Sample records for deep geothermal drill

  1. Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well...

  2. Geothermal drilling technology update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glowka, D.A.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories conducts a comprehensive geothermal drilling research program for the US Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies. The program currently includes seven areas: lost circulation technology, hard-rock drill bit technology, high-temperature instrumentation, wireless data telemetry, slimhole drilling technology, Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) projects, and drilling systems studies. This paper describes the current status of the projects under way in each of these program areas.

  3. Deep Geothermal Drilling Using Millimeter Wave Technology Final Technical Research Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oglesby, Kenneth [Impact Technologies LLC; Woskov, Paul [MIT; Einstein, Herbert [MIT

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional drilling methods are very mature, but still have difficulty drilling through very deep,very hard and hot rocks for geothermal, nuclear waste entombment and oil and gas applications.This project demonstrated the capabilities of utilizing only high energy beams to drill such rocks,commonly called ‘Direct Energy Drilling’, which has been the dream of industry since the invention of the laser in the 1960s. A new region of the electromagnetic spectrum, millimeter wave (MMW) wavelengths at 30-300 giga-hertz (GHz) frequency was used to accomplish this feat. To demonstrate MMW beam drilling capabilities a lab bench waveguide delivery, monitoring and instrument system was designed, built and tested around an existing (but non-optimal) 28 GHz frequency, 10 kilowatt (kW) gyrotron. Low waveguide efficiency, plasma generation and reflected power challenges were overcome. Real-time monitoring of the drilling process was also demonstrated. Then the technical capability of using only high power intense millimeter waves to melt (with some vaporization) four different rock types (granite, basalt, sandstone, limestone) was demonstrated through 36 bench tests. Full bore drilling up to 2” diameter (size limited by the available MMW power) was demonstrated through granite and basalt samples. The project also demonstrated that MMW beam transmission losses through high temperature (260oC, 500oF), high pressure (34.5 MPa, 5000 psi) nitrogen gas was below the error range of the meter long path length test equipment and instruments utilized. To refine those transmission losses closer, to allow extrapolation to very great distances, will require a new test cell design and higher sensitivity instruments. All rock samples subjected to high peak temperature by MMW beams developed fractures due to thermal stresses, although the peak temperature was thermodynamically limited by radiative losses. Therefore, this limited drill rate and rock strength data were not able to be determined experimentally. New methods to encapsulate larger rock specimens must be developed and higher power intensities are needed to overcome these limitations. It was demonstrated that rock properties are affected (weakening then strengthened) by exposure to high temperatures. Since only MMW beams can economically reach rock temperatures of over 1650oC, even exceeding 3000oC, that can cause low viscosity melts or vaporization of rocks. Future encapsulated rock specimens must provide sufficiently large sizes of thermally impacted material to provide for the necessary rock strength, permeability and other analyzes required. Multiple MMW field systems, tools and methods for drilling and lining were identified. It was concluded that forcing a managed over-pressure drilling operation would overcome water influx and hot rock particulates handling problems, while simultaneously forming the conditions necessary to create a strong, sealing rock melt liner. Materials that contact hot rock surfaces were identified for further study. High power windows and gases for beam transmission under high pressures are critical paths for some of the MMW drilling systems. Straightness/ alignment can be a great benefit or a problem, especially if a MMW beam is transmitted through an existing, conventionally drilled bore.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EnergyGeothermalGeothermal Energy & Drilling Technology Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology Geothermal energy is an abundant energy resource that comes from tapping the natural...

  5. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- A study of geothermal drilling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A study of geothermal drilling and the production of electricity from geothermal energy Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search...

  6. Method of deep drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colgate, Stirling A. (4616 Ridgeway, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep drilling is facilitated by the following steps practiced separately or in any combination: (1) Periodically and sequentially fracturing zones adjacent the bottom of the bore hole with a thixotropic fastsetting fluid that is accepted into the fracture to overstress the zone, such fracturing and injection being periodic as a function of the progression of the drill. (2) Casing the bore hole with ductile, pre-annealed casing sections, each of which is run down through the previously set casing and swaged in situ to a diameter large enough to allow the next section to run down through it. (3) Drilling the bore hole using a drill string of a low density alloy and a high density drilling mud so that the drill string is partially floated.

  7. Geothermal drilling research in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G.; Maish, A.B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of this resource. The Department of Energy (DOE), Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE), is conducting an R and D program directed at reducing well costs through improvements in geothermal drilling and completion technology. This program includes R and D activities in high temperature drilling hardware, drilling fluids, lost circulation control methods, completion technology, and advanced drilling systems. An overview of the program is presented.

  8. Micro-earthquake monitoring and tri-axial drill-bit VSP in NEDO {open_quotes}Deep-seated geothermal reservoir survey{close_quotes} in Kakkonda, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, M.; Kondo, T.; Suzuki, I. [Japan Metals and Chemicals Co., Ltd., Iwate (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization has been drilling well WD-1 and employing micro-earthquake monitoring and tri-axial drill-bit VSP as the exploration techniques for the deep geothermal reservoir in the Kakkonda geothermal field, Japan. The results of them are as follows: (1) More than 1000 micro-earthquakes were observed from December 23, 1994 to July 1, 1995 in the Kakkonda geothermal field. Epicenters are distributed NW-SE from a macroscopic viewpoint; they distribute almost in the same areas as the fractured zone in the Kakkonda shallow reservoir as pointed out by Doi et al. (1988). They include three groups trending NE-SW. Depths of hypocenters range from the ground surface to about -2.5 km Sea level; they seem to be deeper in the western part. (2) Well WD-1 drilled into a swarm of micro-earthquakes at depths 1200 to 2200 m and encountered many lost circulations in those depths. However, these earthquakes occurred before well WD-1 reached those depths. (3) The bottom boundary of micro-earthquake distribution has a very similar shape to that of the top of the Kakkonda granite, though all of the micro-earthquakes are plotted 300 m shallower than the top of the granite. (4) The TAD VSP shows a possibility of existence of seismic reflectors at sea levels around -2.0, -2.2 and -2.6 km. These reflectors seem to correspond to the top of the Pre-Tertiary formation, the top of the Kakkonda granite and reflectors within the Kakkonda granite.

  9. Evaluation of Emerging Technology for Geothermal Drilling and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Evaluation of Emerging Technology for Geothermal Drilling and Logging Applications Evaluation of Emerging Technology for Geothermal Drilling and Logging Applications Evaluation of...

  10. Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

  11. Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, J.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

  12. Geothermal drilling in Cerro Prieto

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, B.; Sanchez, G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, 71 goethermal wells have been drilled in Cerro Prieto. The activity has been divided into several stages, and, in each stage, attempts have been made to correct deficiencies that were gradually detected. Some of these problems have been solved; others, such as those pertaining to well casing, cement, and cementing jobs, have persisted. The procedures for well completion - the most important aspect for the success of a well - that were based on conventional oil well criteria have been improved to meet the conditions of the geothermal reservoir. Several technical aspects that have improved should be further optimized, even though the resolutions are considered to be reasonably satisfactory. Particular attention has been given to the development of a high-temperature drilling fluid capable of being used in drilling through lost circulation zones. Conventional oil well drilling techniques have been used except where hole-sloughing is a problem. Sulfonate lignitic mud systems have been used with good results. When temperatures exceed 300/sup 0/C (572/sup 0/F), it has been necessary to use an organic polymer to stabilize the mud properties.

  13. Geothermal drilling research in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current research and development in the following areas are presented: geothermal roller cone bits, polycrystalline diamond compact bits, a continuous chain drill, drilling fluids test equipment, mud research, inert fluids, foam fluids, lost circulation control, completion technology, and advanced drilling and completion systems. (MHR)

  14. 2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project- and Ocean Drilling Program Services on behalf of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program September 2007 #12;#12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which in February 2007 contained

  15. Evaluation of Emerging Technology for Geothermal Drilling and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Evaluation of Emerging Technology for Geothermal Drilling and Logging Applications Georgia Bettin Doug Blankenship Presenter: Doug Blankenship Sandia National Laboratories...

  16. Performance of Deep Geothermal Energy Systems .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manikonda, Nikhil

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Geothermal energy is an important source of clean and renewable energy. This project deals with the study of deep geothermal power plants for the generation… (more)

  17. Use of Downhole Motors in Geothermal Drilling in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyle, D. E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the use of downhole motors in the Tiwi geothermal field in the Philippines, The discussion includes the application Of a Dyna-Drill with insert-type bits for drilling through surface alluvium. The economics of this type of drilling are compared to those of conventional rotary drilling. The paper also describes the use of a turbodrill that drills out scale as the well produces geothermal fluids.

  18. Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

  19. DEEP SEA DRILLING PROJECT DATA FILE DOCUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche&M University, as an account of work performed under the international Ocean Drilling Program which is managedDEEP SEA DRILLING PROJECT DATA FILE DOCUMENTS Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical

  20. Evaluation of Emerging Technology for Geothermal Drilling and Logging Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation of Emerging Technology for Geothermal Drilling and Logging Applications presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  1. Title 11 Alaska Administrative Code 87 Geothermal Drilling and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Drilling and Conservation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 11 Alaska Administrative Code 87...

  2. Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  3. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Vale exploratory slimhole: Drilling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Vale exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New...

  4. Google.org-Backed Potter Drilling Blazing Geothermal Trail |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recovery Act grant, Potter Drilling is developing innovative technologies aimed at making geothermal energy exploration and development cheaper, more efficient and widely...

  5. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA(DOI-BLM...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program...

  6. Geothermal Energy at Oslo Airport Gardermoen.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huuse, Karine Valle

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Rock Energy is a Norwegian company with a patented solution for drilling deep geothermal wells, for exploitation of deep geothermal energy from Hot Dry… (more)

  7. Glass Buttes Exploration and Drilling: 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review Presentation, Walsh, et al, Ormat

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zemach, Ezra

    Glass Buttes Exploration and Drilling: 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review Presentation, Walsh, et al, Ormat

  8. Use of an inert drilling fluid to control geothermal drill pipe corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caskey, B.C.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a geothermal drill pipe corrosion field test are presented. When a low-density drilling fluid was required for drilling a geothermal well because of an underpressured, fractured formation, two drilling fluids were alternatively used to compare drill pipe corrosion rates. The first fluid was an air-water mist with corrosion control chemicals. The other fluid was a nitrogen-water mist without added chemicals. The test was conducted during November 1980 at the Baca Location in northern New Mexico, USA. Data from corrosion rings, corrosion probes, fluid samples, and flow line instrumentation are plotted for the ten day test period. It is shown that the inert drilling fluid (nitrogen) reduced corrosion rates by more than an order of magnitude. Test setup and procedures are also discussed. Development of an on-site inert gas generator could reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control chemical costs.

  9. Georgia Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Georgia's Oil and Gas and Deep Drilling Act regulates oil and gas drilling activities to provide protection of underground freshwater supplies and certain "environmentally sensitive" areas. The...

  10. Impact of common problems in geothermal drilling and completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems that arise in geothermal drilling and completion account for a significant portion of geothermal well costs. In order to evaluate new technologies for combatting these problems, the relative frequencies and severities of different problems have been estimated. The estimates were based on both subjective judgements and analysis of available drilling records. The most common problems include lost circulation, stuck pipe and cementing, and their impact is to increase well cost by an average of at least 15%.

  11. Recommendations of the workshop on advanced geothermal drilling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glowka, D.A.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, Sandia National Laboratories convened a group of drilling experts in Berkeley, CA, on April 15-16, 1997, to discuss advanced geothermal drilling systems. The objective of the workshop was to develop one or more conceptual designs for an advanced geothermal drilling system that meets all of the criteria necessary to drill a model geothermal well. The drilling process was divided into ten essential functions. Each function was examined, and discussions were held on the conventional methods used to accomplish each function and the problems commonly encountered. Alternative methods of performing each function were then listed and evaluated by the group. Alternative methods considered feasible or at least worth further investigation were identified, while methods considered impractical or not potentially cost-saving were eliminated from further discussion. This report summarizes the recommendations of the workshop participants. For each of the ten functions, the conventional methods, common problems, and recommended alternative technologies and methods are listed. Each recommended alternative is discussed, and a description is given of the process by which this information will be used by the U.S. DOE to develop an advanced geothermal drilling research program.

  12. Deep-hole drilling Fruit Flies & Zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yi

    surface to purify air, employing existing technology in a new way. It is the brainchild of artistFEATURE Deep-hole drilling Fruit Flies & Zebrafish Björk FEATURE Academics & Industry: ResearchIScOvER mAGAZInE discover@sheffield.ac.uk Research and Innovation Services University of Sheffield New

  13. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S. G.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the timely development of geothermal resources in the US. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a development program aimed at reducing well costs through improvements in the technology used to drill and complete geothermal wells. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been selected to manage this program for DOE/DGE. Based on analyses of existing well costs, cost reduction goals have been set for the program. These are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987. To meet these goals, technology development in a wide range of areas is required. The near-term goal will be approached by improvements in conventional, rotary drilling technology. The long-term goal will require the development of an advanced drilling and completion system. Currently, the program is emphasizing activities directed at the near-term cost reduction goal, but increased emphasis on advanced system development is anticipated as time progresses. The program is structured into six sub-elements: Drilling Hardware, Drilling Fluids, Completion Technology, Lost Circulation Control Methods, Advanced Drilling Systems, and Supporting Technology. Technology development in each of these areas is conducted primarily through contracts with private industries and universities. Some projects are conducted internally by Sandia. This report describes the program, status, and results of ongoing R and D within the program for the 1980 fiscal year.

  14. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    POWER GENERATION PLANT GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT Project objectives: Drilling a deep geothermal well on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus, Klamath Falls,...

  15. Exploration and drilling for geothermal heat in the Capital District, New York. Volume 4. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Capital District area of New York was explored to determine the nature of a hydrothermal geothermal system. The chemistry of subsurface water and gas, the variation in gravity, magnetism, seismicity, and temperature gradients were determined. Water and gas analyses and temperature gradient measurements indicate the existence of a geothermal system located under an area from Ballston Spa, southward to Altamont, and eastward toward Albany. Gravimetric and magnetic surveys provided little useful data but microseismic activity in the Altamont area may be significant. Eight wells about 400 feet deep, one 600 feet and one 2232 feet were drilled and tested for geothermal potential. The highest temperature gradients, most unusual water chemistries, and greatest carbon dioxide exhalations were observed in the vicinity of the Saratoga and McGregor faults between Saratoga Springs and Schenectady, New York, suggesting some fault control over the geothermal system. Depths to the warm fluids within the system range from 500 meters (Ballston Spa) to 2 kilometers (Albany).

  16. Exploration and drilling for geothermal heat in the Capital District, New York. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Capital District area of New York was explored to determine the nature of a hydrothermal geothermal system. The chemistry of subsurface water and gas, the variation in gravity, magnetism, seismicity, and temperature gradients were determined. Water and gas analyses and temperature gradient measurements indicate the existence of a geothermal system located under an area from Ballston Spa, southward to Altamont, and eastware toward Albany. Gravimetric and magnetic surveys provided little useful data but microseismic activity in the Altamont area may be significant. Eight wells about 400 feet deep, one 600 feet and one 2232 feet were drilled and tested for geothermal potential. The highest temperature gradients, most unusual water chemistries, and greatest carbon dioxide exhalations were observed in the vicinity of the Saratoga and McGregor faults between Saratoga Springs and Schenectady, New York, suggesting some fault control over the geothermal system. Depths to the warm fluids within the system range from 500 meters (Ballston Spa) to 2 kilometers (Albany).

  17. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

  18. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, January 1981-March 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods as they apply to advanced drilling systems.

  19. Drilling, completing, and maintaining geothermal wells in Baca, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pye, S.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 55-MWe power plant is planned for development in the Baca location in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. Union Geothermal has contracted to provide the steam for the power plant. This paper uses Baca Well No. 13 as a case history to describe the drilling methods, casing program, cementing program, and completion methods used by Union. The discussion includes aerated-water. Lost circulation control in mud drilling and its effort on the subsequent casing cementing program are discussed. The paper also includes a case history of scale removal methods used in Baca Well No. 11, including drilling the scale out with a turbodrill and attempts at chemical inhibition.

  20. Geothermal drilling problems and their impact on cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical data are presented that demonstrate the significance of unexpected problems. In extreme cases, trouble costs are the largest component of well costs or severe troubles can lead to abandonment of a hole. Drilling experiences from US geothermal areas are used to analyze the frequency and severity of various problems. In addition, average trouble costs are estimated based on this analysis and the relationship between trouble and depth is discussed. The most frequent drilling and completion problem in geothermal wells is lost circulation. This is especially true for resources in underpressured, fractured formations. Serious loss of circulation can occur during drilling - because of this, the producing portions of many wells are drilled with air or aerated drilling fluid and the resulting corrosion/erosion problems are tolerated - but it can also affect the cementing of well casing. Problems in bonding the casing to the formation result from many other causes as well, and are common in geothermal wells. Good bonds are essential because of the possibility of casing collapse due to thermal cycling during the life of the well. Several other problems are identified and their impacts are quantified and discussed.

  1. Thermo2Pro: Knowledge dissemination for deep geothermal exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1/12 Thermo2Pro: Knowledge dissemination for deep geothermal exploration Philippe Calcagno1 territoires, Voreppe, France # now at Kitware, Villeurbanne, France p.calcagno@brgm.fr Keywords: Deep geothermal exploration, information system, Web tool, sedimentary basin, dissemination. Abstract

  2. Exploration geothermal gradient drilling, Platanares, Honduras, Central America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, S.J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Ruefenacht, H.D.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.; Ramos, N.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a review and summary of the core drilling operations component of the Honduras Geothermal Resource Development Project at the Platanares geothermal prospect in Honduras, Central America. Three intermediate depth (428 to 679 m) coreholes are the first continuously cored geothermal exploration boreholes in Honduras. These coring operations are part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) effort funded by the Agency for International Development (AID) and implemented by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) in cooperation with the Empresa Nacional de Energia Electrica (ENEE) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). This report emphasizes coring operations with reference to the stratigraphy, thermal gradient, and flow test data of the boreholes. The primary objectives of this coring effort were (1) to obtain quantitative information on the temperature distribution as a function of depth, (2) to recover fluids associated with the geothermal reservoir, (3) to recover 75% or better core from the subsurface rock units, and (4) to drill into the subsurface rock as deeply as possible in order to get information on potential reservoir rocks, fracture density, permeabilities, and alteration histories of the rock units beneath the site. The three exploration coreholes drilled to depths of 650, 428 and 679 m, respectively, encountered several hot water entries. Coring operations and associated testing began in mid-October 1986 and were completed at the end of June 1987.

  3. Unique aspects of drilling and completing hot-dry-rock geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carden, R.S.; Nicholson, R.W.; Pettitt, R.A.; Rowley, J.C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling operations at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site have led to numerous developments needed to solve the problems caused by a very harsh downhole environment. A pair of deep wells were drilled to approximately 15,000 ft (4.6 km); formation temperatures were in excess of 600/sup 0/F (300/sup 0/C). The wells were directionally drilled, inclined at 35/sup 0/, one above the other, in a direction orthogonal to the least principal stress field. The well site is near the flank of a young silicic composite volcano in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. The completion of this pair of wells is unique in reservoir development. The lower well was planned as a cold water injector which will be cooled by the introduced water from the static geothermal gradient to about 80/sup 0/F (25/sup 0/C). The upper well will be heated during production to over 500/sup 0/F (250/sup 0/C). The well pair is designed to perform as a closed loop heat-extraction system connected by hydraulic fractures with a vertical spacing of 1200 ft between the wells. These conditions strongly constrain the drilling technique, casing design, cement formulation, and cementing operations.

  4. Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Core Hole Drilling And...

  5. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  6. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  7. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

  8. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  9. Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

  10. Alpine Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300Algoil Jump to:Information332InformationCore Complex Of TheDrilling

  11. Geothermal Energy for New Mexico: Assessment of Potential and Exploratory Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Person, Lara Owens, James Witcher

    2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the drilling operations and subsequent interpretation of thermal and geochemical data from the New Mexico Tech NMT-2GT (OSE RG- 05276 POD) test well. This slim hole was drilled along an elongate heat-flow anomaly at the base of the Socorro Mountains to better assess the geothermal resource potential (Socorro Peak geothermal system) on the western side of the New Mexico Tech campus in Socorro, New Mexico. The reservoir depth, hydraulic properties, temperature and chemistry were unknown prior to drilling. The purpose of the NMT-2GT (OSE RG-05276 POD) well was to explore the feasibility of providing geothermal fluids for a proposed district space heating system on the New Mexico Tech campus. With DOE cost over runs funds we completed NMT-2GT to a depth of 1102 feet at the Woods Tunnel drill site. Temperatures were nearly constant (41 oC ) between a depth of 400�������������������������������¢����������������������������������������������������������������1102 feet. Above this isothermal zone, a strong temperature gradient was observed (210 oC /km) beneath the water table consistent with vertical convective heat transfer. The existence of a groundwater upflow zone was further supported by measured vertical hydraulic head measurements which varied between about 258 feet at the water table to 155 feet at a depth of 1102 feet yielding a vertical hydraulic a gradient of about 0.1. If the upflow zone is 1 km deep, then a vertical flow rate is about 0.6 m/yr could have produced the observed curvature in the thermal profile. This would suggest that the deep bedrock permeability is about 20 mD. This is much lower than the permeability measured in a specific capacity aquifer test completed in 2009 within fracture Paleozoic sandstones near the water table (3000 D). Flow rates measured during drilling were measured using a v-notch weir. Flow rates were consistently around 1000 gpm. While the temperatures are lower than we had anticipated, this geothermal resource can still be developed to heat the NM Tech campus using heat pump technology.

  12. Geopressured geothermal drilling and completions technology development needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maish, A.B.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geopressured geothermal formations found in the Texas and Louisiana gulf coast region and elsewhere have the potential to supply large quantities of energy in the form of natural gas and warm brine (200 to 300/sup 0/F). Advances are needed, however, in hardware technology, well design technology, and drilling and completion practices to enable production and testing of exploratory wells and to enable economic production of the resource should further development be warranted. This report identifies needed technology for drilling and completing geopressured geothermal source and reinjection wells to reduce the cost and to accelerate commercial recovery of this resource. A comprehensive prioritized list of tasks to develop necessary technology has been prepared. Tasks listed in this report address a wide range of technology needs including new diagnostic techniques, control technologies, hardware, instrumentation, operational procedure guidelines and further research to define failure modes and control techniques. Tasks are organized into the functional areas of well design, drilling, casing installation, cementing, completions, logging, brine reinjection and workovers.

  13. Evaluation of aqueous-foam surfactants for geothermal drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rand, P.B.; Montoya, O.J.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous foams are potentially useful drilling and cleanout fluids for geothermal applications. Successful use of foams requires surfactants (foaming agents) that can survive in the high-temperature geothermal environment. In this study, solutions of aqueous-foam-forming surfactants have been exposed to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) and 310/sup 0/C (590/sup 0/F) in various chemical environments to determine if they can survive and make foams after exposure. Comparison of foams before and after exposure and the change in solution pH were used to evaluate their performance. Controlled liquid-volume-fraction foams, made in a packed-bed foam generator, were used for all tests. These tests have shown that many commercially available surfactants can survive short high-temperature cycles in mild acids, mild bases, and salt solutions as evidenced by their ability to make foams after exposure to high temperatures.

  14. Phase 2 and 3 Slim Hole Drilling and Testing at the Lake City, California Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell; Joe Moore; Colin Goranson

    2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    During Phases 2 and 3 of the Lake City GRED II project two slim holes were cored to depths of 1728 and 4727 ft. Injection and production tests with temperature and pressure logging were performed on the OH-1 and LCSH-5 core holes. OH-1 was permanently modified by cementing an NQ tubing string in place below a depth of 947 ft. The LCSH-1a hole was drilled in Quaternary blue clay to a depth of 1727 ft and reached a temperature of 193 oF at a depth of 1649 ft. This hole failed to find evidence of a shallow geothermal system east of the Mud Volcano but the conductive temperature profile indicates temperatures near 325 oF could be present below depth of 4000 ft. The LCSH-5 hole was drilled to a depth of 4727 ft and encountered a significant shallow permeability between depths of 1443 and 1923 ft and below 3955 ft. LCSH-5 drilled impermeable Quaternary fanglomerate to a depth of 1270 ft. Below 1270 ft the rocks consist primarily of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The most significant formation deep in LCSH-5 appears to be a series of poikoilitic mafic lava flows below a depth of 4244 ft that host the major deep permeable fracture encountered. The maximum static temperature deep in LCSH-5 is 323 oF and the maximum flowing temperature is 329 oF. This hole extended the known length of the geothermal system by ¾ of a mile toward the north and is located over ½ mile north of the northernmost hot spring. The OH-1 hole was briefly flow tested prior to cementing the NQ rods in place. This flow test confirmed the zone at 947 ft is the dominant permeability in the hole. The waters produced during testing of OH-1 and LCSH-5 are generally intermediate in character between the deep geothermal water produced by the Phipps #2 well and the thermal springs. Geothermometers applied to deeper fluids tend to predict higher subsurface temperatures with the maximum being 382 oF from the Phipps #2 well. The Lake City geothermal system can be viewed as having shallow (elevation > 4000 ft and temperatures of 270 to 310 oF), intermediate (elevation 2800 to 3700 ft and temperatures 270 to 320 oF ) and deep (elevations < 1000 ft and temperatures 323 to 337 oF) components. In the south part of the field, near Phipps #2 the shallow and deep components are present. In the central part of the field, near OH-1 the shallow and intermediate components are present and presumably the deep component is also present. In the north part of the field, the intermediate and deep components are present. Most or all of the fractures in the core have dips between 45 degrees and vertical and no strong stratigraphic control on the resource has yet been demonstrated. Conceptually, the Lake City geothermal resource seems to be located along the north-south trending range front in a relatively wide zone of fractured rock. The individual fractures do not seem to be associated with any readily identifiable fault. In fact, no major hydraulically conductive faults were identified by the core drilling.

  15. Safety Measures a hinder for Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey Wind Farm(CTIhinder for Geothermal Drilling

  16. An advanced geothermal drilling system: Component options and limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, J. [Pajarito Enterprises, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Saito, Seiji [JMC Geothermal Division, Tokyo (Japan); Long, R.C. [Department of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The historical developments of drilling technology for geothermal resources have followed traditional incremental trends. The local expertise and rigs were adapted from existing drill rigs used for mining, civil, and water well projects. In areas with hydrocarbon resources, petroleum drilling hardware has been adapted; and in other countries, these units were imported as depth requirements increased and more robust derricks and downhole tools were needed. This ad hoc approach has provided adequate exploration and production wells. In contrast to the incremental improvements in petroleum rotary drilling system components this paper reviews a new, purpose-developed system that would solve the known major problems by design. Performance goals of 4 km (12,000 ft.) depth, 400 C, (750 F) and penetration rates greater than 8 m/h (25 ft/h) were selected. This advanced system was reviewed extensively and estimates of perhaps 30 to 60% cost savings were projected, depending on the assumed effectiveness and performance improvements provided. This paper continues the design and feasibility study and presents some of the component and sub-system details developed thus far.

  17. The objectives for deep scientific drilling in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The western area of the United Stated contains three young silicic calderas, all of which contain attractive targets for scientific drilling. Of the three, the Yellowstone caldera complex is the largest, has the most intense geothermal anomalies, and is the most seismically active. On the basis of scientific objectives alone. it is easily the first choice for investigating active hydrothermal processes. This report briefly reviews what is known about the geology of Yellowstone National Park and highlights unique information that could be acquired by research drilling only in Yellowstone. However, it is not the purpose of this report to recommend specific drill sites or to put forth a specific drilling proposal. 175 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Potential impacts of artificial intelligence expert systems on geothermal well drilling costs:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satrape, J.V.

    1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geothermal research Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has as one of its goals to reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells by 25 percent. To attain this goal, DOE continuously evaluates new technologies to determine their potential in contributing to the Program. One such technology is artifical intelligence (AI), a branch of computer science that, in recent years, has begun to impact the marketplace in a number of fields. Expert systems techniques can (and in some cases, already have) been applied to develop computer-based ''advisors'' to assist drilling personnel in areas such as designing mud systems, casing plans, and cement programs, optimizing drill bit selection and bottom hole asssembly (BHA) design, and alleviating lost circulation, stuck pipe, fishing, and cement problems. Intelligent machines with sensor and/or robotic directly linked to AI systems, have potential applications in areas of bit control, rig hydraulics, pipe handling, and pipe inspection. Using a well costing spreadsheet, the potential savings that could be attributed to each of these systems was calculated for three base cases: a dry steam well at The Geysers, a medium-depth Imerial Valley well, and a deep Imperial Valley well. Based on the average potential savings to be realized, expert systems for handling lost circulations problems and for BHA design are the most likely to produce significant results. Automated bit control and rig hydraulics also exhibit high potential savings, but these savings are extremely sensitive to the assumptions of improved drilling efficiency and the cost of these sytems at the rig. 50 refs., 19 figs., 17 tabs.

  19. U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at...

  20. Hydrothermal spallation drilling and advanced energy conversion technologies for Engineered Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustine, Chad R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to study the various factors affecting the economic and technical feasibility of Engineered Geothermal Systems, with a special emphasis on advanced drilling technologies. The first part of ...

  1. Systems study of drilling for installation of geothermal heat pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, J.T.; Sullivan, W.N.; Jacobson, R.D.; Pierce, K.G.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal, or ground-source, heat pumps (GHP) are much more efficient than air-source units such as conventional air conditioners. A major obstacle to their use is the relatively high initial cost of installing the heat-exchange loops into the ground. In an effort to identify drivers which influence installation cost, a number of site visits were made during 1996 to assess the state-of-the-art in drilling for GHP loop installation. As an aid to quantifying the effect of various drilling-process improvements, we constructed a spread-sheet based on estimated time and material costs for all the activities required in a typical loop-field installation. By substituting different (improved) values into specific activity costs, the effect on total project costs can be easily seen. This report contains brief descriptions of the site visits, key points learned during the visits, copies of the spread-sheet, recommendations for further work, and sample results from sensitivity analysis using the spread-sheet.

  2. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Deep Geothermal Drilling Using Millimeter

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite--FOR IMMEDIATEDOEFinal REducationalChapterWave

  3. Drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells in an H/sub 2/S environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dosch, M.W.; Hodgson, S.F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following subjects are covered: facts about hydrogen sulfides; drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells; detection devices and protective equipment; hazard levels and safety procedures; first aid; and H/sub 2/S in California oil, gas, and geothermal fields. (MHR)

  4. Investigation of the feasibility of deep microborehole drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreesen, D.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cohen, J.H. [Maurer Engineering, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in sensor technology, microelectronics, and telemetry technology make it feasible to produce miniature wellbore logging tools and instrumentation. Microboreholes are proposed for subterranean telemetry installations, exploration, reservoir definition, and reservoir monitoring this assumes that very small diameter bores can be produced for significantly lower cost using very small rigs. A microborehole production concept based on small diameter hydraulic or pneumatic powered mechanical drilling, assemblies deployed on coiled tubing is introduced. The concept is evaluated using, basic mechanics and hydraulics, published theories on rock drilling, and commercial simulations. Small commercial drill bits and hydraulic motors were selected for laboratory scale demonstrations. The feasibility of drilling deep, directional, one to two-inch diameter microboreholes has not been challenged by the results to date. Shallow field testing of prototype systems is needed to continue the feasibility investigation.

  5. Directional drilling equipment and techniques for deep hot granite wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brittenham, T.L.; Sursen, G.; Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.; Williams, R.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional directional drilling technology has been extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot dry Rock (HDR) experimental site. Completing the first of a two-wellbore HDR system has resulted in the definition of operational limitations of many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-2), to a measured depth of 15,300 ft (4.7 km) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 530/sup 0/F (275/sup 0/C) required the development of a new high temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 8500 ft (2.6 km) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35/sup 0/ from the vertical at a controlled azimuthal orientation.

  6. United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nv Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  7. Technical and economic evaluation of selected compact drill rigs for drilling 10,000 foot geothermal production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huttrer, G.W. [Geothermal Management Company, Inc., Frisco, CO (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the investigation and evaluation of several {open_quotes}compact{close_quotes} drill rigs which could be used for drilling geothermal production wells. Use of these smaller rigs would save money by reducing mobilization costs, fuel consumption, crew sizes, and environmental impact. Advantages and disadvantages of currently-manufactured rigs are identified, and desirable characteristics for the {open_quotes}ideal{close_quotes} compact rig are defined. The report includes a detailed cost estimate of a specific rig, and an evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio of using this rig. Industry contacts for further information are given.

  8. GFDI COLLOQUIUM "Use of Mineral vs. Polymer Drilling Fluids in Deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    GFDI COLLOQUIUM Title "Use of Mineral vs. Polymer Drilling Fluids in Deep Foundation Construction. Refreshments will be served at 1:30M ABSTRACT: In deep foundation design, drilled shafts (also referred to as bored piles or drilled caissons) are preferred because of their large load capacities and greater

  9. A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

    2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10’s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is “mined”. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100’s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

  10. Planning and drilling geothermal energy extraction hole EE-2: a precisely oriented and deviated hole in hot granitic rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helmick, C.; Koczan, S.; Pettitt, R.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the preceding work (Phase I) of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Project at Fenton Hill, two holes were drilled to a depth of nearly 3048 m (10,000 ft) and connected by a vertical hydraulic fracture. In this phase, water was pumped through the underground reservoir for approximately 417 days, producing an energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t). Energy Extraction Hole No. 2 (EE-2) is the first of two deep holes that will be used in the Engineering-Resource Development System (Phase II) of the ongoing HDR Project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This phase of the work consists of drilling two parallel boreholes, inclined in their lower, open-hole sections at 35/sup 0/ to the vertical and separated by a vertical distance of 366 m (1200 ft) between the inclined parts of the drill holes. The holes will be connected by a series of vertical, hydraulically produced fractures in the Precambrian granitic rock complex. EE-2 was drilled to a depth of 4660 m (15,289 ft), where the bottom-hole temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F). Directional drilling techniques were used to control the azimuth and deviation of the hole. Upgrading of the temperature capability of existing hardware, and development of new equipment was necessary to complete the drilling of the hole in the extremely hot, hard, and abrasive granitic formation. The drilling history and the problems with bits, directional tools, tubular goods, cementing, and logging are described. A discussion of the problems and recommendations for overcoming them are also presented.

  11. Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

  12. Precision directional drilling of hot-dry-rock geothermal production well EE-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carden, R.S.; Rowley, J.C.; Helmick, C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deviated directional drilling of the hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal production well EE-3 (Energy Extraction No. 3) was successfully completed on August 1981. The injection well, EE-2, previously had been drilled with its lower part at an inclination of 35/sup 0/ to the vertical. It reached an on-line depth of 15,292 feet and its bottom-hole temperature was 608/sup 0/F (320/sup 0/C). The production well EE-3 was required to be drilled 1200 feet (370 m) above and parallel to the injection well. This necessitated high precision, controlled-trajectory directional drilling operations. The directional drilling of EE-3 was accomplished within the required tolerances at a depth of 13,933 feet and a bottom-hole temperature of 580/sup 0/F (280/sup 0/C).

  13. Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 5 - System Evaluations. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is aimed at decreasing the costs and increasing the efficiency of drilling gas wells in excess of 15,000 feet. This volume presents a summary of an evaluation of various drilling techniques. Drilling solutions were compared quantitatively against typical penetration rates derived from conventional systems. A qualitative analysis measured the impact of a proposed system on the drilling industry. The evaluations determined that the best candidates f o r improving the speed and efficiency of drilling deep gas wells include: PDC/TSD bits, slim-hole drilling, roller-cone bits, downhole motors, top-driven systems, and coiled-tubing drilling.

  14. Failure mechanisms of polycrystalline diamond compact drill bits in geothermal environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, E.R.; Pope, L.E.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past few years the interest in polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drill bits has grown proportionately with their successful use in drilling oil and gas wells in the North Sea and the United States. This keen interest led to a research program at Sandia to develop PDC drill bits suitable for the severe drilling conditions encountered in geothermal fields. Recently, three different PDC drill bits were tested using either air or mud drilling fluids: one in the laboratory with hot air, one in the Geysers field with air, and one in the Geysers field with mud. All three tests were unsuccessful due to failure of the braze joint used to attach the PDC drill blanks to the tungsten carbide studs. A post-mortem failure analysis of the defective cutters identified three major failure mechanisms: peripheral nonbonding caused by braze oxidation during the brazing step, nonbonding between PDC drill blanks and the braze due to contamination prior to brazing, and hot shortness. No evidence was found to suggest that the braze failures in the Geysers field tests were caused by frictional heating. In addition, inspection of the PDC/stud cutter assemblies using ultrasonic techniques was found to be ineffective for detecting the presence of hot shortness in the braze joint.

  15. The influence of geothermal sources on deep ocean temperature, salinity, and flow fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speer, Kevin G. (Kevin George)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a study of the effect of geothermal sources on the deep circulation, temperature and salinity fields. In Chapter 1 background material is given on the strength and distribution of geothermal heating. In ...

  16. Wear mechanisms for polycrystalline-diamond compacts as utilized for drilling in geothermal environments. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, L.E. Jr.; Sogoian, G.C.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work, which was performed in the period from 12/6/79 to 9/30/81 included: (1) rock cutting experiments with single point polycrystalline sintered diamond compact (PDC) cutters to quantitatively determine cutter wear rates and identify wear modes, (2) PDC rock cutting experiments to measure temperatures developed and examine the effects of tool wear, cutting parameters and coolant flow rates on temperature generation, (3) assisting in performing full scale laboratory drilling experiments with PDC bits, using preheated air to simulate geothermal drilling conditions, and in analyzing and reporting the experimental results, and (4) acting in a consulting role with the purpose of establishing design specifications for geothermal hard matrix PDC bits to be procured by Sandia Laboratories for test purposes.

  17. Recent drilling activities at the earth power resources Tuscarora geothermal power project's hot sulphur springs lease area.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goranson, Colin

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by at least 6,000 feet long with up to 1,700 feet of vertical offset. The well (HSS-2) was successfully drilled through a shallow thick sequence of altered Tertiary Volcanic where previous exploration wells had severe hole-caving problems. The ''tight-hole'' drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to reduce Smectite-type clay swelling problems. Core from the 330 F fractured geothermal reservoir system at depths of 2,950 feet indicated 30% Smectite type clays existed in a fault-gouge zone where total loss of circulation occurred during coring. Smectite-type clays are not typically expected at temperatures above 300 F. The fracture zone at 2,950 feet exhibited a skin-damage during injection testing suggesting that the drilling fluids may have caused clay swelling and subsequent geothermal reservoir formation damage. The recent well drilling experiences indicate that drilling problems in the shallow clays at Hot Sulphur Springs can be reduced. In addition, average penetration rates through the caprock system can be on the order of 25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production formation drilling will depend on finding drilling fluids that will not cause formation damage in the Smectite-rich fractured geothermal reservoir system. Information obtained at Hot Sulphur Springs may apply to other geothermal systems developed in volcanic settings.

  18. The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to:InformationThe Potomac EdisonEnergyGeothermal

  19. Deep geothermal reservoirs evolution: from a modeling perspective BRGM, 3 Avenue Claude Guillemin, BP 36009 -45060 Orlans Cedex 2, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Deep geothermal reservoirs evolution: from a modeling perspective S. Lopez1 1 BRGM, 3 Avenue Claude deep geothermal reservoirs evolution and management based on examples ranging from direct use of geothermal heat to geothermal electricity production. We will try to focus on French experiences

  20. Closed chamber drill stem test detects deep damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkstresser, M.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Closed chamber drill stem tests are a relatively new development in drill stem testing. The technique was originated to reduce operational and safety problems caused by hydrate formation during conventional drill stem tests in the Canadian Arctic. During the 1970s, closed chamber testing found widespread acceptance in Canada and is now becoming more widely used in the US. The closed chamber testing method is used in conjunction with conventional drill stem testing tools and equipment. The only additional requirement is a means of continuously monitoring pressure at the surface; therefore, the method can be conducted anywhere conventional drill stem testing equipment is available. The advantage and disadvantages of the system are discussed.

  1. Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4) Analysis of Phase 1 data indicated that there is decreased specific energy as the rotational speed increases; (5) Technology transfer, as part of Phase 1, was accomplished with technical presentations to the industry (see Judzis, Boucher, McCammon, and Black); (6) TerraTek prepared a design concept for the high speed drilling test stand, which was planned around the proposed high speed mud motor concept. Alternative drives for the test stand were explored; a high speed hydraulic motor concept was finally used; (7) The high speed system was modified to accommodate larger drill bits than originally planned; (8) Prototype mud turbine motors and the high speed test stand were used to drive the drill bits at high speed; (9) Three different rock types were used during the testing: Sierra White granite, Crab Orchard sandstone, and Colton sandstone. The drill bits used included diamond impregnated bits, a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit, a thermally stable PDC (TSP) bit, and a hybrid TSP and natural diamond bit; and (10) The drill bits were run at rotary speeds up to 5500 rpm and weight on bit (WOB) to 8000 lbf. During Phase 2, the ROP as measured in depth of cut per bit revolution generally increased with increased WOB. The performance was mixed with increased rotary speed, with the depth cut with the impregnated drill bit generally increasing and the TSP and hybrid TSP drill bits generally decreasing. The ROP in ft/hr generally increased with all bits with increased WOB and rotary speed. The mechanical specific energy generally improved (decreased) with increased WOB and was mixed with increased rotary speed.

  2. Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnis Judzis; Alan Black; Homer Robertson

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the ultra-high rotary speed drilling system is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm--usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document details the progress to date on the program entitled ''Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling'' for the period starting 1 October 2004 through 30 September 2005. Additionally, research activity from 1 October 2005 through 28 February 2006 is included in this report: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance. (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments. Some difficulties continue in obtaining ultra-high speed motors. Improvements have been made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs have been provided to vendors for production. A more consistent product is required to minimize the differences in bit performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program has been completed. (3) TerraTek is progressing through Task 3 ''Small-scale cutting performance tests''. (4) Significant testing has been performed on nine different rocks. (5) Bit balling has been observed on some rock and seems to be more pronounces at higher rotational speeds. (6) Preliminary analysis of data has been completed and indicates that decreased specific energy is required as the rotational speed increases (Task 4). This data analysis has been used to direct the efforts of the final testing for Phase I (Task 5). (7) Technology transfer (Task 6) has begun with technical presentations to the industry (see Judzis).

  3. Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision has been approved forDaytonCounty,

  4. Drilling deep through the ocean crust into the upper mantle Benot Ildefonse (1) and Mission Moho proponents (2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Drilling deep through the ocean crust into the upper mantle Benoît Ildefonse (1) and Mission Moho the inventory of global thermal, chemical and associated biological fluxes. Drilling an ultra-deep hole, and into the uppermost mantle is a long-standing goal of scientific ocean drilling; it remains critical to answer many

  5. SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high (greater than 10,000 rpm) rotational speeds. The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development and test results that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with rigs having a smaller footprint to be more mobile. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The project draws on TerraTek results submitted to NASA's ''Drilling on Mars'' program. The objective of that program was to demonstrate miniaturization of a robust and mobile drilling system that expends small amounts of energy. TerraTek successfully tested ultrahigh speed ({approx}40,000 rpm) small kerf diamond coring. Adaptation to the oilfield will require innovative bit designs for full hole drilling or continuous coring and the eventual development of downhole ultra-high speed drives. For domestic operations involving hard rock and deep oil and gas plays, improvements in penetration rates is an opportunity to reduce well costs and make viable certain field developments. An estimate of North American hard rock drilling costs is in excess of $1,200 MM. Thus potential savings of $200 MM to $600 MM are possible if drilling rates are doubled [assuming bit life is reasonable]. The net result for operators is improved profit margin as well as an improved position on reserves. The significance of the ''ultra-high rotary speed drilling system'' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm--usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document details the progress to date on the program entitled ''SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING'' for the period starting June 23, 2003 through September 30, 2004. (1) TerraTek has reviewed applicable literature and documentation and has convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance. (2) TerraTek has designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments. Some difficulties in obtaining ultra-high speed motors for this feasibility work were encountered though they were sourced mid 2004. (3) TerraTek is progressing through Task 3 ''Small-scale cutting performance tests''. Some improvements over early NASA experiments have been identified.

  6. SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high (greater than 10,000 rpm) rotational speeds. The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development and test results that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with rigs having a smaller footprint to be more mobile. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The project draws on TerraTek results submitted to NASA's ''Drilling on Mars'' program. The objective of that program was to demonstrate miniaturization of a robust and mobile drilling system that expends small amounts of energy. TerraTek successfully tested ultrahigh speed ({approx}40,000 rpm) small kerf diamond coring. Adaptation to the oilfield will require innovative bit designs for full hole drilling or continuous coring and the eventual development of downhole ultra-high speed drives. For domestic operations involving hard rock and deep oil and gas plays, improvements in penetration rates is an opportunity to reduce well costs and make viable certain field developments. An estimate of North American hard rock drilling costs is in excess of $1,200 MM. Thus potential savings of $200 MM to $600 MM are possible if drilling rates are doubled [assuming bit life is reasonable]. The net result for operators is improved profit margin as well as an improved position on reserves. The significance of the ''ultra-high rotary speed drilling system'' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm--usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document details the progress to date on the program entitled ''SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING'' for the period starting June 23, 2003 through September 30, 2004. TerraTek has reviewed applicable literature and documentation and has convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance. TerraTek has designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments. Some difficulties in obtaining ultra-high speed motors for this feasibility work were encountered though they were sourced mid 2004. TerraTek is progressing through Task 3 ''Small-scale cutting performance tests''. Some improvements over early NASA experiments have been identified.

  7. Geopressured-geothermal well report. Volume I. Drilling and completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gladys McCall site activities are covered through the completion of the test well and salt water disposal well. The test well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet, then plugged back to 15,831 feet. Three 4'' diameter diamond cores were taken for analysis. An existing well on site, the Getty-Butts Gladys McCall No. 1, was reentered and completed to a depth of 3514 feet as a salt water disposal well. The geologic interpretation of the Gladys McCall site indicated target sands for testing at 15,080 feet through 15, 831 feet. Reservoir fluid temperature at this depth is estimated to be approximately 313/sup 0/F and pressure is estimated to be +-12,800 psi. The preliminary reservoir volume estimate is 3.6 billion barrels of brine. The design wells program includes environmental monitoring of the Gladys McCall site by Louisiana State University. Field stations are set up to monitor surface and ground water quality, subsidence, land loss and shoreline erosion, and seismicity. As of December 31, 1981 the study shows no significant impact on the environment by site operations.

  8. 1 INTRODUCTION The geothermal Bouillante area is located on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 INTRODUCTION The geothermal Bouillante area is located on the western coast of Basse and isotopic composition of the deep geothermal fluids using well and spring waters. The predictable nature the production stage and for future exploration drilling related to the development of the geothermal field. 2

  9. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  10. Drilling Addendum to Resource Assessment of Low- and Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Gary C.; Bacon, C. Forrest; Chapman, Rodger H.; Chase, Gordon W.; Majmundar, Hasmukhrai H.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This addendum report presents the results of the California Division of Mines and Geology (CDMG) drilling program at Calistoga, California, which was the final geothermal-resource assessment investigation performed under terms of the second year contract (1979-80) between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CDMG under the State Coupled Program. This report is intended to supplement information presented in CDMG's technical report for the project year, ''Resource Assessment of Low- and Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California''. During the investigative phase of the CDMG's Geothermal Project, over 200 well-driller's reports were obtained from the Department of Water Resources (DWR). It was hoped that the interpretation and correlation of these logs would reveal the subsurface geology of the Upper Napa Valley and also provide a check for the various geophysical surveys that were performed in the course of the study. However, these DWR driller logs proved to be inadequate due to the brief, non-technical, and erroneous descriptions contained on the logs. As a result of the lack of useable drill-hole data, and because information was desired from,deeper horizons, it became evident that drilling some exploratory holes would be necessary in order to obtain physical evidence of the stratigraphy and aquifers in the immediate Calistoga area. Pursuant to this objective, a total of twelve sites were selected--four under jurisdiction of Napa County and eight under jurisdiction of the City of Calistoga. A moratorium is currently in existence within Napa County on most geothermal drilling, and environmental and time constraints precluded CDMG from obtaining the necessary site permits within the county. However, a variance was applied for and obtained from the City of Calistoga to allow CDMG to drill within the city limits. With this areal constraint and also funding limits in mind, six drilling sites were selected on the basis of (1) proximity to areas where geophysical surveys had been performed, (2) accessibility of the site for drill rig setup, and (3) favorability for obtaining the maximum information possible concerning the geology and the resources. Necessary landowner permission and permits were secured for these sites, and actual drilling began on December 17, 1980. Drilling was terminated on February 4, 1981, with the completion of three holes that ranged in depth from 205 to 885 feet. Use of a relatively new drilling technique called the Dual Tube Method enabled the collection of precise subsurface data of a level of detail never before obtained in the Calistoga area. As a result, a totally new and unexpected picture of the geothermal reservoir conditions there has been obtained, and is outlined in this addendum report.

  11. International Partnership for Geothermal Technology - 2012 Peer...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    River Geothermal Drilling Project Canada The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project GermanyEU Toward the Understanding of Induced Seismicity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems...

  12. Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnis Judzis; Homer Robertson; Alan Black

    2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the ''ultra-high rotary speed drilling system'' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm-usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document details the progress at the end of Phase 1 on the program entitled ''Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling'' for the period starting 1 March 2006 and concluding 30 June 2006. (Note: Results from 1 September 2005 through 28 February 2006 were included in the previous report (see Judzis, Black, and Robertson)). Summarizing the accomplished during Phase 1: {lg_bullet} TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kickoff meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis). {lg_bullet} TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Some difficulties continued in obtaining ultra-high speed motors. Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed. {lg_bullet} TerraTek concluded Task 3 ''Small-scale cutting performance tests.'' {sm_bullet} Significant testing was performed on nine different rocks. {sm_bullet} Five rocks were used for the final testing. The final tests were based on statistical design of experiments. {sm_bullet} Two full-faced bits, a small diameter and a large diameter, were run in Berea sandstone. {lg_bullet} Analysis of data was completed and indicates that there is decreased specific energy as the rotational speed increases (Task 4). Data analysis from early trials was used to direct the efforts of the final testing for Phase I (Task 5). {lg_bullet} Technology transfer (Task 6) was accomplished with technical presentations to the industry (see Judzis, Boucher, McCammon, and Black).

  13. Feasibility study of tuned-resonator, pulsating cavitating water jet for deep-hole drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Lindenmuth, W.T.; Conn, A.F.; Frederick, G.S.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the advantages of pulsing a submerged jet to increase its erosion capability (particularly as caused by cavitation) in augmenting deep-hole drill bits. Various methods of accomplishing the pulsation are presented and discussed. The most attractive systems uncovered are acoustic oscillators which passively accomplish pulsations in the flow at frequencies corresponding to a Strouhal number in the range of 0.2 to 1.0. Such passive oscillators are assessed to be feasible candidates for development into practical deep hole drill bit systems and a long range plan for this research and development is presented and discussed.

  14. Continental Scientific Drilling (CSD): Technology Barriers to Deep Drilling Studies in Thermal Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolstad, George A.; Rowley, John C.

    1987-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the proceedings of a workshop. The primary thrust of these discussion was to identify the major key technology barriers to the Department of Energy (DOE) supported Thermal Regimes CSD projects and to set priorities for research and development. The major technological challenge is the high temperature to be encountered at depth. Specific problems derived from this issue were widely recognized among the participants and are reflected in this summary. A major concern for the projected Thermal Regimes CSD boreholes was the technology required for continuous coring, in contrast to that required for drilling without core or spot coring. Current commercial technology bases for these two techniques are quite different. The DOE has successfully fielded projects that used both technologies, i.e, shallow continuous coring (Inyo Domes and Valles Caldera) and deeper drilling with spot cores (Imperial Valley-SSSDP). It was concluded that future scientific objectives may still require both approaches, but continuous coring is the most likely requirement in the near term. (DJE-2005)

  15. A Deep Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    granites as targets for geothermal resources. Authors DAC Manning, PL Younger, FW Smith, JM Jones, DJ Dufton and S. Diskin Published Journal Journal of the Geological...

  16. Idaho Geothermal Commercialization Program. Idaho geothermal handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammer, G.D.; Esposito, L.; Montgomery, M.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following topics are covered: geothermal resources in Idaho, market assessment, community needs assessment, geothermal leasing procedures for private lands, Idaho state geothermal leasing procedures - state lands, federal geothermal leasing procedures - federal lands, environmental and regulatory processes, local government regulations, geothermal exploration, geothermal drilling, government funding, private funding, state and federal government assistance programs, and geothermal legislation. (MHR)

  17. Comprehensive Ocean Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

  18. Laser-Mechanical Drilling for Geothermal Energy: Low-Contact Drilling Technology to Enable Economical EGS Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Foro Energy is developing a unique capability and hardware system to transmit high power lasers over long distances via fiber optic cables. This laser power is integrated with a mechanical drilling bit to enable rapid and sustained penetration of hard rock formations too costly to drill with mechanical drilling bits alone. The laser energy that is directed at the rock basically softens the rock, allowing the mechanical bit to more easily remove it. Foro Energy’s laser-assisted drill bits have the potential to be up to 10 times more economical than conventional hard-rock drilling technologies, making them an effective way to access the U.S. energy resources currently locked under hard rock formations.

  19. Minor actinide waste disposal in deep geological boreholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sizer, Calvin Gregory

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a waste canister design suitable for the disposal of vitrified minor actinide waste in deep geological boreholes using conventional oil/gas/geothermal drilling technology. ...

  20. Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoag, Christopher Ian

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling ...

  1. Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to:52c8ff988c1 No38e4011f618b NoIllinois: Energy ResourcesDedini Sexploration

  2. Geothermal reservoir assessment: Northern Basin and Range Province, Stillwater prospect, Churchill County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-July 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Union Oil Company of California drilled two exploratory geothermal wells in the Stillwater geothermal prospect area in northwestern Nevada to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations, which included the drilling of four earlier deep temperature gradient wells in the Stillwater area, was also provided. The two wells were drilled to total depths of 6946 ft and 10,014 ft with no significant drilling problems. A maximum reservoir temperature of 353 F was measured at 9950 ft. The most productive well flow tested at a rate of 152,000 lbs/hr with a wellhead temperature of 252 F and pressure of 20 psig. Based upon current economics, the Stillwater geothermal prospect is considered to be subcommercial for the generation of electrical power. This synopsis of the exploratory drilling activities and results contains summary drilling, geologic, and reservoir information from two exploratory geothermal wells.

  3. Advanced geothermal foam drilling systems (AFS) -- Phase 1 final report, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. C. Maurer

    1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced coiled-tubing foam drilling system is being developed where two concentric strings of coiled tubing are used to convey water and air to the hole bottom where they are mixed together to produce foam for underbalanced drilling. This system has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs by increasing drilling rates (due to the motor being powered by water), and reducing compressor and nitrogen costs (due to lower gas pressures and volumes).

  4. Improved Tubulars for Better Economics in Deep Gas Well Drilling using Microwave Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinesh Agrawal; Paul Gigl; Mark Hunt; Mahlon Dennis

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the entire research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Based on the results of the Phase I and insurmountable difficulties faced in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program was slightly changed in the Phase II in which an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) has been adopted. This process can be developed into a semicontinuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. The main objective of the Phase II research program is to demonstrate the potential to economically manufacture microwave processed coiled tubing with improved performance for extended useful life under hostile coiled tubing drilling conditions. After the completion of the Phase II, it is concluded that scale up and sintering of a thin wall common O.D. size tubing that is widely used in the market is still to be proved and further experimentation and refinement of the sintering process is needed in Phase III. Actual manufacturing capability of microwave sintered, industrial quality, full length tubing will most likely require several million dollars of investment.

  5. Improved Tubulars for Better Economics in Deep Gas Well Drilling Using Microwave Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinesh Agrawal

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the entire research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Based on the results of the Phase I and insurmountable difficulties faced in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program was slightly changed in the Phase II in which an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) has been adopted. This process can be developed into a semicontinuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. The main objective of the Phase II research program is to demonstrate the potential to economically manufacture microwave processed coiled tubing with improved performance for extended useful life under hostile coiled tubing drilling conditions. After the completion of the Phase II, it is concluded that scale up and sintering of a thin wall common O.D. size tubing that is widely used in the market is still to be proved and further experimentation and refinement of the sintering process is needed in Phase III. Actual manufacturing capability of microwave sintered, industrial quality, full length tubing will most likely require several million dollars of investment.

  6. Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghanashyam Neupane; Earl D. Mattson; Travis L. McLing; Carl D. Palmer; Robert W. Smith; Thomas R. Wood

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Geological survey has estimated that there are up to 4,900 MWe of undiscovered geothermal resources and 92,000 MWe of enhanced geothermal potential within the state of Idaho. Of particular interest are the resources of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) which was formed by volcanic activity associated with the relative movement of the Yellowstone Hot Spot across the state of Idaho. This region is characterized by a high geothermal gradient and thermal springs occurring along the margins of the ESRP. Masking much of the deep thermal potential of the ESRP is a regionally extensive and productive cold-water aquifer. We have undertaken a study to infer the temperature of the geothermal system hidden beneath the cold-water aquifer of the ESRP. Our approach is to estimate reservoir temperatures from measured water compositions using an inverse modeling technique (RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. In the initial stages of this study, we apply the RTEst model to water compositions measured from a limited number of wells and thermal springs to estimate the regionally extensive geothermal system in the ESRP.

  7. Alphine 1/Federal: Drilling report. Final report, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witcher, J.C. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.; Pisto, L. [Tonto Drilling Services, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hahman, W.R. [Hahman (W. Richard), Las Cruces, NM (United States); Swanberg, C.A. [Swanberg (Chandler A.), Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional geologic and geophysical surveys, shallow temperature-gradient drilling, and published reconnaissance geothermal studies infer possible hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resources in the Alpine-Springerville area. This report discusses the results of a State of Arizona and US Department of Energy funded drilling project designed to gather the deep temperature and stratigraphic data necessary to determine if near-term HDR geothermal potential actually exists in this portion of the White Mountains region of Arizona. A 4505 feet deep slim-hole exploratory well, Alpiner/Federal, was drilled within the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest at Alpine Divide near the Alpine Divide Camp Ground about 5 miles north of Alpine, Arizona in Apache County (Figure 1).

  8. A field strategy to monitor radioactivity associated with investigation derived wastes returned from deep drilling sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rego, J.H.; Smith, D.K.; Friensehner, A.V.

    1995-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA) is drilling deep (>1500m) monitoring wells that penetrate both unsaturated (vadose) and saturated zones potentially contaminated by sub-surface nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Drill site radiological monitoring returns data on drilling effluents to make informed management decisions concerning fluid management. Because of rapid turn-around required for on-site monitoring, a representative sample will be analyzed simultaneously for {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} emitters by instrumentation deployed on-site. For the purposes of field survey, accurate and precise data is returned, in many cases, with minimal sample treatment. A 30% efficient high purity germanium detector and a discriminating liquid scintillation detector are being evaluated for {gamma} and {alpha}/{beta} monitoring respectively. Implementation of these detector systems complements a successful on-site tritium monitoring program. Residual radioactivity associated with underground nuclear tests include tritium, activation products, fission products and actinides. Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) is used in {alpha}/{beta} liquid scintillation counting and is a function of the time distribution of photon emission. In particular, we hope to measure {sup 241}Am produced from {sup 241}Pu by {beta} decay. Because {sup 241}Pu is depleted in fissile bomb fuels, maximum PSD resolution will be required. The high purity germanium detector employs a multichannel analyzer to count gamma emitting radionuclides; we will designate specific window configurations to selectively monitor diagnostic fission product radionuclides (i.e., {sup 137}Cs).

  9. A COMPILATION OF DATA ON FLUIDS FROM GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosner, S.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXCHANGERS; GEOTHERMAL ENERGY: GEOTHERMAL SPACE HEATING;Well INFORMATION OWNER-- GEOTHERMAL ENERGY AND tUNERAL CORP.ION OhNEf. -- GEOTHERMAL ENERGY AND MINERAL CORP. DRILLING

  10. Field drilling tests on improved geothermal unsealed roller-cone bits. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, R.R.; Jones, A.H.; Winzenried, R.W.; Maish, A.B.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and field testing of a 222 mm (8-3/4 inch) unsealed, insert type, medium hard formation, high-temperature bit are described. Increased performance was gained by substituting improved materials in critical bit components. These materials were selected on bases of their high temperature properties, machinability and heat treatment response. Program objectives required that both machining and heat treating could be accomplished with existing rock bit production equipment. Six of the experimental bits were subjected to air drilling at 240/sup 0/C (460/sup 0/F) in Franciscan graywacke at the Geysers (California). Performances compared directly to conventional bits indicate that in-gage drilling time was increased by 70%. All bits at the Geysers are subjected to reaming out-of-gage hole prior to drilling. Under these conditions the experimental bits showed a 30% increase in usable hole drilled, compared with the conventional bits. The materials selected improved roller wear by 200%, friction per wear by 150%, and lug wear by 150%. These tests indicate a potential well cost savings of 4 to 8%. Savings of 12% are considered possible with drilling procedures optimized for the experimental bits.

  11. IMPROVED TUBULARS FOR BETTER ECONOMICS IN DEEP GAS WELL DRILLING USING MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinesh Agrawal; Paul Gigl; Mahlon Dennis; Roderic Stanley

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Originally, it was proposed to accomplish this by developing an efficient and economically viable continuous microwave process to sinter continuously formed/extruded steel powder for the manufacture of seamless coiled tubing and other tubular products. However, based on the results and faced with insurmountable difficulties in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program has been slightly changed. In the continuation proposal an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) is adopted. This process can be developed into a semi-continuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. Originally, the entire program was spread over three phases with the following goals: Phase I: Demonstration of the feasibility concept of continuous microwave sintering process for tubular steel products. Phase II: Design, building and testing of a prototype microwave system which shall be combined with a continuous extruder for steel tubular objects. Phase III: Execution of the plan for commercialization of the technology by one of the industrial partners. However, since some of the goals of the phase I were not completed, an extension of nine months was granted and we continued extrusion experiments, designed and built semicontinuous microwave sintering unit.

  12. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

  13. Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

  14. Alaska: a guide to geothermal energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

  15. Washington: a guide to geothermal energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R.G.; Basescu, N.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

  16. Temporary Bridging Agents for use in Drilling and Completion of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watters, Larry; Watters, Jeff; Sutton, Joy; Combs, Kyle; Bour, Daniel; Petty, Susan; Rose, Peter; Mella, Michael

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    CSI Technologies, in conjunction with Alta Rock Energy and the University of Utah have undergone a study investigating materials and mechanisms with potential for use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems wells as temporary diverters or lost circulation materials. Studies were also conducted with regards to particle size distribution and sealing effectiveness using a lab-scale slot testing apparatus to simulate fractures. From the slot testing a numerical correlation was developed to determine the optimal PSD for a given fracture size. Field trials conducted using materials from this study were also successful.

  17. Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: Energy Resources Jump to:|| Open Energy

  18. Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 4 - System Description. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, E.E.; Maurer, W.C.; Hood, M.; Cooper, G.; Cook, N.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first section of this Volume will discuss the ''Conventional Drilling System''. Today's complex arrangement of numerous interacting systems has slowly evolved from the very simple cable tool rigs used in the late 1800s. Improvements to the conventional drilling rig have varied in size and impact over the years, but the majority of them have been evolutionary modifications. Each individual change or improvement of this type does not have significant impact on drilling efficiency and economics. However, the change is almost certain to succeed, and over time--as the number of evolutionary changes to the system begin to add up--improvements in efficiency and economics can be seen. Some modifications, defined and described in this Volume as Advanced Modifications, have more than just an evolutionary effect on the conventional drilling system. Although the distinction is subtle, there are several examples of incorporated advancements that have had significantly more impact on drilling procedures than would a truly evolutionary improvement. An example of an advanced modification occurred in the late 1970s with the introduction of Polycrystalline Diamond Compact (PDC) drill bits. PDC bits resulted in a fundamental advancement in drilling procedures that could not have been accomplished by an evolutionary improvement in materials metallurgy, for example. The last drilling techniques discussed in this Volume are the ''Novel Drilling Systems''. The extent to which some of these systems have been developed varies from actually being tested in the field, to being no more than a theoretical concept. However, they all have one thing in common--their methods of rock destruction are fundamentally different from conventional drilling techniques. When a novel drilling system is introduced, it is a revolutionary modification of accepted drilling procedures and will completely replace current techniques. The most prominent example of a revolutionary modification in recent history was the complete displacement of cable tool rigs by rotary drilling rigs in the late 1920s.

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DIRECTIONAL WELLS AT THE PAILAS GEOTHERMAL Costa Rica. Since 2009, the Costa Rican Electricity Company (ICE) has drilled 7 deep directional boreholes (in addition to the 9 existing vertical boreholes). The purpose of directional drilling has been

  20. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  1. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.G.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Research Program for Fiscal Year 1998. The Exploration Technology research area focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to expose the deep portions of known systems. The Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal and hot dry rock reservoirs. The Drilling Technology projects focus on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. The Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Direct use research covers the direct use of geothermal energy sources for applications in other than electrical production.

  2. A History or Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States: Drilling 1976-2006

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment(October-DecemberBased onIn-Cylinder Laser DiagnosticsDOEA2Drilling

  3. Jules Verne or Joint Venture? Investigation of a Novel Concept for Deep Geothermal Energy Extraction.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wachtmeister, Henrik

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Geothermal energy is an energy source with potential to supply mankind with both heat and electricity in nearly unlimited amounts. Despite this potential geothermal… (more)

  4. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update, FY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renner, Joel Lawrence

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Geothermal Program serves two broad purposes: 1) to assist industry in overcoming near-term barriers by conducting cost-shared research and field verification that allows geothermal energy to compete in today's aggressive energy markets; and 2) to undertake fundamental research with potentially large economic payoffs. The four categories of work used to distinguish the research activities of the Geothermal Program during FY 2000 reflect the main components of real-world geothermal projects. These categories form the main sections of the project descriptions in this Research Update. Exploration Technology research focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to explore the deep portions of known systems. Research in geophysical and geochemical methods is expected to yield increased knowledge of hidden geothermal systems. Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal reservoirs and enhanced geothermal systems. Research in various reservoir analysis techniques is generating a wide range of information that facilitates development of improved reservoir management tools. Drilling Technology focuses on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. Ongoing research to avert lost circulation episodes in geothermal drilling is yielding positive results. Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Increased output and improved performance of binary cycles will result from investigations in heat cycle research.

  5. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K. (eds.)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

  6. Geothermal development of the Madison group aquifer: a case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, J.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geothermal well has been drilled at the St. Mary's Hospital in Pierre, South Dakota. The well is 2176 feet deep and artesian flows 375 gpm at 106/sup 0/F. The well is producing fluids from the Mississippian Madison Group, a sequence of carbonate rocks deposited over several western states. The project was funded to demonstrate the goethermal potential of this widespread aquifer. This case study describes the development of the project through geology, drilling, stimulation, and testing.

  7. Geothermal Progress Monitor report No. 5. Progress report, June 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Updated information is presented on activities and progress in the areas of electric power plants, direct heat applications, deep well drilling, leasing of federal lands, legislative and regulatory actions, research and development, and others. Special attention is given in this report to 1980 highlights, particularly in the areas of electric and direct heat uses, drilling, and the Federal lands leasing program. This report also includes a summary of the DOE FY 1982 geothermal budget request to Congress.

  8. Geothermal COMPAX drill bit development. Final technical report, July 1, 1976-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, L.E. Jr.; Sogoian, G.C.; Flom, D.G.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective was to develop and demonstrate the performance of new drill bit designs utilizing sintered polycrystalline diamond compacts for the cutting edges. The scope included instrumented rock cutting experiments under ambient conditions and at elevated temperature and pressure, diamond compact wear and failure mode analysis, rock removal modeling, bit design and fabrication, full-scale laboratory bit testing, field tests, and performance evaluation. A model was developed relating rock cutting forces to independent variables, using a statistical test design and regression analysis. Experiments on six rock types, covering a range of compressive strengths from 8 x 10/sup 3/ psi to 51 x 10/sup 3/ psi, provided a satisfactory test of the model. Results of the single cutter experiments showed that the cutting and thrust (penetration) forces, and the angle of the resultant force, are markedly affected by rake angle, depth of cut, and speed. No unusual force excursions were detected in interrupted cutting. Wear tests on two types of diamond compacts cutting Jack Fork Sandstone yielded wear rates equivalent at high cutting speeds, where thermal effects are probably operative. At speeds below approx. 400 surface feet per minute (sfm), the coarser sintered diamond product was superior. 28 refs., 235 figs., 55 tabs.

  9. Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To Efficiently Exploit Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July...

  10. Geothermal Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal energy is thermal energy generated and stored in the Earth. Geothermal energy can manifest on the surface of the Earth, or near the surface of the Earth, where humankind may harness it to serve our energy needs. Geothermal resources are reservoirs of hot water that exist at varying temperatures and depths below the Earth's surface. Wells can be drilled into these underground reservoirs to tap steam and very hot water that can be brought to the surface for a variety of uses.

  11. Fluid-rock interactions in the Rhine Graben: A thermodynamic model of the hydrothermal alteration observed in deep drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komninou, A.; Yardley, B.W.D. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom)] [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep drilling at Soultz-sous-Forets, France, on the western flanks of the Rhine Graben, has penetrated Hercynian granite underlying Mesozoic sediments. Veins are present throughout the drilled granite, and there are flows of warm water localized in fractures within the granite. Detailed mineralogical study of core material from the research drillhole EPSI has been carried out in order to assess the alteration history of the Soultz granite, part of the crystalline basement of the Rhine Graben. The results of the study have been used, in conjunction with analyses of present-day fluids from deep drilling in the Rhine Graben reported in the literature, to model thermodynamically the alteration process, and in particular to evaluate if it is likely to be continuing today. Reaction-path calculations show that if deep basinal brines, such as are known from sediments of the central Rhine Graben, react with Hercynian granite, they will form different alteration assemblages depending on both the path that the fluid follows (e.g., descending through sediments or through granite) and the extent of preexisting alteration of the granite. The calculations suggest that fluid now sampled from granite in EPS-1 achieved its peak temperature, c. 200{degrees}C while within Permo-Triassic sandstone. The modeling also indicates that present-day fluids from the Rhine Graben system are capable of producing the vein quartz and possibly also the baryte veins, seen in the EPSI core. Much of the alteration present in the granite in the vicinity of veins and fractures may have been produced by a flow regime similar to that prevailing today. 48 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Improved Tubulars for Better Economics in Deep Gas Well Drilling using Microwave Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinesh Agrawal; Paul Gigl; Mahlon Dennis

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration. The current process of the manufacture long tubular steel products consists of shaping the tube from flat strip, welding the seam and sections into lengths that can be miles long, and coiling onto reels. However, the welds, that are a weak point, now limit the performance of the coil tubing. This is not only from a toughness standpoint but also from a corrosion standpoint. By utilizing the latest developments in the sintering of materials with microwave energy and powder metal extrusion technology for the manufacture of seamless coiled tubing and other tubular products, these problems can be eliminated. The project is therefore to develop a continuous microwave process to sinter continuously steel tubulars and butt-join them using microwave/induction process. The program started about three years ago and now we are in the middle of Phase II. In Phase I (which ended in February 2005) a feasibility study of the extrusion process of steel powder and continuously sinter the extruded tubing was conducted. The research program has been based on the development of microwave technology to process tubular specimens of powder metals, especially steels. The existing microwave systems at the Materials Research Laboratory (MRL) and Dennis Tool Company (DTC) were suitably modified to process tubular small specimens. The precursor powder metals were either extruded or cold isostatically pressed (CIP) to form tubular specimens. After conducting an extensive and systematic investigation of extrusion process for producing long tubes, it was determined that there were several difficulties in adopting extrusion process and it cannot be economically used for producing thousands of feet long green tubing. Therefore, in the Phase II the approach was modified to the microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave). This process can be developed into a semi-continuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. This report summarizes the progress made to-date in this new approach. The final steel composition matching with the Quality tubing's QT-16Cr80 was short listed and used for all experiments. Bonding experiments using 4 different braze powders were conducted and the process optimized to obtain high degree of bonding strength. For fabrication of green tubulars a large CIP unit was acquired and tested. This equipment is located at the Dennis Tool facility in Houston. Microwave sintering experiments for continuous processing of the CIPed tubes are under progress in order to identify the optimum conditions. There have been some reproducibility problems and we are at present working to resolve these problems.

  13. Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    eliminating bit wear and drill string fatigue, hydrothermal spallation drilling can transform the costs of geothermal well construction and enable widespread deployment of...

  14. Temporary Bridging Agents for Use in Drilling and Completions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Temporary Bridging Agents for Use in Drilling and Completions of EGS Temporary Bridging Agents for Use in Drilling and Completions of EGS DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 -...

  15. A STUDY OF THE STRUCTURAL CONTROL OF FLUID FLOW WITHIN THE CERRO PRIETO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, John E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and development geothermal wells and section lines A - d andof the Cerro Prieto Geothermal wells (Figure 4) are drilled

  16. Drill pipe corrosion control using an inert drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a geothermal drill pipe corrosion field test are presented. When a low-density drilling fluid was required for drilling a geothermal well because of an underpressured, fractured formation, two drilling fluids were alternately used to compare drill pipe corrosion rates. The first fluid was an air-water mist with corrosion control chemicals. The other fluid was a nitrogen-water mist without added chemicals. The test was conducted during November 1980 at the Baca Location in northern New Mexico. Data from corrosion rings, corrosion probes, fluid samples and flow line instrumentation are plotted for the ten day test period. It is shown that the inert drilling fluid, nitrogen, reduced corrosion rates by more than an order of magnitude. Test setup and procedures are also discussed. Development of an onsite inert gas generator could reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control chemical costs.

  17. The Very Deep Hole Concept: Evaluation of an Alternative for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    some experience at drilling geothermal wells where formationholes for oil, gas, and geothermal wells, or for mineral

  18. Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Development of drilling systems based upon rock penetration technologies not commonly employed in the geothermal industry.

  19. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renner, J.L.

    2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Geothermal Program serves two broad purposes: (1) to assist industry in overcoming near-term barriers by conducting cost-shared research and field verification that allows geothermal energy to compete in today's aggressive energy markets; and (2) to undertake fundamental research with potentially large economic payoffs. The four categories of work used to distinguish the research activities of the Geothermal Program during FY 2000 reflect the main components of real-world geothermal projects. These categories form the main sections of the project descriptions in this Research Update. Exploration Technology research focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to explore the deep portions of known systems. Research in geophysical and geochemical methods is expected to yield increased knowledge of hidden geothermal systems. Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal reservoirs and enhanced geothermal systems. Research in various reservoir analysis techniques is generating a wide range of information that facilitates development of improved reservoir management tools. Drilling Technology focuses on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. Ongoing research to avert lost circulation episodes in geothermal drilling is yielding positive results. Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Increased output and improved performance of binary cycles will result from investigations in heat cycle research.

  20. A Technology Roadmap for Strategic Development of Enhanced Geothermal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems DOE Project Partner AltaRock Energy drills for geothermal energy at the Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration site, near Bend, Oregon. DOE...

  1. A Roadmap for Strategic Development of Geothermal Exploration...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Report -- Geothermal Technologies Office DOE Project Partner AltaRock Energy drills for geothermal energy at the Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration site, near Bend, Oregon. A...

  2. JOIDES Resolution Drill Ship Drill into Indian Ridge MOHO Hole Cleaning Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindanger, Catharina

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) uses a variety of technology for use in its deep water scientific research, including the Joint Oceanographic Institutions for Deep Earth Sampling (JOIDES) Resolution (JR) drill ship. The JR drill ship...

  3. Geothermal heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aureille, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the study is to demonstrate the viability of geothermal heating projects in energy and economic terms and to provide nomograms from which an initial estimate may be made without having to use data-processing facilities. The effect of flow rate and temperature of the geothermal water on drilling and on the network, and the effect of climate on the type of housing are considered.

  4. Driltac (Drilling Time and Cost Evaluation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The users manual for the drill tech model for estimating the costs of geothermal wells. The report indicates lots of technical and cost detail. [DJE-2005

  5. Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook - Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook - Chapter 6 - Drilling and Well Construction Abstract Drilling...

  6. Geothermal energy abstract sets. Special report No. 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, C. (comp.)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains annotated citations in the following areas: (1) case histories; (2) drilling; (3) reservoir engineering; (4) injection; (5) geothermal well logging; (6) environmental considerations in geothermal development; (7) geothermal well production; (8) geothermal materials; (9) electric power production; (10) direct utilization of geothermal energy; (11) economics of geothermal energy; and (12) legal, regulatory and institutional aspects. (ACR)

  7. A COMPILATION OF DATA ON FLUIDS FROM GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosner, S.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NO. 1i GEOLOGY; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; GEOTHERMAL DRILLING. BLAKEHOT SPRINGS; hELLS; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; QUANTIT AT IVE CHEMDATA ON WATER WEllS, GEOTHERMAL WElLS, AND OIL TESTS IN

  8. Ultrasonic drilling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duran, E.L.; Lundin, R.L.

    1988-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation. 3 figs.

  9. Ultrasonic drilling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duran, Edward L. (Santa Fe, NM); Lundin, Ralph L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation.

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of these projects there are really big challenges to be solved (extremely high overpressure, water salinity of this Study. There is no room to discuss the exploration, deep drilling, reservoir engineering and water in Hungary, their focus is on geothermal power plant project development. Having reviewed the available

  11. Finding Hidden Geothermal Resources in the Basin and Range Using Electrical Survey Techniques: A Computational Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Pritchett; not used on publication

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For many years, there has been speculation about "hidden" or "blind" geothermal systems—reservoirs that lack an obvious overlying surface fluid outlet. At present, it is simply not known whether "hidden" geothermal reservoirs are rare or common. An approach to identifying promising drilling targets using methods that are cheaper than drilling is needed. These methods should be regarded as reconnaissance tools, whose primary purpose is to locate high-probability targets for subsequent deep confirmation drilling. The purpose of this study was to appraise the feasibility of finding "hidden" geothermal reservoirs in the Basin and Range using electrical survey techniques, and of adequately locating promising targets for deep exploratory drilling based on the survey results. The approach was purely theoretical. A geothermal reservoir simulator was used to carry out a lengthy calculation of the evolution of a synthetic but generic Great Basin-type geothermal reservoir to a quasi-steady "natural state". Postprocessors were used to try to estimate what a suite of geophysical surveys of the prospect would see. Based on these results, the different survey techniques were compared and evaluated in terms of their ability to identify suitable drilling targets. This process was completed for eight different "reservoir models". Of the eight cases considered, four were "hidden" systems, so that the survey techniques could be appraised in terms of their ability to detect and characterize such resources and to distinguish them from more conventionally situated geothermal reservoirs. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then to combine the results of both surveys with other pertinent information using mathematical "inversion" techniques to characterize the subsurface quantitatively. Many such surveys and accompanying analyses can be carried out for the cost of a single unsuccessful deep "discovery well".

  12. Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. C. Maurer

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 50% of the cost of a new geothermal power plant is in the wells that must be drilled. Compared to the majority of oil and gas wells, geothermal wells are more difficult and costly to drill for several reasons. First, most U.S. geothermal resources consist of hot, hard crystalline rock formations which drill much slower than the relatively soft sedimentary formations associated with most oil and gas production. Second, high downhole temperatures can greatly shorten equipment life or preclude the use of some technologies altogether. Third, producing viable levels of electricity from geothermal fields requires the use of large diameter bores and a high degree of fluid communication, both of which increase drilling and completion costs. Optimizing fluid communication often requires creation of a directional well to intersect the best and largest number of fracture capable of producing hot geothermal fluids. Moineau motor stators made with elastomers cannot operate at geothermal temperatures, so they are limited to the upper portion of the hole. To overcome these limitations, Maurer Engineering Inc. (MEI) has developed a turbodrill that does not use elastomers and therefore can operate at geothermal temperatures. This new turbodrill uses a special gear assembly to reduce the output speed, thus allowing a larger range of bit types, especially tri-cone roller bits, which are the bits of choice for drilling hard crystalline formations. The Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) represents a significant improvement for drilling geothermal wells and has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs while increasing production, thereby making geothermal energy less expensive and better able to compete with fossil fuels. The final field test of the AGT will prepare the tool for successful commercialization.

  13. Geothermal reservoir assessment case study: Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denton, J.M.; Bell, E.J.; Jodry, R.L.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two 1500 foot temperature gradient holes and two deep exploratory wells were drilled and tested. Hydrologic-hydrochemical, shallow temperature survey, structural-tectonic, petrologic alteration, and solid-sample geochemistry studies were completed. Eighteen miles of high resolution reflection seismic data were gathered over the area. The study indicates that a geothermal regime with temperatures greater than 400/sup 0/F may exist at a depth of approximately 7500' to 10,000' over an area more than ten miles in length.

  14. Scientific Drilling, Number 1, 2005 Scientific ocean drilling started in the early 1960s with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Scientific Drilling, Number 1, 2005 Scientific ocean drilling started in the early 1960s, or the Moho). This project, known as Mohole, was succeeded by the Deep Sea Drilling Project, the International Phase of Ocean Drilling, the Ocean Drilling Program, and the current Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  15. OM300 Direction Drilling Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacGugan, Doug

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    OM300 – Geothermal Direction Drilling Navigation Tool: Design and produce a prototype directional drilling navigation tool capable of high temperature operation in geothermal drilling Accuracies of 0.1° Inclination and Tool Face, 0.5° Azimuth Environmental Ruggedness typical of existing oil/gas drilling Multiple Selectable Sensor Ranges High accuracy for navigation, low bandwidth High G-range & bandwidth for Stick-Slip and Chirp detection Selectable serial data communications Reduce cost of drilling in high temperature Geothermal reservoirs Innovative aspects of project Honeywell MEMS* Vibrating Beam Accelerometers (VBA) APS Flux-gate Magnetometers Honeywell Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) High-temperature electronics Rugged High-temperature capable package and assembly process

  16. ESMERALDA ENERGY COMPANY FINAL SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT, January 2008, EMIGRANT SLIMHOLE DRILLING PROJECT, DOE GRED III (DE-FC36-04GO14339)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Deymonaz, Jeffrey G. Hulen, Gregory D. Nash, Alex Schriener

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project (“ESDP”) was a highly successful, phased resource evaluation program designed to evaluate the commercial geothermal potential of the eastern margin of the northern Fish Lake Valley pull-apart basin in west-central Nevada. The program involved three phases: (1) Resource evaluation; (2) Drilling and resource characterization; and (3) Resource testing and assessment. Efforts included detailed geologic mapping; 3-D modeling; compilation of a GIS database; and production of a conceptual geologic model followed by the successful drilling of the 2,938 foot deep 17-31 slimhole (core hole), which encountered commercial geothermal temperatures (327? F) and exhibits an increasing, conductive, temperature gradient to total depth; completion of a short injection test; and compilation of a detailed geologic core log and revised geologic cross-sections. Results of the project greatly increased the understanding of the geologic model controlling the Emigrant geothermal resource. Information gained from the 17-31 core hole revealed the existence of commercial temperatures beneath the area in the Silver Peak Core Complex which is composed of formations that exhibit excellent reservoir characteristics. Knowledge gained from the ESDP may lead to the development of a new commercial geothermal field in Nevada. Completion of the 17-31 core hole also demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of deep core drilling as an exploration tool and the unequaled value of core in understanding the geology, mineralogy, evolutional history and structural aspects of a geothermal resource.

  17. New wells architectures to access deep geothermal reservoirsand increase well productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with the higher costs of well drilling and completion. Our first step in tackling theproblem,was to consider with the wellbore flow which is modelled by a 1D momentum equation describing the conservation of the fluid in the wellbore fluid coupled to the heat transfer in the reservoir.We apply this coupled wellbore and reservoir

  18. Chemical logging of geothermal wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Charles A. (Idaho Falls, ID); McAtee, Richard E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of geothermal aquifers can be detected while drilling in geothermal formations by maintaining a chemical log of the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions in the return drilling fluid. A continuous increase in the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions is indicative of the existence of a warm or hot geothermal aquifer at some increased depth.

  19. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heat transmission fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.the 5-km Deep Enhanced Geothermal Reservoir at Soultz-sous-

  20. High-temperature directional drilling turbodrill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a high-temperature turbodrill for directional drilling of geothermal wells in hard formations is summarized. The turbodrill may be used for straight-hole drilling but was especially designed for directional drilling. The turbodrill was tested on a dynamometer stand, evaluated in laboratory drilling into ambient temperature granite blocks, and used in the field to directionally drill a 12-1/4-in.-diam geothermal well in hot 200/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) granite at depths to 10,5000 ft.

  1. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

  2. Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Abstract The U.S. Navy's Geothermal Program Office (GPO) has been conducting geothermal...

  3. Alaska: a guide to geothermal energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alaska's geothermal potential, exploration, drilling, utilization, and legal and institutional setting are covered. Economic factors of direct use projects are discussed. (MHR)

  4. Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon's geothermal potential, exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting are covered. Economic factors of direct use projects are discussed. (MHR)

  5. Washington: a guide to geothermal energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R.G.; Basescu, N.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington's geothermal potential is discussed. The following topics are covered: exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting, and economic factors of direct use projects. (MHR)

  6. Advanced drilling systems study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis (Livesay Consultants, Encintas, CA)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

  7. US geothermal database and Oregon cascade thermal studies: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell, D.D.; Steele, J.L.; Carter, L.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes two tasks of different nature. The first of these tasks was the preparation of a data base for heat flow and associated ancillary information for the United States. This data base is being used as the basis for preparation of the United States portion of a geothermal map of North America. The ''Geothermal Map of North America'' will be published as part of the Decade of North American Geology (DNAG) series of the Geological Society of America. The second of these tasks was to make a geothermal evaluation of holes drilled in the Cascade Range as part of a Department of Energy (DOE)/Industry co-sponsored deep drilling project. This second task involved field work, making temperature logs in the holes, and laboratory work, measuring thermal conductivity measurements on an extensive set of samples from these holes. The culmination of this task was an interpretation of heat flow values in terms of the regional thermal conditions; implications for geothermal systems in the Cascade Range; evaluation of the effect of groundwater flow on the depths that need to be drilled for successful measurements in the Cascade Range; and investigation of the nature of the surface groundwater effects on the temperature-depth curves. 40 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project'S Hot Sulphur Springs Lease Area Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  9. HydroPulse Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.J. Kolle

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tempress HydroPulse{trademark} tool increases overbalanced drilling rates by generating intense suction pulses at the drill bit. This report describes the operation of the tool; results of pressure drilling tests, wear tests and downhole drilling tests; and the business case for field applications. The HydroPulse{trademark} tool is designed to operate on weighted drilling mud at conventional flow rates and pressures. Pressure drilling tests confirm that the HydroPulse{trademark} tool provides 33% to 200% increased rate of penetration. Field tests demonstrated conventional rotary and mud motor drilling operations. The tool has been operated continuous for 50 hours on weighted mud in a wear test stand. This level of reliability is the threshold for commercial application. A seismic-while-drilling version of the tool was also developed and tested. This tool was used to demonstrate reverse vertical seismic profiling while drilling an inclined test well with a PDC bit. The primary applications for the HydroPulse{trademark} tool are deep onshore and offshore drilling where rate of penetration drives costs. The application of the seismic tool is vertical seismic profiling-while-drilling and look-ahead seismic imaging while drilling.

  10. Design and testing of a deep sea formation water and temeperature sampling probe for the Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisseler, Patrick James

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . Components were then fabricated by a local machine shop. All components under went quality inspection and were then assembled. Full scale testing at the Ocean Drilling Programs Annex is the next step. If successful, the probe is to undergo sea trials...

  11. Application of a New Structural Model & Exploration Technologies to Define a Blind Geothermal System: A Viable Alternative to Grid Drilling for Geothermal Exploration: McCoy, Churchill County, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Relevance of research: Improve exploration technologies for range-hosted geothermal systems:Employ new concept models and apply existing methods in new ways; Breaking geothermal exploration tasks into new steps, segmenting the problem differently; Testing new models for dilatent structures; Utilizing shallow thermal aquifer model to focus exploration; Refining electrical interpretation methods to map shallow conductive featuresIdentifying key faults as fluid conduits; and Employ soil gas surveys to detect volatile elements and gases common to geothermal systems.

  12. SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program DOE Geothermal Technologies Program presentation...

  13. Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A state-by-state review of major geothermal-development activities during 1982 is presented. It also inlcudes a summary of recent drilling and exploration efforts and the results of the 1982 leasing program. Two complementary sections feature an update of geothermal direct-use applications and a site-by-site summary of US geothermal electric-power development.

  14. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 65 ( 1995 ) 119-133 The Hengill geothermal area, Iceland: Variation of temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 65 ( 1995 ) 119-133 The Hengill geothermal area. These conditions are approached at the Hengill geothermal area, S. Iceland, a dominantly basaltic area. The likely measurements from four drill sites within the area indicate average, near-surface geothermal gradients of up

  15. West Texas geothermal resource assessment. Part I. Geothermal exploration in Trans-Pecos, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, R.F.; Taylor, B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All of the new drilling for geothermal gradient and heat flow studies have been concentrated in an area near Hueco Tanks State Park. Interest in the area was raised by the silica geothermometry map of Hoffer (1979) and its proximity to El Paso, which is less than 25 miles away and expanding rapidly toward the area of geothermal interest. Several industries in El Paso appear to be potential users of non-electrical grade hot waters. A total of 14 holes have been drilled for geothermal gradient and heat-flow measurements. Of these, 12 were 50 meters deep and all but two had gradients in excess of 100/sup 0/C/km, one having a gradient as high as 306/sup 0/C/km. Of the remaining two, one penetrated bedrock at about 50 meters and was drilled to a total depth of 125 meters. The gradient in the limestone bedrock is 170/sup 0/C/km and the heat flow is about 11 x 10/sup -6/cal/cm/sup 2/ sec. This is the highest heat flow thus far reported for a locality in the Rio Grande Rift. The last hole is 300 meters deep and has a gradient of 142/sup 0/C/km and a heat flow of 9 x 10/sup -6/cal/cm/sup 2/ sec. The Hueco Tanks site is very promising for at least space heating applications of hot water. Based on the 300 meter hole the potential for electricity grade temperatures still exist, but the tight limestone bedrock may require hot dry rock extraction technology.

  16. Workshop on geothermal drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirteen papers and abstracts are included. Seven papers were abstracted and six abstracts were listed by title. (MHR)

  17. New River Geothermal Research Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation: Project objectives: Demonstration of an innovative blend of modern tectonic research applied to the Imperial Valley with a proprietary compilation of existing thermal and drilling data. The developed geologic model will guide the targeting of two test wells and the identification of permeable zones capable of commercial geothermal power production.

  18. Geothermal program overview: Fiscal years 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Geothermal Energy Program is involved in three main areas of research: finding and tapping the resource; power generation; and direct use of geothermal energy. This publication summarizes research accomplishments for FY 1993 and 1994 for the following: geophysical and geochemical technologies; slimhole drilling for exploration; resource assessment; lost circulation control; rock penetration mechanics; instrumentation; Geothermal Drilling Organization; reservoir analysis; brine injection; hot dry rock; The Geysers; Geothermal Technology Organization; heat cycle research; advanced heat rejection; materials development; and advanced brine chemistry.

  19. 2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which contained almost 22,000 citation records related to the Deep Sea Drilling Institute (AGI). The database has been on line since August 2002. Beginning in 2006, citation records

  20. Blast furnace taphole drill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gozeling, J.A.; de Boer, S.; Spiering, A.A.

    1984-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A blast furnace taphole drill has a flaring head with cutting edges at its cutting end formed by intersecting angled faces. A central bore carries cleaning air to the cutting end. To prevent blockage of the cleaning air bore by debris and possible jamming of the drill, the head has deep radial grooves formed at the bottoms of the valley shapes between the cutting edges. The grooves extend radially from the air bore and conduct the air so that it can get behind or under jammed debris. Reduced taphole drilling times can be achieved.

  1. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- ESMERALDA ENERGY COMPANY FINAL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ESMERALDA ENERGY COMPANY FINAL SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT, January 2008, EMIGRANT SLIMHOLE DRILLING PROJECT, DOE GRED III (DE-FC36-04GO14339) Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

  2. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Survey DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project summary: Drilling into large aperture open fractures (LAFs) typically yield production wells with...

  3. Geothermal Discovery Offers Hope for More Potential Across the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Data System project, managed by the Arizona Geological Survey. Based on drilling results, researchers conservatively estimate a basin-wide power density of about 5 to...

  4. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    geothermalhistory3engineering.pdf More Documents & Publications A History or Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States: Drilling 1976-2006...

  5. Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following subjects are covered: Oregons' geothermal potential, exploration methods and costs, drilling, utilization methods, economic factors of direct use projects, and legal and institutional setting. (MHR)

  6. Microseismicity and 3-D Mapping of an Active Geothermal Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    during drilling. Authors Catherine Lewis Kenedi, Eylon Shalev, Alan Lucas and Peter Malin Conference Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010; Bali, Indonesia; 042010 Published...

  7. Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    395. Notes Among these wells were exploration and monitoring wells drilled near the Fish Hatchery Springs in preparation for the siting of a second binary geothermal power...

  8. 2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2009 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  9. 2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2008 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  10. 2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2012 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  11. 2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2007 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  12. 2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2011 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  13. Turbodrilling in the Geothermal Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert, P.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal drilling, historically, has presented what seemed to be insurmountable barriers to the efficient and extended use of downhole drilling motors, especially those containing elastomeric bearing or motor components. In addition to being damaging to rubber, the typical temperatures of 177 to 371 C (350 to 700 F) create other operating problems as well. Recent innovations, specifically in turbodrill design, have opened heretofore unrealized potentials and allowed, for the first time, extended downhole drilling of geothermal wells. A considerable amount of experience has been obtained both in The Geysers and Imperial County areas of California primarily in directional drilling applications using insert, diamond, and polycrystallines diamond compact bits. Other hot-hole applications are currently being drilled successfully or planned in other states, both onshore and offshore. The turbodrill is devoid of any elastomers or other temperature-sensitive materials, hence, its capabilities are closely matched to the requirements of the industry. The bearing assembly can withstand the rigors found in the drilling of typical geothermal formations and provide the performance necessary to stay in the hole, thus providing increased penetration rates and, hence, more economical drilling. This paper presents case histories of recent turbodrill performances in all areas where used. Furthermore, data will be presented showing the performance of insert, diamond, and polycrystalline diamond bits as they relate to the turbodrill, together with forecasts as to the potential that turbodrills have to offer in accelerating and controlling the drilling of geothermal wells.

  14. Turbodrilling in the geothermal environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert, P.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal drilling, historically, has presented what seemed to be insurmountable barriers to the efficient and extended use of downhole drilling motors, especially those containing elastomeric bearing or motor components. In addition to being damaging to rubber, the typical temperatures of 177/sup 0/ to 371/sup 0/C (350/sup 0/ to 700/sup 0/F) create other operating problems as well. Recent innovations, specifically in turbodrill design, have opened heretofore unrealized potentials and allowed, for the first time, extended downhole drilling of geothermal wells. A considerable amount of experience has been obtained both in The Geysers and Imperial County areas of California primarily in directional drilling applications using insert, diamond, and polycrystallines diamond compact bits. Other hot-hole applications are currently being drilled successfully or planned in other states, both on- and off-shore. The turbodrill is devoid of any elastomers or other temperature-sensitive materials, hence, its capabilities are closely matched to the requirements of the industry. The bearing assembly can withstand the rigors found in the drilling of typical geothermal formations and provide the performance necessary to stay in the hole, thus providing increased penetration rates and, hence, more economical drilling. This paper will present case histories of recent turbodrill performances in all areas where used. Furthermore, data will be presented showing the performance of insert, diamond, and polycrystalline diamond bits as they relate to the turbodrill, together with forecasts as to the potential that turbodrills have to offer in accelerating and controlling the drilling of geothermal wells.

  15. Electrical resistivity investigations at the Olkaria geothermal field, Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhogal, P.S.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bipole-dipole, Schlumberger and in line dipole-dipole electrical resistivity configurations were used to delineate the Olkaria geothermal reservoir with the view to site boreholes for the production of electric power using the geopressurized hot water. The dipole-dipole resistivity data provided the least ambiguous and most usable data for assessing the resource. Deep drilling into two of the anomalies outlined by this survey has proved the existence of high-temperature reservoirs and a 15MW power station is under construction.

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    is an important parameter in geothermal drilling since it affects drilling fluid, operations and equipment THE INLET AND OUTLET MUD TEMPERATURES WHILE DRILLING GEOTHERMAL FORMATIONS Sema Tekin1 and Serhat Akin2 1-Omerbeyli field were estimated by using mud inlet and outlet temperatures obtained during drilling. GTEMP wellbore

  17. Turbodrilling in the geothermal environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert, P.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal drilling, historically, has presented what seemed to be insurmountable barriers to the efficient and extended use of downhole drilling motors, especially those containing elastomeric bearing or motor components. In addition to being damaging to rubber, the typical temperatures of 350-700/degree/ F create other operating problems as well. Recent innovations, specifically in the Turbodrill design, have opened unrealized potentials and allowed, for the first time, extended downhole drilling of geothermal wells. A presentation is made of the case histories of recent Turbodrill performances in all areas where used. Furthermore, data is presented showing the performance of insert, diamond, and Stratapax bits as they relate to the Turbodrill, together with forecasts as to the potential that turbodrills have to offer in accelerating and controlling the drilling of geothermal and hot petroleum wells. 1 ref.

  18. The 1983 Temperature Gradient and Heat Flow Drilling Project for the State of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, Michael A.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Summer of 1983, the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources carried out a three-hole drilling program to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The project was part of the state-coupled US Department of Energy Geothermal Program. Richardson Well Drilling of Tacoma, Washington was subcontracted through the State to perform the work. The general locations of the project areas are shown in figure 1. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens--Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

  19. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, P D

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

  20. STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Wolhart

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

  1. Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, P.F. II, Smith, C.C.; Keeney, R.C.; Kirk, D.K.; Conover, M.F.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal downhole conditions that may affect the performance and reliability of selected materials and components used in the drilling, completion, logging, and production of geothermal wells are reviewed. The results of specific research and development efforts aimed at improvement of materials and components for downhole contact with the hostile physicochemical conditions of the geothermal reservoir are discussed. Materials and components covered are tubular goods, stainless steels and non-ferrous metals for high-temperature downhole service, cements for high-temperature geothermal wells, high-temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downhole pumps. (MHR)

  2. Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Geothermal Technologies Office Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office Presentation by Geothermal Technologies Director Doug Hollett at the Stanford...

  3. Sweet lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco Fee. Annual report, December 1, 1979-February 27, 1981. Volume I. Drilling and completion test well and disposal well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, R.W. (ed.)

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sweet lake site is located approximately 15 miles southeast of Lake Charles in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A geological study showed that the major structure in this area is a graben. The dip of the beds is northwesterly into the basin. A well drilled into the deep basin would find the target sand below 18,000', at high pressures and temperatures. However, since there is no well control in the basin, the specific site was chosen on the 15,000' contour of the target sand in the eastern, more narrow part of the garben. Those key control wells are present within one mile of the test well. The information acquired by drilling the test well confirmed the earlier geologic study. The target sand was reached at 15,065', had a porosity of over 20% and a permeability to water of 300 md. The original reservoir pressure was 12,060 psi and the bottom hole temperature 299{sup 0}F. There are approximately 250 net feet of sand available for the perforation. The disposal well was drilled to a total depth of 7440'.

  4. Proposed Drill Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed drill sites for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or deep resource confirmation wells. Temperature gradient contours based on shallow TG program and faults interpreted from seismic reflection survey are shown, as are two faults interpreted by seismic contractor Optim but not by Oski Energy, LLC.

  5. Proposed Drill Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Proposed drill sites for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or deep resource confirmation wells. Temperature gradient contours based on shallow TG program and faults interpreted from seismic reflection survey are shown, as are two faults interpreted by seismic contractor Optim but not by Oski Energy, LLC.

  6. Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010 Combination basins turned out to represent new interesting targets, where geothermal potential may be important. Deep

  7. Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

  8. Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S. Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S. Iceland Geothermal...

  9. Newberry exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During July--November, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with CE Exploration, drilled a 5,360 feet exploratory slimhole (3.895 inch diameter) in the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Bend, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed numerous temperature logs, and at the completion of drilling attempted to perform injection tests. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: over 4,000 feet of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Newberry KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  10. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY09 Annual Report #12;Discrete core sampling #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine research successes of the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), programs

  11. Wilcox sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy. Report of Investigations No. 117

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debout, D.G.; Weise, B.R.; Gregory, A.R.; Edwards, M.B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional studies of the lower Eocene Wilcox Group in Texas were conducted to assess the potential for producing heat energy and solution methane from geopressured fluids in the deep-subsurface growth-faulted zone. However, in addition to assembling the necessary data for the geopressured geothermal project, this study has provided regional information of significance to exploration for other resources such as lignite, uranium, oil, and gas. Because the focus of this study was on the geopressured section, emphasis was placed on correlating and mapping those sandstones and shales occurring deeper than about 10,000 ft. The Wilcox and Midway Groups comprise the oldest thick sandstone/shale sequence of the Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. The Wilcox crops out in a band 10 to 20 mi wide located 100 to 200 mi inland from the present-day coastline. The Wilcox sandstones and shales in the outcrop and updip shallow subsurface were deposited primarily in fluvial environments; downdip in the deep subsurface, on the other hand, the Wilcox sediments were deposited in large deltaic systems, some of which were reworked into barrier-bar and strandplain systems. Growth faults developed within the deltaic systems, where they prograded basinward beyond the older, stable Lower Cretaceous shelf margin onto the less stable basinal muds. Continued displacement along these faults during burial resulted in: (1) entrapment of pore fluids within isolated sandstone and shale sequences, and (2) buildup of pore pressure greater than hydrostatic pressure and development of geopressure.

  12. Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  13. Reports on Deep Earth Sampling and NUMBER1,2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    into the ocean due to scientific drilling. The new technology does not stop with riser drilling, but includes neutral energy by deep drilling with required new technology into very hot crust (p.40). If more globally Drilling Program with the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program Reports on Deep Earth

  14. GRAIN-SCALE FAILURE IN THERMAL SPALLATION DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, S C; Lomov, I; Roberts, J J

    2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal power promises clean, renewable, reliable and potentially widely-available energy, but is limited by high initial capital costs. New drilling technologies are required to make geothermal power financially competitive with other energy sources. One potential solution is offered by Thermal Spallation Drilling (TSD) - a novel drilling technique in which small particles (spalls) are released from the rock surface by rapid heating. While TSD has the potential to improve drilling rates of brittle granitic rocks, the coupled thermomechanical processes involved in TSD are poorly described, making system control and optimization difficult for this drilling technology. In this paper, we discuss results from a new modeling effort investigating thermal spallation drilling. In particular, we describe an explicit model that simulates the grain-scale mechanics of thermal spallation and use this model to examine existing theories concerning spalling mechanisms. We will report how borehole conditions influence spall production, and discuss implications for macro-scale models of drilling systems.

  15. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Summary: Locate and drill two exploration wells that will be used to define the nature and extent of the geothermal resources on Jemez Pueblo in the Indian Springs area.

  17. A GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL STUDY OF THE BACA GEOTHERMAL FIELD, VALLES CALDERA, NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilt, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as defined from deep geothermal wells at Baca. c o TABLE 1.log of Jemez Springs geothermal well. Los Alamos ScientificThe most productive geothermal wells are located in Redondo

  18. Geothermal -- The Energy Under Our Feet: Geothermal Resource Estimates for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, B. D.; Nix, R. G.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 16, 2006, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado hosted a geothermal resources workshop with experts from the geothermal community. The purpose of the workshop was to re-examine domestic geothermal resource estimates. The participating experts were organized into five working groups based on their primary area of expertise in the following types of geothermal resource or application: (1) Hydrothermal, (2) Deep Geothermal Systems, (3) Direct Use, (4) Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHPs), and (5) Co-Produced and Geopressured. The workshop found that the domestic geothermal resource is very large, with significant benefits.

  19. Program for the improvement of downhole drilling-motor bearings and seals. Final report: Phase III, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic laboratory testing and evaluation program to select high-temperature seals, bearings, and lubricants for geothermal downhole drilling motors is summarized.

  20. Experimental Assessment of Water Based Drilling Fluids in High Pressure and High Temperature Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravi, Ashwin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper selection of drilling fluids plays a major role in determining the efficient completion of any drilling operation. With the increasing number of ultra-deep offshore wells being drilled and ever stringent environmental and safety regulations...

  1. Geothermal System Overview ASHRAE Headquarters Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Geothermal System Overview ASHRAE Headquarters Building Dennis Meyer Director of Commercial Sales center #12;Geothermal Loop · Vertical closed-loop ­ 12 bores at 400 feet deep with 1.25" HDPE ­ Boreholes enhanced grout · Standard 2-pipe building loop with VFD pump #12;#12;#12;#12;ClimateMaster Geothermal

  2. GRED STUDIES AND DRILLING OF AMERICULTURE STATE 2, AMERICULTURE TILAPIA FARM LIGHTNING DOCK KGRA, ANIMAS VALLEY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witcher, James

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the GRED drilling operations in the AmeriCulture State 2 well with an overview of the preliminary geologic and geothermal findings, from drill cuttings, core, geophysical logs and water geochemical sampling.

  3. Fort Bliss exploratory slimholes: Drilling and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During November/96 to April/97 Sandia National Laboratories provided consulation, data collection, analysis and project documentation to the U.S. Army for a series of four geothermal exploratory slimholes drilled on the McGregor Range approximately 25 miles north of El Paso, Texas. This drilling was directed toward evaluating a potential reservoir for geothermal power generation in this area, with a secondary objective of assessing the potential for direct use applications such as space heating or water de-salinization. This report includes: representative temperature logs from the wells; daily drilling reports; a narrative account of the drilling and testing; a description of equipment used; a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data; and recommendations for future work.

  4. Geothermal programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

    1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a number of geothermal programs supported through two offices in the Department of Energy: the Office of Renewable Technologies, Geothermal Technologies Division, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Engineering, Mathematics and Geosciences. Within these programs, we are carrying out research in injection monitoring, optical instrumentation for geothermal wells, seismic imaging methods, geophysical and drilling investigations of young volcanic systems in California, and fundamental studies of the rock and mineral properties.

  5. Advanced seismic imaging for geothermal development John N. Louie*, Nevada Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno; Satish K. Pullammanappallil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced seismic imaging for geothermal development John N. Louie*, Nevada Seismological Laboratory In the geothermal fields of the Great Basin physiographic province of western North America, drilling success to be the only effective geophysical means of accurately targeting geothermal drilling. At target depths of 1

  6. Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration DOE Geothermal...

  7. Geothermal Progress Monitor report No. 8. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Progress Monitor (GPM) Report Number 8 presents information concerning ongoing technology transfer activities and the mechanisms used to support these activities within geothermal R and D programs. A state-by-state review of major geothermal development activities for the reporting period 1 February 1983 through 31 July 1983 is provided. Recent drilling and exploration efforts and the current status of geothermal electric power plant development in the United States are summarized.

  8. Geothermal heating for Caliente, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallis, F.; Schaper, J.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of geothermal resources in the town of Caliente, Nevada (population 600) has been the objective of two grants. The first grant was awarded to Ferg Wallis, part-owner and operator of the Agua Caliente Trailer Park, to assess the potential of hot geothermal water for heating the 53 trailers in his park. The results from test wells indicate sustainable temperatures of 140/sup 0/ to 160/sup 0/F. Three wells were drilled to supply all 53 trailers with domestic hot water heating, 11 trailers with space heating and hot water for the laundry from the geothermal resource. System payback in terms of energy cost-savings is estimated at less than two years. The second grant was awarded to Grover C. Dils Medical Center in Caliente to drill a geothermal well and pipe the hot water through a heat exchanger to preheat air for space heating. This geothermal preheater served to convert the existing forced air electric furnace to a booster system. It is estimated that the hospital will save an average of $5300 in electric bills per year, at the current rate of $.0275/KWH. This represents a payback of approximately two years. Subsequent studies on the geothermal resource base in Caliente and on the economics of district heating indicate that geothermal may represent the most effective supply of energy for Caliente. Two of these studies are included as appendices.

  9. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

  10. 2014 Ocean Drilling Cita on Report Covering Cita ons Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014 Ocean Drilling Cita on Report Covering Cita ons Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and Interna onal Ocean Discovery Program from #12;22014 Ocean Drilling Cita on Report Introduc on At the end of each fiscal year, the Interna onal

  11. Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume I. Review and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The history of geothermal exploration in Hawaii is reviewed briefly. The nature and occurrences of geothermal resources are presented island by island. An overview of geothermal markets is presented. Other topies covered are: potential markets of the identified geothermal areas, well drilling technology, hydrothermal fluid transport, overland and submarine electrical transmission, community aspects of geothermal development, legal and policy issues associated with mineral and land ownership, logistics and infrastructure, legislation and permitting, land use controls, Regulation 8, Public Utilities Commission, political climate and environment, state plans, county plans, geothermal development risks, and business planning guidelines.

  12. Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Blackwell; Kenneth Wisian; Maria Richards; Mark Leidig; Richard Smith; Jason McKenna

    2003-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dizie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems. Documented a relation between natural heat loss for geothermal and electrical power production potential and determined heat flow for 27 different geothermal systems. Prepared data set for generation of a new geothermal map of North American including industry data totaling over 25,000 points in the US alone.

  13. Geothermal program review 16: Proceedings. A strategic plan for geothermal research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The proceedings contain 21 papers arranged under the following topical sections: Exploration technology (4 papers); Reservoir technology (5 papers); Energy conversion technology (8 papers); Drilling technology (2 papers); and Direct use and geothermal heat pump technology (2 papers). An additional section contains a report on a workshop on dual-use technologies for hydrothermal and advanced geothermal reservoirs.

  14. COSO Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1, CGEH No. 1. Completion...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1, CGEH No. 1. Completion report. (Coso Hot Springs KGRA) Abstract Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH No. 1) is the first deep exploratory...

  15. Geothermal materials development activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

  16. Frio sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At leat 30 percent of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feet of methane in solution in this water. Only 10 percent of the water and methane (1 billion barrels of water and 40 billion cubic feet of methane) will be produced without reinjection of the waste water into the producing formation. Reservoir simulation studies indicate that 90 percent of the methane can be produced with reinjection. 106 figures.

  17. Geothermal Energy Association Recognizes the National Geothermal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Geothermal Energy Association Recognizes the National Geothermal Data System Geothermal Energy Association Recognizes the National Geothermal Data System July 29, 2014 - 8:20am...

  18. atlantic drill site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    140 7th Avenue South, University of South Florida, St Atlantic DSDP (Deep Sea Drilling Project) Site 607 and South Atlantic ODP Site 1090. Data collected provide and...

  19. Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1998 of a 3000-m-deep drill hole on the resurgent dome has provided useful information on present and past periods of circulation of water at temperatures of 100-200C within the...

  20. Energy 101: Geothermal Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    See how we can generate clean, renewable energy from hot water sources deep beneath the Earth's surface. The video highlights the basic principles at work in geothermal energy production, and illustrates three different ways the Earth's heat can be converted into electricity.

  1. Energy 101: Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    See how we can generate clean, renewable energy from hot water sources deep beneath the Earth's surface. The video highlights the basic principles at work in geothermal energy production, and illustrates three different ways the Earth's heat can be converted into electricity.

  2. Geothermal Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Katherine

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessment (Williams et al., 2009) outlined a mean 30GWe of undiscovered hydrothermal resource in the western US. One goal of the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) is to accelerate the development of this undiscovered resource. The Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) Blue Ribbon Panel (GTO, 2011) recommended that DOE focus efforts on helping industry identify hidden geothermal resources to increase geothermal capacity in the near term. Increased exploration activity will produce more prospects, more discoveries, and more readily developable resources. Detailed exploration case studies akin to those found in oil and gas (e.g. Beaumont, et al, 1990) will give operators a single point of information to gather clean, unbiased information on which to build geothermal drilling prospects. To support this effort, the National Renewable Energy laboratory (NREL) has been working with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a template for geothermal case studies on the Geothermal Gateway on OpenEI. In fiscal year 2013, the template was developed and tested with two case studies: Raft River Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Raft_River_Geothermal_Area) and Coso Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Coso_Geothermal_Area). In fiscal year 2014, ten additional case studies were completed, and additional features were added to the template to allow for more data and the direct citations of data. The template allows for: Data - a variety of data can be collected for each area, including power production information, well field information, geologic information, reservoir information, and geochemistry information. Narratives ? general (e.g. area overview, history and infrastructure), technical (e.g. exploration history, well field description, R&D activities) and geologic narratives (e.g. area geology, hydrothermal system, heat source, geochemistry.) Exploration Activity Catalog - catalog of exploration activities conducted in the area (with dates and references.) NEPA Analysis ? a query of NEPA analyses conducted in the area (that have been catalogued in the OpenEI NEPA database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  3. Geothermal Development and the Use of Categorical Exclusions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, A.; Young, K. R.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) can be complex and time consuming. Currently, a geothermal developer may have to complete the NEPA process multiple times during the development of a geothermal project. One mechanism to reduce the timeframe of the federal environmental review process for activities that do not have a significant environmental impact is the use of Categorical Exclusions (CXs), which can exempt projects from having to complete an Environmental Assessment or Environmental Impact Statement. This study focuses primarily on the CX process and its applicability to geothermal exploration. In this paper, we Provide generalized background information on CXs, including previous NEPA reports addressing CXs, the process for developing CXs, and the role of extraordinary circumstances; Examine the history of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) geothermal CXs;Compare current CXs for oil, gas, and geothermal energy; Describe bills proposing new statutory CXs; Examine the possibility of standardizing geothermal CXs across federal agencies; and Present analysis from the Geothermal NEPA Database and other sources on the potential for new geothermal exploration CXs. As part of this study, we reviewed Environmental Assessments (EAs) conducted in response to 20 geothermal exploration drilling permit applications (Geothermal Drilling Permits or Notices of Intents) since the year 2001, the majority of which are from the last 5 years. All 20 EAs reviewed for this study resulted in a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). While many of these FONSI's involved proponent proposed or federal agency required mitigation, this still suggests it may be appropriate to create or expand an exploration drilling CX for geothermal, which would have a significant impact on reducing geothermal exploration timelines and up-front costs. Ultimately, federal agencies tasked with permitting and completing environmental reviews for geothermal exploration drilling activities and/or legislative representatives are the responsible parties to discuss the merits and implementation of new or revised CXs for geothermal development.

  4. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update - Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Laney

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. The Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) works in partnership with industry to establish geothermal energy as an economically competitive contributor to the U.S. energy supply. Geothermal energy production, a $1.5 billion a year industry, generates electricity or provides heat for direct use applications. The technologies developed by the Geothermal Technologies Program will provide the Nation with new sources of electricity that are highly reliable and cost competitive and do not add to America's air pollution or the emission of greenhouse gases. Geothermal electricity generation is not subject to fuel price volatility and supply disruptions from changes in global energy markets. Geothermal energy systems use a domestic and renewable source of energy. The Geothermal Technologies Program develops innovative technologies to find, access, and use the Nation's geothermal resources. These efforts include emphasis on Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with continued R&D on geophysical and geochemical exploration technologies, improved drilling systems, and more efficient heat exchangers and condensers. The Geothermal Technologies Program is balanced between short-term goals of greater interest to industry, and long-term goals of importance to national energy interests. The program's research and development activities are expected to increase the number of new domestic geothermal fields, increase the success rate of geothermal well drilling, and reduce the costs of constructing and operating geothermal power plants. These improvements will increase the quantity of economically viable geothermal resources, leading in turn to an increased number of geothermal power facilities serving more energy demand. These new geothermal projects will take advantage of geothermal resources in locations where development is not currently possible or economical.

  5. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. The Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) works in partnership with industry to establish geothermal energy as an economically competitive contributor to the U.S. energy supply. Geothermal energy production, a $1.5 billion a year industry, generates electricity or provides heat for direct use applications. The technologies developed by the Geothermal Technologies Program will provide the Nation with new sources of electricity that are highly reliable and cost competitive and do not add to America's air pollution or the emission of greenhouse gases. Geothermal electricity generation is not subject to fuel price volatility and supply disruptions from changes in global energy markets. Geothermal energy systems use a domestic and renewable source of energy. The Geothermal Technologies Program develops innovative technologies to find, access, and use the Nation's geothermal resources. These efforts include emphasis on Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with continued R&D on geophysical and geochemical exploration technologies, improved drilling systems, and more efficient heat exchangers and condensers. The Geothermal Technologies Program is balanced between short-term goals of greater interest to industry, and long-term goals of importance to national energy interests. The program's research and development activities are expected to increase the number of new domestic geothermal fields, increase the success rate of geothermal well drilling, and reduce the costs of constructing and operating geothermal power plants. These improvements will increase the quantity of economically viable geothermal resources, leading in turn to an increased number of geothermal power facilities serving more energy demand. These new geothermal projects will take advantage of geothermal resources in locations where development is not currently possible or economical.

  6. Geothermal Program Review XI: proceedings. Geothermal Energy - The Environmental Responsible Energy Technology for the Nineties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings contain papers pertaining to current research and development of geothermal energy in the USA. The seven sections of the document are: Overview, The Geysers, Exploration and Reservoir Characterization, Drilling, Energy Conversion, Advanced Systems, and Potpourri. The Overview presents current DOE energy policy and industry perspectives. Reservoir studies, injection, and seismic monitoring are reported for the geysers geothermal field. Aspects of geology, geochemistry and models of geothermal exploration are described. The Drilling section contains information on lost circulation, memory logging tools, and slim-hole drilling. Topics considered in energy conversion are efforts at NREL, condensation on turbines and geothermal materials. Advanced Systems include hot dry rock studies and Fenton Hill flow testing. The Potpourri section concludes the proceedings with reports on low-temperature resources, market analysis, brines, waste treatment biotechnology, and Bonneville Power Administration activities. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY12 Annual Report #12;Handling downhole tool string #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine research in seafloor sediments and rocks. IODP builds upon the earlier successes of the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP

  8. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY11 Annual Report #12;Sunset aboard the JOIDES Resolution #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine as recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks. IODP builds upon the earlier successes of the Deep Sea Drilling

  9. Slimhole Drilling, Logging, and Completion Technology - An Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FINGER,JOHN T.; JACOBSON,RONALD D.

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using slim holes (diameter < 15 cm) for geothermal exploration and small-scale power production can produce significant cost savings compared to conventional rotary-drilling methods. In addition, data obtained from slim holes can be used to lower the risks and costs associated with the drilling and completion of large-diameter geothermal wells. As a prime contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Sandia National Laboratories has worked with industry since 1992 to develop and promote drilling, testing, and logging technology for slim holes. This paper describes the current status of work done both in-house and contracted to industry. It focuses on drilling technology, case histories of slimhole drilling projects, data collection and rig instrumentation, and high-temperature logging tools.

  10. Away from the Range Front- Intra-Basin Geothermal Exploration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project highlights: Escalate mechanical and structural methods to build on; Push-core may optimize shallow drilling; & Over-coring stress measurement may reveal local stress.

  11. Geothermal Energy Research and Development Program; Project Summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an internal DOE Geothermal Program document. This document contains summaries of projects related to exploration technology, reservoir technology, drilling technology, conversion technology, materials, biochemical processes, and direct heat applications. [DJE-2005

  12. U.S. and Australian Advanced Geothermal Projects Face Setbacks...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EGS involves injecting water at high pressure into deep, hot rock formations to fracture the rock, creating either a new geothermal reservoir of hot water embedded in hot...

  13. An Updated Numerical Model Of The Larderello-Travale Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    between the geothermal field and the surrounding deep aquifers, and the field sustainability. All the available geoscientific data collected in about one century of...

  14. Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010 1 3D-hydromechanical Behavior of a Stimulated Fractured Rock Mass Xavier Rachez and Sylvie Gentier BRGM, Geothermal Department) were drilled down to 5 km depths. Heat is extracted from this geothermal borehole triplet by injecting

  15. Environmental Conditions for Ocean Drilling Program Operations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    problems and delays during the several previous Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) legs in the South Atlantic by the Deep Sea Drilling Project1 s shipboard Cruise Operations managers (DSDP Operations report, 1974, 1976 STATION, TX 77843-3469 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION 1 II. GENERAL ANTARCTIC WATER MASSES

  16. GRC Workshop: The Power of the National Geothermal Data System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Drilling Down: How Legacy and New Research Data Can Advance Geothermal Development—The Power of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) A workshop at the Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada Abstract: The National Geothermal Data System's (NGDS) launch in 2014 will provide open access to millions of datasets, sharing technical geothermal-relevant data across the geosciences to propel geothermal development and production forward. By aggregating findings from the Energy Department's RD&D projects and consistent, reliable geological and geothermal information from all 50 states, this free, interactive tool can shorten project development timelines and facilitate scientific discovery and best practices. Stop by our workshop for an overview of how your company can benefit from implementing, and participating in this open-source based, distributed network. To register for the GRC Annual Meeting, visit the GRC Annual Meeting and GEA Geothermal Energy Expo event website.

  17. Heating the New Mexico Tech Campus with geothermal energy. Final report, July 1, 1978-October 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeFebre, V.; Miller, A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An area between the base of Socorro Peak and the New Mexico Tech Campus (located in central New Mexico) has been proposed as a site for geothermal exploratory drilling. The existing site environment is summarized, a program for site monitoring is proposed, impacts of geothermal production and reinjection are listed, and problems associated with geothermal development are examined. The most critical environmental impact is the increased seismic activity that may be associated with geothermal fluid migration resulting from geothermal production and reinjection.

  18. Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

  19. Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

  20. Geothermal-resource verification for Air Force bases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, P.R. Jr.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the various types of geothermal energy reviews some legal uncertainties of the resource and then describes a methodology to evaluate geothermal resources for applications to US Air Force bases. Estimates suggest that exploration costs will be $50,000 to $300,000, which, if favorable, would lead to drilling a $500,000 exploration well. Successful identification and development of a geothermal resource could provide all base, fixed system needs with an inexpensive, renewable energy source.

  1. 4 Scientific Drilling, No. 3, September 2006 Science ReportsScience Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    4 Scientific Drilling, No. 3, September 2006 Science ReportsScience Reports IODP Expeditions 304 forty years after the Mohole Project (Bascom, 1961), the goal of drilling a complete section through in situ oceanic crust remains unachieved. Deep Sea Drilling Project ­ Ocean Drilling Program (DSDP

  2. Geothermal-Heat Extraction As a source of renewable energy, geothermal-heat extraction has become increasingly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    Geothermal-Heat Extraction As a source of renewable energy, geothermal-heat extraction has become increasingly important in recent years. Proper design of a geothermal system, be it for deep or for shallow well? 40 MWh/a are required for heating the building. Assume an energy efficiency of 70%. Create a 2D

  3. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Drill Site Location Map 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    Newberry project drill site location map 2010. Once the exploration mythology is validated, it can be applied throughout the Cascade Range and elsewhere to locate and develop “blind” geothermal resources.

  4. Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect, North-Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  5. Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, B.C.; Harman, G.; Pitsenbarger, J. [eds.] [eds.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Energy Technology (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production.

  6. European Geothermal Congress 2013 Pisa, Italy, 3-7 June 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    European Geothermal Congress 2013 Pisa, Italy, 3-7 June 2013 1 Relative chronology of deep Rhine Graben, the deep geothermal reservoirs constitute fractured dominated systems. However constitute recharge drain. 1. INTRODUCTION In France, the geothermal heating production is mainly located

  7. Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Geothermal Drilling Permit |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS dataIndiana:Coop Inc Place: Vermont ServiceEnergyOpen Energy

  8. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey Wind Farm(CTIhinderProject Smart

  9. Materials for geothermal production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in the development of new materials continue to be made in the geothermal materials project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, work was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems. Efforts to transfer the technologies developed in these efforts to other energy-related sectors of the economy continued and considerable success was achieved.

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    AND PDM SYSTEMS IMPROVE DRILLING PERFORMANCE IN A CALIFORNIA GEOTHERMAL WELL Dennis Lovett, Terra and reliability in drilling operations by utilizing a specially designed positive displacement motor (PDM system allows data transmission without a continuous fluid column. Operating the Coso geothermal field

  11. Industrial food processing and space heating with geothermal heat. Final report, February 16, 1979-August 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunze, J.F.; Marlor, J.K.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A competitive aware for a cost sharing program was made to Madison County, Idaho to share in a program to develop moderate-to-low temperature geothermal energy for the heating of a large junior college, business building, public shcools and other large buildings in Rexburg, Idaho. A 3943 ft deep well was drilled at the edge of Rexburg in a region that had been probed by some shallower test holes. Temperatures measured near the 4000 ft depth were far below what was expected or needed, and drilling was abandoned at that depth. In 1981 attempts were made to restrict downward circulation into the well, but the results of this effort yielded no higher temperatures. The well is a prolific producer of 70/sup 0/F water, and could be used as a domestic water well.

  12. Drill string enclosure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

    1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

  13. Characterization of the geothermal resource at Lackland AFB, San Antonio, Texas. Phase I report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawford, T.W.; Malone, C.R.; Allman, D.W.; Zeisloft, J.; Foley, D.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geothermal resource under Lackland Air Force Base (AFB), San Antonio, Texas was studied. It is the conclusion of the investigators that a geothermal well drilled at the site recommended by this study has a high probability of delivering geothermal fluids in sufficient quantity and at adequate temperatures to support a projected space and domestic hot water heating system. An exploratory production well location is recommended in the southwest sector of the base, based upon geologic conditions and the availability of sufficient open space to support the drilling operation. It is projected that a production well drilled at the recommended location would produce geothermal fluid of 130 to 145/sup 0/F at a rate of approximately 1000 gpm with reasonable fluid drawdowns. The Environmental Assessment for the drilling portion of the project has been completed, and no irreversible or irretrievable impacts are anticipated as a result of this drilling program. The permitting process is proceeding smoothly.

  14. Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

  15. Assessment of the geothermal resources of Indiana based on existing geologic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaught, T.L.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general geology of Indiana is presented including the following: physiography, stratigraphy, and structural features. The following indicators of geothermal energy are discussed: heat flow and thermal gradient, geothermal occurrences, seismic activity, geochemistry, and deep sedimentary basins. (MHR)

  16. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on scientific ocean drilling,please contact Joint Oceanographic Institutions,Inc.,1200 New York Avenue,NW,Suite 400,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on scientific ocean drilling,please contact Joint Oceanographic:www.joiscience.org; Phone:(202)232-3900. Design of this map was supported by the Ocean Drilling Program under° 20° 20° Deep Sea Drilling Project THE DEEP SEA DRILLING PROJECT (DSDP; 1968-1983) pioneered

  17. Ice Drilling Gallonmilkjugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    Ice Drilling Materials · Gallonmilkjugs · Syringes,largeand small · Pitchers · Spraybottles · 13x9? ·Isitbettertosquirtthewaterslowlyorasquicklyaspossible? ·Doestherateatwhichyousquirtthewaterchangethediameteroftheholes? ·Doesthetypeof`drill

  18. DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY Drilling for seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Hydrothermal Cooling 90% saving over Mechanical cooling Coordination With Offshore OTEC Plant to seep in #12;DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY BACKGROUND Not BOTH From the SAME Conduit Investment OFFSHORE Facilities Drilled Hydrothermal Energy Plant Cooling Power Biofuel / H2 Fresh Water DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL

  19. Optimizing drilling performance using a selected drilling fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judzis, Arnis (Salt Lake City, UT); Black, Alan D. (Coral Springs, FL); Green, Sidney J. (Salt Lake City, UT); Robertson, Homer A. (West Jordan, UT); Bland, Ronald G. (Houston, TX); Curry, David Alexander (The Woodlands, TX); Ledgerwood, III, Leroy W. (Cypress, TX)

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve drilling performance, a drilling fluid is selected based on one or more criteria and to have at least one target characteristic. Drilling equipment is used to drill a wellbore, and the selected drilling fluid is provided into the wellbore during drilling with the drilling equipment. The at least one target characteristic of the drilling fluid includes an ability of the drilling fluid to penetrate into formation cuttings during drilling to weaken the formation cuttings.

  20. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

  1. Geothermal progress monitor: Report No. 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue synthesizes information on all aspects of geothermal development in this country and abroad to permit identification and quantification of trends in the use of this source of energy. The contents include: (1) the Federal Beat; (2) The Industry Scene; (3) Financing; (4) Development Status; (5) Leasing and Drilling; (6) State and Local; (7) International; and (8) Technology Transfer. (ACR)

  2. Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

  3. Caldera processes and magma-hydrothermal systems continental scientific drilling program: thermal regimes, Valles caldera research, scientific and management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, F.; Nielson, D.L. (eds.)

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-range core-drilling operations and initial scientific investigations are described for four sites in the Valles caldera, New Mexico. The plan concentrates on the period 1986 to 1993 and has six primary objectives: (1) study the origin, evolution, physical/chemical dynamics of the vapor-dominated portion of the Valles geothermal system; (2) investigate the characteristics of caldera fill and mechanisms of caldera collapse and resurgence; (3) determine the physical/chemical conditions in the heat transfer zone between crystallizing plutons and the hydrothermal system; (4) study the mechanism of ore deposition in the caldera environment; (5) develop and test high-temperature drilling techniques and logging tools; and (6) evaluate the geothermal resource within a large silicic caldera. Core holes VC-2a (500 m) and VC-2b (2000 m) are planned in the Sulphur Springs area; these core holes will probe the vapor-dominated zone, the underlying hot-water-dominated zone, the boiling interface and probable ore deposition between the two zones, and the deep structure and stratigraphy along the western part of the Valles caldera fracture zone and resurgent dome. Core hole VC-3 will involve reopening existing well Baca number12 and deepening it from 3.2 km (present total depth) to 5.5 km, this core hole will penetrate the deep-crystallized silicic pluton, investigate conductive heat transfer in that zone, and study the evolution of the central resurgent dome. Core hole VC-4 is designed to penetrate deep into the presumably thick caldera fill in eastern Valles caldera and examine the relationship between caldera formation, sedimentation, tectonics, and volcanism. Core hole VC-5 is to test structure, stratigraphy, and magmatic evolution of pre-Valles caldera rocks, their relations to Valles caldera, and the influences of regional structure on volcanism and caldera formation.

  4. Pueblo of Jemez Geothermal Feasibility Study Fianl Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.A. Kelley; N. Rogers; S. Sandberg; J. Witcher; J. Whittier

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project assessed the feasibility of developing geothermal energy on the Pueblo of Jemez, with particular attention to the Red Rocks area. Geologic mapping of the Red Rocks area was done at a scale of 1:6000 and geophysical surveys identified a potential drilling target at a depth of 420 feet. The most feasible business identified to use geothermal energy on the reservation was a greenhouse growing culinary and medicinal herbs. Space heating and a spa were identified as two other likely uses of geothermal energy at Jemez Pueblo. Further geophysical surveys are needed to identify the depth to the Madera Limestone, the most likely host for a major geothermal reservoir.

  5. Coupling geothermal energy capture with carbon dioxide sequestration in naturally permeable, porous geologic formations  – a novel approach for expanding geothermal energy utilization.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randolph, Jimmy Bryan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis research presents a new method to harness geothermal energy by combining it with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. CO2 is injected into deep,… (more)

  6. Application Of Electrical Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electrical Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Application Of Electrical...

  7. Energy Department Explores Deep Direct Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department Explores Deep Direct Use Cascaded uses of geothermal energy include district heating and industrial uses as well as agricultural applications like greenhouses and...

  8. Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes characterization2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes 13 In this study, we report chemical and isotope data for 23 geothermal water samples collected geothermal waters collected from deep boreholes16 in different geothermal fields (Ohaaki, Wairakei, Mokai

  9. Design of a diesel exhaust-gas purification system for inert-gas drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caskey, B.C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To combat the serious oxygen corrosion of drill pipe when a low density drilling fluid (air or mist) is used in geothermal drilling, a system has been designed that produces an inert gas (essentially nitrogen) to be substituted for air. The system fits on three flatbed trailers, is roadable and produces 2000 scfm of gas. The projected cost for gas is slightly less than $2.00 per thousand standard cubic feet.

  10. 3-D Magnetotelluric Investigations for geothermal exploration in Martinique (Lesser Antilles). Characteristic Deep Resistivity Structures, and Shallow Resistivity Distribution Matching Heliborne TEM Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coppo, Nicolas; Girard, Jean-François; Wawrzyniak, Pierre; Hautot, Sophie; Tarits, Pascal; Jacob, Thomas; Martelet, Guillaume; Mathieu, Francis; Gadalia, Alain; Bouchot, Vincent; Traineau, Hervé

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of a global French program oriented towards the development of renewable energies, Martinique Island (Lesser Antilles, France) has been extensively investigated (from 2012 to 2013) through an integrated multi-methods approach, with the aim to define precisely the potential geothermal ressources, previously highlighted (Sanjuan et al., 2003). Amongst the common investigation methods deployed, we carried out three magnetotelluric (MT) surveys located above three of the most promising geothermal fields of Martinique, namely the Anses d'Arlet, the Montagne Pel{\\'e}e and the Pitons du Carbet prospects. A total of about 100 MT stations were acquired showing single or multi-dimensional behaviors and static shift effects. After processing data with remote reference, 3-D MT inversions of the four complex elements of MT impedance tensor without pre-static-shift correction, have been performed for each sector, providing three 3-D resistivity models down to about 12 to 30 km depth. The sea coast effe...

  11. Drilling Report- First CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the hydrogeochemistry of a subsurface geothermal outflow zone of the caldera near the source of convective upflow, (2) to obtain structural and stratigraphic information from...

  12. Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill deep resource wells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: A cost effective three (3) Phased Program to locate and confirm up to Five (5) commercial geothermal resources in Colorado. The heat resources to be prioritized will be those able to support a minimum electrical generation capacity of 10 MW by location.

  13. DRILLING MACHINES GENERAL INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    TC 9-524 Chapter 4 DRILLING MACHINES GENERAL INFORMATION PURPOSE This chapter contains basic information pertaining to drilling machines. A drilling machine comes in many shapes and sizes, from small hand-held power drills to bench mounted and finally floor-mounted models. They can perform operations

  14. Rotary blasthole drilling update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Blasthole drilling rigs are the unsung heroes of open-pit mining. Recently manufacturers have announced new tools. Original equipment manufactures (OEMs) are making safer and more efficient drills. Technology and GPS navigation systems are increasing drilling accuracy. The article describes features of new pieces of equipment: Sandvik's DR460 rotary blasthole drill, P & H's C-Series drills and Atlas Copco's Pit Viper PV275 multiphase rotary blasthole drill rig. DrillNav Plus is a blasthole navigation system developed by Leica Geosystems. 5 photos.

  15. Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Z. Adam Szybinski

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley – Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well – Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

  16. Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, B.C.; Pichiarella, L.S. [eds.; Kane, L.S.; Henline, D.M.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Energy (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past two months.

  17. California Geothermal Energy Collaborative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Geothermal Energy Collaborative Geothermal Education and Outreach Guide of California Davis, and the California Geothermal Energy Collaborative. We specifically would like to thank support of the California Geothermal Energy Collaborative. We also thank Charlene Wardlow of Ormat for her

  18. Development of a geothermal acoustic borehole televiewer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heard, F.E.; Bauman, T.J.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most geothermal wells are drilled in hard rock formations where fluid flow is through systems of open fractures. Productivity of these wells is usually determined by the extent of intersection of the wellbore with the fracture system. A need exists for fracture mapping methods and tools which can operate in a geothermal environment. In less hostile environments, the acoustic borehole televiewer has been shown to be a useful tool for determining location, orientation, and characterization of fractures as they intersect the borehole and for general wellbore and casing inspection. The development conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to adapt an acoustic borehole televiewer for operation in a geothermal environment is described. The modified instrument has been successfully tested at temperatures as high as 280/sup 0/C and pressures up to 5000 psi, and used successfully to map fractures and casing damage in geothermal wells.

  19. Geothermal direct use engineering and design guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R.G.; Culver, G.; Ellis, P.F.; Higbee, C.; Kindle, C.; Lienau, P.J.; Lunis, B.C.; Rafferty, K.; Stiger, S.; Wright, P.M.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook is designed to be a comprehensive, thoroughly practical reference guide for engineers and designers of direct heat projects. These projects could include the conversion of geothermal energy into space heating cooling of buildings, district heating, greenhouse heating, aquaculture and industrial processing. The Guidebook is directed at understanding the nature of geothermal resources and the exploration of these resources, fluid sampling techniques, drilling, and completion of geothermal wells through well testing, and reservoir evaluation. It presents information useful to engineers on the specification of equipment including well pumps, piping, heat exchangers, space heating equipment, heat pumps and absorption refrigeration. A compilation of current information about greenhouse, aquaculture and industrial applications is included together with a discussion of engineering cost analysis, regulation requirements, and environmental considerations. The purpose of the Guidebook is to provide an integrated view for the development of direct use projects for which there is a very potential in the United States.

  20. Geothermal direct use engineering and design guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lienau, P.J.; Lunis, B.C. (eds.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook is designed to be a comprehensive, thoroughly practical reference guide for engineers and designers of direct heat projects. These projects could include the conversion of geothermal energy into space heating and cooling of buildings, district heating, greenhouse heating, aquaculture and industrial processing. The Guidebook is directed at understanding the nature of geothermal resources and the exploration of the resources, fluid sampling techniques, drilling, and completion of geothermal wells through well testing, and reservoir evaluation. It presents information useful to engineers on the specification of equipment including well pumps, piping, heat exchangers, space heating equipment, heat pumps and absorption refrigeration. A compilation of current information about greenhouse aquaculture and industrial applications is included together with a discussion of engineering cost analysis, regulation requirements, and environmental consideration. The purpose of the Guidebook is to provide an integrated view for the development of direct use projects for which there is a very large potential in the United States.

  1. Geothermal Brief: Market and Policy Impacts Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, B.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility-scale geothermal electricity generation plants have generally taken advantage of various government initiatives designed to stimulate private investment. This report investigates these initiatives to evaluate their impact on the associated cost of energy and the development of geothermal electric generating capacity using conventional hydrothermal technologies. We use the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) to analyze the effects of tax incentives on project economics. Incentives include the production tax credit, U.S. Department of Treasury cash grant, the investment tax credit, and accelerated depreciation schedules. The second half of the report discusses the impact of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Loan Guarantee Program on geothermal electric project deployment and possible reasons for a lack of guarantees for geothermal projects. For comparison, we examine the effectiveness of the 1970s DOE drilling support programs, including the original loan guarantee and industry-coupled cost share programs.

  2. Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

  3. Geophysical imaging methods for analysis of the Krafla Geothermal Field, NE Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Beatrice Smith

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Joint geophysical imaging techniques have the potential to be reliable methods for characterizing geothermal sites and reservoirs while reducing drilling and production risks. In this study, we applied a finite difference ...

  4. Geothermal technology publications and related reports: A bibliography, January 1986 through December 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolendino, C.D. (ed.)

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia publications resulting from DOE programs in Geothermal Technologies, Magma Energy and Continental Scientific Drilling are listed for reference. The RandD includes borehole-related technologies, in situ processes, and wellbore diagnostics.

  5. Directional Drilling and Equipment for Hot Granite Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R. E.; Neudecker, J. W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directional drilling technology was extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, hot dry rock (HDR) experimental site. Borehole geometries, extremely hard and abrasive granite rock, and high formation temperatures combined to provide a challenging environment for directional drilling tools and instrumentation. Completing the first of the two-wellbore HDR system resulted in the definition of operation limitations of -many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation, and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-21), to a measured depth of 4.7 km (15,300 ft) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 320 C (610 F) required the development of a new high-temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 2.6 km (8,500 ft) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35{sup o} from the vertical at the controlled azimuthal orientation. Data were collected to optimize the drilling procedures far the programmed directional drilling of well EE-3 parallel to, and 370 metres (1,200 ft) above, Drilling equipment and techniques used in drilling wellbores for extraction of geothermal energy from hot granite were generally similar to those that are standard and common to hydrocarbon drilling practices. However, it was necessary to design some new equipment for this program: some equipment was modified especially for this program and some was operated beyond normal ratings. These tools and procedures met with various degrees of success. Two types of shock subs were developed and tested during this project. However, downhole time was limited, and formations were so varied that analysis of the capabilities of these items is not conclusive. Temperature limits of the tools were exceeded. EE-2. Commercial drilling and fishing jars were improved during the drilling program. Three-cone, tungsten-carbide insert bit performance with downhole motors was limited by rapid gauge wear. Rotary drilling was optimized for wells EE-2 and EE-3 using softer (IADS 635 code) bits and provided a balance between gauge,. cutting structure, and bearing life. Problems of extreme drill string drag, drill string twist-off, and corrosion control are discussed.

  6. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on scientific ocean drilling,please contact Integrated Ocean Drilling Program,Texas A&M University,1000 Discovery Drive,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on scientific ocean drilling,please contact Integrated Ocean Drilling.E-mail:information@iodp.tamu.edu; Web:www.iodp-usio.org;Telephone:(979) 845-2673. Design of this map was supported by the Ocean Drilling in this publication do not reflect the views of NSF or Texas A&M University. Deep Sea Drilling Project Legs 1­96,Ocean

  7. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Smith, 1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal...

  8. National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs Abstract To satisfy the critical need for geothermal data to advance geothermal energy as...

  9. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basalt K Eburru Geothermal Area Eburru Geothermal Area East African Rift System Kenya Rift Basalt Fukushima Geothermal Area Fukushima Geothermal Area Northeast Honshu Arc...

  10. Geothermal Energy Resources (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Louisiana developed policies regarding geothermal stating that the state should pursue the rapid and orderly development of geothermal resources.

  11. Geothermal Data Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) has designed and tested a comprehensive, federated information system that will make geothermal data widely available. This new National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) will provide access to all types of geothermal data to enable geothermal analysis and widespread public use, thereby reducing the risk of geothermal energy development.

  12. Eos, Vol. 75, No. 40, October 4, 1994 At the same time, drilling can contribute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    Eos, Vol. 75, No. 40, October 4, 1994 At the same time, drilling can contribute to a number questions at optimal geological sites from around the world and should involve drilling and coring at a variety of depths. That is, the program should not be restricted to only deep or shallow drilling

  13. EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates Ormat Nevada, Inc.’s (Ormat’s) proposed geothermal project consists of drilling up to 16 wells for geothermal exploration approximately 70 miles southeast of Bend, Oregon and 50 miles northwest of Burns, Oregon just south of U.S. Highway 20. The proposed project includes three distinct drilling areas. Up to three wells would be drilled on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Prineville District (Mahogany), up to ten wells would be drilled on lands managed by the BLM Burns District (Midnight Point), and up to three wells would be drilled on private land located adjacent to the federal geothermal leases west of Glass Butte (Private Lands). DOE funding would be associated with three of the sixteen proposed wells. BLM is the lead agency and DOE is participating as a cooperating agency.

  14. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Wolhart

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

  15. Geothermal reservoir at Tatapani Geothermal field, Surguja district, Madhya Pradesh, IN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitale, U.L.; Sarolkar, P.B.; Rawat, H.S.; Shukia, S.N.

    1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tatapani Geothermal field, located on the Son-Narmada mega lineament is one of the most intense geothermal manifestation, with hot spring temperature of 98°c. in Central India. 21 Exploratory and thermal gradient boreholes followed by 5 production wells for proposed 300 KWe binary cycle power plant, have revealed specific reservoir parameters of shallow geothermal reservoir of 110°c in upper 350 m of geothermal system and their possible continuation to deeper reservoir of anticipated temperature of 160 ± 10°c. Testing of five production wells done by Oil and Natural Gas Corporation concurrently with drilling at different depths and also on completion of drilling, have established feeder zones of thermal water at depth of 175-200 m, 280-300 m, maximum temperature of 112.5°c and bottom hole pressure of 42 kg/cm². Further interpretation of temperature and pressure profiles, injection test, well head discharges and chemical analysis data has revealed thermal characteristics of individual production wells and overall configuration of .thermal production zones with their permeability, temperature, and discharge characteristics in the shallow thermal reservoir area. Well testing data and interpretation of reservoir parameters therefrom, for upper 350 m part of geothermal system and possible model of deeper geothermal reservoir at Tatapani have been presented in the paper.

  16. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- State geothermal commercialization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    State geothermal commercialization programs in seven Rocky Mountain states. Semiannual progress report, July-December 1980 Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site...

  17. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New...

  18. Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Cotton City, New Mexico Coordinates Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlem...

  19. Core Drilling Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tank Farms workers demonstrate core drilling capabilities for Hanford single-shell tanks. Core drilling is used to determine the current condition of each tank to assist in the overall assessment...

  20. Well drilling apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prins, K.; Prins, R.K.

    1982-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A drill rig for drilling wells having a derrick adapted to hold and lower a conductor string and drill pipe string. A support frame is fixed to the derrick to extend over the well to be drilled, and a rotary table, for holding and rotating drill pipe strings, is movably mounted thereon. The table is displaceable between an active position in alignment with the axis of the well and an inactive position laterally spaced therefrom. A drill pipe holder is movably mounted on the frame below the rotary table for displacement between a first position laterally of the axis of the well and a second position in alignment with the axis of the well. The rotary table and said drill pipe holder are displaced in opposition to each other, so that the rotary table may be removed from alignment with the axis of the well and said drill pipe string simultaneously held without removal from said well.

  1. Geothermal Progress Monitor. Report No. 18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The near-term challenges of the US geothermal industry and its long-range potential are dominant themes in this issue of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Progress Monitor which summarizes calendar-year 1996 events in geothermal development. Competition is seen as an antidote to current problems and a cornerstone of the future. Thus, industry's cost-cutting strategies needed to increase the competitiveness of geothermal energy in world markets are examined. For example, a major challenge facing the US industry today is that the sales contracts of independent producers have reached, or soon will, the critical stage when the prices utilities must pay them drop precipitously, aptly called the cliff. However, Thomas R. Mason, President and CEO of CalEnergy told the DOE 1996 Geothermal Program Review XIV audience that while some of his company's plants have ''gone over the cliff, the world is not coming to an end.'' With the imposition of severe cost-cutting strategies, he said, ''these plants remain profitable... although they have to be run with fewer people and less availability.'' The Technology Development section of the newsletter discusses enhancements to TOUGH2, the general purpose fluid and heat flow simulator and the analysis of drill cores from The Geysers, but the emphasis is on advanced drilling technologies.

  2. Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

  3. Geothermal innovative technologies catalog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology items in this report were selected on the basis of technological readiness and applicability to current technology transfer thrusts. The items include technologies that are considered to be within 2 to 3 years of being transferred. While the catalog does not profess to be entirely complete, it does represent an initial attempt at archiving innovative geothermal technologies with ample room for additions as they occur. The catalog itself is divided into five major functional areas: Exploration; Drilling, Well Completion, and Reservoir Production; Materials and Brine Chemistry; Direct Use; and Economics. Within these major divisions are sub-categories identifying specific types of technological advances: Hardware; Software; Data Base; Process/Procedure; Test Facility; and Handbook.

  4. Expanding Geothermal Resource Utilization in Nevada through Directed Research and Public Outreach

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project entails finding and assessing geothermal systems to: Increase geothermal development through research and outreach; Reduce risk in drill target selection, thus reducing project development costs; and Recent research includes development of shallow temperature surveys, seismic methods, aerial photography, field structural geology.

  5. Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010 1 3D Flow Modelling of the Medium-Term Circulation Test Performed in the Deep Geothermal Site of Soultz-Sous-forêts (France) Sylvie Gentier, Xavier Rachez, Tien Dung Tran Ngoc, Mariane Peter-Borie, Christine Souque BRGM, Geothermal

  6. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop General overview of Geothermal...

  7. Geothermal: About

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshortGeothermal Heat Pumps Geothermal

  8. Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karl, Bernie [CHSR,LLC Owner] [CHSR,LLC Owner

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective for the Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project is to provide another source of base-load renewable energy in the Fairbanks North Star Borough (FNSB). To accomplish this, Chena Hot Springs Resort (Chena) drilled a re-injection well to 2700 feet and a production well to 2500 feet. The re-injection well allows a greater flow of water to directly replace the water removed from the warmest fractures in the geothermal reservoir. The new production will provide access to warmer temperature water in greater quantities.

  9. Geothermal Development and the Use of Categorical Exclusions Under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, A.; Young, K. R.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) can be complex and time consuming. Currently, a geothermal developer may have to complete the NEPA process multiple times during the development of a geothermal project. One mechanism to reduce the timeframe of the federal environmental review process for activities that do not have a significant environmental impact is the use of Categorical Exclusions (CXs), which can exempt projects from having to complete an Environmental Assessment or Environmental Impact Statement. This study focuses primarily on the CX process and its applicability to geothermal exploration. In this paper, we: Provide generalized background information on CXs, including previous NEPA reports addressing CXs, the process for developing CXs, and the role of extraordinary circumstances; Examine the history of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) geothermal CXs; Compare current CXs for oil, gas, and geothermal energy; Describe bills proposing new statutory CXs; Examine the possibility of standardizing geothermal CXs across federal agencies; and Present analysis from the Geothermal NEPA Database and other sources on the potential for new geothermal exploration CXs. As part of this study, we reviewed Environmental Assessments (EAs) conducted in response to 20 geothermal exploration drilling permit applications (Geothermal Drilling Permits or Notices of Intents) since the year 2001, the majority of which are from the last 5 years. All 20 EAs reviewed for this study resulted in a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). While many of these FONS's involved proponent proposed or federal agency required mitigation, this still suggests it may be appropriate to create or expand an exploration drilling CX for geothermal, which would have a significant impact on reducing geothermal exploration timelines and up-front costs. Ultimately, federal agencies tasked with permitting and completing environmental reviews for geothermal exploration drilling activities and/or legislative representatives are the responsible parties to discuss the merits and implementation of new or revised CXs for geothermal development.

  10. Superhard nanophase cutter materials for rock drilling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voronov, O.; Tompa, G.; Sadangi, R.; Kear, B.; Wilson, C.; Yan, P.

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low Pressure-High Temperature (LPHT) System has been developed for sintering of nanophase cutter and anvil materials. Microstructured and nanostructured cutters were sintered and studied for rock drilling applications. The WC/Co anvils were sintered and used for development of High Pressure-High Temperature (HPHT) Systems. Binderless diamond and superhard nanophase cutter materials were manufactured with help of HPHT Systems. The diamond materials were studied for rock machining and drilling applications. Binderless Polycrystalline Diamonds (BPCD) have high thermal stability and can be used in geothermal drilling of hard rock formations. Nanophase Polycrystalline Diamonds (NPCD) are under study in precision machining of optical lenses. Triphasic Diamond/Carbide/Metal Composites (TDCC) will be commercialized in drilling and machining applications.

  11. Beowawe Geothermal Area evaluation program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iovenitti, J. L

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several exploration programs were conducted at the Beowawe Geothermal Prospect, Lander and Eureka County, Nevada. Part I, consisting of a shallow temperature hole program, a mercury soil sampling survey, and a self-potential survey were conducted in order to select the optimum site for an exploratory well. Part II consisted of drilling a 5927-foot exploratory well, running geophysical logs, conducting a drill stem test (2937-3208 feet), and a short-term (3-day) flow test (1655-2188 feet). All basic data collected is summarized.

  12. Parcperdue geopressure-geothermal project. Study a geopressured reservoir by drilling and producing a well in a limited geopressured water sand. Final technical report, September 28, 1979-December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, J.R.; Stanley, J.G. (eds.) [eds.

    1984-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of geopressured reservoirs was investigated by drilling and producing a well in small, well defined, geopressured reservoir; and performing detailed pressure transient analysis together with geological, geophysical, chemical, and physical studies. The Dow-DOE L. R. Sweezy No. 1 well was drilled to a depth of 13,600 feet in Parcperdue field, just south of Lafayette, Louisiana, and began production in April, 1982. The production zone was a poorly consolidated sandstone which constantly produced sand into the well stream, causing damage to equipment and causing other problems. The amount of sand production was kept manageable by limiting the flow rate to below 10,000 barrels per day. Reservoir properties of size, thickness, depth, temperature, pressure, salinity, porosity, and permeability were close to predicted values. The reservoir brine was undersaturated with respect to gas, containing approximately 20 standard cubic feet of gas per barrel of brine. Shale dewatering either did not occur or was insignificant as a drive mechanism. Production terminated when the gravel-pack completion failed and the production well totally sanded in, February, 1983. Total production up to the sanding incident was 1.94 million barrels brine and 31.5 million standard cubic feet gas.

  13. Lost circulation in geothermal wells: survey and evaluation of industry experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, M.A.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lost circulation during drilling and completion of geothermal wells can be a severe problem, particularly in naturally fractured and/or vugular formations. Geothermal and petroleum operators, drilling service companies, and independent consultants were interviewed to assess the lost circulation problem in geothermal wells and to determine general practices for preventing lost circulation. This report documents the results and conclusions from the interviews and presents recommendations for needed research. In addition, a survey was also made of the lost circulation literature, of currently available lost circulation materials, and of existing lost circulation test equipment.

  14. Geothermal Exploration Policy Mechanisms: Lessons for the United States from International Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, B.; Economy, R.; Lowder, T.; Schwabe, P.; Regenthal, S.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on five of the policy types that are most relevant to the U.S. market and political context for the exploration and confirmation of conventional hydrothermal (geothermal) resources in the United States: (1) drilling failure insurance, (2) loan guarantees, (3) subsidized loans, (4) capital subsidies, and (5) government-led exploration. It describes each policy type and its application in other countries and regions. It offers policymakers a guide for drafting future geothermal support mechanisms for the exploration-drilling phase of geothermal development.

  15. Proposal for a Planetary Geology and Geophysics Initiative on Lunar Drilling Shaopeng Huang, Dept. Geol. Sciences., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shaopeng

    and technology. As the Moon is the cornerstone for deep space exploration, lunar drilling will become technologies for lunar drilling is lagging behind deep space exploration strategy and planning. Compelling verification of those new conceptual models. · Borehole drilling is the only means of directly measuring

  16. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

  17. T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    that in deep and super deep wells the temperature of the drilling fluid (at a given depth) depends on the current vertical depth, on drilling technology (flow rate, well design, fluid properties, penetration rate of the thermal equilibrium when the temperature of drilling fluid (at a given depth) is a linear function of time

  19. Geothermal FIT Design: International Experience and U.S. Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickerson, W.; Gifford, J.; Grace, R.; Cory, K.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing power plants is a risky endeavor, whether conventional or renewable generation. Feed-in tariff (FIT) policies can be designed to address some of these risks, and their design can be tailored to geothermal electric plant development. Geothermal projects face risks similar to other generation project development, including finding buyers for power, ensuring adequate transmission capacity, competing to supply electricity and/or renewable energy certificates (RECs), securing reliable revenue streams, navigating the legal issues related to project development, and reacting to changes in existing regulations or incentives. Although FITs have not been created specifically for geothermal in the United States to date, a variety of FIT design options could reduce geothermal power plant development risks and are explored. This analysis focuses on the design of FIT incentive policies for geothermal electric projects and how FITs can be used to reduce risks (excluding drilling unproductive exploratory wells).

  20. Interactive Maps from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The interactive maps are built with layers of spatial data that are also available as direct file downloads (see DDE00299). The maps allow analysis of these many layers, with various data sets turned on or off, for determining potential areas that would be favorable for geothermal drilling or other activity. They provide information on current exploration projects and leases, Bureau of Land Management land status, and map presentation of each type of scientific spatial data: geothermal, geophysical, geologic, geodetic, groundwater, and geochemical.

  1. ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their Application to Geothermal Well Testing, in Geothermalthe Performance of Geothermal Wells, Geothermal Res.of Production Data from Geothermal Wells, Geothermal Res.

  2. Temporary Cementitious Sealers in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Butcher, T.; Brothers, L.; Bour, D.

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike conventional hydrothennal geothermal technology that utilizes hot water as the energy conversion resources tapped from natural hydrothermal reservoir located at {approx}10 km below the ground surface, Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) must create a hydrothermal reservoir in a hot rock stratum at temperatures {ge}200 C, present in {approx}5 km deep underground by employing hydraulic fracturing. This is the process of initiating and propagating a fracture as well as opening pre-existing fractures in a rock layer. In this operation, a considerable attention is paid to the pre-existing fractures and pressure-generated ones made in the underground foundation during drilling and logging. These fractures in terms of lost circulation zones often cause the wastage of a substantial amount of the circulated water-based drilling fluid or mud. Thus, such lost circulation zones must be plugged by sealing materials, so that the drilling operation can resume and continue. Next, one important consideration is the fact that the sealers must be disintegrated by highly pressured water to reopen the plugged fractures and to promote the propagation of reopened fractures. In response to this need, the objective of this phase I project in FYs 2009-2011 was to develop temporary cementitious fracture sealing materials possessing self-degradable properties generating when {ge} 200 C-heated scalers came in contact with water. At BNL, we formulated two types of non-Portland cementitious systems using inexpensive industrial by-products with pozzolanic properties, such as granulated blast-furnace slag from the steel industries, and fly ashes from coal-combustion power plants. These byproducts were activated by sodium silicate to initiate their pozzolanic reactions, and to create a cemetitious structure. One developed system was sodium silicate alkali-activated slag/Class C fly ash (AASC); the other was sodium silicate alkali-activated slag/Class F fly ash (AASF) as the binder of temper-try sealers. Two specific additives without sodium silicate as alkaline additive were developed in this project: One additive was the sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as self-degradation promoting additive; the other was the hard-burned magnesium oxide (MgO) made from calcinating at 1,000-1,500 C as an expansive additive. The AASC and AASF cementitious sealers made by incorporating an appropriate amount of these additives met the following six criteria: 1) One dry mix component product; 2) plastic viscosity, 20 to 70 cp at 300 rpm; 3) maintenance of pumpability for at least 1 hour at 85 C; 4) compressive strength >2000 psi; 5) self-degradable by injection with water at a certain pressure; and 6) expandable and swelling properties; {ge}0.5% of total volume of the sealer.

  3. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Discover new 260F and 300F geothermal reservoirs in Oregon. To demonstrate the application of high precision geophysics for well targeting. Demonstrate a combined testing approach to Flowing Differential Self Potential (FDSP) and electrical tomography resistivity as a guide to exploration and development. Demonstrate utility and benefits of sump-less drilling for a low environmental impact. Create both short and long term employment through exploration, accelerated development timeline and operation.

  4. Remote drill bit loader

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dokos, J.A.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A drill bit loader is described for loading a tapered shank of a drill bit into a similarly tapered recess in the end of a drill spindle. The spindle has a transverse slot at the inner end of the recess. The end of the tapered shank of the drill bit has a transverse tang adapted to engage in the slot so that the drill bit will be rotated by the spindle. The loader is in the form of a cylinder adapted to receive the drill bit with the shank projecting out of the outer end of the cylinder. Retainer pins prevent rotation of the drill bit in the cylinder. The spindle is lowered to extend the shank of the drill bit into the recess in the spindle and the spindle is rotated to align the slot in the spindle with the tang on the shank. A spring unit in the cylinder is compressed by the drill bit during its entry into the recess of the spindle and resiliently drives the tang into the slot in the spindle when the tang and slot are aligned. In typical remote drilling operations, whether in hot cells or water pits, drill bits have been held using a collet or end mill type holder with set screws. In either case, to load or change a drill bit required the use master-slave manipulators to position the bits and tighten the collet or set screws. This requirement eliminated many otherwise useful work areas because they were not equipped with slaves, particularly in water pits.

  5. Remote drill bit loader

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dokos, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A drill bit loader for loading a tapered shank of a drill bit into a similarly tapered recess in the end of a drill spindle. The spindle has a transverse slot at the inner end of the recess. The end of the tapered shank of the drill bit has a transverse tang adapted to engage in the slot so that the drill bit will be rotated by the spindle. The loader is in the form of a cylinder adapted to receive the drill bit with the shank projecting out of the outer end of the cylinder. Retainer pins prevent rotation of the drill bit in the cylinder. The spindle is lowered to extend the shank of the drill bit into the recess in the spindle and the spindle is rotated to align the slot in the spindle with the tang on the shank. A spring unit in the cylinder is compressed by the drill bit during its entry into the recess of the spindle and resiliently drives the tang into the slot in the spindle when the tang and slot are aligned.

  6. Training and Drills

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume offers a framework for effective management of emergency response training and drills. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  7. Remote drill bit loader

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dokos, J.A.

    1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A drill bit loader is described for loading a tapered shank of a drill bit into a similarly tapered recess in the end of a drill spindle. The spindle has a transverse slot at the inner end of the recess. The end of the tapered shank of the drill bit has a transverse tang adapted to engage in the slot so that the drill bit will be rotated by the spindle. The loader is in the form of a cylinder adapted to receive the drill bit with the shank projecting out of the outer end of the cylinder. Retainer pins prevent rotation of the drill bit in the cylinder. The spindle is lowered to extend the shank of the drill bit into the recess in the spindle and the spindle is rotated to align the slot in the spindle with the tang on the shank. A spring unit in the cylinder is compressed by the drill bit during its entry into the recess of the spindle and resiliently drives the tang into the slot in the spindle when the tang and slot are aligned. 5 figs.

  8. Earth drill rig

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rassieur, C.L.

    1987-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an earth drill rig wherein an upwardly and downwardly moving drill-string-turning rotary table is rotated by a kelly bar connected at its lower end to a vertical drive shaft, the kelly bar being journalled for rotation in and fixed against axial movement with respect to a drill frame assembly and the rotary table being mounted for axial movement on and along the drill frame assembly. The drill frame assembly is pivotally mounted on a vehicle on a substantially horizontal axis for pivoting between an upright position and a substantially horizontal position for transportation. The improvement described here comprises the drill frame assembly pivot axis positioned below the lower end of the kelly bar and above the upper end of the vertical drive shaft, and a universal coupling connecting the lower end of the kelly bar and the vertical drive shaft the universal coupling comprising universal joints at opposite ends of an elongated slip joint connector and connected there-by for relative axial movement but driving coupling between the universal joints. The universal joints lie generally on a circle of which the drill frame assembly pivot axis is the center. The drill frame assembly can be moved between the upright and the substantially horizontal positions without disconnecting the kelly bar from the vertical drive shaft, the kelly bar being revolvable by the drive shaft through substantially the entire range of movement of the drill frame assembly.

  9. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

  10. Director, Geothermal Technologies Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The mission of the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) is to accelerate the development and deployment of clean, domestic geothermal resources that will promote a stronger, more productive economy...

  11. Geothermal Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of geothermal energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply geothermal systems within the Federal sector.

  12. Design and Modeling of the NU Smart Space Drilling System (SSDS) Yinghui Liu, Brian Weinberg, Constantinos Mavroidis*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    1 Design and Modeling of the NU Smart Space Drilling System (SSDS) Yinghui Liu, Brian Weinberg: http://www.coe.neu.edu/~mavro * Associate Professor, Corresponding Author Abstract Deep space drilling Drilling System (SSDS), which is currently being developed at Northeastern University (NU), is a compact

  13. Updated U.S. Geothermal Supply Curve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, C.; Young, K. R.; Anderson, A.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents the approach used to update the U.S. geothermal supply curve. The analysis undertaken in this study estimates the supply of electricity generation potential from geothermal resources in the United States and the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), capital costs, and operating and maintenance costs associated with developing these geothermal resources. Supply curves were developed for four categories of geothermal resources: identified hydrothermal (6.4 GWe), undiscovered hydrothermal (30.0 GWe), near-hydrothermal field enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) (7.0 GWe) and deep EGS (15,900 GWe). Two cases were considered: a base case and a target case. Supply curves were generated for each of the four geothermal resource categories for both cases. For both cases, hydrothermal resources dominate the lower cost range of the combined geothermal supply curve. The supply curves indicate that the reservoir performance improvements assumed in the target case could significantly lower EGS costs and greatly increase EGS deployment over the base case.

  14. A Geological and Geophysical Study of the Geothermal Energy Potential of Pilgrim Springs, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, Donald L.; Forbes, Robert B. [eds.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pilgrim Springs geothermal area, located about 75 km north of Nome, was the subject of an intensive, reconnaissance-level geophysical and geological study during a 90-day period in the summer of 1979. The thermal springs are located in a northeast-oriented, oval area of thawed ground approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} in size, bordered on the north by the Pilgrim River. A second, much smaller, thermal anomaly was discovered about 3 km northeast of the main thawed area. Continuous permafrost in the surrounding region is on the order of 100 m thick. Present surface thermal spring discharge is {approx} 4.2 x 10{sup -3} m{sup 3} s{sup -1} (67 gallons/minute) of alkali-chloride-type water at a temperature of 81 C. The reason for its high salinity is not yet understood because of conflicting evidence for seawater vs. other possible water sources. Preliminary Na-K-Ca geothermometry suggests deep reservoir temperatures approaching 150 C, but interpretation of these results is difficult because of their dependence on an unknown water mixing history. Based on these estimates, and present surface and drill hole water temperatures, Pilgrim Springs would be classified as an intermediate-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system.

  15. Development and Manufacture of Cost-Effective Composite Drill Pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James C. Leslie

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Composite Products and Technology, Inc. (ACPT) has developed composite drill pipe (CDP) that matches the structural and strength properties of steel drill pipe, but weighs less than 50 percent of its steel counterpart. Funding for the multiyear research and development of CDP was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy through the Natural Gas and Oil Projects Management Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Composite materials made of carbon fibers and epoxy resin offer mechanical properties comparable to steel at less than half the weight. Composite drill pipe consists of a composite material tube with standard drill pipe steel box and pin connections. Unlike metal drill pipe, composite drill pipe can be easily designed, ordered, and produced to meet specific requirements for specific applications. Because it uses standard joint connectors, CDP can be used in lieu of any part of or for the entire steel drill pipe section. For low curvature extended reach, deep directional drilling, or ultra deep onshore or offshore drilling, the increased strength to weight ratio of CDP will increase the limits in all three drilling applications. Deceased weight will reduce hauling costs and increase the amount of drill pipe allowed on offshore platforms. In extreme extended reach areas and high-angle directional drilling, drilling limits are associated with both high angle (fatigue) and frictional effects resulting from the combination of high angle curvature and/or total weight. The radius of curvature for a hole as small as 40 feet (12.2 meters) or a build rate of 140 degrees per 100 feet is within the fatigue limits of specially designed CDP. Other properties that can be incorporated into the design and manufacture of composite drill pipe and make it attractive for specific applications are corrosion resistance, non-magnetic intervals, and abrasion resistance coatings. Since CDP has little or no electromagnetic force fields up to 74 kilohertz (KHz), a removable section of copper wire can be placed inside the composite pipe to short the tool joints electrically allowing electromagnetic signals inside the collar to induce and measure the same within the rock formation. By embedding a pair of wires in the composite section and using standard drill pipe box and pin ends equipped with a specially developed direct contact joint electrical interface, power can be supplied to measurement-while-drilling (MWD) and logging-while-drilling (LWD) bottom hole assemblies. Instantaneous high-speed data communications between near drill bit and the surface are obtainable utilizing this 'smart' drilling technology. The composite drill pipe developed by ACPT has been field tested successfully in several wells nationally and internationally. These tests were primarily for short radius and ultra short radius directional drilling. The CDP in most cases performed flawlessly with little or no appreciable wear. ACPT is currently marketing a complete line of composite drill collars, subs, isolators, casing, and drill pipe to meet the drilling industry's needs and tailored to replace metal for specific application requirements.

  16. Drilling optimization using drilling simulator software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salas Safe, Jose Gregorio

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    equipment is being used on some rigs, adding more overall costs to the drilling operation. Other industries facing a similar dilemma-aerospace, airlines, utilities, and the military- have all resorted to sophisticated training and technology... and Gaebler3). Rotary Speed, RPM Weight on Bit, Klbs Rotary Speed, RPM Weight on Bit, Klbs Rotary Speed, RPM Weight on Bit, Klbs ROP,m/h 10 20 7 Fig. 3 shows the five basic processes encountered during the drilling of a well that account for more...

  17. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- GEOTHERMAL / SOLAR HYBRID DESIGNS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GEOTHERMAL SOLAR HYBRID DESIGNS: USE OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY FOR CSP FEEDWATER HEATING Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

  18. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Development of a geothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site...

  19. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Recovery Act: Geothermal Data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recovery Act: Geothermal Data Aggregation: Submission of Information into the National Geothermal Data System, Final Report DOE Project DE-EE0002852 June 24, 2014 Geothermal...

  20. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Calpine geothermal visitor center...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Calpine geothermal visitor center upgrade project An interactive approach to geothermal outreach and education at The Geysers Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ |...

  1. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rafferty, 1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Rafferty, 1997)...

  2. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Lienau, 1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

  3. Drilling continues upward momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moritis, G.

    1990-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses how the drilling recovery that began during the second half of 1989 is continuing into 1990. On top of this, the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait has caused disarray in oil markets, driving up oil prices, and disrupting access to oil supplies. Potentially, this upheaval could lead to an upward spike in worldwide drilling activity.

  4. International guide: blasthole drills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, J.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This survey is a comprehensive quick reference guide for surface mine operators. It details rotary blasthole drill rigs that are available around the world. More than 60 drills, each with a pulldown of about 125 kN, are included in the survey.

  5. Drilling operations change gear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, S.D.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicts that several technological developments (e.g. measurement-while-drilling tools, computer data-gathering systems, improved drill bits, muds, downhole mud motors, and more efficient rigs) will have a major effect on drilling operations in the not-too-distant future. While several companies manufacture MWD systems and most can boast of successful runs, the major problem with the MWD system is cost. Manufacturers continue to make advances in both turbine and positive displacement mud motors. As the life span of downhole mud motors improves, these motors can economically compete with a rotary rig in drilling certain straight-hole intervals. Prototype bit designs include the use of lasers, electronic beams, flames, sparks, explosives, rocket exhaust, chains, projectiles, abrasive jets, and high-pressure erosion. Because drilling fluids are taking a large share of the drilling budget, mud engineers are trying to optimize costs, while maintaining well bore stability and increasing penetration rates. Many companies are taking the strategy of designing the simplest mud program possible and increasing additives only as needed. Air and foam drilling techniques are gaining attention. Concludes that as crude oil prices increase and the rig count begins to rebound, attention will once again turn to drilling technology and methodology.

  6. Disposal of drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryson, W.R.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to 1974 the disposal of drilling fluids was not considered to be much of an environmental problem. In the past, disposal of drilling fluids was accomplished in various ways such as spreading on oil field lease roads to stabilize the road surface and control dust, spreading in the base of depressions of sandy land areas to increase water retention, and leaving the fluid in the reserve pit to be covered on closure of the pit. In recent years, some states have become concerned over the indescriminate dumping of drilling fluids into pits or unauthorized locations and have developed specific regulations to alleviate the perceived deterioration of environmental and groundwater quality from uncontrolled disposal practices. The disposal of drilling fluids in Kansas is discussed along with a newer method or treatment in drilling fluid disposal.

  7. Focus on rotary drill rigs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schivley, G.P. Jr.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the drill rig, focusing on the rotary drill rigs. There are two principal drilling methods - rotary and percussion. In certain situations, percussion drilling is the most practical method, but for most applications, rotary drilling using the rotary-tricone bit with either steel-toothed cones or carbide inserts, is the common and accepted drilling technique. There are four principal reasons for a rotary drill rig: to provide power to the rotary-tricone bit; to provide air to clean the hole; to provide a life-support system for the rotary-tricone bits; and, to provide a stable and efficient platform from which to drill the hole.

  8. GEOTHERMAL SUBSIDENCE RESEARCH PROGRAM PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippmann, Marcello J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    associated with geothermal energy development. These g o a lthe division of Geothermal Energy. TASK 1 Identify Areas forLaboratory, NSF Geothermal Energy Conference, Pasadena,

  9. Video Resources on Geothermal Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal video offerings at the Department of Energy include simple interactive illustrations of geothermal power technologies and interviews on initiatives in the Geothermal Technologies Office.

  10. GEOTHERMAL SUBSIDENCE RESEARCH PROGRAM PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippmann, Marcello J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration, Division of Geothermal Energy. Two teams ofassociated with geothermal energy development. These g o a lthe division of Geothermal Energy. TASK 1 Identify Areas for

  11. GEOTHERMAL SUBSIDENCE RESEARCH PROGRAM PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippmann, Marcello J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Subsiding Areas and Geothermal Subsidence Potential25 Project 2-Geothermal Subsidence Potential Maps . . . . .Subsidence Caused by a Geothermal Project and Subsidence Due

  12. National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The second meeting of Federal agency representatives interested in the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program took place on June 15, 1993. The Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hosted the meeting at the Washington, D.C., offices of DOE. Representatives from the National Science Foundation, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Bureau of Mines, National Institute of Standards and Technology, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, and various offices within the Department of Energy attended. For a complete list of attendees see Attachment A. The purpose of the meeting was: (1) to cover the status of efforts to gain formal approval for NADET, (2) to brief participants on events since the last meeting, especially two recent workshops that explored research needs in drilling and excavation, (3) to review some recent technological advances, and (4) to solicit statements of the importance of improving drilling and excavation technologies to the missions of the various agencies. The meeting agenda is included as Attachment B.

  13. Deep temperatures in the Paris Basin using tectonic Damien Bonte1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Claude Keywords: Temperature, Modelling, Paris Basin, geothermal energy. ABSTRACT The determination of deep temperatures in a basin is one of the key parameters in the exploration of geothermal energy parameters in the exploration of geothermal energy. This study, carried out as part of 2 project, presents

  14. Exploration ofr geothermal resources in Dixie Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parchman, W.L.; Knox, J.W.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A case history of SUNEDCO's exploratory efforts, which ultimately led to the drilling and discovery of the Dixie Valley goethermal field, is presented. The geochemistry from three active lot springs in the area: Dixie Hot Springs, South Hot Springs, and Hyder Hot Springs, was examined. Two heat flow drilling programs were conducted at Dixie Hot Springs consisting of 45 temperature gradient holes ranging in depth from 30 to 1500 ft. From this program a heat-flow anomaly was mapped extending along the Stillwater Range front in which temperature gradients are greater than 100/sup 0/c/Km. in 1978, the number 1 SW Lamb well was drilled on a 152 acre farmout from Chevron. The well was completed as a geothermal producer in a zone of fractured volcanic rocks. Since then, five additional geothermal producing wells were completed within the anomalous area. (MJF)

  15. Geothermal Today: 2005 Geothermal Technologies Program Highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE/EERE Geothermal Technologies Program publication highlights accomplishments and activities of the program during the last two years.

  16. Drilling/producing depths; Two records and a revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that record depths for natural gas or oil well drilling or producing continue to be rare occurrences, although one or two still come in each year. Records fell in Texas Railroad Commission (RRC) District 9 and in the California area of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) Pacific Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in 1990. Deep drilling and production has traditionally been defined as well depths greater than 15,000 ft. Smith Tool reported that 9.4% of all active rotary rigs were dedicated to targets below 15,000 ft at the beginning of 1991. Deep rigs had dropped to 8.1% by year-end 1991, but remained above the 1989 and 1990 levels of 8.4 and 7.6%, respectively. In 1988 about 11% of active rigs were drilling deep at any given time.

  17. Government Information Interest Group (GIIG) Rolling in the Deep Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    Government Information Interest Group (GIIG) Rolling in the Deep Web: Mining free resources;Most Science Info Is in the Deep Web Federated Searching Federated search drills down to the deep web where scientific databases reside Students and researchers need information from the deep web. Unlike

  18. Retrospective examination of geothermal environmental assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, J.W.; Eddlemon, G.K.; Reed, A.W.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1976, the Department of Energy (DOE) has supported a variety of programs and projects dealing with the exploration, development, and utilization of geothermal energy. This report presents an overview of the environmental impacts associated with these efforts. Impacts that were predicted in the environmental analyses prepared for the programs and projects are reviewed and summarized, along with measures that were recommended to mitigate these impacts. Also, for those projects that have gone forward, actual impacts and implemented mitigation measures are reported, based on telephone interviews with DOE and project personnel. An accident involving spills of geothermal fluids was the major environmental concern associated with geothermal development. Other important considerations included noise from drilling and production, emissions of H/sub 2/S and cooling tower drift, disposal of solid waste (e.g., from H/sub 2/S control), and the cumulative effects of geothermal development on land use and ecosystems. Mitigation measures were frequently recommended and implemented in conjunction with noise reduction; drift elimination; reduction of fugitive dust, erosion, and sedimentation; blowout prevention; and retention of wastes and spills. Monitoring to resolve uncertainties was often implemented to detect induced seismicity and subsidence, noise, drift deposition, concentrations of air and water pollutants, and effects on groundwater. The document contains an appendix, based on these findings, which outlines major environmental concerns, mitigation measures, and monitoring requirements associated with geothermal energy. Sources of information on various potential impacts are also listed.

  19. Geothermal News

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorge Waldmann George Waldmann Phonegeothermal/900546 Geothermal News en

  20. Geothermal Tomorrow 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brochure describing the recent activities and future research direction of the DOE Geothermal Program.

  1. Alaska geothermal bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liss, S.A.; Motyka, R.J.; Nye, C.J. (comps.)

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alaska geothermal bibliography lists all publications, through 1986, that discuss any facet of geothermal energy in Alaska. In addition, selected publications about geology, geophysics, hydrology, volcanology, etc., which discuss areas where geothermal resources are located are included, though the geothermal resource itself may not be mentioned. The bibliography contains 748 entries.

  2. Geothermal Technologies Newsletter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Newsletter features the latest information about its geothermal research and development efforts. The Geothermal Resources Council (GRC)— a tax-exempt, non-profit, geothermal educational association — publishes quarterly as an insert in its GRC Bulletin.

  3. Geothermal Direct Heat Applications Program Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the undefined risk in the development and use of geothermal energy as a thermal energy source, the Department of Energy Division of Geothermal Energy solicited competitive proposals for field experiments in the direct use of geothermal energy. Twenty-two proposals were selected for cost-shared funding with one additional project co-funded by the State of New Mexico. As expected, the critical parameter was developing a viable resource. So far, of the twenty resources drilled, fourteen have proved to be useful resources. These are: Boise, Idaho; Elko heating Company in Nevada; Pagosa Springs, Colorado; Philip School, Philip, South Dakota; St. Mary's Hospital, Pierre, South Dakota; Utah Roses near Salt Lake City; Utah State Prison, Utah; Warm Springs State Hospital, Montana; T-H-S Hospital, Marlin, Texas; Aquafarms International in the Cochella Valley, California; Klamath County YMCA and Klamath Falls in Oregon; Susanville, California and Monroe, utah. Monroe's 164 F and 600 gpm peak flow was inadequate for the planned project, but is expected to be used in a private development. Three wells encountered a resource insufficient for an economical project. These were Madison County at Rexburg, Idaho; Ore-Ida Foods at Ontario, Oregon and Holly Sugar at Brawley, California. Three projects have yet to confirm their resource. The Navarro College well in Corsicana, Texas is being tested; the Reno, Moana, Nevada well is being drilled and the El Centro, California well is scheduled to be drilled in January 1982. The agribusiness project at Kelly Hot Springs was terminated because a significant archeological find was encountered at the proposed site. The Diamond Ring Ranch in South Dakota, and the additional project, Carrie Tingley Hospital in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico both used existing wells. The projects that encountered viable resources have proceeded to design, construct, and in the most advanced projects, to operate geothermal systems for district heating, space heating, grain drying and aquaculture.

  4. Report of the Offset Drilling Workshop Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report of the Offset Drilling Workshop held at Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Need for an Engineering Leg 35 Realistic Strategies for Offset Drilling 37 Appendix 1 Workshop (Leg 153) 21 Figure 4 "Rig Floor Perception" of Generic Boreholes Drilled During Leg 153 22 Figure 5

  5. Cranial Drilling Tool with Retracting Drill Bit Upon Skull Penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cranial Drilling Tool with Retracting Drill Bit Upon Skull Penetration Paul Loschak1 , Kechao Xiao1 is required to perform the drilling w devices on the market. Although frequent monitoring has been correlated of a sufficient number of neurosurgeons [3]. The cranial drilling device described in this paper designed to allow

  6. Geothermal development in Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, K.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Creelman, R.A. [Creelman (R.A.) and Associates, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Buckingham, N.W. [Glenelg Shire Council, Portland, VIC (Australia); Harrington, H.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)]|[Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Australia, natural hot springs and hot artesian bores have been developed for recreational and therapeutic purposes. A district heating system at Portland, in the Otway Basin of western Victoria, has provided uninterrupted service for 12 Sears without significant problems, is servicing a building area of 18 990 m{sup 2}, and has prospects of expansion to manufacturing uses. A geothermal well has provided hot water for paper manufacture at Traralgon, in the Gippsland Basin of eastern Victoria. Power production from hot water aquifers was tested at Mulka in South Australia, and is undergoing a four-year production trial at Birdsville in Queensland. An important Hot Dry Rock resource has been confirmed in the Cooper Basin. It has been proposed to build an HDR experimental facility to test power production from deep conductive resources in the Sydney Basin near Muswellbrook.

  7. Future Technologies to Enhance Geothermal Energy Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J J; Kaahaaina, N; Aines, R; Zucca, J; Foxall, B; Atkins-Duffin, C

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal power is a renewable, low-carbon option for producing base-load (i.e., low-intermittency) electricity. Improved technologies have the potential to access untapped geothermal energy sources, which experts estimate to be greater than 100,000 MWe. However, many technical challenges in areas such as exploration, drilling, reservoir engineering, and energy conversion must be addressed if the United States is to unlock the full potential of Earth's geothermal energy and displace fossil fuels. (For example, see Tester et al., 2006; Green and Nix, 2006; and Western Governors Association, 2006.) Achieving next-generation geothermal power requires both basic science and applied technology to identify prospective resources and effective extraction strategies. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a long history of research and development work in support of geothermal power. Key technologies include advances in scaling and brine chemistry, economic and resource assessment, direct use, exploration, geophysics, and geochemistry. For example, a high temperature, multi-spacing, multi-frequency downhole EM induction logging tool (GeoBILT) was developed jointly by LLNL and EMI to enable the detection and orientation of fractures and conductive zones within the reservoir (Figure 1). Livermore researchers also conducted studies to determine how best to stave off increased salinity in the Salton Sea, an important aquatic ecosystem in California. Since 1995, funding for LLNL's geothermal research has decreased, but the program continues to make important contributions to sustain the nation's energy future. The current efforts, which are highlighted in this report, focus on developing an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) and on improving technologies for exploration, monitoring, characterization, and geochemistry. Future research will also focus on these areas.

  8. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Telephone Flat Geothermal Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final: Comments and Responses to Comments Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

  9. Geothermal Energy R&D Program Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal budget actual amounts are shown for FY 1989 -1992, broken down by about 15 categories. Here, the main Program categories are: Exploration Technology, Drilling Technology, Reservoir Technology, Conversion Technology (power plants and materials), Industry-Coupled Drilling, Drilling Applications, Reservoir Engineering Applications, Direct Heat, Geopressured Wells Operation, and Hot Dry Rock Research. Here the title--Industry-Coupled Drilling--covered case studies of the Coso, CA, and Dixie Valley, NV, fields, and the Long Valley Exploratory Well (which had started as a magma energy exploration project, but reported here as a hydrothermal prospect evaluation well). (DJE 2005)

  10. Temporary Bridging Agents for Use in Drilling and Completions of EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop materials or systems that bridge to seal or divert flow from fractures existing while drilling EGS wells or in injection formation and that eventually decompose thereby leaving the fractures unsealed and undamaged.

  11. Geothermal direct heat applications program summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1978, the Department of Energy Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies initiated a program to accelerate the direct use of geothermal energy, in which 23 projects were selected. The projects, all in the western part of the US, cover the use of geothermal energy for space conditioning (heating and cooling) and agriculture (aquaculture and greenhouses). Initially, two projects were slated for industrial processing; however, because of lack of geothermal resources, these projects were terminated. Of the 23 projects, seven were successfully completed, ten are scheduled for completion by the end of 1983, and six were terminated for lack of resources. Each of the projects is being documented from its inception through planning, drilling, and resource confirmation, design, construction, and one year of monitoring. The information is being collected, evaluated, and will be reported. Several reports will be produced, including detailed topical reports on economics, institutional and regulatory problems, engineering, and a summary final report. To monitor progress and provide a forum for exchange of information while the program is progressing, semiannual or annual review meetings have been held with all project directors and lead engineers for the past four years. This is the sixth meeting in that series. Several of the projects which have been terminated are not included this year. Overall, the program has been very successful. Valuable information has been gathered. problems have been encountered and resolved concerning technical, regulatory, and institutional constraints. Most projects have been proven to be economical with acceptable pay-back periods. Although some technical problems have emerged, they were resolved with existing off-the-shelf technologies and equipment. The risks involved in drilling for the resource, the regulatory constraints, the high cost of finance, and large front-end cost remain the key obstacles to the broad development of geothermal direct use applications.

  12. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 209 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING MANTLE PERIDOTITE ALONG Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. D. Jay Miller Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

  13. January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 210 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING THE NEWFOUNDLAND HALF OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND­IBERIA TRANSECT: THE FIRST CONJUGATE MARGIN DRILLING IN A NON-VOLCANIC RIFT Brian E. Tucholke Co Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  14. February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Richter Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  15. December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 203 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE EQUATORIAL -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University. Acton Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  16. Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    1 Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1990 - June 1996 Stanford Geothermal Program. THE EFFECTS OF ADSORPTION ON VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELDS.1 1.1 SUMMARY? ..............................................................................................2 1.4 ADSORPTION IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS ........................................................3

  17. Models of Geothermal Brine Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Moller Weare; John H. Weare

    2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Many significant expenses encountered by the geothermal energy industry are related to chemical effects. When the composition, temperature of pressure of the fluids in the geological formation are changed, during reservoir evolution, well production, energy extraction or injection processes, the fluids that were originally at equilibrium with the formation minerals come to a new equilibrium composition, temperature and pressure. As a result, solid material can be precipitated, dissolved gases released and/or heat lost. Most geothermal energy operations experience these phenomena. For some resources, they create only minor problems. For others, they can have serious results, such as major scaling or corrosion of wells and plant equipment, reservoir permeability losses and toxic gas emission, that can significantly increase the costs of energy production and sometimes lead to site abandonment. In future operations that exploit deep heat sources and low permeability reservoirs, new chemical problems involving very high T, P rock/water interactions and unknown injection effects will arise.

  18. National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification presentation...

  19. Directional drilling sub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benoit, L.F.

    1980-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A directional drilling ''sub'' provides a shifting end portion which allows the sub to be rotated from a first in-line axially straight orientation with the drill string to a second angled or ''bent'' position which second position is normally associated with conventional bent ''subs'' which are permanently structured in the bent position. The device shifts from the first (In-line) position to the second (Bent) position upon the application of torsional force thereto which torsional force can be applied, for example, by the actuation of a ''turbodrill'' (Normally attached thereto in operation). The device can be manufactured or machined to provide varying angles to the sub in its bent position to satisfy differing directional drilling situations. The axially aligned first position allows easy entry of the drill string, sub , and turbodrill into the well hole, while the second bend position is used to commence directional drilling. The sub will return gradually to its original axially aligned position when the device is withdrawn from the wellhole, as such position is the path of minimum resistance for the withdrawing drill string and torsion is not present to hold the sub in the bent position.

  20. Drill pipe with helical ridge for drilling highly angulated wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finnegan, J.E.; Williams, J.G.

    1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method for drilling a highly angulated wellbore with a rotary rig having a drill string terminated with a bit which method employs drilling fluid. The improvement comprises: employing a length of drill pipe in the highly angulated drill string which has a helical ridge disposed thereabout, wherein the flight of the helical ridge is wound in the same direction as the rotation of the drill string such as to move drill cuttings in a direction from the bit to the surface upon rotation, and wherein the height of the helical ridge above the circumferential surface of the length of the drill pipe is 1 to 15 percent of the diameter of the drill pipe.

  1. Geothermal Energy Association Annual Industry Briefing: 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Energy Association Annual Industry Briefing: 2015 State of Geothermal Geothermal Energy Association Annual Industry Briefing: 2015 State of Geothermal February 24, 2015...

  2. Drill wear: its effect on the diameter of drilled holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichert, William Frederick

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    genoa arrrZgg zo gaamWra gHZ. zo ZaaXm axz:gVm VZXgg DRILL WEhR: ITS EFFECT ON THE DlhEETER GF DRILLED HOLES h Thesis Villian Frederick Reiehert, Jr. hpproved as to style and oontent by: a rman o onn ee ea o par nen hugus t 1955 h.... I RTRONCTIOE ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e s ~ o e o o o ~ N I I DRILLS AND DRXLLXNG ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o e ~ o ~ ~ Twist Drills Drill Presses Cutting Fluids . . . ~ Drill Pigs IIX DESCRIPTXOM OF EQUIPRERT AND PROCEXlIRE 6 13 19 23 27 Drilliag Eguipeeat...

  3. Guidebook to Geothermal Finance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon, J. P.; Meurice, J.; Wobus, N.; Stern, F.; Duaime, M.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook is intended to facilitate further investment in conventional geothermal projects in the United States. It includes a brief primer on geothermal technology and the most relevant policies related to geothermal project development. The trends in geothermal project finance are the focus of this tool, relying heavily on interviews with leaders in the field of geothermal project finance. Using the information provided, developers and investors may innovate in new ways, developing partnerships that match investors' risk tolerance with the capital requirements of geothermal projects in this dynamic and evolving marketplace.

  4. Final report on the design and development of a Rolling Float Meter for drilling-fluid outflow measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staller, G.E.; Westmoreland, J.J.; Whitlow, G.L.; Wright, E.K.; Glowka, D.A.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lost circulation, which is the loss of well drilling fluids to the formation while drilling, is a common problem encountered while drilling geothermal wells. The rapid detection of the loss of well drilling fluids is critical to the successful and cost-effective treatment of the wellbore to stop or minimize lost circulation. Sandia National Laboratories has developed an instrument to accurately measure the outflow rate of drilling fluids while drilling. This instrument, the Rolling Float Meter, has been under development at Sandia since 1991 and is now available for utilization by interested industry users. This report documents recent Rolling Float Meter design upgrades resulting from field testing and industry input, the effects of ongoing testing and evaluation both in the laboratory and in the field, and the final design package that is available to transfer this technology to industry users.

  5. Geothermal Well and Heat Flow Data for the United States (Southern Methodist University (SMU) Geothermal Laboratory)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Blackwell, D.D. and others

    Southern Methodist University makes two databases and several detailed maps available. The Regional Heat Flow Database for the United States contains information on primarily regional or background wells that determine the heat flow for the United States; temperature gradients and conductivity are used to generate heat flow measurements. Information on geology of the location, porosity, thermal conductivity, water table depth, etc. are also included when known. There are usually three data files for each state or region. The first files were generated in 1989 for the data base creating the Decade of North America Geology (DNAG) Geothermal Map. The second set is from 1996 when the data base was officially updated for the Department of Energy. The third set is from 1999 when the Western U.S. High Temperature Geothermal data base was completed. As new data is received, the files continue to be updated. The second major resource is the Western Geothermal Areas Database, a database of over 5000 wells in primarily high temperature geothermal areas from the Rockies to the Pacific Ocean. The majority of the data are from company documents, well logs, and publications with drilling dates ranging from 1960 to 2000. Many of the wells were not previously accessible to the public. Users will need to register, but will then have free, open access to the databases. The contents of each database can be viewed and downloaded as Excel spreadsheets. See also the heat flow maps at http://www.smu.edu/geothermal/heatflow/heatflow.htm

  6. Finite Element Modeling of Drilling Using DEFORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Joel D.; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vijayaraghavan, A. (2005), “Drilling of Fiber- ReinforcedFINITE ELEMENT MODELING OF DRILLING USING DEFORM J. Gardner,of Comprehensive Drilling Simulation Tool” ABSTRACT DEFORM-

  7. The Geysers Geothermal Field Update1990/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brophy, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Geysers geothermal cooling towers.   Geothermal in  Geysers  Geothermal  Cooling  Towers.   Aminzadeh, processes  –  Geothermal  resources  near  cooling 

  8. Summary of geothermal exploration activity in the State of Washington from 1978 to 1983. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, M.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project activity is summarized with references to the publications produced. Project findings are reported as they relate to specific geothermal resource target areas. Some major projects of the goethermal exploration program are: thermal and mineral spring chemistry, heat flow drilling, temperature gradient measurements, Cascade Range regional gravity, geohydrology study of the Yakima area, low temperature geothermal resources, geology, geochemistry of Cascade Mountains volcanic rocks, and soil mercury studies. (MHR)

  9. Geothermal technology publications and related reports: a bibliography, January 1984-December 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, D.L. (ed.)

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technological limitations restrict the commercial availability of US geothermal resources and prevent effective evaluation of large resources, as magma, to meet future US needs. The US Department of Energy has asked Sandia to serve as the lead laboratory for research in Geothermal Technologies and Magma Energy Extraction. In addition, technology development and field support has been provided to the US Continental Scientific Drilling Program. Published results for this work from January 1984 through December 1985 are listed in this bibliography.

  10. Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 3, March-April 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reviewed in the following areas: electric uses; direct heat uses; drilling activities; exploration; leases; outreach and technical assistance; feasibility studies and application demonstrations; geothermal loan guarantee program; general activities; R and D activities; legal, institutional, and regulatory activities; environmental activities; and state, local, and private sector activities. Also included are a list of reports and publications and a directory of individuals in the geothermal community. (MHR)

  11. Marcellus Shale Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing; Technicalities and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Pipe · Air Rotary Drilling Rig · Hydraulic Rotary Drilling Rig ­ Barite/Bentonite infused drilling muds A "Thumper Truck" #12;Rigging Up #12;Drilling · The Drill String ­ Diesel Powered ­ Drilling Bit ­ Drilling

  12. Proposed scientific activities for the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSSDP) has been organized for the purpose of investigating a hydrothermal system at depths and temperatures greater than has been done before. Plans are to deepen an existing well or to drill a new well for research purposes for which temperatures of 300/sup 0/C will be reached at a depth of less than 3.7 km and then deepen that well a further 1.8 km. This report recounts the Congressional history of the appropriation to drill the hole and other history through March 1984, gives a review of the literature on the Salton Sea Geothermal Field and its relationship to other geothermal systems of the Salton Trough, and describes a comprehensive series of investigations that have been proposed either in the well or in conjunction with the SSSDP. Investigations in geophysics, geochemistry and petrology, tectonics and rock mechanics, and geohydrology are given. A tabulation is given of current commercial and state-of-the-art downhole tools and their pressure, temperature, and minimum hole size limitations.

  13. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume III. (Geopressure thesaurus). Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepehrnoori, K.; Carter, F.; Schneider, R.; Street, S.; McGill, K.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesaurus of terminology associated with the geopressured geothermal energy field has been developed as a part of the Geopressured Geothermal Information System data base. The subject scope includes: (1) geopressure resource assessment; (2) geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of geopressured systems; (3) geopressure exploration and exploration technology; (4) geopressured reservoir engineering and drilling technology; (5) economic aspects; (6) environmental aspects; (7) legal, institutional, and sociological aspects; (8) electrical and nonelectrical utilization; and (9) other energy sources, especially methane and other fossil fuel reserves, associated with geopressured reservoirs.

  14. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Latera area, Tuscany, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

  15. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Taupo, North Island, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

  16. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hvalfjordur Fjord area, re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

  17. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL QUARTERLY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM QUARTERLY REPORT OCTOBER 1 ­ DECEMBER 31, 1996 #12;1 1 AN EXPERIMENTAL that in the vertical case. 1.2 INTRODUCTION The process of boiling in porous media is of significance in geothermal

  18. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL QUARTERLY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    1 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM QUARTERLY REPORT JANUARY 1 - MARCH 31, 1997 #12;2 1 AN EXPERIMENTAL in geothermal systems as well as in many other applications such as porous heat pipes, drying and nuclear waste

  19. GEOTHERM Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DeAngelo, Jacob

    GEOTHERM is a comprehensive system of public databases and software used to store, locate, and evaluate information on the geology, geochemistry, and hydrology of geothermal systems. Three main databases address the general characteristics of geothermal wells and fields, and the chemical properties of geothermal fluids; the last database is currently the most active. System tasks are divided into four areas: (1) data acquisition and entry, involving data entry via word processors and magnetic tape; (2) quality assurance, including the criteria and standards handbook and front-end data-screening programs; (3) operation, involving database backups and information extraction; and (4) user assistance, preparation of such items as application programs, and a quarterly newsletter. The principal task of GEOTHERM is to provide information and research support for the conduct of national geothermal-resource assessments. The principal users of GEOTHERM are those involved with the Geothermal Research Program of the U.S. Geological Survey.

  20. Geothermal Technologies Newsletter Archives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you'll find past issues of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies program newsletter, which features information about its geothermal research and development efforts....

  1. Foundation House, New York, geothermal heat pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, J.W.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Foundation House, planned to house half a dozen nonprofit foundations, will be constructed on 64th Street just east of Central Park in Manhattan, New York. It is in a Landmark District and designed by the architectural firm of Henry George Greene, AIA of Scarsdale, NY (project architect, David Wasserman). The 20,000-square foot building of five floors above ground and two below, will illustrate how energy-savings technology and environmentally sensitive construction methods can be economical. The heating and cooling system, including refrigeration requirements for the freezers and refrigerators in the commercial kitchen, will be provided by geothermal heat pumps using standing column wells. The facility is the first building on the island of Manhattan to feature geothermal heating and cooling. The mechanical system has been the assistance of Carl Orio`s firm of Water & Energy Systems corporation of Atkinson, New Hampshire. The two 1550-foot standing column wells were drilled by John Barnes of Flushing, NY.

  2. Completion and testing report: INEL Geothermal Exploratory Well One (INEL-1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prestwich, S.M.; Bowman, J.A.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INEL Geothermal Exploratory Well One (INEL-1) was drilled in search of a goethermal resource beneath the Snake River Plain for use at the Chemical Processing Plant (CPP) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site. The drilling site was selected as the most promising location within reasonable distance of the CPP. The resource was thought to be located at a depth near 7500 ft (2300 m). Neither significant production nor high temperatures were noted at that depth, and the well was then drilled to 10,333 ft (3150 m) with similar findings. Rock cores, geophysical logs, and hydrologic tests of the well to date indicate that no useful geothermal resource exists at this location. Information is presented on the drilling, completion, and testing of INEL-1.

  3. In-situ stress and fracture permeability in a fault-hosted geothermal reservoir at Dixie Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickman, S. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Barton, C.; Zoback, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a study relating fractured rock hydrology to in-situ stress and recent deformation within the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, borehole televiewer logging and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements were conducted in a 2.7-km-deep geothermal production well (73B-7) drilled into the Stillwater fault zone. Borehole televiewer logs from well 73B-7 show numerous drilling-induced tensile fractures, indicating that the direction of the minimum horizontal principal stress, S{sub hmin}, is S57{degrees}E. As the Stillwater fault at this location dips S50{degrees}E at {approximately}53{degrees}, it is nearly at the optimal orientation for normal faulting in the current stress field. Analysis of the hydraulic fracturing data shows that the magnitude of S{sub hmin} is 24.1 and 25.9 MPa at 1.7 and 2.5 km, respectively. In addition, analysis of a hydraulic fracturing test from a shallow well 1.5 km northeast of 73B-7 indicates that the magnitude of S{sub hmin} is 5.6 MPa at 0.4 km depth. Coulomb failure analysis shows that the magnitude of S{sub hmin} in these wells is close to that predicted for incipient normal faulting on the Stillwater and subparallel faults, using coefficients of friction of 0.6-1.0 and estimates of the in-situ fluid pressure and overburden stress. Spinner flowmeter and temperature logs were also acquired in well 73B-7 and were used to identify hydraulically conductive fractures.

  4. Other Geothermal Energy Publications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you'll find links to other organization's publications — including technical reports, newsletters, brochures, and more — about geothermal energy.

  5. Geothermal Industry Partnership Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you'll find links to information about partnership opportunities and programs for the geothermal industry.

  6. South Dakota geothermal handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sources of geothermal fluids in South Dakota are described and some of the problems that exist in utilization and materials selection are described. Methods of heat extraction and the environmental concerns that accompany geothermal fluid development are briefly described. Governmental rules, regulations and legislation are explained. The time and steps necessary to bring about the development of the geothermal resource are explained in detail. Some of the federal incentives that encourage the use of geothermal energy are summarized. (MHR)

  7. Geothermal Government Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you'll find links to federal, state, and local government programs promoting geothermal energy development.

  8. Lithium isotopes in island arc geothermal systems: Guadeloupe, Martinique (French West Indies) and experimental approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Lithium isotopes in island arc geothermal systems: Guadeloupe, Martinique (French West Indies and the Diamant areas). The lithium isotopic signatures of the geothermal fluids collected from deep reservoirs during formation of Li- bearing secondary minerals by the uptake of lithium into the alteration minerals

  9. Cycle Analysis on Ocean Geothermal Power Generation using Multi-staged Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cycle Analysis on Ocean Geothermal Power Generation using Multi-staged Turbine 2013. 09. 11 Korea ORC #12;Cycle simulation Solver : HYSYS Basic simulation design T-S diagram Pump Turbine Evaporator & turbine : iso-entropic process Pump Turbine Evaporator Condenser 4 1 2 3 Geothermal water Deep seawater

  10. Coupled greenhouse warming and deep-sea acidification in the middle Steven M. Bohaty,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachos, James

    concentration records from multiple Deep Sea Drilling Project and Ocean Drilling Program sites for the time and deep waters is estimated during the MECO at the study sites. The interval of peak warming at $40.0 Ma, reflecting a temporary shoaling of the calcite compensation depth. The synchroneity of deep- water

  11. Lake Petn Itz, a 165 m deep lake in northern Guatemala, is the deepest lake in the lowlands of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    deep- water sites in the central basin. All cores show an abrupt transition from Late Glacial dense gypCONTENTS Lake Petén Itzá 1 Scientific Drillling Project Drilling K-T and Chicxulub 3 Event Strata in Texas Deep Upcoming Conferences 9 Workshops 10 Iceland Deep Drilling 11 Project Congratulations to the 12 2006 DOSECC

  12. Geothermal energy in Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of goethermal resources in Nevada and resource applications are discussed. The social and economic advantages of utilizing geothermal energy are outlined. Federal and State programs established to foster the development of geothermal energy are discussed. The names, addresses, and phone numbers of various organizations actively involved in research, regulation, and the development of geothermal energy are included. (MHR)

  13. Combination drilling and skiving tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination drilling and skiving tool including a longitudinally extending hollow skiving sleeve slidably and concentrically mounted on a right-handed twist drill. Dogs or pawls provided on the internal periphery of the skiving sleeve engage with the helical grooves of the drill. During a clockwise rotation of the tool, the drill moves downwardly and the sleeve translates upwardly, so that the drill performs a drilling operation on a workpiece. On the other hand, the drill moves upwardly and the sleeve translates downwardly, when the tool is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, and the sleeve performs a skiving operation. The drilling and skiving operations are separate, independent and exclusive of each other.

  14. RECIPIENT:Potter Drilling Inc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Potter Drilling Inc u.s. DEPARTUEN T OF ENERG EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENT ER NEPA DEIERlIINATION PROJECr TITLE: Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS...

  15. A Case Study of Wide Diameter Casing for Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, T.R.; Freeston, D.H.; Winmill, R.L.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three wells have been drilled in the central resistivity area of a geothermal field in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. Using a well bore simulator, WELL SIM V3.0, reservoir conditions and well characteristics are evaluated to determine the increase in output by increasing production casing diameters from either 8-5/8 inches OD or 9-5/8 inches OD to 13-3/8 inches OD. Increases in well drilling costs are determined to provide a commentary on the economics. While open hole size is effectively doubled, well costs increase by 10% and, in this study, output increases by an average of 18%.

  16. Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nauduri, Anantha S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . Rodolphe Leschot invented and patented the earliest form of diamond core drills. T. F. Rowland patented an ?offshore rotary drilling rig?. Captain Lucas, with his Spindletop field wells, Earle Halliburton with his cementing service company, inventors... is the ancient water and brine wells drilled from the prehistoric eras to not so modern times. The second stage is the drilling of the earliest oil wells, and development of basic derricks, rigs, and cable tool rigs. The third stage is the development of rotary...

  17. GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bresee, J. C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. Direct Application of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . .Reservoir Assessment: Geothermal Fluid Injection, ReservoirD. E. Appendix Small Geothermal Power Plants . . . . . . .

  18. Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majer, Ernest L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coast geopressured-geothermal wells: Two studies, Pleasantinduced by geopressured-geothermal well development. In:

  19. SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurements in geothermal wells," Proceedings, Secondin Larderello Region geothermal wells for reconstruction of

  20. Well drilling tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, F.K.

    1981-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed a turbodrill having an axial thrust bearing section which is contained within a lubricant chamber arranged within an annular space between the case and shaft of the turbodrill above the turbine section, and which is defined between means sealing between the shaft and the case which, in use of the turbodrill, are above the drilling fluid circulating therethrough.

  1. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 208 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EARLY CENOZOIC EXTREME CLIMATES -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  2. Drilling subsurface wellbores with cutting structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansure, Arthur James (Alburquerque, NM); Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona (The Woodlands, TX)

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for forming a wellbore includes a drill tubular. A drill bit is coupled to the drill tubular. One or more cutting structures are coupled to the drill tubular above the drill bit. The cutting structures remove at least a portion of formation that extends into the wellbore formed by the drill bit.

  3. The Future of Geothermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    The Future of Geothermal Energy Impact of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) on the United States in the 21st Century #12;The Future of Geothermal Energy Impact of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS and Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, Under DOE Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-05ID

  4. CALCIUM CARBONATE DEPOSITION IN GEOTHERMAL WELLBORES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    geothermal energy exploration and development are most important. Geothermal resources in Costa Rica have of energy development in Costa Rica. The Miravalles geothermCALCIUM CARBONATE DEPOSITION IN GEOTHERMAL WELLBORES MIRAVALLES GEOTHERMAL FIELD COSTA RICA

  5. Reference book on geothermal direct use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lienau, P.J.; Lund, J.W.; Rafferty, K.; Culver, G.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the direct uses of geothermal energy in the United States. Topics discussed include: low-temperature geothermal energy resources; energy reserves; geothermal heat pumps; geothermal energy for residential buildings; and geothermal energy for industrial usage.

  6. Geological interpretation of Mount Ciremai geothermal system from remote sensing and magneto-teluric analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumintadireja, Prihadi; Irawan, Dasapta E; Irawan, Diky; Fadillah, Ahmad

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The exploration of geothermal system at Mount Ciremai has been started since the early 1980s and has just been studied carefully since the early 2000s. Previous studies have detected the potential of geothermal system and also the groundwater mechanism feeding the system. This paper will discuss the geothermal exploration based on regional scale surface temperature analysis with Landsat image to have a more detail interpretation of the geological setting and magneto-telluric or MT survey at prospect zones, which identified by the previous method, to have a more exact and in depth local scale structural interpretation. Both methods are directed to pin point appropriate locations for geothermal pilot hole drilling and testing. We used four scenes of Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper or ETM+ data to estimate the surface manifestation of a geothermal system. Temporal analysis of Land Surface Temperature or LST was applied and coupled with field temperature measurement at seven locations. By combining the TTM with ...

  7. The Geysers Geothermal Field Update1990/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brophy, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gains  with  geothermal  power.  Geothermal Resources gains  with  geothermal  power.  Geothermal Resources of Tables:  Table 1:  Geothermal Power Plants Operating at 

  8. Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Range Geothermal Region Big Windy Hot Springs Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal Region Bingham Caribou Geothermal Area Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Birdsville...

  9. Program for the improvement of downhole drilling motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, J.T.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work done under contract to Sandia National Labs and to the Department of Energy for improvement of downhole drilling motors. The focus of this program was the development of a better bearing-and-seal assembly that could be used in different kinds of drilling motors in a geothermal environment. Major tasks were: (1) design and construction of seal testing devices, (2) screening and evaluation of candidate seals in a simulated bearing/seal package, (3) tests of the most promising candidates in a full-scale bearing/seal package, and (4) analysis of failed seals after testing. The key results from this program were: (1) identification of seal/shaft/lubricant systems that performed well at high pressure and temperature, (2) identification of other seal designs that should be avoided for similar applications, and (3) evaluation of the test machines' design.

  10. Cost effectiveness of sonic drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masten, D.; Booth, S.R.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sonic drilling (combination of mechanical vibrations and rotary power) is an innovative environmental technology being developed in cooperation with DOE`s Arid-Site Volatile Organic Compounds Integrated Demonstration at Hanford and the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration at Sandia. This report studies the cost effectiveness of sonic drilling compared with cable-tool and mud rotary drilling. Benefit of sonic drilling is its ability to drill in all types of formations without introducing a circulating medium, thus producing little secondary waste at hazardous sites. Progress has been made in addressing the early problems of failures and downtime.

  11. The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a complete record of the volcanic stratigraphy that can be used in complementary science projects. This project will function in tandem with Project Hotspot, a continental...

  12. Odessa fabricator builds rig specifically for geothermal drilling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the nation's oil and gas fields. Now the Odessa-based company is branching out into alternative energy. The company recently delivered its first Thermal Single rig, a...

  13. Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to:52c8ff988c1Dering Harbor, New York:Supercritical CO2 andProject | Open

  14. Drilling for Geothermal Resources Rules - Idaho | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to:52c8ff988c1DeringDolgeville,Massachusetts:Drax SiemensSystems Jump

  15. Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHi Gtel Jump to:County,1143807°,Hilltop,Hinsdale Wave3°Power

  16. DOE and Navy Collaborate on Geothermal Drilling Technology | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgramofContract atInc.,House,

  17. Laser Drills Could Relight Geothermal Energy Dreams | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington,LM-04-XXXXLocated at Mt. Iron on the

  18. Bureau of Land Management - Geothermal Drilling Permit | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek

  19. Evaluation of Emerging Technology for Geothermal Drilling and Logging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof EnergyHouse EnvironmentalEstimatingin

  20. EUROPEAN GEOTHERMAL DRILLING EXPERIENCE- PROBLEM AREAS AND CASE STUDIES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite--FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE AprilGrowthERDA

  1. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Chapter 6. Drilling and Well Construction

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite--FOR IMMEDIATEDOEFinal REducationalChapter 6.

  2. Handbook of Best Practices for Geothermal Drilling Released | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground SourceHBLEDFriends of the Earth ♦ Greenpeace

  3. Handbook of Best Practices for Geothermal Drilling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground SourceHBLEDFriends of the Earth ♦

  4. Geothermal Drilling of New England | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (TheEtelligenceGainSpanRate-Making Jump

  5. Geothermal Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6TheoreticalFuelCellGeminiEnergyPowerTablesPhase)Use Jump

  6. Title 11 Alaska Administrative Code 87 Geothermal Drilling and Conservation

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump JumpAl., 1978)TillmanMunicipal Electric UtilonEnergy| Open

  7. Odessa fabricator builds rig specifically for geothermal drilling |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLC OrderEfficiencyOceanOctober XX, 2009 OctoberDepartment

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit at Explora MuseumFloatingFrontGTOGeorge

  9. Handbook of Best Practices for Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:Net JumpStrategy |Hammerfest Strom UK coWind

  10. Proposed resource evaluation plan. Salton Sea scientific drilling program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents a plan for evaluating the deep geothermal resource in the Salton Sea area of Imperial County, California. The plan is divided into two testing programs, followed by the modeling and evaluation of the underground geothermal resource. The testing program related to geological data collection includes acquiring and analyzing the core, running geophysical and temperature/pressure logs in both the deep well and the injection well, and carrying out extensive mud-logging activities. The flow testing program includes temperature, pressure, and flow measurements made in the well and surface facilities. Sampling and analysis of fluid and scale both in the well and at the surface facilities will also be carried out. 6 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  11. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Final Report: Geothermal Dual...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Final Report: Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

  12. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    literature and how it affects access to land and mineral rights for geothermal energy production References B. C. Farhar (2002) Geothermal Access to Federal and Tribal Lands: A...

  13. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Sustaining the National Geothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sustaining the National Geothermal Data System: Considerations for a System Wide Approach and Node Maintenance, Geothermal Resources Council 37th Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada,...

  14. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Hulin Geopressure-geothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hulin Geopressure-geothermal test well: First order levels Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

  15. A drop-in-concept for deep borehole canister emplacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Ethan Allen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep boreholes drilled into crystalline bedrock (i.e., "granite") is an interesting repository alternative of long standing. Work at MIT over the past two decades, and more recently ...

  16. Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics.

  17. Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics.

  18. Development of a micro-drilling burr-control chart for PCB drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    single- or double-sided). Drilling provides the holes forstandard conditions. Fig. 4. Drilling experimental setup.a standard procedure in PCB drilling). These were clamped

  19. Colorado Potential Geothermal Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado PRS Cool Fairways Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the weakened basement rocks. Isostatic gravity was utilized to identify structural basin areas, characterized by gravity low values reflecting weakened basement rocks. Together interpreted regional fault zones and basin outlines define geothermal "exploration fairways", where the potential exists for deep, superheated fluid flow in the absence of Pliocene or younger volcanic units Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4544698.569273 m Left: 144918.141004 m Right: 763728.391299 m Bottom: 4094070.397932 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  20. The 1980-1982 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, Michael A.; Phillips, William M.; Schuster, J.Eric

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1978, the Division of Geology and Earth Resources of the Washington Department of Natural Resources has participated in the U.S. Department of Energy's (USDOE) State-Coupled Geothermal Resource Program. Federal and state funds have been used to investigate and evaluate the potential for geothermal resources, on both a reconnaissance and area-specific level. Preliminary results and progress reports for the period up through mid-1980 have already been released as a Division Open File Report (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981). Preliminary results and progress summaries of work carried out from mid-1980 through the end of 1982 are presented in this report. Only one other summary report dealing with geothermal resource investigations in the state has been published. An Information Circular released by the Division (Schuster and others, 1978) compiled the geology, geochemistry, and heat flow drilling results from a project in the Indian Heaven area in the south Cascades. The previous progress report for the geothermal program (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981) included information on temperature gradients measured throughout the state, heat flow drilling in the southern Cascades, gravity surveys for the southern Cascades, thermal and mineral spring investigations, geologic mapping for the White Pass-Tumac Mountain area, and area specific studies for the Camas area of Clark County and Mount St. Helens. This work, along with some additional studies, led to the compilation of the Geothermal Resources of Washington map (Korosec, Kaler, and others, 1981). The map is principally a nontechnical presentation based on all available geothermal information, presented as data points, tables, and text on a map with a scale of 1:500,000.

  1. Drill bit assembly for releasably retaining a drill bit cutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glowka, David A. (Austin, TX); Raymond, David W. (Edgewood, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A drill bit assembly is provided for releasably retaining a polycrystalline diamond compact drill bit cutter. Two adjacent cavities formed in a drill bit body house, respectively, the disc-shaped drill bit cutter and a wedge-shaped cutter lock element with a removable fastener. The cutter lock element engages one flat surface of the cutter to retain the cutter in its cavity. The drill bit assembly thus enables the cutter to be locked against axial and/or rotational movement while still providing for easy removal of a worn or damaged cutter. The ability to adjust and replace cutters in the field reduces the effect of wear, helps maintains performance and improves drilling efficiency.

  2. Workshop on CSDP data needs for the BACA geothermal field: a summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangold, D.C.; Tsang, C.F. (eds.)

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These workshop summaries discuss the data needs of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) community and provide an introduction to the available geological, geophysical, geochemical and reservoir engineering data of the Baca geothermal field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico. Individual abstracts have been prepared for the presentations. (ACR)

  3. Development of hot dry rock geothermal resources; technical and economic issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tester, J.W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical and economic issues related to the commercial feasibility of hot dry rock geothermal energy for producing electricity and heat are discussed. Topics covered include resource characteristics, reservoir thermal capacity and lifetime, drilling and surface plant costs, financial risk and anticipated rate of return. The current status of research and deveopment efforts in the US are also summarized.

  4. Geothermal low-temperature reservoir assessment in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Icerman, L.; Lohse, R.L.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sixty-four shallow temperature gradient holes were drilled on the Mesilla Valley East Mesa (east of Interstate Highways 10 and 25), stretching from US Highway 70 north of Las Cruces to NM Highway 404 adjacent to Anthony, New Mexico. Using these data as part of the site selection process, Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd. of Denver, Colorado, drilled two low-temperature geothermal production wells to the immediate north and south of Tortugas Mountain and encountered a significant low-temperature reservoir, with a temperature of about 150{sup 0}F and flow rates of 750 to 1500 gallons per minute at depths from 650 to 1250 feet. These joint exploration activities resulted in the discovery and confirmation of a 30-square-mile low-temperature geothermal anomaly just a few miles to the east of Las Cruces that has been newly named as the Las Cruces east Mesa Geothermal Field. Elevated temperature and heat flow data suggest that the thermal anomaly is fault controlled and extends southward to the Texas border covering a 100-square-mile area. With the exception of some localized perturbations, the anomaly appears to decrease in temperature from the north to the south. Deeper drilling is required in the southern part of the anomaly to confirm the existence of commercially-exploitable geothermal waters.

  5. Advance Seismic Data Analysis Program: (The "Hot Pot Project")

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: To improve geothermal well target selection and reduce drilling risk through an innovative and advanced analytical method for interpreting seismic data to locate deep geothermal structures.

  6. Apparatus in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Alpine, UT); Hall, Jr., Tracy H. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Lehi, UT); Pixton, David S. (Provo, UT)

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus in a drill string comprises an internally upset drill pipe. The drill pipe comprises a first end, a second end, and an elongate tube intermediate the first and second ends. The elongate tube and the ends comprising a continuous an inside surface with a plurality of diameters. A conformable spirally welded metal tube is disposed within the drill pipe intermediate the ends thereof and terminating adjacent to the ends of the drill pipe. The conformable metal tube substantially conforms to the continuous inside surface of the metal tube. The metal tube may comprise a non-uniform section which is expanded to conform to the inside surface of the drill pipe. The non-uniform section may comprise protrusions selected from the group consisting of convolutions, corrugations, flutes, and dimples. The non-uniform section extends generally longitudinally along the length of the tube.

  7. The Role of Cost Shared R&D in the Development of Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Program Review starts with two interesting pieces on industries outlook about market conditions. Dr. Allan Jelacics introductory talk includes the statistics on the impacts of the Industry Coupled Drilling Program (late-1970's) on geothermal power projects in Nevada and Utah (about 140 MWe of power stimulated). Most of the papers in these Proceedings are in a technical report format, with results. Sessions included: Exploration, The Geysers, Reservoir Engineering, Drilling, Energy Conversion (including demonstration of a BiPhase Turbine Separator), Energy Partnerships (including the Lake County effluent pipeline to The Geysers), and Technology Transfer (Biochemical processing of brines, modeling of chemistry, HDR, the OIT low-temperature assessment of collocation of resources with population, and geothermal heat pumps). There were no industry reviews at this meeting.

  8. Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the continuous generating capacity of binary-cycle, medium-enthalpy geothermal power with solar thermal technology. SOURCE: Laura Garchar Characterizing and Predicting Resource...

  9. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  10. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  11. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    injection wells capacity; temperature; costs; legal reviews by Oregon DoJ. * Partners: Johnson Controls?? Overview 3 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Project Objectives...

  12. Geothermal Technologies Office: Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exploration Technologies (6) Geopressured Resources (1) Geothermal Analysis (14) Heat Pumps (8) High-Temperature Cements (2) High-Temperature Downhole MWD Tools for...

  13. Engineered Geothermal Systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drange, Lars Anders

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Different concepts for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are presented and evaluated according to their potential for medium to large scale power production in Norwegian… (more)

  14. Geothermal Outreach Publications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you'll find the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) most recent outreach publications about geothermal technologies, research, and development.

  15. Drilling problems don't slow Williston basin operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, S.D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of the Williston basin's tough drilling environment, exploration activity has continued to increase, especially around northwestern North Dakota's Nesson anticline. The foremost drilling problem is the Charles slat section, which lies 8000-9000 ft deep; this section requires a salt-saturated mud system with additives, a heavyweight pipe, and a careful cementing job. Nevertheless, big discoveries - such as Texaco Inc.'s gas well in McKenzie Co., which tested at 9.9 million CF/day and 179 bbl/day of condensate - will spur exploration for some time since most of the basin remains untouched. Moreover, drilling engineers will soon be able to mitigate, if not eliminate, the typical difficulties encountered.

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 109 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  17. Transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R; Fox, Joe R

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. The transmission element may include an annular housing forming a trough, an electrical conductor disposed within the trough, and an MCEI material disposed between the annular housing and the electrical conductor.

  18. Drilling Productivity Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocationDiurnalCommittee Draft Advice9Drilling

  19. Evaluation of noise associated with geothermal-development activities. Final report, July 31, 1979-April 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, M.; Stern, R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared for the purpose of ascertaining the current state of noise generation, suppression, and mitigation techniques associated with geothermal development. A description of the geothermal drilling process is included as well as an overview of geothermal development activities in the United States. Noise sources at the well site, along geothermal pipelines, and at the power plants are considered. All data presented are measured values by workers in the field and by Marshall Long/Acoustics. One particular well site was monitored for a period of 55 continuous days, and includes all sources of noise from the time that the drilling rig was brought in until the time that it was moved off site. A complete log of events associated with the drilling process is correlated with the noise measurements including production testing of the completed well. Data are also presented which compare measured values of geothermal noise with federal, state, county, and local standards. A section on control of geothermal noise is also given. Volume I of this document presents summary information.

  20. Potential of geothermal energy in China .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Peter On

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis provides an overview of geothermal power generation and the potential for geothermal energy utilization in China. Geothermal energy is thermal energy stored in… (more)