considerations.

290

New York/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York/Geothermal New York/Geothermal < New York Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New York Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New York No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New York No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in New York No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for New York Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

291

West Virginia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Virginia/Geothermal West Virginia/Geothermal < West Virginia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF West Virginia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in West Virginia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in West Virginia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in West Virginia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for West Virginia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

292

New Jersey/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey/Geothermal Jersey/Geothermal < New Jersey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Jersey Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Jersey No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Jersey No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in New Jersey No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for New Jersey Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

293

Away from the Range Front: Intra-Basin Geothermal Exploration Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Away from the Range Front: Intra-Basin Geothermal Exploration Geothermal Away from the Range Front: Intra-Basin Geothermal Exploration Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Away from the Range Front: Intra-Basin Geothermal Exploration Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project applies the known relationship between fault permeability and the mechanics of rocks under stress to reduce risks in exploration well targeting. Although the concept has been applied before, the project would innovate by dramatically increasing the detail and types of information on the mechanical state of the target area using a variety of low-cost measurements in advance of deep drilling. In addition to the mechanical data, holes into the shallow warm aquifer related to the thermal anomaly will allow analysis of chemical indicators of upflow as a more direct measure of the location of fault permeability.

294

Alaska: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alaska's geothermal potential, exploration, drilling, utilization, and legal and institutional setting are covered. Economic factors of direct use projects are discussed. (MHR)

Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oregon's geothermal potential, exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting are covered. Economic factors of direct use projects are discussed. (MHR)

Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following: electrical uses, direct-heat uses, drilling activities, leases, geothermal loan guarantee program, general activities, and legal, institutional, and regulatory activites. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Washington: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Washington's geothermal potential is discussed. The following topics are covered: exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting, and economic factors of direct use projects. (MHR)

Bloomquist, R.G.; Basescu, N.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

US geothermal database and Oregon cascade thermal studies: (Final report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes two tasks of different nature. The first of these tasks was the preparation of a data base for heat flow and associated ancillary information for the United States. This data base is being used as the basis for preparation of the United States portion of a geothermal map of North America. The ''Geothermal Map of North America'' will be published as part of the Decade of North American Geology (DNAG) series of the Geological Society of America. The second of these tasks was to make a geothermal evaluation of holes drilled in the Cascade Range as part of a Department of Energy (DOE)/Industry co-sponsored deep drilling project. This second task involved field work, making temperature logs in the holes, and laboratory work, measuring thermal conductivity measurements on an extensive set of samples from these holes. The culmination of this task was an interpretation of heat flow values in terms of the regional thermal conditions; implications for geothermal systems in the Cascade Range; evaluation of the effect of groundwater flow on the depths that need to be drilled for successful measurements in the Cascade Range; and investigation of the nature of the surface groundwater effects on the temperature-depth curves. 40 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

Blackwell, D.D.; Steele, J.L.; Carter, L.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Development of San Kamphaeng Geothermal Energy Project in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

San Kamphaeng Geothermal Field located in northern Thailand, has been selected for a case study and exploration drilling program due to relevant geologic data obtained from the area and favorable sociological conditions. The first geothermal exploration well in Thailand, GTE-1, was commenced at the end of 1981. At present, six geothermal exploration wells (GTE-1 to GTE-6), with an average maximum depth of 500 m., have been drilled. Two wells encountered hot water while the rest are dry. GTE-2 is now discharging hot water of 85C with a very small discharge. GTE-6 encountered hot water of 120C at a depth of 489 m. It is now discharging hot water of 104SC at 3.6 bars pressure and at approximately 4 1/s at the well head. A number of shallow wells, with depths of less than 50 m., were drilled in the thermal manifestation area. Here, resistivity surveys showed relatively low values at shallow depths, suggesting possible zones of thermal water accumulation. Five shallow wells encountered hot water with temperatures ranging from 100C to 130C. A reservoir model of the San Kamphaeng geothermal system is proposed. Under the joint technical program between the governments of Thailand and Japan, a deep exploration well of 1500 m. is scheduled to start in July of 1984.

Ramingwong, T.; Praserdvigai, S.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Deep Blue No 2- A Resource In The Making At Blue Mountain | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2- A Resource In The Making At Blue Mountain 2- A Resource In The Making At Blue Mountain Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Deep Blue No 2- A Resource In The Making At Blue Mountain Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper provides a summary of the drilling operations, flow and injection testing and downhole measurements obtained during the drilling and testing of Deep Blue No.2. This well was sited as a step out to Deep Blue No.1 which measured 145°C at a depth of 645 meters. The maximum temperature recorded in Deep Blue No.2 while drilling was 167.5°C at a depth of 585 meters. Preliminary geothermometry from the short rigon flow test conducted last April 2004 indicated a parent reservoir temperature of 240°C. The results from the November 2004 flow and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Design and testing of a deep sea formation water and temeperature sampling probe for the Ocean Drilling Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ocean Drilling Program is an international research consortium dedicated to exploring the structure and history of earth beneath the oceans. The program receives funds from the National Science Foundation and 18 member countries. Texas A&M University serves as the science operator, drill ship operator, and Gulf Coast Core Repository. The objective of the program is to learn about the geological makeup of the ocean floor and develop a better understanding of how it was formed. Fluid and temperature samples are one means of determining the chemistry of the formation. In order to obtain quality samples a tool must probe into the formation approximately 18 inches and capture a small volume of fluid and record temperatures. The Ocean Drilling Program has developed two such probes, the IPOD in situ Pore Water Sampling Probe (PWS) and the Water Sample and Temperature Probe (WSTP). These probes return samples at near in situ conditions; however, fluid samples typically encounter a pressure drop as they enter the tool. Samples collected using these probes are suspected of giving questionable results due to possible gas/fluid separation as the sample experiences a pressure drop upon entering the probe. Fluid returned at formation pressure is hoped to give scientist a more accurate picture of the formation conditions and allow comparison between samples returned at formation pressure and those returned under partial pressure. The objective of this project was to design, test, and manufacture a probe that would consistently-return fluid and temperature samples at in situ conditions, The project was broken down into two stages, namely the design stage and the testing and manufacturing stage. The design stage was governed by a regimented design methodology. Steps included in the methodology were 1) Need Analysis, 2) Conceptual Design, 3) Conceptual Design Evaluation, and 4) Embodiment Design. The manufacturing and testing stage of the project consisted of full sample system testing and supervision of the manufacturing process. the result of the design process was a sampling system that combined a back pressure piston and metering valve. Full testing of this sampling system showed the sampling system allowed sampling of formation fluid with minimal pressure drop between the formation and the probe. Favorable results of the sampling system allowed for the development of a new probe tip configuration, as well as, a new modularized electronics section. Machine drawings were generated for all components of the tool. Components were then fabricated by a local machine shop. All components under went quality inspection and were then assembled. Full scale testing at the Ocean Drilling Programs Annex is the next step. If successful, the probe is to undergo sea trials in October of 1995.

Fisseler, Patrick James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems Geothermal Lab Call...

303

Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan: Magma Gulf/Technadril-Dept. of Energy MGT-DOE AMOCO Fee No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Lousiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: generalized site activities, occupational health and safety, drilling operations, production testing, environmental assessment and monitoring plan, permits, program management, reporting, and schedule. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Electrical Resistivity At Coso Geothermal Area (1972) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Resistivity At Coso Geothermal Area (1972) Electrical Resistivity At Coso Geothermal Area (1972) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Electrical Resistivity At Coso Geothermal Area (1972) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date 1972 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Identify drilling sites for exploration Notes Electrical resistivity studies outline areas of anomalously conductive ground that may be associated with geothermal activity and assist in locating drilling sites to test the geothermal potential. References Ferguson, R. B. (1 June 1973) Progress report on electrical resistivity studies, COSO Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California

305

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems, paper presentedin the Deep Reservoir of the Mt. Amiata Geothermal Field,Italy, Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, 31, 153-

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Workshop on geothermal drilling fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thirteen papers and abstracts are included. Seven papers were abstracted and six abstracts were listed by title. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Monitoring and repairing geothermal casing cement: a case history  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A manmade geothermal reservoir has been created by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rocks, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by hydraulic fracturing, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the closed circulation loop. A second generation system, presently being drilled, will entail creating multiple, parallel, vertical fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. The original completion of injection Hole EE-1, consisting of a conventional high-temperature formulation of Class B portland cement, stabilized with 40% silica sand, did not withstand the cyclic stresses, and rapid deterioration of casing-to-cement and cement-to-formation bonds occurred, which allowed significant flow in the resulting microannulus. The performance history of the casing cement for the existing HDR EE-1 injection well, the subsequent remedial cementing program, the cement bond logs, and the radioactive isotope tracer injections tests, used to monitor the condition of the casing cement is described. (MHR)

Pettitt, R.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

LOCAL POPULATION IMPACTS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT IN THE GEYSERS - CALISTOGA REGION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Socio-Economic Impacts of Geothermal Develop- ment. LawrenceMatlock, 1978. Summary of 1977 Geothermal Drilling - WesternUnited States, Geothermal Energy Magazine vo. 6, no. 5, pp.

Haven, Kendal F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 3 (RRGE-3) is an exploratory hole with three directional legs, drilled to depths ranging from approximately 5,500 to 6,000 feet into intruded quartz monzonite basement rock of the Raft River valley of southeastern Idaho. The goal of the Raft River Geothermal R and D program is to determine the feasibility of developing and utilizing medium temperature (300/sup 0/F) geothermal resources for power generation and nonelectrical applications. This well was drilled to provide data to further investigate and evaluate the geothermal reservoir, as well as to optimize the location of possible future resource and/or injection wells and to develop methods to reduce the cost of geothermal wells. The drilling and completion of RRGE-3 is described and the daily drilling reports, drill bit records, descriptions of the casing, cementing, logging and coring programs, and the containment techniques employed on RRGE-3 are included.

Shoopman, H.H. (comp.)

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Monitoring temperature conditions in recently drilled nonproductive industry boreholes in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Temperature conditions were monitored in seven industry petroleum-test wells (called holes-of-opportunity in this report) that were drilled in central and eastern Oklahoma. Five of these wells provided useful temperature information, and two wells were used to determine the length of time needed for the borehole-fluid temperature to achieve thermal equilibrium with the formation rocks. Four wells were used to verify the validity of a geothermal-gradient map of Oklahoma. Temperature surveys in two wells indicated a gradient lower than the predicted gradients on the geothermal-gradient map. When deep temperature data, between 5000 and 13,000 feet, are adjusted for mud-circulation effects, the adjusted gradients approximate the gradients on the geothermal-gradient map. The temperature-confirmation program appears to substantiate the geographic distribution of the high- and low-thermal-gradient regimes in Oklahoma. 13 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs.

Harrison, W.E.; Luza, K.V.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

West Texas geothermal resource assessment. Part I. Geothermal exploration in Trans-Pecos, Texas. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All of the new drilling for geothermal gradient and heat flow studies have been concentrated in an area near Hueco Tanks State Park. Interest in the area was raised by the silica geothermometry map of Hoffer (1979) and its proximity to El Paso, which is less than 25 miles away and expanding rapidly toward the area of geothermal interest. Several industries in El Paso appear to be potential users of non-electrical grade hot waters. A total of 14 holes have been drilled for geothermal gradient and heat-flow measurements. Of these, 12 were 50 meters deep and all but two had gradients in excess of 100/sup 0/C/km, one having a gradient as high as 306/sup 0/C/km. Of the remaining two, one penetrated bedrock at about 50 meters and was drilled to a total depth of 125 meters. The gradient in the limestone bedrock is 170/sup 0/C/km and the heat flow is about 11 x 10/sup -6/cal/cm/sup 2/ sec. This is the highest heat flow thus far reported for a locality in the Rio Grande Rift. The last hole is 300 meters deep and has a gradient of 142/sup 0/C/km and a heat flow of 9 x 10/sup -6/cal/cm/sup 2/ sec. The Hueco Tanks site is very promising for at least space heating applications of hot water. Based on the 300 meter hole the potential for electricity grade temperatures still exist, but the tight limestone bedrock may require hot dry rock extraction technology.

Roy, R.F.; Taylor, B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Geothermal Energy Program Summary Document, FY 1982  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy is derived from the internal heat of the earth. Much of it is recoverable with current or near current technology. Geothermal energy can be used for electric power production, residential and commercial space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, and agricultural applications. Three principal types of geothermal resources are exploitable through the year 2000. In order of technology readiness, these resources are: hydrothermal; geopressured (including dissolved natural gas); and hot dry rock. In hydrothermal systems, natural water circulation moves heat from deep internal sources toward the earth's surface. Geothermal fluids (water and steam) tapped by drilling can be used to generate electricity or provide direct heat. Geopressured resources, located primarily in sedimentary basins along the Gulf Coast of Texas and of Louisiana, consist of water and dissolved methane at high pressure and at moderately high temperature. In addition to recoverable methane, geopressured resources provide thermal energy and mechanical energy derived from high fluid pressures, although methane offers the greatest immediate value. Commercial development of geopressured energy may begin in the mid-1980s. Economic feasibility depends on the amount of methane that a given well can produce, a highly uncertain factor at present.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Geothermal Energy Program Summary Document, FY 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is derived from the internal heat of the earth. Much of it is recoverable with current or near current technology. Geothermal energy can be used for electric power production, residential and commercial space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, and agricultural applications. Three principal types of geothermal resources are exploitable through the year 2000. In order of technology readiness, these resources are: hydrothermal; geopressured (including dissolved natural gas); and hot dry rock. In hydrothermal systems, natural water circulation moves heat from deep internal sources toward the earth's surface. Geothermal fluids (water and steam) tapped by drilling can be used to generate electricity or provide direct heat. Geopressured resources, located primarily in sedimentary basins along the Gulf Coast of Texas and of Louisiana, consist of water and dissolved methane at high pressure and at moderately high temperature. In addition to recoverable methane, geopressured resources provide thermal energy and mechanical energy derived from high fluid pressures, although methane offers the greatest immediate value. Commercial development of geopressured energy may begin in the mid-1980s. Economic feasibility depends on the amount of methane that a given well can produce, a highly uncertain factor at present.

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot

315

Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 7  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A state-by-state review of major geothermal-development activities during 1982 is presented. It also inlcudes a summary of recent drilling and exploration efforts and the results of the 1982 leasing program. Two complementary sections feature an update of geothermal direct-use applications and a site-by-site summary of US geothermal electric-power development.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Geothermal development plan: Yuma county  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One hot spring and 33 wells drilled in the county discharge water at temperatures sufficient for direct-use geothermal applications such as process heat and space heating and cooling. Currently, one industry within the county has been identified which may be able to use geothermal energy for its process heat requirements. Also, a computer simulation model was used to predict geothermal energy on line as a function of time under both private and city-owned utility development of the resource.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

Stephen Wolhart

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Tongonan geothermal field Leyte, Philippines. Report on exploration and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal exploration and development in the Philippines are reviewed. The geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the Tongonan geothermal field are described. The well drilling, power development, and plans for a 112 MW power plant are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Hydrogeologic and geothermal investigation of Pagosa Springs, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The following topics are covered: geology; geophysical surveys; geothermal wells, springs, and heat flow; hydrology; drilling program, well testing, and mineralogical and petrographic studies of samples from geothermal wells. (MHR)

Galloway, M.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Scientific drilling technologies for hostile environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper briefly reviews the current United States Department of Energy Continental Scientific Drilling Program for Thermal Regimes and the related technologies being developed for geothermal drilling. Plans for penetrating into a molten magma body at temperatures from 800 to 1000{degree}C are also reviewed. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Traeger, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(20) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

323

Geothermal program overview: Fiscal years 1993--1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Geothermal Energy Program is involved in three main areas of research: finding and tapping the resource; power generation; and direct use of geothermal energy. This publication summarizes research accomplishments for FY 1993 and 1994 for the following: geophysical and geochemical technologies; slimhole drilling for exploration; resource assessment; lost circulation control; rock penetration mechanics; instrumentation; Geothermal Drilling Organization; reservoir analysis; brine injection; hot dry rock; The Geysers; Geothermal Technology Organization; heat cycle research; advanced heat rejection; materials development; and advanced brine chemistry.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Sweet lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco Fee. Annual report, December 1, 1979-February 27, 1981. Volume I. Drilling and completion test well and disposal well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sweet lake site is located approximately 15 miles southeast of Lake Charles in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A geological study showed that the major structure in this area is a graben. The dip of the beds is northwesterly into the basin. A well drilled into the deep basin would find the target sand below 18,000', at high pressures and temperatures. However, since there is no well control in the basin, the specific site was chosen on the 15,000' contour of the target sand in the eastern, more narrow part of the garben. Those key control wells are present within one mile of the test well. The information acquired by drilling the test well confirmed the earlier geologic study. The target sand was reached at 15,065', had a porosity of over 20% and a permeability to water of 300 md. The original reservoir pressure was 12,060 psi and the bottom hole temperature 299{sup 0}F. There are approximately 250 net feet of sand available for the perforation. The disposal well was drilled to a total depth of 7440'.

Rodgers, R.W. (ed.)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following subjects are covered: Oregons' geothermal potential, exploration methods and costs, drilling, utilization methods, economic factors of direct use projects, and legal and institutional setting. (MHR)

Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Investigation of the thermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade volcanic arc: First phase of a program for scientific drilling in the Cascade Range Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection...

327

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Analyses of operational times...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Analyses of operational times and technical aspects of the Salton Sea scientific drilling project: (Final report) Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map |...

328

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Only weak hydrothermal alteration was noted in these rocks. Drillhole surveys and drilling rate data indicate that the geothermal system is structurally controlled and that the...

329

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, (4) Bacca Ranch, Valle Grande, New Mexico, (5) Jemez Caldera, New Mexico, (6) Raft River, Idaho, and (7) Marysville, Montona. (MHR)

Pratt, H.R.; Simonson, E.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

U.S. Department of Energy, Geothermal Program Review VII, Critique of the Geothermal Exploration R&D Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exploration can be described as consisting of two components: finding something worth drilling and testing; and defining and constraining that system after it has been drilled and tested. To date, geothermal exploration in the United States has concentrated on the drilling and testing of rather obvious targets--places where steam and boiling water issue from the ground. Relatively little has been done in the exploration of concealed or blind systems, probably because there have been so many obvious targets. However, these largely have been drilled, tested and constrained by boundaries, and almost entirely are committed to development schemes. The need now is to develop an exploration methodology for the '90s and thereafter that will be effective in the search for blind geothermal systems. Such work is being done currently in Japan; my company was privileged to have served the New Energy Development Organization and the Electric Power Development Company, both Japanese government companies, in the design of a methodology to assess concealed heat sources in 4 different terrains: recent volcanic with abundant thermal manifestations; volcanic outflow; volcanic or non-volcanic with few surface manifestations; and non-volcanic with background-level heat flow. work was based on the application of existing exploration techniques. The Japanese agencies now are attempting to develop new techniques specifically for the task of applying the methodology. Two important observations can be made about this quest for a methodology to explore (and find) concealed geothermal systems: First, most geothermal systems are dominated by ground-water hydrology; and very little is done to systematically investigate or define the effects of hydrology. The Cascade ''rain curtain'' is an example of the importance of hydrologic effects in geothermal exploration. We at GeothermEx first encountered this effect in 1975-76, when we drilled a 2,000-foot-deep hole west of Klamath Lake for Weyerhauser Company. Very little has been done since then to utilize the knowledge of this ''rain curtain'' in exploration in the Cascades or elsewhere.

Koenig, James B.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

331

Results of deep exploratory drilling between long and Newark Valleys, White Pine County, Nevada - implications for oil migration in the nearby Yankee gold mine paleohydrothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In mid-1992, a consortium headed by Pioneer Oil and Gas (Midvale, Utah) drilled a deep (6700 ft) exploratory well in the southern Ruby Mountains-Buck Mountain are near the Alligator Ridge mining district in White Pine County, Nevada. The test well is located 1.5 mi southwest of USMX, Inc.'s, Yankee gold mine, an open-pit operation centered on a Carlin-type, sediment-hosted gold orebody noteworthy for containing abundant, fracture-controlled live oil. The Pioneer well as dry, but intersected much of the same stratigraphic section hosting gold at Yankee, thereby providing valuable clues to mechanisms of oil migration at this unusual, oil-bearing precious-metal deposit. Most of the gold at Yankee is hosted by the Devonian Pilot Shale, with a basal argillaceous limestone containing the bulk of the deposit's live oil. The equivalent section in the Pioneer wildcat well is a silty calcareous dolomite. Whereas the basal Pilot limestone at Yankee is rich in thick, locally gold- and arsenic-anomalous calcite veins and modules hosting abundant oil-bearing fluid inclusion, the basal Pilot dolomite in the Pioneer well contains only a few thin calcite-pyrite veinlets devoid of fluid inclusions. Moreover, the Yankee calcite veins have the same light-stable-isotope signatures as hydrothermal carbonate veins near or elsewhere in the Alligator Ridge district. These relationships imply that oil at Yankee migrated in the same hydrothermal system responsible for gold mineralization. Such systems elsewhere in the eastern Basin and Range, given favorable source rocks, traps, seals, and migratory pathways, might well have formed not only gold deposits, but also rich, spatially coincident oil reservoirs.

Pinnell, M.L. (Pioneer Oil and Gas, Midvale, UT (United States)); Hulen, J.B. (Univ. of Utah Research Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Cox, J.W. (USMX, Reno, NV (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AND PDM SYSTEMS IMPROVE DRILLING PERFORMANCE IN A CALIFORNIA GEOTHERMAL WELL Dennis Lovett, Terra system allows data transmission without a continuous fluid column. Operating the Coso geothermal field

Stanford University

333

Baltazor KGRA and vicinity, Nevada: geothermal reservoir assessment case study, northern Basin and Range province. Final report, 1 October 1978-31 January 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Baltazor KGRA and McGee/Painted Hills geothermal prospects are located in northern Humboldt County, Nevada along the northwestern margin of the Basin and Range province. Exploration work other than drilling has included groundwater sampling, a microearthquake study, a geologic literature search and photogeologic mapping, compilation of aeromagnetic and gravity mapping, soil mercury surveying, electrical resistivity and self-potential surveys and detailed hydrothermal alteration mapping. Exploration drilling included 27 shallow temperature gradient holes, four intermediate-depth gradient wells and one 3703-foot deep test, Baltazor 45-14. The deep test penetrated Miocene rhyolite, andesite, basalt and andesitic basalt flows before excessive hold deviation forced an end to drilling and completion as a deep temperature observation well. A temperature survey two weeks after completion obtained a 119.7/sup 0/C (247.4/sup 0/F) reading at survey total depth, 1110 m (3640 feet).

Wright, T.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Vale exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing  

SciTech Connect

During April-May, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation, drilled a 5825{prime} exploratory slimhole (3.85 in. diameter) in the Vale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Vale, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During drilling we performed several temperature logs, and after drilling was complete we performed injection tests, bailing from a zone isolated by a packer, and repeated temperature logs. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: 2714{prime} of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid records; numerous temperature logs; pressure shut-in data from injection tests; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Vale KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Completion report: Raft River Geothermal Production Well Five (RRGP-5)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Production Well Five (RRGP-5) is a production well in the Raft River KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area). The plan for this well included three barefoot legs. Due to technical and funding problems, two legs were drilled; only one leg is a producing leg. This report describes the entire drilling operation and includes daily drilling reports, drill bit records, casing records, and descriptions of cementing, logging, coring, and containment techniques.

Miller, L.G.; Prestwich, S.M.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Project. Annual report, fiscal year 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of extracting geothermal energy from hot dry rock in the earth's crust was investigated. The concept being investigated involves drilling a deep hole, creating an artificial geothermal reservoir at the bottom of the hole by hydraulic fracturing, and then intersecting the fracture with a second borehole. At the beginning of FY77, the downhole system was complete, but the impedance to the flow of fluid was too high to proceed confidently with the planned energy extraction demonstration. Therefore, in FY77 work focused on an intensive investigation of the characteristics of the downhole system and on the development of the necessary tools and techniques for understanding and improving it. Research results are presented under the following section headings: introduction and history; hot dry rock resource assessment and site selection; instrumentation and equipment development; drilling and fracturing; reservoir engineering; energy extraction system; environmental studies; project management and liaison; and, looking back and ahead. (JGB)

Not Available

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Wilcox sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy. Report of Investigations No. 117  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regional studies of the lower Eocene Wilcox Group in Texas were conducted to assess the potential for producing heat energy and solution methane from geopressured fluids in the deep-subsurface growth-faulted zone. However, in addition to assembling the necessary data for the geopressured geothermal project, this study has provided regional information of significance to exploration for other resources such as lignite, uranium, oil, and gas. Because the focus of this study was on the geopressured section, emphasis was placed on correlating and mapping those sandstones and shales occurring deeper than about 10,000 ft. The Wilcox and Midway Groups comprise the oldest thick sandstone/shale sequence of the Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. The Wilcox crops out in a band 10 to 20 mi wide located 100 to 200 mi inland from the present-day coastline. The Wilcox sandstones and shales in the outcrop and updip shallow subsurface were deposited primarily in fluvial environments; downdip in the deep subsurface, on the other hand, the Wilcox sediments were deposited in large deltaic systems, some of which were reworked into barrier-bar and strandplain systems. Growth faults developed within the deltaic systems, where they prograded basinward beyond the older, stable Lower Cretaceous shelf margin onto the less stable basinal muds. Continued displacement along these faults during burial resulted in: (1) entrapment of pore fluids within isolated sandstone and shale sequences, and (2) buildup of pore pressure greater than hydrostatic pressure and development of geopressure.

Debout, D.G.; Weise, B.R.; Gregory, A.R.; Edwards, M.B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Prospects for improvement in geothermal well technology and their expected benefits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance restrictions on current geothermal drilling technology and their impact on drilling costs are reviewed, with the impact on electric power costs. Sensitivities of drilling costs to changes in drilling performance are analyzed. A programmatic goal for improving drilling performance is offered. The likely cost savings to the nation if the goal is attained are estimated though the use of a geothermal well drilling scenario for the 1978 to 1990 period, which was derived from DOE's geothermal power on-line scenario. The present worth of the expectd savings stream (benefit) is offered as a point of departure for justifying programmatic costs for improving drilling technology.

Not Available

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA EA at Patua Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field, Patua Geothermal Project Phase II General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Gradient Resources Geothermal Area Patua Geothermal Area Project Location Fernley, Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Drilling Techniques, Thermal Gradient Holes Time Frame (days) NEPA Process Time 327 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided

340

Drill report  

SciTech Connect

North Slope drilling activity is described. As of November 14, 1984, four rigs were actively drilling in the Kuparuk River field with another two doing workovers. Only one rig was drilling in the Prudhoe Bay field, with another doing workovers and one on standby.

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The 1983 Temperature Gradient and Heat Flow Drilling Project for the State of Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the Summer of 1983, the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources carried out a three-hole drilling program to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The project was part of the state-coupled US Department of Energy Geothermal Program. Richardson Well Drilling of Tacoma, Washington was subcontracted through the State to perform the work. The general locations of the project areas are shown in figure 1. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens--Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

Korosec, Michael A.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Geothermal development plan: Pinal county  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wells drilled in the county provide evidence of geothermal energy sufficient for process heat and space heating and cooling applications. Annual energy consumption was estimated for industries whose process heat requirements are less than 105/sup 0/C (221/sup 0/F). This information was then used to model the introduction of geothermal energy into the process heat market. Also, agriculture and agribusiness industries were identified. Many of these are located on or near a geothermal resource and might be able to utilize geothermal energy in their operations.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Geothermal materials development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level 1 and 2 Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results transferred to industry. In FY 1990, the R D efforts were focused on reducing well drilling and completion costs and on mitigating corrosion in well casing. Activities on lost circulation control materials, CO{sub 2}- resistant lightweight cements, and thermally conductive corrosion and scale-resistant protective liner systems have reached the final development stages, and cost-shared field tests are planned for the FY 1991--1992 time frame. Technology transfer efforts on high temperature elastomers for use in drilling tools are continuing under Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) sponsorship.

Kukacka, L.E.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Geothermal energy  

SciTech Connect

Dry hot rock in the Earth's crust represents the largest and most broadly distributed reservoir of usable energy accessible to man. The engineering equipment and methods required to extract and use this energy appear to exist and are now being investigated actively at LASL. At least for deep systems in relatively impermeable rock, not close to active faults, the extraction of energy frtom dry geothermal resertvoirs should involve no significant environmental hazards. The principal environmental effects of such energy systems will be those associated with the surface facilities that use the geothermal heat; these will be visual, in land use, and in the thermal-pollution potential of low-temperature power plants. The energy extraction system itself should be clean; safe, unobtrusive, and economical. (auth)

Smith, M.C.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat Flow From Four...

346

Cuttings Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

80) 80) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the heat transfer mechanism Notes In an investigation of the thermal regime of this Basin and Range geothermal area, temperature measurements were made in 25 shallow and 1 intermediate depth borehole. Thermal conductivity measurements were made on 312 samples from cores and drill cuttings. The actual process by which heat is transferred is rather complex; however, the heat flow determinations can be divided into two groups. The first group, less than 4.0 HFU, are indicative of regions with primarily conductive regimes, although deep-seated mass transfer is implied. The second group, greater than 4.0

347

Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal downhole conditions that may affect the performance and reliability of selected materials and components used in the drilling, completion, logging, and production of geothermal wells are reviewed. The results of specific research and development efforts aimed at improvement of materials and components for downhole contact with the hostile physicochemical conditions of the geothermal reservoir are discussed. Materials and components covered are tubular goods, stainless steels and non-ferrous metals for high-temperature downhole service, cements for high-temperature geothermal wells, high-temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downhole pumps. (MHR)

Ellis, P.F. II, Smith, C.C.; Keeney, R.C.; Kirk, D.K.; Conover, M.F.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Geothermal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Geothermal Power) (Redirected from Geothermal Power) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Geothermal Energy RSF GeothermalPowerStation.jpg Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth [Geo (Earth) + thermal (heat)].The temperature of the Earth varies widely, and a wide range of temperatures can be suitable for using geothermal energy, from room temperature to above 300° F.[1] This heat can be drawn from several sources, ranging from the shallow ground (the upper 10 feet beneath the surface of the Earth) that maintains a relatively constant temperature of approximately 50° to 60° F, to reservoirs of extremely hot water and steam located both near the Earth's surface as well as several miles deep into the Earth, even reaching the Earth's magma.[2][3] Geothermal

349

Coring in deep hardrock formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

OM-300 - MWD Geothermal Navigation Instrument Geothermal Project | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OM-300 - MWD Geothermal Navigation Instrument Geothermal Project OM-300 - MWD Geothermal Navigation Instrument Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title OM-300 - MWD Geothermal Navigation Instrument Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 High-Temperature Downhole MWD Tools for Directional Drilling Project Description Honeywell proposes to perform this project in three phases; Phase 1 will enhance accelerometers, magnetometers and high temperature electronic components to operate at 300C. Phase 2 will define, design and demonstrate circuit card assembly (CCA) and external packaging capable of operating in the temperature, shock, and vibration of downhole MWD tools. Phase 3 will utilize the components onto a CCA, integrate the CCA sensors into a final package for final assembly, test, and the delivery of one Prototype.

351

Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Maps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

353

NREL: Learning - Geothermal Direct Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Use Direct Use Photo of alligators on a farm. Geothermally heated waters allow alligators to thrive on a farm in Colorado, where temperatures can drop below freezing. Geothermal reservoirs of hot water, which are found a few miles or more beneath the Earth's surface, can be used to provide heat directly. This is called the direct use of geothermal energy. Geothermal direct use has a long history, going back to when people began using hot springs for bathing, cooking food, and loosening feathers and skin from game. Today, hot springs are still used as spas. But there are now more sophisticated ways of using this geothermal resource. In modern direct-use systems, a well is drilled into a geothermal reservoir to provide a steady stream of hot water. The water is brought up through

354

Proceedings of the symposium on the Long Valley Caldera: A pre-drilling data review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This proceedings volume contains papers or abstracts of papers presented at a two-day symposium held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on 17 and 18 March 1987. Speakers presented a large body of new scientific results and geologic-hydrogeoloic interpretations for the Long Valley caldera. The talks and the discussions that followed focused on concepts and models for the present-day magmatic-hydrothermal system. Speakers at the symposium also addressed the topic of where to site future scientific drill holes in the caldera. Deep scientific drilling projects such as those being contemplated by the DOE Division of Geothermal Technology (DGT), under the Magma Energy Program, and by the DOE Office of Energy Research, Division of Engineering and Geosciences (DEG), along with the USGS and NSE, under the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP), will be major and expensive national undertakings. DOE/DEG is sponsoring a program of relatively shallow coreholes in the caldera, and DOE/DGT is considering the initiation of a multiphase program to drill a deep hole for geophysical observations and sampling of the ''near magmatic'' environment as early as FY 1988, depending on the DOE budget. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers.

Goldstein, N.E. (ed.)

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Frio sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At leat 30 percent of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feet of methane in solution in this water. Only 10 percent of the water and methane (1 billion barrels of water and 40 billion cubic feet of methane) will be produced without reinjection of the waste water into the producing formation. Reservoir simulation studies indicate that 90 percent of the methane can be produced with reinjection. 106 figures.

Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The Marysville, Montana Geothermal Project. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the exploration of an anomalous site near Marysville, Montana, where the geothermal heat flow is about 10 times the regional average. The site arouses scientific interest because there are no surface manifestations such as young volcanics, hot springs, geysers, etc., within 20 miles of it. Also, there is significant economic interest in exploring the source of heat as a potential for the generation of electricity. Included herein are independent sections prepared by each contractor. Consequently, there is some overlapping information, generally presented from different viewpoints. The project consists of geophysical surveys in 1973 and 1974, the drilling of the deep well in the summer of 1974 to a depth of 6790 feet, the coring and logging of the well, the supporting scientific studies, and the data analysis. Since so much data are available on the Marysville system, it can serve as a testing and research area to help locate and understand similar systems. (GRA)

Not Available

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration 5: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon SUMMARY This EA evaluates Ormat Nevada, Inc.'s (Ormat's) proposed geothermal project consists of drilling up to 16 wells for geothermal exploration approximately 70 miles southeast of Bend, Oregon and 50 miles northwest of Burns, Oregon just south of U.S. Highway 20. The proposed project includes three distinct drilling areas. Up to three wells would be drilled on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Prineville District (Mahogany), up to ten wells would be drilled on lands managed by the BLM Burns District (Midnight Point), and up to three wells would be drilled on

358

EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon SUMMARY This EA evaluates Ormat Nevada, Inc.'s (Ormat's) proposed geothermal project consists of drilling up to 16 wells for geothermal exploration approximately 70 miles southeast of Bend, Oregon and 50 miles northwest of Burns, Oregon just south of U.S. Highway 20. The proposed project includes three distinct drilling areas. Up to three wells would be drilled on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Prineville District (Mahogany), up to ten wells would be drilled on lands managed by the BLM Burns District (Midnight Point), and up to three wells would be drilled on

359

Geothermal Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Resources and Technologies Geothermal Resources and Technologies Geothermal Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:24am Addthis Photo of steam rising high in the air from a geyser. Geothermal energy leverages heated air and water from beneath the earth's surface. This page provides a brief overview of geothermal energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply geothermal systems within the Federal sector. Overview Geothermal energy is produced from heat and hot water found within the earth. Federal agencies can harness geothermal energy for heating and cooling air and water, as well as for electricity production. Geothermal resources can be drawn through several resources. The resource can be at or near the surface or miles deep. Geothermal systems move heat

360

GRAIN-SCALE FAILURE IN THERMAL SPALLATION DRILLING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal power promises clean, renewable, reliable and potentially widely-available energy, but is limited by high initial capital costs. New drilling technologies are required to make geothermal power financially competitive with other energy sources. One potential solution is offered by Thermal Spallation Drilling (TSD) - a novel drilling technique in which small particles (spalls) are released from the rock surface by rapid heating. While TSD has the potential to improve drilling rates of brittle granitic rocks, the coupled thermomechanical processes involved in TSD are poorly described, making system control and optimization difficult for this drilling technology. In this paper, we discuss results from a new modeling effort investigating thermal spallation drilling. In particular, we describe an explicit model that simulates the grain-scale mechanics of thermal spallation and use this model to examine existing theories concerning spalling mechanisms. We will report how borehole conditions influence spall production, and discuss implications for macro-scale models of drilling systems.

Walsh, S C; Lomov, I; Roberts, J J

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and Testing in Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and Testing in Geothermal Exploration Abstract No abstract prepared. Authors Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen and Gene Polik Organization Sandia National Laboratories Published Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 1999 Report Number SAND99-1976 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and Testing in Geothermal Exploration Citation

362

Advanced geothermal hydraulics model -- Phase 1 final report, Part 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced geothermal well hydraulics model (GEODRIL) is being developed to accurately calculate bottom-hole conditions in these hot wells. In Phase 1, real-time monitoring and other improvements were added to GEODRIL. In Phase 2, GEODRIL will be integrated into Marconi's Intelligent Drilling Monitor (IDM) that will use artificial intelligence to detect lost circulation, fluid influxes and other circulation problems in geothermal wells. This software platform has potential for significantly reducing geothermal drilling costs.

W. Zheng; J. Fu; W. C. Maurer

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A deep drilling research program titled 'An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration' was conducted at TerraTek's Drilling and Completions Laboratory. Drilling tests were run to simulate deep drilling by using high bore pressures and high confining and overburden stresses. The purpose of this testing was to gain insight into practices that would improve rates of penetration and mechanical specific energy while drilling under high pressure conditions. Thirty-seven test series were run utilizing a variety of drilling parameters which allowed analysis of the performance of drill bits and drilling fluids. Five different drill bit types or styles were tested: four-bladed polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC), 7-bladed PDC in regular and long profile, roller-cone, and impregnated. There were three different rock types used to simulate deep formations: Mancos shale, Carthage marble, and Crab Orchard sandstone. The testing also analyzed various drilling fluids and the extent to which they improved drilling. The PDC drill bits provided the best performance overall. The impregnated and tungsten carbide insert roller-cone drill bits performed poorly under the conditions chosen. The cesium formate drilling fluid outperformed all other drilling muds when drilling in the Carthage marble and Mancos shale with PDC drill bits. The oil base drilling fluid with manganese tetroxide weighting material provided the best performance when drilling the Crab Orchard sandstone.

TerraTek

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Technology assessment of geothermal pumping equipment. final report, July 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty-eight separate interviews were conducted with DOE personnel, DOE contractors doing geothermal research, persons associated with geothermal installations, companies engaged in the drilling and completion of geothermal well, and pump manufactures. The reports of these interviews are presented and summarized and conclusions are drawn.

Nichols, K.E.; Malgieri, A.J.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Geothermal -- The Energy Under Our Feet: Geothermal Resource Estimates for the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On May 16, 2006, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado hosted a geothermal resources workshop with experts from the geothermal community. The purpose of the workshop was to re-examine domestic geothermal resource estimates. The participating experts were organized into five working groups based on their primary area of expertise in the following types of geothermal resource or application: (1) Hydrothermal, (2) Deep Geothermal Systems, (3) Direct Use, (4) Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHPs), and (5) Co-Produced and Geopressured. The workshop found that the domestic geothermal resource is very large, with significant benefits.

Green, B. D.; Nix, R. G.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Chemical Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Chemical Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Chemical Logging Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To use new methods to assist geothermal well drilling. Notes Chemical logging resulted in the development of a technique to assist in geothermal well drilling and resource development. Calcium-alkalinity ratios plotted versus drill depth assisted in defining warm and hot water aquifers. Correlations between the calcium-alkalinity log and lithologic logs were used to determine aquifer types and detection of hot water zones

367

Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project'S Hot Sulphur Springs Lease Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project'S Hot Sulphur Springs Lease Area Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by

368

Geothermal Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Basics Resource Basics Geothermal Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:58pm Addthis Although geothermal heat pumps can be used almost anywhere, most direct-use and electrical production facilities in the United States are located in the west, where the geothermal resource base is concentrated. Current drilling technology limits the development of geothermal resources to relatively shallow water- or steam-filled reservoirs, most of which are found in the western part of the United States. But researchers are developing new technologies for capturing the heat in deeper, "dry" rocks, which would support drilling almost anywhere. Geothermal Resources Map This map shows the distribution of geothermal resources across the United States. If you have trouble accessing this information because of a

369

Property:Geothermal/Partner1Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Website Website Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/Partner1Website Property Type URL Description Partner 1 Website (URL) Pages using the property "Geothermal/Partner1Website" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alum Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project + http://www.spectir.com/ + Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Geothermal Project + http://www.fpl.com/ + Application of 2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration and Production Wells in a Basin and Range Geothermal System Humboldt House-Rye Patch Geothermal Area Geothermal Project + http://www.apexhipoint.com/ + Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid-Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, NV Geothermal Project + http://www.unr.edu/Geothermal/ +

370

Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada July 13, 2010 - 5:17pm Addthis Sierra Geothermal discovered temperatures hot enough for large-scale geothermal energy production at one of its wells near Silver Peak, Nev. | Photo courtesy of Sierra Geothermal Sierra Geothermal discovered temperatures hot enough for large-scale geothermal energy production at one of its wells near Silver Peak, Nev. | Photo courtesy of Sierra Geothermal Paul Lester Communications Specialist for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy In May 2010, Sierra Geothermal determined temperature at the bottom of a well drilled at the company's Alum project near Silver Peak, Nev., was hot enough for commercial-sized geothermal energy production - measured as 147

371

Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada July 13, 2010 - 5:17pm Addthis Sierra Geothermal discovered temperatures hot enough for large-scale geothermal energy production at one of its wells near Silver Peak, Nev. | Photo courtesy of Sierra Geothermal Sierra Geothermal discovered temperatures hot enough for large-scale geothermal energy production at one of its wells near Silver Peak, Nev. | Photo courtesy of Sierra Geothermal Paul Lester Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy In May 2010, Sierra Geothermal determined temperature at the bottom of a well drilled at the company's Alum project near Silver Peak, Nev., was hot enough for commercial-sized geothermal energy production - measured as 147

372

Geothermal technology development at Sandia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal technology development at Sandia consists of work in two major project areas - Hard Rock Penetration and Magma Energy Extraction. The Hard Rock Penetration Program is directed at reducing drilling costs for geothermal wells. Current activities are focused in three areas: borehole mechanics, rock penetration mechanics, and industry cost-shared research. The Magma Energy Extraction Program is investigating the engineering feasibility of utilizing crustal magma bodies as a source of energy. Work is divided into four major areas: geophysics, geochemistry/materials, drilling, and energy extraction.

Dunn, J.C.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Geopressured-Geothermal Drilling and Testing Plan, Volume II, Testing Plan; Dow Chemical Co. - Dept. of Energy Dow-DOE Sweezy No. 1 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Dow/D.O.E. L. R. Sweezy No. 1 geopressured geothermal production well was completed in August of 1981. The well was perforated and gravel packed in approximately 50 feet of sand from 13,344 feet to 13,395 feet. Permeabilities of 6 to 914 millidarcies were measured with porosity of 25 to 36%. Static surface pressure after well clean-up was 5000 psi. At 1000 B/D flow rate the drawdown was 50 psi. The water produced in clean-up contained 100,000 ppm TDS. This report details the plan for testing this well with the goal of obtaining sufficient data to define the total production curve of the small, 939 acre, reservoir. A production time of six to nine months is anticipated. The salt water disposal well is expected to be completed and surface equipment installed such that production testing will begin by April 1, 1982. The program should be finished and reports written by February 28, 1983. The brine will be produced from the No.1 well, passed through a separator where the gas is removed, then reinjected into the No.2 (SWD) well under separator pressure. Flow rates of up to 25,000 B/D are expected. The tests are divided into a two-week short-term test and six to nine-month long-term tests with periodic downhole measurement of drawdown and buildup rates. Data obtained in the testing will be relayed by phoneline computer hookup to Otis Engineering in Dallas, Texas, where the reservoir calculations and modeling will be done. At the point where sufficient data has been obtained to reach the objectives of the program, production will be ended, the wells plugged and abandoned, and a final report will be issued.

None

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

FINAL REPORT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY PHASE II ANIMAS VALLEY, NEW MEXICO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Final Technical Report covering siting, permitting, and drilling two geothermal temperature gradient holes. This report provides a summary of geotechnical and geophysical data that led to the siting, drilling, and completion of 2 temperature gradient holes in the geothermal anomaly at Lightning Dock Known Geothermal Resource Area in the Animas Valley of New Mexico. Included in this report is a summary of institutional factors and data defining the well drilling process and acquiring drilling permits. Data covering the results of the drilling and temperature logging of these two holes are provided. The two gradient holes were sited on federal geothermal leases owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. and both holes were drilled into lakebed sediments some distance from the intense shallow geothermal anomaly located in the eastern half of Section 7, Township 25 South, Range 19 West.

Roy A.Cunniff; Roger L. Bowers

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

Program in geothermal well technology directed toward achieving DOE/DGE power-on-line goals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the material used in an oral presentation to the DOE/Division of Geothermal Energy, which was designed to illustrate the importance of well technology development in reducing geothermal well costs, and to achieve geothermal power-on-line goals. Examination of recent studies of the economics of geothermal energy leads to the conclusion that the overall sensitivity of geothermal power-on-line to well cost is in the range of one to two. Current data suggest that a vigorous R and D program in rotary drilling technology can reduce geothermal drilling costs by about 20%, but a reduction of 40 to 50% is needed to achieve DOE/DGE goals. Research in advanced drilling systems is needed to satisfy this more stringent requirement. Some critical technological deficiencies that occur when current rotary drilling techniques are used for geothermal drilling are discussed. A broadly based development program directed at correcting these deficiencies is defined.

Polito, J.; Varnado, S.G.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are included: geothermal power plants proposed and on-line; direct heat applications proposed and operational; trends in drilling activities; exploration; leases; outreach and technical assistance; feasibility studies and application demonstrations; geothermal loan guaranty program; research and development activities; legal, institutional, and regulatory activities; environmental activities; reports and publications; and a directory. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Underbalanced drilling in remedial operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operators are finding additional applications for underbalanced drilling (UBD) technology that deliver benefits besides faster, more trouble-free drilling and improved well productivity. Underbalanced workovers, completions and re-drills are being performed with impressive results. This article will describe some of the jobs and applications, and detail the special surface equipment being used to make this a success. This is the fifth in a series of articles on UBD technology and its rapid development in this field. The paper discusses deep gas wells in the Texas Panhandle, gas and condensate wells near Mobile, Alabama, and the Austin Chalk wells in Texas and Louisiana.

Cuthbertson, R.L.; Vozniak, J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Utilization of melting techniques for borehole wall stabilization. [Applied to geothermal well production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program on the Subterrene concept based on excavation by melting has been completed. Theoretical and experimental studies were made for a broad range of applications. Most recently, a study of Subterrene deep geothermal well production systems predicted that, compared to rotary-drilled wells, significant cost savings are possible, e.g., 2 and 4 million dollars for 10-km-deep wells and geothermal gradients of 25 and 40 K/km, respectively. It was also concluded that for most wells the rate of penetration of the melting bits should be increased several times over that attained in the Subterrene tests. Subterrene melting penetration tests showed that borehole glass liners can be formed in a wide variety of materials and structural characterization tests showed that tuff glass cylinders can be many times stronger in compression than the parent material. Also, the tests showed that the rock-glass liner permeability decreases rapidly with confining pressure. New melting devices are conceivable that could line rotary-drilled boreholes with rock glass or other materials with resultant improvements in well costs. With emphasis on borehole liners, an overview of Subterrene program results, data on rock-glass liners, and suggestions on how molten materials might be applied to the borehole wall as part of a rotary drilling operation are presented.

Altseimer, J.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The role of geothermal energy in the world  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy, in the broadest sense, is the natural heat of the earth. Immense amounts of thermal energy are generated and stored in the earth`s core, mantle, and crust. The heat is transferred from the interior towards the surface mostly by conduction, and this conductive heat flow makes temperatures rise with increasing depth in the crust on average 25-30{degrees}C/km. This is called the geothermal gradient. The recoverable thermal energy theoretically suitable for direct applications has been estimated at 2.9 {times} 10{sup 24} Joules, which is about 10,000 times the present annual world consumption of primary energy without regard to grade (Armstead, 1983). Most of the earth`s heat is, however, far too deeply buried to be tapped by man, even under the most optimistic assumptions of technological development. Geothermal energy has at present a considerable economic potential only in areas where thermal water or steam is concentrated at depths less than 3 km(1.9 mi) in restricted volumes analogous to oil in commercial oil reservoirs. The drilling technology is similar for geothermal fluid as for oil. But as the energy content of a barrel of oil is much greater than an equivalent amount of hot water, the economic requirements for permeability of the formations and the productivity of the geothermal wells are much higher than for oil wells. Geothermal production wells are commonly 2 km (1.2 mi) deep, but rarely much over 3 km (1.9 mi) at present.

Fridleifsson, I.B. [United Nations Univ. Geothermal Training Programme, Reykjavik (Iceland)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Geothermal programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a number of geothermal programs supported through two offices in the Department of Energy: the Office of Renewable Technologies, Geothermal Technologies Division, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Engineering, Mathematics and Geosciences. Within these programs, we are carrying out research in injection monitoring, optical instrumentation for geothermal wells, seismic imaging methods, geophysical and drilling investigations of young volcanic systems in California, and fundamental studies of the rock and mineral properties.

Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS).31 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, 301998). Computer modeling for geothermal systems: predicting

Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Acoustical properties of drill strings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recovery of petrochemical and geothermal resources requires extensive drilling of wells to increasingly greater depths. Real-time collection and telemetry of data about the drilling process while it occurs thousands of feet below the surface is an effective way of improving the efficiency of drilling operations. Unfortunately, due to hostile down-hole environments, telemetry of this data is an extremely difficult problem. Currently, commercial systems transmit data to the surface by producing pressure pulses within the portion of the drilling mud enclosed in the hollow steel drill string. Transmission rates are between two and four data bits per second. Any system capable of raising data rates without increasing the complexity of the drilling process will have significant economic impact. One alternative system is based upon acoustical carrier waves generated within the drill string itself. If developed, this method would accommodate data rates up to 100 bits per second. Unfortunately, the drill string is a periodic structure of pipe and threaded tool joints, the transmission characteristics are very complex and exhibit a banded and dispersive structure. Over the past forty years, attempts to field systems based upon this transmission method have resulted in little success. This paper examines this acoustical transmission problem in great detail. The basic principles of acoustic wave propagation in the periodic structure of the drill string are examined through theory, laboratory experiment, and field test. The results indicate the existence of frequency bands which are virtually free of attenuation and suitable for data transmission at high bit rates. 9 refs., 38 figs., 2 tabs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Program for the improvement of downhole drilling-motor bearings and seals. Final report: Phase III, Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A systematic laboratory testing and evaluation program to select high-temperature seals, bearings, and lubricants for geothermal downhole drilling motors is summarized.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

GRED STUDIES AND DRILLING OF AMERICULTURE STATE 2, AMERICULTURE TILAPIA FARM LIGHTNING DOCK KGRA, ANIMAS VALLEY, NM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the GRED drilling operations in the AmeriCulture State 2 well with an overview of the preliminary geologic and geothermal findings, from drill cuttings, core, geophysical logs and water geochemical sampling.

Witcher, James

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Continental drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Workshop on Continental Drilling was convened to prepare a report for submission to the US Geodynamics Committee with respect to the contribution that could be made by land drilling to resolve major problems of geodynamics and consider the mechanisms by which the responsibility for scientific planning, establishment of priorities, administration, and budgeting for a land-drilling program within the framework of the aims of the Geodynamics Project would best be established. A new and extensive program to study the continental crust is outlined in this report. The Workshop focused on the following topics: processes in the continental crust (mechanism of faulting and earthquakes, hydrothermal systems and active magma chambers); state and structure of the continental crust (heat flow and thermal structure of the crust; state of ambient stress in the North American plate; extent, regional structure, and evolution of crystalline continental crust); short hole investigations; present state and needs of drilling technology; drill hole experimentation and instrumentation; suggestions for organization and operation of drilling project; and suggested level of effort and funding. Four recommendations are set down. 8 figures, 5 tables. (RWR)

Shoemaker, E.M. (ed.)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Geothermal instrumentation development activities at Sandia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major element of Sandia's Geothermal Technology Development Program is the effort directed toward development of instrumentation. This effort has two aspects, the development of high temperature components and prototype tools and the investigation of new concepts and capabilities. The focus of these activities is the acquisition of information to make geothermal drilling and resource development more efficient. Several projects of varying nature and scope make up the instrumentation development element, and this element will expand as the program emphasis on development of an advanced geothermal drilling system and the need for improved information grow. 13 refs.

Carson, C.C.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Geothermal Lost Circulation Zone Mapping Tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation is an expensive and often encountered problem when drilling into geothermal formations. A method is needed to more accurately describe loss zones encountered during geothermal drilling to allow for more realistic testing since present testing techniques are inadequate. A Lost Circulation Zone Mapping Tool (LCZMT) is being developed that will quickly locate a loss zone and then provide a visual image of this zone as it intersects the wellbore. A modified Sandia high temperature Acoustic Borehole Televiewer should allow modeling of geothermal loss zones, which would in turn lead to testing that can be performed to evaluate lost circulation materials under simulated downhole conditions. 5 refs., 5 figs.

Bauman, T.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Geothermal heating for Caliente, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utilization of geothermal resources in the town of Caliente, Nevada (population 600) has been the objective of two grants. The first grant was awarded to Ferg Wallis, part-owner and operator of the Agua Caliente Trailer Park, to assess the potential of hot geothermal water for heating the 53 trailers in his park. The results from test wells indicate sustainable temperatures of 140/sup 0/ to 160/sup 0/F. Three wells were drilled to supply all 53 trailers with domestic hot water heating, 11 trailers with space heating and hot water for the laundry from the geothermal resource. System payback in terms of energy cost-savings is estimated at less than two years. The second grant was awarded to Grover C. Dils Medical Center in Caliente to drill a geothermal well and pipe the hot water through a heat exchanger to preheat air for space heating. This geothermal preheater served to convert the existing forced air electric furnace to a booster system. It is estimated that the hospital will save an average of $5300 in electric bills per year, at the current rate of $.0275/KWH. This represents a payback of approximately two years. Subsequent studies on the geothermal resource base in Caliente and on the economics of district heating indicate that geothermal may represent the most effective supply of energy for Caliente. Two of these studies are included as appendices.

Wallis, F.; Schaper, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Geothermal: About  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - About Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

391

Geothermal: Publications  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Publications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

392

Geothermal Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The word geothermal comes from the Greek words geo (earth) and therme (heat). So, geothermal energy is heat from within the Earth.

393

Geothermal Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Geothermal Resources and Technologies Geothermal Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:24am Addthis Photo of steam rising high in the air from a geyser. Geothermal energy leverages heated air and water from beneath the earth's surface. This page provides a brief overview of geothermal energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply geothermal systems within the Federal sector. Overview Geothermal energy is produced from heat and hot water found within the earth. Federal agencies can harness geothermal energy for heating and cooling air and water, as well as for electricity production. Geothermal resources can be drawn through several resources. The resource can be at or near the surface or miles deep. Geothermal systems move heat

394

Geothermal materials development activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

Kukacka, L.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development and Testing of Insulated Drill Pipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has comprised design, analysis, laboratory testing, and field testing of insulated drill pipe (IDP). This paper will briefly describe the earlier work, but will focus on results from the recently-completed field test in a geothermal well. Field test results are consistent with earlier analyses and laboratory tests, all of which support the conclusion that insulated drill pipe can have a very significant effect on circulating fluid temperatures. This will enable the use of downhole motors and steering tools in hot wells, and will reduce corrosion, deterioration of drilling fluids, and heat-induced failures in other downhole components.

Champness, T.; Finger, J.; Jacobson, R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

Geothermal Progress Monitor report No. 8. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal Progress Monitor (GPM) Report Number 8 presents information concerning ongoing technology transfer activities and the mechanisms used to support these activities within geothermal R and D programs. A state-by-state review of major geothermal development activities for the reporting period 1 February 1983 through 31 July 1983 is provided. Recent drilling and exploration efforts and the current status of geothermal electric power plant development in the United States are summarized.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Review of the Drilling R and D Program at Sandia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling projects conducted for the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) and the Office of Energy Research (OER), both of the Department of Energy (DOE), are described. The DGE Well Technology Program includes drilling, well completion, and high temperature logging instrumentation R and D for geothermal applications. Accomplishments to date include successful laboratory testing of the continuous chain drill and development of temperature, pressure, and flow sondes capable of operation at 275/sup 0/C. Efforts are also under way to develop high-temperature, high-performance bits, high-temperature drilling fluids, and high-temperature downhole motors. Bearings, seals, and lubricants for use in high-temperature bits and motors are also being developed and tested. Recent results are presented. An OER drilling experiment into a lava lake at Kilauea Iki, Hawaii, is being conducted. Materials and techniques for drilling into an active magma/hydrothermal system are in a preliminary phase of study.

Stoller, H.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Lost Circulation Experience in Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation during drilling and cementing in geothermal wells is a problem common to most geothermal areas. Material and rig time costs due to lost circulation often represent one fourth or more of the total well cost. Assessment of the general drilling and completion practices commonly used for handling lost circulation have been surveyed and evaluated under a study sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. Results of this study, including interviews with geothermal production companies and with drilling fluid service companies, are reported in the paper. Conclusions and recommendations are presented for control of lost circulation during geothermal operations. Recent improvements in lost circulation materials and techniques and potential equipment solutions to the lost circulation problem are discussed. Research needs are also identified.

Goodman, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Property:Geothermal/Partner6Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partner6Website Partner6Website Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/Partner6Website Property Type URL Description Partner 6 Website (URL) Pages using the property "Geothermal/Partner6Website" Showing 4 pages using this property. C Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells Geothermal Project + http://www.sensortran.com/ + I Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Geothermal Project + http://www.pitt.edu/ + S Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Geothermal Project + http://www.sercel.com/ + T The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Geothermal Project + http://www.icdp-online.org/contenido/icdp/front_content.php +

400

Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dizie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems. Documented a relation between natural heat loss for geothermal and electrical power production potential and determined heat flow for 27 different geothermal systems. Prepared data set for generation of a new geothermal map of North American including industry data totaling over 25,000 points in the US alone.

David Blackwell; Kenneth Wisian; Maria Richards; Mark Leidig; Richard Smith; Jason McKenna

2003-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geothermal drill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Steamboat Hills exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During July-September, 1993, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Far West Capital, drilled a 4000 feet exploratory slimhole (3.9 inch diameter) in the Steamboat Hills geothermal field near Reno, Nevada. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed four series of production and injection tests while taking downhole (pressure-temperature-spinner) and surface (wellhead pressure and temperature, flow rate) data. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: continuous core (with detailed log); borehole televiewer images of the wellbore`s upper 500 feet; daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; numerous temperature logs; and comparative data from production and injection wells in the same field. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, F.D.; Hickox, C.E.; Eaton, R.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Geothermal program review 16: Proceedings. A strategic plan for geothermal research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proceedings contain 21 papers arranged under the following topical sections: Exploration technology (4 papers); Reservoir technology (5 papers); Energy conversion technology (8 papers); Drilling technology (2 papers); and Direct use and geothermal heat pump technology (2 papers). An additional section contains a report on a workshop on dual-use technologies for hydrothermal and advanced geothermal reservoirs.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Exploration for deep coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most important factor in safe mining is the quality of the roof. The article explains how the Rosebud Mining Co. conducts drilling and exploration in 11 deep coal mine throughout Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rosebud uses two Atlas Copco CS10 core drilling rigs mounted on 4-wheel drive trucks. The article first appeared in Atlas Copco's in-house magazine, Deep Hole Driller. 3 photos.

NONE

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Chemical logging- a geothermal technique | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

logging- a geothermal technique logging- a geothermal technique Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Chemical logging- a geothermal technique Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Chemical logging studies conducted at the Department of Energy's Raft River Geothermal Test Site in south central Idaho resulted in the development of a technique to assist in geothermal well drilling and resource development. Calcium-alkalinity ratios plotted versus drill depth assisted in defining warm and hot water aquifers. Correlations between the calcium-alkalinity log and lithologic logs were used to determine aquifer types and detection of hot water zones 15 to 120 m before drill penetration. INEL-1 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site in

405

Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

76) 76) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Second and third exploratory wells drilled Notes Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2, RRGE-2 drilled. During this period, a third well, RRGE-3 was also drilled and well production was tested. Down-hole data was obtained from RRGE-3. References Speake, J.L. (1 August 1976) Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion report Kunze, J.F. (1 October 1976) Geothermal R and D Project report for period April 1, 1976 to June 30, 1976

406

Geothermal reservoir technology research at the DOE Idaho Operations Office  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal reservoir technology research projects managed at the Department of Energy Idaho Falls Operations office (DOE-ID) account for a large portion of the Department of Energy funding for reservoir technology research (approximately 7 million dollars in FY-95). DOE-ID managed projects include industry coupled geothermal exploration drilling, cooperative research projects initiated through the Geothermal Technology Organization (GTO), and other geothermal reservoir technology research projects. A solicitation for cost-shared industry coupled drilling has been completed and one zward has been made in FY-95. Another solicitation for industry coupled drilling may be conducted in the spring of 1996. A separate geothermal research technology research, development and demonstration solicitation will result in multiple year awards over the next 2 years. The goals of these solicitations are to ensure competition for federal money and to get the Government and the geothermal industry the most useful information for their research dollars.

Creed, Bob

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

407

Geothermal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Overview Technologies Resources Market Data Geothermal Topics Data Resources Financing Permitting & Policy Links Geothermal Energy The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide a spectacular backdrop for a cooling tower array at the ORMAT Mammoth Geothermal Power Plant in Central California. Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth. A wide range of temperatures can be suitable for using geothermal energy, from room temperature to above 300° F.[1] This heat can be drawn from various depths, ranging from the shallow ground (the upper 10 feet beneath the surface of the Earth) that maintains a relatively constant temperature of approximately 50° to 60° F, to reservoirs of extremely hot water and steam located several miles deep into the Earth.[2][3]

408

Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume I. Review and analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The history of geothermal exploration in Hawaii is reviewed briefly. The nature and occurrences of geothermal resources are presented island by island. An overview of geothermal markets is presented. Other topies covered are: potential markets of the identified geothermal areas, well drilling technology, hydrothermal fluid transport, overland and submarine electrical transmission, community aspects of geothermal development, legal and policy issues associated with mineral and land ownership, logistics and infrastructure, legislation and permitting, land use controls, Regulation 8, Public Utilities Commission, political climate and environment, state plans, county plans, geothermal development risks, and business planning guidelines.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Microfossils from Cerro Prieto geothermal wells, Baja California, Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To aid in a paleoenvironmental and age reconstruction of the Cerro Prieto reservoir system, 59 samples of well cuttings were analyzed for microfossils. The cuttings were obtained at depths from 351 to 3495 m in 14 geothermal wells in the Cerro Prieto field, Baja California, Mexico. We found foraminifera in 6 samples, ostracodes in 19 samples, and nannoplankton as coccoliths in 24 samples. Other groups, such as molluscs, insects, fish skeletal parts, and plant material were occasionally present. Detailed interpretations are not possible at this time because of poor preservation of samples. This is primarily due to causes: dissolution by geothermal fluids that reach 350{sup 0}C, and the extensive mixing of filled Cretaceous forms (reworked from the Colorado Plateau region) with Tertiary species during drilling. Further studies of ostracodes and foraminifera from colder portions of the wells are needed. The abundant and well-preserved ostracodes indicate marine to brackish water environments that correspond, in part, to lagoonal or estuarine facies. The presence of the mid-Tertiary (15-My-old) marine foraminifera, Cassigerinela chipolensis, in wells M-11 and M-38, 350 to 500 m deep, is perplexing. These are not laboratory contaminates and, as yet, have not been found in the drilling mud. If further studies confirm their presence at Cerro Prieto, established ideas about the opening of the Gulf of California and about Pacific Coast mid-Tertiary history will need to be rewritten.

Cotton, M.L.; Vonder Haar, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Analyzing the dynamic behavior of downhole equipment during drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced geothermal drilling systems will require a bottom hole assembly (BHA) which utilizes sophisticated electronic and mechanical equipment to accomplish faster, more trouble free, smarter drilling. The bit-drill string/formation interaction during drilling imposes complex, intermittent dynamic loading on the downhole equipment. A finite element computer code, GEODYN, is being developed to allow analysis of the structural response of the downhole equipment during drilling and to simulate the drilling phenomena (i.e. penetration, direction, etc.). Phase 1 GEODYN, completed early in 1984, provides the capability to model the dynamic response of a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit interacting with a non-homogeneous formation. Succeeding development phases will allow inclusion of stabilizers and, eventually, the entire drill string in addition to facilitating drill ahead simulation.

Baird, J.A.; Caskey, B.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Geometry and material choices govern hard-rock drilling performance of PDC drag cutters.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has partnered with industry on a multifaceted, baseline experimental study that supports the development of improved drag cutters for advanced drill bits. Different nonstandard cutter lots were produced and subjected to laboratory tests that evaluated the influence of selected design and processing parameters on cutter loads, wear, and durability pertinent to the penetration of hard rock with mechanical properties representative of formations encountered in geothermal or deep oil/gas drilling environments. The focus was on cutters incorporating ultrahard PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) overlays (i.e., diamond tables) on tungsten-carbide substrates. Parameter variations included changes in cutter geometry, material composition, and processing conditions. Geometric variables were the diamond-table thickness, the cutting-edge profile, and the PDC/substrate interface configuration. Material and processing variables for the diamond table were, respectively, the diamond particle size and the sintering pressure applied during cutter fabrication. Complementary drop-impact, granite-log abrasion, linear cutting-force, and rotary-drilling tests examined the response of cutters from each lot. Substantial changes in behavior were observed from lot to lot, allowing the identification of features contributing major (factor of 10+) improvements in cutting performance for hard-rock applications. Recent field demonstrations highlight the advantages of employing enhanced cutter technology during challenging drilling operations.

Wise, Jack LeRoy

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Geothermal Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The first geothermal power generation in the world was started at Larderello, Italy in 1904. Then, New Zealand succeeded in the geothermal power generating country. These developments were then followed by the United States, Mexico, Japan and the Soviet Union, and at present, about 25 countries are utilizing geothermal power, or investigating geothermal resources.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Heat flow and geothermal potential of Kansas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The plan of the US Geological Survey and Kansas Geological Survey to drill four deep hydrologic tests in Kansas prompted a geothermal study in these wells. These wells were drilled through the Arbuckle Group to within a few feet of basement and two of the holes were deepened on into the basement and core samples collected of the basement rock. Because of the depth of the four holes and because of the fact that they have been cased through most of their depth and left undisturbed to reach temperature equilibrium, it is possible to get highly accurate, stable temperature measurements through the complete sedimentary section. In addition an extensive suite of geophysical logs were obtained for each of the holes (gamma-ray, travel time, density, neutron porosity, electric, etc.) and cuttings were collected at frequent intervals. In addition 5 other holes were logged as part of this study. For these holes cutting samples and geophysical logs are not available, but the additional holes offer useful supplementary information on the temperature regime in other parts of Kansas.

Blackwell, D.D.; Steele, J.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To Efficiently Exploit Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To Efficiently Exploit Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Drilling Systems Project Description This project proposes to develop a cost-effective microhole drilling and completion technology with the Flash Abrasive Slurry Jet (ASJ) system and optimize it to maximize the efficiency of fluid circulation and heat removal for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The proposed approach is expected to address the key obstacles that currently prevent EGS from becoming a technically feasible, commercially viable major contributor for electricity generation, namely: (1) reduce costs for drilling and well completion and (2) increase the volume of hot rock from which heat can be extracted.

415

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (27) Areas (8) Regions (0) Abstract: No abstract prepared. Author(s): Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 1999 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Acoustic Logs At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Acoustic Logs At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999)

416

Geothermal Energy Program overview  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained with the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost- effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy -- the heat of the Earth -- is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40% of the total US energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma ( the four types of geothermal energy) still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Occupational hazards associated with geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exposure to noise, H{sub 2}S, NH/sub 3/, hazardous chemicals and wastes, and heat are the major occupational health hazards associated with geothermal energy development - from drilling to power production. Exposures to these agents, although not unique to geothermal energy development, occur in situations peculiar to the industry. Reports show that occupational illnesses associated with geothermal energy development are increasing, while the corresponding rates from all power production are decreasing. Most of those related to geothermal energy result from the H{sub 2}S-abatement systems used in response to environmental pollution regulations.

Hahn, J.L.

1979-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The U.S. Navy's Geothermal Program Office (GPO) has been conducting geothermal exploration activities in the Camp Wilson area of Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twenty-nine Palms, CA, for almost two years. Work has included self-potential (SP) surveys, fault structure analyses using LiDAR surveys, and drilling and assessment of five (5) temperature-gradient holes. For several decades the GPO has worked

419

Geothermal Literature Review (Mcnitt, 1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mcnitt, 1978) Mcnitt, 1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review (Mcnitt, 1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes "A literature search found 46 geothermal fields for which reservoir temperatures in excess of 180degrees C have been proven by drilling and for which there is either drilling or geophysical data on which to base an estimate of field area. These fields are ranked according to area in Table 1 and their frequency distribution is shown in Fig. 2." "Sufficient information was found in the literature search to calculate an empirical

420

Testing, planning, and redrilling of Geothermal Test Hole GT-2, Phases IV and V. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Holes GT-2 and EE-1 comprise the two deep drill holes of the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Extraction Experiment. EE-1 had been directionally drilled to intersect a hydraulic fracture extending outward from near the bottom of GT-2, thus completing the underground circulation loop. After the drilling of EE-1, a 16-month period of experimental testing ensued to determine the characteristics of the reservoir. This period is designated as Phase IV and includes work done in GT-2 and EE-1. As a result of this testing, it was determined that parallel fracture zones existed at the bottoms of both holes, and that the impedance to flow between the holes was too high for a meaningful flow experiment. A plan was then adopted to directionally drill out of GT-2 at a depth of about 2600 m (8500 ft) to intersect the fracture zone near the bottom of EE-1 to create a better connection. The directional drilling strategy, cementing practices, bit selections, coring procedures, and logging results comprise the Phase V work.

Pettitt, R.A.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Image Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Image Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Image Logs Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis EGS potential of Coso Geothermal Region Notes During the second year of this project, wellbore logs and stress data were acquired in a new production well drilled in the Coso Geothermal Field, 38C-9. The image analysis results include the discrimination of natural from drilling induced fractures in wellbore image data, natural fracture characterization, and wellbore failure analysis References Sheridan, J.; Hickman, S.H. (1 January 2004) IN SITU STRESS,

422

Session 10: The Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico: The Experiences Gained from Its Exploration and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cerro Prieto case study demonstrated the value of a multidisciplinary effort for exploring and developing a geothermal field. There was no problem in recognizing the geothermal potential of the Cerro Prieto area because of the many obvious surface manifestations. However, the delineation of the geothermal reservoir at depth was not so straightforward. Wells drilled near the abundant surface manifestations only produced fluids of relatively low enthalpy. Later it was determined that these zones of high heat loss corresponded to discharge areas where faults and fractures allowed thermal fluids to leak to the surface, and not to the main geothermal reservoir. The early gravity and seismic refraction surveys provided important information on the general structure of the area. Unaware of the existence of a higher density zone of hydrothermally altered sediments capping the geothermal reservoir, CFE interpreted a basement horst in the western part of the field and hypothesized that the bounding faults were controlling the upward flow of thermal fluids. Attempting to penetrate the sedimentary column to reach the ''basement horst'', CFE discovered the {alpha} geothermal reservoir (in well M-5). The continuation of the geothermal aquifer (actually the {beta} reservoir) east of the original well field was later confirmed by a deep exploration well (M-53). The experience of Cerro Prieto showed the importance of chemical ratios, and geothermometers in general, in establishing the subsurface temperatures and fluid flow patterns. Fluid chemical and isotopic compositions have also been helpful to determine the origin of the fluids, fluid-production mechanisms and production induced effects on the reservoir.

Lippman, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.; Halfman, S.E.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

GRR/Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development 5-WA-a.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies Geothermal Act 78.60 RCW Geothermal Rules 332-17 WAC Triggers None specified In Washington geothermal drilling and well development are regulated by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WSDNR). Geothermal production wells and core holes deeper than 750ft require the developer go through the whole WSDNR permitting process (which requires a public hearing) and require that the developer complete the State Environmental

424

Geothermal Program Review XI: proceedings. Geothermal Energy - The Environmental Responsible Energy Technology for the Nineties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers pertaining to current research and development of geothermal energy in the USA. The seven sections of the document are: Overview, The Geysers, Exploration and Reservoir Characterization, Drilling, Energy Conversion, Advanced Systems, and Potpourri. The Overview presents current DOE energy policy and industry perspectives. Reservoir studies, injection, and seismic monitoring are reported for the geysers geothermal field. Aspects of geology, geochemistry and models of geothermal exploration are described. The Drilling section contains information on lost circulation, memory logging tools, and slim-hole drilling. Topics considered in energy conversion are efforts at NREL, condensation on turbines and geothermal materials. Advanced Systems include hot dry rock studies and Fenton Hill flow testing. The Potpourri section concludes the proceedings with reports on low-temperature resources, market analysis, brines, waste treatment biotechnology, and Bonneville Power Administration activities. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect, North-Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect, North-Central Nevada Abstract N/A Author U.S. Geological Survey Published Publisher Not Provided, 2009 Report Number 2009-1022 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect, North-Central Nevada Citation U.S. Geological Survey. 2009. Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect,

426

Drilling optimization using drilling simulator software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drilling operations management will face hurdles to reduce costs and increase performance, and to do this with less experience and organizational drilling capacity. A technology called Drilling Simulators Software has shown an extraordinary potential to improve the drilling performance and reduce risk and cost. Different approaches have been made to develop drilling-simulator software. The Virtual Experience Simulator, geological drilling logs, and reconstructed lithology are some of the most successful. The drilling simulations can run multiple scenarios quickly and then update plans with new data to improve the results. Its storage capacity for retaining field drilling experience and knowledge add value to the program. This research shows the results of using drilling simulator software called Drilling Optimization Simulator (DROPS) in the evaluation of the Aloctono block, in the Pirital field, eastern Venezuela. This formation is characterized by very complex geology, containing faulted restructures, large dips, and hard and abrasive rocks. The drilling performance in this section has a strong impact in the profitability of the field. A number of simulations using geological drilling logs and the concept of the learning curve defined the optimum drilling parameters for the block. The result shows that DROPS has the capability to simulate the drilling performance of the area with reasonable accuracy. Thus, it is possible to predict the drilling performance using different bits and the learning-curve concept to obtain optimum drilling parameters. All of these allow a comprehensive and effective cost and drilling optimization.

Salas Safe, Jose Gregorio

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Turnkey drilling  

SciTech Connect

The recent surge in the popularity of turnkey drilling has produced a number of questions about turnkey operations from both operators and contractors. The International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC) has no approved turnkey contract (although several of the member districts have printed one), leaving the parties participating in a turnkey well unsure of their responsibilities and obligations. Additionally, operators are finding liens filed against turnkey wells they thought were paid for. The term turnkey itself is often misunderstood and applied to a variety of guaranteed well commitments. Some turnkeys require the contractor to provide everything from location preparation to final production pipe or plugs. Others allow contingencies for stuck pipe, lost circulation, kicks and bad storms.

Pierce, D.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Slimhole Drilling, Logging, and Completion Technology - An Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using slim holes (diameter < 15 cm) for geothermal exploration and small-scale power production can produce significant cost savings compared to conventional rotary-drilling methods. In addition, data obtained from slim holes can be used to lower the risks and costs associated with the drilling and completion of large-diameter geothermal wells. As a prime contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Sandia National Laboratories has worked with industry since 1992 to develop and promote drilling, testing, and logging technology for slim holes. This paper describes the current status of work done both in-house and contracted to industry. It focuses on drilling technology, case histories of slimhole drilling projects, data collection and rig instrumentation, and high-temperature logging tools.